WorldWideScience

Sample records for hydraulic head distribution

  1. Experimental Study For Pizometric Head Distribution Under Hydraulic Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Najm Obaid Salim Alghazali

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this research the experimental method by using Hydraulic modeling used to determination the flow net in order to analyses seepage flow through single- layer soil foundation underneath hydraulic structure. as well as steady the consequence of the cut-off inclination angle on exit gradient factor of safety uplift pressure and quantity of seepage by using seepage tank were designed in the laboratory with proper dimensions with two cutoffs . The physical model seepage tank was designed in two downstream cutoff angles which are 90 and 120 and upstream cutoff angles 90 45 120. After steady state flow the flow line is constructed by dye injection in the soil from the upstream side in front view of the seepage tank and the equipotentials line can be constructed by pizometer fixed to measure the total head. From the result It is concluded that using downstream cut-off inclined towards the downstream side with amp1256 equal 120 that given value of redaction 25 is beneficial in increasing the safety factor against the piping phenomenon. using upstream cut-off inclined towards the downstream side with amp1256 equal 45 that given value of redaction 52 is beneficial in decreasing uplift pressure and quantity of seepage.

  2. Effect of hydraulic head and slope on water distribution uniformity of the IDE drip irrigation system

    OpenAIRE

    Ella, Victor B.; Reyes, Manuel R.; R. Yoder

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of the effect of topography and operating heads on the emission uniformity distribution in drip irrigation systems is important in water management and could serve as the basis for optimizing water-use efficiency and crop productivity. This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of slope and hydraulic head on the water distribution uniformity of a low-cost drip irrigation system developed by International Development Enterprises (IDE). The drip system was tested for water dis...

  3. Impact of uncertainty description on assimilating hydraulic head in the MIKE SHE distributed hydrological model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Donghua; Madsen, Henrik; Ridler, Marc E.

    2015-01-01

    uncertainty. In most hydrological EnKF applications, an ad hoc model uncertainty is defined with the aim of avoiding a collapse of the filter. The present work provides a systematic assessment of model uncertainty in DA applications based on combinations of forcing, model parameters, and state uncertainties....... This is tested in a case where groundwater hydraulic heads are assimilated into a distributed and integrated catchment-scale model of the Karup catchment in Denmark. A series of synthetic data assimilation experiments are carried out to analyse the impact of different model uncertainty assumptions...

  4. Effect of hydraulic head and slope on water distribution uniformity of a low-cost drip irrigation system

    OpenAIRE

    Ella, Victor B.; Reyes, Manuel R.; R. Yoder

    2008-01-01

    Metadata only record Assessment of the effect of topography and operating heads on the emission uniformity distribution in drip irrigation systems is important in irrigation water management and could serve as basis for optimizing water use efficiency and crop productivity. This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of hydraulic head and slope on the water distribution uniformity of a low-cost drip irrigation system developed by the International Development Enterprises (IDE), a non...

  5. Impact of uncertainty description on assimilating hydraulic head in the MIKE SHE distributed hydrological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Donghua; Madsen, Henrik; Ridler, Marc E.; Refsgaard, Jens C.; Jensen, Karsten H.

    2015-12-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is a popular data assimilation (DA) technique that has been extensively used in environmental sciences for combining complementary information from model predictions and observations. One of the major challenges in EnKF applications is the description of model uncertainty. In most hydrological EnKF applications, an ad hoc model uncertainty is defined with the aim of avoiding a collapse of the filter. The present work provides a systematic assessment of model uncertainty in DA applications based on combinations of forcing, model parameters, and state uncertainties. This is tested in a case where groundwater hydraulic heads are assimilated into a distributed and integrated catchment-scale model of the Karup catchment in Denmark. A series of synthetic data assimilation experiments are carried out to analyse the impact of different model uncertainty assumptions on the feasibility and efficiency of the assimilation. The synthetic data used in the assimilation study makes it possible to diagnose model uncertainty assumptions statistically. Besides the model uncertainty, other factors such as observation error, observation locations, and ensemble size are also analysed with respect to performance and sensitivity. Results show that inappropriate definition of model uncertainty can greatly degrade the assimilation performance, and an appropriate combination of different model uncertainty sources is advised.

  6. Flow of variable-density formation water in deep sloping aquifers: minimizing the error in representation and analysis when using hydraulic-head distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachu, Stefan; Michael, Karsten

    2002-03-01

    Although not fully adequate, freshwater hydraulic heads have been used historically to represent and analyze variable-density flow in sloping aquifers in sedimentary basins. The use of environmental heads is valid only for strictly vertical flow in unconfined aquifers, while using variable-density hydraulic heads contravenes Darcy's law. Although the use of hydraulic-head surfaces is the simplest and quickest means of flow analysis and interpretation, preceding other methods such as numerical modeling, it introduces some errors that should be assessed and minimized in order to provide the most accurate flow representation. A first error is introduced when approximating the potential and buoyancy components along aquifer slope of the flow-driving force with their projections onto the horizontal plane. This error is most probably negligibly small for sloping aquifers in undisturbed sedimentary basins, but may be significant for aquifers dipping at a significant angle, such as in folded strata. A second error is introduced when using only hydraulic heads in the representation and analysis, and neglecting the buoyancy component of the flow-driving force. The significance of this error can be assessed by performing a Driving Force Ratio (DFR) analysis. There is no single or critical value of the DFR, below which the error in using hydraulic heads alone is negligible, and above which it is not acceptable anymore; rather, the decision regarding the error acceptability should and can be made on a case by case basis. The DFR, hence the errors in flow direction and magnitude, can be minimized for any given aquifer by using an optimum reference density in hydraulic-head calculations that is the areally-weighted average density of formation water in that aquifer. In flow analyses based on potentiometric surfaces, the use of freshwater as the reference density actually maximizes the errors introduced by the neglect of the buoyancy component of the flow-driving force because it

  7. High Pressure Hydraulic Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-20

    to 500 0 F. 5 cycles. 5000 F room temperature to 50001F; 45 ______________ Icycles The tesis planned for the distribution system demonstrator were...American Society for Testing and Materials ASTM D412 - Tension Testing of Vulcanized Rubber ASTM D571 - Testing Automotive Hydraulic Brake Hose Society of

  8. Integrated hydraulic cooler and return rail in camless cylinder head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriott, Craig D [Clawson, MI; Neal, Timothy L [Ortonville, MI; Swain, Jeff L [Flushing, MI; Raimao, Miguel A [Colorado Springs, CO

    2011-12-13

    An engine assembly may include a cylinder head defining an engine coolant reservoir, a pressurized fluid supply, a valve actuation assembly, and a hydraulic fluid reservoir. The valve actuation assembly may be in fluid communication with the pressurized fluid supply and may include a valve member displaceable by a force applied by the pressurized fluid supply. The hydraulic fluid reservoir may be in fluid communication with the valve actuation assembly and in a heat exchange relation to the engine coolant reservoir.

  9. Averaging hydraulic head, pressure head, and gravitational head in subsurface hydrology, and implications for averaged fluxes, and hydraulic conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. H. de Rooij

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Current theories for water flow in porous media are valid for scales much smaller than those at which problem of public interest manifest themselves. This provides a drive for upscaled flow equations with their associated upscaled parameters. Upscaling is often achieved through volume averaging, but the solution to the resulting closure problem imposes severe restrictions to the flow conditions that limit the practical applicability. Here, the derivation of a closed expression of the effective hydraulic conductivity is forfeited to circumvent the closure problem. Thus, more limited but practical results can be derived. At the Representative Elementary Volume scale and larger scales, the gravitational potential and fluid pressure are treated as additive potentials. The necessary requirement that the superposition be maintained across scales is combined with conservation of energy during volume integration to establish consistent upscaling equations for the various heads. The power of these upscaling equations is demonstrated by the derivation of upscaled water content-matric head relationships and the resolution of an apparent paradox reported in the literature that is shown to have arisen from a violation of the superposition principle. Applying the upscaling procedure to Darcy's Law leads to the general definition of an upscaled hydraulic conductivity. By examining this definition in detail for porous media with different degrees of heterogeneity, a series of criteria is derived that must be satisfied for Darcy's Law to remain valid at a larger scale.

  10. Multivariate distributions of soil hydraulic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wei; Pachepsky, Yakov; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Martinez, Gonzalo; Bogena, Heye; Vereecken, Harry

    2014-05-01

    Statistical distributions of soil hydraulic parameters have to be known when synthetic fields of soil hydraulic properties need to be generated in ensemble modeling of soil water dynamics and soil water content data assimilation. Pedotransfer functions that provide statistical distributions of water retention and hydraulic conductivity parameters for textural classes are most often used in the parameter field generation. Presence of strong correlations can substantially influence the parameter generation results. The objective of this work was to review and evaluate available data on correlations between van Genuchten-Mualem (VGM) model parameters. So far, two different approaches were developed to estimate these correlations. The first approach uses pedotransfer functions to generate VGM parameters for a large number of soil compositions within a textural class, and then computes parameter correlations for each of the textural classes. The second approach computes the VGM parameter correlations directly from parameter values obtained by fitting VGM model to measured water retention and hydraulic conductivity data for soil samples belonging to a textural class. Carsel and Parish (1988) used the Rawls et al. (1982) pedotransfer functions, and Meyer et al. (1997) used the Rosetta pedotransfer algorithms (Schaap, 2002) to develop correlations according to the first approach. We used the UNSODA database (Nemes et al. 2001), the US Southern Plains database (Timlin et al., 1999), and the Belgian database (Vereecken et al., 1989, 1990) to apply the second approach. A substantial number of considerable (>0.7) correlation coefficients were found. Large differences were encountered between parameter correlations obtained with different approaches and different databases for the same textural classes. The first of the two approaches resulted in generally higher values of correlation coefficients between VGM parameters. However, results of the first approach application depend

  11. A new zonation algorithm with parameter estimation using hydraulic head and subsidence observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meijing; Burbey, Thomas J; Nunes, Vitor Dos Santos; Borggaard, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Parameter estimation codes such as UCODE_2005 are becoming well-known tools in groundwater modeling investigations. These programs estimate important parameter values such as transmissivity (T) and aquifer storage values (Sa ) from known observations of hydraulic head, flow, or other physical quantities. One drawback inherent in these codes is that the parameter zones must be specified by the user. However, such knowledge is often unknown even if a detailed hydrogeological description is available. To overcome this deficiency, we present a discrete adjoint algorithm for identifying suitable zonations from hydraulic head and subsidence measurements, which are highly sensitive to both elastic (Sske) and inelastic (Sskv) skeletal specific storage coefficients. With the advent of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), distributed spatial and temporal subsidence measurements can be obtained. A synthetic conceptual model containing seven transmissivity zones, one aquifer storage zone and three interbed zones for elastic and inelastic storage coefficients were developed to simulate drawdown and subsidence in an aquifer interbedded with clay that exhibits delayed drainage. Simulated delayed land subsidence and groundwater head data are assumed to be the observed measurements, to which the discrete adjoint algorithm is called to create approximate spatial zonations of T, Sske , and Sskv . UCODE-2005 is then used to obtain the final optimal parameter values. Calibration results indicate that the estimated zonations calculated from the discrete adjoint algorithm closely approximate the true parameter zonations. This automation algorithm reduces the bias established by the initial distribution of zones and provides a robust parameter zonation distribution.

  12. STOCHASTIC ANALYSIS OF UNSATURATED FLOW WITH THE NORMAL DISTRIBUTION OF SOIL HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Guan-hua; Zhang Ren-duo

    2003-01-01

    Stochastic approaches are useful to quantitatively describe transport behavior over large temporal and spatial scales while accounting for the influence of small-scale variabilities. Numerous solutions have been developed for unsaturated soil water flow based on the lognormal distribution of soil hydraulic conductivity. To our knowledge, no available stochastic solutions for unsaturated flow have been derived on the basis of the normal distribution of hydraulic conductivity. In this paper, stochastic solutions were developed for unsaturated flow by assuming the normal distribution of saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks). Under the assumption that soil hydraulic properties are second-order stationary, analytical expressions for capillary tension head variance (σ2h) and effective hydraulic conductivity (K*ii) in stratified soils were derived using the perturbation method. The dependence of σ2h and K*ii on soil variability and mean flow variables (the mean capillary tension head and its temporal and spatial gradients) and mean flow conditions (wetting and drying) were systematically analyzed. The calculated variance of capillary tension head with the analytical solution derived in this paper was compared with field experimental data. The good agreement indicates that the analytical solution is applicable to evaluate the variance of capillary tension head of field soils with moderate variability.

  13. Design Formulae for Hydraulic Stability and Structural Integrity of Dolos Breakwater Round-Heads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Jensen, Jacob Birk; Liu, Z.

    1995-01-01

    A rational design of Dolos armour unit should incorporate both the hydraulic stability and the structural integrity. The previous tests performed by Aalborg University (AU) resulted in design formulae for the trunk of a 1:1.5 slope Dolos breakwater without superstructure including both...... the hydraulic stability and the structural integrity. The objective of the round-head tests is to produce similar design formulae for Dolos armour in around-head. The tests will also include examinations of the hydraulic stability and run-up for a trunk section adjacent to the round-head. A run-up formula...

  14. Using environmental tracers and transient hydraulic heads to estimate groundwater recharge and conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdal, Daniel; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2017-04-01

    Regional groundwater flow strongly depends on groundwater recharge and hydraulic conductivity. While conductivity is a spatially variable field, recharge can vary in both space and time. None of the two fields can be reliably observed on larger scales, and their estimation from other sparse data sets is an open topic. Further, common hydraulic-head observations may not suffice to constrain both fields simultaneously. In the current work we use the Ensemble Kalman filter to estimate spatially variable conductivity, spatiotemporally variable recharge and porosity for a synthetic phreatic aquifer. We use transient hydraulic-head and one spatially distributed set of environmental tracer observations to constrain the estimation. As environmental tracers generally reside for a long time in an aquifer, they require long simulation times and carries a long memory that makes them highly unsuitable for use in a sequential framework. Therefore, in this work we use the environmental tracer information to precondition the initial ensemble of recharge and conductivities, before starting the sequential filter. Thereby, we aim at improving the performance of the sequential filter by limiting the range of the recharge to values similar to the long-term annual recharge means and by creating an initial ensemble of conductivities that show similar pattern and values to the true field. The sequential filter is then used to further improve the parameters and to estimate the short term temporal behavior as well as the temporally evolving head field needed for short term predictions within the aquifer. For a virtual reality covering a subsection of the river Neckar it is shown that the use of environmental tracers can improve the performance of the filter. Results using the EnKF with and without this preconditioned initial ensemble are evaluated and discussed.

  15. Locations of hydraulic-head observations (HOBS) for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the well locations for hydraulic-head observations used in the calibration of the transient hydrologic model of the Central Valley flow...

  16. Vertical groundwater storage properties and changes in confinement determined using hydraulic head response to atmospheric tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acworth, R. Ian; Rau, Gabriel C.; Halloran, Landon J. S.; Timms, Wendy A.

    2017-04-01

    Accurate determination of groundwater state of confinement and compressible storage properties at vertical resolution over depth is notoriously difficult. We use the hydraulic head response to atmospheric tides at 2 cpd frequency as a tracer to quantify barometric efficiency (BE) and specific storage (Ss) over depth. Records of synthesized Earth tides, atmospheric pressure, and hydraulic heads measured in nine piezometers completed at depths between 5 and 55 m into unconsolidated smectitic clay and silt, sand and gravel were examined in the frequency domain. The barometric efficiency increased over depth from ˜0.05 in silty clay to ˜0.15 in sands and gravels. BE for silty clay was confirmed by calculating the loading efficiency as 0.95 using rainfall at the surface. Specific storage was calculated using effective rather than total moisture. The differences in phase between atmospheric pressure and hydraulic heads at 2 cpd were ˜180° below 10 m indicating confined conditions despite the low BE. Heads in the sediment above a fine sand and silt layer at 12 m exhibited a time variable phase difference between 0° and 180° indicating varying confinement. Our results illustrate that the atmospheric tide at 2 cpd is a powerful natural tracer for quantifying groundwater state of confinement and compressible storage properties in layered formations from hydraulic heads and atmospheric pressure records without the need for externally induced hydraulic stress. This approach could significantly improve the development of conceptual hydrogeological model used for groundwater resource development and management.

  17. Designing of Hydraulically Balanced Water Distribution Network Based on GIS and EPANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RASOOLI Ahmadullah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this paper are, designing and balancing of Water Distribution Network (WDN based on loops hydraulically balanced method as well as using Geographical Information System (GIS methodology with the contribution of EPANET. GIS methodology is used to ensure WDN’s integrity and skeletonized a proper and functional WDN by using Network Analyst utilizing the geometric network and topology network by hierarchical geo-databases. The problem is to make WDN hydraulically balanced by applying WDN balancing method. For that reason, we have analyzed water flows in each pipe and performed the iterations process on loops in order to make the algebraic summation of head loss“h_f” around any closed loop zero. In case, the summation of pipe flows must be equal to the flow amount entering or leaving the system through each node. At each iteration, reasonable changes occurred at pipes flow until the head loss has become very small or fixed zero as (optimizes correction by using excel sheet solver. Since this method is confirmed to be effective, simulations were done by using GIS and EPANET water distribution platform. As a result, we accomplished hydraulically balanced WDN. Finally, we have analyzed and simulated hydraulics parameters for the targeted area in Kabul city. Thus, determined successfully the hydraulics state of parameters around the network as a positive result. It is worth mentioning that, Hardy-cross method is being used for approaching more precise optimized correction and consequences concerning hydraulically-balanced and optimal WDN. This method can be done for complex loops WDN as well; the advantage of the method is simple math and self-correction. Managers and engineers who work in the field of water supply this methodology has been recommended as the more advantageous workflow in planning water distribution pattern.

  18. Influence of aquifer heterogeneity on karst hydraulics and catchment delineation employing distributive modeling approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Oehlmann

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to their heterogeneous nature, karst aquifers pose a major challenge for hydrogeological investigations. Important procedures like the delineation of catchment areas for springs are hindered by the unknown locations and hydraulic properties of highly conductive karstic zones. In this work numerical modeling was employed as a tool in delineating catchment areas of several springs within a karst area in southwestern Germany. For this purpose, different distributive modeling approaches were implemented in the Finite Element simulation software Comsol Multiphysics®. The investigation focuses on the question to which degree the effect of karstification has to be taken into account for accurately simulating the hydraulic head distribution and the observed spring discharges. The results reveal that the representation of heterogeneities has a large influence on the delineation of the catchment areas. Not only the location of highly conductive elements but also their geometries play a major role for the resulting hydraulic head distribution and thus for catchment area delineation. The size distribution of the karst conduits derived from the numerical models agrees with knowledge from karst genesis. It was thus shown that numerical modeling is a useful tool for catchment delineation in karst aquifers based on results from different field observations.

  19. An Analytical Solution of Hydraulic Head due to an Oscillatory Pumping Test in a Confined, Unconfined or Leaky Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C. S.; Yeh, H. D.

    2014-12-01

    This study builds a mathematical model for three-dimensional (3D) transient hydraulic head induced by an oscillatory pumping test in a confined, unconfined or leaky aquifer. The aquifers are of a rectangular shape where the four sides are under the Robin conditions. The 3D flow governing equation with a line sink term representing a vertical well is employed. The sink term has a cosine function for the oscillatory pumping. A general equation describing the head on the top of the three kinds of aquifers is considered. The analytical head solution of the model is derived by the direct Fourier method and the double-integral transform and in terms of a double series with fast convergence. With the aid of the solution, we have found that the vertical component of flow vanishes when Kv d2/(KhD2) > 1 where Kh and Kv are aquifer's hydraulic conductivities, respectively, D is aquifer's thickness, and d is a distance measured from the pumping well. Under the condition, temporal head distributions predicted by the present solution agree with those predicted by solutions developed based on two-dimensional flow by most previous researches.

  20. The Use of Hydraulic Head and Atmospheric Tritium to Identify Presence of Fractures in Clayey Aquitards: Numerical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, E. A.; Parker, B. L.; Cherry, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    groundwater head monitoring and formation sampling events at different spacing intervals. The modeling indicates that, monitoring at 3-m spacing along a line at an elevation positioned deep in the aquitard locates and determines connectivity of most vertical fractures. Moreover, it may be possible from measured tritium distributions in aquitards to estimate the depth of hydraulically active partially penetrating fractures. Thus, horizontal monitoring is a valuable complement to vertical monitoring nests in the study of aquitard integrity.

  1. Hydraulic slotting technology to prevent coal and gas outburst during heading excavation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, G.; Guo, Z.; Xie, L.; Xin, X.; Shan, Z. [Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo (China)

    2007-02-15

    The technology of measures to prevent coal and gas outburst was analyzed in serious outburst coal seam under research and experiments in real situations. A new measure, called hydraulic slotting, was described and studied in detail. The characteristic parameters of hydraulic slotting was given in the Jiaozuo mining area and the characteristics of validity, adaptability and security were evaluated. The research results show that slotting heading by high pressure large diameter jet releases not only the stress surrounding the strata but also the gas in coal seam is revealed. The resistance to coal and gas outburst was increased dramatically at once if the area of the slot was big enough. The experimentation succeeded in a 2000 m heading excavation and prevented coal and gas outburst. The heading driving speed was more than doubled. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Transient flow between aquifers and surface water: analytically derived field-scale hydraulic heads and fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. H. de Rooij

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing importance of catchment-scale and basin-scale models of the hydrological cycle makes it desirable to have a simple, yet physically realistic model for lateral subsurface water flow. As a first building block towards such a model, analytical solutions are presented for horizontal groundwater flow to surface waters held at prescribed water levels for aquifers with parallel and radial flow. The solutions are valid for a wide array of initial and boundary conditions and additions or withdrawals of water, and can handle discharge into as well as lateral infiltration from the surface water. Expressions for the average hydraulic head, the flux to or from the surface water, and the aquifer-scale hydraulic conductivity are developed to provide output at the scale of the modelled system rather than just point-scale values. The upscaled conductivity is time-variant. It does not depend on the magnitude of the flux but is determined by medium properties as well as the external forcings that drive the flow. For the systems studied, with lateral travel distances not exceeding 10 m, the circular aquifers respond very differently from the infinite-strip aquifers. The modelled fluxes are sensitive to the magnitude of the storage coefficient. For phreatic aquifers a value of 0.2 is argued to be representative, but considerable variations are likely. The effect of varying distributions over the day of recharge damps out rapidly; a soil water model that can provide accurate daily totals is preferable over a less accurate model hat correctly estimates the timing of recharge peaks.

  3. Hydraulics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Robert L.; Kirby, Klane

    This curriculum guide contains a course in hydraulics to train entry-level workers for automotive mechanics and other fields that utilize hydraulics. The module contains 14 instructional units that cover the following topics: (1) introduction to hydraulics; (2) fundamentals of hydraulics; (3) reservoirs; (4) lines, fittings, and couplers; (5)…

  4. Pinhole test for identifying susceptibility of soils to piping erosion: effect water quality and hydraulic head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadal Romero, E.; Verachtert, E.; Poesen, J.

    2009-07-01

    Piping has been observed in both natural and soils, as well as under different types of land uses and vegetation covers. Despite its importance, no standard widely-applied methodology exists to assess susceptibility of soils to piping. This study aims at evaluating the pinhole test for assessing the susceptibility of soils to piping under different conditions. More precisely, the effects of hydraulic head and water quality are being assessed. Topsoil samples (remoulded specimens) with a small range of water contents were taken in Central Belgium (Heverlee) and the susceptibility of these soil samples are investigated under standardized laboratory conditions with a pinhole test device. Three hydraulic heads (50,180 and 380 mm) and two water qualities (tap and distilled water) were used, reflecting dominant field conditions. (Author) 6 refs.

  5. Spring 1961 hydraulic head in the lower pumped zone of California's Central Valley (from Williamson and others, 1989)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the spring 1961 hydraulic head in the lower pumped zone of California's Central Valley. It was used to initiate the water-level...

  6. A Distributed Algorithm for Energy Optimization in Hydraulic Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallesøe, Carsten; Wisniewski, Rafal; Jensen, Tom Nørgaard

    2014-01-01

    is distributed in the sense that all calculations are implemented where the necessary information is available, including both parameters and measurements. A communication network between the pumps is implemented for global optimization. The local implementation of the algorithm means that the system becomes......An industrial case study in the form of a large-scale hydraulic network underlying a district heating system is considered. A distributed control is developed that minimizes the aggregated electrical energy consumption of the pumps in the network without violating the control demands. The algorithm...... a Plug & Play control system as most commissioning can be done during the manufacture of the pumps. Only information on the graph-structure of the hydraulic network is needed during installation....

  7. Joint inversion of hydraulic head and self-potential data associated with harmonic pumping tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soueid Ahmed, A.; Jardani, A.; Revil, A.; Dupont, J. P.

    2016-09-01

    Harmonic pumping tests consist in stimulating an aquifer by the means of hydraulic stimulations at some discrete frequencies. The inverse problem consisting in retrieving the hydraulic properties is inherently ill posed and is usually underdetermined when considering the number of well head data available in field conditions. To better constrain this inverse problem, we add self-potential data recorded at the ground surface to the head data. The self-potential method is a passive geophysical method. Its signals are generated by the groundwater flow through an electrokinetic coupling. We showed using a 3-D saturated unconfined synthetic aquifer that the self-potential method significantly improves the results of the harmonic hydraulic tomography. The hydroelectric forward problem is obtained by solving first the Richards equation, describing the groundwater flow, and then using the result in an electrical Poisson equation describing the self-potential problem. The joint inversion problem is solved using a reduction model based on the principal component geostatistical approach. In this method, the large prior covariance matrix is truncated and replaced by its low-rank approximation, allowing thus for notable computational time and storage savings. Three test cases are studied, to assess the validity of our approach. In the first test, we show that when the number of harmonic stimulations is low, combining the harmonic hydraulic and self-potential data does not improve the inversion results. In the second test where enough harmonic stimulations are performed, a significant improvement of the hydraulic parameters is observed. In the last synthetic test, we show that the electrical conductivity field required to invert the self-potential data can be determined with enough accuracy using an electrical resistivity tomography survey using the same electrodes configuration as used for the self-potential investigation.

  8. Straight-flow hydraulic turbine-generator for ultralow-head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushimoto, Masakazu; Ujiie, Ryuichi (Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-01-10

    This report introduces features and structures of the straight-flow hydraulic turbine-generator considered for ultralow-head hydropower generation. Largest feature of straight flow(S/F) is that the generator rotor is fitted so as to surround the periphery of runner. This fundamental structure is classified to overhang type, downstream stay-column type and others dependent on the arrangement of main bearing which supports the rotor weight. The essential part of the hydraulic turbine is the sealing equipment for the center part of the rotor. Special attention must be paid to the selection of material and structure of this equipment. The maximum point to determine the structure is the countermeasure for the radial and axial rigidity reduction in the S/F hydro-generator. It is also necessary to conduct moisture prevention for the generator and to insulate to prevent axial current. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Radation distribution in head & thorax computerized tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mahdavi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Determination of the exposure levels in the computerized tomography (CT practices is necessary to define the respected national reference levels, quality control of CT centers and the risk assessment for radiation induced cancers. Material and Methods: On the basis of this necessity, the radiation exposure distribution due to common CT practices has been investigated at Razi Hospital CT center in Rasht using tissue-equivalent phantoms and the thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD. The Head and Thorax phantoms were used with the standard dimensions incorporating holes at the center and edges for TLD placement. Dosimetry was carried out using LiF Mg, Cu, P small chips due to their relatively tissue equivalence, high sensitivity convenient annealing procedure and the non-complex glow curve. Results: Results showed that CTDI for Head is 52.85 mGy and for Body is 68.15mGy. CTDLW for Head is 13.67 mGy and for Body is 16.94mGy . Conclusion: In comparison with other radiographical procedures, patient absorbed doses in CT imaging are usually very high. Content of dose is increased by increase of mAs.

  10. Research on the hydraulic transformer with new distribution pairs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new distribution pairs of the hydraulic transformer (HT) has been proposed to extend its output pressure range. A common pressure rail (CPR) test-rig was built to test the performance of the HT. The simulation and the test were carried out to explore the output pressure, the displacement and the speed stability of the HT. The research results have shown as follows. Firstly, the designed HT can realize regu- lating the pressure, and its output pressure is determined by the control angle of the port plate and affected by the load. The ratio of the load pressure (pB) to the supply pressure (pA) of the HT varies from 0 to 1.2. Secondly, the HT is a hydraulic component of variable displacement, and the displacement of the every port of the HT depends on the control angle and is not affected by loads. Finally, the speed stability of the HT becomes better with the control angle rising, and the movement zone exists while the control angle is lower than 15°. The high pulsation of the driving torque of the HT results in the poor speed stability. The research will contribute to the improvement of the HT performance in the future.

  11. Research on the hydraulic transformer with new distribution pairs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG XiaoPing; YANG HuaYong; XU Bing; XU XiuHua

    2008-01-01

    A new distribution pairs of the hydraulic transformer (HT) has been proposed to extend its output pressure range. A common pressure rail (CPR) test-rig was built to test the performance of the HT. The simulation and the test were carried out to explore the output pressure, the displacement and the speed stability of the HT. The research results have shown as follows. Firstly, the designed HT can realize regulating the pressure, and its output pressure is determined by the control angle of the port plate and affected by the load. The ratio of the load pressure (PB) to the supply pressure (PA) of the HT varies from 0 to 1.2. Secondly, the HT is a hydraulic component of variable displacement, and the displacement of the every port of the HT depends on the control angle and is not affected by loads. Finally, the speed stability of the HT becomes better with the control angle rising, and the movement zone exists while the control angle is lower than 15°. The high pulsation of the driving torque of the HT results in the poor speed stability. The research will contribute to the improvement of the HT performance in the future.

  12. Numerical analysis of Coriolis effect on low-head hydraulic turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, S. H.; Xiao, Y. X.; Zhou, X. Z.; Zhang, J.; Zeng, C. J.; Luo, Y. Y.; Xu, W.; Wang, Z. W.

    2016-11-01

    For the low-head hydropower station, the operating head is low, and the turbine intake channel is relatively short. The turbine internal flow behaviour can be influenced by fluid flows in the upstream reservoir easily, then it would influence the turbine hydraulic performance. Water flows in the upstream reservoir can be influenced by the Coriolis force by the Earth rotation, and it differs at the different Rossby number. In this paper, the Coriolis effect on the approach flows and the turbine performances are investigated numerically for the low-head units. Firstly, the Coriolis effect (under the different latitudes and the same characteristic length scale) on reservoir flows was predicted. Secondly, the prototype performance of a bulb-type turbine was simulated including the reservoir flow with the Coriolis effect, and then the effect on the turbine performance is be discussed. Results show that the flow field in the upstream reservoir at the low Rossby number, the ratio of inertial force to Coriolis force, can sufficiently influence the turbine intake flows and the turbine performances. Adjusting the side-wall distance can reduce the Coriolis effects.

  13. Temporal and vertical variation of hydraulic head in aquifers in the Edgewood area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Colleen A.; Tenbus, Fredrick J.

    1998-01-01

    Water-level data and interpretations from previous hydrogeological studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, were compared to determine similarities and differences among the aquifers. Because the sediments that comprise the shallow aquifers are discontinuous, the shallow ground-water-flow systems are local rather than extensive across the Edgewood Area. Hydrogeologic cross sections, hydrographs of water levels, and vertical gradients calculated from previous studies in the Canal Creek area, Graces Quarters, the O-Field area, Carroll Island, and the J-Field area, over periods of record ranging from 1 to 10 years during 1986-97, were used to determine recharge and discharge areas, connections between aquifers, and hydrologic responses of aquifers to natural and anthropogenic stress. Each of the aquifers in the study areas exhibited variation of hydraulic head that was attributed to seasonal changes in recharge. Upward hydraulic gradients and seasonal reversals of vertical hydraulic gradients between aquifers indicate the potential for local ground-water discharge from most of the aquifers that were studied in the Edgewood Area. Hydraulic head in individual aquifers in Graces Quarters and Carroll Island responded to offsite pumping during part of the period of record. Hydraulic head in most of the confined aquifers responded to tidal loading effects from nearby estuaries.

  14. The Maintenance of Heading Machine Hydraulic System%掘进机液压系统的维护

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卞丽霞

    2011-01-01

    The paper mainly discussed the rotation of hydraulic tank, oil return filter system and the axial piston pump of heading machine's hydraulic system, the adjustment of axial piston pump, relief valve pressure and one-way throttle valve and the maintenance of hydraulic system and the using of hydraulic components.%本文主要阐述了掘进机液压系统的液压油箱、液压系统的回油过滤器、轴向柱塞泵的旋转、轴向柱塞泵、溢流阀压力的调整、单向节流阀的调整、液压系统维护、液压元件的使用等维护.

  15. A hydraulic distribution device of a powered support section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravlev, R.P.; Barinov, V.S.; Demidovich, Z.A.; Fedorov, L.I.; Kozhukhov, L.F.; Mosunov, Yu.Ya.

    1981-01-30

    The goal of this invention is to reduce the working time for manual control in the process of bracing a hydraulic prop and complete use of the working pressure of the support's hydraulic system to perform initial bracing of the hydraulic prop. To achieve this goal, the device has a reflux valve with a locking element and a choke, the latter situated between the piston and rod chambers; the floating piston is made with a stop which interacts with the motion limiter, while the rod of the floating piston has a pusher which interacts with the locking element of the reflux valve. Use of the hydraulic device of this design in powered supports during their operation under various mining conditions significantly raises the operating life of hydraulic supports and hydraulic distributors, while lowering the total complex's down time. Automatic positioning of the predetermined amount of initial spacing shortens the time in which the operator handles the support sections. The operator uses the time available to perform succeeding operations (transition to the next control panel, unloading, and transfer).

  16. Uncertainty analysis of a combined Artificial Neural Network - Fuzzy logic - Kriging system for spatial and temporal simulation of Hydraulic Head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapoglou, Evdokia; Karatzas, George P.; Trichakis, Ioannis C.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the uncertainty, using various methodologies, in a combined Artificial Neural Network (ANN) - Fuzzy logic - Kriging system, which can simulate spatially and temporally the hydraulic head in an aquifer. This system uses ANNs for the temporal prediction of hydraulic head in various locations, one ANN for every location with available data, and Kriging for the spatial interpolation of ANN's results. A fuzzy logic is used for the interconnection of these two methodologies. The full description of the initial system and its functionality can be found in Tapoglou et al. (2014). Two methodologies were used for the calculation of uncertainty for the implementation of the algorithm in a study area. First, the uncertainty of Kriging parameters was examined using a Bayesian bootstrap methodology. In this case the variogram is calculated first using the traditional methodology of Ordinary Kriging. Using the parameters derived and the covariance function of the model, the covariance matrix is constructed. A common method for testing a statistical model is the use of artificial data. Normal random numbers generation is the first step in this procedure and by multiplying them by the decomposed covariance matrix, correlated random numbers (sample set) can be calculated. These random values are then fitted into a variogram and the value in an unknown location is estimated using Kriging. The distribution of the simulated values using the Kriging of different correlated random values can be used in order to derive the prediction intervals of the process. In this study 500 variograms were constructed for every time step and prediction point, using the method described above, and their results are presented as the 95th and 5th percentile of the predictions. The second methodology involved the uncertainty of ANNs training. In this case, for all the data points 300 different trainings were implemented having different training datasets each time

  17. Hydraulic Tomography and High-Resolution Slug Testing to Determine Hydraulic Conductivity Distributions - Year 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    the addition into a well of a known volume of water or a physical slug. More recently, pneumatic methods have become popular ( Zemansky and McElwee...and Zemansky , 2000), (Sellwood, 2001) and (Ross, 2004)]. The aquifer material at GEMS exhibits linear and non-linear responses to slug testing...1976; Zurbuchen et al., 2002; and Zemansky and McElwee, 2005). Slug tests have been a common method for obtaining information about the hydraulic

  18. Unseen head pose prediction using dense multivariate label distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao-li SANG; Hu CHEN; Ge HUANG; Qi-jun ZHAO

    2016-01-01

    Accurate head poses are useful for many face-related tasks such as face recognition, gaze estimation, and emotion analysis. Most existing methods estimate head poses that are included in the training data (i.e., previously seen head poses). To predict head poses that are not seen in the training data, some regression-based methods have been proposed. However, they focus on estimating continuous head pose angles, and thus do not systematically evaluate the performance on predicting unseen head poses. In this paper, we use a dense multivariate label distribution (MLD) to represent the pose angle of a face image. By incorporating both seen and unseen pose angles into MLD, the head pose predictor can estimate unseen head poses with an accuracy comparable to that of estimating seen head poses. On the Pointing’04 database, the mean absolute errors of results for yaw and pitch are 4.01◦ and 2.13◦, respectively. In addition, experiments on the CAS-PEAL and CMU Multi-PIE databases show that the proposed dense MLD-based head pose estimation method can obtain the state-of-the-art performance when compared to some existing methods.

  19. Calculation Method and Distribution Characteristics of Fracture Hydraulic Aperture from Field Experiments in Fractured Granite Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yang-Bing; Feng, Xia-Ting; Yan, E.-Chuan; Chen, Gang; Lü, Fei-fei; Ji, Hui-bin; Song, Kuang-Yin

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the fracture hydraulic aperture and its relation to the mechanical aperture and normal stress is urgently needed in engineering construction and analytical research at the engineering field scale. A new method based on the in situ borehole camera measurement and borehole water-pressure test is proposed for the calculation of the fracture hydraulic aperture. This method comprises six steps. The first step is to obtain the equivalent hydraulic conductivity of the test section from borehole water-pressure tests. The second step is a tentative calculation to obtain the qualitative relation between the reduction coefficient and the mechanical aperture obtained from borehole camera measurements. The third step is to choose the preliminary reduction coefficient for obtaining the initial hydraulic aperture. The remaining three steps are to optimize, using the genetic algorithm, the hydraulic apertures of fractures with high uncertainty. The method is then applied to a fractured granite engineering area whose purpose is the construction of an underground water-sealed storage cavern for liquefied petroleum gas. The probability distribution characteristics of the hydraulic aperture, the relationship between the hydraulic aperture and the mechanical aperture, the hydraulic aperture and the normal stress, and the differences between altered fractures and fresh fractures are all analyzed. Based on the effects of the engineering applications, the method is proved to be feasible and reliable. More importantly, the results of the hydraulic aperture obtained in this paper are different from those results elicited from laboratory tests, and the reasons are discussed in the paper.

  20. Temporal response of hydraulic head, temperature, and chloride concentrations to sea-level changes, Floridan aquifer system, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J. D.; Vacher, H. L.; Sanford, Ward E.

    2009-06-01

    Three-dimensional density-dependent flow and transport modeling of the Floridan aquifer system, USA shows that current chloride concentrations are not in equilibrium with current sea level and, second, that the geometric configuration of the aquifer has a significant effect on system responses. The modeling shows that hydraulic head equilibrates first, followed by temperatures, and then by chloride concentrations. The model was constructed using a modified version of SUTRA capable of simulating multi-species heat and solute transport, and was compared to pre-development conditions using hydraulic heads, chloride concentrations, and temperatures from 315 observation wells. Three hypothetical, sinusoidal sea-level changes occurring over 100,000 years were used to evaluate how the simulated aquifer responds to sea-level changes. Model results show that hydraulic head responses lag behind sea-level changes only where the Miocene Hawthorn confining unit is thick and represents a significant restriction to flow. Temperatures equilibrate quickly except where the Hawthorn confining unit is thick and the duration of the sea-level event is long (exceeding 30,000 years). Response times for chloride concentrations to equilibrate are shortest near the coastline and where the aquifer is unconfined; in contrast, chloride concentrations do not change significantly over the 100,000-year simulation period where the Hawthorn confining unit is thick.

  1. Locations, values, and uncertainties of hydraulic-head observations for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital geospatial data set contains the locations, values, and uncertainties of hydraulic-head observations used in the calibration of the transient model of...

  2. Data tables of well locations, perforated intervals, and time series of hydraulic-head observations for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the well locations, perforated intervals, and time series of hydraulic-head observations used in the calibration of the transient...

  3. Initial hydraulic heads for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the hydraulic-head values in 16 model layers used to initiate the transient simulation of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow...

  4. Locations, values, and uncertainties of hydraulic-head observations for the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital geospatial data set contains the locations, values, and uncertainties of hydraulic-head observations used in the calibration of the transient model of...

  5. MEASUREMENT OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY DISTRIBUTIONS: A MANUAL OF PRACTICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of hydrologists to perform field measurements of aquifer hydraulic properties must be enhanced in order to significantly improve the capacity to solve groundwater contamination problems at Superfund and other sites. The primary purpose of this manual is to provide ne...

  6. [Effect of hydraulic load distribution on sewage treatment efficiency of earthworm bio-filter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Yang, Jian; Yang, Ju-Chuan; Chen, Qiao-Yan; Lou, Shan-Jie

    2008-07-01

    Effect of hydraulic load distribution on sewage treatment efficiency of earthworm bio-filter was studied by analyzing influent and effluent of earthworm bio-filter and earthworm behaviors. The results show that when hydraulic load varying from 2.0 m3/(m2 x d) to 6.0 m3/(m2 x d), the concentration of each pollutant in earthworm bio-filter effluent increases slowly and is little effected by hydraulic load. When hydraulic load reaches 6.7 m3/(m2 x d), the concentration of COD, BOD5, SS, NH4(+) -N and TP in earthworm bio-filter effluent increases obviously, but the TN concentration in effluent presents descending tendency. The earthworms become rather inadaptable to the living conditions at this operating mode. As hydraulic load increasing, the earthworms' relative ingestive ability is improved at first, and then decreases. The earthworms' relative ingestive ability comes to the maximum at hydraulic load of 4.8 m3/(m2 x d), with good organic removal efficiency. The relation ships between hydraulic load and average weight, average density, unit-area biomass of the earthworms are significant negative correlation. The hydraulic load of 4.8 m3/(m2 x d) is recommended, but not over 6.7 m3/(m2 x d).

  7. New empirical relationship between grain size distribution and hydraulic conductivity for ephemeral streambed sediments

    KAUST Repository

    Rosas, Jorge

    2014-07-19

    Grain size distribution, porosity, and hydraulic conductivity were determined for 39 sediment samples collected from ephemeral streams (wadis) in western Saudi Arabia. The measured hydraulic conductivity values were then compared to values calculated using 20 different empirical equations commonly used to estimate hydraulic conductivity from grain size analyses. It was found that most of the hydraulic conductivity values estimated from the empirical equations correlated very poorly with the measured hydraulic conductivity values. Modifications of the empirical equations, including changes to special coefficients and statistical offsets, were made to produce modified equations that considerably improved the hydraulic conductivity estimates from grain size data for wadi sediments. The Chapuis, Hazen, Kozeny, Slichter, Terzaghi, and Barr equations produced the best correlations, but still had relatively high predictive errors. The Chapius equation was modified for wadi sediments by incorporating mud percentage and the standard deviation (in phi units) into a new equation that reduced the predicted hydraulic conductivity error to ±14.1 m/day. The equation is best applied to ephemeral stream samples that have hydraulic conductive values greater than 2 m/day.

  8. Determination of hydraulic conductivity from grain-size distribution for different depositional environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Jorge; Lopez, Oliver; Missimer, Thomas M; Coulibaly, Kapo M; Dehwah, Abdullah H A; Sesler, Kathryn; Lujan, Luis R; Mantilla, David

    2014-01-01

    Over 400 unlithified sediment samples were collected from four different depositional environments in global locations and the grain-size distribution, porosity, and hydraulic conductivity were measured using standard methods. The measured hydraulic conductivity values were then compared to values calculated using 20 different empirical equations (e.g., Hazen, Carman-Kozeny) commonly used to estimate hydraulic conductivity from grain-size distribution. It was found that most of the hydraulic conductivity values estimated from the empirical equations correlated very poorly to the measured hydraulic conductivity values with errors ranging to over 500%. To improve the empirical estimation methodology, the samples were grouped by depositional environment and subdivided into subgroups based on lithology and mud percentage. The empirical methods were then analyzed to assess which methods best estimated the measured values. Modifications of the empirical equations, including changes to special coefficients and addition of offsets, were made to produce modified equations that considerably improve the hydraulic conductivity estimates from grain size data for beach, dune, offshore marine, and river sediments. Estimated hydraulic conductivity errors were reduced to 6 to 7.1 m/day for the beach subgroups, 3.4 to 7.1 m/day for dune subgroups, and 2.2 to 11 m/day for offshore sediments subgroups. Improvements were made for river environments, but still produced high errors between 13 and 23 m/day.

  9. Determination of hydraulic conductivity from grain-size distribution for different depositional environments

    KAUST Repository

    Rosas, Jorge

    2013-06-06

    Over 400 unlithified sediment samples were collected from four different depositional environments in global locations and the grain-size distribution, porosity, and hydraulic conductivity were measured using standard methods. The measured hydraulic conductivity values were then compared to values calculated using 20 different empirical equations (e.g., Hazen, Carman-Kozeny) commonly used to estimate hydraulic conductivity from grain-size distribution. It was found that most of the hydraulic conductivity values estimated from the empirical equations correlated very poorly to the measured hydraulic conductivity values with errors ranging to over 500%. To improve the empirical estimation methodology, the samples were grouped by depositional environment and subdivided into subgroups based on lithology and mud percentage. The empirical methods were then analyzed to assess which methods best estimated the measured values. Modifications of the empirical equations, including changes to special coefficients and addition of offsets, were made to produce modified equations that considerably improve the hydraulic conductivity estimates from grain size data for beach, dune, offshore marine, and river sediments. Estimated hydraulic conductivity errors were reduced to 6 to 7.1m/day for the beach subgroups, 3.4 to 7.1m/day for dune subgroups, and 2.2 to 11m/day for offshore sediments subgroups. Improvements were made for river environments, but still produced high errors between 13 and 23m/day. © 2013, National Ground Water Association.

  10. Design of a New Type of Distribution Valve for Hydraulic Breaker and Analysis of Energy Consumption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Energy consumed by distribution valves causes an energy loss for the output energy of hydraulic breakers, which has a significant influence on its efficiency. A new type of distribution valve used for hydraulic breakers, designed to reduce energy consumption, is analyzed on the basis of the operating principle and energy loss of the current distribution valve. The new distribution valve adopts a cone valve and the optimization technique of unequal open degree for the valve port. Theoretical calculations and analyses have proven that the new distribution valve can reduce energy loss by 9.0127J, or energy consumption by 31%, during an impact cycle and the efficiency of the hydraulic breaker can be raised by 4.5%. It has the following characteristics: little leakage, little pressure loss and low energy consumption.

  11. Simultaneous transient operation of a high head hydro power plant and a storage pumping station in the same hydraulic scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucur, D. M.; Dunca, G.; Cervantes, M. J.; Cǎlinoiu, C.; Isbǎşoiu, E. C.

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents an on-site experimental analysis of a high head hydro power plant and a storage pumping station, in an interconnected complex hydraulic scheme during simultaneous transient operation. The investigated hydropower site has a unique structure as the pumping station discharges the water into the hydropower plant penstock. The operation regimes were chosen for critical scenarios such as sudden load rejections of the turbines as well as start-ups and stops with different combinations of the hydraulic turbines and pumps operation. Several parameters were simultaneously measured such as the pumped water discharge, the pressure at the inlet pump section, at the outlet of the pumps and at the vane house of the hydraulic power plant surge tank. The results showed the dependence of the turbines and the pumps operation. Simultaneous operation of the turbines and the pumps is possible in safe conditions, without endangering the machines or the structures. Furthermore, simultaneous operation of the pumping station together with the hydropower plant increases the overall hydraulic efficiency of the site since shortening the discharge circuit of the pumps.

  12. Elemental distribution in human femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, C., E-mail: catia.santos@itn.pt [Dep. Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Centro de Física Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, IST/CTN, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Fonseca, M. [Dep. Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Centro de Física Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Universidade Europeia|Laureate International Universities, 1500-210 Lisboa (Portugal); Corregidor, V. [Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, IST/CTN, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Silva, H. [Dep. Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Centro de Física Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, IST/CTN, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Luís, H.; Jesus, A.P. [Dep. Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Centro de Física Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); and others

    2014-07-15

    Osteoporosis is the most common bone disease with severe symptoms and harmful effects on the patient quality of life. Because abnormal distribution and concentration of the major and trace elements may help to characterize the disease, ion beam analysis is applied to the study of bone samples. Proton Induced X-ray Emission and Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry are applied for qualitative and quantitative analysis of an osteoporotic bone sample, for the determination of the Ca/P ratio and analysis of the distribution of major and trace elements. The analysis was made both in trabecular and cortical bone and the results are in agreement with the information found in literature.

  13. Elemental distribution in human femoral head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, C.; Fonseca, M.; Corregidor, V.; Silva, H.; Luís, H.; Jesus, A. P.; Branco, J.; Alves, L. C.

    2014-07-01

    Osteoporosis is the most common bone disease with severe symptoms and harmful effects on the patient quality of life. Because abnormal distribution and concentration of the major and trace elements may help to characterize the disease, ion beam analysis is applied to the study of bone samples. Proton Induced X-ray Emission and Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry are applied for qualitative and quantitative analysis of an osteoporotic bone sample, for the determination of the Ca/P ratio and analysis of the distribution of major and trace elements. The analysis was made both in trabecular and cortical bone and the results are in agreement with the information found in literature.

  14. Stochastic water demand modelling for a better understanding of hydraulics in water distribution networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokker, E.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    In the water distribution network water quality process take place influenced by de flow velocity and residence time of the water in the network. In order to understand how the water quality changes in the water distribution network, a good understanding of hydraulics is required. Specifically in

  15. Probing liquid distribution in partially saturated porous materials with hydraulic admittance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, P; Fairweather, J F; Schwartz, D T

    2011-09-01

    The distribution of two immiscible fluids in a complex porous material during displacement is often central to understanding its function. Characterization of this distribution is traditionally determined via optically transparent flow cells. However, for opaque or thin porous materials of the order of hundreds of microns, optical visualization proves to be difficult and requires sophisticated imaging techniques that are expensive and difficult to come by. We describe here a bench-top tool that dynamically probes the hydraulic pathways leading to each free-interface within a single capillary and a bundle of seven capillaries at various saturations (i.e., hydraulic path lengths). A small volumetric displacement was applied to each interface such that the interfaces remained pinned at the capillary walls and the resultant oscillatory pressure drop was measured to determine the hydraulic admittance at each applied oscillation frequency. When the magnitude of the hydraulic admittance was plotted vs. applied oscillation frequency, a resonance peak was found for each degenerately filled capillary. The corresponding peaks were represented by a half-loop (100% filled) and full loops (partially filled) in a Nyquist plot. We compared the theoretical and measured admittance curves and found good agreement for both capillary systems at high filled states. The theoretical predictions became worse when the hydraulic path length was comparable to the capillary radius. The analysis for the hydraulic admittance of a bundle of capillaries is developed here and experimentally validated for the first time.

  16. GAS AND OIL POWER DISTRIBUTION RATIO OF A NEW HYDRAULIC BREAKER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hongqiang; LI Meixiang; GAO Bin; HE Qinghua

    2007-01-01

    The working principle of a new hydraulic breaker operated jointly by gas and hydraulic flow which has a reasonable structure, high efficiency and long piston life-span, is analyzed, and the optimal power distribution ratio of the sealed nitrogen gas to the high-pressure oil in the process of piston impacting is studied. Through theoretical analysis, optimization simulation and detailed calculation, it is determined that the impact system has optimal mechanical performance and highest efficiency when the distribution ratio Φis between 0.3 and 0.5. The theoretical result is also verified by repeated tests.

  17. Surface flow types, near-bed hydraulics and the distribution of stream macroinvertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Reid

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatial variation in hydraulic conditions in streams often results in distinct water surface patterns, or surface flow types. Visual assessments of the distribution of surface flow types have been used to provide rapid assessment of the habitat heterogeneity. The efficacy of this approach is predicated on the notion that surface flow types consistently represent a distinct suite of hydraulic conditions with biological relevance. This study tested this notion, asking three specific questions. First, do surface flow types provide a characterisation of physical habitat that is relevant to macroinvertebrates? Second, how well do near-bed hydraulic conditions explain macroinvertebrate distributions? Third, what components of near-bed hydraulic conditions exert the strongest influence on macroinvertebrate distributions?

    Results show that hydraulic conditions (incorporating direct measurements of near-bed velocity and turbulence in three dimensions and substratum character (incorporating estimates of particle size distribution, and biofilm and macrophyte cover within each surface flow type were largely distinct and that macroinvertebrate assemblages differed across flow types in taxon richness and assemblage composition, thus supporting the notion that rapid assessments of surface flow type distributions provide biologically relevant information.

    Macroinvertebrate assemblages were most strongly correlated with water depth, size of a flow type patch, near-bed velocity in the downstream direction, turbulence in the transverse direction, % pebble, % sand, % silt and clay and macrophyte cover. This study suggests that surface flow type mapping provides an assessment of physical habitat that is relevant to macroinvertebrates. The strong relationship detected between macroinvertebrate assemblages and transverse turbulence also highlights the value of directly measuring near-bed hydraulics. Further investigations are required to test the

  18. Surface flow types, near-bed hydraulics and the distribution of stream macroinvertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Reid

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Spatial variation in hydraulic conditions in streams often results in distinct water surface patterns, or surface flow types. Visual assessments of the distribution of surface flow types have been used to provide rapid assessment of habitat heterogeneity. The efficacy of this approach is predicated on the notion that surface flow types consistently represent a distinct suite of hydraulic conditions with biological relevance. This study tested this notion, asking three specific questions. First, do surface flow types provide a characterisation of physical habitat that is relevant to macroinvertebrates? Second, how well do near-bed hydraulic conditions explain macroinvertebrate distributions? Third, what components of near-bed hydraulic conditions exert the strongest influence on macroinvertebrate distributions?

    Results show that hydraulic conditions (incorporating direct measurements of near-bed velocity and turbulence in three dimensions and substratum character (incorporating estimates of particle size distribution, and biofilm and macrophyte cover within each surface flow type were largely distinct and that macroinvertebrate assemblages differed across flow types in taxon richness and assemblage composition, thus supporting the notion that rapid assessments of surface flow type distributions provide biologically relevant information.

    Macroinvertebrate assemblages were most strongly correlated with water depth, size of a flow type patch, near-bed velocity in the downstream direction, turbulence in the transverse direction, % pebble, % sand, % silt and clay and macrophyte cover. This study suggests that surface flow type mapping provides an assessment of physical habitat that is relevant to macroinvertebrates. The strong relationship detected between macroinvertebrate assemblages and transverse turbulence also highlights the value of directly measuring near-bed hydraulics. Further investigations are required to test the

  19. Hydraulic characteristics of converse curvature section and aerator in high-head and large discharge spillway tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The hydraulic characteristics and cavitation erosion near the converse curvature section in the high-head and large discharge spillway tunnel have been important issues of concern to the hydropower project.In this paper,the evolutions of hydraulic elements such as pressure,flow velocity,wall shear stress,etc.in the converse curvature section are analyzed and the impacts of bottom aerator on hydraulic characteristics are discussed,with the commercial software FLUENT6.3 as a platform and combining the k-model and VOF method.The flow pattern in the converse curvature section of spillway tunnel is given by the three-dimensional numerical simulation.It indicates that the pressure changes rapidly with great pressure gradient from the beginning to the end of the curve.It also shows that the shear stress on side wall just downstream the end of the converse curvature curve is still increasing;the aeration cavity formed downstream the bottom aerator may cause the side wall pressure decreased to worsen the cavitation characteristics near the side wall.By means of the physical model experiment,the three-dimensional aerator composed of side wall baffling aerator and bottom aerator is studied,the baffling aerator suitable for the water flow conditions with water depth of 6.0 to 8.0 m and flow velocity of 35 to 50 m/s is proposed.

  20. Empirical analysis of the stress-strain relationship between hydraulic head and subsidence in the San Joaquin Valley Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, K. L.; Farr, T.

    2016-12-01

    Aquifer subsidence due to groundwater abstraction poses a significant threat to aquifer sustainability and infrastructure. The need to prevent permanent compaction to preserve aquifer storage capacity and protect infrastructure begs a better understanding of how compaction is related to groundwater abstraction and aquifer hydrogeology. The stress-strain relationship between hydraulic head changes and aquifer compaction has previously been observed to be hysteretic in both empirical and modeling studies. Here, subsidence data for central California's San Joaquin Valley derived from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) for the period 2007-2016 is examined relative to hydraulic head levels in monitoring and production wells collected by the California Department of Water Resources. Such a large and long-term data set is available for empirical analysis for the first time thanks to advances in InSAR data collection and geospatial data management. The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) funded this work to provide the background and an update on subsidence in the Central Valley to support future policy. Part of this work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA.

  1. Characterisation of hydraulic head changes and aquifer properties in the London Basin using Persistent Scatterer Interferometry ground motion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonì, R.; Cigna, F.; Bricker, S.; Meisina, C.; McCormack, H.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, Persistent Scatterer Interferometry was applied to ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT satellite data covering 1992-2000 and 2002-2010 respectively, to analyse the relationship between ground motion and hydraulic head changes in the London Basin, United Kingdom. The integration of observed groundwater levels provided by the Environment Agency and satellite-derived displacement time series allowed the estimation of the spatio-temporal variations of the Chalk aquifer storage coefficient and compressibility over an area of ∼1360 km2. The average storage coefficient of the aquifer reaches values of 1 × 10-3 and the estimated average aquifer compressibility is 7.7 × 10-10 Pa-1 and 1.2 × 10-9 Pa-1 for the periods 1992-2000 and 2002-2010, respectively. Derived storage coefficient values appear to be correlated with the hydrogeological setting, where confined by the London Clay the storage coefficient is typically an order of magnitude lower than where the chalk is overlain by the Lambeth Group. PSI-derived storage coefficient estimates agree with the values obtained from pumping tests in the same area. A simplified one-dimensional model is applied to simulate the ground motion response to hydraulic heads changes at nine piezometers. The comparison between simulated and satellite-observed ground motion changes reveals good agreement, with errors ranging between 1.4 and 6.9 mm, and being 3.2 mm on average.

  2. Fracture hydraulic conductivity in the Mexico City clayey aquitard: Field piezometer rising-head tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Carlos; Ortega-Guerrero, Adrián

    A regional lacustrine aquitard covers the main aquifer of the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The aquitard's hydraulic conductivity (K') is fundamental for evaluating the natural protection of the aquifer against a variety of contaminants present on the surface and its hydraulic response. This study analyzes the distribution and variation of K' in the plains of Chalco, Texcoco and Mexico City (three of the six former lakes that existed in the Basin of Mexico), on the basis of 225 field-permeability tests, in nests of existing piezometers located at depths of 2-85 m. Tests were interpreted using the Hvorslev method and some by the Bouwer-Rice method. Results indicate that the distribution of K' fits log-Gaussian regression models. Dominant frequencies for K' in the Chalco and Texcoco plains range between 1E-09 and 1E-08 m/s, with similar population means of 1.19E-09 and 1.7E-09 m/s, respectively, which are one to two orders of magnitude higher than the matrix conductivity. In the Mexico City Plain the population mean is near by one order of magnitude lower; K'=2.6E-10 m/s. The contrast between the measured K' and that of the matrix is attributed to the presence of fractures in the upper 25-40 m, which is consistent with the findings of previous studies on solute migration in the aquitard. Un imperméable régional d'origine lacustre recouvre le principal aquifère de la zone urbaine de la ville de Mexico. La conductivité hydraulique K' de cet imperméable est fondamentale pour évaluer la protection naturelle de l'aquifère, contre les différents contaminants présents en surface, et sa réponse hydraulique. Cette étude analyse et les variations de K' dans les plaines de Chalco, Texcoco et Mexico (trois des six anciens lacs qui existaient dans le Bassin de Mexico), sur la base de 225 essais de perméabilité sur le terrain, réalisés en grappes dans des piézomètres existants entre 2 et 85 m de profondeur. Les essais ont été interprétés avec la m

  3. Design Formulae for Hydraulic Stability and Structural Integrity of Dolos Breakwater Round-Heads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Jensen, Jacob Birk; Liu, Z.

    1995-01-01

    A rational design of Dolos armour unit should incorporate both the hydraulic stability and the structural integrity. The previous tests performed by Aalborg University (AU) resulted in design formulae for the trunk of a 1:1.5 slope Dolos breakwater without superstructure including both...

  4. Unsaturated hydraulic properties of Sphagnum moss and peat reveal trimodal pore-size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tobias K. D.; Iden, Sascha C.; Durner, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    In ombrotrophic peatlands, the moisture content of the vadose zone (acrotelm) controls oxygen diffusion rates, redox state, and the turnover of organic matter. Whether peatlands act as sinks or sources of atmospheric carbon thus relies on variably saturated flow processes. The Richards equation is the standard model for water flow in soils, but it is not clear whether it can be applied to simulate water flow in live Sphagnum moss. Transient laboratory evaporation experiments were conducted to observe evaporative water fluxes in the acrotelm, containing living Sphagnum moss, and a deeper layer containing decomposed moss peat. The experimental data were evaluated by inverse modeling using the Richards equation as process model for variably-saturated flow. It was tested whether water fluxes and time series of measured pressure heads during evaporation could be simulated. The results showed that the measurements could be matched very well providing the hydraulic properties are represented by a suitable model. For this, a trimodal parametrization of the underlying pore-size distribution was necessary which reflects three distinct pore systems of the Sphagnum constituted by inter-, intra-, and inner-plant water. While the traditional van Genuchten-Mualem model led to great discrepancies, the physically more comprehensive Peters-Durner-Iden model which accounts for capillary and noncapillary flow, led to a more consistent description of the observations. We conclude that the Richards equation is a valid process description for variably saturated moisture fluxes over a wide pressure range in peatlands supporting the conceptualization of the live moss as part of the vadose zone.

  5. Numerical modeling of temperature distributions within the neonatal head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leeuwen, G M; Hand, J W; Lagendijk, J J; Azzopardi, D V; Edwards, A D

    2000-09-01

    Introduction of hypothermia therapy as a neuroprotection therapy after hypoxia-ischemia in newborn infants requires appraisal of cooling methods. In this numerical study thermal simulations were performed to test the hypothesis that cooling of the surface of the cranium by the application of a cooling bonnet significantly reduces deep brain temperature and produces a temperature differential between the deep brain and the body core. A realistic three-dimensional (3-D) computer model of infant head anatomy was used, derived from magnetic resonance data from a newborn infant. Temperature distributions were calculated using the Pennes heatsink model. The cooling bonnet was at a constant temperature of 10 degrees C. When modeling head cooling only, a constant body core temperature of 37 degrees C was imposed. The computed result showed no significant cooling of the deep brain regions, only the very superficial regions of the brain are cooled to temperatures of 33-34 degrees C. Poor efficacy of head cooling was still found after a considerable increase in the modeled thermal conductivities of the skin and skull, or after a decrease in perfusion. The results for the heatsink thermal model of the infant head were confirmed by comparison of results computed for a scaled down adult head, using both the heatsink description and a discrete vessel thermal model with both anatomy and vasculature obtained from MR data. The results indicate that significant reduction in brain temperature will only be achieved if the infant's core temperature is lowered.

  6. Analysis of Grain Size Distribution and Hydraulic Conductivity for a Variety of Sediment Types with Application to Wadi Sediments

    KAUST Repository

    Rosas Aguilar, Jorge

    2013-05-01

    Grain size distribution, porosity, and hydraulic conductivity from over 400 unlithified sediment samples were analized. The measured hydraulic conductivity values were then compared to values calculated using 20 different empirical equations commonly used to estimate hydraulic conductivity from grain size analyses. It was found that most of the hydraulic conductivity values estimated from the empirical equations correlated very poorly to the measured hydraulic conductivity values. Modifications of the empirical equations, including changes to special coefficients and statistical off sets, were made to produce modified equations that considerably improve the hydraulic conductivity estimates from grain size data for beach, dune, off shore marine, and wadi sediments. Expected hydraulic conductivity estimation errors were reduced. Correction factors were proposed for wadi sediments, taking mud percentage and the standard deviation (in phi units) into account.

  7. Distributed optical fiber-based theoretical and empirical methods monitoring hydraulic engineering subjected to seepage velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Huaizhi; Tian, Shiguang; Cui, Shusheng; Yang, Meng; Wen, Zhiping; Xie, Wei

    2016-09-01

    In order to systematically investigate the general principle and method of monitoring seepage velocity in the hydraulic engineering, the theoretical analysis and physical experiment were implemented based on distributed fiber-optic temperature sensing (DTS) technology. During the coupling influence analyses between seepage field and temperature field in the embankment dam or dike engineering, a simplified model was constructed to describe the coupling relationship of two fields. Different arrangement schemes of optical fiber and measuring approaches of temperature were applied on the model. The inversion analysis idea was further used. The theoretical method of monitoring seepage velocity in the hydraulic engineering was finally proposed. A new concept, namely the effective thermal conductivity, was proposed referring to the thermal conductivity coefficient in the transient hot-wire method. The influence of heat conduction and seepage could be well reflected by this new concept, which was proved to be a potential approach to develop an empirical method monitoring seepage velocity in the hydraulic engineering.

  8. Head-mounted projective displays for creating distributed collaborative environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Jannick P.; Davis, Larry; Ha, Yonggang; Hamza-Lup, Felix G.; Del Vento, Benjamin; Gao, Chunyu; Hua, Hong; Biocca, Frank

    2002-08-01

    In this paper, we shall present an overview of research in augmented reality technology and applications conducted in collaboration with the 3DVIS Lab and the MIND Lab. We present research in the technology of head-mounted projective displays and tracking probes. We then review mathematical methods developed for augmented reality. Finally we discuss applications in medical augmented reality and point to current developments in distributed 3d collaborative environments.

  9. Flowing fluid electrical conductivity logging of a deep borehole during and following drilling: estimation of transmissivity, water salinity and hydraulic head of conductive zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Christine; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Rosberg, Jan-Erik; Juhlin, Christopher; Dobson, Patrick F.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2016-11-01

    Flowing fluid electrical conductivity (FFEC) logging is a hydrogeologic testing method that is usually conducted in an existing borehole. However, for the 2,500-m deep COSC-1 borehole, drilled at Åre, central Sweden, it was done within the drilling period during a scheduled 1-day break, thus having a negligible impact on the drilling schedule, yet providing important information on depths of hydraulically conductive zones and their transmissivities and salinities. This paper presents a reanalysis of this set of data together with a new FFEC logging data set obtained soon after drilling was completed, also over a period of 1 day, but with a different pumping rate and water-level drawdown. Their joint analysis not only results in better estimates of transmissivity and salinity in the conducting fractures intercepted by the borehole, but also yields the hydraulic head values of these fractures, an important piece of information for the understanding of hydraulic structure of the subsurface. Two additional FFEC logging tests were done about 1 year later, and are used to confirm and refine this analysis. Results show that from 250 to 2,000 m depths, there are seven distinct hydraulically conductive zones with different hydraulic heads and low transmissivity values. For the final test, conducted with a much smaller water-level drawdown, inflow ceased from some of the conductive zones, confirming that their hydraulic heads are below the hydraulic head measured in the wellbore under non-pumped conditions. The challenges accompanying 1-day FFEC logging are summarized, along with lessons learned in addressing them.

  10. Flowing fluid electrical conductivity logging of a deep borehole during and following drilling: estimation of transmissivity, water salinity and hydraulic head of conductive zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Christine; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Rosberg, Jan-Erik; Juhlin, Christopher; Dobson, Patrick F.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2017-03-01

    Flowing fluid electrical conductivity (FFEC) logging is a hydrogeologic testing method that is usually conducted in an existing borehole. However, for the 2,500-m deep COSC-1 borehole, drilled at Åre, central Sweden, it was done within the drilling period during a scheduled 1-day break, thus having a negligible impact on the drilling schedule, yet providing important information on depths of hydraulically conductive zones and their transmissivities and salinities. This paper presents a reanalysis of this set of data together with a new FFEC logging data set obtained soon after drilling was completed, also over a period of 1 day, but with a different pumping rate and water-level drawdown. Their joint analysis not only results in better estimates of transmissivity and salinity in the conducting fractures intercepted by the borehole, but also yields the hydraulic head values of these fractures, an important piece of information for the understanding of hydraulic structure of the subsurface. Two additional FFEC logging tests were done about 1 year later, and are used to confirm and refine this analysis. Results show that from 250 to 2,000 m depths, there are seven distinct hydraulically conductive zones with different hydraulic heads and low transmissivity values. For the final test, conducted with a much smaller water-level drawdown, inflow ceased from some of the conductive zones, confirming that their hydraulic heads are below the hydraulic head measured in the wellbore under non-pumped conditions. The challenges accompanying 1-day FFEC logging are summarized, along with lessons learned in addressing them.

  11. Subchondral bone density distribution in the human femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, David A.; Meguid, Michael; Lubovsky, Omri; Whyne, Cari M. [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Orthopaedic Biomechanics Laboratory, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    This study aims to quantitatively characterize the distribution of subchondral bone density across the human femoral head using a computed tomography derived measurement of bone density and a common reference coordinate system. Femoral head surfaces were created bilaterally for 30 patients (14 males, 16 females, mean age 67.2 years) through semi-automatic segmentation of reconstructed CT data and used to map bone density, by shrinking them into the subchondral bone and averaging the greyscale values (linearly related to bone density) within 5 mm of the articular surface. Density maps were then oriented with the center of the head at the origin, the femoral mechanical axis (FMA) aligned with the vertical, and the posterior condylar axis (PCA) aligned with the horizontal. Twelve regions were created by dividing the density maps into three concentric rings at increments of 30 from the horizontal, then splitting into four quadrants along the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral axes. Mean values for each region were compared using repeated measures ANOVA and a Bonferroni post hoc test, and side-to-side correlations were analyzed using a Pearson's correlation. The regions representing the medial side of the femoral head's superior portion were found to have significantly higher densities compared to other regions (p < 0.05). Significant side-to-side correlations were found for all regions (r {sup 2} = 0.81 to r {sup 2} = 0.16), with strong correlations for the highest density regions. Side-to-side differences in measured bone density were seen for two regions in the anterio-lateral portion of the femoral head (p < 0.05). The high correlation found between the left and right sides indicates that this tool may be useful for understanding 'normal' density patterns in hips affected by unilateral pathologies such as avascular necrosis, fracture, developmental dysplasia of the hip, Perthes disease, and slipped capital femoral head epiphysis. (orig.)

  12. Hydraulic architecture and photoinhibition influence spatial distribution of the arborescent palm Euterpe edulis in subtropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, M Genoveva; Campanello, Paula I; Villagra, Mariana; Montti, Lía; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2014-06-01

    Physiological characteristics of saplings can be considered one of the most basic constraints on species distribution. The shade-tolerant arborescent palm Euterpe edulis Mart. is endemic to the Atlantic Forest of Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay. At a local scale, saplings of this species growing in native forests are absent in gaps. We tested the hypothesis whether sensitivity to photoinhibition or hydraulic architecture constrains the distribution of E. edulis saplings in sun-exposed forest environments. Using shade houses and field studies, we evaluated growth, survival, hydraulic traits and the susceptibility of Photosystem II to photoinhibition in E. edulis saplings under different growth irradiances. Survival rates in exposed sites in the field were very low (a median of 7%). All saplings exhibited photoinhibition when exposed to high radiation levels, but acclimation to a high radiation environment increased the rate of recovery. Petiole hydraulic conductivity was similar across treatments regardless of whether it was expressed per petiole cross-sectional area or per leaf area. At the plant level, investment in conductive tissues relative to leaf area (Huber values) increased with increasing irradiance. Under high irradiance conditions, plants experienced leaf water potentials close to the turgor-loss point, and leaf hydraulic conductance decreased by 79% relative to its maximum value. Euterpe edulis saplings were able to adjust their photosynthetic traits to different irradiance conditions, whereas hydraulic characteristics at the leaf level did not change across irradiance treatments. Our results indicate that uncoupling between water demand and supply to leaves apparently associated with high resistances to water flow at leaf insertion points, in addition to small stems with low water storage capacity, weak stomatal control and high vulnerability of leaves to hydraulic dysfunction, are the main ecophysiological constraints that prevent the growth and

  13. Multilevel groundwater monitoring of hydraulic head and temperature in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho, 2007-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jason C.; Twining, Brian V.

    2011-01-01

    During 2007 and 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, collected quarterly depth-discrete measurements of fluid pressure and temperature in six boreholes located in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer of Idaho. Each borehole was instrumented with a multilevel monitoring system consisting of a series of valved measurement ports, packer bladders, casing segments, and couplers. Hydraulic heads (head) and water temperatures in boreholes were monitored at 86 hydraulically-isolated depth intervals located 448.0 to 1,377.6 feet below land surface. The calculation of head is most sensitive to fluid pressure and the altitude of the pressure transducer at each port coupling; it is least sensitive to barometric pressure and water temperature. An analysis of errors associated with the head calculation determined the accuracy of an individual head measurement at +/- 2.3 feet. Many of the sources of measurement error are diminished when considering the differences between two closely-spaced readings of head; therefore, a +/- 0.1 foot measurement accuracy was assumed for vertical head differences (and gradients) calculated between adjacent monitoring zones. Vertical head and temperature profiles were unique to each borehole, and were characteristic of the heterogeneity and anisotropy of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. The vertical hydraulic gradients in each borehole remained relatively constant over time with minimum Pearson correlation coefficients between head profiles ranging from 0.72 at borehole USGS 103 to 1.00 at boreholes USGS 133 and MIDDLE 2051. Major inflections in the head profiles almost always coincided with low permeability sediment layers. The presence of a sediment layer, however, was insufficient for identifying the location of a major head change in a borehole. The vertical hydraulic gradients were defined for the major inflections in the head profiles and were as much as 2.2 feet per foot. Head gradients

  14. Models for Unsaturated Hydraulic Conductivity Based on Truncated Lognormal Pore-size Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Malama, Bwalya

    2013-01-01

    We develop a closed-form three-parameter model for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity associated with a three-parameter lognormal model of moisture retention, which is based on lognormal grainsize distribution. The derivation of the model is made possible by a slight modification to the theory of Mualem. We extend the three-parameter lognormal distribution to a four-parameter model that also truncates the pore size distribution at a minimum pore radius. We then develop the corresponding four-parameter model for moisture retention and the associated closed-form expression for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The four-parameter model is fitted to experimental data, similar to the models of Kosugi and van Genuchten. The proposed four-parameter model retains the physical basis of Kosugi's model, while improving fit to observed data especially when simultaneously fitting pressure-saturation and pressure-conductivity data.

  15. Particle Swarm Optimization for Hydraulic Analysis of Water Distribution Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Moosavian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of flow in water-distribution networks with several pumps by the Content Model may be turned into a non-convex optimization uncertain problem with multiple solutions. Newton-based methods such as GGA are not able to capture a global optimum in these situations. On the other hand, evolutionary methods designed to use the population of individuals may find a global solution even for such an uncertain problem. In the present paper, the Content Model is minimized using the particle-swarm optimization (PSO technique. This is a population-based iterative evolutionary algorithm, applied for non-linear and non-convex optimization problems. The penalty-function method is used to convert the constrained problem into an unconstrained one. Both the PSO and GGA algorithms are applied to analyse two sample examples. It is revealed that while GGA demonstrates better performance in convex problems, PSO is more successful in non-convex networks. By increasing the penalty-function coefficient the accuracy of the solution may be improved considerably.

  16. Neutron Tomography Using Mobile Neutron Generators for Assessment of Void Distributions in Thermal Hydraulic Test Loops

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Peter; Bjelkenstedt, Tom; Andersson Sundén, Erik; Sjöstrand, Henrik; Jacobsson, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the lateral distribution of steam (void) and water in a nuclear fuel assembly is of great value for nuclear reactor operators and fuel manufacturers, with consequences for both reactor safety and economy of operation. Therefore, nuclear relevant two-phase flows are being studied at dedicated thermal-hydraulic test loop, using twophase flow systems ranging from simplified geometries such as heated circular pipes to full scale mock-ups of nuclear fuel assemblies. Neutron t...

  17. On the distribution of scaling hydraulic parameters in a spatially anisotropic banana field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regalado, Carlos M.

    2005-06-01

    When modeling soil hydraulic properties at field scale it is desirable to approximate the variability in a given area by means of some scaling transformations which relate spatially variable local hydraulic properties to global reference characteristics. Seventy soil cores were sampled within a drip irrigated banana plantation greenhouse on a 14×5 array of 2.5 m×5 m rectangles at 15 cm depth, to represent the field scale variability of flow related properties. Saturated hydraulic conductivity and water retention characteristics were measured in these 70 soil cores. van Genuchten water retention curves (WRC) with optimized m ( m≠1-1/ n) were fitted to the WR data and a general Mualem-van Genuchten model was used to predict hydraulic conductivity functions for each soil core. A scaling law, of the form ν=ανi*, was fitted to soil hydraulic data, such that the original hydraulic parameters νi were scaled down to a reference curve with parameters νi*. An analytical expression, in terms of Beta functions, for the average suction value, hc, necessary to apply the above scaling method, was obtained. A robust optimization procedure with fast convergence to the global minimum is used to find the optimum hc, such that dispersion is minimized in the scaled data set. Via the Box-Cox transformation P(τ)=(αiτ-1)/τ, Box-Cox normality plots showed that scaling factors for the suction ( αh) and hydraulic conductivity ( αk) were approximately log-normally distributed (i.e. τ=0), as it would be expected for such dynamic properties involving flow. By contrast static soil related properties as αθ were found closely Gaussian, although a power τ=3/4 was best for approaching normality. Application of four different normality tests (Anderson-Darling, Shapiro-Wilk, Kolmogorov-Smirnov and χ2 goodness-of-fit tests) rendered some contradictory results among them, thus suggesting that this widely extended practice is not recommended for providing a suitable probability

  18. Development of hydraulic power unit and accumulator charging circuit for electricity generation, storage and distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.N.Okoye; JIANG Ji-hai; LIU Hai-chang

    2008-01-01

    It is the purpose of the present paper to convert hydraulic energy to electric energy and saves both the pressure and electrical energy for re - use during the next system upstroke using two secondary units coupled to induction motor to drive cylinder loads. During upstroke operation, the variable pump/motor (P/M) driven by both electric motor and the second (P/M) works as hydraulic pump and output flow to the cylinders which drive the load. During load deceleration, the cylinders work as pump while the operation of the two secondary units are reversed, the variable (P/M) works as a motor generating a torque with the electric motor to drive the other(P/M) which transforms mechanical energy to hydraulic energy that is saved in the accumulator. When the en-ergy storage capacity of the accumulator is attained as the operation continues, energy storage to the accumulator is thermostatically stopped while the induction motor begins to work as a generator and generates electricity that is stored in the power distribution unit. Simulations were performed using a limited PT2 Block, I.e. 2nd-ordertransfer function with limitation of slope and signal output to determine suitable velocity of the cylinder which will match high performance and system stability. A mathematical model suited to the simulation of the hydrau-lic accumulator both in an open-or close-loop system is presented. The quest for improvement of lower energy capacity storage, saving and re-utilization of the conventional accumulator resulting in the short cycle time usage of hydraulic accumulators both in domestic and industrial purposes necessitates this research. The outcome of the research appears to be very efficient for generating fluctuation free electricity, power quality and reliability, energy saving/reutilization and system noise reduction.

  19. Classification of boar spermatozoid head images using a model intracellular density distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez, Lidia; Petkov, Nicolai; Alegre, Enrique; Sanfeliu, A; Cortes, ML

    2005-01-01

    We propose a novel classification method to identify boar spermatozoid heads which present an intracellular intensity distribution similar to a model. From semen sample images, head images are isolated and normalized. We define a model intensity distribution averaging a set of head images assumed as

  20. Design of Hydraulic Gauge Head of Differential Pressure Type and Parameter Optimization of the Gauge Head%差压式液压测头的设计及参数优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    母德强; 崔博; 范以撒; 陈懿

    2014-01-01

    The design and working principle of a hydraulic gauge head is intruced in this paper, which is based on the differential pressure-measuring principle with liquid as working media. With the help of CFX, the differential pres-sure system characteristics curves are plotted and the influence level of the structure parameters on working perfor-mance of the hydraulic gauge head is also analyzed. Bsides, the parameters of the gauge head are optimized.%提出一种以液体为工作介质,基于差压法的液压测头的设计和工作原理。利用CFX软件绘制了Δp-s工作曲线图,分析了各参数对液压测头工作性能的影响,对液压测头的几个重要参数进行了优化。

  1. FRACTAL SCALING OF PARTICLE AND PORE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS AND ITS RELATION TO SOIL HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BACCHI O.O.S.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractal scaling has been applied to soils, both for void and solid phases, as an approach to characterize the porous arrangement, attempting to relate particle-size distribution to soil water retention and soil water dynamic properties. One important point of such an analysis is the assumption that the void space geometry of soils reflects its solid phase geometry, taking into account that soil pores are lined by the full range of particles, and that their fractal dimension, which expresses their tortuosity, could be evaluated by the fractal scaling of particle-size distribution. Other authors already concluded that although fractal scaling plays an important role in soil water retention and porosity, particle-size distribution alone is not sufficient to evaluate the fractal structure of porosity. It is also recommended to examine the relationship between fractal properties of solids and of voids, and in some special cases, look for an equivalence of both fractal dimensions. In the present paper data of 42 soil samples were analyzed in order to compare fractal dimensions of pore-size distribution, evaluated by soil water retention curves (SWRC of soils, with fractal dimensions of soil particle-size distributions (PSD, taking the hydraulic conductivity as a standard variable for the comparison, due to its relation to tortuosity. A new procedure is proposed to evaluate the fractal dimension of pore-size distribution. Results indicate a better correlation between fractal dimensions of pore-size distribution and the hydraulic conductivity for this set of soils, showing that for most of the soils analyzed there is no equivalence of both fractal dimensions. For most of these soils the fractal dimension of particle-size distribution does not indicate properly the pore trace tortuosity. A better equivalence of both fractal dimensions was found for sandy soils.

  2. Use of Distribution Devices for Hydraulic Profiling of Coolant Flow in Core Gas-cooled Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Satin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In setting up a reactor plant for the transportation-power module of the megawatt class an important task is to optimize the path of flow, i.e. providing moderate hydraulic resistance, uniform distribution of the coolant. Significant contribution to the hydraulic losses makes one selected design of the coolant supplies. It is, in particular, hemispherical or semi-elliptical shape of the supply reservoir, which is selected to reduce its mass, resulting in the formation of torusshaped vortex in the inlet manifold, that leads to uneven coolant velocity at the inlet into the core, the flow pulsations, hydraulic losses.To control the flow redistribution in the core according to the level of energy are used the switchgear - deflectors installed in a hemispherical reservoir supplying coolant to the fuel elements (FE of the core of gas-cooled reactor. This design solution has an effect on the structure of the flow, rate in the cooling duct, and the flow resistance of the collector.In this paper we present the results of experiments carried out on the gas dynamic model of coolant paths, deflectors, and core, comprising 55 fuel rod simulators. Numerical simulation of flow in two-parameter model, using the k-ε turbulence model, and the software package ANSYS CFX v14.0 is performed. The paper demonstrates that experimental results are in compliance with calculated ones.The results obtained suggest that the use of switchgear ensures a coolant flow balance directly at the core inlet, thereby providing temperature reduction of fuel rods with a uniform power release in the cross-section. Considered options to find constructive solutions for deflectors give an idea to solve the problem of reducing hydraulic losses in the coolant paths, to decrease pulsation components of flow in the core and length of initial section of flow stabilization.

  3. A geostatistical methodology for the optimal design of space-time hydraulic head monitoring networks and its application to the Valle de Querétaro aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Júnez-Ferreira, H E; Herrera, G S

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for the optimal design of space-time hydraulic head monitoring networks and its application to the Valle de Querétaro aquifer in Mexico. The selection of the space-time monitoring points is done using a static Kalman filter combined with a sequential optimization method. The Kalman filter requires as input a space-time covariance matrix, which is derived from a geostatistical analysis. A sequential optimization method that selects the space-time point that minimizes a function of the variance, in each step, is used. We demonstrate the methodology applying it to the redesign of the hydraulic head monitoring network of the Valle de Querétaro aquifer with the objective of selecting from a set of monitoring positions and times, those that minimize the spatiotemporal redundancy. The database for the geostatistical space-time analysis corresponds to information of 273 wells located within the aquifer for the period 1970-2007. A total of 1,435 hydraulic head data were used to construct the experimental space-time variogram. The results show that from the existing monitoring program that consists of 418 space-time monitoring points, only 178 are not redundant. The implied reduction of monitoring costs was possible because the proposed method is successful in propagating information in space and time.

  4. Distributions of cranial pathologies provide evidence for head-butting in dome-headed dinosaurs (Pachycephalosauridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Joseph E; Dischler, Collin; Longrich, Nicholas R

    2013-01-01

    Pachycephalosaurids are small, herbivorous dinosaurs with domed skulls formed by massive thickening of the cranial roof. The function of the dome has been a focus of debate: the dome has variously been interpreted as the product of sexual selection, as an adaptation for species recognition, or as a weapon employed in intraspecific combat, where it was used in butting matches as in extant ungulates. This last hypothesis is supported by the recent identification of cranial pathologies in pachycephalosaurids, which appear to represent infections resulting from trauma. However, the frequency and distribution of pathologies have not been studied in a systematic fashion. Here, we show that pachycephalosaurids are characterized by a remarkably high incidence of cranial injury, where 22% of specimens have lesions on the dome. Frequency of injury shows no significant difference between different genera, but flat-headed morphs (here interpreted as juveniles or females) lack lesions. Mapping of injuries onto a digitial pachycephalosaurid skull shows that although lesions are distributed across the dome, they cluster near the apex, which is consistent with the hypothesis that the dome functioned for intraspecific butting matches.

  5. Locations, values, and uncertainties of hydraulic-head observations for the steady-state, prepumped period of the transient ground-water flow model, Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital geospatial data set contains the locations, values, and uncertainties of 700 hydraulic-head observations used in the steady-state, prepumped period of...

  6. P3-8: Eye Position Distribution Depending on Head Orientation in Natural Scene Viewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoichi Nakashima

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We usually move our body and head as well as eyes in order to obtain information from visual environments. Although several studies reported the coordination between eye and head movements, most of them used simple stimuli and/or conditions. In this study, we investigated relationships between eye movements and head orientations while viewing natural scene images in a large size of screen. We measured participants' eye positions and head orientations simultaneously during a natural scene image viewing (each image subtended about 53 × 41 deg, in which the participant on a chair moved their head and eyes naturally for 5 s. We analyzed the eye- and head-movement data to obtain frequency distribution of eye position as a function of head orientation. The results showed a clear correlation between horizontal eye position and horizontal head orientation. When the head pointed to the left or right, the peak frequency of eye position shifted also to the left or right (relative to the head, respectively, and when the head was centered, the peak of the frequency distribution for the eye position was also centered in the head. These results are consistent with our previous study in which a visual search task was performed (visual search for “T” among “L”s. In contrast, no correlation was found between vertical direction between the eye positions and head orientations. These findings suggest that the mechanism of head-eye coordination may function only horizontally at least under the present condition.

  7. Sludge accumulation and distribution impact the hydraulic performance in waste stabilisation ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggins, Liah X; Ghisalberti, Marco; Ghadouani, Anas

    2017-03-01

    Waste stabilisation ponds (WSPs) are used worldwide for wastewater treatment, and throughout their operation require periodic sludge surveys. Sludge accumulation in WSPs can impact performance by reducing the effective volume of the pond, and altering the pond hydraulics and wastewater treatment efficiency. Traditionally, sludge heights, and thus sludge volume, have been measured using low-resolution and labour intensive methods such as 'sludge judge' and the 'white towel test'. A sonar device, a readily available technology, fitted to a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) was shown to improve the spatial resolution and accuracy of sludge height measurements, as well as reduce labour and safety requirements. Coupled with a dedicated software package, the profiling of several WSPs has shown that the ROV with autonomous sonar device is capable of providing sludge bathymetry with greatly increased spatial resolution in a greatly reduced profiling time, leading to a better understanding of the role played by sludge accumulation in hydraulic performance of WSPs. The high-resolution bathymetry collected was used to support a much more detailed hydrodynamic assessment of systems with low, medium and high accumulations of sludge. The results of the modelling show that hydraulic performance is not only influenced by the sludge accumulation, but also that the spatial distribution of sludge plays a critical role in reducing the treatment capacity of these systems. In a range of ponds modelled, the reduction in residence time ranged from 33% in a pond with a uniform sludge distribution to a reduction of up to 60% in a pond with highly channelized flow. The combination of high-resolution measurement of sludge accumulation and hydrodynamic modelling will help in the development of frameworks for wastewater sludge management, including the development of more reliable computer models, and could potentially have wider application in the monitoring of other small to medium water bodies

  8. Evaluation of advanced hydraulic turbomachinery for underground pumped hydroelectric storage. Part 1. Single-stage regulated pump turbines for operating heads of 500 to 1000 m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigo, A.A.; Blomquist, C.A.; Degnan, J.R.

    1979-10-01

    High-head, large-capacity turbomachinery is needed for the concept of underground pumped hydroelectric storage to be technically and economically attractive. Single-stage, reversible, Francis-type pump turbines with adjustable wicket gates appear to offer the most economically attractive option for heads between about 500 and 1000 m. The feasibility of developing these types of machines for capacities up to 500 MW and operating heads up to 1000 m has been evaluated. Preliminary designs have been generated for six single-stage pump turbines. The designs are for capacities of 350 and 500 MW and for operating heads of 500, 750, and 1000 m. The report contains drawings of the machines along with material specifications and hydraulic performance data. Mechanical, hydraulic, and economic analyses indicate that these machines will behave according to the criteria used to design them and that they can be built at a reasonable cost. The stress and deflection responses of the 500-MW, 100-m-head pump turbine, determined by detailed finite element analysis techniques, give solid evidence of the integrity of the conceptual designs of the six units and indicate no unsolvable problems. Results of a life expectancy analysis of the wicket gates indicate that a near infinite life can be expected for these components when they are subjected to normal design loads. Efficiencies of 90.7 and 91.4% in the generating and pumping modes, respectively, can be expected for the 500-MW, 1000-m-head unit. Performances of the other five machines are comparable. The specific costs of the pump turbines in mid-1978 US dollars per kW vary from 19.2 to 11.8 over a head range of from 500 to 1000 m for the 500-MW machines and from 20.0 to 12.3 for the 350-MW machines.

  9. The method of distributions for dispersive transport in porous media with uncertain hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boso, Francesca; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    2016-06-01

    Predictions of solute transport in subsurface environments are notoriously unreliable due to aquifer heterogeneity and uncertainty about the values of hydraulic parameters. Probabilistic framework, which treats the relevant parameters and solute concentrations as random fields, allows for quantification of this predictive uncertainty. By providing deterministic equations for either probability density function or cumulative distribution function (CDF) of predicted concentrations, the method of distributions enables one to estimate, e.g., the probability of a contaminant's concentration exceeding a safe dose. We derive a deterministic equation for the CDF of solute concentration, which accounts for uncertainty in flow velocity and initial conditions. The coefficients in this equation are expressed in terms of the mean and variance of concentration. The accuracy and robustness of the CDF equations are analyzed by comparing their predictions with those obtained with Monte Carlo simulations and an assumed beta CDF.

  10. Multiobjective optimization of water distribution systems accounting for economic cost, hydraulic reliability, and greenhouse gas emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenyan; Maier, Holger R.; Simpson, Angus R.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, three objectives are considered for the optimization of water distribution systems (WDSs): the traditional objectives of minimizing economic cost and maximizing hydraulic reliability and the recently proposed objective of minimizing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It is particularly important to include the GHG minimization objective for WDSs involving pumping into storages or water transmission systems (WTSs), as these systems are the main contributors of GHG emissions in the water industry. In order to better understand the nature of tradeoffs among these three objectives, the shape of the solution space and the location of the Pareto-optimal front in the solution space are investigated for WTSs and WDSs that include pumping into storages, and the implications of the interaction between the three objectives are explored from a practical design perspective. Through three case studies, it is found that the solution space is a U-shaped curve rather than a surface, as the tradeoffs among the three objectives are dominated by the hydraulic reliability objective. The Pareto-optimal front of real-world systems is often located at the "elbow" section and lower "arm" of the solution space (i.e., the U-shaped curve), indicating that it is more economic to increase the hydraulic reliability of these systems by increasing pipe capacity (i.e., pipe diameter) compared to increasing pumping power. Solutions having the same GHG emission level but different cost-reliability tradeoffs often exist. Therefore, the final decision needs to be made in conjunction with expert knowledge and the specific budget and reliability requirements of the system.

  11. Statistical Approach to Boar Semen Evaluation Using Intracellular Intensity Distribution of Head Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez, L.; Petkov, N.; Alegre, E.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a method for the classification of boar sperm heads based on their intracellular intensity distributions observed in microscopic images. The image pre-processing comprises segmentation of cell heads and normalization for brightness, contrast and size. Next, we define a model distribution

  12. Reliability analysis of flood embankments taking into account a stochastic distribution of hydraulic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amabile Alessia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flooding is a worldwide phenomenon. Over the last few decades the world has experienced a rising number of devastating flood events and the trend in such natural disasters is increasing. Furthermore, escalations in both the probability and magnitude of flood hazards are expected as a result of climate change. Flood defence embankments are one of the major flood defence measures and reliability assessment for these structures is therefore a very important process. Routine hydro-mechanical models for the stability of flood embankments are based on the assumptions of steady-state through-flow and zero pore-pressures above the phreatic surface, i.e. negative capillary pressure (suction is ignored. Despite common belief, these assumptions may not always lead to conservative design. In addition, hydraulic loading is stochastic in nature and flood embankment stability should therefore be assessed in probabilistic terms. This cannot be accommodated by steady-state flow models. The paper presents an approach for reliability analysis of flood embankment taking into account the transient water through-flow. The factor of safety of the embankment is assessed in probabilistic terms based on a stochastic distribution for the hydraulic loading. Two different probabilistic approaches are tested to compare and validate the results.

  13. Multilevel groundwater monitoring of hydraulic head and temperature in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho, 2009–10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, Brian V.; Fisher, Jason C.

    2012-01-01

    During 2009 and 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey’s Idaho National Laboratory Project Office, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, collected quarterly, depth-discrete measurements of fluid pressure and temperature in nine boreholes located in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. Each borehole was instrumented with a multilevel monitoring system consisting of a series of valved measurement ports, packer bladders, casing segments, and couplers. Multilevel monitoring at the Idaho National Laboratory has been ongoing since 2006. This report summarizes data collected from three multilevel monitoring wells installed during 2009 and 2010 and presents updates to six multilevel monitoring wells. Hydraulic heads (heads) and groundwater temperatures were monitored from 9 multilevel monitoring wells, including 120 hydraulically isolated depth intervals from 448.0 to 1,377.6 feet below land surface. Quarterly head and temperature profiles reveal unique patterns for vertical examination of the aquifer’s complex basalt and sediment stratigraphy, proximity to aquifer recharge and discharge, and groundwater flow. These features contribute to some of the localized variability even though the general profile shape remained consistent over the period of record. Major inflections in the head profiles almost always coincided with low-permeability sediment layers and occasionally thick sequences of dense basalt. However, the presence of a sediment layer or dense basalt layer was insufficient for identifying the location of a major head change within a borehole without knowing the true areal extent and relative transmissivity of the lithologic unit. Temperature profiles for boreholes completed within the Big Lost Trough indicate linear conductive trends; whereas, temperature profiles for boreholes completed within the axial volcanic high indicate mostly convective heat transfer resulting from the vertical movement of groundwater. Additionally, temperature profiles

  14. Neutron Tomography Using Mobile Neutron Generators for Assessment of Void Distributions in Thermal Hydraulic Test Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, P.; Bjelkenstedt, T.; Sundén, E. Andersson; Sjöstrand, H.; Jacobsson-Svärd, S.

    Detailed knowledge of the lateral distribution of steam (void) and water in a nuclear fuel assembly is of great value for nuclear reactor operators and fuel manufacturers, with consequences for both reactor safety and economy of operation. Therefore, nuclear relevant two-phase flows are being studied at dedicated thermal-hydraulic test loop, using two-phase flow systems ranging from simplified geometries such as heated circular pipes to full scale mock-ups of nuclear fuel assemblies. Neutron tomography (NT) has been suggested for assessment of the lateral distribution of steam and water in such test loops, motivated by a good ability of neutrons to penetrate the metallic structures of metal pipes and nuclear fuel rod mock-ups, as compared to e.g. conventional X-rays, while the liquid water simultaneously gives comparatively good contrast. However, these stationary test loops require the measurement setup to be mobile, which is often not the case for NT setups. Here, it is acknowledged that fast neutrons of 14 MeV from mobile neutron generators constitute a viable option for a mobile NT system. We present details of the development of neutron tomography for this purpose at the division of Applied Nuclear Physics at Uppsala University. Our concept contains a portable neutron generator, exploiting the fusion reaction of deuterium and tritium, and a detector with plastic scintillator elements designed to achieveadequate spatial and energy resolution, all mounted in a light-weight frame without collimators or bulky moderation to allow for a mobile instrument that can be moved about the stationary thermal hydraulic test sections. The detector system stores event-to-event pulse-height information to allow for discrimination based on the energy deposition in the scintillator elements.

  15. Distribution of xylem hydraulic resistance in fruiting truss of tomato influenced by water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ieperen, W; Volkov, V S; Van Meeteren, U

    2003-01-01

    In this study xylem hydraulic resistances of peduncles (truss stalk), pedicels (fruit stalk) and the future abscission zone (AZ) halfway along the pedicel of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) plants were directly measured at different stages of fruit development, in plants grown under two levels of water availability in the root environment. The xylem hydraulic connection between shoot and fruits has previously been investigated, but contradictory conclusions were drawn about the presence of a flow resistance barrier in the pedicel. These conclusions were all based on indirect functional measurements and anatomical observations of water-conducting tissue in the pedicel. In the present study, by far the largest resistances were measured in the AZ where most individual vessels ended. Plants grown at low water availability in the root environment had xylem with higher hydraulic resistances in the peduncle and pedicel segments on both sides of the AZ, while the largest increase in hydraulic resistance was measured in the AZ. During fruit development hydraulic resistances in peduncle and pedicel segments decreased on both sides of the AZ, but tended to increase in the AZ. The overall xylem hydraulic resistance between the shoot and fruit tended to increase with fruit development because of the dominating role of the hydraulic resistance in the AZ. It is discussed whether the xylem hydraulic resistance in the AZ of tomato pedicels in response to water stress and during fruit development contributes to the hydraulic isolation of fruits from diurnal cycles of water stress in the shoot.

  16. Functional possibilities for forming different inverse population distributions in diode-side-pumped laser heads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grechin, S G; Nikolaev, P P; Sharandin, E A [N.E. Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-31

    The functional possibilities of diode-side-pumped laser heads of solid-state lasers for forming inverse population distributions of different types are analysed. The invariants determining the relationship between the laser head parameters upon scaling are found. The results of comparative experimental studies are presented. (lasers)

  17. Prediction of spatially variable unsaturated hydraulic conductivity using scaled particle-size distribution functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nasta, P.; Romano, N.; Assouline, S; Vrugt, J.A.; Hopmans, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous scaling of soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity functions provides an effective means to characterize the heterogeneity and spatial variability of soil hydraulic properties in a given study area. The statistical significance of this approach largely depends on the number of s

  18. Isotopic and Hydraulic Head Evidence for Cross-formational Leakage of Saline Water From the Rio Grande Alluvium to the Hueco Bolson Aquifer, Trans-Pecos Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbs, B. J.; Eastoe, C. J.; Bangs, E.; Reinert, S.

    2002-12-01

    The twin-cities of El Paso and Juarez share the water resources of the Hueco Bolson, a Tertiary and Quaternary basin fill aquifer that spans the international border. Artesian conditions existed in the El Paso-Juarez Valley during predevelopment times, and dilute groundwaters in the Hueco Bolson flowed upward and mixed with the mineralized water in the shallow Rio Grande alluvium (alluvial deposits less than 60 m thick). The hydraulic gradient has been reversed since predevelopment times by heavy municipal pumping in the Hueco Bolson aquifer, and many of the deeper wells in the El Paso-Juarez Valley have been retired due to salinity exceeding 1500 mg/L TDS. Previous studies based on groundwater modeling suggested that salinity increased in deeper wells due to induced leakage of saline water from the shallow Rio Grande alluvium. Hydrochemical, isotopic and hydraulic head data collected in this study support this model. Tritium levels in several deeper wells in the El Paso-Juarez Valley (screens set from 90 to 210 m) vary from 1.2 to 7.9 TU, indicating post-bomb water from leakage from the Rio Grande and Rio Grande alluvium. The hydraulic head gradient is oriented vertically downward between the alluvial and bolson aquifers, reaching 0.14 (27 m/189 m) in one well nest. Groundwater from the same well nest gives δ18O and δ2H values plotting along a mixing curve, representing evaporated and saline waters in shallow alluvial wells (-7.2 to -8.3 δ18O \\permil, -66 to -71 δ2H \\permil), meteoric and dilute waters in the deepest bolson well (-10.7 δ18O \\permil, -76 δ2H \\permil), and intermediate and mixed saline water in middle bolson wells (-9.8 to -10.3 δ18O \\permil, -76 to -77 δ2H \\permil).

  19. River delta network hydraulic residence time distributions and their role in coastal nutrient biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt, M. R.; Castaneda, E.; Twilley, R.; Hodges, B. R.; Passalacqua, P.

    2015-12-01

    River deltas have the potential to mitigate increased nutrient loading to coastal waters by acting as biofilters that reduce the impact of nutrient enrichment on downstream ecosystems. Hydraulic residence time (HRT) is known to be a major control on biogeochemical processes and deltaic floodplains are hypothesized to have relatively long HRTs. Hydrological connectivity and delta floodplain inundation induced by riverine forces, tides, and winds likely alter surface water flow patterns and HRTs. Since deltaic floodplains are important elements of delta networks and receive significant fluxes of water, sediment, and nutrients from distributary channels, biogeochemical transformations occurring within these zones could significantly reduce nutrient loading to coastal receiving waters. However, network-scale estimates of HRT in river deltas are lacking and little is known about the effects of tides, wind, and the riverine input on the HRT distribution. Subsequently, there lacks a benchmark for evaluating the impact of engineered river diversions on coastal nutrient ecology. In this study, we estimate the HRT of a coastal river delta by using hydrodynamic modeling supported by field data and relate the HRT to spatial and temporal patterns in nitrate levels measured at discrete stations inside a delta island at Wax Lake Delta. We highlight the control of the degree of hydrological connectivity between distributary channels and interdistributary islands on the network HRT distribution and address the roles of tides and wind on altering the shape of the distribution. We compare the observed nitrate concentrations to patterns of channel-floodplain hydrological connectivity and find this connectivity to play a significant role in the nutrient removal. Our results provide insight into the potential role of deltaic wetlands in reducing the nutrient loading to near-shore waters in response to large-scale river diversions.

  20. Comparative Analysis of CTF and Trace Thermal-Hydraulic Codes Using OECD/NRC PSBT Benchmark Void Distribution Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Avramova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The international OECD/NRC PSBT benchmark has been established to provide a test bed for assessing the capabilities of thermal-hydraulic codes and to encourage advancement in the analysis of fluid flow in rod bundles. The benchmark was based on one of the most valuable databases identified for the thermal-hydraulics modeling developed by NUPEC, Japan. The database includes void fraction and departure from nucleate boiling measurements in a representative PWR fuel assembly. On behalf of the benchmark team, PSU in collaboration with US NRC has performed supporting calculations using the PSU in-house advanced thermal-hydraulic subchannel code CTF and the US NRC system code TRACE. CTF is a version of COBRA-TF whose models have been continuously improved and validated by the RDFMG group at PSU. TRACE is a reactor systems code developed by US NRC to analyze transient and steady-state thermal-hydraulic behavior in LWRs and it has been designed to perform best-estimate analyses of LOCA, operational transients, and other accident scenarios in PWRs and BWRs. The paper presents CTF and TRACE models for the PSBT void distribution exercises. Code-to-code and code-to-data comparisons are provided along with a discussion of the void generation and void distribution models available in the two codes.

  1. Determination of important pipes segments in water distribution systems using the hydraulic vulnerability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Segalla Pizzolatti

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Water supply systems, due to their configuration, tend to be vulnerable to internal and external threats, which can potentially cause instability in water distribution. The vulnerability assessment is a tool that has been used to ensure the water supply in different failure scenarios, and can assist in seeking alternatives for supplying water in emergency situations. This work aimed mainly at determining the most important or critical segments for an adequate performance of the water supply system when there are emergency conditions such as the ones caused by natural disasters. The system’s hydraulic performance was evaluated based on simulations using EPANET 2.0. The vulnerability was determined by using an application written in Visual Basic 6.0 to customize EPANET using its Programmer's Toolkit. The system vulnerability was determined with the interruption of one segment at a time to calculate, in a dynamic way, the importance of each segment to the system, and by comparison of these results to the index of relative importance by flow rate. The results showed that using the indices Vulnerability-System and Vulnerability-Node was adequate to establish the importance of a critical segment in the performance of a network.

  2. Using a physically-based transit time distribution function to estimate the hydraulic parameters and hydraulic transit times of an unconfined aquifer from tritium measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farlin, Julien; Maloszewski, Piotr; Schneider, Wilfried; Gallé, Tom

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater transit time is of interest in environmental studies pertaining to the transport of pollutants from its source to the aquifer outlet (spring or pumping well) or to an observation well. Different models have been proposed to describe the distribution of transit times within groundwatersheds, the most common being the dispersion model, the exponential-piston-flow model (EPM) both proposed by Maloszewski and Zuber (Maloszewski and Zuber, 1982) and the (two or three parameter) gamma model (Amin and Campana, 1996; Kirchner et al., 1999). Choosing which function applies best is a recurrent and controversial problem in hydrogeology. The object of this study is to revisit the applicability of the EPM for unconfined aquifers, and to introduce an alternative model based explicitly on groundwater hydraulics. The alternative model is based on the transit time of water from any point at the groundwater table to the aquifer outlet, and is used to calculate inversely the hydraulic parameters of a fractured unconfined sandstone aquifer from tritium measurements made in a series of contact springs. This model is compared to the EPM, which is usually adopted to describe the transit time distribution of confined and unconfined aquifers alike. Both models are tested against observations, and it is shown that the EPM fails the test for some of the springs, and generally seems to overestimate the older water component. Amin, I. E., and M. E. Campana (1996), A general lumped parameter model for the interpretation of tracer data and transit time calculation in hydrologic systems, Journal of Hydrology, 179, 1-21, doi: 10.1016/0022-1694(95)02880-3. Kirchner, J. W., X. H. Feng, and C. Neal (1999), Fractal stream chemistry and its implications for contaminant transport in catchments, Nature physics, 403, 524-527, doi: 10.1038/35000537. Maloszewski, P., and A. Zuber (1982), Determining the turnover time of groundwater systems with the aid of environmental tracers, Journal of

  3. Inverse modelling of in situ soil water dynamics: investigating the effect of different prior distributions of the soil hydraulic parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Scharnagl

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In situ observations of soil water state variables under natural boundary conditions are often used to estimate the soil hydraulic properties. However, many contributions to the soil hydrological literature have demonstrated that the information content of such data is insufficient to accurately and precisely estimate all the soil hydraulic parameters. In this case study, we explored to which degree prior information about the soil hydraulic parameters can help improve parameter identifiability in inverse modelling of in situ soil water dynamics under natural boundary conditions. We used percentages of sand, silt, and clay as input variables to the ROSETTA pedotransfer function that predicts the parameters in the van Genuchten-Mualem (VGM model of the soil hydraulic functions. To derive additional information about the correlation structure of the predicted parameters, which is not readily provided by ROSETTA, we employed a Monte Carlo approach. We formulated three prior distributions that incorporate to different extents the prior information about the VGM parameters derived with ROSETTA. The inverse problem was posed in a formal Bayesian framework and solved using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC simulation with the DiffeRential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM algorithm. Synthetic and real-world soil water content data were used to illustrate the approach. The results of this study demonstrated that prior information about the soil hydraulic parameters significantly improved parameter identifiability and that this approach was effective and robust, even in case of biased prior information. To be effective and robust, however, it was essential to use a prior distribution that incorporates information about parameter correlation.

  4. Predicting Future Deterioration of Hydraulic Steel Structures with Markov Chain and Multivariate Samples of Statistical Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo A. Riveros

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Combined effects of several complex phenomena cause the deterioration of elements of steel hydraulic structures on the nation’s lock systems: loss of protective systems, corrosion, cracking and fatigue, impacts, and overloads. This paper presents examples of deterioration of steel hydraulic structures. A method for predicting future deterioration based on current conditions is also presented. This paper also includes a procedure for developing deterioration curves when condition state data is available.

  5. A modified nodal pressure method for calculating flow distribution in hydraulic circuits for the case of unconventional closing relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egor M. Mikhailovsky

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a method for numerically solving the problem of flow distribution in hydraulic circuits with lumped parameters for the case of random closing relations. The conventional and unconventional types of relations for the laws of isothermal steady fluid flow through the individual hydraulic circuit components are studied. The unconventional relations are presented by those given implicitly by the flow rate and dependent on the pressure of the working fluid. In addition to the unconventional relations, the formal conditions of applicability were introduced. These conditions provide a unique solution to the flow distribution problem. A new modified nodal pressure method is suggested. The method is more versatile in terms of the closing relation form as compared to the unmodified one, and has lower computational costs as compared to the known technique of double-loop iteration. The paper presents an analysis of the new method and its algorithm, gives a calculated example of a gas transportation network, and its results.

  6. Influence of hydraulic regimes on bacterial community structure and composition in an experimental drinking water distribution system

    OpenAIRE

    Douterelo, I.; Sharpe, R.L.; Boxall, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms formed on the inner-pipe surfaces of drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) can alter drinking water quality, particularly if they are mechanically detached from the pipe wall to the bulk water, such as due to changes in hydraulic conditions. Results are presented here from applying 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene to investigate the influence of different hydrological regimes on bacterial community structure and to study the potential mobilisatio...

  7. Method of Relating Grain Size Distribution to Hydraulic Conductivity in Dune Sands to Assist in Assessing Managed Aquifer Recharge Projects: Wadi Khulays Dune Field, Western Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Lopez Valencia, Oliver M.

    2015-11-12

    Planning for use of a dune field aquifer for managed aquifer recharge (MAR) requires that hydraulic properties need to be estimated over a large geographic area. Saturated hydraulic conductivity of dune sands is commonly estimated from grain size distribution data by employing some type of empirical equation. Over 50 samples from the Wadi Khulays dune field in Western Saudi Arabia were collected and the grain size distribution, porosity, and hydraulic conductivity were measured. An evaluation of 20 existing empirical equations showed a generally high degree of error in the predicted compared to the measured hydraulic conductivity values of these samples. Statistical analyses comparing estimated versus measured hydraulic conductivity demonstrated that there is a significant relationship between hydraulic conductivity and mud percentage (and skewness). The modified Beyer equation, which showed a generally low prediction error, was modified by adding a second term fitting parameter related to the mud concentration based on 25 of the 50 samples analyzed. An inverse optimization process was conducted to quantify the fitting parameter and a new empirical equation was developed. This equation was tested against the remaining 25 samples analyzed and produced an estimated saturated hydraulic conductivity with the lowest error of any empirical equation. This methodology can be used for large dune field hydraulic conductivity estimation and reduce planning costs for MAR systems.

  8. Method of Relating Grain Size Distribution to Hydraulic Conductivity in Dune Sands to Assist in Assessing Managed Aquifer Recharge Projects: Wadi Khulays Dune Field, Western Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver M. Lopez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Planning for use of a dune field aquifer for managed aquifer recharge (MAR requires that hydraulic properties need to be estimated over a large geographic area. Saturated hydraulic conductivity of dune sands is commonly estimated from grain size distribution data by employing some type of empirical equation. Over 50 samples from the Wadi Khulays dune field in Western Saudi Arabia were collected and the grain size distribution, porosity, and hydraulic conductivity were measured. An evaluation of 20 existing empirical equations showed a generally high degree of error in the predicted compared to the measured hydraulic conductivity values of these samples. Statistical analyses comparing estimated versus measured hydraulic conductivity demonstrated that there is a significant relationship between hydraulic conductivity and mud percentage (and skewness. The modified Beyer equation, which showed a generally low prediction error, was modified by adding a second term fitting parameter related to the mud concentration based on 25 of the 50 samples analyzed. An inverse optimization process was conducted to quantify the fitting parameter and a new empirical equation was developed. This equation was tested against the remaining 25 samples analyzed and produced an estimated saturated hydraulic conductivity with the lowest error of any empirical equation. This methodology can be used for large dune field hydraulic conductivity estimation and reduce planning costs for MAR systems.

  9. Distribution of xylem hydraulic resistance in fruiting truss of tomato influenced by water stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ieperen, van W.; Volkov, V.S.; Meeteren, van U.

    2003-01-01

    In this study xylem hydraulic resistances of peduncles (truss stalk), pedicels (fruit stalk) and the future abscission zone (AZ) halfway along the pedicel of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) plants were directly measured at different stages of fruit development, in plants grown under two levels o

  10. Unusually extensive head trauma in a hydraulic elevator accident: post-mortem MSCT findings, autopsy results and scene reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Christina; Schön, Corinna A; Kneubuehl, Beat; Thali, Michael J; Aghayev, Emin

    2008-10-01

    Accidental or intentional falls from a height are a form of blunt trauma and occur frequently in forensic medicine. Reports describing elevator accidents as a small subcategory of falls from heights are rare in the medical literature and no report on injury patterns or scene reconstruction of such an accident was found. A case of an accident in a hydraulic elevator with a man falling 3m was examined using post-mortem multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) and autopsy. The man suffered an unusually extensive trauma and died at the scene. Post-mortem MSCT examination showed a comminute fracture of the skull, the right femur and the first lumbar vertebra. Severe lacerations of the brain with epidural, subdural and subarachnoidal haemorrhages over both hemispheres were diagnosed. Autopsy confirmed these findings. To reconstruct the accident we used radiological and autopsy results as well as findings at the scene.

  11. Head/tail Breaks: A New Classification Scheme for Data with a Heavy-tailed Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Bin

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a new classification scheme - head/tail breaks - in order to find groupings or hierarchy for data with a heavy-tailed distribution. The heavy-tailed distributions are heavily right skewed, with a minority of large values in the head and a majority of small values in the tail, commonly characterized by a power law, a lognormal or an exponential function. For example, a country's population is often distributed in such a heavy-tailed manner, with a minority of people (e.g., 20 percent) in the countryside and the vast majority (e.g., 80 percent) in urban areas. This heavy-tailed distribution is also called scaling, hierarchy or scaling hierarchy. This new classification scheme partitions all of the data values around the mean into two parts and continues the process iteratively for the values (above the mean) in the head until the head part values are no longer heavy-tailed distributed. Thus, the number of classes and the class intervals are both naturally determined. We therefore claim tha...

  12. The distribution of some intrinsic parameters of head-tail radio sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, E. A.

    1979-01-01

    The properties of a sample comprising 44 head-tail galaxies for which radio observations have been published are presented. The distributions of the absolute photographic magnitude, the radio power at 610 MHz, and opening-angle of these sources are presented confirming the results of Owen and

  13. The distribution of some intrinsic parameters of head-tail radio sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, E. A.

    1979-01-01

    The properties of a sample comprising 44 head-tail galaxies for which radio observations have been published are presented. The distributions of the absolute photographic magnitude, the radio power at 610 MHz, and opening-angle of these sources are presented confirming the results of Owen and Rudnic

  14. Design of an Attitude and Heading Reference System Based on Distributed Filtering for Small UAV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A development procedure for a low-cost attitude and heading reference system (AHRS based on the distributed filter has been proposed. The AHRS consists of three single-axis accelerometers, three single-axis gyroscopes, and one 3-axis digital compass. The initial attitude estimation is readily accomplished by using the complementary filtering. The attitude estimation for UAV flying in the real time is realized by using the three low orders EKF. The validation results show that the estimated orientations of the developed AHRS are within the acceptable region, and AHRS can give a stabilized attitude and heading information for a long time.

  15. Real-time dynamic hydraulic model for water distribution networks: steady state modelling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osman, Mohammad S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Osman2_2016.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 17244 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Osman2_2016.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 REAL-TIME DYNAMIC HYDRAULIC MODEL... of specially developed methods which have been published and hence are not further discussed. ∆PfP is the pressure loss due to pipe friction and determined from Darcy-Weisbach equation (5):  2000 ' 2 D LufPfP  (5) 'f is the friction factor L...

  16. Plasma distributions in meteor head echoes and implications for radar cross section interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Robert A.; Brown, Peter; Close, Sigrid

    2017-09-01

    The derivation of meteoroid masses from radar measurements requires conversion of the measured radar cross section (RCS) to meteoroid mass. Typically, this conversion passes first through an estimate of the meteor plasma density derived from the RCS. However, the conversion from RCS to meteor plasma density requires assumptions on the radial electron density distribution. We use simultaneous triple-frequency measurements of the RCS for 63 large meteor head echoes to derive estimates of the meteor plasma size and density using five different possible radial electron density distributions. By fitting these distributions to the observed meteor RCS values and estimating the goodness-of-fit, we determine that the best fit to the data is a 1 /r2 plasma distribution, i.e. the electron density decays as 1 /r2 from the center of the meteor plasma. Next, we use the derived plasma distributions to estimate the electron line density q for each meteor using each of the five distributions. We show that depending on the choice of distribution, the line density can vary by a factor of three or more. We thus argue that a best estimate for the radial plasma distribution in a meteor head echo is necessary in order to have any confidence in derived meteoroid masses.

  17. Energy efficient distributed cluster head scheduling scheme for two tiered wireless sensor network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kannan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Network (WSN provides a significant contribution in the emerging fields such as ambient intelligence and ubiquitous computing. In WSN, optimization and load balancing of network resources are critical concern to provide the intelligence for long duration. Since clustering the sensor nodes can significantly enhance overall system scalability and energy efficiency this paper presents a distributed cluster head scheduling (DCHS algorithm to achieve the network longevity in WSN. The major novelty of this work is that the network is divided into primary and secondary tiers based on received signal strength indication of sensor nodes from the base station. The proposed DCHS supports for two tier WSN architecture and gives suggestion to elect the cluster head nodes and gateway nodes for both primary and secondary tiers. The DCHS mechanism satisfies an ideal distribution of the cluster head among the sensor nodes and avoids frequent selection of cluster head, based on Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI and residual energy level of the sensor nodes. Since the RSSI is the key parameter for this paper, the practical experiment was conducted to measure RSSI value by using MSP430F149 processor and CC2500 transceiver. The measured RSSI values were given input to the event based simulator to test the DCHS mechanism. The real time experimental study validated the proposed scheme for various scenarios.

  18. Influence of hydraulic regimes on bacterial community structure and composition in an experimental drinking water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douterelo, I; Sharpe, R L; Boxall, J B

    2013-02-01

    Microbial biofilms formed on the inner-pipe surfaces of drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) can alter drinking water quality, particularly if they are mechanically detached from the pipe wall to the bulk water, such as due to changes in hydraulic conditions. Results are presented here from applying 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene to investigate the influence of different hydrological regimes on bacterial community structure and to study the potential mobilisation of material from the pipe walls to the network using a full scale, temperature-controlled experimental pipeline facility accurately representative of live DWDS. Analysis of pyrosequencing and water physico-chemical data showed that habitat type (water vs. biofilm) and hydraulic conditions influenced bacterial community structure and composition in our experimental DWDS. Bacterial community composition clearly differed between biofilms and bulk water samples. Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria were the most abundant phyla in biofilms while Alphaproteobacteria was predominant in bulk water samples. This suggests that bacteria inhabiting biofilms, predominantly species belonging to genera Pseudomonas, Zooglea and Janthinobacterium, have an enhanced ability to express extracellular polymeric substances to adhere to surfaces and to favour co-aggregation between cells than those found in the bulk water. Highest species richness and diversity were detected in 28 days old biofilms with this being accentuated at highly varied flow conditions. Flushing altered the pipe-wall bacterial community structure but did not completely remove bacteria from the pipe walls, particularly under highly varied flow conditions, suggesting that under these conditions more compact biofilms were generated. This research brings new knowledge regarding the influence of different hydraulic regimes on the composition and structure of bacterial communities within DWDS and the implication that this

  19. Study on the distribution of strata rock temperature around a driving head with auxiliary ventilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jian-liang

    2004-01-01

    The distributions of strata rock temperature around a driving head with auxiliary ventilation were analyzed theoretically based on a program which was developed by the authors to predict the thermal environmental conditions in a development heading with forcing auxiliary ventilation. The influences of wetnessof the airway surface were discussed on the cooled zone of the strata rock and on the temperature distribution in the surrounding rock. It is shown that the advancing speed and driving time have little influence on the temperature profile in front of the working face of a driving airway, and the rock temperature 1.5 m ahead of the working face can be taken as the virgin rock temperature.

  20. A Numerical Method for the Estimation of Distributed Hydraulic Conductivity Using Richards Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockett, R.; Haber, E.

    2013-12-01

    Characterizing groundwater flow in the vadose zone has many important and practical applications in near surface hydrogeology. The spatial estimation of the hydraulic conductivity function, which is the regulator of unsaturated groundwater flow, is an critical step in any hydrogeologic site characterization. However, this estimation is difficult and simplifications are consistently used to avert these conceptual and computational difficulties. Comprehensive time-lapse data of in situ saturations, or proxies of saturation from geophysical methods, are increasingly available. Using these large data sets appropriately, and maximizing the utility of the data to recover estimates of heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity, requires innovative numerical methods. This inverse problem has been approached in many different ways in the literature from stochastic methods to various gradient based methods. However, the way in which the computational complexity of the inverse method scales becomes important as problem size increases; as computational memory and time often become the bottleneck of solving the inverse problem when the problem is solved for heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity in two- and particularly in three-dimensions. For the inverse problem involving Richards equation, some version of a Gauss-Newton method (e.g. Levenberg-Marquardt) with a direct calculation of the sensitivity matrix is commonly used. However, while these approaches allow to deal with moderate scale problems they have one major drawback: the sensitivity matrix is a large dense matrix and its computation requires dense linear algebra and, for large scale problems, a non-trivial amount of storage. Furthermore, previous work use either numerical or automatic differentiation in order to compute the sensitivity matrix and this can generate inaccuracies in its computation and tarry convergence of the optimization algorithm. We suggest a modern numerical method that allows for the solution of the

  1. spatial distribution pattern of the steppe toad-headed lizard (phrynocephalus frontalis) and its influencing factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    spatial distribution patterns are associated with life history and behavioral adaptations of animals.for studying the spatial distribution pattern of the steppe toad-headed lizard (phrynocephalusfrontalis) and its influencing factors,we conducted experiments in hunshandake sandy land in inner mongolia,china in july 2009.by calculating the clustered indices,we found that the lizard was aggregately distributed when the sampling quadrat was smaller than 10 m × 10 m,and uniformly distributed when it was greater than 10 m × 10 m.the nearest neighbor rule showed a clustering distribution pattern for p frontalis and the distribution pattern was quadrat-sampling dependent.furthermore,the cluster was determined by environmental factors when the sampling quadrat was smaller than 20 m × 20 m,but it was determined by both environmental factors and characteristics of the lizard when it was larger than 20 m × 20 m.our results suggested that the steppe toad-headed lizards tended to aggregate into suitable habitat patches in desert areas.additionally,we discussed that the lizard aggregation could be potentially used as an indictor of movement of sand dunes.

  2. Biofilm structures (EPS and bacterial communities) in drinking water distribution systems are conditioned by hydraulics and influence discolouration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, K; Osborn, A M; Boxall, J B

    2017-03-27

    High-quality drinking water from treatment works is degraded during transport to customer taps through the Drinking Water Distribution System (DWDS). Interactions occurring at the pipe wall-water interface are central to this degradation and are often dominated by complex microbial biofilms that are not well understood. This study uses novel application of confocal microscopy techniques to quantify the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and cells of DWDS biofilms together with concurrent evaluation of the bacterial community. An internationally unique, full-scale, experimental DWDS facility was used to investigate the impact of three different hydraulic patterns upon biofilms and subsequently assess their response to increases in shear stress, linking biofilms to water quality impacts such as discolouration. Greater flow variation during growth was associated with increased cell quantity but was inversely related to EPS-to-cell volume ratios and bacterial diversity. Discolouration was caused and EPS was mobilised during flushing of all conditions. Ultimately, biofilms developed under low-varied flow conditions had lowest amounts of biomass, the greatest EPS volumes per cell and the lowest discolouration response. This research shows that the interactions between hydraulics and biofilm physical and community structures are complex but critical to managing biofilms within ageing DWDS infrastructure to limit water quality degradation and protect public health.

  3. 超低水头水轮机流动数值模拟及水力性能研究%Research on Flow Numerical Simulation and Hydraulic Performance of Ultra Low-head Water Turbine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖惠民

    2013-01-01

    In order to develop economical and practical ultra low-head turbine (the net head low than 5m),the internal flow of ultra low-head water turbine with utilization of water and wave energy for generation is simulated by using computational fluid dynamics technology.The efficiency of the entire turbine is predicted and the hydraulic characteristics of the ultra low-head water turbine are analyzed.In the 1.5-5m head range,numerical simulations show that the ultra low-head water turbine has relatively high and slowly changing efficiency,and its output power basically depends on the head.%为开发经济实用超低水头(净水头低于5 m)的水轮机,基于流体动力学理论对可应用于水能、波浪能发电的某超低水头水轮机进行了内部流动数值模拟及性能预测,并分析了水头和转速特性.结果表明,在1.5~5.0m水头范围内,水轮机效率较高,变化平稳,输出功率主要取决于水头.

  4. Weighted recalibration of the Rosetta pedotransfer model with improved estimates of hydraulic parameter distributions and summary statistics (Rosetta3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yonggen; Schaap, Marcel G.

    2017-04-01

    Pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have been widely used to predict soil hydraulic parameters in favor of expensive laboratory or field measurements. Rosetta (Schaap et al., 2001, denoted as Rosetta1) is one of many PTFs and is based on artificial neural network (ANN) analysis coupled with the bootstrap re-sampling method which allows the estimation of van Genuchten water retention parameters (van Genuchten, 1980, abbreviated here as VG), saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), and their uncertainties. In this study, we present an improved set of hierarchical pedotransfer functions (Rosetta3) that unify the water retention and Ks submodels into one. Parameter uncertainty of the fit of the VG curve to the original retention data is used in the ANN calibration procedure to reduce bias of parameters predicted by the new PTF. One thousand bootstrap replicas were used to calibrate the new models compared to 60 or 100 in Rosetta1, thus allowing the uni-variate and bi-variate probability distributions of predicted parameters to be quantified in greater detail. We determined the optimal weights for VG parameters and Ks, the optimal number of hidden nodes in ANN, and the number of bootstrap replicas required for statistically stable estimates. Results show that matric potential-dependent bias was reduced significantly while root mean square error (RMSE) for water content were reduced modestly; RMSE for Ks was increased by 0.9% (H3w) to 3.3% (H5w) in the new models on log scale of Ks compared with the Rosetta1 model. It was found that estimated distributions of parameters were mildly non-Gaussian and could instead be described rather well with heavy-tailed α-stable distributions. On the other hand, arithmetic means had only a small estimation bias for most textures when compared with the mean-like ;shift; parameter of the α-stable distributions. Arithmetic means and (co-)variances are therefore still recommended as summary statistics of the estimated distributions. However, it

  5. Management of a water distribution network by coupling GIS and hydraulic modeling: a case study of Chetouane in Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelbaki, Chérifa; Benchaib, Mohamed Mouâd; Benziada, Salim; Mahmoudi, Hacène; Goosen, Mattheus

    2016-04-01

    For more effective management of water distribution network in an arid region, Mapinfo GIS (8.0) software was coupled with a hydraulic model (EPANET 2.0) and applied to a case study region, Chetouane, situated in the north-west of Algeria. The area is characterized not only by water scarcity but also by poor water management practices. The results showed that a combination of GIS and modeling permits network operators to better analyze malfunctions with a resulting more rapid response as well as facilitating in an improved understanding of the work performed on the network. The grouping of GIS and modeling as an operating tool allows managers to diagnosis a network, to study solutions of problems and to predict future situations. The later can assist them in making informed decisions to ensure an acceptable performance level for optimal network operation.

  6. Management of a water distribution network by coupling GIS and hydraulic modeling: a case study of Chetouane in Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelbaki, Chérifa; Benchaib, Mohamed Mouâd; Benziada, Salim; Mahmoudi, Hacène; Goosen, Mattheus

    2017-06-01

    For more effective management of water distribution network in an arid region, Mapinfo GIS (8.0) software was coupled with a hydraulic model (EPANET 2.0) and applied to a case study region, Chetouane, situated in the north-west of Algeria. The area is characterized not only by water scarcity but also by poor water management practices. The results showed that a combination of GIS and modeling permits network operators to better analyze malfunctions with a resulting more rapid response as well as facilitating in an improved understanding of the work performed on the network. The grouping of GIS and modeling as an operating tool allows managers to diagnosis a network, to study solutions of problems and to predict future situations. The later can assist them in making informed decisions to ensure an acceptable performance level for optimal network operation.

  7. In-situ falling-head test for hydraulic conductivity: Evaluation in layered sediments of an analysis derived for homogenous sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnette, Matthew C.; Genereux, David P.; Birgand, François

    2016-08-01

    The hydraulic conductivity (K) of streambeds is a critical variable controlling interaction of groundwater and surface water. The Hvorslev analysis for estimating K from falling-head test data has been widely used since the 1950s, but its performance in layered sandy sediments common in streams and lakes has not previously been examined. Our numerical simulations and laboratory experiments show that the Hvorslev analysis yields accurate K values in both homogenous sediment (for which the analysis was originally derived) and layered deposits with low-K sand over high-K sand. K from the Hvorslev analysis deviated significantly from true K only when two conditions were present together: (1) high-K sand was present over low-K sand, and (2) the bottom of the permeameter in which K was measured was at or very near the interface between high-K and low-K. When this combination of conditions exists, simulation and laboratory sand tank results show that in-situ Hvorslev K underestimates the true K of the sediment within a permeameter, because the falling-head test is affected by low-K sediment outside of (below the bottom of) the permeameter. In simulation results, the maximum underestimation (occurring when the bottom of the permeameter was at the interface of high K over low K) was by a factor of 0.91, 0.59, and 0.12 when the high-K to low-K ratio was 2, 10, and 100, respectively. In laboratory sand tank experiments, the underestimation was by a factor of about 0.83 when the high-K to low-K ratio was 2.3. Also, this underestimation of K by the Hvorslev analysis was about the same whether the underlying low-K layer was 2 cm or 174 cm thick (1% or 87% of the domain thickness). Numerical model simulations were useful in the interpretation of in-situ field K profiles at streambed sites with layering; specifically, scaling the model results to the maximum measured K at the top of the field K profiles helped constrain the likely ratio of high K to low K at field locations with

  8. Evaluation of electric field distribution in electromagnetic stimulation of human femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yukun; Souffrant, Robert; Kluess, Daniel; Ellenrieder, Martin; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; van Rienen, Ursula; Bader, Rainer

    2014-12-01

    Electromagnetic stimulation is a common therapy used to support bone healing in the case of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. In the present study, we investigated a bipolar induction screw system with an integrated coil. The aim was to analyse the influence of the screw parameters on the electric field distribution in the human femoral head. In addition, three kinds of design parameters (the shape of the screw tip, position of the screw in the femoral head, and size of the screw insulation) were varied. The electric field distribution in the bone was calculated using the finite element software Comsol Multiphysics. Moreover, a validation experiment was set up for an identical bone specimen with an implanted screw. The electric potential of points inside and on the surface of the bone were measured and compared to numerical data. The electric field distribution within the bone was clearly changed by the different implant parameters. Repositioning the screw by a maximum of 10 mm and changing the insulation length by a maximum of 4 mm resulted in electric field volume changes of 16% and 7%, respectively. By comparing the results of numerical simulation with the data of the validation experiment, on average, the electric potential difference of 19% and 24% occurred when the measuring points were at a depth of approximately 5 mm within the femoral bone and directly on the surface of the femoral bone, respectively. The results of the numerical simulations underline that the electro-stimulation treatment of bone in clinical applications can be influenced by the implant parameters. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Hydraulic model analysis of water distribution system, Rockwell International, Rocky Flats, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perstein, J.; Castellano, J.A. [Hughes Associates, Inc., Wheaton, MD (United States)

    1989-01-20

    Rockwell International requested an analysis of the existing plant site water supply distribution system at Rocky Flats, Colorado, to determine its adequacy. On September 26--29, 1988, Hughes Associates, Inc., Fire Protection Engineers, accompanied by Rocky Flats Fire Department engineers and suppression personnel, conducted water flow tests at the Rocky Flats plant site. Thirty-seven flows from various points throughout the plant site were taken on the existing domestic supply/fire main installation to assure comprehensive and thorough representation of the Rocky Flats water distribution system capability. The analysis was completed in four phases which are described, together with a summary of general conclusions and recommendations.

  10. Water Treatment Technology - Hydraulics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on hydraulics provides instructional materials for three competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: head loss in pipes in series, function loss in…

  11. Estimation of electrical conductivity distribution within the human head from magnetic flux density measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Nuo; Zhu, S A; He, Bin

    2005-06-01

    We have developed a new algorithm for magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT), which uses only one component of the magnetic flux density to reconstruct the electrical conductivity distribution within the body. The radial basis function (RBF) network and simplex method are used in the present approach to estimate the conductivity distribution by minimizing the errors between the 'measured' and model-predicted magnetic flux densities. Computer simulations were conducted in a realistic-geometry head model to test the feasibility of the proposed approach. Single-variable and three-variable simulations were performed to estimate the brain-skull conductivity ratio and the conductivity values of the brain, skull and scalp layers. When SNR = 15 for magnetic flux density measurements with the target skull-to-brain conductivity ratio being 1/15, the relative error (RE) between the target and estimated conductivity was 0.0737 +/- 0.0746 in the single-variable simulations. In the three-variable simulations, the RE was 0.1676 +/- 0.0317. Effects of electrode position uncertainty were also assessed by computer simulations. The present promising results suggest the feasibility of estimating important conductivity values within the head from noninvasive magnetic flux density measurements.

  12. Investigation of elemental distribution in human femoral head by PIXE and SRXRF microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.X. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)]. E-mail: yxzhang@sinap.ac.cn; Wang, Y.S. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)]. E-mail: wangyinsong@sinap.ac.cn; Zhang, Y.P. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)]. E-mail: zhangyongping@sinap.ac.cn; Zhang, G.L. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)]. E-mail: zhangguilin@sinap.ac.cn; Huang, Y.Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China)]. E-mail: huangyy@mail.ihep.ac.cn; He, W. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China)]. E-mail: hew@mail.ihep.ac.cn

    2007-07-15

    In order to study the distribution and possible degenerative processes inducing the loss of inorganic substances in bone and to provide a scientific basis for the prevention and therapy of osteoporosis, proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method is used for the determination of elemental concentrations in femoral heads from five autopsies and seven patients with femoral neck fractures. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) microprobe analysis technique is used to scan a slice of the femoral head from its periphery to its center, via cartilage, compact and spongy zones. The specimen preparation and experiment procedure are described in detail. The results show that the concentrations of P, Ca, Fe, Cu, Sr in the control group are higher than those in the patient group, but the concentrations of S, K, Zn, Mn are not significantly different. The quantitative results of elemental distribution, such as Ca, P, K, Fe, Zn, Sr and Pb in bone slice tissue including cartilage, substantial compact and substantial spongy, are investigated. The data obtained show that the concentrations of Ca, P, K, (the major elements of bone composition), are obviously low in both spongy and cartilage zones in the patient group, but there are no remarkable differences in the compact zone. Combined with the correlations between P, K, Zn, Sr and Ca, the loss mechanism of minerals and the physiological functions of some metal elements in bone are also discussed.

  13. Flow Forecasting in Urban Drainage Systems using Deterministic Updating of Water Levels in Distributed Hydraulic Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lisbeth S.; Borup, Morten; Møller, A.;

    2011-01-01

    the performance of the updating procedure for flow forecasting. Measured water levels in combination with rain gauge input are used as basis for the evaluation. When compared to simulations without updating, the results show that it is possible to obtain an improvement in the 20 minute forecast of the water level...... to eliminate some of the unavoidable discrepancies between model and reality. The latter can partly be achieved by using the commercial tool MOUSE UPDATE, which is capable of inserting measured water levels from the system into the distributed, physically based MOUSE model. This study evaluates and documents...

  14. A study of the key problem of optimum hydraulic design for a pump system with low head%低扬程泵装置优化水力设计的关键问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐磊; 陆林广; 梁金栋; 王刚; 董雷

    2012-01-01

    An in-depth study on the problem of optimum hydraulic design for a pump system with low head has been made in this paper. The efficiency of a pump system with low head is divided into two aspects: one is pump efficiency and the other is conduit efficiency. Some problems about the definition of pump segment in the pump system, efficiency modification for the pump segment and flow pattern of inlet conduit in the pump system are discussed. The influence of conduit hydraulic loss on the conduit efficiency and pump system efficiency is analyzed and the influence of both flow velocity and flow pattern on the conduit hydraulic loss is illustrated by calculation samples, from which the conclusions are drawn as follows: under the condition of low head, the key problem of how to increase the pump system efficiency is to reduce the conduit hydraulic loss as much as possible; The essential way to reduce the conduit hydraulic loss may be to lower the flow velocity and improve the flow pattern in the conduit. The approaches to reduce the conduit hydraulic loss mainly include: to choose the type of pump system and conduit with the optimal hydraulic performance, to suitably lower pump nD value, to choose better pump model, to suitably relax the restrictions for conduit control size, and to sufficiently optimize hydraulic design for conduit shape.%对低扬程泵装置的优化水力设计问题进行了较为深入的研究.将低扬程泵装置效率分解为水泵效率和流道效率两个方面,讨论了泵装置中泵段的概念和泵段效率的修正等问题,分析了流道水力损失对流道效率及泵装置效率的影响,通过实例说明了流道内的流速和流态对流道水力损失的影响,得到以下结论:在低扬程条件下,尽可能减小流道水力损失是提高泵装置效率的关键;减小流道水力损失的关键是降低流道内的流速和改善流道内的流态,其途径主要包括选择水力性能最优的泵装置型式和流道

  15. The estimation of 3D SAR distributions in the human head from mobile phone compliance testing data for epidemiological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wake, Kanako; Varsier, Nadège; Watanabe, Soichi; Taki, Masao; Wiart, Joe; Mann, Simon; Deltour, Isabelle; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2009-10-01

    A worldwide epidemiological study called 'INTERPHONE' has been conducted to estimate the hypothetical relationship between brain tumors and mobile phone use. In this study, we proposed a method to estimate 3D distribution of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the human head due to mobile phone use to provide the exposure gradient for epidemiological studies. 3D SAR distributions due to exposure to an electromagnetic field from mobile phones are estimated from mobile phone compliance testing data for actual devices. The data for compliance testing are measured only on the surface in the region near the device and in a small 3D region around the maximum on the surface in a homogeneous phantom with a specific shape. The method includes an interpolation/extrapolation and a head shape conversion. With the interpolation/extrapolation, SAR distributions in the whole head are estimated from the limited measured data. 3D SAR distributions in the numerical head models, where the tumor location is identified in the epidemiological studies, are obtained from measured SAR data with the head shape conversion by projection. Validation of the proposed method was performed experimentally and numerically. It was confirmed that the proposed method provided good estimation of 3D SAR distribution in the head, especially in the brain, which is the tissue of major interest in epidemiological studies. We conclude that it is possible to estimate 3D SAR distributions in a realistic head model from the data obtained by compliance testing measurements to provide a measure for the exposure gradient in specific locations of the brain for the purpose of exposure assessment in epidemiological studies. The proposed method has been used in several studies in the INTERPHONE.

  16. The estimation of 3D SAR distributions in the human head from mobile phone compliance testing data for epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wake, Kanako; Varsier, Nadège; Watanabe, Soichi; Taki, Masao; Wiart, Joe; Mann, Simon; Deltour, Isabelle; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2009-10-07

    A worldwide epidemiological study called 'INTERPHONE' has been conducted to estimate the hypothetical relationship between brain tumors and mobile phone use. In this study, we proposed a method to estimate 3D distribution of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the human head due to mobile phone use to provide the exposure gradient for epidemiological studies. 3D SAR distributions due to exposure to an electromagnetic field from mobile phones are estimated from mobile phone compliance testing data for actual devices. The data for compliance testing are measured only on the surface in the region near the device and in a small 3D region around the maximum on the surface in a homogeneous phantom with a specific shape. The method includes an interpolation/extrapolation and a head shape conversion. With the interpolation/extrapolation, SAR distributions in the whole head are estimated from the limited measured data. 3D SAR distributions in the numerical head models, where the tumor location is identified in the epidemiological studies, are obtained from measured SAR data with the head shape conversion by projection. Validation of the proposed method was performed experimentally and numerically. It was confirmed that the proposed method provided good estimation of 3D SAR distribution in the head, especially in the brain, which is the tissue of major interest in epidemiological studies. We conclude that it is possible to estimate 3D SAR distributions in a realistic head model from the data obtained by compliance testing measurements to provide a measure for the exposure gradient in specific locations of the brain for the purpose of exposure assessment in epidemiological studies. The proposed method has been used in several studies in the INTERPHONE.

  17. Spatial Variability of Strontium Distribution Coefficients and Their Correlation With Hydraulic Conductivity in the Canadian Forces Base Borden Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, M. J. L.; Sudicky, E. A.; Gillham, R. W.; Kachanoski, R. G.

    1991-10-01

    Distribution coefficients (Kd), defined as the ratio of the concentration of solute associated with the solids to the concentration in solution, are widely used in the prediction of reactive solute transport. With the advent of stochastic approaches to describe solute transport, there is a need to examine the spatial distribution of Kd, and its correlation with the hydraulic conductivity (K). Distribution coefficients were measured in triplicates for strontium on 1279 subsamples of cores from Canadian Forces Base Borden for which K measurements were available. The Kd values ranged from 4.4 to 29.8 mL/g, with a mean of 9.9 and standard deviation of 2.89 mL/g. The standard error on the triplicate means was 0.95 mL/g or approximately 10% of the mean. The spatial behavior of Kd and K (expressed as In (Kd) and ln (K)) was examined in three directions: horizontally along two orthogonal transects and vertically. The two variables each behaved nearly identically in the two horizontal directions, suggesting horizontal isotropy. Horizontally, ln (Kd) appeared as "white noise" suggesting that the horizontal spacing between cores (1 m) was too large to detect any self-correlation. The distribution coefficient displayed increasing power spectral density with increasing scale in the vertical direction, while In (K) showed these trends in all directions. Depending on the model used, the, correlation lengths obtained by least squares fits of the power spectra varied from 1 to 7.5 m horizontally and from 10 to 30 cm vertically for ln (K); and from 30 cm to 2 m horizontally and from 30 to 70 cm vertically for ln (Kd). The ln (Kd) values showed a significant but very weak negative overall correlation with ln (K) at the 99.95% confidence level. The cross-spectral and coherency analysis showed that the sign and degree of correlation between ln (Kd) and ln (K) depended on the scale and direction considered. The correlations in all directions and at all scales were weak, and could not

  18. Comparative Analysis of CTF and Trace Thermal-Hydraulic Codes Using OECD/NRC PSBT Benchmark Void Distribution Database

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The international OECD/NRC PSBT benchmark has been established to provide a test bed for assessing the capabilities of thermal-hydraulic codes and to encourage advancement in the analysis of fluid flow in rod bundles. The benchmark was based on one of the most valuable databases identified for the thermal-hydraulics modeling developed by NUPEC, Japan. The database includes void fraction and departure from nucleate boiling measurements in a representative PWR fuel assembly. On behalf of the be...

  19. Reducing leaks in water distribution networks. Controlling pressure by means of automatic hydraulic valves; Reduccion de fugas en redes de distribucion de agua. Control de la presion mediante valvulas hidraulicas automaticas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singla Font, S.

    2005-07-01

    Any water distribution network, bet it of drinking water or irrigation water, always loses an inevitable amount. One of the main ways to reduce leaks is to optimise the pressure in the network by means of hydraulic valves with different types of control devices. These can be either completely hydraulic or supplemented by electronic systems. (Author)

  20. Spatial and temporal distributions of migration in bio-retention systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yu-Qi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban bio-retention system is meaningful in reducing rainfall runoff and enhancing infiltration capacity. But the moisture migration in bio-retention systems are not clear under climate change. The spatial and temporal distribution of moisture under different rainfall events in bio-retention systems are studied in this paper based on experimental data in Beijing. Richards model is introduced to simulate the spatial and temporal distribution of moisture including pressure head, hydraulic head and water content under different initial and boundary conditions. As a result, we found that from the depth of the node to the lower boundary, the values of pressure head and hydraulic head increase with depth and decrease with time, while the values of water content represent opposite trends relative to the distribution of pressure head and hydraulic head in bio-retention systems.

  1. Stochastic kinetics of a single headed motor protein: dwell time distribution of KIF1A

    CERN Document Server

    Garai, Ashok

    2010-01-01

    KIF1A, a processive single headed kinesin superfamily motor, hydrolyzes Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to move along a filamentous track called microtubule. The stochastic movement of KIF1A on the track is characterized by an alternating sequence of pause and translocation. The sum of the durations of pause and the following translocation defines the dwell time at the binding site on the microtubule. Using the NOSC model (Nishinari et. al. PRL, {\\bf 95}, 118101 (2005)), which captures the Brownian ratchet mechanism of individual KIF1A along with its biochemical cycle, we systematically derive an analytical expression for the dwell time distribution. In principle, our theoretical prediction can be tested by carrying out single-molecule experiments with adequate spatio-temporal resolution.

  2. Data regarding hydraulic fracturing distributions and treatment fluids, additives, proppants, and water volumes applied to wells drilled in the United States from 1947 through 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Tanya J.; Varela, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive, published, and publicly available data regarding the extent, location, and character of hydraulic fracturing in the United States are scarce. The objective of this data series is to publish data related to hydraulic fracturing in the public domain. The spreadsheets released with this data series contain derivative datasets aggregated temporally and spatially from the commercial and proprietary IHS database of U.S. oil and gas production and well data (IHS Energy, 2011). These datasets, served in 21 spreadsheets in Microsoft Excel (.xlsx) format, outline the geographical distributions of hydraulic fracturing treatments and associated wells (including well drill-hole directions) as well as water volumes, proppants, treatment fluids, and additives used in hydraulic fracturing treatments in the United States from 1947 through 2010. This report also describes the data—extraction/aggregation processing steps, field names and descriptions, field types and sources. An associated scientific investigation report (Gallegos and Varela, 2014) provides a detailed analysis of the data presented in this data series and comparisons of the data and trends to the literature.

  3. Meteoroid velocity distribution derived from head echo data collected at Arecibo during regular world day observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Sulzer

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the observation and analysis of ionization flashes associated with the decay of meteoroids (so-called head echos detected by the Arecibo 430 MHz radar during regular ionospheric observations in the spring and autumn equinoxes. These two periods allow pointing well-above and nearly-into the ecliptic plane at dawn when the event rate maximizes. The observation of many thousands of events allows a statistical interpretation of the results, which show that there is a strong tendency for the observed meteoroids to come from the apex as has been previously reported (Chau and Woodman, 2004. The velocity distributions agree with Janches et al. (2003a when they are directly comparable, but the azimuth scan used in these observations allows a new perspective. We have constructed a simple statistical model which takes meteor velocities as input and gives radar line of sight velocities as output. The intent is to explain the fastest part of the velocity distribution. Since the speeds interpreted from the measurements are distributed fairly narrowly about nearly 60 km s-1, double the speed of the earth in its orbit, is consistent with the interpretation that many of the meteoroids seen by the Arecibo radar are moving in orbits about the sun with similar parameters as the earth, but in the retrograde direction. However, it is the directional information obtained from the beam-swinging radar experiment and the speed that together provide the evidence for this interpretation. Some aspects of the measured velocity distributions suggest that this is not a complete description even for the fast part of the distribution, and it certainly says nothing about the slow part first described in Janches et al. (2003a. Furthermore, we cannot conclude anything about the entire dust population since there are probably selection effects that restrict the observations to a subset of the population.

  4. Hydraulic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Sheng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    This book discusses in detail the planning, design, construction and management of hydraulic structures, covering dams, spillways, tunnels, cut slopes, sluices, water intake and measuring works, ship locks and lifts, as well as fish ways. Particular attention is paid to considerations concerning the environment, hydrology, geology and materials etc. in the planning and design of hydraulic projects. It also considers the type selection, profile configuration, stress/stability calibration and engineering countermeasures, flood releasing arrangements and scouring protection, operation and maintenance etc. for a variety of specific hydraulic structures. The book is primarily intended for engineers, undergraduate and graduate students in the field of civil and hydraulic engineering who are faced with the challenges of extending our understanding of hydraulic structures ranging from traditional to groundbreaking, as well as designing, constructing and managing safe, durable hydraulic structures that are economical ...

  5. Reproducible 3D printed head tanks for electrical impedance tomography with realistic shape and conductivity distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, James; Aristovich, Kirill; Low, Barney; Holder, David

    2017-05-22

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) has many promising applications in brain injury monitoring. To evaluate both instrumentation and reconstruction algorithms, experiments are first performed in head tanks. Existing methods, whilst accurate, produce a discontinuous conductivity, and are often made by hand, making it hard for other researchers to replicate. We have developed a method for constructing head tanks directly in a 3D printer. Conductivity was controlled through perforations in the skull surface, which allow for saline to pass through. Varying the diameter of the holes allowed for the conductivity to be controlled with 3% error for the target conductivity range. Taking CT and MRI segmentations as a basis, this method was employed to create an adult tank with a continuous conductivity distribution, and a neonatal tank with fontanelles. Using 3D scanning a geometric accuracy of 0.21 mm was recorded, equal to that of the precision of the 3D printer used. Differences of 6.1%  ±  6.4% (n  =  11 in 4 tanks) compared to simulations were recorded in c. 800 boundary voltages. This may be attributed to the morphology of the skulls increasing tortuosity effects and hole misalignment. Despite significant differences in errors between three repetitions of the neonatal tank, images of a realistic perturbation could still be reconstructed with different tanks used for the baseline and perturbation datasets. These phantoms can be reproduced by any researcher with access to a 'hobbyist' 3D printer in a matter of days. All design files have been released using an open source license to encourage reproduction and modification.

  6. Hydraulic Tomography at North Campus Research Site: Let Data Tell the Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, C. H. M.; Yeh, T. C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic tomography (HT) is a sequential cross-hole hydraulic test followed by inversion of the data to map the spatial distribution of aquifer hydraulic properties (Yeh and Liu, 2000). We provide a focused, qualitative discussion on the hydraulic tomography data reported in Berg and Illman (2011). At the North Campus Research Site (NCRS) of the University of Waterloo, 8 pumping tests are conducted sequentially at different locations of the well field while drawdown is monitored at 44 ports distributed at 8 other wells. Without conducting inverse modeling, we discuss the behavior of the drawdown curves and the temporal evolution head field in response to pumping location, heterogeneity in aquifer parameters (i.e. hydraulic conductivity (K) and specific storage (Ss)), flow regimes, and boundary conditions. We emphasize the importance and direct benefits for conducting hydraulic tomography surveys relies primarily on the collection of non-redundant data, not on the inverse models. This paper attempts to use an intuitive/logical approach to qualitative hydraulic tomography analysis. Our interpretation on the aquifer heterogeneity largely agrees with the intensive core sampling (i.e. local K measurements) and inverse modeling results. We conclude some of the inspection procedures can be beneficial before the inversion of data, while the quantitative and unifying estimation of hydraulic parameter fields can only be done using an inverse model.

  7. HYDRAULIC SERVO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, D.E.

    1962-05-01

    A hydraulic servo is designed in which a small pressure difference produced at two orifices by an electrically operated flapper arm in a constantly flowing hydraulic loop is hydraulically amplified by two constant flow pumps, two additional orifices, and three unconnected ball pistons. Two of the pistons are of one size and operate against the additional orifices, and the third piston is of a different size and operates between and against the first two pistons. (AEC)

  8. Evaluation of advanced hydraulic turbomachinery for underground pumped hydroelectric storage. Part 2. Two-stage regulated pump/turbines for operating heads of 1000 to 1500 m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomquist, C.A.; Frigo, A.A.; Degnan, J.R.

    1979-10-01

    This UPHS report applies to Francis-type, reversible pump/turbines regulated with gating systems. The first report, however, covered single-stage regulations; this report covers two-stage regulations. Development of a two-stage regulated pump/turbine appears to be attractive because the proposed single-drop UPHS concept requires turbomachinery with a head range of 1000 to 2000 m. With turbomachinery of this range available, the single-drop scheme offers a simple and economic UPHS option. Six different two-stage, top-gated pump/turbines have been analyzed: three that generate 500 MW and three that generate 350 MW. In each capacity, one machine has an operating head of 1000 m, another has a head of 1250 m, and the third has a head of 1500 m. The rated efficiencies of the machines vary from about 90% (1000-m head) to about 88% (1500-m head). Costs in 1978 $/kW for the three 500-MW units are: 20.5 (1000 m), 16.5 (1250 m), and 13.5 (1500 m). Corresponding costs for the three 350-MW units are 23, 18, and 14 $/kW. No major turbomachinery obstacles are foreseen that could hamper development of these pump/turbines. Further model testing and development are needed before building them.

  9. Numerical modeling of the effect of variation of boundary conditions on vadose zone hydraulic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tairone Paiva Leão

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available An accurate estimation of hydraulic fluxes in the vadose zone is essential for the prediction of water, nutrient and contaminant transport in natural systems. The objective of this study was to simulate the effect of variation of boundary conditions on the estimation of hydraulic properties (i.e. water content, effective unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and hydraulic flux in a one-dimensional unsaturated flow model domain. Unsaturated one-dimensional vertical water flow was simulated in a pure phase clay loam profile and in clay loam interlayered with silt loam distributed according to the third iteration of the Cantor Bar fractal object Simulations were performed using the numerical model Hydrus 1D. The upper and lower pressure heads were varied around average values of -55 cm for the near-saturation range. This resulted in combinations for the upper and lower constant head boundary conditions, respectively, of -50 and -60 cm, -40 and -70 cm, -30 and -80 cm, -20 and -90 cm, and -10 and -100 cm. For the drier range the average head between the upper and lower boundary conditions was set to -550 cm, resulting in the combinations -500 and -600 cm, -400 and -700 cm, -300 and -800 cm, -200 and -900 cm, and -100 and -1,000 cm, for upper and lower boundary conditions, respectively. There was an increase in water contents, fluxes and hydraulic conductivities with the increase in head difference between boundary conditions. Variation in boundary conditions in the pure phase and interlayered one-dimensional profiles caused significant deviations in fluxes, water contents and hydraulic conductivities compared to the simplest case (a head difference between the upper and lower constant head boundaries of 10 cm in the wetter range and 100 cm in the drier range.

  10. Inverse modelling of in situ soil water dynamics: investigating the effect of different prior distributions of the soil hydraulic parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Scharnagl; J.A. Vrugt; H. Vereecken; M. Herbst

    2011-01-01

    In situ observations of soil water state variables under natural boundary conditions are often used to estimate the soil hydraulic properties. However, many contributions to the soil hydrological literature have demonstrated that the information content of such data is insufficient to accurately and

  11. Scale dependence of the hydraulic properties of a fractured aquifer estimated using transfer functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedretti, D.; Russian, A.; Sanchez-Vila, X.; Dentz, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present an investigation of the scale dependence of hydraulic parameters in fractured media based on the concept of transfer functions (TF). TF methods provide an inexpensive way to perform aquifer parameter estimation, as they relate the fluctuations of an observation time series (hydraulic head fluctuations) to an input function (aquifer recharge) in frequency domain. Fractured media are specially sensitive to this approach as hydraulic parameters are strongly scale-dependent, involving nonstationary statistical distributions. Our study is based on an extensive data set, involving up to 130 measurement points with periodic head measurements that in some cases extend for more than 30 years. For each point, we use a single-porosity and dual-continuum TF formulation to obtain a distribution of transmissivities and storativities in both mobile and immobile domains. Single-porosity TF estimates are compared with data obtained from the interpretation of over 60 hydraulic tests (slug and pumping tests). Results show that the TF is able to estimate the scale dependence of the hydraulic parameters, and it is consistent with the behavior of estimates from traditional hydraulic tests. In addition, the TF approach seems to provide an estimation of the system variance and the extension of the ergodic behavior of the aquifer (estimated in approximately 500 m in the analyzed aquifer). The scale dependence of transmissivity seems to be independent from the adopted formulation (single or dual-continuum), while storativity is more sensitive to the presence of multiple continua.

  12. [Analytical method for the potential distribution of head sphere model under the stimulation of point current source].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zheng; He, Wei; He, Chuanhong; Zhang, Zhanlong

    2008-08-01

    The 4-layer sphere model of human head was built; the layers from outside to inside represented the scalp, the skull, the CFS and the brain, respectively. The point current source placed on the outmost layer was regarded as the boundary condition, and the method of separation of variables was used to solve the equations. The potential distribution and the current expression were given, and the isopotential-line map and current lines were drawn. The simulation result can be used to analyze head EIT problems.

  13. Distribution of Absorbed Doses to the Important Organs of Head and Neck Region in Panoramic Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byeong Sam; Choi, Karp Sick [Dept. of Dental Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Deagu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chin Soo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Deagu (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the distribution of absorbed doses of each important organs of head and neck region in panoramic radiography. Radiation dosimetry at internal anatomic sites and skin surfaces of phantom (RT-210 Humanoid Head and Neck Section R) was performed with lithium fluoride (TLD-100R) thermoluminescent dosimeters according to change of kilovoltage (65 kVp, 75 kVp and 85 kVp) with 4 miliamperage and 20 second exposure time. The results obtained were as follows; Radiation absorbed doses of internal anatomic sites were presented the highest does of 1.04 mGy, 1.065 mGy and 2.09 mGy in nasopharynx, relatively high doses of 0.525 mGy, 0.59 mGy and 1.108 mGy in deep lobe of parotid gland, 0.481 mGy, 0.68 mGy and 1.191 mGy in submandibular gland. But there were comparatively low doses of 0.172 mGy and 0.128 mGy in eyes and thyroid gland that absorbed dose was estimated at 85kVp. Radiation absorbed doses of skin surfaces were presented the highest doses of 1.263 mGy, 1.538 mGy and 2.952 mGy in back side of first cervical vertebra and relatively high doses of 0.267 mGy, 0.401 mGy and 0.481 mGy in parotid gland. But there were comparatively low doses of 0.057 mGy, 0.068 mGy and 0.081 mGy in philtrum and 0.059 mGy in middle portion of chin that absorbed dose was estimated at 85 kVp. According to increase of kilovoltage, the radiation absorbed doses were increased 1.1 times when kilovoltage changes from 65 kVp to 75 kVp and 1.9 times when kilovoltage changes from 75 kVp to 85 kVp at internal anatomic sites. According to increase of kilovoltage, the radiation absorbed doses were increased 1.3 times when kilovoltage changes from 65 kVp to 75 kVp and 1.6 times when kilovoltage changes from 75 kVp to 85 kVp at skin surfaces.

  14. Frequency, magnitude, and distribution of head impacts in Pop Warner football: the cumulative burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ricky H; Wong, Andrew K; Bailes, Julian E

    2014-03-01

    A growing body of research suggests that subconcussive head impacts or repetitive mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) can have cumulative and deleterious effects. Several studies have investigated head impacts in football at the professional, collegiate, and high school levels, in an attempt to elucidate the biomechanics of head impacts among football players. Youth football players, generally from 7 to 14 years of age, constitute 70% of all football players, yet burden of, and susceptibility to, head injury in this population is not well known. A novel impact sensor utilizing binary force switches (Shockbox(®)) was used to follow an entire Pop Warner football team consisting of twenty-two players for six games and five practices. The impact sensor was designed to record impacts with linear accelerations over 30g. In addition, video recording of games and practices were used to further characterize the head impacts by type of position (skilled versus unskilled), field location of impact (open field versus line of scrimmage), type of hit (tackling, tackled, or hold/push), and whether the impact was a head-to-head impact or not. We recorded a total of 480 head impacts. An average of 21.8 head impacts occurred per practice, while 61.8 occurred per game. Players had an average of 3.7 head impacts per game and 1.5 impacts per practice (p80g) was 11. Two concussions were diagnosed over the course of the season. However, due to technical reasons the biomechanics of those hits resulting in concussions were not captured. Despite smaller players and slower play when compared to high school, collegiate or professional players, those involved in youth football sustain a moderate number of head impacts per season with several high magnitude impacts. Our results suggest that players involved in open-field, tackling plays that have head-to-head contact sustain impacts with the highest linear accelerations. Our data supports previously published data that suggests changes to the

  15. Basic hydraulics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, P D

    1982-01-01

    BASIC Hydraulics aims to help students both to become proficient in the BASIC programming language by actually using the language in an important field of engineering and to use computing as a means of mastering the subject of hydraulics. The book begins with a summary of the technique of computing in BASIC together with comments and listing of the main commands and statements. Subsequent chapters introduce the fundamental concepts and appropriate governing equations. Topics covered include principles of fluid mechanics; flow in pipes, pipe networks and open channels; hydraulic machinery;

  16. Sedimentary facies, geomorphic features and habitat distribution at the Hudson Canyon head from AUV multibeam data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierdomenico, Martina; Guida, Vincent G.; Macelloni, Leonardo; Chiocci, Francesco L.; Rona, Peter A.; Scranton, Mary I.; Asper, Vernon; Diercks, Arne

    2015-11-01

    Mapping of physical benthic habitats at the head of Hudson Canyon was performed by means of integrated analysis of acoustic data, video surveys and seafloor sampling. Acoustic mapping, performed using AUV-mounted multibeam sonar, provided ultra-high resolution bathymetric and backscatter imagery for the identification of geomorphological features and the characterization of surficial sediments. Habitat characterization in terms of seafloor texture and identification of benthic and demersal communities was accomplished by visual analysis of still photographs from underwater vehicles. Habitat classes were defined on the basis of the seafloor texture observed on photos and then compared with the geophysical data in order to associate habitats to acoustic classes and/or geomorphological features. This enabled us to infer habitat distribution on the basis of morpho-acoustic classes and extrapolate results over larger areas. Results from bottom trawling were used to determine the overall biodiversity within the identified habitats. Our analysis revealed a variety of topographic and sedimentological structures that provide a wide range of physical habitats. A variety of sandy and muddy substrates, gravel patches and mudstone outcrops host rich and varied faunal assemblages, including cold-water corals and sponge communities. Pockmark fields below 300 m depth suggest that methane-based chemosynthetic carbonate deposition may contributes to creation of specific benthic habitats. Hummocky terrain has been delineated along the canyon rims and associated with extensive, long-term burrowing activity by golden tilefish (Lopholatilus chamaeleonticeps). These results show the relationships of physical features to benthic habitat variation, support the notion of the area as a biodiversity hotspot and define essential habitats for planning of sustainable regional fisheries.

  17. Impact of head immobilization position on dose distribution in patients of brainstem glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Sharma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of patient position (supine and prone on conventional bilateral field, three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT treatment plans in patients of brainstem glioma with a view to exploring the possibility of avoiding beam entry through immobilization accessories. Methods: Five patients of brainstem glioma were immobilized and scanned in supine and prone positions with a combination of head rest and thermoplastic cast. Each patient was planned with three techniques: (i 2-fields bilateral (ii 3-fields 3DCRT, and (iii 5-fields IMRT. Plan quality was analyzed in terms of planning target volume (PTV coverage and dose to various critical organs at risk (OAR for both the supine and prone treatment positions. Results: In case of bilateral fields (parallel opposed planning, the PTV coverage and dose to the OAR were almost similar for both the supine and prone positions. In 3DCRT plan, although the PTV coverage and dose to critical structures were comparable for both the supine and prone position, dose to cochlea was lower for the prone position plan. A modest decrease in maximum dose to optic nerves and mean dose to temporal lobes were also observed for the prone position plan. In IMRT plans, the PTV coverage and homogeneity were comparable in both the supine and prone positions. Reduction in average maximum and mean doses to all OARs with functional subunit (FSU in series and parallel respectively was observed in the IMRT plan for prone position when compared to the supine position.Conclusion: Supine and prone positions resulted in almost similar dose distribution in all the three techniques applied. At some instances, the prone position showed better normal tissues sparing when compared to supine. Moreover, prone position is more likely to avoid attenuation due to immobilization devices and uncertainty in dose calculation under large

  18. Hamiltonian Monte Carlo algorithm for the characterization of hydraulic conductivity from the heat tracing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djibrilla Saley, A.; Jardani, A.; Soueid Ahmed, A.; Raphael, A.; Dupont, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    Estimating spatial distributions of the hydraulic conductivity in heterogeneous aquifers has always been an important and challenging task in hydrology. Generally, the hydraulic conductivity field is determined from hydraulic head or pressure measurements. In the present study, we propose to use temperature data as source of information for characterizing the spatial distributions of the hydraulic conductivity field. In this way, we performed a laboratory sandbox experiment with the aim of imaging the heterogeneities of the hydraulic conductivity field from thermal monitoring. During the laboratory experiment, we injected a hot water pulse, which induces a heat plume motion into the sandbox. The induced plume was followed by a set of thermocouples placed in the sandbox. After the temperature data acquisition, we performed a hydraulic tomography using the stochastic Hybrid Monte Carlo approach, also called the Hamiltonian Monte Carlo (HMC) algorithm to invert the temperature data. This algorithm is based on a combination of the Metropolis Monte Carlo method and the Hamiltonian dynamics approach. The parameterization of the inverse problem was done with the Karhunen-Loève (KL) expansion to reduce the dimensionality of the unknown parameters. Our approach has provided successful reconstruction of the hydraulic conductivity field with low computational effort.

  19. Hydraulic Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This table is required whenever hydraulic structures are shown in the flood profile. It is also required if levees are shown on the FIRM, channels containing the...

  20. Maneuvering impact boring head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollinger, W. Thor; Reutzel, Edward W.

    1998-01-01

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure.

  1. The Effects of Cylinder Head Gasket Opening on Engine Temperature Distribution for a Water-Cooled Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, J. Y.; Chi, G. X.

    2017-02-01

    In a liquid-cooled engine, coolant is pumped throughout the water jacket of the engine, drawing heat from the cylinder head, pistons, combustion chambers, cylinder walls, and valves, etc. If the engine temperature is too high or too low, various problems will occur. These include overheating of the lubricating oil and engine parts, excessive stresses between engine parts, loss of power, incomplete burning of fuel, etc. Thus, the engine should be maintained at the proper operating temperature. This study investigated the effects of different cylinder head gasket opening on the engine temperature distributions in a water-cooled motorcycle engine. The numerical predictions for the temperature distribution are in good agreement with the experimental data within 20%.

  2. Modelling the species distribution of flat-headed cats (Prionailurus planiceps, an endangered South-East Asian small felid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Wilting

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The flat-headed cat (Prionailurus planiceps is one of the world's least known, highly threatened felids with a distribution restricted to tropical lowland rainforests in Peninsular Thailand/Malaysia, Borneo and Sumatra. Throughout its geographic range large-scale anthropogenic transformation processes, including the pollution of fresh-water river systems and landscape fragmentation, raise concerns regarding its conservation status. Despite an increasing number of camera-trapping field surveys for carnivores in South-East Asia during the past two decades, few of these studies recorded the flat-headed cat. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we designed a predictive species distribution model using the Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt algorithm to reassess the potential current distribution and conservation status of the flat-headed cat. Eighty-eight independent species occurrence records were gathered from field surveys, literature records, and museum collections. These current and historical records were analysed in relation to bioclimatic variables (WorldClim, altitude (SRTM and minimum distance to larger water resources (Digital Chart of the World. Distance to water was identified as the key predictor for the occurrence of flat-headed cats (>50% explanation. In addition, we used different land cover maps (GLC2000, GlobCover and SarVision LLC for Borneo, information on protected areas and regional human population density data to extract suitable habitats from the potential distribution predicted by the MaxEnt model. Between 54% and 68% of suitable habitat has already been converted to unsuitable land cover types (e.g. croplands, plantations, and only between 10% and 20% of suitable land cover is categorised as fully protected according to the IUCN criteria. The remaining habitats are highly fragmented and only a few larger forest patches remain. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on our findings, we recommend that future conservation

  3. Modelling the Species Distribution of Flat-Headed Cats (Prionailurus planiceps), an Endangered South-East Asian Small Felid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, Andrew J.; Hesse, Deike; Mohamed, Azlan; Traeholdt, Carl; Cheyne, Susan M.; Sunarto, Sunarto; Jayasilan, Mohd-Azlan; Ross, Joanna; Shapiro, Aurélie C.; Sebastian, Anthony; Dech, Stefan; Breitenmoser, Christine; Sanderson, Jim; Duckworth, J. W.; Hofer, Heribert

    2010-01-01

    Background The flat-headed cat (Prionailurus planiceps) is one of the world's least known, highly threatened felids with a distribution restricted to tropical lowland rainforests in Peninsular Thailand/Malaysia, Borneo and Sumatra. Throughout its geographic range large-scale anthropogenic transformation processes, including the pollution of fresh-water river systems and landscape fragmentation, raise concerns regarding its conservation status. Despite an increasing number of camera-trapping field surveys for carnivores in South-East Asia during the past two decades, few of these studies recorded the flat-headed cat. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we designed a predictive species distribution model using the Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) algorithm to reassess the potential current distribution and conservation status of the flat-headed cat. Eighty-eight independent species occurrence records were gathered from field surveys, literature records, and museum collections. These current and historical records were analysed in relation to bioclimatic variables (WorldClim), altitude (SRTM) and minimum distance to larger water resources (Digital Chart of the World). Distance to water was identified as the key predictor for the occurrence of flat-headed cats (>50% explanation). In addition, we used different land cover maps (GLC2000, GlobCover and SarVision LLC for Borneo), information on protected areas and regional human population density data to extract suitable habitats from the potential distribution predicted by the MaxEnt model. Between 54% and 68% of suitable habitat has already been converted to unsuitable land cover types (e.g. croplands, plantations), and only between 10% and 20% of suitable land cover is categorised as fully protected according to the IUCN criteria. The remaining habitats are highly fragmented and only a few larger forest patches remain. Conclusion/Significance Based on our findings, we recommend that future conservation efforts for

  4. The effect of q-distributed electrons on the head-on collision of ion acoustic solitary waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Uday Narayan; Chatterjee, Prasanta [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Roychoudhury, Rajkumar [Physics and Applied Mathematics, ISI, Kolkata 700009 (India)

    2012-01-15

    The head-on collision of ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) in two component plasma comprising nonextensive distributed electrons is investigated. Two opposite directional Kortewg-de-vries (KdV) equations are derived and the phase shift due to collision is obtained using the extended version of Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method. Different ranges of nonextensive parameter q are considered and their effects on phase shifts are observed. It is found that the presence of nonextensive distributed electrons plays a significant role on the nature of collision of ion acoustic solitary waves.

  5. The Comparison of Predicted and Measured Hydraulic Conductivities of Soils having Different Physical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengin, Enes; Abiddin Erguler, Zeynal; Karakuş, Hüseyin

    2015-04-01

    Hydraulic conductivity is one of the most important parameter of earth science related studies such as engineering geology, soil physics, agriculture etc. In order to estimate the ability of soils to transport fluid through particles, field and laboratory tests have been performed since last decades of 19th century. Constant and falling head tests are widely used to directly measure hydraulic conductivity values in laboratory conditions for soils having different particle size distributions. The determination of hydraulic conductivity of soils by performing these methods are time consuming processes and also requires undisturbed samples to reflect in-situ natural condition. Considering these limitations, numerous approaches have been proposed to practically estimate hydraulic conductivity of soils by utilizing empirical equations based on simple physical and index properties such as grain size distribution curves related parameters, porosity, void ratio, etc. Many previous studies show that the hydraulic conductivity values calculated by empirical equations deviate more than two order magnitude than the measured hydraulic conductivity values obtained from convenient permeability tests. In order to investigate the main controlling parameters on hydraulic conductivity of soils, a comprehensive research program was carried out on some disturbed and undisturbed soil samples collected from different locations in Turkey. The hydraulic conductivity values of samples were determined as changing between 10-6 and 10-9 m/s by using falling head tests. In addition to these tests, basic soil properties such as natural water content, Atterberg limits, specific gravity and grain size analyses of these samples were also defined to be used as an input parameters of empirical equations for prediction hydraulic conductivity values. In addition, data from previous studies were also used for the aim of this study. The measured hydraulic conductivity values were correlated with all

  6. Changing head model extent affects finite element predictions of transcranial direct current stimulation distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indahlastari, Aprinda; Chauhan, Munish; Schwartz, Benjamin; Sadleir, Rosalind J.

    2016-12-01

    Objective. In this study, we determined efficient head model sizes relative to predicted current densities in transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Approach. Efficiency measures were defined based on a finite element (FE) simulations performed using nine human head models derived from a single MRI data set, having extents varying from 60%-100% of the original axial range. Eleven tissue types, including anisotropic white matter, and three electrode montages (T7-T8, F3-right supraorbital, Cz-Oz) were used in the models. Main results. Reducing head volume extent from 100% to 60%, that is, varying the model’s axial range from between the apex and C3 vertebra to one encompassing only apex to the superior cerebellum, was found to decrease the total modeling time by up to half. Differences between current density predictions in each model were quantified by using a relative difference measure (RDM). Our simulation results showed that {RDM} was the least affected (a maximum of 10% error) for head volumes modeled from the apex to the base of the skull (60%-75% volume). Significance. This finding suggested that the bone could act as a bioelectricity boundary and thus performing FE simulations of tDCS on the human head with models extending beyond the inferior skull may not be necessary in most cases to obtain reasonable precision in current density results.

  7. Hydraulic Conductivity of Residual Soil-Cement Mix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindasamy, P.; Taha, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    In Malaysia, although there are several researches on engineering properties of residual soils, however study on the hydraulic conductivity properties of metasedimentary residual soils is still lacking. Construction of containment walls like slurry wall techniques can be achieved with hydraulic conductivity of approximately 5 x 10-7cm/sec. The objectives of the study were to determine the physical properties of metasedimentary residual soils and to determine the influence of 1%, 3%, 5% and 10% of cement on hydraulic conductivity parameters. The coefficient of hydraulic conductivity of the soil naturally and soil-cement mixtures were determined by using the falling head test. According to the test, the hydraulic conductivity of the original soil was 4.16 x 10-8 m/s. The value decreases to 3.89 x 10-8 m/s, 2.78 x 10-8 m/s then 6.83 x 10-9 m/s with the addition of 1%, 3% and 5% of cement additives, respectively. During the hydration process, cement hydrates is formed followed by the increase in pH value and Ca(OH)2 which will alter the modification of pores size and distribution. When the quantity of cement increases, the pores size decrease. But, the addition of 10% cement gives an increased hydraulic conductivity value to 2.78 x 10-8 m/s. With 10%, the pore size increase might due to flocculation and agglomeration reaction. The generated hydraulic conductivity values will indirectly become a guide in the preliminary soil cement stabilization to modify the properties of the soil to become more like the properties of a soft rock.1. Introduction

  8. Application of a frequency distribution method for determining instars of the beet armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) from widths of cast head capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y. Chen; S. J. Seybold

    2013-01-01

    Instar determination of field-collected insect larvae has generally been based on the analysis of head capsule width frequency distributions or bivariate plotting, but few studies have tested the validity of such methods. We used head capsules from exuviae of known instars of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae),...

  9. Experimental Section: On the magnetic field distribution generated by a dipolar current source situated in a realistically shaped compartment model of the head

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijs, J.W.H.; Bosch, F.G.C.; Peters, M.J.; Lopes da silva, F.H.

    1987-01-01

    The magnetic field distribution around the head is simulated using a realistically shaped compartment model of the head. The model is based on magnetic resonance images. The 3 compartments describe the brain, the skull and the scalp. The source is represented by a current dipole situated in the

  10. Electric field distribution in a finite-volume head model of deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Peadar F; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2009-11-01

    This study presents a whole-head finite element model of deep brain stimulation to examine the effect of electrical grounding, the finite conducting volume of the head, and scalp, skull and cerebrospinal fluid layers. The impedance between the stimulating and reference electrodes in the whole-head model was found to lie within clinically reported values when the reference electrode was incorporated on a localized surface in the model. Incorporation of the finite volume of the head and inclusion of surrounding outer tissue layers reduced the magnitude of the electric field and activating function by approximately 20% in the region surrounding the electrode. Localized distortions of the electric field were also observed when the electrode was placed close to the skull. Under bipolar conditions the effect of the finite conducting volume was shown to be negligible. The results indicate that, for monopolar stimulation, incorporation of the finite volume and outer tissue layers can alter the magnitude of the electric field and activating function when the electrode is deep within the brain, and may further affect the shape if the electrode is close to the skull.

  11. 盘式配流中液压冲击的控制方法%The Methods for Controlling Hydraulic Shock During Distributing Oil by Distributor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡廷文; 许锦宗

    2001-01-01

    提出几个可用于完善液压泵和液压马达配流 盘先前设计的简单有效的基本方程,着重讨论了设置困油角和设置阻尼槽的两种配流盘的改 进设计方法,这种设计决策能够减小和消除盘式配流中的液压冲击,可作为设计人员的参考 。%This study develops several simple basic equations that may be used to guide final adjustments to up-front design of the distrubutor of the hydraulic pump and motor. In particular, the design methods for one distributor that have initial compression-angle and initial expansion-angle, and another that have damping troughs are examined. The design decisions can reduce and cancel hydraulic shock during distributing oil.

  12. Optimizing granules size distribution for aerobic granular sludge stability: Effect of a novel funnel-shaped internals on hydraulic shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jia-Heng; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Zhao, Hang; Yu, Hai-Tian; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Xu, Xiang-Yang; Zhu, Liang

    2016-09-01

    A novel funnel-shaped internals was proposed to enhance the stability and pollutant removal performance of an aerobic granular process by optimizing granule size distribution. Results showed up to 68.3±1.4% of granules in novel reactor (R1) were situated in optimal size range (700-1900μm) compared to less than 29.7±1.1% in conventional reactor (R2), and overgrowth of large granules was effectively suppressed without requiring additional energy. Consequently, higher total nitrogen (TN) removal (81.6±2.1%) achieved in R1 than in R2 (48.1±2.7%). Hydraulic analysis revealed the existence of selectively assigning hydraulic pressure in R1. The total shear rate (τtotal) on large granules was 3.07±0.14 times higher than that of R2, while τtotal of small granules in R1 was 70.7±4.6% in R2. Furthermore, large granules in R1 with intact extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) outer layer structure entrapped hydroxyapatite at center, which formed a core structure and further enhanced the stability of aerobic granules.

  13. Analyzing the effects of geological and parameter uncertainty on prediction of groundwater head and travel time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, X.; Sonneborg, T.O.; Jørgensen, F.

    2013-01-01

    in three scenarios involving simulation of groundwater head distribution and travel time. The first scenario implied 100 stochastic geological models all assigning the same hydraulic parameters for the same geological units. In the second scenario the same 100 geological models were subjected to model...

  14. Combining 3D Hydraulic Tomography with Tracer Tests for Improved Transport Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-León, E; Leven, C; Haslauer, C P; Cirpka, O A

    2016-07-01

    Hydraulic tomography (HT) is a method for resolving the spatial distribution of hydraulic parameters to some extent, but many details important for solute transport usually remain unresolved. We present a methodology to improve solute transport predictions by combining data from HT with the breakthrough curve (BTC) of a single forced-gradient tracer test. We estimated the three dimensional (3D) hydraulic-conductivity field in an alluvial aquifer by inverting tomographic pumping tests performed at the Hydrogeological Research Site Lauswiesen close to Tübingen, Germany, using a regularized pilot-point method. We compared the estimated parameter field to available profiles of hydraulic-conductivity variations from direct-push injection logging (DPIL), and validated the hydraulic-conductivity field with hydraulic-head measurements of tests not used in the inversion. After validation, spatially uniform parameters for dual-domain transport were estimated by fitting tracer data collected during a forced-gradient tracer test. The dual-domain assumption was used to parameterize effects of the unresolved heterogeneity of the aquifer and deemed necessary to fit the shape of the BTC using reasonable parameter values. The estimated hydraulic-conductivity field and transport parameters were subsequently used to successfully predict a second independent tracer test. Our work provides an efficient and practical approach to predict solute transport in heterogeneous aquifers without performing elaborate field tracer tests with a tomographic layout.

  15. Field-in-Field Technique to Improve Dose Distribution in the Junction of the Field with Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seon Myeong; Lee, Yeong Cheol; Jeong, Daek Yang; Kim, Young Bum [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    In treating head and neck cancer, it is very important to irradiate uniform dose on the junction of the bilateral irradiation field of the upper head and neck and the anterior irradiation field of the lower neck. In order to improve dose distribution on the junction, this study attempted to correct non uniform dose resulting from under dose and over dose using the field-in-field technique in treating the anterior irradiation field of the lower neck and to apply the technique to the treatment of head and neck cancer through comparison with conventional treatment. In order to examine dose difference between the entry point and the exit point where beam diffusion happens in bilateral irradiation on the upper head and neck, we used an anthropomorphic phantom. Computer Tomography was applied to the anthropomorphic phantom, the dose of interest points was compared in radiation treatment planning, and it was corrected by calculating the dose ratio at the junction of the lower neck. Dose distribution on the junction of the irradiated field was determined by placing low-sensitivity film on the junction of the lower neck and measuring dose distribution on the conventional bilateral irradiation of the upper head and neck and on the anterior irradiation of the lower neck. In addition, using the field-in-field technique, which takes into account beam diffusion resulting from the bilateral irradiation of the upper head and neck, we measured difference in dose distribution on the junction in the anterior irradiation of the lower neck. In order to examine the dose at interest points on the junction, we compared and analyzed the change of dose at the interest points on the anthropomorphic phantom using a thermoluminescence dosimeter. In case of dose sum with the bilateral irradiation of the upper head and neck when the field-in-field technique is applied to the junction of the lower neck in radiation treatment planning, The dose of under dose areas increased by 4.7-8.65%. The dose

  16. 高水头条件下氯离子击穿高岭土衬垫的离心模型试验研究%Centrifuge Modeling for Chloridion Breaking Through Kaolin Clay Liner with High Hydraulic Head

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹良通; 曾兴; 李育超; 钟孝乐; 陈云敏

    2012-01-01

    One-dimensional chloridion movement in a Kaolin clay liner is modeled by using 400 g-t. Centrifuge machine, liner model is prepared by consolidating a high water content Kaolin slurry in 1 g condition. The breakthrough of chloridion in the Kaolin clay liner under high hydraulic head is successfully simulated at SO g centrifugal acceleration for 3 hours and 52 minutes. The results indicate the liner model experienced further consolidation in the centrifuge due to the induced seepage force, and the consolidation-induced seepage resulted in a transient flow in the early stage. The transient flow influenced the chloridion movement process, which is inconsistent with the condition of Ogata's analytical solution (1961) for one-dimensional advection-dispersion problem. An equivalent time method is proposed in this paper to analyze the test results. The prototype breakthrough time was predicted by the fitted parameters. The experimental results demonstrated that under a hydraulic head of 10 m, the breakthrough time for 2 m-thick Kaolin clay liner with a hydraulic conductivity of 3.2 x 10-9 m/s was 1.97 year, and the stable leakage rate was 0.604 m/yr.%利用400 g-t土工离心机模拟了高水头条件下氯离子在高岭土衬垫中的一维运移及击穿过程.在1g条件下采用高含水率的高岭土泥浆加压固结制备形成衬垫模型,离心模型试验离心加速度50 g,历时3 h 52 min,成功模拟了高水头条件下氯离子击穿黏土衬垫的过程.试验结果表明:离心状态下模型在高渗透压力作用发生再固结,在约30 min固结过程中模型发生了非稳定渗流,对早期污染物运移过程具有一定的影响,导致该运移过程与Ogata (1961)提出的污染物一维对流-扩散解析解的求解条件有所差异.采用等效时间的方法对试验结果进行拟合,根据拟合的参数预测原型的击穿时间,发现渗透系数为3.2×10-9 m/s的2 m厚黏土衬垫在上覆10 m水头作用下的击穿时间仅为1

  17. Demonstration of the ExoMars sample preparation and distribution system jointly with an optical instrument head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Wolfgang; Thiele, Hans; Hofmann, Peter; Baglioni, Pietro

    The ExoMars program will search for past and present life on Mars. ExoMars will address important scientific goals and demonstrate key in-situ enabling technologies. Among such technologies are the acquisition, preparation, distribution and analysis of samples from Mars surface rocks and from the subsurface. The 2018 mission will land an ESA rover on Mars which carries a sample preparation and distribution system (SPDS) and a suite of analytical instruments, the Pasteur Payload with its Analytical Laboratory Drawer (ALD). Kayser-Threde GmbH (Germany) will be responsible for the SPDS as a subcontractor under the mission prime Thales Alenia Space. The SPDS comprises a number of complex mechanisms and mechanical devices designed to transport drill core samples within the rover analytical laboratory, to crush them to powder with a fine grain size, to portion discrete amounts of powdered sample material, to distribute and fill the material into sample containers and to prepare flat sample surfaces for scientific analysis. Breadboards of the crushing mechanism, the dosing mechanism and a distribution carousel with sample containers and a powder sample surface flattening mechanism were built and tested. Kayser-Threde, as a member of the Spanish led ExoMars Raman Instrument team, is also responsible for development of the Raman optical head, which will be mounted inside ALD and will inspect the crushed samples, when they are presented to the instrument by the distribution carousel. Within this activity, which is performed under contract with the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the University of Jena (Germany) and funded by the German DLR, Kayser-Threde can demonstrate Raman measurements with the optical head and a COTS laser and spectrometer and thus simulate the full Raman instrument optical path. An autofocus system with actuator and feedback optics is also part of this activity, which allows focusing the 50 m Raman spot on the surface of the powdered sample

  18. Trends in hydraulic fracturing distributions and treatment fluids, additives, proppants, and water volumes applied to wells drilled in the United States from 1947 through 2010: data analysis and comparison to the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Tanya J.; Varela, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is presently the primary stimulation technique for oil and gas production in low-permeability, unconventional reservoirs. Comprehensive, published, and publicly available information regarding the extent, location, and character of hydraulic fracturing in the United States is scarce. This national spatial and temporal analysis of data on nearly 1 million hydraulically fractured wells and 1.8 million fracturing treatment records from 1947 through 2010 (aggregated in Data Series 868) is used to identify hydraulic fracturing trends in drilling methods and use of proppants, treatment fluids, additives, and water in the United States. These trends are compared to the literature in an effort to establish a common understanding of the differences in drilling methods, treatment fluids, and chemical additives and of how the newer technology has affected the water use volumes and areal distribution of hydraulic fracturing. Historically, Texas has had the highest number of records of hydraulic fracturing treatments and associated wells in the United States documented in the datasets described herein. Water-intensive horizontal/directional drilling has also increased from 6 percent of new hydraulically fractured wells drilled in the United States in 2000 to 42 percent of new wells drilled in 2010. Increases in horizontal drilling also coincided with the emergence of water-based “slick water” fracturing fluids. As such, the most current hydraulic fracturing materials and methods are notably different from those used in previous decades and have contributed to the development of previously inaccessible unconventional oil and gas production target areas, namely in shale and tight-sand reservoirs. Publicly available derivative datasets and locations developed from these analyses are described.

  19. A mini slug test method for determination of a local hydraulic conductivity of an unconfined sandy aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinsby, Klaus; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Andersen, Lars J.;

    1992-01-01

    from level to level and thereby establish vertical profiles of the hydraulic conductivity. The head data from the test well are recorded with a 10 mm pressure transducer, and the initial head difference required is established by a small vacuum pump. The method described has provided 274 spatially......A new and efficient mini slug test method for the determination of local hydraulic conductivities in unconfined sandy aquifers is developed. The slug test is performed in a small-diameter (1 inch) driven well with a 0.25 m screen just above the drive point. The screened drive point can be driven...... distributed measurements of a local hydraulic conductivity at a tracer test site at Vejen, Denmark. The mini slug test results calculated by a modified Dax slug test analysing method, applying the elastic storativity in the Dax equations instead of the specific yield, are in good accordance with the results...

  20. Flow-Log Analysis for Hydraulic Characterization of Selected Test Wells at the Indian Point Energy Center, Buchanan, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John H.

    2008-01-01

    Flow logs from 24 test wells were analyzed as part of the hydraulic characterization of the metamorphosed and fractured carbonate bedrock at the Indian Point Energy Center in Buchanan, New York. The flow logs were analyzed along with caliper, optical- and acoustic-televiewer, and fluid-resistivity and temperature logs to determine the character and distribution of fracture-flow zones and estimate their transmissivities and hydraulic heads. Many flow zones were associated with subhorizontal to shallow-dipping fractured zones, southeast-dipping bedding fractures, northwest-dipping conjugate fractures, or combinations of bedding and conjugate fractures. Flow-log analysis generally provided reasonable first-order estimates of flow-zone transmissivity and head differences compared with the results of conventional hydraulic-test analysis and measurements. Selected results of an aquifer test and a tracer test provided corroborating information in support of the flow-log analysis.

  1. Integration of Tracer Test Data to Refine Geostatistical Hydraulic Conductivity Fields Using Sequential Self-Calibration Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bill X Hu; Jiang Xiaowei; Wan Li

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of local measurements of hydraulic conductivity, geostatistical methods have been found to be useful in heterogeneity characterization of a hydraulic conductivity field on a regional scale. However, the methods are not suited to directly integrate dynamic production data, such as,hydraulic head and solute concentration, into the study of conductivity distribution. These data, which record the flow and transport processes in the medium, are closely related to the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity. In this study, a three-dimensional gradient-based inverse method-the sequential self-calibration (SSC) method-is developed to calibrate a hydraulic conductivity field,initially generated by a geostatistical simulation method, conditioned on tracer test results. The SSC method can honor both local hydraulic conductivity measurements and tracer test data. The mismatch between the simulated hydraulic conductivity field and the reference true one, measured by its mean square error (MSE), is reduced through the SSC conditional study. In comparison with the unconditional results, the SSC conditional study creates the mean breakthrough curve much closer to the reference true curve, and significantly reduces the prediction uncertainty of the solute transport in the observed locations. Further, the reduction of uncertainty is spatially dependent, which indicates that good locations, geological structure, and boundary conditions will affect the efficiency of the SSC study results.

  2. Distribution of elastic fibers in the head and neck: a histological study using late-stage human fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Hideaki; Umezawa, Takashi; Omine, Yuya; Kasahara, Masaaki; Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shinichi

    2013-03-01

    There is little or no information about the distribution of elastic fibers in the human fetal head. We examined this issue in 15 late-stage fetuses (crown-rump length, 220-320 mm) using aldehyde-fuchsin and elastica-Masson staining, and we used the arterial wall elastic laminae and external ear cartilages as positive staining controls. The posterior pharyngeal wall, as well as the ligaments connecting the laryngeal cartilages, contained abundant elastic fibers. In contrast with the sphenomandibular ligament and the temporomandibular joint disk, in which elastic fibers were partly present, the discomalleolar ligament and the fascial structures around the pterygoid muscles did not have any elastic fibers. In addition, the posterior marginal fascia of the prestyloid space did contain such fibers. Notably, in the middle ear, elastic fibers accumulated along the tendons of the tensor tympani and stapedius muscles and in the joint capsules of the ear ossicle articulations. Elastic fibers were not seen in any other muscle tendons or vertebral facet capsules in the head and neck. Despite being composed of smooth muscle, the orbitalis muscle did not contain any elastic fibers. The elastic fibers in the sphenomandibular ligament seemed to correspond to an intermediate step of development between Meckel's cartilage and the final ligament. Overall, there seemed to be a mini-version of elastic fiber distribution compared to that in adults and a different specific developmental pattern of connective tissues. The latter morphology might be a result of an adaptation to hypoxic conditions during development.

  3. On a treatment of the spatial distribution of pressure head in a steep soil layer during a big storm from the viewpoint of its long-term evolution process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, M.

    2013-12-01

    A difficulty of predicting runoff characteristics from catchment properties such as geology. topography, soil and vegetation is caused by their heterogeneous spatial distributions. The regularities are derived from a nested structure of developments with different time scales: topography is evolved due to orogenic movement and erosion, soil development is repeated through landslide occurrences, and plants have a life cycle. Revealing the nested structure must be a key for evaluating an effect of catchment properties on the runoff prediction. Our study project 'Prediction of catchment runoff changes based on elucidating a nested structure consisting of the developments of topography, soil and vegetation' challenges a unique simulation for a long-term soil evolution process supported by vegetation roots and an efficient drainage system like natural pipes between the periods of landslide occurrences. In this presentation, I will discuss how we can generally treat the spatial distribution of pressure head in a soil layer on hillslope for a big storm triggering the landslide initiation. Most people may answer this will be dependent on a given storm hyetograph only because of an unsteady process, but here we are considering the meaning of its distribution in a long historical evolution of the soil layer on a steep hillslope in an active tectonic region such as Japan and the West Coast. A quasi-steady state created within a soil layer in response to a given hydraulic condition can give us important information for developing a simulation model for the evolution process of a soil layer.

  4. Estimation of fault hydraulic properties on regional time and spatial scales using pre-production overpressure distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, E.; Verweij, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of the analysis and interpretation of the observed pre-production fluid overpressure distribution in Rotliegend sandstones in block L8 in the Dutch offshore. The general objective of this study is to develop workflows to improve the understanding of timescales

  5. DCE: A Distributed Energy-Efficient Clustering Protocol for Wireless Sensor Network Based on Double-Phase Cluster-Head Election.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ruisong; Yang, Wei; Wang, Yipeng; You, Kaiming

    2017-05-01

    Clustering is an effective technique used to reduce energy consumption and extend the lifetime of wireless sensor network (WSN). The characteristic of energy heterogeneity of WSNs should be considered when designing clustering protocols. We propose and evaluate a novel distributed energy-efficient clustering protocol called DCE for heterogeneous wireless sensor networks, based on a Double-phase Cluster-head Election scheme. In DCE, the procedure of cluster head election is divided into two phases. In the first phase, tentative cluster heads are elected with the probabilities which are decided by the relative levels of initial and residual energy. Then, in the second phase, the tentative cluster heads are replaced by their cluster members to form the final set of cluster heads if any member in their cluster has more residual energy. Employing two phases for cluster-head election ensures that the nodes with more energy have a higher chance to be cluster heads. Energy consumption is well-distributed in the proposed protocol, and the simulation results show that DCE achieves longer stability periods than other typical clustering protocols in heterogeneous scenarios.

  6. Hydraulic Actuators with Autonomous Hydraulic Supply for the Mainline Aircrafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Shumilov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Applied in the aircraft control systems, hydraulic servo actuators with autonomous hydraulic supply, so-called, hydraulic actuators of integrated configuration, i.e. combination of a source of hydraulic power and its load in the single unit, are aimed at increasing control system reliability both owing to elimination of the pipelines connecting the actuator to the hydraulic supply source, and owing to avoidance of influence of other loads failure on the actuator operability. Their purpose is also to raise control system survivability by eliminating the long pipeline communications and their replacing for the electro-conductive power supply system, thus reducing the vulnerability of systems. The main reason for a delayed application of the hydraulic actuators in the cutting-edge aircrafts was that such aircrafts require hydraulic actuators of considerably higher power with considerable heat releases, which caused an unacceptable overheat of the hydraulic actuators. Positive and negative sides of the hydraulic actuators, their alternative options of increased reliability and survivability, local hydraulic systems as an advanced alternative to independent hydraulic actuators are considered.Now to use hydraulic actuators in mainline aircrafts is inexpedient since there are the unfairly large number of the problems reducing, first and last, safety of flights, with no essential weight and operational advantages. Still works to create competitive hydraulic actuators ought to be continued.Application of local hydraulic systems (LHS will allow us to reduce length of pressure head and drain pipelines and mass of pipelines, as well as to raise their general fail-safety and survivability. Application of the LHS principle will allow us to use a majority of steering drive advantages. It is necessary to allocate especially the following:- ease of meeting requirements for the non-local spread of the engine weight;- essentially reducing length and weight of

  7. WATER ENERGY IN HYDROAMELIORATIVE SYSTEMS USING THE HYDRAULIC TRANSFORMER TYPE A. BARGLAZAN AND THE HYDRAULIC HAMMER (HYDRAULIC PUMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodor Eugen Man

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents two examples of exploitation of water energy that can be used in the irrigation field. First of theseexamples is the hydraulic transformer type A. Barglazan used for irrigation, pumped water is taken directly from theriver’s well, using a hydraulic pump which simultaneously carried out a double transformation in this way: hydraulicenergy into mechanic energy and mechanical energy into hydraulic energy. Technology preparation and devices designwas done in record time, seeing that this constructive solution is more robust, reliable and with improved energyperformance versus the laboratory prototype. The experimental research which was made at 1:1 scale proved theirgood function over time. Another example is the hydraulic hammer (hydraulic pump that uses low-head energy topump water, with a global efficiency of about 10 - 50%. Currently, the new situation of private ownership of landprovides conditions for new pumping microstations to be made where irrigation is necessary and optimal hydrauliclocations exist.

  8. Characteristic study of head-on collision of dust-ion acoustic solitons of opposite polarity with kappa distributed electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Shahida; Mahmood, Shahzad; Adnan, Muhammad; Qamar, Anisa

    2016-09-01

    The head on collision between two dust ion acoustic (DIA) solitary waves, propagating in opposite directions, is studied in an unmagnetized plasma constituting adiabatic ions, static dust charged (positively/negatively) grains, and non-inertial kappa distributed electrons. In the linear limit, the dispersion relation of the dust ion acoustic (DIA) solitary wave is obtained using the Fourier analysis. For studying characteristic head-on collision of DIA solitons, the extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo method is employed to obtain Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations with quadratic nonlinearities and investigated the phase shifts in their trajectories after the interaction. It is revealed that only compressive solitary waves can exist for the positive dust charged concentrations while for negative dust charge concentrations both the compressive and rarefactive solitons can propagate in such dusty plasma. It is found that for specific sets of plasma parameters, the coefficient of nonlinearity disappears in the KdV equation for the negative dust charged grains. Therefore, the modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equations with cubic nonlinearity coefficient, and their corresponding phase shift and trajectories, are also derived for negative dust charged grains plasma at critical composition. The effects of different plasma parameters such as superthermality, concentration of positively/negatively static dust charged grains, and ion to electron temperature ratio on the colliding soliton profiles and their corresponding phase shifts are parametrically examined.

  9. Heading for new shores: projecting marine distribution ranges of selected larger foraminifera.

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    Anna E Weinmann

    Full Text Available The distribution of modern symbiont-bearing larger foraminifera is confined to tropical and subtropical shallow water marine habitats and a narrow range of environmental variables (e.g. temperature. Most of today's taxa are restricted to tropical and subtropical regions (between 30°N and 30°S and their minimum temperature limits are governed by the 14 to 20°C isotherms. However, during times of extensive global warming (e.g., the Eocene and Miocene, larger foraminifera have been found as far north as 50°N (North America and Central Europe as well as towards 47°S in New Zealand. During the last century, sea surface temperatures have been rising significantly. This trend is expected to continue and climate change scenarios for 2050 suggest a further increase by 1 to 3°C. We applied Species Distribution Models to assess potential distribution range changes of three taxa of larger foraminifera under current and future climate. The studied foraminifera include Archaias angulatus, Calcarina spp., and Amphistegina spp., and represent taxa with regional, superregional and global distribution patterns. Under present environmental conditions, Amphistegina spp. shows the largest potential distribution, apparently due to its temperature tolerance. Both Archaias angulatus and Calcarina spp. display potential distributions that cover currently uninhabited regions. Under climate conditions expected for the year 2050, all taxa should display latitudinal range expansions between 1 to 2.5 degrees both north- and southward. The modeled range projections suggest that some larger foraminifera may colonize biogeographic regions that so far seemed unsuitable. Archaias angulatus and Calcarina spp. also show an increase in habitat suitability within their native occurrence ranges, suggesting that their tolerance for maximum temperatures has yet not been fully exploited and that they benefit from ocean warming. Our findings suggest an increased role of larger

  10. Heading for new shores: projecting marine distribution ranges of selected larger foraminifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinmann, Anna E; Rödder, Dennis; Lötters, Stefan; Langer, Martin R

    2013-01-01

    The distribution of modern symbiont-bearing larger foraminifera is confined to tropical and subtropical shallow water marine habitats and a narrow range of environmental variables (e.g. temperature). Most of today's taxa are restricted to tropical and subtropical regions (between 30°N and 30°S) and their minimum temperature limits are governed by the 14 to 20°C isotherms. However, during times of extensive global warming (e.g., the Eocene and Miocene), larger foraminifera have been found as far north as 50°N (North America and Central Europe) as well as towards 47°S in New Zealand. During the last century, sea surface temperatures have been rising significantly. This trend is expected to continue and climate change scenarios for 2050 suggest a further increase by 1 to 3°C. We applied Species Distribution Models to assess potential distribution range changes of three taxa of larger foraminifera under current and future climate. The studied foraminifera include Archaias angulatus, Calcarina spp., and Amphistegina spp., and represent taxa with regional, superregional and global distribution patterns. Under present environmental conditions, Amphistegina spp. shows the largest potential distribution, apparently due to its temperature tolerance. Both Archaias angulatus and Calcarina spp. display potential distributions that cover currently uninhabited regions. Under climate conditions expected for the year 2050, all taxa should display latitudinal range expansions between 1 to 2.5 degrees both north- and southward. The modeled range projections suggest that some larger foraminifera may colonize biogeographic regions that so far seemed unsuitable. Archaias angulatus and Calcarina spp. also show an increase in habitat suitability within their native occurrence ranges, suggesting that their tolerance for maximum temperatures has yet not been fully exploited and that they benefit from ocean warming. Our findings suggest an increased role of larger foraminifera as

  11. The Fate and Distribution of Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Intra-Arterial Infusion in Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongting Jin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate if autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs could treat osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH and what the fate and distribution of the cells are in dogs. Twelve Beagle dogs were randomly divided into two groups: MSCs group and SHAM operated group. After three weeks, dogs in MSCs group and SHAM operated group were intra-arterially injected with autologous MSCs and 0.9% normal saline, respectively. Eight weeks after treatment, the necrotic volume of the femoral heads was significantly reduced in MSCs group. Moreover, the trabecular bone volume was increased and the empty lacunae rate was decreased in MSCs group. In addition, the BrdU-positive MSCs were unevenly distributed in femoral heads and various vital organs. But no obvious abnormalities were observed. Furthermore, most of BrdU-positive MSCs in necrotic region expressed osteocalcin in MSCs group and a few expressed peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ. Taken together, these data indicated that intra-arterially infused MSCs could migrate into the necrotic field of femoral heads and differentiate into osteoblasts, thus improving the necrosis of femoral heads. It suggests that intra-arterial infusion of autologous MSCs might be a feasible and relatively safe method for the treatment of femoral head necrosis.

  12. Hydraulic characterization of " Furcraea andina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Velasquez, M. F.; Fallico, C.; Molinari, A.; Santillan, P.; Salazar, M.

    2012-04-01

    The present level of pollution, increasingly involving groundwaters, constitutes a serious risk for environment and human health. Therefore the remediation of saturated and unsaturated soils, removing pollutant materials through innovative and economic bio-remediation techniques is more frequently required. Recent studies on natural fiber development have shown the effectiveness of these fibers for removal of some heavy metals, due to the lignin content in the natural fibers which plays an important role in the adsorption of metal cations (Lee et al., 2004; Troisi et al., 2008; C. Fallico, 2010). In the context of remediation techniques for unsaturated and/or saturated zone, an experimental approach for the hydraulic characterization of the "Furcraea andina" (i.e., Cabuya Blanca) fiber was carried out. This fiber is native to Andean regions and grows easily in wild or cultivated form in the valleys and hillsides of Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Fibers of "Furcraea andina" were characterized by experimental tests to determine their hydraulic conductivity or permeability and porosity in order to use this medium for bioremediation of contaminated aquifer exploiting the physical, chemical and microbial capacity of natural fiber in heavy metal adsorption. To evaluate empirically the hydraulic conductivity, laboratory tests were carried out at constant head specifically on the fibers manually extracted. For these tests we used a flow cell (used as permeameter), containing the "Furcraea andina" fibers to be characterized, suitably connected by a tygon pipe to a Marriott's bottle, which had a plastic tube that allow the adjustment of the hydraulic head for different tests to a constant value. By this experiment it was also possible to identify relationships that enable the estimation of permeability as a function of density, i.e. of the compaction degree of the fibers. Our study was carried out for three values of hydraulic head (H), namely 10, 18, and 25 cm and for each

  13. Characterisation of river-aquifer exchange fluxes: The role of spatial patterns of riverbed hydraulic conductivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Q.; Kurtz, W.; Brunner, P.; Vereecken, H.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.

    2015-12-01

    KF and NS-EnKF improve the characterisation of non-MultiGaussian riverbed properties, hydraulic heads and exchange fluxes by piezometric head assimilation, and only NS-EnKF could preserve the initial distribution of riverbed hydraulic conductivities.

  14. Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomavirus infections and genotype distribution in head and neck cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyi Deng

    Full Text Available To investigate the prevalence, genotypes, and prognostic values of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and human papillomavirus (HPV infections in Japanese patients with different types of head and neck cancer (HNC.HPV and EBV DNA, EBV genotypes and LMP-1 variants, and HPV mRNA expression were detected by PCR from fresh-frozen HNC samples. HPV genotypes were determined by direct sequencing, and EBV encoded RNA (EBER was examined by in situ hybridization.Of the 209 HNC patients, 63 (30.1% had HPV infection, and HPV-16 was the most common subtype (86.9%. HPV E6/E7 mRNA expression was found in 23 of 60 (38.3% HPV DNA-positive cases detected. The site of highest prevalence of HPV was the oropharynx (45.9%. Among 146 (69.9% HNCs in which EBV DNA was identified, 107 (73.3% and 27 (18.5% contained types A and B, respectively, and 124 (84.9% showed the existence of del-LMP-1. However, only 13 (6.2% HNCs were positive for EBER, 12 (92.3% of which derived from the nasopharynx. Co-infection of HPV and EBER was found in only 1.0% of HNCs and 10.0% of NPCs. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed significantly better disease-specific and overall survival in the HPV DNA+/mRNA+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPC patients than in the other OPC patients (P = 0.027 and 0.017, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that stage T1-3 (P = 0.002 and HPV mRNA-positive status (P = 0.061 independently predicted better disease-specific survival. No significant difference in disease-specific survival was found between the EBER-positive and -negative NPC patients (P = 0.155.Our findings indicate that co-infection with HPV and EBV is rare in HNC. Oropharyngeal SCC with active HPV infection was related to a highly favorable outcome, while EBV status was not prognostic in the NPC cohort.

  15. Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomavirus infections and genotype distribution in head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zeyi; Uehara, Takayuki; Maeda, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Matayoshi, Sen; Kiyuna, Asanori; Agena, Shinya; Pan, Xiaoli; Zhang, Chunlin; Yamashita, Yukashi; Xie, Minqiang; Suzuki, Mikio

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence, genotypes, and prognostic values of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in Japanese patients with different types of head and neck cancer (HNC). HPV and EBV DNA, EBV genotypes and LMP-1 variants, and HPV mRNA expression were detected by PCR from fresh-frozen HNC samples. HPV genotypes were determined by direct sequencing, and EBV encoded RNA (EBER) was examined by in situ hybridization. Of the 209 HNC patients, 63 (30.1%) had HPV infection, and HPV-16 was the most common subtype (86.9%). HPV E6/E7 mRNA expression was found in 23 of 60 (38.3%) HPV DNA-positive cases detected. The site of highest prevalence of HPV was the oropharynx (45.9%). Among 146 (69.9%) HNCs in which EBV DNA was identified, 107 (73.3%) and 27 (18.5%) contained types A and B, respectively, and 124 (84.9%) showed the existence of del-LMP-1. However, only 13 (6.2%) HNCs were positive for EBER, 12 (92.3%) of which derived from the nasopharynx. Co-infection of HPV and EBER was found in only 1.0% of HNCs and 10.0% of NPCs. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed significantly better disease-specific and overall survival in the HPV DNA+/mRNA+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPC) patients than in the other OPC patients (P = 0.027 and 0.017, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that stage T1-3 (P = 0.002) and HPV mRNA-positive status (P = 0.061) independently predicted better disease-specific survival. No significant difference in disease-specific survival was found between the EBER-positive and -negative NPC patients (P = 0.155). Our findings indicate that co-infection with HPV and EBV is rare in HNC. Oropharyngeal SCC with active HPV infection was related to a highly favorable outcome, while EBV status was not prognostic in the NPC cohort.

  16. A distributed hydrologic model for the estimation of the design flood and for the hydraulic safety of existing dams in Sardinia (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortis, Clorinda; Sarigu, Alessio; Montaldo, Nicola; Saba, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    The recent floods observed in 2004 and 2008 in Sardinia (Italy) showed a significant flood increase in magnitude and frequency and put the attention on the problem of the hydraulic safety of existing dams. Thirty dams built for both electric production and water supply for irrigation and civil uses during the 1920-1960 are present in Sardinia (Italy). The distributed hydrologic model is an event model (FEST) which assesses runoff through a simplified approach based on Soil Conservation Service equations and runoff propagation through the Muskingum-Cunge approach. The FEST needs the calibration of different parameters: 1) the critical support area that defines the minimum drainage area required to initiate a channel, 2) the ratio between cross-section width and flood flow depth for hillslope, 3) the hillslope values of the Gaulckler-Stickler roughness coefficient, and 4) the Curve Number obtained/extracted from the landscape characteristics of each basin. The data collection of numerous historical flood observations of the Sardinian basins allow for the first time to accurately calibrate an hydrologic model for the Sardinian basins, characterized by hortonian runoff mechanisms typically, steep hillslopes and thin soils. Areas of the catchments are between 4 and 3147 Km2 and the basins are characterized by an high variability of the landscape characteristics such as geology, topography, soil, land use and vegetation. Using the calibrated hydrologic model and the synthetic design hyetograph the design floods of the dams are estimated. The comparison between peak flows of the generated design floods and those estimated using typical regionalized statistical methods (based for Sardinian studies on two components extreme value (TCEV) and logarithmic probabilistic distributions) shows contradiction and interesting results. For large scale basin (> 200 km2) the two contrasting methods agree, while for small basins the proposed method underestimates the peak respect to the

  17. Undular Hydraulic Jump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Castro-Orgaz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The transition from subcritical to supercritical flow when the inflow Froude number Fo is close to unity appears in the form of steady state waves called undular hydraulic jump. The characterization of the undular hydraulic jump is complex due to the existence of a non-hydrostatic pressure distribution that invalidates the gradually-varied flow theory, and supercritical shock waves. The objective of this work is to present a mathematical model for the undular hydraulic jump obtained from an approximate integration of the Reynolds equations for turbulent flow assuming that the Reynolds number R is high. Simple analytical solutions are presented to reveal the physics of the theory, and a numerical model is used to integrate the complete equations. The limit of application of the theory is discussed using a wave breaking condition for the inception of a surface roller. The validity of the mathematical predictions is critically assessed using physical data, thereby revealing aspects on which more research is needed

  18. Development and implementation of a fluid flow code to evaluate block hydraulic behaviors of the fractured rock masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Jeong-Gi; Han, Jisu; Lee, Dahye; Cho, Taechin

    2017-04-01

    A computer program code was developed to estimate the hydraulic head distribution through the 2-D DFN(discrete fracture network) blocks considering hydraulic aperture of the individual fractures, and to determine flow quantity, directional block hydraulic conductivity and principal hydraulic conductivity tensor according to fracture geometry such as orientation, frequency and size of the fracture network systems. The generated stochastic DFN system is assumed to have a network structure in which the equivalent flow pipe composed linear fractures is complexly connected. DFN systems often include individual or group of sub-network that are isolated from a network that can act as fluid flow passages from one flow boundary to another, and the fluid flow is completely blocked due to lack of connectivity. Fractures that are completely or partially isolated in the DFN system do not contribute to the overall fluid flow through the DFN system and add to the burden of numerical computation. This sometimes leads to numerical instability and failure to provide a solution. In this study, geometric and mathematical routines were designed and implemented to classify and eliminate such sub-networks. The developed program code can calculate the total head at each node connected to the flow path with various aperture as well as hydraulic conductivity of the individual flow pipe using the SOR method. Numerical experiments have been carried out to explore the applicability of the developed program code. A total of 108 stochastic 2-D DFN blocks of 20 m×20 m with various hydraulic aperture were prepared using two joint sets with fixed input parameters of fracture orientation, frequency and size distribution. The hydraulic anisotropy and the chance for equivalent continuum behavior of the DFN system were found to depend on the variability of fracture aperture.

  19. Permeâmetro de carga decrescente associado a programa computacional para a determinação da condutividade hidráulica do solo saturado Falling head permeameter and software to determine the hydraulic conductivity of saturated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Ivonir Gubiani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A condutividade hidráulica do solo saturado (Kθs é uma propriedade com grande variabilidade, o que exige a utilização de um número maior de determinações para que sua descrição possa ser feita adequadamente pela função densidade de probabilidade normal. Consequentemente, há aumento de trabalho e de tempo para a obtenção dos resultados, principalmente se as determinações forem feitas com equipamentos de pouca praticidade. A construção de equipamentos de maior praticidade e o desenvolvimento de ferramentas computacionais podem tornar o processo de análise mais rápido e preciso. Com esse objetivo, foi construído um permeâmetro de carga decrescente e desenvolvido um software para a aquisição de dados. As medidas de Kθs obtidas com esses equipamentos, em amostras de um Argissolo, mostraram menor variabilidade, avaliada pelo coeficiente de variação, o que resultou em maior precisão das determinações. Além disso, o tempo de análise foi reduzido em 30 %.The soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kθs is a property with great variability, which requires the use of a greater number of determinations so that they can be described by the normal probability density function. Consequently, there is an increase in time and labor to obtain Kθs results if determined by conventional equipment. The use of more practical equipment and computational tools allows a faster and more accurate analysis. With this aim a falling head permeameter was built and a software for data acquisition was developed. Values of Kθs obtained with this equipment in Hapludalf samples showed less variability, as assessed by the coefficient of variation, resulting in more precise measurements. Moreover, the time of analysis was reduced by 30 %.

  20. Computation of high-resolution SAR distributions in a head due to a radiating dipole antenna representing a hand-held mobile phone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Kamer, JB; Lagendijk, JJW

    2002-01-01

    SAR distributions in a healthy female adult head as a result of a radiating vertical dipole antenna (frequency 915 MHz) representing a hand-field mobile phone have been computed for three different resolutions: 2 mm, 1 mm and 0.4 mm. The extremely high resolution of 0.4 mm was obtained with our quas

  1. Investigating patterns and controls of groundwater up-welling in a lowland river by combining Fibre-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing with observations of vertical hydraulic gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krause

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the patterns and controls of aquifer–river exchange in a fast-flowing lowland river by the conjunctive use of streambed temperature anomalies identified with Fibre-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (FO-DTS and observations of vertical hydraulic gradients (VHG.

    FO-DTS temperature traces along this lowland river reach reveal discrete patterns with "cold spots" indicating groundwater up-welling. In contrast to previous studies using FO-DTS for investigation of groundwater–surface water exchange, the fibre-optic cable in this study was buried in the streambed sediments, ensuring clear signals despite fast flow and high discharges. During the observed summer baseflow period, streambed temperatures in groundwater up-welling locations were found to be up to 1.5 °C lower than ambient streambed temperatures. Due to the high river flows, the cold spots were sharp and distinctly localized without measurable impact on down-stream surface water temperature.

    VHG patterns along the stream reach were highly variable in space, revealing strong differences even at small scales. VHG patterns alone are indicators of both, structural heterogeneity of the stream bed as well as of the spatial heterogeneity of the groundwater–surface water exchange fluxes and are thus not conclusive in their interpretation. However, in combination with the high spatial resolution FO-DTS data we were able to separate these two influences and clearly identify locations of enhanced exchange, while also obtaining information on the complex small-scale streambed transmissivity patterns responsible for the very discrete exchange patterns. The validation of the combined VHG and FO-DTS approach provides an effective strategy for analysing drivers and controls of groundwater–surface water exchange, with implications for the quantification of biogeochemical cycling and contaminant transport at aquifer–river interfaces.

  2. Use of complex hydraulic variables to predict the distribution and density of unionids in a side channel of the Upper Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuer, J.J.; Newton, T.J.; Zigler, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    Previous attempts to predict the importance of abiotic and biotic factors to unionids in large rivers have been largely unsuccessful. Many simple physical habitat descriptors (e.g., current velocity, substrate particle size, and water depth) have limited ability to predict unionid density. However, more recent studies have found that complex hydraulic variables (e.g., shear velocity, boundary shear stress, and Reynolds number) may be more useful predictors of unionid density. We performed a retrospective analysis with unionid density, current velocity, and substrate particle size data from 1987 to 1988 in a 6-km reach of the Upper Mississippi River near Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin. We used these data to model simple and complex hydraulic variables under low and high flow conditions. We then used classification and regression tree analysis to examine the relationships between hydraulic variables and unionid density. We found that boundary Reynolds number, Froude number, boundary shear stress, and grain size were the best predictors of density. Models with complex hydraulic variables were a substantial improvement over previously published discriminant models and correctly classified 65-88% of the observations for the total mussel fauna and six species. These data suggest that unionid beds may be constrained by threshold limits at both ends of the flow regime. Under low flow, mussels may require a minimum hydraulic variable (Rez.ast;, Fr) to transport nutrients, oxygen, and waste products. Under high flow, areas with relatively low boundary shear stress may provide a hydraulic refuge for mussels. Data on hydraulic preferences and identification of other conditions that constitute unionid habitat are needed to help restore and enhance habitats for unionids in rivers. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  3. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF THE HYDRAULIC CHARACTERISTICS OF SIDE INLET/OUTLETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Fei; GAO Xue-ping

    2011-01-01

    The hydraulic characteristics at the side inlet/outlet of pumped storage plants is studied by numerical simulations, covering the flow distribution, head loss, vortex, and others.Based on the physical model test, the realizable k - ε turbulence model is used in the 3-D simulation of the side inlet/outlet.A new scheme is suggested to obtain the uneven flow distribution over three branch orifices.The variation of the free surface with the reservoir water level under the pumped condition is simulated, with results consistent with the experimental results.

  4. Gravity-Driven Hydraulic Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germanovich, L. N.; Garagash, D.; Murdoch, L. C.; Robinowitz, M.

    2014-12-01

    This study is motived by a new method for disposing of nuclear waste by injecting it as a dense slurry into a hydraulic fracture that grows downward to great enough depth to permanently isolate the waste. Disposing of nuclear waste using gravity-driven hydraulic fractures is mechanically similar to the upward growth of dikes filled with low density magma. A fundamental question in both applications is how the injected fluid controls the propagation dynamics and fracture geometry (depth and breadth) in three dimensions. Analog experiments in gelatin [e.g., Heimpel and Olson, 1994; Taisne and Tait, 2009] show that fracture breadth (the short horizontal dimension) remains nearly stationary when the process in the fracture "head" (where breadth is controlled) is dominated by solid toughness, whereas viscous fluid dissipation is dominant in the fracture tail. We model propagation of the resulting gravity-driven (buoyant or sinking), finger-like fracture of stationary breadth with slowly varying opening along the crack length. The elastic response to fluid loading in a horizontal cross-section is local and can be treated similar to the classical Perkins-Kern-Nordgren (PKN) model of hydraulic fracturing. The propagation condition for a finger-like crack is based on balancing the global energy release rate due to a unit crack extension with the rock fracture toughness. It allows us to relate the net fluid pressure at the tip to the fracture breadth and rock toughness. Unlike the PKN fracture, where breadth is known a priori, the final breadth of a finger-like fracture is a result of processes in the fracture head. Because the head is much more open than the tail, viscous pressure drop in the head can be neglected leading to a 3D analog of Weertman's hydrostatic pulse. This requires relaxing the local elasticity assumption of the PKN model in the fracture head. As a result, we resolve the breadth, and then match the viscosity-dominated tail with the 3-D, toughness

  5. Evaluation of dose-volume metrics for microbeam radiation therapy dose distributions in head phantoms of various sizes using Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Danielle; Siegbahn, E. Albert; Fallone, B. Gino; Serduc, Raphael; Warkentin, Brad

    2012-05-01

    This work evaluates four dose-volume metrics applied to microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) using simulated dosimetric data as input. We seek to improve upon the most frequently used MRT metric, the peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR), by analyzing MRT dose distributions from a more volumetric perspective. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate dose distributions in three cubic head phantoms: a 2 cm mouse head, an 8 cm cat head and a 16 cm dog head. The dose distribution was calculated for a 4 × 4 mm2 microbeam array in each phantom, as well as a 16 × 16 mm2 array in the 8 cm cat head, and a 32 × 32 mm2 array in the 16 cm dog head. Microbeam widths of 25, 50 and 75 µm and center-to-center spacings of 100, 200 and 400 µm were considered. The metrics calculated for each simulation were the conventional PVDR, the peak-to-mean valley dose ratio (PMVDR), the mean dose and the percentage volume below a threshold dose. The PVDR ranged between 3 and 230 for the 2 cm mouse phantom, and between 2 and 186 for the 16 cm dog phantom depending on geometry. The corresponding ranges for the PMVDR were much smaller, being 2-49 (mouse) and 2-46 (dog), and showed a slightly weaker dependence on phantom size and array size. The ratio of the PMVDR to the PVDR varied from 0.21 to 0.79 for the different collimation configurations, indicating a difference between the geometric dependence on outcome that would be predicted by these two metrics. For unidirectional irradiation, the mean lesion dose was 102%, 79% and 42% of the mean skin dose for the 2 cm mouse, 8 cm cat and 16 cm dog head phantoms, respectively. However, the mean lesion dose recovered to 83% of the mean skin dose in the 16 cm dog phantom in intersecting cross-firing regions. The percentage volume below a 10% dose threshold was highly dependent on geometry, with ranges for the different collimation configurations of 2-87% and 33-96% for the 2 cm mouse and 16 cm dog heads, respectively. The results of this study

  6. Complex Fluids and Hydraulic Fracturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbati, Alexander C; Desroches, Jean; Robisson, Agathe; McKinley, Gareth H

    2016-06-07

    Nearly 70 years old, hydraulic fracturing is a core technique for stimulating hydrocarbon production in a majority of oil and gas reservoirs. Complex fluids are implemented in nearly every step of the fracturing process, most significantly to generate and sustain fractures and transport and distribute proppant particles during and following fluid injection. An extremely wide range of complex fluids are used: naturally occurring polysaccharide and synthetic polymer solutions, aqueous physical and chemical gels, organic gels, micellar surfactant solutions, emulsions, and foams. These fluids are loaded over a wide range of concentrations with particles of varying sizes and aspect ratios and are subjected to extreme mechanical and environmental conditions. We describe the settings of hydraulic fracturing (framed by geology), fracturing mechanics and physics, and the critical role that non-Newtonian fluid dynamics and complex fluids play in the hydraulic fracturing process.

  7. Ultra-low-head hydroelectric technology: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Daqing; Deng, Zhiqun (Daniel)

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, distributed renewable energy-generation technologies, such as wind and solar, have developed rapidly. Nevertheless, the utilization of ultra-low-head (ULH) water energy (i.e., situations where the hydraulic head is less than 3 m or the water flow is more than 0.5 m/s with zero head) has received little attention. We believe that, through technological innovations and cost reductions, ULH hydropower has the potential to become an attractive, renewable, and sustainable resource. This paper investigates potential sites for ULH energy resources, the selection of relevant turbines and generators, simplification of civil works, and project costs. This review introduces the current achievements on ULH hydroelectric technology to stimulate discussions and participation of stakeholders to develop related technologies for further expanding its utilization as an important form of renewable energy.

  8. Etude numérique et expérimentale des distributions équipées de poussoirs hydrauliques. Influence et comportement de l'aération de l'huile Numerical and Experimental Study of Valvetrains Equipped with Hydraulic Lash Adjusters. Influence and Behaviour of Oil Aeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porot P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Un code numérique de simulation des distributions équipées de poussoirs hydrauliques a été développé. Le code est basé sur trois sous-modèles couplés : mécanique, hydraulique et physique. Le premier étudie la distribution comme un assemblage masses ressorts, le deuxième étudie le poussoir comme un organe hydraulique à part entière et le dernier permet d'étudier l'aération de l'huile et en particulier les phénomènes de dissolution. Une validation expérimentale a été menée sur un banc culasse alimenté par une huile mélangée à de l'air en proportions mesurées. L'instrumentation permettait de mesurer l'accélération de la tête de soupape, son déplacement au voisinage du siège et la force entre poussoir et soupape. Cette validation a montré que la simulation reflétait bien la réalité, notamment en ce qui concerne les effets de l'aération. A model of valvetrain equipped with a direct acting hydraulic lash adjuster (HLA is presented. As it is the cause of many problems, a possible aeration is taken into account. The main model is made of three submodels:1. The first one is a mechanical one with masses, springs and dampers and needs the cam laws and the pressure of the chamber of the HLA as data. 2. The second submodel is an hydraulic one. It studies the HLA chamber through the check valve flows, the leakage flow and the mechanical strains on the chamber oil. This submodel gives the chamber pressure to the first submodel. 3. The third submodel is a physical one and evaluates the instantaneous amount of air present in the chamber oil. It takes into account the arrival of new bubbles through the check valve and the mass exchanges (diffusion, dissolution between the bubbles and the oil bulk. This amount of air has a direct influence on the chamber pressure calculation made in the second submodel. Experimental validation of the model was conducted on an engine head. This engine head was feeded by an oil circuit in which

  9. HYDRAULICS, LOUISA COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydraulic data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydraulic analysis for estimating flood stages for a flood insurance study. It...

  10. Hydraulic Hybrid Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA and the United Parcel Service (UPS) have developed a hydraulic hybrid delivery vehicle to explore and demonstrate the environmental benefits of the hydraulic hybrid for urban pick-up and delivery fleets.

  11. Analyzing the effects of geological and parameter uncertainty on prediction of groundwater head and travel time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. He

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainty of groundwater model predictions has in the past mostly been related to uncertainty in the hydraulic parameters, whereas uncertainty in the geological structure has not been considered to the same extent. Recent developments in theoretical methods for quantifying geological uncertainty have made it possible to consider this factor in groundwater modeling. In this study we have applied the multiple-point geostatistical method (MPS integrated in the Stanford Geostatistical Modeling Software (SGeMS for exploring the impact of geological uncertainty on groundwater flow patterns for a site in Denmark. Realizations from the geostatistical model were used as input to a groundwater model developed from Modular three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water model (MODFLOW within the Groundwater Modeling System (GMS modeling environment. The uncertainty analysis was carried out in three scenarios involving simulation of groundwater head distribution and travel time. The first scenario implied 100 stochastic geological models all assigning the same hydraulic parameters for the same geological units. In the second scenario the same 100 geological models were subjected to model optimization, where the hydraulic parameters for each of them were estimated by calibration against observations of hydraulic head and stream discharge. In the third scenario each geological model was run with 216 randomized sets of parameters. The analysis documented that the uncertainty on the conceptual geological model was as significant as the uncertainty related to the embedded hydraulic parameters.

  12. 修筑寒区小型水利工程的经验回顾%A Review of Experience in Constructing Low-head Hydraulic Projects in Permafrost Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rudolf V. Zhang

    2004-01-01

    The paper provides a review of experience with the construction of hydraulic projects in the permafrost regions. Principles for construction, operation and maintenance of earth dams are refined and formulated. High priority needs for improving the stability of structures are identified.

  13. Sliding of microtubules by a team of dynein motors: Understanding the effect of spatial distribution of motor tails and mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hanumant Pratap; Takshak, Anjneya; Mall, Utkarsh; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2016-06-01

    Molecular motors are natural nanomachines that use the free energy released from ATP hydrolysis to generate mechanical forces. Cytoplasmic dynein motors often work collectively as a team to drive important processes such as axonal growth, proplatelet formation and mitosis, as forces generated by single motors are insufficient. A large team of dynein motors is used to slide cytoskeletal microtubules with respect to one another during the process of proplatelet formation and axonal growth. These motors attach to a cargo microtubule via their tail domains, undergo the process of detachment and reattachment of their head domains on another track microtubule, while sliding the cargo microtubule along the track. Traditional continuum/mean-field approaches used in the past are not ideal for studying the sliding mechanism of microtubules, as they ignore spatial and temporal fluctuations due to different possible distributions of motor tails on cargo filament, as well as binding/unbinding of motors from their track. Therefore, these models cannot be used to address important questions such as how the distribution of motor tails on microtubules, or how the mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubule tracks affects the sliding velocity of cargo microtubule. To answer these, here we use a computational stochastic model where we model each dynein motor explicitly. In our model, we use both random as well as uniform distributions of dynein motors on cargo microtubule, as well as mutual exclusion of motors on microtubule tracks. We find that sliding velocities are least affected by the distribution of motor tails on microtubules, whereas they are greatly affected by mutual exclusion of motor heads on microtubule tracks. We also find that sliding velocity depends on the length of cargo microtubule if mutual exclusion among motor heads is considered.

  14. On the Hydraulics of Flowing Horizontal Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, A.; Zhan, H.

    2003-12-01

    A flowing horizontal well is a special type of horizontal well that does not have pumping/injecting facility. The discharge rate of a flowing horizontal well is controlled by the hydraulic gradient between the aquifer and the well and it generally varies with time if the hydraulic head of the aquifer is transient. This type of well has been used in landslide control, mining dewatering, water table control, underground water transportation through a horizontal tunnel, agricultural water drainage, and other applications. Flowing horizontal wells have quite different hydrodynamic characteristics from horizontal wells with fixed pumping or injecting rates because their discharge rates are functions of the aquifer hydraulic heads (Zhan et al, 2001; Zhan and Zlotnik, 2002). Hydraulics of flowing horizontal wells have rarely been studied although the hydraulics of flowing vertical wells have been extensively investigated before. The purpose of this paper is to obtain analytical solutions of groundwater flow to a flowing horizontal-well in a confined aquifer, in a water table aquifer without precipitation, and in a water table aquifer with precipitation. The functions of the flowing horizontal well discharge rates versus time will be obtained under above mentioned different aquifer conditions. The relationships of the aquifer hydraulic heads versus the discharge rates of the well will be investigated. The rate of water table decline due to the dewatering of the well will also be computed, and this solution is particularly useful for landslide control and mining dewatering. The theoretical solutions will be compared with results of experiments that will be conducted in the hydrological laboratory at Texas A&M University. Reference: Zhan, H., Wang, L.V., and Park, E, On the horizontal well pumping tests in the anisotropic confined aquifers, J. hydrol., 252, 37-50, 2001. Zhan, H., and Zlotnik, V. A., Groundwater flow to a horizontal or slanted well in an unconfined aquifer

  15. Thermal Hydraulic Stability in a Coaxial Thermosyphon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jianhui; LU Wenqiang; LI Qing; LI Qiang; ZHOU Yuan

    2005-01-01

    The heat transfer and thermal hydraulic stability in a two-phase thermosyphon with coaxial riser and down-comer has been experimentally investigated and theoretically analyzed to facilitate its application in cold neutron source. The flow in a coaxial thermosyphon was studied experimentally for a variety of heating rates, transfer tube lengths, charge capacities, and area ratios. A numerical analysis of the hydraulic balance between the driving pressure head and the resistance loss has also been performed. The results show that the presented coaxial thermosyphon has dynamic performance advantages relative to natural circulation in a boiling water reactor.

  16. Demographics, Velocity Distributions, and Impact Type as Predictors of AIS 4+ Head Injuries in Motor Vehicle Crashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Fitzharris, Michael; Pintar, Frank A.; Stemper, Brian D.; Rinaldi, James; Maiman, Dennis J.; Fildes, Brian N.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine differences between the United States-based NASS and CIREN and Australia-based ANCIS databases in occupant-, crash-, and vehicle-related parameters for AIS 4+ head injuries in motor vehicle crashes. Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine roles of the change in velocity (DV), crash type (frontal, far-side, nearside, rear impact), seatbelt use, and occupant position, gender, age, stature, and body mass in cranial traumas. Belted and unbelted non-ejected occupant (age >16 years) data from 1997–2006 were used for the NASS and CIREN datasets, and 2000–2010 for ANCIS. Vehicle model year, and occupant position and demographics including body mass index (BMI) data were obtained. Injuries were coded using AIS 1990–1998 update. Similarities were apparent across all databases: mean demographics were close to the mid-size anthropometry, mean BMI was in the normal to overweight range, and representations of extreme variations were uncommon. Side impacts contributed to over one-half of the ensemble, implying susceptibility to head trauma in this mode. Odds of sustaining head injury increased by 4% per unit increase in DV (OR: 1.04, 95% CI: 1.03–1.04, pcrash- and occupant-related outcomes from the two continents indicate a worldwide need to revise the translation acceleration-based head injury criterion to include the angular component in an appropriate format for improved injury assessment and mitigation. PMID:22105402

  17. Characteristics analysis for different water heads on the efficiency hill chart of Francis turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. N.; Guo, P. C.; Luo, X. Q.; Wang, Y. L.; Sun, S. H.

    2016-05-01

    Based on the test results of Francis turbine, the causes and inevitability of various hydraulic phenomena in the model combined characteristic curve for typical water heads were analyzed in this paper. the difference of the model combined characteristic curve from the low water head to the high water head is compared, and the characteristics and commonness of the model combined characteristic curve about different water head are summarized. Further, hydraulic performance and geometric features of Francis turbine are revealed by particularly analyzing model combined characteristic curves, and to provide powerful theoretical basis and definite modification direction for the hydraulic design of hydraulic turbine.

  18. Spatial variability in streambed hydraulic conductivity of contrasting stream morphologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sebök, Éva; Calvache, Carlos Duque; Engesgaard, Peter Knudegaard;

    2015-01-01

    Streambed hydraulic conductivity is one of the main factors controlling variability in surface water-groundwater interactions, but only few studies aim at quantifying its spatial and temporal variability in different stream morphologies. Streambed horizontal hydraulic conductivities (Kh) were...... therefore determined from in-stream slug tests, vertical hydraulic conductivities (Kv) were calculated with in-stream permeameter tests and hydraulic heads were measured to obtain vertical head gradients at eight transects, each comprising five test locations, in a groundwater-dominated stream. Seasonal...... small-scale measurements were taken in December 2011 and August 2012, both in a straight stream channel with homogeneous elevation and downstream of a channel meander with heterogeneous elevation. All streambed attributes showed large spatial variability. Kh values were the highest at the depositional...

  19. A preliminary assessment of the effects of heat flux distribution and penetration on the creep rupture of a reactor vessel lower head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.Y.; Bentz, J.; Simpson, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Witt, R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The objective of the Lower Head Failure (LHF) Experiment Program is to experimentally investigate and characterize the failure of the reactor vessel lower head due to thermal and pressure loads under severe accident conditions. The experiment is performed using 1/5-scale models of a typical PWR pressure vessel. Experiments are performed for various internal pressure and imposed heat flux distributions with and without instrumentation guide tube penetrations. The experimental program is complemented by a modest modeling program based on the application of vessel creep rupture codes developed in the TMI Vessel Investigation Project. The first three experiments under the LHF program investigated the creep rupture of simulated reactor pressure vessels without penetrations. The heat flux distributions for the three experiments are uniform (LHF-1), center-peaked (LHF-2), and side-peaked (LHF-3), respectively. For all the experiments, appreciable vessel deformation was observed to initiate at vessel wall temperatures above 900K and the vessel typically failed at approximately 1000K. The size of failure was always observed to be smaller than the heated region. For experiments with non-uniform heat flux distributions, failure typically occurs in the region of peak temperature. A brief discussion of the effect of penetration is also presented.

  20. Regional differences in islet distribution in the human pancreas--preferential beta-cell loss in the head region in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Wang

    Full Text Available While regional heterogeneity in islet distribution has been well studied in rodents, less is known about human pancreatic histology. To fill gaps in our understanding, regional differences in the adult human pancreas were quantitatively analyzed including the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D. Cadaveric pancreas specimens were collected from the head, body and tail regions of each donor, including subjects with no history of diabetes or pancreatic diseases (n = 23 as well as patients with T2D (n = 12. The study further included individuals from whom islets were isolated (n = 7 to study islet yield and function in a clinical setting of islet transplantation. The whole pancreatic sections were examined using an innovative large-scale image capture and unbiased detailed quantitative analyses of the characteristics of islets from each individual (architecture, size, shape and distribution. Islet distribution/density is similar between the head and body regions, but is >2-fold higher in the tail region. In contrast to rodents, islet cellular composition and architecture were similar throughout the pancreas and there was no difference in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in islets isolated from different regions of the pancreas. Further studies revealed preferential loss of large islets in the head region in patients with T2D. The present study has demonstrated distinct characteristics of the human pancreas, which should provide a baseline for the future studies integrating existing research in the field and helping to advance bi-directional research between humans and preclinical models.

  1. Thermally Actuated Hydraulic Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack; Ross, Ronald; Chao, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Thermally actuated hydraulic pumps have been proposed for diverse applications in which direct electrical or mechanical actuation is undesirable and the relative slowness of thermal actuation can be tolerated. The proposed pumps would not contain any sliding (wearing) parts in their compressors and, hence, could have long operational lifetimes. The basic principle of a pump according to the proposal is to utilize the thermal expansion and contraction of a wax or other phase-change material in contact with a hydraulic fluid in a rigid chamber. Heating the chamber and its contents from below to above the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to expand significantly, thus causing a substantial increase in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid out of the chamber. Similarly, cooling the chamber and its contents from above to below the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to contract significantly, thus causing a substantial decrease in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid into the chamber. The displacement of the hydraulic fluid could be used to drive a piston. The figure illustrates a simple example of a hydraulic jack driven by a thermally actuated hydraulic pump. The pump chamber would be a cylinder containing encapsulated wax pellets and containing radial fins to facilitate transfer of heat to and from the wax. The plastic encapsulation would serve as an oil/wax barrier and the remaining interior space could be filled with hydraulic oil. A filter would retain the encapsulated wax particles in the pump chamber while allowing the hydraulic oil to flow into and out of the chamber. In one important class of potential applications, thermally actuated hydraulic pumps, exploiting vertical ocean temperature gradients for heating and cooling as needed, would be used to vary hydraulic pressures to control buoyancy in undersea research

  2. Xylem hydraulic conductivity related to conduit dimensions along chrysanthemum stems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsse, J.; Heijden, van der G.W.A.M.; Ieperen, van W.; Keijzer, C.J.; Meeteren, van U.

    2001-01-01

    The stem xylem conduit dimensions and hydraulic conductivity of chrysanthemum plants (Dendranthemaxgrandiflorum Tzvelev cv. Cassa) were analysed and quantified. Simple exponential relations describe conduit length distribution, height dependency of conduit length distribution, and height dependency

  3. Hydraulic Conductivity Anisotropy of Heterogeneous Unsaturated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dongmin; Zhu, Jianting

    2010-05-01

    The effects of saturation degree (or capillary pressure) on hydraulic conductivity anisotropy in unsaturated soils have not been fully understood. This study developed an approach based on a conceptualization of combining the neural network based pedo-transfer function (PTF) results with the thin layer concept to explore the capillary pressure-dependent anisotropy in relation to soil texture and soil bulk density. The main objective is to examine how anisotropy characteristics are related to the relationships between hydraulic parameters and the basic soil attributes such as texture and bulk density. The hydraulic parameters are correlated with the texture and bulk density based on the pedo-transfer function (PTF) results. It is demonstrated that non-monotonic behavior of the unsaturated soil anisotropy in relation to the capillary pressure is only observed when the saturated hydraulic conductivity and the shape parameter are both related to the mean particle diameter. When only one hydraulic parameter is related to the grain diameter or when both are not related to the same attribute simultaneously, the unsaturated soil anisotropy increases monotonically with the increasing capillary pressure head. Therefore, it is suggested that this behavior is mainly due to the coupled dependence of the layer saturated hydraulic conductivities and the shape factors on the texture and bulk density. The correlation between the soil grain diameter and bulk density decreases the anisotropy effects of the unsaturated layered soils. The study illustrates that the inter-relationships of soil texture, bulk density, and hydraulic properties may cause vastly different characteristics of anisotropic unsaturated soils.

  4. Vibration of hydraulic machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yulin; Liu, Shuhong; Dou, Hua-Shu; Qian, Zhongdong

    2013-01-01

    Vibration of Hydraulic Machinery deals with the vibration problem which has significant influence on the safety and reliable operation of hydraulic machinery. It provides new achievements and the latest developments in these areas, even in the basic areas of this subject. The present book covers the fundamentals of mechanical vibration and rotordynamics as well as their main numerical models and analysis methods for the vibration prediction. The mechanical and hydraulic excitations to the vibration are analyzed, and the pressure fluctuations induced by the unsteady turbulent flow is predicted in order to obtain the unsteady loads. This book also discusses the loads, constraint conditions and the elastic and damping characters of the mechanical system, the structure dynamic analysis, the rotor dynamic analysis and the system instability of hydraulic machines, including the illustration of monitoring system for the instability and the vibration in hydraulic units. All the problems are necessary for vibration pr...

  5. A hybrid inverse method for hydraulic tomography in fractured and karstic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Jardani, Abderrahim; Jourde, Hervé

    2017-08-01

    We apply a stochastic Newton (SN) approach to solve a high-dimensional hydraulic inverse problem in highly heterogeneous geological media. By recognizing the connection between the cost function of deterministic optimizations and the posterior probability density of stochastic inversions, the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampler of SN is constructed by two parts: a deterministic part, which corresponds to a Newton step of deterministic optimization, and a stochastic part, which is a Gaussian distribution with the inverse of the local Hessian as the covariance matrix. The hybrid inverse method exploits the efficient tools for fast solution of deterministic inversions to improve the efficiency of the MCMC sampler. To address the ill-posedness of the inverse problem, a priori models, generated by a transition-probability geostatistical method, and conditioned to inter-well connection data, are used as regularization constraints. The effectiveness of the stochastic Newton method is first demonstrated by a synthetic test. The transmissivity field of the synthetic model is highly heterogeneous, and includes sharp variations. The inverse approach was then applied to a field hydraulic tomography investigation in a fractured and karstified aquifer to reconstruct its transmissivity field from a collection of real hydraulic head measurements. From the inversions, a series of transmissivity fields that produce good correlations between the inverted and the measured hydraulic heads were obtained. The inverse approach produced slightly different a posteriori transmissivity patterns for different a priori structure models of transmissivity; however, the trend and location of the high-transmissivity channels are consistent among various realizations. In addition, the uncertainty associated with each realization of the inverted transmissivity fields was quantified.

  6. Handbook of hydraulic fluid technology

    CERN Document Server

    Totten, George E

    2011-01-01

    ""The Handbook of Hydraulic Fluid Technology"" serves as the foremost resource for designing hydraulic systems and for selecting hydraulic fluids used in engineering applications. Featuring new illustrations, data tables, as well as practical examples, this second edition is updated with essential information on the latest hydraulic fluids and testing methods. The detailed text facilitates unparalleled understanding of the total hydraulic system, including important hardware, fluid properties, and hydraulic lubricants. Written by worldwide experts, the book also offers a rigorous overview of h

  7. Joint assimilation of piezometric heads and groundwater temperatures for improved modelling of river-aquifer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Wolfgang; Hendricks-Franssen, Harrie-Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2013-04-01

    conductivities and leakage coefficients). Focusing on the river streambed, we found that the assimilated piezometric head data mainly gave information on the magnitude of river-aquifer exchange fluxes and assimilated temperature data led to a better characterization of the spatial distribution of leakage coefficients. It also became obvious, that localization techniques have a positive influence on the estimation of hydraulic conductivities because they are able to restrict non-physical parameter updates. Results for the real-world case also indicate that a good prediction of groundwater temperatures can be achieved through data assimilation with EnKF where the best results were obtained with a simultaneous update of model parameters.

  8. Avaliação hidráulica de um sistema de irrigação localizada de baixa pressão, projetado pelo software "bubbler" Design and hydraulics evaluation of a low-head microirrigation, bubbler system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivam H. de Souza

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Conduziu-se este trabalho com o objetivo de avaliar o desempenho de um sistema de irrigação a baixa pressão, bubbler, em condições de campo. A avaliação consistiu de um estudo dividido em duas fases, em que, na primeira, foi elaborado o dimensionamento hidráulico do sistema de irrigação, com uso do programa computacional Bubbler versão 1.1, enquanto, na segunda fase, ocorreram a instalação e os testes de campo. Estabeleceram-se as alturas de 0,77; 0,71; 0,68 e 0,67 m na saída das mangueiras emissoras no campo, conforme recomendação do programa. Foram feitas as avaliações de vazão em cada mangueira emissora, para determinar o Coeficiente de Uniformidade de Christiansen (CUC, a Uniformidade de Distribuição (UD e a Eficiência de Aplicação (EA. Os testes mostraram CUC igual a 96,64%, UD igual a 95,85% e EA igual a 86,98%. O sistema no campo proporcionou vazão média de 64,8 L h-1 contra os 79,2 L h-1 estabelecidos pelo programa. Os valores encontrados de vazão diferiram dos valores projetados pelo aplicativo, em conseqüência da variação dos diâmetros e das perdas de carga (linear e localizada que apresentaram desvio-padrão de 0,23 m.This work was done with the objective of evaluating a low-pressure irrigation system (bubbler system, under field conditions. This evaluation consisted of a study divided in two phases: in the first, the hydraulic design of the irrigation system was elaborated with the use of the software named Bubbler version 1.1; while, in the second phase the installation and the field tests were done. Volumetric tests were accomplished in each emission hose to determine: the flow variation, the coefficients of uniformity, and the application efficiency. It was established the heights of the emitter hose exit at 0.77; 0.71; 0.68 and 0.67 m, on the field, following the recommendation of the software. The tests showed a Christiansen's Uniformity Coefficient (CUC of 96.64%, a Distribution Uniformity (DU of

  9. Head pulsations in a centrifugal pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiko, V. S.; Sotnyk, M. I.; Moskalenko, V. V.

    2017-08-01

    This article investigated the factors, which affect to the character of the head pulsations of a centrifugal pump. We investigated the dependence of the shape and depth of these pulsations from the operation mode of the pump. Was determined, that the head pulsations at the outlet of the impeller (pulsations on the blade passing frequency) cause head pulsations at the outlet of the pump, that have the same frequency, but differ in shape and depth. These pulsations depend on the design features of the flow-through part of the pump (from the ratio of hydraulic losses on the friction and losses on the vortex formation). A feature of the researches that were conducted is also the using of not only hydraulic but also electric modeling methods. It allows determining the values of the components of hydraulic losses.

  10. Hierarchical contribution of river–ocean connectivity, water chemistry, hydraulics, and substrate to the distribution of diadromous snails in Puerto Rican streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan F. Blanco; Frederick N. Scatena

    2006-01-01

    Diadromous faunas dominate most tropical coastal streams and rivers, but the factors controlling their distribution are not well understood. Our study documents abiotic variables controlling the distribution and abundance of the diadromous snail Neritina virginea (Gastropoda:Neritidae) in the Caribbean island of Puerto Rico. An intensive survey of N. virginea density...

  11. The influence of hydraulic forces on the selection of structural form

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glerum, A.; Schippers, J.

    1981-01-01

    Besides that the hydraulic forces have an influence on the structure, the shape of the structure may often influence the hydraulic loads as well. A distinction should be made between hydrostatic forces which are for instance caused by a difference in head between two water levels and dynamic forces

  12. Root water extraction and limiting soil hydraulic conditions estimated by numerical simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong van Lier, de Q.; Metselaar, K.; Dam, van J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Root density, soil hydraulic functions, and hydraulic head gradients play an important role in the determination of transpiration-rate-limiting soil water contents. We developed an implicit numerical root water extraction model to solve the Richards equation for the modeling of radial root water

  13. FEMA DFIRM Hydraulic Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This layer and accompanying attribute table is required whenever hydraulic structures are shown in the flood profile. It is also required if levees are shown on the...

  14. Water Hydraulic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conrad, Finn

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents research results using IT-Tools for CAD and dynamic modelling, simulation, analysis, and design of water hydraulic actuators for motion control of machines, lifts, cranes and robots. Matlab/Simulink and CATIA are used as IT-Tools. The contributions include results from on......-going research projects on fluid power and mechatronics based on tap water hydraulic servovalves and linear servo actuators and rotary vane actuators for motion control and power transmission. Development and design a novel water hydraulic rotary vane actuator for robot manipulators. Proposed mathematical...... modelling, control and simulation of a water hydraulic rotary vane actuator applied to power and control a two-links manipulator and evaluate performance. The results include engineering design and test of the proposed simulation models compared with IHA Tampere University’s presentation of research...

  15. Constant-Pressure Hydraulic Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, C. W.

    1982-01-01

    Constant output pressure in gas-driven hydraulic pump would be assured in new design for gas-to-hydraulic power converter. With a force-multiplying ring attached to gas piston, expanding gas would apply constant force on hydraulic piston even though gas pressure drops. As a result, pressure of hydraulic fluid remains steady, and power output of the pump does not vary.

  16. Effects of radial diffuser hydraulic design on a double-suction centrifugal pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, H. C.; Zhang, Y. X.; Xu, C.; Zhang, J. Y.; Li, Z. L.

    2016-05-01

    In order to study effects of radial diffuser on hydraulic performance of crude oil pump, the steady CFD numerical method is applied and one large double-suction oil pump running in long-distance pipeline is considered. The research focuses on analysing the influence of its diffuser vane profile on hydraulic performance of oil pump. The four different types of cylindrical vane have been designed by in-house codes mainly including double arcs (DA), triple arcs (TA), equiangular spiral line (ES) and linear variable angle spiral line (LVS). During design process diffuser vane angles at inlet and outlet are tentatively given within a certain range and then the wrapping angle of the four types of diffuser vanes can be calculated automatically. Under the given inlet and outlet angles, the linear variable angle spiral line profile has the biggest wrapping angle and profile length which is good to delay channel diffusion but bring more friction hydraulic loss. Finally the vane camber line is thickened at the certain uniform thickness distribution and the 3D diffuser models are generated. The whole flow passage of oil pump with different types of diffusers under various flow rate conditions are numerically simulated based on RNG k-ɛ turbulent model and SIMPLEC algorithm. The numerical results show that different types of diffusers can bring about great difference on the hydraulic performance of oil pump, of which the ES profile diffuser with its proper setting angle shows the best hydraulic performance and its inner flow field is improved obviously. Compared with the head data from model sample, all designed diffusers can make a certain improvement on head characteristic. At the large flow rate conditions the hydraulic efficiency increases obviously and the best efficiency point shift to the large flow rate range. The ES profile diffuser embodies the better advantages on pump performance which can be explained theoretically that the diffuser actually acts as a diffusion

  17. Blood volume distribution in patients with cirrhosis: aspects of the dual-head gamma-camera technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiszka-Kanowitz, Marianne; Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Møller, Søren;

    2001-01-01

    : The close relation between the estimated blood volume in the thorax region and the central and arterial blood volume, obtained by the dynamic indicator dilution technique (r=0.87, PWhole-body scintigraphy showed altered blood volume distribution in the cirrhotic...

  18. Is the spatial distribution of brain lesions associated with closed-head injury in children predictive of subsequent development of posttraumatic stress disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herskovits, Edward H.; Gerring, Joan P.; Davatzikos, Christos; Bryan, R. Nick

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine whether there is an association between the spatial distributions of lesions detected at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain in children, adolescents, and young adults after closed-head injury (CHI) and development of the reexperiencing symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data obtained in 94 subjects without a history of PTSD as determined by parental interview were analyzed. MR images were obtained 3 months after CHI. Lesions were manually delineated and registered to the Talairach coordinate system. Mann-Whitney analysis of lesion distribution and PTSD status at 1 year (again, as determined by parental interview) was performed, consisting of an analysis of lesion distribution versus the major symptoms of PTSD: reexperiencing, hyperarousal, and avoidance. RESULTS: Of the 94 subjects, 41 met the PTSD reexperiencing criterion and nine met all three PTSD criteria. Subjects who met the reexperiencing criterion had fewer lesions in limbic system structures (eg, the cingulum) on the right than did subjects who did not meet this criterion (Mann-Whitney, P =.003). CONCLUSION: Lesions induced by CHI in the limbic system on the right may inhibit subsequent manifestation of PTSD reexperiencing symptoms in children, adolescents, and young adults. Copyright RSNA, 2002.

  19. Application of Large-Scale Inversion Algorithms to Hydraulic Tomography in an Alluvial Aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, P; Jardani, A; Soueid Ahmed, A; Abbas, M; Wang, X; Jourde, H; Lecoq, N

    2017-03-01

    Large-scale inversion methods have been recently developed and permitted now to considerably reduce the computation time and memory needed for inversions of models with a large amount of parameters and data. In this work, we have applied a deterministic geostatistical inversion algorithm to a hydraulic tomography investigation conducted in an experimental field site situated within an alluvial aquifer in Southern France. This application aims to achieve a 2-D large-scale modeling of the spatial transmissivity distribution of the site. The inversion algorithm uses a quasi-Newton iterative process based on a Bayesian approach. We compared the results obtained by using three different methodologies for sensitivity analysis: an adjoint-state method, a finite-difference method, and a principal component geostatistical approach (PCGA). The PCGA is a large-scale adapted method which was developed for inversions with a large number of parameters by using an approximation of the covariance matrix, and by avoiding the calculation of the full Jacobian sensitivity matrix. We reconstructed high-resolution transmissivity fields (composed of up to 25,600 cells) which generated good correlations between the measured and computed hydraulic heads. In particular, we show that, by combining the PCGA inversion method and the hydraulic tomography method, we are able to substantially reduce the computation time of the inversions, while still producing high-quality inversion results as those obtained from the other sensitivity analysis methodologies.

  20. OPTIMAL HYDRAULIC DESIGN AND CAD APPLICATIONS OF AXIAL FLOW HYDRAULIC TURBINE'S RUNNER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A method of the optimal hydraulic design and CAD application of runner blades of axial-flow hydraulic turbines are discussed on the basis of optimization principle and CAD technique in this paper. Based on the theory of fluid dynamics, the blade′s main geometrical parameter, working parameters and performances index of the blades and the relationship between them are analysed, and the mathematical model of optimal hydraulic design of axial-flow runners has been established. Through nonlinear programming, the problems can be solved. By making use of the calculation geometry and computer graphics, the distribution method of the singular points, and an CAD applied software, an optimal hydraulic design are presented.

  1. The electric field distributions in anatomical head models during transcranial direct current stimulation for post-stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, Zoi; Parazzini, Marta; Ravazzani, Paolo; Samaras, Theodoros

    2017-01-01

    The lack of knowledge of the electric field distribution inside the brain of stroke patients receiving transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) calls for estimating it computationally. Moreover, the impact on this distribution of a novel clinical management approach which involves secondary motor areas (SMA) in stroke rehabilitation needs to be evaluated. Finally, the differences in the electric field distributions due to gender and age need to be investigated. This work presents the development of two different anatomical models (young adult female and elderly male) with an ischemic stroke region of spherical volume 10 cm(3) or 50 cm(3) , using numerical models of the Virtual Population (ViP). The stroke phase was considered as acute or chronic, resulting in different electrical properties of the area. Two different electrode montages were used - One over the lesion area and the contralateral supra-orbital region and the other over the SMA and the contralateral supra-orbital region. A quasi-electrostatic solver was used to numerically solve the Laplace equation with the finite-difference technique. Both the 99th percentile of the electric field intensity distribution ("E peak value") and the percentage of the tissue volumes with electric field intensity over 50% and 70% of the E peak value were assessed inside the target areas of the primary motor cortex (M1) and the SMA, as well as in other brain tissues (hypothalamus and cerebellum). In the acute phase of an ischemic stroke, the normalized electric field intensity distributions do not differ noticeably compared to those in the brain of a healthy person (mean square difference electric field in the tissues in the SMA are almost equal for both electrode montages. The peak values of the electric field distribution ("E peak values") in cerebellum and hypothalamus for both electrode montages are rather small but different from those of healthy patients. The largest difference of 21% decrease with respect to a

  2. Trend of hydraulic units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshimaru, Jun' ichi

    1988-11-01

    The gear, vane and piston pumps occupy a more then 90% share in the hydraulic pumps. Comparatively large pumps are mainly variable delivery piston pumps. The piston pumps are comparatively high in output density (output per unit weight), indicating the hydraulic pump in performance, and tend to become higher and higher in it. Though they are mainly 210 to 350kgf/cm/sup 2/ in rated pressure, some of them come to surpass 400kgf/cm/sup 3/ in it. While the progress in computation also requires the high speed operation, high accuracy and other severe conditions for the hydraulic units, which accordingly and increasingly intensify the requirement for hydraulic oil in abrasion resistibility, oxidation stability and response characteristics. While cavitation comes to easily occur, which considerably and disadvantageously influences hydraulic oil in life through degradation, noise level and respondingness. From now on, the development of high performance oil and study of mechanical structure are important. 19 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Cavitation in Hydraulic Machinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjeldsen, M.

    1996-11-01

    The main purpose of this doctoral thesis on cavitation in hydraulic machinery is to change focus towards the coupling of non-stationary flow phenomena and cavitation. It is argued that, in addition to turbulence, superimposed sound pressure fluctuations can have a major impact on cavitation and lead to particularly severe erosion. For the design of hydraulic devices this finding may indicate how to further limit the cavitation problems. Chapter 1 reviews cavitation in general in the context of hydraulic machinery, emphasizing the initial cavitation event and the role of the water quality. Chapter 2 discusses the existence of pressure fluctuations for situations common in such machinery. Chapter 3 on cavitation dynamics presents an algorithm for calculating the nucleation of a cavity cluster. Chapter 4 describes the equipment used in this work. 53 refs., 55 figs.,10 tabs.

  4. Microbial effect on soil hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Alex; Rosenzweig, Ravid; Volk, Elazar; Rosenkranz, Hella; Iden, Sascha; Durner, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Although largely ignored, the soil contains large amount of biofilms (attached microbes) that can affect many processes. While biochemical processes are studied, biophysical processes receive only little attention. Biofilms may occupy some of the pore space, and by that affect the soil hydraulic properties. This effect on unsaturated soils, however, was not intensively studied. In this research we directly measure the hydraulic properties, namely the soil's unsaturated hydraulic conductivity function and retention curve, for soils containing real biofilm. To do that we inoculate soil with biofilm-forming bacteria and incubate it with sufficient amounts of nutrient until biofilm is formed. The hydraulic properties of the incubated soil are then measured using several techniques, including multi-step outflow and evaporation method. The longer measurements (evaporation method) are conducted under refrigeration conditions to minimize microbial activity during the experiment. The results show a clear effect of the biofilm, where the biofilm-affected soil (sandy loam in our case) behaves like a much finer soil. This qualitatively makes sense as the biofilm generates an effective pore size distribution that is characterized by smaller pores. However, the effect is much more complex and needs to be studied carefully considering (for example) dual porosity models. We compare our preliminary results with other experiments, including flow-through column experiments and experiments with biofilm analogues. Clearly a better understanding of the way microbial activity alters the hydraulic properties may help designing more efficient bioremediation, irrigation, and other soil-related processes.

  5. Effects of variations in hydraulic conductivity and flow conditions on groundwater flow and solute transport in peatlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellner, Erik [Dept. of Forest Ecology, Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)

    2007-02-15

    (in the same way as a clay layer), whereas a second tight layer influences less. Presence of a highly permeable horizontal layer increased the lateral flow but how the solute concentrations are enhanced by this depends on where the solute source is located. The border conditions that determine the directions and sizes of fluxes are crucial for the resulting distributions. High flow rates, created by steep hydraulic-head gradients and permeable soils, generate clear differences between areas of inflow and outflow. When the flow rates are smaller, the importance of diffusion processes increases and the differences between areas of inflow and outflow get smaller. A change in the size of the recharge (precipitation-evapotranspiration) can change the hydraulic head pattern and flow paths, such that the distribution of solutes gets altered substantially. This has also the implication that seasonal shifts in the recharge may cause a seasonal variation in the distribution of a soluble compound. The same effect could occur when shifts in climate take place. As most peatlands are expected to develop from fen-types to bog-types, the expected final flow pattern may seem obvious and perhaps irreversible. However, temporal variations in recharge may create alternating periods of inflow and outflow from the underlying aquifer, and the relationships between time and rates in each direction determine the resulting distribution of a solute.

  6. Hydraulics and pneumatics

    CERN Document Server

    Parr, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Nearly all industrial processes require objects to be moved, manipulated or subjected to some sort of force. This is frequently accomplished by means of electrical equipment (such as motors or solenoids), or via devices driven by air (pneumatics) or liquids (hydraulics).This book has been written by a process control engineer as a guide to the operation of hydraulic and pneumatic systems for all engineers and technicians who wish to have an insight into the components and operation of such a system.This second edition has been fully updated to include all recent developments su

  7. Popeye Project: Hydraulic umbilical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, K.G.; Williams, V.T.

    1996-12-31

    For the Popeye Project, the longest super-duplex hydraulic umbilical in the world was installed in the Gulf of Mexico. This paper reports on its selection and project implementation. Material selection addresses corrosion in seawater, water-based hydraulic fluid, and methanol. Five alternatives were considered: (1) carbon-steel with traditional coating and anodes, (2) carbon-steel coated with thermally sprayed aluminum, (3) carbon-steel sheathed in aluminum, (4) super-duplex, and (5) titanium. The merits and risks associated with each alternative are discussed. The manufacture and installation of the selected umbilical are also reported.

  8. A calculation method of water distribution network hydraulic based on preconditioned conjugate gradient method%一种基于预处理共轭梯度法的给水管网水力计算方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王美香

    2014-01-01

    提出了一种新的给水管网水力计算方法.该方法对给水管网系统的节点流量连续性方程进行重新构造,用改进的Cholesky分解方法对重新构造的矩阵进行三角分解,然后使用预处理共轭梯度法求解.经用供水管网模型进行验证并与EPANET软件的计算结果进行比较,结果表明:该算法共迭代5次,用时0.102 s,与EPANET混合节点-环方法的求解精度和速度非常接近,且弥补了EPA-NET软件的应用缺陷,可用于求解大型城市的给水管网系统.%A calculation method of water distribution network hydraulic was proposed.The nodes flow conti-nuity equation of water distribution system was reconstructed,the reconstructed matrix was decomposed tri-angularly by a modified Cholesky decomposition method,and thus it was suitable for the use of precondi-tioned conjugate gradient method.It was tested by the model of water distribution network(WDN)hydrau-lic.Compared with calculation result of EPANET software,the proposed algorithm does total iteration five times in 0.1 02 s,which closed to the result of mixed node-ring method used in EPANET software in the as-pect of accuracy and speed.The proposed algorithm overcame the defects of EPANET software,which could be used to solve large-scale urban water supply network system.

  9. Investigating patterns and controls of groundwater up-welling in a lowland river by combining fibre-optic distributed temperature sensing with observations of vertical head gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krause

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the patterns and controls of aquifer-river exchange in a fast-flowing lowland river by the conjunctive use of streambed temperature anomalies identified with Fibre-optic Distributed Temperature Sensed (FO-DTS and observations of vertical hydraulic gradients (VHG.

    FO-DTS temperature traces along this lowland river reach reveal discrete patterns with "cold spots" indicating groundwater up-welling. In contrast to previous studies using FO-DTS for investigation of groundwater-surface water exchange, the fibre-optic cable in this study was buried in the streambed sediments, ensuring clear signals despite fast flow and high discharges. During the observed summer baseflow period, streambed temperatures in groundwater up-welling locations were found to be up to 1.5 °C lower than ambient streambed temperatures. Due to the high river flows the cold spots were sharp and distinctly localized without measurable impact on downstream surface water temperature.

    VHG patterns along the stream reach were highly variable in space, revealing strong differences even at small scales. VHG patterns alone are indicators of both, structural heterogeneity of the stream bed as well as of the spatial heterogeneity of the groundwater-surface water exchange fluxes and are thus not conclusive in their interpretation. However, in combination with the high spatial resolution DTS data we were able to separate these two influences and clearly identify locations of enhanced exchange, while also obtaining information on the complex small-scale streambed transmissivity patterns responsible for the very discrete exchange patterns.

  10. Hydraulic Arm Modeling via Matlab SimHydraulics

    OpenAIRE

    Věchet, Stanislav; Krejsa, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    System modeling is a vital tool for cost reduction and design process speed up in most engineering fields. The paper is focused on modeling of hydraulic arm as a part of intelligent prosthesis project, in the form of 2DOF open kinematic chain. The arm model combines mechanical, hydraulic and electric subsystems and uses Matlab as modeling tool. SimMechanics Matlab extension is used for mechanical part modeling, SimHydraulics toolbox is used for modeling of hydraulic circuit used for actuating...

  11. Assimilation of temperature and hydraulic gradients for quantifying the spatial variability of streambed hydraulics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiang; Andrews, Charles B.; Liu, Jie; Yao, Yingying; Liu, Chuankun; Tyler, Scott W.; Selker, John S.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the spatial and temporal characteristics of water flux into or out of shallow aquifers is imperative for water resources management and eco-environmental conservation. In this study, the spatial variability in the vertical specific fluxes and hydraulic conductivities in a streambed were evaluated by integrating distributed temperature sensing (DTS) data and vertical hydraulic gradients into an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and smoother (EnKS) and an empirical thermal-mixing model. The formulation of the EnKF/EnKS assimilation scheme is based on a discretized 1D advection-conduction equation of heat transfer in the streambed. We first systematically tested a synthetic case and performed quantitative and statistical analyses to evaluate the performance of the assimilation schemes. Then a real-world case was evaluated to calculate assimilated specific flux. An initial estimate of the spatial distributions of the vertical hydraulic gradients was obtained from an empirical thermal-mixing model under steady-state conditions using a constant vertical hydraulic conductivity. Then, this initial estimate was updated by repeatedly dividing the assimilated specific flux by estimates of the vertical hydraulic gradients to obtain a refined spatial distribution of vertical hydraulic gradients and vertical hydraulic conductivities. Our results indicate that optimal parameters can be derived with fewer iterations but greater simulation effort using the EnKS compared with the EnKF. For the field application in a stream segment of the Heihe River Basin in northwest China, the average vertical hydraulic conductivities in the streambed varied over three orders of magnitude (5 × 10-1 to 5 × 102 m/d). The specific fluxes ranged from near zero (qz < ±0.05 m/d) to ±1.0 m/d, while the vertical hydraulic gradients were within the range of -0.2 to 0.15 m/m. The highest and most variable fluxes occurred adjacent to a debris-dam and bridge pier. This phenomenon is very likely

  12. An evaluation of a hubless inducer and a full flow hydraulic turbine driven inducer boost pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, B. K.; Martinson, A. R.

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the performance of several configurations of hubless inducers with a hydrodynamically similar conventional inducer and to demonstrate the performance of a full flow hydraulic turbine driven inducer boost pump using these inducers. A boost pump of this type consists of an inducer connected to a hydraulic turbine with a high speed rotor located in between. All the flow passes through the inducer, rotor, and hydraulic turbine, then into the main pump. The rotor, which is attached to the main pump shaft, provides the input power to drive the hydraulic turbine which, in turn, drives the inducer. The inducer, rotating at a lower speed, develops the necessary head to prevent rotor cavitation. The rotor speed is consistent with present main engine liquid hydrogen pump designs and the overall boost pump head rise is sufficient to provide adequate main pump suction head. This system would have the potential for operating at lower liquid hydrogen tank pressures.

  13. A multiscale approach to determine hydraulic conductivity in thick claystone aquitards using field, laboratory, and numerical modeling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. A.; Barbour, S. L.; Hendry, M. J.; Novakowski, K.; van der Kamp, G.

    2016-07-01

    Characterizing the hydraulic conductivity (K) of aquitards is difficult due to technical and logistical difficulties associated with field-based methods as well as the cost and challenge of collecting representative and competent core samples for laboratory analysis. The objective of this study was to produce a multiscale comparison of vertical and horizontal hydraulic conductivity (Kv and Kh, respectively) of a regionally extensive Cretaceous clay-rich aquitard in southern Saskatchewan. Ten vibrating wire pressure transducers were lowered into place at depths between 25 and 325 m, then the annular was space was filled with a cement-bentonite grout. The in situ Kh was estimated at the location of each transducer by simulating the early-time pore pressure measurements following setting of the grout using a 2-D axisymmetric, finite element, numerical model. Core samples were collected during drilling for conventional laboratory testing for Kv to compare with the transducer-determined in situ Kh. Results highlight the importance of scale and consideration of the presence of possible secondary features (e.g., fractures) in the aquitard. The proximity of the transducers to an active potash mine (˜1 km) where depressurization of an underlying aquifer resulted in drawdown through the aquitard provided a unique opportunity to model the current hydraulic head profile using both the Kh and Kv estimates. Results indicate that the transducer-determined Kh estimates would allow for the development of the current hydraulic head distribution, and that simulating the pore pressure recovery can be used to estimate moderately low in situ Kh (<10-11 m s-1).

  14. HYDRAULICS, TUSCARAWAS COUNTY, OHIO, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydraulic data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydraulic procedures for estimating flood discharges for a flood insurance...

  15. PAT Design Strategy for Energy Recovery in Water Distribution Networks by Electrical Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena M. Ramos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the management of water distribution networks, large energy savings can be yielded by exploiting the head drop due to the network pressure control strategy, i.e., for leak reductions. Hydropower in small streams is already exploited, but technical solutions combining efficiency and economic convenience are still required. In water distribution networks, an additional design problem comes out from the necessity of ensuring a required head drop under variable operating conditions, i.e., head and discharge variations. Both a hydraulic regulation (HR—via a series-parallel hydraulic circuit- and an electrical regulation (ER—via inverter- are feasible solutions. A design procedure for the selection of a production device in a series-parallel hydraulic circuit has been recently proposed. The procedure, named VOS (Variable Operating Strategy, is based on the overall plant efficiency criteria and is applied to a water distribution network where a PAT (pump as a turbine is used in order to produce energy. In the present paper the VOS design procedure has been extended to the electrical regulation and a comparison between HR and ER efficiency and flexibility within a water distribution network is shown: HR was found more flexible than ER and more efficient. Finally a preliminary economic study has been carried out in order to show the viability of both systems, and a shorter payback period of the electromechanical equipment was found for HR mode.

  16. Hydraulic hoist-press

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babayev, Z.B.; Abashev, Z.V.

    1982-01-01

    The efficiency expert of the Angrenskiy production-technological administration of the production association Sredazugol A. V. Bubnov has suggested a hydraulic hoist-press for repairing road equipment which is a device consisting of lifting mechanism, press and test stand for verifying the high pressure hoses and pumps.

  17. Modelling of Hydraulic Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Zhou, Jianjun; Hansen, Lars Henrik

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a case study of identifying the physical model (or the grey box model) of a hydraulic test robot. The obtained model is intended to provide a basis for model-based control of the robot. The physical model is formulated in continuous time and is derived by application...

  18. Water Hydraulic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conrad, Finn

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents research results using IT-Tools for CAD and dynamic modelling, simulation, analysis, and design of water hydraulic actuators for motion control of machines, lifts, cranes and robots. Matlab/Simulink and CATIA are used as IT-Tools. The contributions include results from on-going...

  19. Effects of model layer simplification using composite hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Nicasio; Kuniansky, Eve L.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of simplifying hydraulic property layering within an unconfined aquifer and the underlying confining unit were assessed. The hydraulic properties of lithologic units within the unconfined aquifer and confining unit were computed by analyzing the aquifer-test data using radial, axisymmetric two-dimensional (2D) flow. Time-varying recharge to the unconfined aquifer and pumping from the confined Upper Floridan aquifer (USA) were simulated using 3D flow. Conceptual flow models were developed by gradually reducing the number of lithologic units in the unconfined aquifer and confining unit by calculating composite hydraulic properties for the simplified lithologic units. Composite hydraulic properties were calculated using either thickness-weighted averages or inverse modeling using regression-based parameter estimation. No significant residuals were simulated when all lithologic units comprising the unconfined aquifer were simulated as one layer. The largest residuals occurred when the unconfined aquifer and confining unit were aggregated into a single layer (quasi-3D), with residuals over 100% for the leakage rates to the confined aquifer and the heads in the confining unit. Residuals increased with contrasts in vertical hydraulic conductivity between the unconfined aquifer and confining unit. Residuals increased when the constant-head boundary at the bottom of the Upper Floridan aquifer was replaced with a no-flow boundary.

  20. Fatal accident distribution by age, gender and head injury, and death probability at accident scene in Mashhad, Iran, 2006-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangooei Dovom, Hossein; Shafahi, Yousef; Zangooei Dovom, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have investigated road traffic deaths, but few have compared by road user type. Iran, with an estimated 44 road traffic deaths per 100,000 population in 2002 had higher road traffic deaths than any other country for which reliable estimates can be made. So, the present study was conducted on road death data and identified fatal accident distribution by age, gender and head injury as well as the influences of age and gender on deaths at accident scenes for all road user groups. Data used in this study are on fatal road accidents recorded by forensic medicine experts of the Khorasan Razavi province in Mashhad, the capital of the province, the second largest city and the largest place of pilgrimage, immigration and tourism in Iran. Chi-square test and odds ratio were used to identify the relation of death place with age and gender in 2495 fatal road accidents from 2006 to 2009. The t-test and analysis of variance were employed for continues variable, age, to compare males' and females' mean age for all road user categories. For two genders, all three groups of fatalities (pedestrian, motorcyclist and motor vehicle occupant) had a peak at the ages of 21-30. The youngest were male motorcyclists (mean age = 28). Old pedestrians were included in road deaths very much, too. Male/female overall ratio was 3.41 and the highest male/female ratio was related to motorcyclists (14). The overall ratio of head injury to other organ injuries (torso and underbody) was 2.51 and pedestrians had the largest amount of head injury (38.2%). Regarding death at accident scene, for all road users, gender did not have any significant relation with death at the scene (P-value > 0.1); on the contrary, age had significant relation (P-value accident scenes (male/female ratio at accident sense motorcyclists 41-50 and motor vehicle occupants 31-40 died the most at accident scenes. Identifying the most endangered groups of road accident fatalities, which was conducted in this

  1. Reactive barriers: hydraulic performance and design enhancements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, B D M

    2004-01-01

    The remediation of contaminated ground water is a multibillion-dollar global industry. Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are one of the leading technologies being developed in the search for alternatives to the pump-and-treat method. Improving the hydraulic performance of these PRBs is an important part of maximizing their potential to the industry. Optimization of the hydraulic performance of a PRB can be defined in terms of finding the balance between capture, residence time, and PRB longevity that produces a minimum-cost acceptable design. Three-dimensional particle tracking was used to estimate capture zone and residence time distributions. Volumetric flow analysis was used for estimation of flow distribution across a PRB and in the identification of flow regimes that may affect the permeability or reactivity of portions of the PRB over time. Capture zone measurements extended below the base of partially penetrating PRBs and were measured upgradient from the portion of aquifer influenced by PRB emplacement. Hydraulic performance analysis of standard PRB designs confirmed previously presented research that identified the potential for significant variation in residence time and capture zone. These variations can result in the need to oversize the PRB to ensure that downgradient contaminant concentrations do not exceed imposed standards. The most useful PRB design enhancements for controlling residence time and capture variation were found to be customized downgradient gate faces, velocity equalization walls, deeper emplacement of the funnel than the gate, and careful manipulation of the hydraulic conductivity ratio between the gate and the aquifer.

  2. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Jeffrey R.; Glaser, Steven D.

    2007-09-13

    The self-potential (SP) response during hydraulic fracturing of intact Sierra granite was investigated in the laboratory. Excellent correlation of pressure drop and SP suggests that the SP response is created primarily by electrokinetic coupling. For low pressures, the variation of SP with pressure drop is linear, indicating a constant coupling coefficient (Cc) of -200 mV/MPa. However for pressure drops >2 MPa, the magnitude of the Cc increases by 80% in an exponential trend. This increasing Cc is related to increasing permeability at high pore pressures caused by dilatancy of micro-cracks, and is explained by a decrease in the hydraulic tortuosity. Resistivity measurements reveal a decrease of 2% prior to hydraulic fracturing and a decrease of {approx}35% after fracturing. An asymmetric spatial SP response created by injectate diffusion into dilatant zones is observed prior to hydraulic fracturing, and in most cases this SP variation revealed the impending crack geometry seconds before failure. At rupture, injectate rushes into the new fracture area where the zeta potential is different than in the rock porosity, and an anomalous SP spike is observed. After fracturing, the spatial SP distribution reveals the direction of fracture propagation. Finally, during tensile cracking in a point load device with no water flow, a SP spike is observed that is caused by contact electrification. However, the time constant of this event is much less than that for transients observed during hydraulic fracturing, suggesting that SP created solely from material fracture does not contribute to the SP response during hydraulic fracturing.

  3. Hydraulic analysis of cell-network treatment wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huaguo; Jawitz, James W.

    2006-11-01

    SummaryWhen individual cells of a multiple-cell treatment wetland are hydraulically connected, the wetland has a cell-network structure. The hydraulic performance of treatment wetlands is often characterized using tracer residence time distributions (RTDs) measured between the wetland inlet and outlet, such that the wetland is considered as a single hydraulic unit, regardless of the extent of networking between individual internal cells. This work extends the single hydraulic unit approach to enable the specification of moments and RTD parameters for individual cells, or clusters of cells, within the cell-network based on inert tracer tests with injection only at the network inlet. Hydraulic performance is quantified in terms of hydraulic efficiency and travel time dimensionless variance using both the method of moments and RTD modeling. Cell-network analysis was applied to a case study from the Orlando Easterly Wetland (OEW), demonstrating the improvement in hydraulic performance of individual wetland cells following wetland restoration activities. Furthermore, cell-network analysis indicated that the location of water quality sampling station locations within the cell network can significantly affect the accuracy of pollutant removal effectiveness estimation when the individual sample station RTD does not represent the hydraulic unit RTD. At the OEW, it was determined that historical nutrient removal effectiveness estimation may be underestimated for one area and overestimated for another, and recommendations were provided for sample station locations to minimize future performance estimation errors.

  4. Modeling and parameter estimation for hydraulic system of excavator's arm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Qing-hua; HAO Peng; ZHANG Da-qing

    2008-01-01

    A retrofitted electro-bydraulic proportional system for hydraulic excavator was introduced firstly. According to the principle and characteristic of load independent flow distribution(LUDV)system, taking boom hydraulic system as an example and ignoring the leakage of hydraulic cylinder and the mass of oil in it,a force equilibrium equation and a continuous equation of hydraulic cylinder were set up.Based On the flow equation of electro-hydraulic proportional valve, the pressure passing through the valve and the difference of pressure were tested and analyzed.The results show that the difference of pressure does not change with load, and it approximates to 2.0 MPa. And then, assume the flow across the valve is directly proportional to spool displacement andis not influenced by load, a simplified model of electro-hydraulic system was put forward. At the same time, by analyzing the structure and load-bearing of boom instrument, and combining moment equivalent equation of manipulator with rotating law, the estimation methods and equations for such parameters as equivalent mass and bearing force of hydraulic cylinder were set up. Finally, the step response of flow of boom cylinder was tested when the electro-hydraulic proportional valve was controlled by the stepcurrent. Based on the experiment curve, the flow gain coefficient of valve is identified as 2.825×10-4m3/(s·A)and the model is verified.

  5. Hydraulic manipulator research at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Recently, task requirements have dictated that manipulator payload capacity increase to accommodate greater payloads, greater manipulator length, and larger environmental interaction forces. General tasks such as waste storage tank cleanup and facility dismantlement and decommissioning require manipulator life capacities in the range of hundreds of pounds rather than tens of pounds. To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned once again to hydraulics as a means of actuation. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem), sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a history of projects that incorporate hydraulics technology, including mobile robots, teleoperated manipulators, and full-scale construction equipment. In addition, to support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators, ORNL has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The purpose of this article is to describe the past hydraulic manipulator developments and current hydraulic manipulator research capabilities at ORNL. Included are example experimental results from ORNL`s flexible/prismatic test stand.

  6. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF CHARACTERISTIC FREQUENCY IN UNSTEADY HYDRAULIC BEHAVIOUR OF A LARGE HYDRAULIC TURBINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fu-jun; LI Xiao-qin; MA Jia-mei; YANG Min; ZHU Yu-liang

    2009-01-01

    The features of unsteady flow such as pressure variation and fluctuation in a large hydraulic turbine usually lead to the instability of operation.This article reports the recent in site investigation concerning the characteristic frequencies in pressure fluctuation,shaft torsional oscillation and structural vibration of a prototype 700 MW Francis turbine unit.The investigation was carried out for a wide load range of 200 MW-700 MW in the condition of water head 57 m-90 m.An extensive analysis of both time-history and frequency data of these unsteady hydraulic behaviours was conducted.It was observed that the pressure fluctuation in a draft tube is stronger than that in upstream flow passage.The low frequency with about one third of rotation frequency is dominative for the pressure fluctuation in part load range.Also the unsteady features of vibration of head cover and torsional oscillation of shaft exhibited the similar features.Numerical analysis showed that the vibration and oscillation are caused by vortex rope in the draft tube.In addition,a strong vibration with special characteristic frequency was observed for the head cover in middle load range.The pressure fluctuation in the draft tube with the same frequency was also recorded.Because this special vibration has appeared in the designed normal running condition,it should be avoided by carefully allocating power load in the future operation.

  7. Inferring the heterogeneity, transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity of crystalline aquifers from a detailed water-table map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewandel, Benoît; Jeanpert, Julie; Ladouche, Bernard; Join, Jean-Lambert; Maréchal, Jean-Christophe

    2017-07-01

    Estimating the transmissivity or hydraulic conductivity field to characterize the heterogeneity of a crystalline aquifer is particularly difficult because of the wide variations of the parameters. We developed a new approach based on the analysis of a dense network of water-table data. It is based on the concept that large-scale variations in hydraulic head may give information on large-scale aquifer parameters. The method assumes that flux into the aquifer is mainly sub-horizontal and that the water table is mostly controlled by topography, rather than recharge. It is based on an empirical statistical relationship between field data on transmissivity and the inverse slope values of a topography-reduced water-table map. This relationship is used to compute a transmissivity map that must be validated with field measurements. The proposed approach can provide a general pattern of transmissivity, or hydraulic conductivity, but cannot correctly reproduce strong variations at very local scale (less than10 m), and will face of some uncertainties where vertical flows cannot be neglected. The method was tested on a peridotite (ultramafic rock) aquifer of 3.5 km2 in area located in New Caledonia. The resulting map shows transmissivity variations over about 5 orders of magnitude (average LogT: -5.2 ± 0.7). Comparison with a map based on measured water-level data (n = 475) shows that the comparison between LogT-computed values and LogT data deduced from 28 hydraulic tests is estimated with an error less than 20% in 71% of cases (LogT ± 0.4), and with an error less than 10% (LogT ± 0.2 on average) in 39% of cases. From this map a hydraulic-conductivity map has been computed showing values ranging over 8 orders of magnitude. The repeatability of the approach was tested on a second data set of hydraulic-head measurements (n = 543); the mean deviation between both LogT maps is about 11%. These encouraging results show that the method can give valuable parameter estimates, and

  8. Remotely Adjustable Hydraulic Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouns, H. H.; Gardner, L. D.

    1987-01-01

    Outlet pressure adjusted to match varying loads. Electrohydraulic servo has positioned sleeve in leftmost position, adjusting outlet pressure to maximum value. Sleeve in equilibrium position, with control land covering control port. For lowest pressure setting, sleeve shifted toward right by increased pressure on sleeve shoulder from servovalve. Pump used in aircraft and robots, where hydraulic actuators repeatedly turned on and off, changing pump load frequently and over wide range.

  9. Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... object that's stuck in the wound. previous continue Concussions Concussions — the temporary loss of normal brain function due ... also a type of internal head injury. Repeated concussions can permanently damage the brain. In many cases, ...

  10. Head Tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & ... When this happens, the neck muscles go into spasm, causing the head to tilt to one side. ...

  11. Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ATV) Safety Balance Disorders Knowing Your Child's Medical History First Aid: Falls First Aid: Head Injuries Preventing Children's Sports Injuries Getting Help: Know the Numbers Concussions Stay Safe: Baseball Concussions Concussions: Getting Better Sports and Concussions Dealing ...

  12. Head MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart valves Heart defibrillator or pacemaker Inner ear (cochlear) implants Kidney disease or dialysis (you may not ... to: Abnormal blood vessels in the brain ( arteriovenous malformations of the head ) Tumor of the nerve that ...

  13. 3D Blade Hydraulic Design Method of the Rotodynamic Multiphase Pump Impeller and Performance Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxue Zhang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A hydraulic design method of three-dimensional blade was presented to design the blades of the rotodynamic multiphase pump. Numerical simulations and bench test were conducted to investigate the performance of the example impeller designed by the presented method. The results obtained from the bench test were in good agreement with the simulation results, which indicated the reasonability of the simulation. The distributions of pressure and gas volume fraction were analyzed and the results showed that the designed impeller was good for the transportation of mixture composed of gas and liquid. In addition, the advantage of the impeller designed by the presented method was suitable for using in large volume rate conditions, which were reflected by the comparison of the head performance between this three-dimensional design method and another one.

  14. Rapid Hydraulic Assessment for Stream Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    account the hydraulic conditions of the stream being restored. This is true whether the project involves a few feet of bank stabilization or several...coefficient, α, expresses a correction for nonuniformity in the velocity distribution, and in most applications this value is assumed to be 1 or read from...a table (e.g., Chow 1959, p.28). The depth and slope angle terms can be replaced by a vertical expression of the depth, y, because in most rivers

  15. Power Management in Mobile Hydraulic Applications - An Approach for Designing Hydraulic Power Supply Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen

    2004-01-01

    in a project to develop rules and methods for designing and controlling mobile hydraulic systems in the most energy efficient way, when also considering the operational aspects of the system. The paper first describes the thoughts and ideas behind the project and then focus on an automated approach to design......Throughout the last three decades energy consumption has become one of the primary design aspects in hydraulic systems, especially for mobile hydraulic systems, as power and cooling capacity here is at limited disposal. Considering the energy usage, this is dependent on component efficiency......, but even more important is the system topology. However, there are no rules or guidelines for what system topology to choose for a given application, in order to obtain the most energy efficient system, nor for how the energy should be distributed in the system. This paper describes the approach taken...

  16. Hydraulic Conductivity Measurements with HTU at Eurajoki, Olkiluoto, Borehole OL-KR15 and OL-KR15B, Year 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haemaelaeinen, H.

    2005-07-01

    As a part of the site investigations for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel, hydraulic conductivity measurements were carried out in borehole OL-KR15 at Eurajoki, Olkiluoto. The objective was to investigate the distribution of the hydraulic conductivity in the surrounding bedrock volume. Measurements were carried out during 2003-2004 in two phases. The total length of the borehole OL-KR15 is 518,85 m and 158 45,14 m. Of the 471 ,5 m + 44,5 m total measurable length 414 m was covered with 237 standard tests with 2 m packer separation as specified in the research plan, partly with 1 m overlaps. 259 tests were initiated, but some of them ended to hardware or software errors or unsuitable parameter values. Double-packer constant-head method was used throughout with nominal 200 kPa overpressure. Injection stage lasted normally 20 minutes and fall-off stage 10 minutes. The tests were often shortened if there were clear indications that the hydraulic conductivity is below the measuring range of the system. The pressure in the test section was let to stabilise at least 5 min before injection. In some test sections the stabilisation or injection stage lasted several hours. Two transient (Horner and 1/Q) interpretations and one stationary-state (Moye) interpretation were made in-situ immediately after the test. The Hydraulic Testing Unit (HTU-system) is owned by Posiva Oy and it was operated by Geopros Oy. (orig.)

  17. Hydraulic System Design of Hydraulic Actuators for Large Butterfly Valves

    OpenAIRE

    HUANG, Ye; Liu, Changsheng; Shiongur Bamed

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic control systems of butterfly valves are presently valve-controlled and pump-controlled. Valve-controlled hydraulic systems have serious power loss and generate much heat during throttling. Pump-controlled hydraulic systems have no overflow or throttling losses but are limited in the speed adjustment of the variable-displacement pump, generate much noise, pollute the environment, and have motor power that does not match load requirements, resulting in low efficiency under...

  18. Comparison of electric field strength and spatial distribution of electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy in a realistic human head model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Hee; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Laine, Andrew F.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2017-01-01

    Background This study examines the strength and spatial distribution of the electric field induced in the brain by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST). Methods The electric field induced by standard (bilateral, right unilateral, and bifrontal) and experimental (focal electrically administered seizure therapy and frontomedial) ECT electrode configurations as well as a circular MST coil configuration was simulated in an anatomically realistic finite element model of the human head. Maps of the electric field strength relative to an estimated neural activation threshold were used to evaluate the stimulation strength and focality in specific brain regions of interest for these ECT and MST paradigms and various stimulus current amplitudes. Results The standard ECT configurations and current amplitude of 800–900 mA produced the strongest overall stimulation with median of 1.8–2.9 times neural activation threshold and more than 94% of the brain volume stimulated at suprathreshold level. All standard ECT electrode placements exposed the hippocampi to suprathreshold electric field, although there were differences across modalities with bilateral and right unilateral producing respectively the strongest and weakest hippocampal stimulation. MST stimulation is up to 9 times weaker compared to conventional ECT, resulting in direct activation of only 21% of the brain. Reducing the stimulus current amplitude can make ECT as focal as MST. Conclusions The relative differences in electric field strength may be a contributing factor for the cognitive sparing observed with right unilateral compared to bilateral ECT, and MST compared to right unilateral ECT. These simulations could help understand the mechanisms of seizure therapies and develop interventions with superior risk/benefit ratio. PMID:27318858

  19. Design Considerations for Hydropower Development In a Water Distribution System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DavidP.Chamberlain; EdStewart; Fei-FanYeh; MichaelT.Stift

    2004-01-01

    Installation of a hydraulic turbine in a water distribution system involving long pipeline reaches requires several unique design considerations. For a fixed speed unit, the selection of design points for head and flow needs to be optimized to provide an operating envelope that would maximize the return on the investment given the widely varied flow and pressure conditions imposed by the water distribution system. The selection of a turbine design speed is essential in facilitating runner design, which must minimize the hydraulic pressure transients on turbine runaway that may result in overstressing the existing pipelines. Method and approach to evaluate these considerations are outlined. Relevant results for the selected design are presented using the 4.3 MW Rancho Penasquitos Pressure Control/Hydroelectric Facility as an illustrative example. Licensing requirements for small inline hydroelectric facilities are also briefly discussed.

  20. Head First Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Griffiths, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    Wouldn't it be great if there were a statistics book that made histograms, probability distributions, and chi square analysis more enjoyable than going to the dentist? Head First Statistics brings this typically dry subject to life, teaching you everything you want and need to know about statistics through engaging, interactive, and thought-provoking material, full of puzzles, stories, quizzes, visual aids, and real-world examples. Whether you're a student, a professional, or just curious about statistical analysis, Head First's brain-friendly formula helps you get a firm grasp of statistics

  1. Hydraulic System Design of Hydraulic Actuators for Large Butterfly Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye HUANG

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic control systems of butterfly valves are presently valve-controlled and pump-controlled. Valve-controlled hydraulic systems have serious power loss and generate much heat during throttling. Pump-controlled hydraulic systems have no overflow or throttling losses but are limited in the speed adjustment of the variable-displacement pump, generate much noise, pollute the environment, and have motor power that does not match load requirements, resulting in low efficiency under light loads and wearing of the variable-displacement pump. To overcome these shortcomings, this article designs a closed hydraulic control system in which an AC servo motor drives a quantitative pump that controls a spiral swinging hydraulic cylinder, and analyzes and calculates the structure and parameters of a spiral swinging hydraulic cylinder. The hydraulic system adjusts the servo motor’s speed according to the requirements of the control system, and the motor power matches the power provided to components, thus eliminating the throttling loss of hydraulic circuits. The system is compact, produces a large output force, provides stable transmission, has a quick response, and is suitable as a hydraulic control system of a large butterfly valve.

  2. Modelling of Hydraulic Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Zhou, Jianjun; Hansen, Lars Henrik

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a case study of identifying the physical model (or the grey box model) of a hydraulic test robot. The obtained model is intended to provide a basis for model-based control of the robot. The physical model is formulated in continuous time and is derived by application...... of the laws of physics on the system. The unknown (or uncertain) parameters are estimated with Maximum Likelihood (ML) parameter estimation. The identified model has been evaluated by comparing the measurements with simulation of the model. The identified model was much more capable of describing the dynamics...... of the system than the deterministic model....

  3. Hydraulic mining method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Lester H.; Knoke, Gerald S.

    1985-08-20

    A method of hydraulically mining an underground pitched mineral vein comprising drilling a vertical borehole through the earth's lithosphere into the vein and drilling a slant borehole along the footwall of the vein to intersect the vertical borehole. Material is removed from the mineral vein by directing a high pressure water jet thereagainst. The resulting slurry of mineral fragments and water flows along the slant borehole into the lower end of the vertical borehole from where it is pumped upwardly through the vertical borehole to the surface.

  4. Spinning hydraulic jump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abderrahmane, Hamid; Kasimov, Aslan

    2013-11-01

    We report an experimental observation of a new symmetry breaking of circular hydraulic jump into a self-organized structure that consists of a spinning polygonal jump and logarithmic-spiral waves of fluid elevation downstream. The waves are strikingly similar to spiral density waves in galaxies. The fluid flow exhibits counterparts of salient morphological features of galactic flows, in particular the outflow from the center, jets, circum-nuclear rings, gas inflows toward the galactic center, and vortices. The hydrodynamic instability revealed here may have a counterpart that plays a role in the formation and sustainability of spiral arms in galaxies.

  5. 46 CFR 28.880 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... hydraulic equipment and the adjacent work area. Protection shall be afforded to the operator of hydraulic... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydraulic equipment. 28.880 Section 28.880 Shipping... INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.880 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system must...

  6. Physico-empirical approach for mapping soil hydraulic behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D'Urso

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Pedo-transfer functions are largely used in soil hydraulic characterisation of large areas. The use of physico-empirical approaches for the derivation of soil hydraulic parameters from disturbed samples data can be greatly enhanced if a characterisation performed on undisturbed cores of the same type of soil is available. In this study, an experimental procedure for deriving maps of soil hydraulic behaviour is discussed with reference to its application in an irrigation district (30 km2 in southern Italy. The main steps of the proposed procedure are: i the precise identification of soil hydraulic functions from undisturbed sampling of main horizons in representative profiles for each soil map unit; ii the determination of pore-size distribution curves from larger disturbed sampling data sets within the same soil map unit. iii the calibration of physical-empirical methods for retrieving soil hydraulic parameters from particle-size data and undisturbed soil sample analysis; iv the definition of functional hydraulic properties from water balance output; and v the delimitation of soil hydraulic map units based on functional properties.

  7. Distribution of photoperiod-insensitive alleles Ppd-B1a and Ppd-D1a and their effect on heading time in Japanese wheat cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Masako; Chono, Makiko; Matsunaka, Hitoshi; Fujita, Masaya; Oda, Shunsuke; Kubo, Katashi; Kiribuchi-Otobe, Chikako; Kojima, Hisayo; Nishida, Hidetaka; Kato, Kenji

    2011-12-01

    The genotypes of photoperiod response genes Ppd-B1 and Ppd-D1 in Japanese wheat cultivars were determined by a PCR-based method, and heading times were compared among genotypes. Most of the Japanese wheat cultivars, except those from the Hokkaido region, carried the photoperiod-insensitive allele Ppd-D1a, and heading was accelerated 10.3 days compared with the Ppd-D1b genotype. Early cultivars with Ppd-D1a may have been selected to avoid damage from preharvest rain. In the Hokkaido region, Ppd-D1a frequency was lower and heading date was late regardless of Ppd-D1 genotype, suggesting another genetic mechanism for late heading in Hokkaido cultivars. In this study, only 11 cultivars proved to carry Ppd-B1a, and all of them carried another photoperiod-insensitive allele, Ppd-D1a. The Ppd-B1a/Ppd-D1a genotype headed 6.7 days earlier than the Ppd-B1b/Ppd-D1a genotype, indicating a significant effect of Ppd-B1a in the genetic background with Ppd-D1a. Early-maturity breeding in Japan is believed to be accelerated by the introduction of the Ppd-B1a allele into medium-heading cultivars carrying Ppd-D1a. Pedigree analysis showed that Ppd-B1a in three extra-early commercial cultivars was inherited from 'Shiroboro 21' by early-heading Chugoku lines bred at the Chugoku Agriculture Experimental Station.

  8. Applied hydraulic transients

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhry, M Hanif

    2014-01-01

    This book covers hydraulic transients in a comprehensive and systematic manner from introduction to advanced level and presents various methods of analysis for computer solution. The field of application of the book is very broad and diverse and covers areas such as hydroelectric projects, pumped storage schemes, water-supply systems, cooling-water systems, oil pipelines and industrial piping systems. Strong emphasis is given to practical applications, including several case studies, problems of applied nature, and design criteria. This will help design engineers and introduce students to real-life projects. This book also: ·         Presents modern methods of analysis suitable for computer analysis, such as the method of characteristics, explicit and implicit finite-difference methods and matrix methods ·         Includes case studies of actual projects ·         Provides extensive and complete treatment of governed hydraulic turbines ·         Presents design charts, desi...

  9. Pressure regulation in nonlinear hydraulic networks by positive controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Persis, Claudio; Skovmose Kallesøe, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    We report on our investigation of an industrial case study of a system distributed over a network, namely a large-scale hydraulic network which underlies a district heating system. The network comprises an arbitrarily large number of end-users and actuators distributed along the network. After intro

  10. Head Start.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Geri

    2000-01-01

    Discusses an art project in which students created drawings of mop heads. Explains that the approach of drawing was more important than the subject. States that the students used the chiaroscuro technique, used by Rembrandt and Caravaggio, in which light appears out of the darkness. (CMK)

  11. 教学用话筒头部球面微生物检测结果分析%Distribution of microorganism on surface of multimedia microphone head

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈云霞; 武延隽

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the variation and distribution of microorganism on the surface of microphone head. Methods The specimens were collected with sterilized swab scrubbing. The abundance and density of the microorganisms were detected with bacterial culture and identification tests. The antigen of respiratory virus was detected with direct fluorescence antibody ( DFA) and the specific DNA of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydiae trachomatis, and Chlamydophila pneumoniae were detected with polymerase chain reaction ( PCR). Results There were 3-9 bacterial species belonging to 2 -6 genuses on the surface of microphone head. The positive detection rates of Staphylococcus,Streptococcus, Neisseria, Corynebacterium, and Bacillus were 17. 33% - 59. 77% , 21. 21% - 88. 89% , 15. 78% - 23. 54% , 5.67% -11.12% ,and 2. 08% - 12.36% , respectively. The microorganisms detected were mainly normal bacteria of oral cavity and pharyngonasal cavity, as well as the common bacteria in the environment. The antigen positive rate was 56. 25% , 87.50% ,68.75% ,81. 25% ,43.75% ,43. 75% ,and 68. 75% for adenovirus,respiratory syncytial virus,influenza virus A, influenza virus B,parainfluenza virus 1,parainfluenza virus 2 and parainfluenza virus 3,respectively. The positive rate of Chlamydiae trachomatis was 6.25%. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae were not checked out. Conclusion There were abundant microbial populations on the surface of microphone head,including pathogen and conditioned pathogen. The microphone is a potential vector associated with respiratory infections.%目的 检测教学用话筒头部球面微生物分布情况.方法无菌棉拭子采集标本,采用常规细菌培养与鉴定法检测细菌,采用直接免疫荧光法(DFA)检测多种呼吸道病毒抗原,采用聚合酶链反应(PCR)法对肺炎支原体、肺炎衣原体、沙眼农原体的特异性DNA核酸片段进行检测.结果话筒头部球面细菌学检出2~6个菌属,3~9个菌种,

  12. Dynamic changes in the distribution and time course of blood-brain barrier-permeative nitroxides in the mouse head with EPR imaging: visualization of blood flow in a mouse model of ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emoto, Miho C; Sato-Akaba, Hideo; Hirata, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hirotada G

    2014-09-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging using nitroxides as redox-sensitive probes is a powerful, noninvasive method that can be used under various physiological conditions to visualize changes in redox status that result from oxidative damage. Two blood-brain barrier-permeative nitroxides, 3-hydroxymethyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl (HMP) and 3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-yloxy (MCP), have been widely used as redox-sensitive probes in the brains of small animals, but their in vivo distribution and properties have not yet been analyzed in detail. In this study, a custom-made continuous-wave three-dimensional (3D) EPR imager was used to obtain 3D EPR images of mouse heads using MCP or HMP. This EPR imager made it possible to take 3D EPR images reconstructed from data from 181 projections acquired every 60s. Using this improved EPR imager and magnetic resonance imaging, the distribution and reduction time courses of HMP and MCP were examined in mouse heads. EPR images of living mice revealed that HMP and MCP have different distributions and different time courses for entering the brain. Based on the pharmacokinetics of the reduction reactions of HMP and MCP in the mouse head, the half-lives of HMP and MCP were clearly and accurately mapped pixel by pixel. An ischemic mouse model was prepared, and the half-life of MCP was mapped in the mouse head. Compared to the half-life in control mice, the half-life of MCP in the ischemic model mouse brain was significantly increased, suggesting a shift in the redox balance. This in vivo EPR imaging method using BBB-permeative MCP is a useful noninvasive method for assessing changes in the redox status in mouse brains under oxidative stress.

  13. The helical turbine: A new idea for low-head hydro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorlov, A.M. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Substantial potential exists at small hydro sites where heads are too low for conventional hydraulic turbines. A spiral-bladed turbine may offer a new alternative for tapping that potential in a cost-efficient manner.

  14. Reliability modeling of hydraulic system of drum shearer machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SEYED HADI Hoseinie; MOHAMMAD Ataie; REZA Khalookakaei; UDAY Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The hydraulic system plays an important role in supplying power and its transition to other working parts of a coal shearer machine.In this paper,the reliability of the hydraulic system of a drum shearer was analyzed.A case study was done in the Tabas Coal Mine in Iran for failure data collection.The results of the statistical analysis show that the time between failures (TBF)data of this system followed the 3-parameters Weibull distribution.There is about a 54% chance that the hydraulic system of the drum shearer will not fail for the first 50 h of operation.The developed model shows that the reliability of the hydraulic system reduces to a zero value after approximately 1 650 hours of operation.The failure rate of this system decreases when time increases.Therefore,corrective maintenance(run-to-failure)was selected as the best maintenance strategy for it.

  15. Hydraulic rams; a comparative investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tacke, J.H.P.M.

    1988-01-01

    A mathematical model describing the essential features of hydraulic ram operation is developed in order to clarify the possibilities and limitations of the ram relative to its site and its adjustments. The model distinguishes three different periods in the pumping cycle of the hydraulic ram: acceler

  16. Hydraulics. FOS: Fundamentals of Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Deere Co., Moline, IL.

    This manual on hydraulics is one of a series of power mechanics texts and visual aids for training in the servicing of agricultural and industrial machinery. Focus is on oil hydraulics. Materials provide basic information and illustrations for use by vocational students and teachers as well as shop servicemen and laymen. The twelve chapters focus…

  17. Hydraulic Stability of Accropode Armour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T.; Burcharth, H. F.; Frigaard, Peter

    , and to assess the influence of core permeability on the hydraulic stability of Accropodes. Two structures were examined, one with a relatively permeable core and one with a relatively impermeable core. In November/December 1995, Ph.D.-student Marten Christensen carried out the model tests on the structure...... with permeable core (crushed granite with a gradation of 5-8 mm). The outcome of this study is described in "Hydraulic Stability of Single-Layer Dolos and Accropode Armour Layers" by Christensen & Burcharth (1995). In January/February 1996, Research Assistant Thomas Jensen carried out a similar study......The present report describes the hydraulic model tests of Accropode armour layers carried out at the Hydraulics Laboratory at Aalborg University from November 1995 through March 1996. The objective of the model tests was to investigate the hydraulic stability of Accropode armour layers...

  18. Hydraulic Stability of Accropode Armour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T.; Burcharth, H. F.; Frigaard, Peter

    , and to assess the influence of core permeability on the hydraulic stability of Accropodes. Two structures were examined, one with a relatively permeable core and one with a relatively impermeable core. In November/December 1995, Ph.D.-student Marten Christensen carried out the model tests on the structure...... with permeable core (crushed granite with a gradation of 5-8 mm). The outcome of this study is described in "Hydraulic Stability of Single-Layer Dolos and Accropode Armour Layers" by Christensen & Burcharth (1995). In January/February 1996, Research Assistant Thomas Jensen carried out a similar study......The present report describes the hydraulic model tests of Accropode armour layers carried out at the Hydraulics Laboratory at Aalborg University from November 1995 through March 1996. The objective of the model tests was to investigate the hydraulic stability of Accropode armour layers...

  19. Horizontal steam generator PGV-1000 thermal-hydraulic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubra, O. [Skoda Company, Prague (Switzerland); Doubek, M. [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Switzerland)

    1995-12-31

    A computer program for the steady state thermal-hydraulic analysis of horizontal steam generator PGV-1000 is presented. The program provides the capability to analyze steam generator PGV-1000 primary side flow and temperature distribution, primary side pressure drops, heat transfer between the primary and secondary sides and multidimensional heat flux distribution. A special attention is paid to the thermal-hydraulics of the secondary side. The code predicts 3-D distribution of the void fraction at the secondary side, mass redistribution under the submerged perforated sheet and the steam generator level profile. By means of developed computer program a detailed thermal-hydraulic study of the PGV-1000 has been carried out. A wide range of calculations has been performed and a set of important steam generator characteristics has been obtained. Some of them are presented in the paper. (orig.). 5 refs.

  20. Interstitial hydraulic conductivity and interstitial fluid pressure for avascular or poorly vascularized tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L J; Schlesinger, M

    2015-09-07

    A correct description of the hydraulic conductivity is essential for determining the actual tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) distribution. Traditionally, it has been assumed that the hydraulic conductivities both in a tumor and normal tissue are constant, and that a tumor has a much larger interstitial hydraulic conductivity than normal tissue. The abrupt transition of the hydraulic conductivity at the tumor surface leads to non-physical results (the hydraulic conductivity and the slope of the TIFP are not continuous at tumor surface). For the sake of simplicity and the need to represent reality, we focus our analysis on avascular or poorly vascularized tumors, which have a necrosis that is mostly in the center and vascularization that is mostly on the periphery. We suggest that there is an intermediary region between the tumor surface and normal tissue. Through this region, the interstitium (including the structure and composition of solid components and interstitial fluid) transitions from tumor to normal tissue. This process also causes the hydraulic conductivity to do the same. We introduce a continuous variation of the hydraulic conductivity, and show that the interstitial hydraulic conductivity in the intermediary region should be monotonically increasing up to the value of hydraulic conductivity in the normal tissue in order for the model to correspond to the actual TIFP distribution. The value of the hydraulic conductivity at the tumor surface should be the lowest in value.

  1. Hydraulic Yaw System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkier, Søren; Pedersen, Henrik C.; Mørkholt, M.

    As wind turbines increase in size, combined with increased lifetime demands, new methods for load reduction needs to be examined. One method is to make the yaw system of the turbine soft/flexible and hereby dampen the loads to the system, which is the focus of the current paper. By utilizing...... the HAWC2 aeroelastic code and an extended model of the NREL 5MW turbine combined with a simplified linear model of the turbine, the parameters of the soft yaw system are optimized to reduce loading in critical components. Results shows that a significant reduction in fatigue and extreme loads to the yaw...... system and rotor shaft when utilizing the soft yaw drive concept compared to the original stiff yaw system. The physical demands of the hydraulic yaw system are furthermore examined for a life time of 20 years. Based on the extrapolated loads, the duty cycles show that it is possible to construct...

  2. Electro Hydraulic Hitch Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M. R.; Andersen, T. O.; Nielsen, B.

    2003-01-01

    system for agricultural applications and driving for transportation. During tranport phases, the lack of suspension causes the vehicle to bounce and pitch, and makes it difficalt to control. Many systems have been proposed to cope with the oscillatory behavior, and different solutions exist. Common......This paper present and discusses R&D results on electro hydraulic hitch control for off-road vehicle, in particular active damping of oscillation occuring on tractors. The research deals with analysis and control of the oscillations occuring on tractors which are design without any susspection...... for most of the systems are that they operate on the hydrailc actuators generally providing the motive forces for moving the implement and/or attachment, typically a plough. The basic idea and physical working principle are to use the implement, moveable relative to the vehicle, as a damper mass. The paper...

  3. Is the spatial distribution of brain lesions associated with closed-head injury predictive of subsequent development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder? Analysis with brain-image database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herskovits, E. H.; Megalooikonomou, V.; Davatzikos, C.; Chen, A.; Bryan, R. N.; Gerring, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine whether there is an association between the spatial distribution of lesions detected at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain in children after closed-head injury and the development of secondary attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data obtained from 76 children without prior history of ADHD were analyzed. MR images were obtained 3 months after closed-head injury. After manual delineation of lesions, images were registered to the Talairach coordinate system. For each subject, registered images and secondary ADHD status were integrated into a brain-image database, which contains depiction (visualization) and statistical analysis software. Using this database, we assessed visually the spatial distributions of lesions and performed statistical analysis of image and clinical variables. RESULTS: Of the 76 children, 15 developed secondary ADHD. Depiction of the data suggested that children who developed secondary ADHD had more lesions in the right putamen than children who did not develop secondary ADHD; this impression was confirmed statistically. After Bonferroni correction, we could not demonstrate significant differences between secondary ADHD status and lesion burdens for the right caudate nucleus or the right globus pallidus. CONCLUSION: Closed-head injury-induced lesions in the right putamen in children are associated with subsequent development of secondary ADHD. Depiction software is useful in guiding statistical analysis of image data.

  4. Modeling the influence of varying hydraulic conditions on aerobic respiration and denitrification in the hyporheic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauth, N.; Schmidt, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    Exchange of water and solutes across the stream-sediment interface is an important control for biogeochemical transformations in the hyporheic zone (HZ) with measurable impacts on nutrient cycling and solute attenuation in fluvial systems. Here we investigate the interplay between turbulent stream flow and HZ flow under various hydraulic conditions applied to two cases: a) three-dimensional generic pool-riffle sequences with different morphological properties, and b) a real mid-stream gravel-bar. Stream flow is simulated by the open source computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software OpenFOAM which provides the hydraulic head distribution at the streambed. It is sequentially coupled to the top of the groundwater model code MIN3P, simulating flow, solute transport, aerobic respiration (AR) and denitrification (DN) in the HZ. Flow in the HZ is directly influenced by the hydraulic head distribution at the streambed surface and the ambient groundwater flow. Three reactive transport scenarios are considered: 1) stream water as the primary source of dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate (NO3) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), 2) upwelling groundwater as an additionally source of NO3, and 3) upwelling groundwater as an additional source of DO in various concentrations. Results show an increase in hyporheic exchange flow for increasing stream discharge with a concurrent decrease in residence time. The fraction of circulating stream water through the HZ is in the range of 1x10-5 to 1x10-6 per unit stream length, decreasing with increasing discharge. Ambient groundwater flow in both the up- and downwelling direction diminishes significantly the hyporheic exchange flow and extent. Biogeochemical processes in the HZ are strongly controlled by ambient groundwater flow, even more so than by changes in stream discharge. AR and DN efficiencies of the HZ are significantly reduced by up- and downwelling groundwater and are positively correlated with median residence times. AR occurs in

  5. Incorporating Soil Hydraulic Parameter Statistics in Developing Pedo-transfer Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Zhu, J.; Ye, M.; Meyer, P. D.; Pan, F.; Hassan, A. E.

    2007-12-01

    In this study, we develop artificial neural network (ANN) based pedotransfer functions (PTFs) to predict soil hydraulic properties. The PTF approach is an efficient way of translating less costly available data, such as particle-size distributions, soil textures and other geophysical measurements, to soil hydraulic parameters required for numerical simulations and other applications. The ANN PTFs need to be trained before being used to transfer indirect measurements to soil hydraulic parameters. The traditional training process, in general, is to adjust ANN's coefficients to solely minimize the difference between the estimated and measured soil hydraulic parameters. The training process, however, did not consider the distributions of soil hydraulic parameters and the trained neural networks may yield improper distributions, which may severely affect probabilistic predictions. We incorporate the distributions of the soil hydraulic parameters into the ANN PTF development. In addition, it has been observed that PTFs can introduce unrealistic correlations between the output parameters. The unwanted artificial correlations need to be penalized during the training process, since it is well known that parameter correlations have significant effect on predictions. We achieve these two goals by adding two regularization terms to the ANN objective functions. A suite of new neural network models are developed to estimate soil hydraulic parameters. These neural network models have the same input and output variables, but different objective functions, which incorporate sequentially the site soil hydraulic parameter measurements, parameter probability distributions, and parameter correlations.

  6. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, A Hakan; Ozdamar, Tuğçe

    2013-06-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of compacted zeolites were investigated as a function of compaction water content and zeolite particle size. Initially, the compaction characteristics of zeolites were determined. The compaction test results showed that maximum dry unit weight (γ(dmax)) of fine zeolite was greater than that of granular zeolites. The γ(dmax) of compacted zeolites was between 1.01 and 1.17 Mg m(-3) and optimum water content (w(opt)) was between 38% and 53%. Regardless of zeolite particle size, compacted zeolites had low γ(dmax) and high w(opt) when compared with compacted natural soils. Then, hydraulic conductivity tests were run on compacted zeolites. The hydraulic conductivity values were within the range of 2.0 × 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 1.1 × 10(-7) cm s(-1). Hydraulic conductivity of all compacted zeolites decreased almost 50 times as the water content increased. It is noteworthy that hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite was strongly dependent on the zeolite particle size. The hydraulic conductivity decreased almost three orders of magnitude up to 39% fine content; then, it remained almost unchanged beyond 39%. Only one report was found in the literature on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite, which is in agreement with the findings of this study.

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special ... the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  8. The composition and compression of biofilms developed on ultrafiltration membranes determine hydraulic biofilm resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derlon, Nicolas; Grütter, Alexander; Brandenberger, Fabienne; Sutter, Anja; Kuhlicke, Ute; Neu, Thomas R; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed at identifying how to improve the level of permeate flux stabilisation during gravity-driven membrane filtration without control of biofilm formation. The focus was therefore on understanding (i) how the different fractions of the biofilms (inorganics particles, bacterial cells, EPS matrix) influence its hydraulic resistance and (ii) how the compression of biofilms impacts its hydraulic resistance, i.e., can water head be increased to increase the level of permeate flux stabilisation. Biofilms were developed on ultrafiltration membranes at 88 and 284 cm water heads with dead-end filtration for around 50 days. A larger water head resulted in a smaller biofilm permeability (150 and 50 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1) for biofilms grown at 88 cm and 284 cm water head, respectively). Biofilms were mainly composed of EPS (>90% in volume). The comparison of the hydraulic resistances of biofilms to model fouling layers indicated that most of the hydraulic resistance is due to the EPS matrix. The compressibility of the biofilm was also evaluated by subjecting the biofilms to short-term (few minutes) and long-term variations of transmembrane pressures (TMP). A sudden change of TMP resulted in an instantaneous and reversible change of biofilm hydraulic resistance. A long-term change of TMP induced a slow change in the biofilm hydraulic resistance. Our results demonstrate that the response of biofilms to a TMP change has two components: an immediate variation of resistance (due to compression/relaxation) and a long-term response (linked to biofilm adaptation/growth). Our results provide relevant information about the relationship between the operating conditions in terms of TMP, the biofilm structure and composition and the resulting biofilm hydraulic resistance. These findings have practical implications for a broad range of membrane systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydraulic development of high specific-speed pump-turbines by means of an inverse design method, numerical flow-simulation (CFD) and model testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschberger, P.; Gehrer, A.

    2010-08-01

    In recent years an increased interest in pump-turbines has been recognized in the market. The rapid availability of pumped storage schemes and the benefits to the power system by peak lopping, providing reserve and rapid response for frequency control are becoming of growing advantage. In that context it is requested to develop pump-turbines that reliably stand dynamic operation modes, fast changes of the discharge rate by adjusting the variable diffuser vanes as well as fast changes from pump to turbine operation. Within the present study various flow patterns linked to the operation of a pump-turbine system are discussed. In that context pump and turbine mode are presented separately and different load cases at both operation modes are shown. In order to achieve modern, competitive pump-turbine designs it is further explained which design challenges should be considered during the geometry definition of a pump-turbine impeller. Within the present study a runner-blade profile for a low head pump-turbine has been developed. For the initial hydraulic runner-blade design, an inverse design method has been applied. Within this design procedure, a first blade geometry is generated by imposing the pressure loading-distribution and by means of an inverse 3D potential-flow-solution. The hydraulic behavior of both, pump-mode and turbine-mode is then evaluated by solving the full 3D Navier-Stokes equations in combination with a robust turbulence model. Based on this initial design the blade profile has been further optimized and redesigned considering various hydraulic pump-turbine requirements. Finally, the progress in hydraulic design is demonstrated by model test results which show a significant improvement in hydraulic performance compared to an existing reference design.

  10. Hydraulic development of high specific-speed pump-turbines by means of an inverse design method, numerical flow-simulation (CFD) and model testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerschberger, P; Gehrer, A, E-mail: peter.kerschberger@andritz.co [Andritz Hydro Graz A-8045 Graz, Reichsstrasse 68B (Austria)

    2010-08-15

    In recent years an increased interest in pump-turbines has been recognized in the market. The rapid availability of pumped storage schemes and the benefits to the power system by peak lopping, providing reserve and rapid response for frequency control are becoming of growing advantage. In that context it is requested to develop pump-turbines that reliably stand dynamic operation modes, fast changes of the discharge rate by adjusting the variable diffuser vanes as well as fast changes from pump to turbine operation. Within the present study various flow patterns linked to the operation of a pump-turbine system are discussed. In that context pump and turbine mode are presented separately and different load cases at both operation modes are shown. In order to achieve modern, competitive pump-turbine designs it is further explained which design challenges should be considered during the geometry definition of a pump-turbine impeller. Within the present study a runner-blade profile for a low head pump-turbine has been developed. For the initial hydraulic runner-blade design, an inverse design method has been applied. Within this design procedure, a first blade geometry is generated by imposing the pressure loading-distribution and by means of an inverse 3D potential-flow-solution. The hydraulic behavior of both, pump-mode and turbine-mode is then evaluated by solving the full 3D Navier-Stokes equations in combination with a robust turbulence model. Based on this initial design the blade profile has been further optimized and redesigned considering various hydraulic pump-turbine requirements. Finally, the progress in hydraulic design is demonstrated by model test results which show a significant improvement in hydraulic performance compared to an existing reference design.

  11. Comparative treatment planning study on sequential vs. simultaneous integrated boost in head and neck cancer patients. Differences in dose distributions and potential implications for clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stromberger, Carmen; Ghadjar, Pirus; Marnitz, Simone; Thieme, Alexander Henry; Jahn, Ulrich; Karaj-Rossbacher, Evis; Budach, Volker [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiotherapy, Berlin (Germany); Raguse, Jan D. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Clinic for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Boettcher, Arne [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Otorhinolaryngology, Berlin (Germany); Jamil, Basil [Communal Hospital Frankfurt Oder, Department of Radiation Oncology, Frankfurt/Oder (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The purpose of this work was to compare sequential (SeqB) versus simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) radiotherapy plans delivered with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for patients with locally advanced squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (HNSCC). SeqB and SIB plans using VMAT for 10 HNSCC patients given definitive chemoradiation were generated and analysed for differences in dose distribution, coverage, conformity and homogeneity to the planning target volumes (PTV) 1-3 and sparing of organs at risk (OAR). The mean delineated volumes ± standard deviations were 137.7 ± 44.8, 351.3 ± 83.9 and 895.6 ± 120.5 cm{sup 3} for PTV1-3. The mean volumes encompassed by the corresponding 95 % isodoses were 281 (+ 110 %) ± 73.4, 712.2 (+ 115 %) ± 146.4 and 1381.1 (+ 54 %) ± 217.3 cm{sup 3} with SeqB and 138.2 (+ 7 %) ± 40.1, 380.4 (+ 11 %) ± 91.9 and 1057.3 (+ 21 %) ± 161.4 cm{sup 3} with SIB for PTV1-3, respectively. Both strategies achieved excellent PTV coverage. SeqB provided significantly better coverage of PTV1 and 3, worse conformity for PTV1-3 and a higher mean dose than prescribed (111-115 %) to PTV2 and 3 (p ≤ 0.007). Both strategies provided satisfactory OAR sparing. This study showed significant dosimetric differences with potential clinical relevance between two VMAT boost strategies regarding coverage, conformity and dose to the PTVs. SIB might cause less toxicity. A clinical phase III/IV trial endorsed by the German Head and Neck Clinical Trials Group (IAG-KHT) will evaluate differences in acute/late toxicity as well as in locoregional recurrences between the two boost techniques. (orig.) [German] Vergleich von sequentiellem (SeqB) und simultan-integriertem Boost (SIB) mit moderner volumetrischer Arc-Therapie (VMAT) fuer Patienten mit Plattenepithelkarzinomen der Kopf-Hals-Region. Fuer 10 Patienten mit Plattenepithelkarzinomen der Kopf-Hals-Region und definitiver Radiochemotherapie erfolgte eine VMAT-Planung als SeqB und SIB fuer die

  12. FOREWORD: 26th IAHR Symposium on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yulin; Wang, Zhengwei; Liu, Shuhong; Yuan, Shouqi; Luo, Xingqi; Wang, Fujun

    2012-11-01

    The 26th IAHR Symposium on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems, will be held in Beijing, China, 19-23 August 2012. It is jointly organized by Tsinghua University, State Key Laboratory of Hydro Science and Hydraulic Engineering, China, Jiangsu University, Xi'an University of Technology, China Agricultural University, National Engineering Research Center of Hydropower Equipment and Dongfang Electric Machinery Co., Ltd. It is the second time that China hosts such a symposium. By the end of 2011, the China electrical power system had a total of 1 050 GW installed power, out of which 220 GW was in hydropower plants. The energy produced in hydropower facilities was 662.6 TWh from a total of 4,720 TWh electrical energy production in 2011. Moreover, in 2020, new hydropower capacities are going to be developed, with a total of 180 GW installed power and an estimated 708 TWh/year energy production. And in 2011, the installed power of pumped storage stations was about 25GW. In 2020, the data will be 70GW. At the same time, the number of pumps used in China is increasing rapidly. China produces about 29,000,000 pumps with more than 220 series per year. By the end of 2011, the Chinese pumping system has a total of 950 GW installed power. The energy consumed in pumping facilities was 530 TWh in 2011. The pump energy consumption accounted for about 12% of the national electrical energy production. Therefore, there is a large market in the field of hydraulic machinery including water turbines, pump turbines and a variety of pumps in China. There are also many research projects in this field. For example, we have conducted National Key Research Projects on 1000 MW hydraulic turbine, and on the pump turbines with high head, as well as on the large capacity pumps for water supply. Tsinghua University of Beijing is proud to host the 26th IAHR Symposium on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems. Tsinghua University was established in 1911, after the founding of the People's Republic of China. It

  13. Hydraulic conductivity of organomodified soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, R.B.; Grant, J.M.; Voice, T.C.; Rakhshandehroo, G.; Xu, S.; Boyd, S.A. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The effects of organomodification on soil hydraulic conductivity were investigated. Hydraulic conductivity and porosity of treated and untreated samples of a sandy loam were measured as a function of effective stress. Batch treatment with hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium (HDTMA) and dry packing produced organomodified samples that were 79% less conducive than untreated samples prior to loading. Treated samples lost less hydraulic conductivity as a result of loading than untreated samples so that treated samples had higher conductivity at high loads. Observed differences in conductivity are explained in terms of the role of the treated and untreated clay in controlling initial effective pore size and its change during consolidation.

  14. Estimation of ground water hydraulic parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hvilshoej, Soeren

    1998-11-01

    The main objective was to assess field methods to determine ground water hydraulic parameters and to develop and apply new analysis methods to selected field techniques. A field site in Vejen, Denmark, which previously has been intensively investigated on the basis of a large amount of mini slug tests and tracer tests, was chosen for experimental application and evaluation. Particular interest was in analysing partially penetrating pumping tests and a recently proposed single-well dipole test. Three wells were constructed in which partially penetrating pumping tests and multi-level single-well dipole tests were performed. In addition, multi-level slug tests, flow meter tests, gamma-logs, and geologic characterisation of soil samples were carried out. In addition to the three Vejen analyses, data from previously published partially penetrating pumping tests were analysed assuming homogeneous anisotropic aquifer conditions. In the present study methods were developed to analyse partially penetrating pumping tests and multi-level single-well dipole tests based on an inverse numerical model. The obtained horizontal hydraulic conductivities from the partially penetrating pumping tests were in accordance with measurements obtained from multi-level slug tests and mini slug tests. Accordance was also achieved between the anisotropy ratios determined from partially penetrating pumping tests and multi-level single-well dipole tests. It was demonstrated that the partially penetrating pumping test analysed by and inverse numerical model is a very valuable technique that may provide hydraulic information on the storage terms and the vertical distribution of the horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivity under both confined and unconfined aquifer conditions. (EG) 138 refs.

  15. Predicting saturated hydraulic conductivity using soil morphological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Karahan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have been conducted to predict soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks by parametric soil properties such as bulk density and particle-size distribution. Although soil morphological properties have a strong effect on Ks, studies predicting Ks by soil morphological properties such as type, size, and strength of soil structure; type, orientation and quantity of soil pores and roots and consistency are rare. This study aimed at evaluating soil morphological properties to predict Ks. Undisturbed soil samples (15 cm length and 8.0 cm id. were collected from topsoil (0-15 cm and subsoil (15-30 cm (120 samples with a tractor operated soil sampler at sixty randomly selected sampling sites on a paddy field and an adjecent grassland in Central Anatolia (Cankırı, Turkey. Synchronized disturbed soil samples were taken from the same sampling sites and sampling depths for basic soil analyses. Saturated hydraulic conductivity was measured on the soil columns using a constant-head permeameter. Following the Ks measurements, the upper part of soil columns were covered to prevent evaporation and colums were left to drain in the laboratory. When the water flow through the column was stopped, a subsample were taken for bulk density and then soil columns were disturbed for describing the soil morphological properties. In addition, soil texture, bulk density, pH, field capacity, wilting point, cation exchange capacity, specific surface area, aggregate stability, organic matter, and calcium carbonate were measured on the synchronized disturbed soil samples. The data were divided into training (80 data values and validation (40 data values sets. Measured values of Ks ranged from 0.0036 to 2.14 cmh-1 with a mean of 0.86 cmh-1. The Ks was predicted from the soil morphological and parametric properties by stepwise multiple linear regression analysis. Soil structure class, stickiness, pore-size, root-size, and pore-quantity contributed to the Ks prediction

  16. Measurement of soil hydraulic conductivity in relation with vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Cheng, Qinbo

    2010-05-01

    Hydraulic conductivity is a key parameter which influences hydrological processes of infiltration, surface and subsurface runoff. Vegetation alters surface characteristics (e.g., surface roughness, litter absorption) or subsurface characteristics (e.g. hydraulic conductivity). Field infiltration experiment of a single ring permeameter is widely used for measuring soil hydraulic conductivity. Measurement equipment is a simple single-ring falling head permeameter which consists of a hollow cylinder that is simply inserted into the top soil. An optimization method on the basis of objective of minimum error between the measured and simulated water depths in the single-ring is developed for determination of the soil hydraulic parameters. Using the single ring permeameter, we measured saturated hydraulic conductivities (Ks) of the red loam soil with and without vegetation covers on five hillslopes at Taoyuan Agro-Ecology Experimental Station, Hunan Province of China. For the measurement plots without vegetation roots, Ks value of the soil at 25cm depth is much smaller than that of surface soil (1.52×10-4 vs. 1.10×10-5 m/s). For the measurement plots with vegetation cover, plant roots significantly increase Ks of the lower layer soil but this increase is not significant for the shallow soil. Moreover, influences of vegetation root on Ks depend on vegetation species and ages. Ks value of the Camellia is about three times larger than that of seeding of Camphor (2.62×10-4 vs. 9.82×10-5 m/s). Ks value of the matured Camellia is 2.72×10-4 m/s while Ks value of the young Camellia is only 2.17×10-4 m/s. Key words: single ring permeameter; soil hydraulic conductivity; vegetation

  17. 分布式电驱动汽车 AFS 与电液复合制动集成控制%Integrated Control of Active Front Steering and Motor/Hydraulic Hybrid Braking in Distributed Electric Drive Vehicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁希文; 桂林; 周兵

    2016-01-01

    针对分布式电驱动汽车,以实现车辆主动安全性同时兼顾制动能量回收为目标,提出一种主动前轮转向(AFS)与电液复合制动集成的控制策略.AFS 控制器采用滑模变结构控制,滑移率控制器采用滑模极值搜索算法,基于分层结构(上层为期望制动力矩计算模块,中层为考虑执行器带宽的动态控制分配模块,下层为电机与液压复合执行器),并考虑位置与速率约束.转向制动时,考虑车辆纵向动力学对侧向动力学的影响,引入前轮转角对滑移率控制律进行了修正.在 MATLAB/Simulink 中建立七自由度整车模型,对控制算法进行了验证.结果表明:分离路面直线制动时,所提出的控制策略可以同时保证制动能量回收和制动方向稳定性;转弯制动时,可以更好地跟踪理想横摆角速度,提高了车辆的侧向稳定性.%A new control strategy was proposed by integrating active front steering and electro-hydrau-lic braking in distributed electric drive vehicles to ensure vehicle active safety by taking into account bra-king energy recuperation.The AFS controller was synthesized by means of sliding mode control.The wheel slip controller was designed with a hierarchical control structure.In the upper layer,sliding mode extremum-seeking algorithm was adopted to obtain the desired braking torque,and a dynamic control allo-cator considering different actuators bandwidths was employed to determine the optimal split between the electric and friction brake torque in the middle layer.In the lower layer,a hybrid actuator system consis-ting of the hydraulic brake and the electrical motor was designed on the basis of actuator position and rate constraints.The wheel slip control law was modified by introducing the road wheel angle factor consider-ing the strongly coupled dynamics of steering and braking systems when braking-in-turn.Simulation re-sults obtained with a 7-Do

  18. HYDRAULICS, ATHENS COUNTY, OHIO, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydraulic data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydrologic procedures for estimating flood discharges for a flood insurance...

  19. HYDRAULICS, JACKSON COUNTY, KENTUCKY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydraulic data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydrologic procedures for estimating flood discharges for a flood insurance...

  20. HYDRAULICS, MADISON COUNTY, ALABAMA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — This Hydraulic data was reviewed and approved by FEMA during the initial MT-2 processing. Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management...

  1. HYDRAULICS, HAMPDEN COUNTY, MA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydraulic data in this submittal include spatial datasets and model outputs necessary for computation of the 1-percent flooding extent. The minimum requirement for...

  2. Hydraulic wind energy conversion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to design, build and test a hydraulic wind energy system. This design used a three bladed turbine, which drove a hydraulic pump. The energy is transmitted from the pump through a long hose and into a hydraulic motor, where the energy is used. This wind system was built and tested during the winter of 1980-1981. The power train included a five meter, three bladed wind turbine, a 9.8:1 ratio gearbox, a 1.44 cubic inch displacement pump with a small supercharge gear pump attached. The hydraulic fluid was pumped through a 70', 3/4'' I-D-high pressure flexhose, then through a volume control valve and into a 1.44 cubic inch displacement motor. The fluid was returned through a 70', 1'' I-D-flexhose.

  3. Head Position and Internally Headed Relative Clauses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilico, David

    1996-01-01

    Examines "Head Movement" in internally headed relative clauses (IHRCs). The article shows that in some cases, head movement to an external position need not take place and demonstrates that this movement of the head to a sentence-internal position results from the quantificational nature of IHRCs and Diesing's mapping hypothesis (1990, 1992). (56…

  4. 14 CFR 29.1435 - Hydraulic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hydraulic systems. 29.1435 Section 29.1435... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 29.1435 Hydraulic systems. (a) Design. Each hydraulic system must be designed as follows: (1) Each element of the hydraulic system...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1435 - Hydraulic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hydraulic systems. 23.1435 Section 23.1435... § 23.1435 Hydraulic systems. (a) Design. Each hydraulic system must be designed as follows: (1) Each hydraulic system and its elements must withstand, without yielding, the structural loads expected...

  6. 46 CFR 28.405 - Hydraulic equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydraulic equipment. 28.405 Section 28.405 Shipping... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.405 Hydraulic equipment. (a) Each hydraulic system... than four times the system maximum operating pressure. (c) Each hydraulic system must be equipped...

  7. Advanced Performance Hydraulic Wind Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.; Bruce, Allan; Lam, Adrienne S.

    2013-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, has developed a novel advanced hydraulic wind energy design, which has up to 23% performance improvement over conventional wind turbine and conventional hydraulic wind energy systems with 5 m/sec winds. It also has significant cost advantages with levelized costs equal to coal (after carbon tax rebate). The design is equally applicable to tidal energy systems and has passed preliminary laboratory proof-of-performance tests, as funded by the Department of Energy.

  8. Phenomenon of methane driven caused by hydraulic fracturing in methane-bearing coal seams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Bingxiang; Cheng Qingying; Chen Shuliang

    2016-01-01

    The methane concentration of the return current will always be enhanced to a certain degree when hydraulic fracturing with bedding drilling is implemented to a gassy coal seam in an underground coal mine. The methane in coal seam is driven out by hydraulic fracturing. Thus, the phenomenon is named as methane driven effect of hydraulic fracturing. After deep-hole hydraulic fracturing at the tunneling face of the gassy coal seam, the coal methane content exhibits a‘low-high-low”distribution along exca-vation direction in the following advancing process, verifying the existence of methane driven caused by hydraulic fracturing in methane-bearing coal seam. Hydraulic fracturing causes the change of pore-water and methane pressure in surrounding coal. The uneven distribution of the pore pressure forms a pore pressure gradient. The free methane migrates from the position of high pore (methane) pressure to the position of low pore (methane) pressure. The methane pressure gradient is the fundamental driving force for methane-driven coal seam hydraulic fracturing. The uneven hydraulic crack propagation and the effect of time (as some processes need time to complete and are not completed instantaneously) will result in uneven methane driven. Therefore, an even hydraulic fracturing technique should be used to avoid the negative effects of methane driven; on the other hand, by taking fully advantage of methane driven, two technologies are presented.

  9. Examining the effect of pore size distribution and shape on flow through unsaturated peat using 3-D computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rezanezhad

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated peat soils is controlled by the peat structure which affects the air-filled porosity, pore size distribution and shape. This study investigates how the size and shape of pores affects the flow of water through peat soils. In this study we used X-ray Computed Tomography (CT, at 45 µm resolution under 5 specific soil-water pressure head levels to provide 3-D, high-resolution images that were used to detect the inner pore structure of peat samples under a changing water regime. Pore structure and configuration were found to be irregular, which affected the rate of water transmission through peat soils. The 3-D analysis suggested that pore distribution is dominated by a single large pore-space. At low pressure head, this single large air-filled pore imparted a more effective flowpath compared to smaller pores. Smaller pores were disconnected and the flowpath was more tortuous than in the single large air-filled pore, and their contribution to flow was negligible when the single large pore was active. We quantify the pore structure of peat soil that affects the hydraulic conductivity in the unsaturated condition, and demonstrate the validity of our estimation of peat unsaturated hydraulic conductivity by making a comparison with a standard permeameter-based method. Estimates of unsaturated hydraulic conductivities were made for the purpose of testing the sensitivity of pore shape and geometry parameters on the hydraulic properties of peats and how to evaluate the structure of the peat and its affects on parameterization. We also studied the ability to quantify these factors for different soil moisture contents in order to define how the factors controlling the shape coefficient vary with changes in soil water pressure head. The relation between measured and estimated unsaturated hydraulic conductivity at various heads shows that rapid initial drainage, that changes the air-filled pore properties, creates a

  10. Examining the effect of pore size distribution and shape on flow through unsaturated peat using computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rezanezhad

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated peat soil is controlled by the air-filled porosity, pore size and geometric distribution as well as other physical properties of peat materials. This study investigates how the size and shape of pores affects the flow of water through peat soils. In this study we used X-ray Computed Tomography (CT, at 45 μm resolution under 5 specific soil-water pressure head levels to provide 3-D, high-resolution images that were used to detect the inner pore structure of peat samples under a changing water regime. Pore structure and configuration were found to be irregular, which affected the rate of water transmission through peat soils. The 3-D analysis suggested that pore distribution is dominated by a single large pore-space. At low pressure head, this single large air-filled pore imparted a more effective flowpath compared to smaller pores. Smaller pores were disconnected and the flowpath was more tortuous than in the single large air-filled pore, and their contribution to flow was negligible when the single large pore was active. We quantify the pore structure of peat soil that affects the hydraulic conductivity in the unsaturated condition, and demonstrate the validity of our estimation of peat unsaturated hydraulic conductivity by making a comparison with a standard permeameter-based method. Estimates of unsaturated hydraulic conductivities were made for the purpose of testing the sensitivity of pore shape and geometry parameters on the hydraulic properties of peats and how to evaluate the structure of the peat and its affects on parameterization. We also studied the ability to quantify these factors for different soil moisture contents in order to define how the factors controlling the shape coefficient vary with changes in soil water pressure head. The relation between measured and estimated unsaturated hydraulic conductivity at various heads shows that rapid initial drainage, that changes the air

  11. Research on hydraulic slotting technology controlling coal-gas outbursts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Guo-ying; SHAN Zhi-yong; ZHANG Zi-min

    2008-01-01

    Measured to control serious coal-gas outburst in coal seam were analyzed by theory and experimented in test site. A new technique to distress the coal-bed and drain methane, called hydraulic slotting, was described in detail, and the mechanism of hydrau-lic slotting was put forward and analyzed. The characteristic parameter of hydraulic slotting was given in Jiaozuo mining area and the characteristic of validity, adaptability and secu-rity was evaluated. The results show that the stress surrounding the strata and the gas in coal seam is released efficiently and thoroughly while new techniques are taken, as slot-ting at heading face by high pressure large diameter jet. The resistance to coal and gas outbursts is increased dramatically once the area of slotting is increased to a certain size.In the process of driving 2 000 m tunnel by hydraulic slotting excavation, coal and gas outburst never occurre. The technique could be used to prevent and control potential coal-gas outburst in the proceeding of tunnel driving, and the speed tunneling could be as high as more than 2 times.

  12. Bulb turbine operating at medium head: XIA JIANG case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiseau, F.; Desrats, C.; Petit, P.; Liu, J.

    2012-11-01

    With lots of references for 4-blade bulb turbines, such as these of Wu Jin Xia (4 units - 36.1 MW per unit - 9.2 m rated head), Chang Zhou (15 units - 46.7 MW per unit - 9.5 m rated head) and Tong Wan (4 units - 46.2 MW per unit - 11 m rated head), ALSTOM Power Hydro is one of the major suppliers of bulb turbines operating under medium head for the Chinese market. ALSTOM Power Hydro has been awarded in November 2010 a contract by Jiang Xi Province Xia Jiang Water Control Project Headquarters to equip Xia Jiang's new hydropower plant. The power dam is located on the Gan Jiang river, at about 160 km away from Nan Chang town in South Eastern China. The supply will consist in 5 bulb units including the furniture of both the turbine and its generator, for a total capacity of 200 MW, under a rated net head of 8.6 m. The prototype turbine is a 7.8 m diameter runner, rotating at 71.4 rpm speed. For this project, ALSTOM has proposed a fully new design of 4-blade bulb runner. This paper outlines the main steps of the hydraulic development. First of all, a fine tuning of the blade geometry was performed to enhance the runner behaviour at high loads and low heads, so that to fulfill the demanding requirements of efficiencies and maximum output. The challenge was also to keep an excellent cavitation behaviour, especially at the outer blade diameter in order to avoid cavitation erosion on the prototype. The shape of the blade was optimized by using the latest tools in computational fluid dynamics. Steady state simulations of the distributor and the runner were performed, in order to simulate more accurately the pressure fields on the blade and the velocity distribution at the outlet of the runner. Moreover, draft tube computations have been performed close to the design point and at higher loads. Then, a model fully homologous with the prototype was manufactured and tested at ALSTOM's laboratory in Grenoble (France). The model test results confirmed the predicted ones: the

  13. Hydraulic evaluation of the hypogenic karst area in Budapest (Hungary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhardt, Ildikó; Ötvös, Viktória; Erőss, Anita; Czauner, Brigitta; Simon, Szilvia; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit

    2017-04-01

    The Buda Thermal Karst area, in central Hungary, is in the focus of research interest because of its thermal water resources and the on-going hypogenic karstification processes at the boundary of unconfined and confined carbonates. Understanding of the discharge phenomena and the karstification processes requires clarification of the groundwater flow conditions in the area. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to present a hydraulic evaluation of the flow systems based on analyses of the archival measured hydraulic data of wells. Pressure vs. elevation profiles, tomographic fluid-potential maps and hydraulic cross sections were constructed, based on the data distribution. As a result, gravitational flow systems, hydraulic continuity, and the modifying effects of aquitard units and faults were identified in the karst area. The location of natural discharge areas could be explained and the hydraulic behavior of the Northeastern Margin Fault of the Buda Hills could be determined. The flow pattern determines the differences in the discharge distribution (one- and two-component) and related cave-forming processes between the Central System (Rózsadomb area) and Southern System (Gellért Hill area) natural discharge areas. Among the premises of hypogenic karstification, regional upward flow conditions were confirmed along the main discharge zone of the River Danube.

  14. Hydraulic evaluation of the hypogenic karst area in Budapest (Hungary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhardt, Ildikó; Ötvös, Viktória; Erőss, Anita; Czauner, Brigitta; Simon, Szilvia; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit

    2017-09-01

    The Buda Thermal Karst area, in central Hungary, is in the focus of research interest because of its thermal water resources and the on-going hypogenic karstification processes at the boundary of unconfined and confined carbonates. Understanding of the discharge phenomena and the karstification processes requires clarification of the groundwater flow conditions in the area. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to present a hydraulic evaluation of the flow systems based on analyses of the archival measured hydraulic data of wells. Pressure vs. elevation profiles, tomographic fluid-potential maps and hydraulic cross sections were constructed, based on the data distribution. As a result, gravitational flow systems, hydraulic continuity, and the modifying effects of aquitard units and faults were identified in the karst area. The location of natural discharge areas could be explained and the hydraulic behavior of the Northeastern Margin Fault of the Buda Hills could be determined. The flow pattern determines the differences in the discharge distribution (one- and two-component) and related cave-forming processes between the Central System (Rózsadomb area) and Southern System (Gellért Hill area) natural discharge areas. Among the premises of hypogenic karstification, regional upward flow conditions were confirmed along the main discharge zone of the River Danube.

  15. Technologies and Innovations for Hydraulic Pumps

    OpenAIRE

    Ivantysynova, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Positive displacement machines working as hydraulic pumps or hydraulic motors have always been, are and will be an essential part of any hydraulic system. Current trends and future demands on energy efficient systems will not only drastically increase the number of positive displacement machines needed for modern efficient hydraulic circuits but will significantly change the performance requirements of pumps and motors. Throttleless system configurations will change the landscape of hydraulic...

  16. Two and Three-Phases Fractal Models Application in Soil Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELNAZ Rezaei abajelu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil Hydraulic conductivity is considered as one of the most important hydraulic properties in water and solutionmovement in porous media. In recent years, variousmodels as pedo-transfer functions, fractal models and scaling technique are used to estimate the soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks. Fractal models with two subset of two (solid and pore and three phases (solid, pore and soil fractal (PSF are used to estimate the fractal dimension of soil particles. The PSF represents a generalization of the solid and pore mass fractal models. The PSF characterizes both the solid and pore phases of the porous material. It also exhibits self-similarity to some degree, in the sense that where local structure seems to be similar to the whole structure.PSF models can estimate interface fractal dimension using soil pore size distribution data (PSD and soil moisture retention curve (SWRC. The main objective of this study was to evaluate different fractal models to estimate the Ksparameter. Materials and Methods: The Schaapetal data was used in this study. The complex consists of sixty soil samples. Soil texture, soil bulk density, soil saturated hydraulic conductivity and soil particle size distribution curve were measured by hydrometer method, undistributed soil sample, constant head method and wet sieve method, respectively for all soil samples.Soil water retention curve were determined by using pressure plates apparatus.The Ks parameter could be estimated by Ralws model as a function of fractal dimension by seven fractal models. Fractal models included Fuentes at al. (1996, Hunt and Gee (2002, Bird et al. (2000, Huang and Zhang (2005, Tyler and Wheatcraft (1990, Kutlu et al. (2008, Sepaskhah and Tafteh (2013.Therefore The Ks parameter can be estimated as a function of the DS (fractal dimension by seven fractal models (Table 2.Sensitivity analysis of Rawls model was assessed by making changes±10%, ±20% and±30%(in input parameters

  17. 应用土壤质地预测干旱区葡萄园土壤饱和导水率空间分布%Predicting spatial distribution of soil saturated hydraulic conductivity by soil texture on vineyard in arid region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李涛; 李晓琳; 郝新梅; 康绍忠

    2014-01-01

    The surface soil saturated hydraulic conductivity on farmland is one of the most important factors affecting water infiltration and distribution in soils and is also an important parameter in most soil water flow models. Previous studies have shown that saturated hydraulic conductivity is a highly spatial varied parameter under field conditions. Therefore, understanding and quantifying spatial variability at field scale is valuable to better simulate soil water movement dynamics through incorporating spatially-distributed saturated hydraulic conductivity into soil water flow models. This could help to evaluate impacts from different management practices and to develop precision irrigation management practices. The objectives of this study were to characterize spatial variability of the surface soil saturated hydraulic conductivity and explore its potential association with soil properties. The experiment was conducted on a 7.6 hm2 vineyard in an arid region of northwest China. Soil saturated hydraulic conductivity and other properties (clay, silt, sand, soil bulk density and organic matter) were measured for 0-10 cm soil of the geo-referenced points, which were located on a regular grid of 25 m × 25 m. At each sampling point, the soil saturated hydraulic conductivity was determined by the variable water level method. Spatial structure of spatial saturated hydraulic conductivity was described by a fitted variogram model based on a computed sample variogram, and possible spatial relationship between saturated hydraulic conductivity and other soil properties were evaluated through cross-correlograms. The regression kriging, based on step-wise linear regression of the saturated hydraulic conductivity with other soil properties, was used to predict spatial saturated hydraulic conductivity. I Its performance was compared to ordinary kriging and simple linear regression methods based on ME and RMSE computed from observed and predicted saturated hydraulic conductivity

  18. Analysis and control of flows in pressurized hydraulic networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, R.K.

    2006-01-01

    Analysis, design and flow control problems in pressurized hydraulic networks such as water transmission and distribution systems consisting of pipes and other appurtenant components such as reservoirs, pumps, valves and surge devices are dealt with from the prospective of network synthesis aiming at

  19. Quantized pressure control in large-scale nonlinear hydraulic networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persis, Claudio De; Kallesøe, Carsten Skovmose; Jensen, Tom Nørgaard

    2010-01-01

    It was shown previously that semi-global practical pressure regulation at designated points of a large-scale nonlinear hydraulic network is guaranteed by distributed proportional controllers. For a correct implementation of the control laws, each controller, which is located at these designated poin

  20. Analysis and control of flows in pressurized hydraulic networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, R.K.

    2006-01-01

    Analysis, design and flow control problems in pressurized hydraulic networks such as water transmission and distribution systems consisting of pipes and other appurtenant components such as reservoirs, pumps, valves and surge devices are dealt with from the prospective of network synthesis aiming at

  1. Calibration of effective soil hydraulic parameters of heterogeneous soil profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jhorar, R.K.; Dam, van J.C.; Bastiaanssen, W.G.M.; Feddes, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Distributed hydrological models are useful tools to analyse the performance of irrigation systems at different levels. For the successful application of these models, it is imperative that effective soil hydraulic parameters at the scale of model application are known. The majority of previous

  2. HYDRAULIC CHARACTERISTICS OF CHUTE AERATORS FOR RELEASE WORKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN Shi-ping

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of model tests and theoretical analysis, hydraulic characteristics, air demand, air concentration distribution and their relationships between prototype and model of an aerator were studied. Some computational examples show that the present methods have higher accuracy, and can meet the need of engineering design.

  3. On the Choice of Structure and Layout of Rubble Mound Breakwater Heads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maciñeira, Enrique; Burcharth, Hans F.

    2006-01-01

     The paper discusses the various functional, environmental and structural conditions to consider related to the choice of breakwater head type. Results from hydraulic model tests of rubble mound and caisson head solutions for the new deep water port at Punto Langosteira, La Coruña, Spain, are pre...

  4. Estimating Hydraulic Parameters When Poroelastic Effects Are Significant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, S.J.; Hsieh, P.A.; Illman, W.A.

    2011-01-01

    For almost 80 years, deformation-induced head changes caused by poroelastic effects have been observed during pumping tests in multilayered aquifer-aquitard systems. As water in the aquifer is released from compressive storage during pumping, the aquifer is deformed both in the horizontal and vertical directions. This deformation in the pumped aquifer causes deformation in the adjacent layers, resulting in changes in pore pressure that may produce drawdown curves that differ significantly from those predicted by traditional groundwater theory. Although these deformation-induced head changes have been analyzed in several studies by poroelasticity theory, there are at present no practical guidelines for the interpretation of pumping test data influenced by these effects. To investigate the impact that poroelastic effects during pumping tests have on the estimation of hydraulic parameters, we generate synthetic data for three different aquifer-aquitard settings using a poroelasticity model, and then analyze the synthetic data using type curves and parameter estimation techniques, both of which are based on traditional groundwater theory and do not account for poroelastic effects. Results show that even when poroelastic effects result in significant deformation-induced head changes, it is possible to obtain reasonable estimates of hydraulic parameters using methods based on traditional groundwater theory, as long as pumping is sufficiently long so that deformation-induced effects have largely dissipated. ?? 2011 The Author(s). Journal compilation ?? 2011 National Ground Water Association.

  5. Distribution of photoperiod-insensitive allele Ppd-A1a and its effect on heading time in Japanese wheat cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Masako; Chono, Makiko; Nishimura, Tsutomu; Sato, Mikako; Yoshimura, Yasuhiro; Matsunaka, Hitoshi; Fujita, Masaya; Oda, Shunsuke; Kubo, Katashi; Kiribuchi-Otobe, Chikako; Kojima, Hisayo; Nishida, Hidetaka; Kato, Kenji

    2013-09-01

    The Ppd-A1 genotype of 240 Japanese wheat cultivars and 40 foreign cultivars was determined using a PCR-based method. Among Japanese cultivars, only 12 cultivars, all of which were Hokkaido winter wheat, carried the Ppd-A1a allele, while this allele was not found in Hokkaido spring wheat cultivars or Tohoku-Kyushu cultivars. Cultivars with a photoperiod-insensitive allele headed 6.9-9.8 days earlier in Kanto and 2.5 days earlier in Hokkaido than photoperiod-sensitive cultivars. The lower effect of photoperiod-insensitive alleles observed in Hokkaido could be due to the longer day-length at the spike formation stage compared with that in Kanto. Pedigree analysis showed that 'Purple Straw' and 'Tohoku 118' were donors of Ppd-A1a and Ppd-D1a in Hokkaido wheat cultivars, respectively. Wheat cultivars recently developed in Hokkaido carry photoperiod-insensitive alleles at a high frequency. For efficient utilization of Ppd-1 alleles in the Hokkaido wheat-breeding program, the effect of Ppd-1 on growth pattern and grain yield should be investigated. Ppd-A1a may be useful as a unique gene source for fine tuning the heading time in the Tohoku-Kyushu region since the effect of Ppd-A1a on photoperiod insensitivity appears to differ from the effect of Ppd-B1a and Ppd-D1a.

  6. Analytical solution to problems of hydraulic jump in horizontal triangular channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M.H. Rashwan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A hydraulic jump is formed in a channel whenever supercritical flow changes to subcritical flow in a short distance. It can be used in triangular ditch irrigation to raise the downstream water surface. The basic elements and characteristics of the hydraulic jump are provided to aid designers in selecting more practical basins. In the present study, the slope side, discharge and the energy loss in hydraulic jump in horizontal triangular section are known whereas one has to obtain the sequent depths. The specific force and specific energy equations in a horizontal triangular open channel are made dimensionless, writing it for the sequent depths as a function of discharge and head loss. The proposed modes for hydraulic jump elements are of high accuracy and applicable to a wide range of discharge intensity values and initial conditions without any limitations for the assumptions under consideration.

  7. Hydraulic Soft Yaw System Load Reduction and Prototype Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkier, Søren; Pedersen, Henrik C.; Markussen, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Introducing a hydraulic soft yaw concept for wind turbines leads to significant load reductions in the wind turbine structure. The soft yaw system operates as a shock absorption system on a car, hence absorbing the loading from turbulent wind conditions instead of leading them into the stiff wind...... operates. Further it is analyzed how the soft yaw system influence the power production of the turbine. It is shown that the influence is minimal, but at larger yaw errors the effect is possitive. Due to the implemeted functions in the hydraulic soft yaw system such as even load distribution on the pinions...

  8. Electrical and Magnetic Imaging of Proppants in Shallow Hydraulic Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denison, J. L. S.; Murdoch, L. C.; LaBrecque, D. J.; Slack, W. W.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is an important tool to increase the productivity of wells used for oil and gas production, water resources, and environmental remediation. Currently there are relatively few tools available to monitor the distribution of proppants within a hydraulic fracture, or the propagation of the fracture itself. We have been developing techniques for monitoring hydraulic fractures by injecting electrically conductive, dielectric, or magnetically permeable proppants. We then use the resulting contrast with the enveloping rock to image the proppants using geophysical methods. Based on coupled laboratory and numerical modeling studies, three types of proppants were selected for field evaluation. Eight hydraulic fractures were created near Clemson, SC in May of 2015 by injecting specialized proppants at a depth of 1.5 m. The injections created shallow sub-horizontal fractures extending several meters from the injection point.Each cell had a dense array of electrodes and magnetic sensors on the surface and four shallow vertical electrode arrays that were used to obtain data before and after hydraulic fracturing. Net vertical displacement and transient tilts were also measured. Cores from 130 boreholes were used to characterize the general geometries, and trenching was used to characterize the forms of two of the fractures in detail. Hydraulic fracture geometries were estimated by inverting pre- and post-injection geophysical data. Data from cores and trenching show that the hydraulic fractures were saucer-shaped with a preferred propagation direction. The geophysical inversions generated images that were remarkably similar in form, size, and location to the ground truth from direct observation. Displacement and tilt data appear promising as a constraint on fracture geometry.

  9. Near-saturated hydraulic conductivity: database development, meta-analysis and pedotransfer functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Nicholas; Koestel, John; Messing, Ingmar; Lindahl, Anna

    2013-04-01

    Near-saturated hydraulic conductivity exerts a critical control on water flow and solute transport through the vadose zone, yet very little is known concerning how it is influenced by various soil properties and site factors and attributes. Starting from the 1980's, tension infiltrometers or disc permeameters have become an increasingly popular method to measure near-saturated hydraulic conductivity in undisturbed soil. In this presentation, we describe the development and organization of a large database of tension infiltrometer measurements (n>700) collated from the published literature. The raw datasets were standardized and summarized using a modified Kozeny-Carman model of near-saturated hydraulic conductivity (Jarvis, N.J. 2008. Near-saturated hydraulic properties of macroporous soils. Vadose Zone Journal, 7, 1302-1310). This model was found to accurately describe near-saturated conductivity for this large dataset (92% of cases had R2 values larger than 0.9). We will show the results of some initial analyses of the dataset, which show how hydraulic conductivity at pressure heads of -1 and -10 cm, as well as the slope of the near-saturated conductivity function, are affected by: i.) the choice of method to convert unconfined 3D infiltration to hydraulic conductivity, and ii.) interactions between soil properties such as texture and bulk density and site attributes such as land use and climate. We will also present some initial attempts to develop pedotransfer functions for parameters describing near-saturated hydraulic conductivity using the technique of random forests.

  10. Is HEADS in our heads?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Kirsten A; Hertz, Pernille Grarup; Blix, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Outpatient clinic visits are a window of opportunity to address health risk behaviors and promote a healthier lifestyle among young people. The HEADS (Home, Education, Eating, Activities, Drugs [i.e. substance use including tobacco, alcohol, and illegal drugs], Sexuality [including...... care professionals participated. We found only small reported differences between staff and young patients regarding whether home, education, and activity were addressed. However, staff reported twice the rate of addressing smoking, alcohol, illegal drugs, sexuality, and contraception compared to young...... patients. Young patients reported that smoking, alcohol, illegal drugs, sexuality, and contraception were addressed significantly more at adult clinics in comparison to pediatric clinics. After controlling for age, gender and duration of illness, according to young patients, adjusted odds ratios...

  11. Development of a hydraulic turbine design method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassanos, Ioannis; Anagnostopoulos, John; Papantonis, Dimitris

    2013-10-01

    In this paper a hydraulic turbine parametric design method is presented which is based on the combination of traditional methods and parametric surface modeling techniques. The blade of the turbine runner is described using Bezier surfaces for the definition of the meridional plane as well as the blade angle distribution, and a thickness distribution applied normal to the mean blade surface. In this way, it is possible to define parametrically the whole runner using a relatively small number of design parameters, compared to conventional methods. The above definition is then combined with a commercial CFD software and a stochastic optimization algorithm towards the development of an automated design optimization procedure. The process is demonstrated with the design of a Francis turbine runner.

  12. Thermo-hydraulic analysis for sub-module of Chinese HCSB TBM design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhou; FENG Kai-ming; WANG Xiao-yu; YUAN Tao

    2006-01-01

    Thermo-hydraulic calculation and analysis for sub-module of Chinese HCSB TBM were carried out using FE code ANSYS. Results indicate that temperature distribution in materials used in sub-module is reasonable and acceptable.

  13. Connected analysis nuclear-thermo-hydraulic of parallel channels of a BWR reactor using distributed computation; Analisis acoplado nuclear-termohidraulico de canales paralelos de un reactor BWR empleando computacion distribuida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos Gonzalez, Rina Margarita

    2007-07-15

    This work consists of the integration of three models previously developed which are described widely in Literature: model of the thermo-hydraulic channel, model of the modal neutronic and the model of the recirculation bows. The tool used for this connection of models is the PVM system, Parallel Virtual Machine that allowed paralleling the model by means of the concept of distributed computation. The purpose of making this connection of models is the one of obtaining a more complete tool than better represents the real configuration and the phenomenology of the nucleus of a BWR reactor, thus obtaining better results. In addition to maintaining the flexibility to improve the resulting model at any time, since the very complex or sophisticated models are difficult to improve being impossible to modify the equations they use and can include variables that are not of primary importance in the tackled problem or that mask relations among variables due to the excess of results. Also maintaining the flexibility for adding component of models or systems of the BWR reactor, all of this following the modeling needs. The Swedish Ringhals power plant was chosen to characterize the resulting connected model for counting on a Stability Benchmark that offers the opportunity to count on real plant data. Besides that in case 9 of cycle 14 of this Benchamark oscillations outside phase appeared, which are from great interest because the detection systems that register the average of the power of the nucleus do not detect them. Additionally in this work the model of the recirculation bows as an independent module is obtained in an individual way, since this model belongs to another work and works connected to the reactor vessel. The model of the recirculation bows is able to model several transients of interest, as it is shown in the Appendix A of this work, among which are found the tripping of recirculation pumps or the transference at low or high velocity of them. The scope of the

  14. Hydraulic properties of ladle slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vlček

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of examining of hydraulic properties of ladle slags formed during production of steel. The studied ladle slags were subjected to different cooling mode from the molten state. Based on the ability of the slag react with the water was assessed their hydraulic activity. The hydraulic properties are caused by the presence of minerals dicalcium silicate, tricalcium aluminate, mayenite, brownmillerite and dicalcium ferite. The emergence of required hydrating phases in the ladle slags is conditioned by a sufficient CaO content and their cooling rate. The contact the slag with water during processing and their ageing has a negative effect. The experiment has shown that the phase transformation of the mineral dicalcium silicate which occurs during cooling of the ladle slags cause their volume instability.

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is typically ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is typically ...

  17. Hydraulic and acoustic investigation of sintered glass beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueven, Ibrahim; Luding, Stefan; Steeb, Holger

    2013-06-01

    In the present contribution, we are focussing on the hydraulical and acoustical charcterization of sintered glass beads. For the experiments sintered mono-and weakly polydisperse glass bead samples were applied. Depending on the particle size, degree of particle dispersion and sample treatment during the sintering process, the produced cylindircal samples exhibit different hydraulic and acoustic properties. The more general focus of our research lies on the physical behaviour of oil-water emulsions in porous media by means of combined electromagnetic and acoustic wave propagation. For this purpose, a hydraulic multi-task measuring cell was developed. This cell allows carrying out simple hydraulic permeability and challenging ultrasound experiments in porous materials saturated with Pickering emulsions. In the first phase of our experiments, hydraulical and acoustical measurements of cylindrical sintered glass bead samples were performed in order to determine their intrinsic permeabilities and effective ultrasound velocities. The intrinsic permeability ks, a coupling parameter between the solid matrix and the pore fluid, has a huge influence on wave propagation in fluid-saturated porous media. For the assessment of permeabilities, particle size distributions and porosities of the investigated glass beads were determined.

  18. Transport efficiency and dynamics of hydraulic fracture networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique

    2015-08-01

    Intermittent fluid pulses in the Earth's crust can explain a variety of geological phenomena, for instance the occurrence of hydraulic breccia. Fluid transport in the crust is usually modeled as continuous darcian flow, ignoring that sufficient fluid overpressure can cause hydraulic fractures as fluid pathways with very dynamic behavior. Resulting hydraulic fracture networks are largely self-organized: opening and healing of hydraulic fractures depends on local fluid pressure, which is, in turn, largely controlled by the fracture network. We develop a crustal-scale 2D computer model designed to simulate this process. To focus on the dynamics of the process we chose a setup as simple as possible. Control factors are constant overpressure at a basal fluid source and a constant 'viscous' parameter controlling fracture-healing. Our results indicate that at large healing rates hydraulic fractures are mobile, transporting fluid in intermittent pulses to the surface and displaying a 1/fα behavior. Low healing rates result in stable networks and constant flow. The efficiency of the fluid transport is independent from the closure dynamics of veins or fractures. More important than preexisting fracture networks is the distribution of fluid pressure. A key requirement for dynamic fracture networks is the presence of a fluid pressure gradient.

  19. Transport efficiency and dynamics of hydraulic fracture networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till eSachau

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent fluid pulses in the Earth's crust can explain a variety of geological phenomena, for instance the occurrence of hydraulic breccia. Fluid transport in the crust is usually modeled as continuous darcian flow, ignoring that sufficient fluid overpressure can cause hydraulic fractures as fluid pathways with very dynamic behavior. Resulting hydraulic fracture networks are largely self-organized: opening and healing of hydraulic fractures depends on local fluid pressure, which is, in turn, largely controlled by the fracture network. We develop a crustal-scale 2D computer model designed to simulate this process. To focus on the dynamics of the process we chose a setup as simple as possible. Control factors are constant overpressure at a basal fluid source and a constant 'viscous' parameter controlling fracture-healing. Our results indicate that at large healing rates hydraulic fractures are mobile, transporting fluid in intermittent pulses to the surface and displaying a 1/fα behavior. Low healing rates result in stable networks and constant flow. The efficiency of the fluid transport is independent from the closure dynamics of veins or fractures. More important than preexisting fracture networks is the distribution of fluid pressure. A key requirement for dynamic fracture networks is the presence of a fluid pressure gradient.

  20. [Effects of invertebrate bioturbation on vertical hydraulic conductivity of streambed for a river].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chao-Liang; Song, Jin-Xi; Yang, Xiao-Gang; Xue, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Streambed hydraulic conductivity is a key factor influencing water exchange between surface water and groundwater. However, the streambed invertebrate bioturbation has a great effect on the hydraulic conductivity. In order to determine the impact of invertebrate bioturbation on streambed hydraulic conductivity, the investigation of invertebrate bioturbation and in-situ test of vertical hydraulic conductivity of streambed are simultaneously conducted at five points along the main stream of the Weihe River. Firstly, correlation between the streambed vertical hydraulic conductivity and grain size distribution is analyzed. Secondly, type and density of the invertebrate and their correlation to hydraulic conductivity are determined. Finally, the effect of invertebrate bioturbation on the streambed hydraulic conductivity is illustrated. The results show that the vertical hydraulic conductivity and biological density of invertebrate are 18.479 m x d(-1) and 139 ind x m(-2), respectively for the Caotan site, where sediment composition with a large amount of sand and gravel particles. For Meixian site, the sediment constitutes a large amount of silt and clay particles, in which the vertical hydraulic conductivity and biological density of invertebrate are 2.807 m x d(-1) and 2 742 ind x m(-2) respectively. Besides, for the low permeability of four sites (Meixian, Xianyang, Lintong and Huaxian), grain size particles are similar while the vertical hydraulic conductivity and biological density of invertebrate are significantly different from one site to another. However, for each site, the vertical hydraulic conductivity closely related to biological density of invertebrate, the Pearson correlation coefficient is 0.987. It can be concluded that both grain size particles and invertebrate bioturbation influence sediment permeability. For example, higher values of streambed hydraulic conductivity from strong permeability site mainly due to the large amount of large-size particles

  1. Hydraulic resistance of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Dreszer, C.

    2013-02-01

    Biofilms may interfere with membrane performance in at least three ways: (i) increase of the transmembrane pressure drop, (ii) increase of feed channel (feed-concentrate) pressure drop, and (iii) increase of transmembrane passage. Given the relevance of biofouling, it is surprising how few data exist about the hydraulic resistance of biofilms that may affect the transmembrane pressure drop and membrane passage. In this study, biofilms were generated in a lab scale cross flow microfiltration system at two fluxes (20 and 100Lm-2h-1) and constant cross flow (0.1ms-1). As a nutrient source, acetate was added (1.0mgL-1 acetate C) besides a control without nutrient supply. A microfiltration (MF) membrane was chosen because the MF membrane resistance is very low compared to the expected biofilm resistance and, thus, biofilm resistance can be determined accurately. Transmembrane pressure drop was monitored. As biofilm parameters, thickness, total cell number, TOC, and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were determined, it was demonstrated that no internal membrane fouling occurred and that the fouling layer actually consisted of a grown biofilm and was not a filter cake of accumulated bacterial cells. At 20Lm-2h-1 flux with a nutrient dosage of 1mgL-1 acetate C, the resistance after 4 days reached a value of 6×1012m-1. At 100Lm-2h-1 flux under the same conditions, the resistance was 5×1013m-1. No correlation of biofilm resistance to biofilm thickness was found; Biofilms with similar thickness could have different resistance depending on the applied flux. The cell number in biofilms was between 4×107 and 5×108 cellscm-2. At this number, bacterial cells make up less than a half percent of the overall biofilm volume and therefore did not hamper the water flow through the biofilm significantly. A flux of 100Lm-2h-1 with nutrient supply caused higher cell numbers, more biomass, and higher biofilm resistance than a flux of 20Lm-2h-1. However, the biofilm thickness

  2. Controls of Hydraulic Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a hydraulic wind turbine generator system was proposed based on analysis the current wind turbines technologies. The construction and principles were introduced. The mathematical model was verified using MATLAB and AMsim. A displacement closed loop of swash plate of motor and a speed closed loop of generator were setup, a PID control is introduced to maintain a constant speed and fixed frequency at wind turbine generator. Simulation and experiment demonstrated that the system can connect grid to generate electric and enhance reliability. The control system demonstrates a high performance speed regulation and effectiveness. The results are great significant to design a new type hydraulic wind turbine system.

  3. Integrating hydraulic equivalent sections into a hydraulic geometry study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yanhong; Yi, Yujun; Li, Zhiwei; Wang, Zhaoyin; Zheng, Xiangmin

    2017-09-01

    Hydraulic geometry (HG) is an important geomorphic concept that has played an indispensable role in hydrological analyses, physical studies of streams, ecosystem and aquatic habitat studies, and sedimentology research. More than 60 years after Leopold and Maddock (1953) first introduced the concept of HG, researchers have still not uncovered the physical principles underlying HG behavior. One impediment is the complexity of the natural river cross section. The current study presents a new way to simplify the cross section, namely, the hydraulic equivalent section, which is generalized from the cross section in the ;gradually varied flow of an alluvial river; (GVFAR) and features hydrodynamic properties and bed-building laws similar to those of the GVFAR. Energy balance was used to derive the stage Z-discharge Q relationship in the GVFAR. The GVFAR in the Songhua River and the Yangtze River were selected as examples. The data, including measured discharge, river width, water stage, water depth, wet area, and cross section, were collected from the hydrological yearbooks of typical hydrological stations on the Songhua River and the Yangtze River from 1955 to 1987. The relationships between stage Z-discharge Q and cross-sectional area A-stage Z at various stations were analyzed, and ;at-a-station hydraulic geometry; (AHG) relationships were obtained in power-law forms. Based on derived results and observational data analysis, the Z-Q and Z-A relationships of AHG were similar to rectangular weir flows, thus the cross section of the GVFAR was generalized as a compound rectangular, hydraulic equivalent cross section. As to bed-building characteristics, the bankfull discharge method and the stage-discharge-relation method were used to calculate the dominant variables of the alluvial river. This hydraulic equivalent section has the same Z-Q relation, Z-A relation, dominant discharge, dominant river width, and dominant water depth as the cross section in the GVFAR. With the

  4. Numerical simulations of the impact of hydraulic anisotropy and anthropogenic activities on the complex hydrogeological system of the Lower Yarmouk Gorge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzoufka, Kalliopi; Siebert, Christian; Rödiger, Tino; Inbar, Nimrod; Shalev, Eyal; Möller, Peter; Raggad, Marwan; Rosenthal, Eliahu; Magri, Fabien

    2017-04-01

    Transient numerical simulations of coupled fluid flow and heat transport processes were conducted, to investigate (i) the impact of hydraulic anisotropy on a complex hydrogeological system and (ii) the anomalous geothermal gradient in the Upper Cretaceous (A7/B2) aquifer of the Lower Yarmouk Gorge (LYG). The N-S directed geological profile starts on the basalt-covered Golan Heights, crosses the LYG and ends at the Jordanian Ajloun Plateau. Heated fresh groundwaters ascend within the LYG from the confined A7/B2 limestone aquifer through artesian Meizar wells and artesian Muhkeibeh well field. A hydrogeological study based on high frequency water-table measurements at the Meizar wells suggested strong impact of abstraction at the Mukheibeh wells on the hydraulic head distribution north of the LYG (Shalev et al., 2015). Contrastingly, hydrochemical investigations conducted in the area concluded that recharge areas of the A7/B2 aquifer are: (i) the foothills of Mountain Hermon, (ii) the Ajloun Plateau and (iii) the Syrian Hauran Plateau, indicating the presence of a zone of high-hydraulic anisotropy along the main LYG axis. Due to this still debatable hydraulic feature, flow along the LYG principle axis is enhanced whilst flow perpendicular to it is constrained (Siebert et al., 2014). In agreement, transient simulations based on a NW-SE profile supported further the hypothesis of a structural feature existent (Magri et al., 2015). The modeled profile cross-cuts the heterogeneous zone and hence the heterogeneity was implemented as an impermeable zone by employing the Equivalent Porous Media approach. Initial 2D models managed to successfully reproduce the natural hydraulic head and temperature distributions. In subsequent simulations, by implementing Meizar abstraction rates, results revealed that mixed convection explains the anomalous temperature gradient in the area as temperature patterns of these simulations are in accordance with a temperature-depth borehole

  5. Head Impact Laboratory (HIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HIL uses testing devices to evaluate vehicle interior energy attenuating (EA) technologies for mitigating head injuries resulting from head impacts during mine/...

  6. Modeling transient streaming potentials in falling-head permeameter tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malama, Bwalya; Revil, André

    2014-01-01

    We present transient streaming potential data collected during falling-head permeameter tests performed on samples of two sands with different physical and chemical properties. The objective of the work is to estimate hydraulic conductivity (K) and the electrokinetic coupling coefficient (Cl ) of the sand samples. A semi-empirical model based on the falling-head permeameter flow model and electrokinetic coupling is used to analyze the streaming potential data and to estimate K and Cl . The values of K estimated from head data are used to validate the streaming potential method. Estimates of K from streaming potential data closely match those obtained from the associated head data, with less than 10% deviation. The electrokinetic coupling coefficient was estimated from streaming potential vs. (1) time and (2) head data for both sands. The results indicate that, within limits of experimental error, the values of Cl estimated by the two methods are essentially the same. The results of this work demonstrate that a temporal record of the streaming potential response in falling-head permeameter tests can be used to estimate both K and Cl . They further indicate the potential for using transient streaming potential data as a proxy for hydraulic head in hydrogeology applications.

  7. Heading and head injuries in soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkendall, D T; Jordan, S E; Garrett, W E

    2001-01-01

    In the world of sports, soccer is unique because of the purposeful use of the unprotected head for controlling and advancing the ball. This skill obviously places the player at risk of head injury and the game does carry some risk. Head injury can be a result of contact of the head with another head (or other body parts), ground, goal post, other unknown objects or even the ball. Such impacts can lead to contusions, fractures, eye injuries, concussions or even, in rare cases, death. Coaches, players, parents and physicians are rightly concerned about the risk of head injury in soccer. Current research shows that selected soccer players have some degree of cognitive dysfunction. It is important to determine the reasons behind such deficits. Purposeful heading has been blamed, but a closer look at the studies that focus on heading has revealed methodological concerns that question the validity of blaming purposeful heading of the ball. The player's history and age (did they play when the ball was leather and could absorb significant amounts of water), alcohol intake, drug intake, learning disabilities, concussion definition and control group use/composition are all factors that cloud the ability to blame purposeful heading. What does seem clear is that a player's history of concussive episodes is a more likely explanation for cognitive deficits. While it is likely that the subconcussive impact of purposeful heading is a doubtful factor in the noted deficits, it is unknown whether multiple subconcussive impacts might have some lingering effects. In addition, it is unknown whether the noted deficits have any affect on daily life. Proper instruction in the technique is critical because if the ball contacts an unprepared head (as in accidental head-ball contacts), the potential for serious injury is possible. To further our understanding of the relationship of heading, head injury and cognitive deficits, we need to: learn more about the actual impact of a ball on the

  8. CRITICALITY CURVES FOR PLUTONIUM HYDRAULIC FLUID MIXTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WITTEKIND WD

    2007-10-03

    This Calculation Note performs and documents MCNP criticality calculations for plutonium (100% {sup 239}Pu) hydraulic fluid mixtures. Spherical geometry was used for these generalized criticality safety calculations and three geometries of neutron reflection are: {sm_bullet}bare, {sm_bullet}1 inch of hydraulic fluid, or {sm_bullet}12 inches of hydraulic fluid. This document shows the critical volume and critical mass for various concentrations of plutonium in hydraulic fluid. Between 1 and 2 gallons of hydraulic fluid were discovered in the bottom of HA-23S. This HA-23S hydraulic fluid was reported by engineering to be Fyrquel 220. The hydraulic fluid in GLovebox HA-23S is Fyrquel 220 which contains phosphorus. Critical spherical geometry in air is calculated with 0 in., 1 in., or 12 inches hydraulic fluid reflection.

  9. DCS Hydraulics Submittal, Butler County, Alabama, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydraulics data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydraulic procedures for computing flood elevations for a flood insurance...

  10. DCS Hydraulics Submittal, Bullock County, Alabama, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydraulics data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydraulic procedures for computing flood elevations for a flood insurance...

  11. DCS Hydraulics Submittal, Covington County, Alabama, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydraulics data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydraulic procedures for computing flood elevations for a flood insurance...

  12. Hydraulic Conductivity Measurements with HTU at Eurajoki, Olkiluoto, Boreholes OL-KR16, 16B, 17, 17B, 18 and 18B, Year 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haemaelaeinen, H.

    2005-07-01

    As a part of the site investigations for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel, hydraulic con- ductivity measurements were carried out in boreholes OL-KR16, 16B, 17, 17 B, 18 and 18B at Eurajoki, Olkiluoto. The objective was to investigate the distribution of the hydraulic conductivity in the surrounding bedrock volume. Measurements were carried out during spring-summer 2004. The total lengths of the boreholes are: OL-KR16 170,20 m, OL-KR17 157,13 m and OL-KR18 125,49 m. Corresponding B-holes are around 45 m deep, parallel and adjacent to their 'parent' holes so representing the cased sections of them. The conbined measurable length of the holes is about 453,57 m, of which 429,15 m was covered with 217 standard tests at 2 m packer separation as specified in the research plan. 246 tests were initiated, but some had to be cancelled due to errors or unsuitable control parameters. Double-packer constant-head method was used throughout with nominal 200 kPa overpressure. Injection stage lasted normally 20 minutes and fall-off stage 10 minutes. The tests were often shortened if there were clear indications that the hydraulic conductivity is below the measuring range of the system. The pressure in the test section was let to stabilise at least 5 min before injection. In some test sections the stabilisation, injection or fall-off stage lasted several hours. Two transient (Horner and 1/Q) interpretations and one stationary-state (Moye) interpretation were made in-situ immediately after the test. The Hydraulic Testing Unit (HTU-system) is owned by Posiva Oy and it was operated by Geopros Oy. (orig.)

  13. Hydraulic conductivity measurements with HTU at Eurajoki, Olkiluoto, drillholes OL-KR52 and OL-KR47 in 2013 and 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurmerinta, E. [Poeyry Finland Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    2014-09-15

    As a part of the site investigations for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel, hydraulic conductivity measurements were carried out with the HTU-equipment in drillholes OL KR52 and OL KR47 on the Olkiluoto investigation site. The objective was to investigate the distribution of the hydraulic conductivity in the surrounding bedrock volume. In OL-KR52 measurements were carried out between February 2013 and April 2013 and in OL-KR47 between October 2013 and February 2014. The total length of the drillhole OL-KR52 is 427.35 m, 376.00 m of which was covered by 188 standard tests with 2 m packer separation as specified in the measurement plan. Respectively, OL-KR47 is 1008.76 m long and 312 similar tests were conducted in it covering 624.00 m of the drillhole. These numbers include one equipment test measurement near the surface in OL-KR47. Double-packer constant-head method was used throughout with nominal 200 kPa overpressure. Injection stage lasted normally 20 minutes and fall-off stage 10 minutes. The tests were often shortened if there were clear indications that the hydraulic conductivity is below the measuring range of the system. The pressure in the test section was let to stabilise at least 5 min before injection. In some test sections the test stage times were extended if longer times were needed to obtain correct results or when suited to the working schedule. Two transient (Horner and 1/Q) interpretations and one stationary-state (Moye) interpretation were made in-situ immediately after the test. The Hydraulic Testing Unit (HTU-system) is owned by Posiva Oy and it was operated by Poeyry Finland Oy in co-operation with Geopros Oy. (orig.)

  14. Hydraulic conductivity measurements with HTU at Eurajoki, Olkiluoto, drillholes OL-KR19, OL-KR45 and OL-KR46 in 2009 and 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haemaelaeinen, H. [Geopros Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2011-10-15

    As a part of the site investigations for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel, hydraulic conductivity measurements were carried out with HTU-equipment in drillholes OL-KR19, OL-KR45 and OL-KR46 at Eurajoki, Olkiluoto. The objective was to investigate the distribution of the hydraulic conductivity in the surrounding bedrock volume. Measurements were carried out during 2009 and 2010. The total length of the borehole OL-KR19 is 544,34 m, 241,80 m of which was covered by 121 standard tests with 2 m packer separation as specified in the measurement plan. Respectively, OL-KR45 is 1023,30 m long and 63 similar tests were made in it covering 126,00 m of the hole and OL-KR46 600,10 m long, 151 tests made covering 301,35 m. The measured sections are around the depths of the planned repository. Double-packer constant-head method was used throughout with nominal 200 kPa overpressure. Injection stage lasted normally 20 minutes and fall-off stage 10 minutes. The tests were often shortened if there were clear indications that the hydraulic conductivity is below the measuring range of the system. The pressure in the test section was let to stabilise at least 5 min before injection. In some test sections the test stage times were extended. Two transient (Horner and 1/Q) interpretations and one stationary- state (Moye) interpretation were made in-situ immediately after the test. The Hydraulic Testing Unit (HTU-system) is owned by Posiva Oy and it was operated by Geopros Oy. (orig.)

  15. Smart magnetic markers use in hydraulic fracturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Jarosław; Bogacki, Jan

    2016-11-01

    One of the main challenges and unknowns during shale gas exploration is to assess the range and efficiency of hydraulic fracturing. It is also essential to assess the distribution of proppant, which keeps the fracture pathways open. Solving these problems may considerably increase the efficiency of the shale gas extraction. Because of that, the idea of smart magnetic marker, which can be detected when added to fracturing fluid, has been considered for a long time. This study provides overview of the possibilities of magnetic marker application for shale gas extraction. The imaging methods using electromagnetic markers, are considered or developed in two directions. The first possibility is the markers' electromagnetic activity throughout the whole volume of the fracturing fluid. Thus, it can be assumed that the whole fracturing fluid is the marker. Among these type of hydraulic fracturing solutions, ferrofluid could be considered. The second possibility is marker, which is just one of many components of the fracturing fluid. In this case feedstock magnetic materials, ferrites and nanomaterials could be considered. Magnetic properties of magnetite could be too low and ferrofluids' or nanomaterials' price is unacceptably high. Because of that, ferrites, especially ZnMn ferrites seems to be the best material for magnetic marker. Because of the numerous applications in electronics, it is cheap and easily available, although the price is higher, then that of magnetite. The disadvantage of using ferrite, could be too small mechanical strength. It creates an essential need for combining magnetic marker with proppant into magnetic-ceramic composite.

  16. Hydraulic fracturing system and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciezobka, Jordan; Salehi, Iraj

    2017-02-28

    A hydraulic fracturing system and method for enhancing effective permeability of earth formations to increase hydrocarbon production, enhance operation efficiency by reducing fluid entry friction due to tortuosity and perforation, and to open perforations that are either unopened or not effective using traditional techniques, by varying a pump rate and/or a flow rate to a wellbore.

  17. Hydraulic jumps in a channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonn, D.; Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of hydraulic jumps with flow predominantly in one direction, created either by confining the flow to a narrow channel with parallel walls or by providing an inflow in the form of a narrow sheet. In the channel flow, we find a linear height profile upstream of the jump as expected...

  18. Hydraulic Fracture Containment in Sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dong, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of hydraulic fracturing in soft, high permeability material is considered fundamentally different from that in hard, low permeability rock, where a tensile fracture is created and conventional linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) applies. The fracturing and associated modeling work

  19. Design of hydraulic recuperation unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jandourek Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with design and measurement of hydraulic recuperation unit. Recuperation unit consist of radial turbine and axial pump, which are coupled on the same shaft. Speed of shaft with impellers are 6000 1/min. For economic reasons, is design of recuperation unit performed using commercially manufactured propellers.

  20. Tree Hydraulics: How Sap Rises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Trees transport water from roots to crown--a height that can exceed 100 m. The physics of tree hydraulics can be conveyed with simple fluid dynamics based upon the Hagen-Poiseuille equation and Murray's law. Here the conduit structure is modelled as conical pipes and as branching pipes. The force required to lift sap is generated mostly by…

  1. Tree Hydraulics: How Sap Rises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Trees transport water from roots to crown--a height that can exceed 100 m. The physics of tree hydraulics can be conveyed with simple fluid dynamics based upon the Hagen-Poiseuille equation and Murray's law. Here the conduit structure is modelled as conical pipes and as branching pipes. The force required to lift sap is generated mostly by…

  2. A new linear type hydraulic motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dong; Zhang, Tong; Li, Wenhua; Chen, Xinyang

    2017-08-01

    This paper proposes the design of liner type hydraulic motor on the base of inner curved radial piston hydraulic motor. The hydraulic cylinders of the new type motor are in the straight line which will improve the utilization of the axial space and different out power can be supplied by changes the number of cylinders. In this paper, the structure and working principle of the liner type hydraulic motor is introduced.

  3. Water energy resources of the United States with emphasis on low head/low power resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Douglas G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab. (INEEL); Cherry, Shane J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab. (INEEL); Reeves, Kelly S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab. (INEEL); Lee, Randy D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab. (INEEL); Carroll, Gregory R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab. (INEEL); Sommers, Garold L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab. (INEEL); Verdin, Kristine L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab. (INEEL)

    2004-04-01

    Analytical assessments of the water energy resources in the 20 hydrologic regions of the United States were performed using state-of-the-art digital elevation models and geographic information system tools. The principal focus of the study was on low head (less than 30 ft)/low power (less than 1 MW) resources in each region. The assessments were made by estimating the power potential of all the stream segments in a region, which averaged 2 miles in length. These calculations were performed using hydrography and hydraulic heads that were obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Elevation Derivatives for National Applications dataset and stream flow predictions from a regression equation or equations developed specifically for the region. Stream segments excluded from development and developed hydropower were accounted for to produce an estimate of total available power potential. The total available power potential was subdivided into high power (1 MW or more), high head (30 ft or more)/low power, and low head/low power total potentials. The low head/low power potential was further divided to obtain the fractions of this potential corresponding to the operating envelopes of three classes of hydropower technologies: conventional turbines, unconventional systems, and microhydro (less than 100 kW). Summing information for all the regions provided total power potential in various power classes for the entire United States. Distribution maps show the location and concentrations of the various classes of low power potential. No aspect of the feasibility of developing these potential resources was evaluated. Results for each of the 20 hydrologic regions are presented in Appendix A, and similar presentations for each of the 50 states are made in Appendix B.

  4. Electric field and current density distributions induced in an anatomically-based model of the human head by magnetic fields from a hair dryer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofani, S; Ossola, P; d'Amore, G; Gandhi, O P

    1995-01-01

    We have used the impedance method to calculate the induced electric (E) fields and current densities (J) for the spatially varying vector magnetic fields due to a hair dryer. In this method, applicable for low-frequency exposures where the quasi-static approximation may be made, the biological body or the exposed parts thereof are represented by a three-dimensional (3-D) network of impedances whose individual values are obtained from the electrical properties sigma, epsilon r for the various tissues. We have measured the 3-D variations of the 50-Hz magnetic fields from a typical hair dryer and found that the various components correlate well with those for a helical coil. The non-uniform magnetic fields thus obtained are used to calculate the induced E and J with a resolution of 1.31 cm for the model of the head and neck. The induced E values are compared with the fields endogenous to the body and the minimum detectable E-field limits based on the cellular thermal noise model proposed by Weaver and Astumian (1990, 1992).

  5. The effect of authentic metallic implants on the SAR distribution of the head exposed to 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz dipole near field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, H.; Keshvari, J.; Lappalainen, R.

    2007-03-01

    As the use of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) fields has increased along with increased use of wireless communication, the possible related health risks have also been widely discussed. One safety aspect is the interaction of medical implants and RF devices like mobile phones. In the literature, effects on active implants like pacemakers have been discussed but the studies of passive metallic (i.e. conductive) implants are rare. However, some studies have shown that the EM power absorption in tissues may be enhanced due to metallic implants. In this study, the effect of authentic passive metallic implants in the head region was examined. A half-wave dipole antenna was used as an exposure source and the specific absorption rate (SAR, W kg-1) in the near field was studied numerically. The idea was to model the presumably worst cases of most common implants in an accurate MRI-based phantom. As exposure frequencies GSM (900 and 1800 MHz) and UMTS (2450 MHz) regions were considered. The implants studied were skull plates, fixtures, bone plates and ear rings. The results indicate that some of the implants, under very rare exposure conditions, may cause a notable enhancement in peak mass averaged SAR.

  6. 颅脑损伤并发肺部感染患者病原菌耐药性分析%Analysis of bacterial drug resistance in patients with sputum bacteria distribution of severe head injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温冬华

    2012-01-01

    Objective To understand the sputum bacteria distribution of severe head injury patients with lung infection and the drug resistance, and provide reference to infection control and rational drug use in hospital. Methods The sputum bacterial culture of 92 severe head injury patients from January 2010 to September 2011 in our hospital was made,the 301 cultured pathogenic bacteria was classified,and the antimicrobial susceptibility tests was chose. Results Gram-negative bacteria was the main pathogenic bacteria( 78. 74% ), gram-positive bacteria was in the second place ( 21. 26% ),and the bacteria showed multiple resistance. Conclusion There are important means to improve the survival rates of severe head injury patients by strengthening the care for severe head injury patients, preventing alternate infections,avoiding the drug-resistant strains,and rational use of antibacterial drugs.%目的 了解我院重型颅脑损伤并发肺部感染患者痰液细菌的分布及耐药情况,为医院感染控制和合理用药提供参考.方法 对2010年1月-2011年12月我院92例重型颅脑损伤患者的痰液进行细菌培养,并对培养出的301株致病菌进行分类及药敏试验.结果 革兰阴性菌为主要致病菌,占78.74%,革兰阳性菌占21.26%,细菌多表现为多重耐药性.结论 加强对重型颅脑损伤患者的监护,防止交叉感染,避免耐药菌株的产生,合理使用抗菌药物是提高重型颅脑损伤患者生存率的重要手段.

  7. 14 CFR 25.1435 - Hydraulic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hydraulic systems. 25.1435 Section 25.1435... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 25.1435 Hydraulic systems. (a) Element design. Each element of the hydraulic system must be designed to: (1) Withstand the proof...

  8. 14 CFR 27.1435 - Hydraulic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hydraulic systems. 27.1435 Section 27.1435... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Safety Equipment § 27.1435 Hydraulic systems. (a) Design. Each hydraulic system and its elements must withstand, without yielding, any structural loads...

  9. Simulation of Hydraulic Fracture in Unsaturated Soils with High Degree of Saturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tielin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical simulation approach of hydraulic fracture process, considering the couplings of the stress distribution, the fluid flow of the water-air mixture, the compression and dissolution of air, and the element damage evolution, has been developed to investigate the mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation in porous media during hydraulic fracturing. The concept of homogenized pore fluid has been adopted to represent the water air mixture. A large number of numerical analysis on hydraulic fracturing in clay with incipient injection slot have been carried out to study the mechanism of hydraulic fracturing in unsaturated soil with the characteristic of critical model I type of crack loading using stress intensity factor KIc. The results provide a numerical picture depicting the mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation during hydraulic fracturing. The numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental results, which confirms the adequacy and the power of the numerical approach.

  10. The unsaturated hydraulic characteristics of the Bandelier Tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, D.B.; Gallaher, B.M.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes the physical and, unsaturated hydraulic properties of the Bandelier Tuff determined from laboratory measurements made on core samples collected at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We fit new van Genuchten-type moisture retention curves to this data, which was categorized according to member of the Bandelier Tuff and subunit of the Tshirege Member. Reasonable consistency was observed for hydraulic properties and retention curves within lithologic units, while distinct differences were observed for those properties between units. With the moisture retention data, we constructed vertical profiles of in situ matric suction and hydraulic head. These profiles give an indication of the likely direction of liquid water movement within the unsaturated zone and allow comparison of core-scale and field-scale estimates of water flow and solute transport parameters. Our core-derived transport velocities are much smaller than values estimated from tritium, Cl, and NO{sub 3} contamination found recently in boreholes. The contaminant tracer-derived transport velocities from Los Alamos Canyon are greater than corederived values found for the Otowi Member, and for Mortandad Canyon, greater than core-derived values for that borehole. The significant difference found for Mortandad Canyon suggests that fracture or other fast-path transport may be important there. The relatively small difference between observed and predicted velocities at Los Alamos Canyon may mean that vadose zone transport there occurs by unsaturated matrix flow.

  11. DETERMINATION OF HYDRAULIC TURBINE EFFICIENCY BY MEANS OF THE CURRENT METER METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PURECE C.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents methodology used for determining the efficiency of a low head Kaplan hydraulic turbine with short converging intake. The measurement method used was the current meters method, the only measurement method recommended by the IEC 41standard for flow measurement in this case. The paper also presents the methodology used for measuring the flow by means of the current meters method and the various procedures for calculating the flow. In the last part the paper presents the flow measurements carried out on the Fughiu HPP hydraulic turbines for determining the actual operating efficiency.

  12. Earthquakes Induced by Hydraulic Fracturing in Poland Township, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoumal, R.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Currie, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    Felt seismicity induced by hydraulic fracturing is very rare with only a handful of reported cases worldwide. Using an optimized multi-station cross-correlation template matching routine, 77 earthquakes were identified in Poland Township, Mahoning County, Ohio that were closely related spatially and temporally to active hydraulic fracturing operations. We identified earthquakes as small as M ~1 up to M 3, one of the largest earthquakes induced by hydraulic fracturing in the United States. These events all occurred 4-12 March 2014 and the rate decayed once the Ohio Department of Natural Resources issued a shutdown of hydraulic fracturing at a nearby well on 10 March. Using a locally derived velocity model and double difference relocation, the earthquake epicenters occurred during six stimulation stages along two horizontal well legs that were located ~0.8 km away. Nearly 100 stages in nearby wells at greater distances from the earthquake source region did not coincide with detected seismicity. During the sequence, hypocenters migrated ~600 m along an azimuth of 083 degrees defining a vertically oriented plane of seismicity close to the top of the Precambrian basement. The focal mechanism determined for the M 3 event had a vertically oriented left-lateral fault plane consistent with the earthquake distribution and the regional stress field. The focal mechanism, orientation, and depth of hypocenters were similar to that of the 2011 Youngstown earthquake sequence that occurred ~20 km away, but was correlated with wastewater injection instead of hydraulic fracturing. Considering the relatively large magnitude of these events and the b-value of 0.85, it appears the hydraulic fracturing induced slip along a pre-existing fault/fracture zone optimally oriented in the regional stress field.

  13. Thermal Hydraulic Performance of Tight Lattice Bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yasushi; Akiba, Miyuki; Morooka, Shinichi; Shirakawa, Kenetsu; Abe, Nobuaki

    Recently, the reduced moderation spectrum BWR has been studied. The fast neutron spectrum is obtained through triangular tight lattice fuel. However, there are few thermal hydraulic test data and thermal hydraulic correlation applicable to critical power prediction in such a tight lattice bundle. This study aims to enhance the database of the thermal hydraulic performance of the tight lattice bundle whose rod gap is about 1mm. Therefore, thermal hydraulic performance measurement tests of tight lattice bundles for the critical power, the pressure drop and the counter current flow limiting were performed. Moreover, the correlations to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic performance of the tight lattice bundle were developed.

  14. Design of hydraulic output Stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, W. M.; Harvey, A. C.; Lee, K.

    1983-01-01

    A hydraulic output system for the RE-1000 free piston stirling engine (FPSE) was designed. The hydraulic output system can be readily integrated with the existing hot section of RE-1000 FPSE. The system has two simply supported diaphragms which separate the engine gas from the hydraulic fluid, a dynamic balance mechanism, and a novel, null center band hydraulic pump. The diaphragms are designed to endure more than 10 billion cycles, and to withstand the differential pressure load as high as 14 MPa. The projected thermodynamic performance of the hydraulic output version of RE-1000 FPSE is 1.87 kW at 29/7 percent brake efficiency.

  15. Sensitivity analysis of entropy-constrained designs of water distribution systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyimboh, Tiku; Setiadi, Yohan

    2008-05-01

    A study of the relationship between the statistical entropy and hydraulic reliability of water distribution systems (WDS) was carried out by assessing the effects of layout, flow direction, and pipe costs. Because of an invariance property of the entropy function, different WDS layouts can have identical maximum entropy values. The properties of designs that have identical maximum entropy values were also compared. The results reinforce previous observations that entropy is a potential surrogate measure for hydraulic reliability and suggest that any influences due to the design factors mentioned above are negligible. Maximum entropy designs are shown to be more reliable than other designs, while designs with different layouts but equal maximum entropy values have very similar levels of reliability. The head-dependent analysis method was used and revealed the correlation between entropy and reliability more clearly than hitherto achieved using demand-driven analysis.

  16. Hydraulic fracture during epithelial stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casares, Laura; Vincent, Romaric; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Campillo, Noelia; Navajas, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-03-01

    The origin of fracture in epithelial cell sheets subject to stretch is commonly attributed to excess tension in the cells’ cytoskeleton, in the plasma membrane, or in cell-cell contacts. Here, we demonstrate that for a variety of synthetic and physiological hydrogel substrates the formation of epithelial cracks is caused by tissue stretching independently of epithelial tension. We show that the origin of the cracks is hydraulic; they result from a transient pressure build-up in the substrate during stretch and compression manoeuvres. After pressure equilibration, cracks heal readily through actomyosin-dependent mechanisms. The observed phenomenology is captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which predicts the size and healing dynamics of epithelial cracks as a function of the stiffness, geometry and composition of the hydrogel substrate. Our findings demonstrate that epithelial integrity is determined in a tension-independent manner by the coupling between tissue stretching and matrix hydraulics.

  17. Bio-based Hydraulic Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-17

    currently formulated with vegetable oils (i.e., rapeseed , sun flower, corn, soybean, canola, coconut, etc.) and synthetic ester, such as polyol ester...2008 Vegetable Oil • Excellent lubrication • Nontoxic • Biodegradable • Derived from renewable resources such as rapeseed , sunflower, corn...Mineral Oil 100 SAE 15W-40 G Rapeseed 32 Commercial HF H Polyol ester 22 MIL-PRF-32073 Grade 2 I Canola - Cooking Oil *Hydraulic fluid 3717 April

  18. Fire Resistant Aircraft Hydraulic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    and compounds based on new experimental elastomers as well as most commercially available elastomers were screened in seeking seals that were both...for hydraulic component testing. All of the available E6.5 stock was purchased for the screening tests. However, DuPont stated that other homologs of...with the lubricity and anti-wear additive olyvan A (molybdenum oxysulphide dithiocarbamate ) added in the quantity of less than one percent by weight

  19. HYDRAULIC ELEVATOR INSTALLATION ESTIMATION FOR THE WATER SOURCE WELL SAND-PACK CLEANING UP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ivashechkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article offers design of a hydraulic elevator installation for cleaning up water-source wells of sand packs. It considerers the installation hydraulic circuit according to which the normal pump feeds the high-level tank water into the borehole through two parallel water lines. The water-jet line with washing nozzle for destroying the sand-pack and the supply pipe-line coupled with the operational nozzle of the hydraulic elevator containing the inlet and the supply pipelines for respectively intaking the hydromixture and removing it from the well. The paper adduces equations for fluid motion in the supply and the water-jet pipelines and offers expressions for evaluating the required heads in them. For determining water flow in the supply and the water-jet pipe lines the author proposes to employ graphical approach allowing finding the regime point in Q–H chart by means of building characteristics of the pump and the pipe-lines. For calculating the useful vertical head, supply and dimensions of the hydraulic elevator the article employs the equation of motion quantity with consistency admission of the motion quantity before and after mixing the flows in the hydraulic elevator. The suggested correlations for evaluating the hydraulic elevator efficiency determine the sand pack removal duration as function of its sizes and the ejected fluid flow rate. A hydraulic-elevator installation parameters estimation example illustrates removing a sand pack from a water-source borehole of 41 m deep and 150 mm diameter bored in the village of Uzla of Myadelsk region, of Minsk oblast. The working efficiency of a manufactured and laboratory tested engineering prototype of the hydraulic elevator installation was acknowledged in actual tests at the indicated borehole site. With application of graphical approach, the suggested for the hydraulic elevator installation parameters calculation procedure allows selecting, with given depth and the borehole diameter

  20. Distribution Characteristics of TOC, TN and TP in the Wetland Sediments of Longbao Lake in the San-Jiang Head Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sujin; Si, Jianhua; Qi, Yue; Wang, Zhanqing; Wu, Xiaocui; Hou, Chuanying

    2016-12-01

    The study deals with the distribution of nutrients in wetland sediments, which provide the basis for revealing the wetland eutrophication processes and mechanisms of internal pollution sources. The total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) contents and distribution characteristics of sediment samples were examined. The results showed that the TOC concentration ranged from 3.81 to 15.6 g/kg, the TN concentration ranged from 0.21 to 1.18 g/kg with a mean concentration of 0.66 g/kg, and the TP concentration ranged from 0.16 to 0.35 g/kg with a mean of 0.23 g/kg. Statistical analysis showed close correlations between TOC and TN (R2 = 0.96), and TN and TP (R2 = 0.97), which indicated that the TN and TP in the sediments were from similar sources. The concentrations of TOC, TN, and TP in Long-bao Lake wetland sediments were too low for eutrophication to occur. Our investigation indicated that Longbao Lake undergoes natural evolution rather than anthropogenic activities.

  1. Dynamic characterization of partially saturated engineered porous media and gas diffusion layers using hydraulic admittance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Perry; Fairweather, Joseph D.; Schwartz, Daniel T.

    2012-09-01

    Simple laboratory methods for determining liquid water distribution in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell gas diffusion layers (GDLs) are needed to engineer better GDL materials. Capillary pressure vs. liquid saturation measurements are attractive, but lack the ability to probe the hydraulic interconnectivity and distribution within the pore structure. Hydraulic admittance measurements of simple capillary bundles have recently been shown to nicely measure characteristics of the free-interfaces and hydraulic path. Here we examine the use of hydraulic admittance with a succession of increasingly complex porous media, starting with a laser-drilled sample with 154 asymmetric pores and progress to the behavior of Toray TGP-H090 carbon papers. The asymmetric laser-drilled sample clearly shows hydraulic admittance measurements are sensitive to sample orientation, especially when examined as a function of saturation state. Finite element modeling of the hydraulic admittance is consistent with experimental measurements. The hydraulic admittance spectra from GDL samples are complex, so we examine trends in the spectra as a function of wet proofing (0% and 40% Teflon loadings) as well as saturation state of the GDL. The presence of clear peaks in the admittance spectra for both GDL samples suggests a few pore types are largely responsible for transporting liquid water.

  2. Optimised Iteration in Coupled Monte Carlo - Thermal-Hydraulics Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, J. Eduard; Dufek, Jan

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes an optimised iteration scheme for the number of neutron histories and the relaxation factor in successive iterations of coupled Monte Carlo and thermal-hydraulic reactor calculations based on the stochastic iteration method. The scheme results in an increasing number of neutron histories for the Monte Carlo calculation in successive iteration steps and a decreasing relaxation factor for the spatial power distribution to be used as input to the thermal-hydraulics calculation. The theoretical basis is discussed in detail and practical consequences of the scheme are shown, among which a nearly linear increase per iteration of the number of cycles in the Monte Carlo calculation. The scheme is demonstrated for a full PWR type fuel assembly. Results are shown for the axial power distribution during several iteration steps. A few alternative iteration method are also tested and it is concluded that the presented iteration method is near optimal.

  3. SEISM SAFETY OF PRESSURE HEAD HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING CONSTRUCTIONS Сейсмобезопасность напорных гидротехнических сооружений

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volosoukhin V. A.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Experience of supervision of safety of the hydraulic engineering constructions, operating in our country since 1971, and the first 15 years of the Federal law of the Russian Federation No. 117-FZ from 21.07.1997 “About safety of hydraulic engineering constructions”, when persons under surveillance of GTS steel of power, the industry and a water economic complex is given. The majority (97 % potentially dangerous GTS of the Russian Federation treat the IV class of solidity with service life from 40 to 50 and more years where, as a rule, is absent or the operation service, insufficient quantity of instrumentation is small. Monitoring of a technical condition of similar GTS is possible with use of the mobile, mobile complexes equipped with the modern equipment (hydrological, geophysical, geodetic, mechanical, etc.. Safety of GTS is in many respects caused by a skill level of the operational personnel. For the solution of questions of increase of their safety amending the current legislation is necessary

  4. Numerical simulation of the two-phase flows in a hydraulic coupling by solving VOF model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Zuo, Z. G.; Liu, S. H.; Fan, H. G.; Zhuge, W. L.

    2013-12-01

    The flow in a partially filled hydraulic coupling is essentially a gas-liquid two-phase flow, in which the distribution of two phases has significant influence on its characteristics. The interfaces between the air and the liquid, and the circulating flows inside the hydraulic coupling can be simulated by solving the VOF two-phase model. In this paper, PISO algorithm and RNG k-ɛ turbulence model were employed to simulate the phase distribution and the flow field in a hydraulic coupling with 80% liquid fill. The results indicate that the flow forms a circulating movement on the torus section with decreasing speed ratio. In the pump impeller, the air phase mostly accumulates on the suction side of the blades, while liquid on the pressure side; in turbine runner, air locates in the middle of the flow passage. Flow separations appear near the blades and the enclosing boundaries of the hydraulic coupling.

  5. Hydraulic Redistribution: A Modeling Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, E.; Verma, P.; Loheide, S. P., III

    2014-12-01

    Roots play a key role in the soil water balance. They extract and transport water for transpiration, which usually represents the most important soil water loss in vegetated areas, and can redistribute soil water, thereby increasing transpiration rates and enhancing root nutrient uptake. We present here a two-dimensional model capable of describing two key aspects of root water uptake: root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution. Root water compensation is the ability of root systems to respond to the reduction of water uptake from areas of the soil with low soil water potential by increasing the water uptake from the roots in soil parts with higher water potential. Hydraulic redistribution is a passive transfer of water through the root system from areas of the soil with greater water potential to areas with lower water potential. Both mechanisms are driven by gradients of water potential in the soil and the roots. The inclusion of root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution in models can be achieved by describing root water uptake as a function of the difference in water potential between soil and root xylem. We use a model comprising the Richards equation for the water flow in variably saturated soils and the Darcy's equation for the water flow in the xylem. The two equations are coupled via a sink term, which is assumed to be proportional to the difference between soil and xylem water potentials. The model is applied in two case studies to describe vertical and horizontal hydraulic redistribution and the interaction between vegetation with different root depths. In the case of horizontal redistribution, the model is used to reproduce the fluxes of water across the root system of a tree subjected to uneven irrigation. This example can be extended to situations when only part of the root system has access to water, such as vegetation near creeks, trees at the edge of forests, and street trees in urban areas. The second case is inspired by recent

  6. Hydraulic constraints modify optimal photosynthetic profiles in giant sequoia trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Anthony R; Baxter, Wendy L; Wong, Christopher S; Burgess, Stephen S O; Williams, Cameron B; Næsborg, Rikke R; Koch, George W; Dawson, Todd E

    2016-11-01

    Optimality theory states that whole-tree carbon gain is maximized when leaf N and photosynthetic capacity profiles are distributed along vertical light gradients such that the marginal gain of nitrogen investment is identical among leaves. However, observed photosynthetic N gradients in trees do not follow this prediction, and the causes for this apparent discrepancy remain uncertain. Our objective was to evaluate how hydraulic limitations potentially modify crown-level optimization in Sequoiadendron giganteum (giant sequoia) trees up to 90 m tall. Leaf water potential (Ψ l ) and branch sap flow closely followed diurnal patterns of solar radiation throughout each tree crown. Minimum leaf water potential correlated negatively with height above ground, while leaf mass per area (LMA), shoot mass per area (SMA), leaf nitrogen content (%N), and bulk leaf stable carbon isotope ratios (δ(13)C) correlated positively with height. We found no significant vertical trends in maximum leaf photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (g s), and intrinsic water-use efficiency (A/g s), nor in branch-averaged transpiration (E L), stomatal conductance (G S), and hydraulic conductance (K L). Adjustments in hydraulic architecture appear to partially compensate for increasing hydraulic limitations with height in giant sequoia, allowing them to sustain global maximum summer water use rates exceeding 2000 kg day(-1). However, we found that leaf N and photosynthetic capacity do not follow the vertical light gradient, supporting the hypothesis that increasing limitations on water transport capacity with height modify photosynthetic optimization in tall trees.

  7. International Space Station power module thermal control system hydraulic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, V. [Boeing North American, Inc., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

    1997-12-31

    The International Space Station (ISS) uses four photovoltaic power modules (PVMs) to provide electric power for the US On-Orbit Segment. The PVMs consist of photovoltaic arrays (PVAs), orbit replaceable units (ORUs), photovoltaic radiators (PVRs), and a thermal control system (TCS). The PVM TCS function is to maintain selected PVM components within their specified operating ranges. The TCS consists of the pump flow control subassembly (PFCS), piping system, including serpentine tubing for individual component heat exchangers, headers/manifolds, fluid disconnect couplings (FQDCs), and radiator (PVR). This paper describes the major design requirements for the TCS and the results of the system hydraulic performance predictions in regard to these requirements and system component sizing. The system performance assessments were conducted using the PVM TCS fluid network hydraulic model developed for predicting system/component pressure losses and flow distribution. Hardy-Cross method of iteration was used to model the fluid network configuration. Assessments of the system hydraulic performance were conducted based on an evaluation of uncertainties associated with the manufacturing and design tolerances. Based on results of the analysis, it was concluded that all design requirements regarding system performance could be met. The hydraulic performance range, enveloping possible system operating parameter variations was determined.

  8. Study on the Mixing Characteristics of Dilution Water in the Distribution Pipe of Hydraulic Headbox%稀释水在布浆支管中的混合特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康国兵

    2014-01-01

    稀释水调浓水力式流浆箱通过局部调节浆料浓度控制全幅横向定量偏差,采用Realizable κ-ε湍流模,利用数值模拟的方法研究稀释水在布浆支管内与浆流的混合与扩散特性,数值模拟结果与相关试验数据吻合良好;稀释水在浆流中的混合主要通过反向漩涡的逐渐扩散。在入射点近场,稀释水与浆流快速混合,当z/d>7后,混合参数M变化趋向平缓,这表明混合速度逐渐降低。在稀释水入射点的下游,距离入射点越远,射流扩散程度越高,混合效果越好;提高稀释水的入射速度,有利于提高混合效果。%The method of adjusting the local concentration is taken by hydraulic headbox to control the basis weight in cross direction .In this paper , the turbulence model of Realizable κ-ε was adopted to simulate the mixing of dilution water with stock .The results of simulation are consistent with that of experiment .Reverse vortex pair is the main form of dilution water diffuses in stock .The result shows dilution water and stock mix quickly in near field of jet point, but in the downstream, the mixing parameters ( M) keeps comparatively steady when z >7d.This illustrates the speed of mixing decreases gradually .In the downstream , the dilution get more even with distance increases.Increasing the incidence speed of dilution water is good for mixing effect .

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more ... the body being studied. top of page How is the procedure performed? The technologist begins by positioning ...

  10. A Self-Consistent Approach for Calculating the Effective Hydraulic Conductivity of a Bimodal, Heterogeneous Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozdniakov, Sergey; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2004-01-02

    In this paper, we consider an approach for estimating the effective hydraulic conductivity of a 3D medium with a binary distribution of local hydraulic conductivities. The medium heterogeneity is represented by a combination of matrix medium conductivity with spatially distributed sets of inclusions. Estimation of effective conductivity is based on a self-consistent approach introduced by Shvidler (1985). The tensor of effective hydraulic conductivity is calculated numerically by using a simple system of equations for the main diagonal elements. Verification of the method is done by comparison with theoretical results for special cases and numerical results of Desbarats (1987) and our own numerical modeling. The method was applied to estimating the effective hydraulic conductivity of a 2D and 3D fractured porous medium. The medium heterogeneity is represented by a combination of matrix conductivity and a spatially distributed set of highly conductive fractures. The tensor of effective hydraulic conductivity is calculated for parallel- and random-oriented sets of fractures. The obtained effective conductivity values coincide with Romm's (1966) and Snow's (1969) theories for infinite fracture length. These values are also physically acceptable for the sparsely-fractured-medium case with low fracture spatial density and finite fracture length. Verification of the effective hydraulic conductivity obtained for a fractured porous medium is done by comparison with our own numerical modeling for a 3D case and with Malkovsky and Pek's (1995) results for a 2D case.

  11. Vibrations of hydraulic pump and their solution

    OpenAIRE

    Dobšáková Lenka; Nováková Naděžda; Habán Vladimír; Hudec Martin; Jandourek Pavel

    2017-01-01

    The vibrations of hydraulic pump and connected pipeline system are very problematic and often hardly soluble. The high pressure pulsations of hydraulic pump with the double suction inlet are investigated. For that reason the static pressure and accelerations are measured. The numerical simulations are carried out in order to correlate computed data with experimental ones and assess the main source of vibrations. Consequently the design optimization of the inner hydraulic part of pump is done ...

  12. Temporal changes in hydraulic conductivity of sand porous media biofilters during wastewater infiltration due to biomat formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Deborah N. H.; McCray, John E.; Lowe, Kathryn S.; Siegrist, Robert L.

    2005-09-01

    Porous media biofilters (PMBs) are commonly used to treat domestic wastewater. Biomats develop at the infiltrative surface of PMBs due to continued wastewater application and create an impedance to flow. The goal of this research is to quantify the temporal evolution of normalized biomat hydraulic conductivity ( Kbm/ bbm) and effective hydraulic conductivity ( Ke). Ke is the overall hydraulic conductivity of the infiltrative zone, including biomat and unsaturated media below the biomat. Research was conducted using eight one-dimensional (1D) sand columns with gravel-free and gravel-laden infiltrative surfaces. The columns were loaded at design rates of 100-200 cm/d for 20 weeks of column operation. The Ke values for these continuously loaded columns were determined from analyses of bromide-tracer tests, falling-head permeability tests, and volumetric water content measurements during biomat development. The reduction in the Ke due to biomat formation is due to two factors: reduced hydraulic conductivity of the thin biomat, and a reduced hydraulic conductivity of the subsoil due to development of a biomat-induced unsaturated flow regime. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivities of the subsoil below the biomat ( Kss) were estimated from capillary curves and water content measurements. For observed final biomat thicknesses (less than 1 cm), the biomat hydraulic conductivity, Kbm, is three orders of magnitude smaller than the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity ( Kss). However, the relatively large thickness of the vadose zone causes the Kss to be an important contributor to the overall Ke value. For these columns, the final Ke values were approximately two orders of magnitude smaller than the original value. Because the exact thickness of the biomat ( bbm) is unknown during the flow experiments, the hydraulic conductance of the biomat zone is presented using a normalized hydraulic conductivity function ( Kbm/ bbm). A similar Kbm/ bbm is reached regardless of wastewater

  13. Hydraulic properties of typical salt-affected soils in Jiangsu Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiaomin; SHEN Qirong; XU Yangchun

    2007-01-01

    Every year about 1,500 ha of land is reclaimed from the sea along the coastline of Jiangsu Province,China.It is important to characterize the hydraulic properties of this reclaimed land to be able to predict and manage salt and water movement for amelioration of these saline soils.In this paper,we report hydraulic properties of these salt-affected soils.The pressure-plate method,constant head method,the crust method and Klute's method were used in this study.The satu rated hydraulic conductivities of the soils ranged from 128.66 to 141.26 cm/day and decreased with increasing soil depth.The unsaturated hydraulic conductivities followed an expo nential function of pressure head.The soil water retention curves were similar for three soil layers in the soil.The satu rated water content,field capacity and wilting point decreased with increasing soil depth.Plant available water contents of the three layers in the soil profile were 0.21,0.20 and 0.19 cm3/cm3,respectively.The unsaturated soil water diffu sivity of the studied soils ranged from 0.07 to 10.46 cm2/min,and was related to the water content via an exponential relationship.

  14. Effects of biochars on hydraulic properties of clayey soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Jingbo; Palladino, Mario; Lazarovitch, Naftali; Bonanomi, Giuliano; Battista Chirico, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    Biochar has gained popularity as an amendment to improve soil hydraulic properties. Since biochar properties depend on feedstocks and pyrolysis temperatures used for its production, proper selection of biochar type as soil amendment is of great importance for soil hydraulic properties improvement. This study investigated the effects of eight types of biochar on physical and hydraulic properties of clayey soil. Biochars were derived from four different feedstocks (Alfalfa hay, municipal organic waste, corn residues and wood chip) pyrolyzed at two different temperatures (300 and 550 °C). Clayey soil samples were taken from Leone farm (40° 26' 15.31" N, 14° 59' 45.54" E), Italy, and were oven-dried at 105 °C to determine dry bulk density. Biochars were mixed with the clayey soil at 5% by mass. Bulk densities of the mixtures were also determined. Saturated hydraulic conductivities (Ks) of the original clayey soil and corresponding mixtures were measured by means of falling-head method. Soil water retention measurements were conducted for clayey soil and mixtures using suction table apparatus and Richards' plate with the pressure head (h) up to 12000 cm. van Genuchten retention function was selected to evaluate the retention characteristics of clayey soil and mixtures. Available water content (AWC) was calculated by field capacity (h = - 500 cm) minus wilting pointing (h = -12000 cm). The results showed that biochar addition decreased the bulk density of clayey soil. The Ks of clayey soil increased due to the incorporation of biochars except for waste and corn biochars pyrolyzed at 550 °C. AWC of soils mixed with corn biochar pyrolyzed at 300 °C and wood biochar pyrolyzed at 550 °C, increased by 31% and 7%, respectively. Further analysis will be conducted in combination of biochar properties such as specific surface area and total pore volume. Better understanding of biochar impact on clayey soil will be helpful in biochar selection for soil amendment and

  15. Hydraulic design of a low-specific speed Francis runner for a hydraulic cooling tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, H.; Luo, X. Q.; Liao, W. L.; Zhao, Y. P.

    2012-11-01

    The air blower in a cooling tower is normally driven by an electromotor, and the electric energy consumed by the electromotor is tremendous. The remaining energy at the outlet of the cooling cycle is considerable. This energy can be utilized to drive a hydraulic turbine and consequently to rotate the air blower. The purpose of this project is to recycle energy, lower energy consumption and reduce pollutant discharge. Firstly, a two-order polynomial is proposed to describe the blade setting angle distribution law along the meridional streamline in the streamline equation. The runner is designed by the point-to-point integration method with a specific blade setting angle distribution. Three different ultra-low-specificspeed Francis runners with different wrap angles are obtained in this method. Secondly, based on CFD numerical simulations, the effects of blade setting angle distribution on pressure coefficient distribution and relative efficiency have been analyzed. Finally, blade angles of inlet and outlet and control coefficients of blade setting angle distribution law are optimal variables, efficiency and minimum pressure are objective functions, adopting NSGA-II algorithm, a multi-objective optimization for ultra-low-specific speed Francis runner is carried out. The obtained results show that the optimal runner has higher efficiency and better cavitation performance.

  16. Modeling multidomain hydraulic properties of shrink-swell soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ryan D.; Abou Najm, Majdi R.; Rupp, David E.; Selker, John S.

    2016-10-01

    Shrink-swell soils crack and become compacted as they dry, changing properties such as bulk density and hydraulic conductivity. Multidomain models divide soil into independent realms that allow soil cracks to be incorporated into classical flow and transport models. Incongruously, most applications of multidomain models assume that the porosity distributions, bulk density, and effective saturated hydraulic conductivity of the soil are constant. This study builds on a recently derived soil shrinkage model to develop a new multidomain, dual-permeability model that can accurately predict variations in soil hydraulic properties due to dynamic changes in crack size and connectivity. The model only requires estimates of soil gravimetric water content and a minimal set of parameters, all of which can be determined using laboratory and/or field measurements. We apply the model to eight clayey soils, and demonstrate its ability to quantify variations in volumetric water content (as can be determined during measurement of a soil water characteristic curve) and transient saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks (as can be measured using infiltration tests). The proposed model is able to capture observed variations in Ks of one to more than two orders of magnitude. In contrast, other dual-permeability models assume that Ks is constant, resulting in the potential for large error when predicting water movement through shrink-swell soils. Overall, the multidomain model presented here successfully quantifies fluctuations in the hydraulic properties of shrink-swell soil matrices, and are suitable for use in physical flow and transport models based on Darcy's Law, the Richards Equation, and the advection-dispersion equation.

  17. Hydraulically Driven Grips For Hot Tensile Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, R. Keith; Johnson, George W.

    1994-01-01

    Pair of grips for tensile and compressive test specimens operate at temperatures up to 1,500 degrees F. Grips include wedges holding specimen inside furnace, where heated to uniform temperature. Hydraulic pistons drive wedges, causing them to exert clamping force. Hydraulic pistons and hydraulic fluid remain outside furnace, at room temperature. Cooling water flows through parts of grips to reduce heat transferred to external components. Advantages over older devices for gripping specimens in high-temperature tests; no need to drill holes in specimens, maintains constant gripping force on specimens, and heated to same temperature as that of specimen without risk of heating hydraulic fluid and acuator components.

  18. Stochastic inverse modelling of hydraulic conductivity fields taking into account independent stochastic structures: A 3D case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llopis-Albert, C.; Capilla, J. E.

    2010-09-01

    SummaryMajor factors affecting groundwater flow through fractured rocks include the geometry of each fracture, its properties and the fracture-network connectivity together with the porosity and conductivity of the rock matrix. When modelling fractured rocks this is translated into attaining a characterization of the hydraulic conductivity ( K) as adequately as possible, despite its high heterogeneity. This links with the main goal of this paper, which is to present an improvement of a stochastic inverse model, named as Gradual Conditioning (GC) method, to better characterise K in a fractured rock medium by considering different K stochastic structures, belonging to independent K statistical populations (SP) of fracture families and the rock matrix, each one with its own statistical properties. The new methodology is carried out by applying independent deformations to each SP during the conditioning process for constraining stochastic simulations to data. This allows that the statistical properties of each SPs tend to be preserved during the iterative optimization process. It is worthwhile mentioning that so far, no other stochastic inverse modelling technique, with the whole capabilities implemented in the GC method, is able to work with a domain covered by several different stochastic structures taking into account the independence of different populations. The GC method is based on a procedure that gradually changes an initial K field, which is conditioned only to K data, to approximate the reproduction of other types of information, i.e., piezometric head and solute concentration data. The approach is applied to the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in Sweden, where, since the middle nineties, many experiments have been carried out to increase confidence in alternative radionuclide transport modelling approaches. Because the description of fracture locations and the distribution of hydrodynamic parameters within them are not accurate enough, we address the

  19. Design and Analysis of Hydraulic Chassis with Obstacle Avoidance Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yingjie; Zhang, Xiang

    2017-07-01

    This article mainly expounds the design of hydraulic system for the hydraulic chassis with obstacle avoidance function. Including the selection of hydraulic motor wheels, hydraulic pump, digital hydraulic cylinder and the matching of engine power. And briefly introduces the principle of obstacle avoidance.

  20. Hydraulic resistance of a plant root to water-uptake: A slender-body theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kang Ping

    2016-05-07

    A slender-body theory for calculating the hydraulic resistance of a single plant root is developed. The work provides an in-depth discussion on the procedure and the assumptions involved in calculating a root׳s internal hydraulic resistance as well as the physical and the mathematical aspects of the external three-dimensional flow around the tip of a root in a saturated soil and how this flow pattern enhances uptake and reduces hydraulic resistance. Analytical solutions for the flux density distribution on the stele-cortex interface, local water-uptake profile inside the stele core, the overall water-uptake at the base of the stele, and the total hydraulic resistance of a root are obtained in the slender-body limit. It is shown that a key parameter controlling a root's hydraulic resistance is the dimensionless axial conductivity in the stele, which depends on the permeabilities of the stele and the cortex as well as the root's radial and axial dimensions. Three-dimensional tip effect reduces a root's hydraulic resistance by as much as 36% when compared to the radial flow theory of Landsberg and Fowkes. In addition, the total hydraulic resistance cannot be generally decomposed into the direct sum of a radial resistance and an axial resistance.

  1. Application of computational fluid dynamic to model the hydraulic performance of subsurface flow wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Liwei; Hai Reti; WANG Wenxing; LU Zexiang; YANG Zhiming

    2008-01-01

    A subsurface flow wetland (SSFW) was simulated using a commercial computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code. The constructed media was simulated using porous media and the liquid resident time distribution (RTD) in the SSFW was obtained using the particle trajectory model. The effect of wetland configuration and operating conditions on the hydraulic performance of the SSFW were investigated. The results indicated that the hydraulic performance of the SSFW was predominantly affected by the wetland configuration. The hydraulic efficiency of the SSFW with an inlet at the middle edge of the upper media was 0.584 and the best among the SSFWs with an inlet at the top, the middle, and the bottom edge of the upper media. The constructed media affected the hydraulic performance by the ratio (K) of the upper and lower media resistance. The selection of appropriate media resistance in the protection layer can improve the hydraulic efficiency. When the viscous resistance coefficient of the media in the protection layer changed from 2.315×105 to 1.200×108, the hydraulic efficiency of the SSFW increased from 0.301 to 0.751. However, the effect of operating conditions on the hydraulic efficiency of the SSFW was slight.

  2. Turbulent Motion of Liquids in Hydraulic Resistances with a Linear Cylindrical Slide-Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Velescu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the motion of viscous and incompressible liquids in the annular space of controllable hydraulic resistances with a cylindrical linear slide-valve. This theoretical study focuses on the turbulent and steady-state motion regimes. The hydraulic resistances mentioned above are the most frequent type of hydraulic resistances used in hydraulic actuators and automation systems. To study the liquids’ motion in the controllable hydraulic resistances with a linear cylindrical slide-valve, the report proposes an original analytic method. This study can similarly be applied to any other type of hydraulic resistance. Another purpose of this study is to determine certain mathematical relationships useful to approach the theoretical functionality of hydraulic resistances with magnetic controllable fluids as incompressible fluids in the presence of a controllable magnetic field. In this report, we established general analytic equations to calculate (i velocity and pressure distributions, (ii average velocity, (iii volume flow rate of the liquid, (iv pressures difference, and (v radial clearance.

  3. Effects of inlet momentum and orientation on the hydraulic performance of water storage tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Manoel Lucas Machado; Janzen, Johannes Gérson

    2017-09-01

    The influence of inlet momentum and inlet orientation on hydraulic performance of cylindrical water process tanks were investigated using a factorial design strategy. The hydraulic performance of the tanks was assessed with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, which calculated the flow fields and the residence time distribution (RTD). RTDs were used to quantify the tanks hydraulic performance using hydraulic indexes that represent short-circuiting, mixing, and moment. These indexes were later associated with the effluent fraction of disinfectant (inlet and outlet disinfectant ratio). For small depth-to-diameter ratios, the inlet orientation and the inlet momentum were the most important factors regarding the hydraulic indexes and the effluent fraction of disinfectant, respectively. A poor correlation was obtained between the hydraulic indexes and the effluent fraction of disinfectant, indicating that they are not good predictors for water quality. For large depth-to-diameter ratios, the inlet orientation had the most significant effect on both the hydraulic indexes and effluent fraction of disinfectant. The short-circuiting and mixing indexes presented a good correlation with water quality for this case.

  4. Failure Mode of the Water-filled Fractures under Hydraulic Pressure in Karst Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xin; Lu, Hao; Huang, Houxu; Hao, Yiqing; Xia, Yuanpu

    2017-06-01

    Water-filled fractures continue to grow after the excavation of karst tunnels, and the hydraulic pressure in these fractures changes along with such growth. This paper simplifies the fractures in the surrounding rock as flat ellipses and then identifies the critical hydraulic pressure values required for the occurrence of tensile-shear and compression-shear failures in water-filled fractures in the case of plane stress. The occurrence of tensile-shear fracture requires a larger critical hydraulic pressure than compression-shear failure in the same fracture. This paper examines the effects of fracture strike and lateral pressure coefficient on critical hydraulic pressure, and identifies compression-shear failure as the main failure mode of water-filled fractures. This paper also analyses the hydraulic pressure distribution in fractures with different extensions, and reveals that hydraulic pressure decreases along with the continuous growth of fractures and cannot completely fill a newly formed fracture with water. Fracture growth may be interrupted under the effect of hydraulic tensile shear.

  5. Failure Mode of the Water-filled Fractures under Hydraulic Pressure in Karst Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Xin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Water-filled fractures continue to grow after the excavation of karst tunnels, and the hydraulic pressure in these fractures changes along with such growth. This paper simplifies the fractures in the surrounding rock as flat ellipses and then identifies the critical hydraulic pressure values required for the occurrence of tensile-shear and compression-shear failures in water-filled fractures in the case of plane stress. The occurrence of tensile-shear fracture requires a larger critical hydraulic pressure than compression-shear failure in the same fracture. This paper examines the effects of fracture strike and lateral pressure coefficient on critical hydraulic pressure, and identifies compression-shear failure as the main failure mode of water-filled fractures. This paper also analyses the hydraulic pressure distribution in fractures with different extensions, and reveals that hydraulic pressure decreases along with the continuous growth of fractures and cannot completely fill a newly formed fracture with water. Fracture growth may be interrupted under the effect of hydraulic tensile shear.

  6. Micro-process model of hydraulic shock absorber with abnormal structural noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to discover the causes of the abnormal noise of shock absorbers,it is necessary to identify the operating characteristics of the shock absorbers.A micro-process model for operation of the hydraulic shock absorber was presented.A novel concept,which describes the process of hydraulic shock absorber by dividing it into smaller steps,was proposed.The dynamic model and the differential equations were established.The results of numerical simulation agree well with data obtained from the vibrostand test,indicating that the collision between the piston and the oil,the alternation of static friction and sliding friction acted between the piston and the cylinder,and the adherence between valve plate and piston result in impact on the piston head near the top dead center and the bottom dead center.Ultimately,the impact excites the high-frequency vibration of the piston structure,which can generate the abnormal noise in the hydraulic shock absorber after its transfer.And the maximum vibration acceleration on the piston head and the abnormal noise increase with the increase of the gap between the oil and piston rod head,the maximum static friction force and the adhering function,respectively.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses ... of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  8. Heavy Metal Diffusion through Soft Clay under High Hydraulic Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaheer Ahmed Almani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was focused on the determination of contaminant transport parameters of heavy metal Zinc moving through saturated soft Bangkok undisturbed clay under high hydraulic gradients. These parameters were compared with contaminant transport determined under concentration gradient alone (pure diffusion. In total fifteen column tests were conducted and a mathematical model was applied to determine the coefficients. Two different source concentrations conditions, constant and decreasing, were applied. Testing periods were ranged from 15-60 days while hydraulic gradients were ranged from 0-500. The curves between relative concentration and time and pore volume were developed for the constant source condition whereas curves between source reservoirs concentrations and time were developed for decreasing source condition. The effective diffusion and distribution coefficients, De and Kd, were determined by curve fitting using the computer code POLLUTE v 6.3. The results showed that diffusion coefficient increases and distribution coefficient decreases as hydraulic gradient increases from 0 to high value of 500 due to contribution of dispersion and additional molecular diffusion at high advective velocity. Thus, testing at high gradients ensures the safe performance of earthen barriers under worse conditions.

  9. Helical coil thermal hydraulic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramello, M.; Bertani, C.; De Salve, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-11-01

    A model has been developed in Matlab environment for the thermal hydraulic analysis of helical coil and shell steam generators. The model considers the internal flow inside one helix and its associated control volume of water on the external side, both characterized by their inlet thermodynamic conditions and the characteristic geometry data. The model evaluates the behaviour of the thermal-hydraulic parameters of the two fluids, such as temperature, pressure, heat transfer coefficients, flow quality, void fraction and heat flux. The evaluation of the heat transfer coefficients as well as the pressure drops has been performed by means of the most validated literature correlations. The model has been applied to one of the steam generators of the IRIS modular reactor and a comparison has been performed with the RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code applied to an inclined straight pipe that has the same length and the same elevation change between inlet and outlet of the real helix. The predictions of the developed model and RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code are in fairly good agreement before the dryout region, while the dryout front inside the helical pipes is predicted at a lower distance from inlet by the model.

  10. A WIDE DISTRIBUTION OF A NEW VRN-B1c ALLELE OF WHEAT TRITICUM AESTIVUM L. IN RUSSIA, UKRAINE AND ADJACENT REGIONS: A LINK WITH THE HEADING TIME AND ADAPTIVE POTENTIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shcherban A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The adaptation of common wheat (T. aestivum L. to diverse environmental conditions is greatly under the control of genes involved in determination of vernalization response (Vrn-1 genes. It was found that the variation in common wheat heading time is affected not only by combination of Vrn-1 homoeoalleles but also by multiple alleles at a separate Vrn-1 locus. Previously, we described the Vrn-B1c allele from T.aestivum cv. 'Saratovskaya 29' and found significant differences in the structure of the first (1st intron of this allele when compared to another highly abundant Vrn-B1a allele, specifically, the deletion of 0.8 kb coupled with the duplication of 0.4 kb. We suggested that the changes in the intron 1 of Vrn-B1c allele caused earlier ear emergence in the near-isogenic line and cultivars, carrying this allele. In this study we investigate the distribution of the Vrn-B1c allele in a wide set of spring wheat cultivars from Russia, Ukraine and adjacent regions. The analysis revealed that 40% of Russian and 53% of Ukranian spring wheat cultivars contain the Vrn-B1c allele. The high distribution of the Vrn-B1c allele can be explained by a frequent using of 'Saratovskaya 29' in the breeding process inside the studied area. From the other hand, the predominance of the Vrn-B1c allele among cultivars cultivated in West Siberia and Kazakhstan may be due to the selective advantage of this allele for the region where there is a high risk of early fall frosts.

  11. Hydraulic resistance of carper of cylindrical shape mineral wool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhukov Aleksey Dmitrievich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The properties of the mineral wool mat are determined by the mode of heat treatment and properties of the products. The main parameter to assess the properties of highly porous fibrous material is its resistance to the air flow, which can be estimated by the value of the hydraulic resistance. This parameter includes both the characteristics of the mineral fiber (diameter, length, density characteristics of the system as a whole (total porosity, average density, the content of fibrous inclusions and gas environment parameters (temperature and speed of its motion through the porous layer. Characteristics of the gaseous medium are technological factors, which influence the material during the heat treatment, and hence optimization of the process parameters. The flow of gas through the perforated wall of the hole determined by characteristics, pressurized inside a rolling pin, and the structural characteristics of the mineral geometrical cylinder and his hydraulic resistance. So, a universal criterion, which measures the mass transfer efficiency and hence the effectiveness of the heat treatment, is a hydraulic resistance cylinder. The study of the processes occurring in the mineral wool carpet, showed that its hydraulic resistance is directly proportional to the surface of fibers per unit bed volume and inversely proportional to the third degree of porosity of the layer. Researches have shown that increasing the degree of perforation increases the uneven distribution. However, if total power increases 1.87 times, because the perforation through the inlet portion perforation of rolling pin was disclosure, substantially uniform distribution was achieved. The investigations led to the following conclusions: the specific surface layer has a linear dependence on its average density; hydraulic resistance of the layer will be greater, when the amount of beads and fibers diameter is smaller. The obtained exact dependence allows calculating the hydraulic

  12. Method for achieving hydraulic balance in typical Chinese building heating systems by managing differential pressure and flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lipeng; Xia, Jianjun; Thorsen, Jan Eric;

    2017-01-01

    Hydraulic unbalance is a common problem in Chinese district heating (DH) systems. Hydraulic unbalance has resulted in poor flow distribution among heating branches and overheating of apartments. Studies show that nearly 30% of the total heat supply is being wasted in Chinese DH systems due...... to a lack of pressure and flow control. This study investigated using pre-set radiator valves combined with differential pressure (DP) controllers to achieve hydraulic balance in building distribution systems, and consequently save energy and reduce the emissions. We considered a multi-storey building...

  13. HYDRAULIC CHARACTERISTICS OF VERTICAL VORTEX AT HYDRAULIC INTAKES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yun-liang; WU Chao; YE Mao; JU Xiao-ming

    2007-01-01

    The trace of vertical vortex flow at hydraulic intakes is of the shape of spiral lines, which was observed in the presented experiments with the tracer technique. It represents the fluid particles flow spirally from the water surface to the underwater and rotate around the vortex-axis multi-cycle. This process is similar to the movement of screw. To describe the multi-circle spiral characteristics under the axisymmetric condition, the vertical vortex would change not only in the radial direction but also in the axial direction. The improved formulae for three velocity components for the vertical vortex flow were deduced by using the method of separation of variables in this article. In the improved formulae, the velocity components are the functions of the radial and axial coordinates, so the multi-circle spiral flow of vertical vortex could be simulated. The calculated and measured results for the vertical vortex flow were compared and the causes of errors were analyzed.

  14. An Experimental Investigation of Hydraulic Jet Fracturing Technology with Coiled Tubing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    To solve the increasingly serious problem of "many wells, but low productivity" in China, the hydraulic jetting fracturing technology with coiled tubing, as a new measure for effectively improving the production rate of individual well and enhancing oil and gas recovery, merits much attention nowa- days. On the basis of study of the hydraulic jetting fracturing mechanism with coiled tubing and numerical simulation of pressure distribution inside the pores, the mechanism of pressure rise inside the pores caused by the pressure boost action within the jetting pore and the hydraulic isolation action is examined, and the influence of main parameters on the pressure distribution inside the pores is analyzed. 3 kinds of operating methods of hydraulic jetting fracturing with coiled tubing are raised with the tubular diameter of coiled tub- ing as an important feature parameter. According to the experimental study, the fracturing mechanism and computational resuks of numerical simulation are both examined. It is considered that under the same pres- sure drop of jet nozzle, the pressure inside the pores increases with the confining pressure nearly at a line- ar state. When the vertical depth of the borehole is rather big and the rupture pressure of the formation is higher, it is recommended to use higher pressure drop of jet nozzle for achieving better pressure boost and hydraulic isolation effect. For the hydraulic jetting fracturing with coiled tubing, the coiled tubing with tu- bular diameter not less than 50. 8 mm (2 in. ) is usually used.

  15. Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT of head and neck tumors: perfusion measurements using a distributed-parameter tracer kinetic model. Initial results and comparison with deconvolution-based analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisdas, Sotirios; Konstantinou, George N.; Sherng Lee, Puor; Thng, Choon Hua; Wagenblast, Jens; Baghi, Mehran; San Koh, Tong

    2007-10-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a two-compartment distributed-parameter (DP) tracer kinetic model to generate functional images of several physiologic parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced CT data obtained of patients with extracranial head and neck tumors and to compare the DP functional images to those obtained by deconvolution-based DCE-CT data analysis. We performed post-processing of DCE-CT studies, obtained from 15 patients with benign and malignant head and neck cancer. We introduced a DP model of the impulse residue function for a capillary-tissue exchange unit, which accounts for the processes of convective transport and capillary-tissue exchange. The calculated parametric maps represented blood flow (F), intravascular blood volume (v1), extravascular extracellular blood volume (v2), vascular transit time (t1), permeability-surface area product (PS), transfer ratios k12 and k21, and the fraction of extracted tracer (E). Based on the same regions of interest (ROI) analysis, we calculated the tumor blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and mean transit time (MTT) by using a modified deconvolution-based analysis taking into account the extravasation of the contrast agent for PS imaging. We compared the corresponding values by using Bland-Altman plot analysis. We outlined 73 ROIs including tumor sites, lymph nodes and normal tissue. The Bland-Altman plot analysis revealed that the two methods showed an accepted degree of agreement for blood flow, and, thus, can be used interchangeably for measuring this parameter. Slightly worse agreement was observed between v1 in the DP model and BV but even here the two tracer kinetic analyses can be used interchangeably. Under consideration of whether both techniques may be used interchangeably was the case of t1 and MTT, as well as for measurements of the PS values. The application of the proposed DP model is feasible in the clinical routine and it can be used interchangeably for measuring

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT of head and neck tumors: perfusion measurements using a distributed-parameter tracer kinetic model. Initial results and comparison with deconvolution-based analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisdas, Sotirios [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang GoeUniversity Hospital, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Konstantinou, George N [401 General Military Hospital, Athens (Greece); Lee, Puor Sherng [Department of Oncologic Imaging National Cancer Centre, 169610 Singapore (Singapore); Thng, Choon Hua [Department of Oncologic Imaging National Cancer Centre, 169610 Singapore (Singapore); Wagenblast, Jens [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Johann Wolfgang GoeUniversity Hospital, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Baghi, Mehran [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Johann Wolfgang GoeUniversity Hospital, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Koh, Tong San [Center for Modeling and Control of Complex Systems, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 Singapore (Singapore)

    2007-10-21

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a two-compartment distributed-parameter (DP) tracer kinetic model to generate functional images of several physiologic parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced CT data obtained of patients with extracranial head and neck tumors and to compare the DP functional images to those obtained by deconvolution-based DCE-CT data analysis. We performed post-processing of DCE-CT studies, obtained from 15 patients with benign and malignant head and neck cancer. We introduced a DP model of the impulse residue function for a capillary-tissue exchange unit, which accounts for the processes of convective transport and capillary-tissue exchange. The calculated parametric maps represented blood flow (F), intravascular blood volume (v{sub 1}), extravascular extracellular blood volume (v{sub 2}), vascular transit time (t{sub 1}), permeability-surface area product (PS), transfer ratios k{sub 12} and k{sub 21}, and the fraction of extracted tracer (E). Based on the same regions of interest (ROI) analysis, we calculated the tumor blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and mean transit time (MTT) by using a modified deconvolution-based analysis taking into account the extravasation of the contrast agent for PS imaging. We compared the corresponding values by using Bland-Altman plot analysis. We outlined 73 ROIs including tumor sites, lymph nodes and normal tissue. The Bland-Altman plot analysis revealed that the two methods showed an accepted degree of agreement for blood flow, and, thus, can be used interchangeably for measuring this parameter. Slightly worse agreement was observed between v{sub 1} in the DP model and BV but even here the two tracer kinetic analyses can be used interchangeably. Under consideration of whether both techniques may be used interchangeably was the case of t{sub 1} and MTT, as well as for measurements of the PS values. The application of the proposed DP model is feasible in the clinical routine and it

  17. An easily installable groundwater lysimeter to determine waterbalance components and hydraulic properties of peat soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schwaerzel

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple method for the installation of groundwater lysimeters in peat soils was developed which reduces both time and financial effort significantly. The method was applied on several sites in the Rhinluch, a fen peat land 60 km northwest of Berlin, Germany. Over a two-year period, upward capillary flow and evapotranspiration rates under grassland with different groundwater levels were measured. The installation of tensiometers and TDR probes additionally allowed the in situ determination of the soil hydraulic properties (water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The results of the measurements of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity demonstrate that more than one single method has to be applied if the whole range of the conductivity function from saturation to highly unsaturated is to be covered. Measuring the unsaturated conductivity can be done only in the lab for an adequately wide range of soil moisture conditions. Keywords: peat soils, soil hydraulic properties, evapotranspiration, capillary flow, root distribution, unsaturated zone

  18. Hydroscoop - Bulletin of the small-scale hydraulic laboratory MHyLab; Hydroscoop - Bulletin d'information MHyLab laboratoire de petite hydraulique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denis, V.

    2009-07-01

    This is issue Nr. 5 of the news bulletin of MHyLab, the small-scale hydraulic laboratory in Montcherand, Switzerland. The history of MHyLab development is recalled. The objective of the laboratory is given: the laboratory development of efficient and reliable turbines for the entire small-scale hydraulic range (power: 10 to 2000 kW, flow rate: 0.01 to 10 m{sup 3}/s, hydraulic head: 1 m up to more than 700 m). The first period (1997-2001) was devoted to Pelton turbines for high heads (60 to 70 m) and the second (2001-2009) to Kaplan turbines for low and very low heads (1 to 30 m). In the third period (beginning 2008) diagonal turbines for medium heads (25 to 100 m) are being developed. MHyLab designed, modelled and tested all these different types. The small-scale hydraulic market developed unexpectedly quickly. The potential of small-scale hydraulics in the Canton of Vaud, western Switzerland is presented. Three implemented projects are reported on as examples for MHyLab activities on the market place. The MHyLab staff is presented.

  19. Design of Pumps for Water Hydraulic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Peder; Olsen, Stefan; Bech, Thomas Nørgaard

    1999-01-01

    This paper considers the development of two pumps for water hydraulic applications. The pumps are based on two different working principles: The Vane-type pump and the Gear-type pump. Emphasis is put on the considerations that should be made to account for water as the hydraulic fluid.......KEYWORDS: water, pump, design, vane, gear....

  20. Hydraulic fracturing with distinct element method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruiksma, J.P.; Bezuijen, A.

    2002-01-01

    In this report, hydraulic fracturing is investigated using the distinct element code PFC2D from Itasca. Special routines were written to be able to model hydraulic fracturing. These include adding fluid flow to PFC2D and updating the fluid flow domains when fractures appear. A brief description of t

  1. Hydraulic Actuator for Ganged Control Rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. C.; Robey, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Hydraulic actuator moves several nuclear-reactor control rods in unison. Electromagnetic pump pushes liquid lithium against ends of control rods, forcing them out of or into nuclear reactor. Color arrows show lithium flow for reactor startup and operation. Flow reversed for shutdown. Conceived for use aboard spacecraft, actuator principle applied to terrestrial hydraulic machinery involving motion of ganged rods.

  2. Control arrangement for the actuation of hydraulic consumers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kussel, W.; Dettmers, M.; Weirich, W.

    1988-11-09

    An arrangement for controlling the actuation of hydraulic consumers, by selectively connecting the consumers to hydraulic pressure and return lines; the control arrangement comprising a respective hydraulically operated directional control valve associated with each of the hydraulic consumers, a respective electro-magnetically operated pre-control valve associated with each of the hydraulic directional control valves, and further electro-magnetically operated directional control valve means associated with the pre-control valves, each of the hydraulic consumers being connectible to the hydraulic pressure or return lines via the associated hydraulically operated directional control valve which is actuatable by a hydraulic control line leading from the output of the associated pre-control valve, wherein the inputs of the pre-control valves are connected directly to the hydraulic return line and indirectly, via the further control valve means, to the hydraulic return line or to a hydraulic control pressure line.

  3. Mapping of Soil Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity in Navroud-Assalem Watershed in Guilan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Khaledian

    2016-02-01

    -size distribution and normalization parameters from infiltration test with a near zero pressure head. Evaluation of spatial variation was done using GS+ and zoning map was prepared with ArcGIS software. Statistical evaluation of recorded data was done using SPSS software package. Results and Discussion: Results showed that the soil bulk density was of 1.07 gr cm-3 in average. Furthermore, the results showed that the average of saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks in the watershed was of 3.96 cm hr-1 with a coefficient of variation of 151%. The watershed Ks is classified in the moderate class. Regarding the high value of Ks variation coefficient, using geostatistics is necessary to analyze Ks spatial variation. The results indicate the absence of the anisotropy. Using GS+ software, exponential model was fit on the empirical variation (r2=0.953 and RSS=0.0057 cm hr-1. The effective range was of 2280 m. The difference between the amounts reported by other studies and this study was because of the effect of the difference in the study area (307 km, in this study, scale (the field or watershed and the distance between measured points. Two usual methods of interpolation including inverse distance weighting and ordinal kriging were verified. The results showed that ordinal kriging performed better than inverse distance weighting method (RMSEs for ordinal kriging and inverse distance weighting were 8.97 and 9.75, respectively. Zoning map of Ks was prepared according to the results of GS+ software using ArcGIS software. The correlation coefficients between Ks and sand, silt and clay percents were -0.04, 0.01 and 0.07, which demonstrate a weak effect of soil texture on the Ks as compared with soil structure. The correlation coefficient of the soil bulk density with Ks was of -0.45 which demonstrate a stronger effect as compared with the soil texture. Conclusions: The results of this study can be used to proper management of watersheds. One of the main information needed to manage a watershed

  4. Modeling 3-D permeability distribution in alluvial fans using facies architecture and geophysical acquisitions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhu, Lin; Gong, Huili; Dai, Zhenxue; Guo, Gaoxuan; Teatini, Pietro

    2017-01-01

      Alluvial fans are highly heterogeneous in hydraulic properties due to complex depositional processes, which make it difficult to characterize the spatial distribution of the hydraulic conductivity (K...

  5. Scaling hydraulic properties of a macroporous soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Binayak P.

    1999-06-01

    Macroporous soils exhibit significant differences in their hydraulic properties for different pore domains. Multimodal hydraulic functions may be used to describe the characteristics of multiporosity media. I investigated the usefulness of scaling to describe the spatial variability of hydraulic conductivity (K(-h)) functions of a macroporous soil in Las Nutrias, New Mexico. Piecewise-continuous hydraulic conductivity functions suitable for macroporous soils in conjunction with a hybrid similar media-functional normalization scaling approach were used. Results showed that gravity-dominated flow and the related hydraulic conductivity (K(minus;h) functions of the macropore region are more readily scalable than capillary-dominated flow properties of the mesopore and micropore regions. A possible reason for this behavior is that gravity-dominated flow in the larger pores is mostly influenced by the pore diameter which remains more uniform as compared to tortuous mesopores and micropores with variable neck and body sizes along the pore length.

  6. Hydraulic conductivity of GCLs in MSW landfills

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guo-cheng; YANG Wu-chao; DAN Tang-hui

    2008-01-01

    The state of the art of the study on the hydraulic conductivity of GCLs is presented in terms of the in-fluence of the effective stress, chemical interactions, freeze - thaw cycles and temperature gradients. The chan-ges of void ratio caused by changes of effective stress have a direct linear effect on the hydraulic conductivity, regardless of the cation concentration or the thickness of the adsorbed layer. The hydraulic conductivity is relat-ed to the relative abundance of monovalent and divalent cation(RMD), and RMD has a great effect on the hy-draulic conductivity in weak solution. The long-term susceptibility of GCLs to increased hydraulic conductivity as a response to repeated freeze-thaw cycling is minimal, which has been proved after 150 freeze-thaw cycles. The potential of desiccation cracking increases with the increasing temperature gradient and is related to the ini-tial subsoil water content, the applied overburden stress, etc.

  7. Modeling and Simulation of Hydraulic Engine Mounts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Shanzhong; Marshall McNea

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic engine mounts are widely used in automotive powertrains for vibration isolation.A lumped mechanical parameter model is a traditional approach to model and simulate such mounts.This paper presents a dynamical model of a passive hydraulic engine mount with a double-chamber,an inertia track,a decoupler,and a plunger.The model is developed based on analogy between electrical systems and mechanical-hydraulic systems.The model is established to capture both low and high frequency dynatmic behaviors of the hydraulic mount.The model will be further used to find the approximate pulse responses of the mounts in terms of the force transmission and top chamber pressure.The close form solution from the simplifiod linear model may provide some insight into the highly nonlinear behavior of the mounts.Based on the model,computer simulation has been carried out to study dynamic performance of the hydraulic mount.

  8. Hydraulic test for evaluation of hydrophone VSP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabuuchi, Satoshi; Koide, Kaoru [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Toki, Gifu (Japan). Tono Geoscience Center

    1997-12-01

    This hydraulic test was carried out at the test site of Tono Geoscience Center, Mizunami-shi, Gifu Pref. in order to evaluate the reliability of the hydraulic conductivity estimated from hydrophone VSP experiment. From March to April 1997, we carried out measurements of pore-water pressure at five depths and permeability tests at seven depths down to G.L.-300m, within a borehole drilled in granitic rock. We compared the results of hydraulic test with hydrophone VSP experiment on condition that a single open fracture existed, and we obtained two notable results. First, for the granitic rock at which a single open fracture was found by BTV and also detected by hydrophone VSP experiment, the hydraulic conductivity was 1.54 x 10{sup -7} cm/sec, while for the same granitic rock at which another single open fracture was found by BTV but not detected by hydrophone VSP experiment, the hydraulic conductivity was less than 6 x 10{sup -10} cm/sec. Second, we converted the hydraulic conductivity of 1.54 x 10{sup -7} cm/sec which was obtained in a hydraulic test section of length 2.5 m into an equivalent value for a single open fracture of width 1 mm. The converted value (3.8 x 10{sup -4} cm/sec) was similar to the hydraulic conductivity estimated from hydrophone VSP experiment. In conclusion, the hydraulic test result shows that hydrophone VSP is useful to estimate an approximate hydraulic conductivity of a single open fracture. (author)

  9. Reduction of saltwater intrusion by modifying hydraulic conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strack, O. D. L.; Stoeckl, L.; Damm, K.; Houben, G.; Ausk, B. K.; de Lange, W. J.

    2016-09-01

    We present an approach for reducing saltwater intrusion in coastal aquifers by artificially reducing the hydraulic conductivity in the upper part of selected areas by using a precipitate. We apply a previously presented analytical approach to develop formulas useful for the design of artificial barriers. Equations for the location of the tip of the saltwater wedge are presented and verified through a sand-tank experiment. The analysis is capable of computing discharges exactly, but requires the Dupuit-Forchheimer approximation to compute points of the interface between flowing fresh and stationary saltwater. We consider a vertical coastline and boundaries in the freshwater zone of either given discharge or given head. We demonstrate in the paper that reduction of the hydraulic conductivity in the upper part of a coastal aquifer will result in a decrease of saltwater intrusion, and present analytic expressions that can be used for design purposes. The previously presented analytical approach can be applied to design systems to reduce saltwater intrusion caused by pumping inland from the zone that contains saline groundwater.

  10. Thermal-hydraulic modeling needs for passive reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, J.M. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has received an application for design certification from the Westinghouse Electric Corporation for an Advanced Light Water Reactor design known as the AP600. As part of the design certification process, the USNRC uses its thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes to independently audit the vendor calculations. The focus of this effort has been the small break LOCA transients that rely upon the passive safety features of the design to depressurize the primary system sufficiently so that gravity driven injection can provide a stable source for long term cooling. Of course, large break LOCAs have also been considered, but as the involved phenomena do not appear to be appreciably different from those of current plants, they were not discussed in this paper. Although the SBLOCA scenario does not appear to threaten core coolability - indeed, heatup is not even expected to occur - there have been concerns as to the performance of the passive safety systems. For example, the passive systems drive flows with small heads, consequently requiring more precision in the analysis compared to active systems methods for passive plants as compared to current plants with active systems. For the analysis of SBLOCAs and operating transients, the USNRC uses the RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic system analysis code. To assure the applicability of RELAP5 to the analysis of these transients for the AP600 design, a four year long program of code development and assessment has been undertaken.

  11. DLC coatings for hydraulic applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luca NOBILI; Luca MAGAGNIN

    2009-01-01

    Replacement of lubricating oils with water or low-viscosity fluids is highly desirable in many industrial fields, on account of the environmental and economical advantages. Low lubricity of water might be insufficient for proper operation of hydraulic components, and diamond-like carbon(DLC) coatings are very attractive as solid lubricant films. A remote-plasma PACVD process was utilized to deposit hydrogenated DLC coatings (a-C:H) on different substrates. Microindentation measurements show that the coating hardness is around 35 GPa. Tribological behavior was evaluated by block-on-ring tests performed in water and water with alumina. The wear rate was calculated after measuring the wear volume by a laser profilemeter. Morphological and compositional analysis of the wear tracks reveal that coating failure may occur by abrasive wear or delamination, depending on the substrate properties. Hard and smooth substrates give the best results and dispersed alumina particles increase the wear rate.

  12. Aircraft Hydraulic Systems Dynamic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-01

    4400 PSIG OUTLET PRESSURE ~’f UM5 S1 l .( FIF ~0RV lR 1 .I. AP (c R (V) IFWM) APPROX C ASE !VPý :iI S ReUN N•;MRF.. r p kN i t, isI A! f IN, I:E • ’l...and 1F.GI pump modelo were assumed from data supplied by CECO. 165 _ -- --- - SECTION V HYDRAULIC MOTOR MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND VERIFICATION A fixed...3 70 P.,0 601 ~4 M24.0 3 1p ’, 4 r I 1 1 ISIS 2411 APPENDIX E (CONT.) HSFR TECHNICAL MANUAL (AFAPL-TR-76-43, VOL. IV) 4.15 VANE PU`MP SUBROUTINE 4.15A

  13. Permeability Enhancement in Enhanced Geothermal System as a result of Hydraulic Fracturing and Jacking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Mohammadreza; Klepikova, Maria; Fisch, Hansruedi; Amann, Florian; Loew, Simon

    2016-04-01

    -coring tests, these data were used to conclude on the local stress orientation and stress magnitudes. The hydraulic response of the rock mass under hydro-mechanical perturbations was investigated by conducting various hydraulic packer tests (e.g. pulse, constant rate and constant head) in multiple hydraulically isolated borehole sections before and after the stress measurements. Hydraulic testing of borehole sections which were previously fracked (during HF tests) didn't show a distinct increase in permeability. For the tested borehole sections without natural fractures, this can be explained by the fact that hydraulic fracturing was dominated by fracture normal opening (mode I). In this case, the implemented pressure range (less than 2 MPa) during the hydraulic packer tests was not sufficient to re-open the tensile fractures and permeability would remain unchanged. Conversely, in borehole sections with pre-existing ductile and/or brittle fractures and where HTPF-tests were conducted, the permeability increased by two orders of magnitude, from 10-11 m2/s to˜10-9 m2/s (results of hydraulic tests pre and post HTPF). These findings could be explained by permanent enhancement of permeability as a result of shear dilation of existing structures. Considering the efficiency of the hydraulic stimulation process observed at low differential injection pressures, even more significant permeability enhancement is expected during the upcoming stimulation experiments.

  14. Head and Neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Liselotte; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Loft, Annika

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography with FDG of the head and neck region is mainly used for the diagnosis of head and neck cancer, for staging, treatment evaluation, relapse, and planning of surgery and radio therapy. This article is a practical guide of imaging techniques......, including a detailed protocol for FDG PET in head and neck imaging, physiologic findings, and pitfalls in selected case stories....

  15. Acquisition of Key Parameters of Hydraulic Model for Water Distribution Network Using GPS Survey%通过GPS实测推求给水管网水力模型关键参数

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王俊良; 李鹏; 高金良; 袁一星; 汤维佳

    2011-01-01

    The application of GPS survey techniques is to enhance the accuracy and reliability in modeling water distribution network, as well as reducing amount of work during the primary stage. Taking a large city in northeast China for example, combined with the total station instrument under GPS-RTK mode, water source nodes and pressure monitoring points were measured precisely and three-dimensionally. The elevations of valves and pressure gauges in the measurement of pipeline resistance and valve resistance were also acquired. The results are more precise than those measured with traditional estimating methods. Different points in the area can be measured synchronously, which simplifies many procedures during measurement of pipelines and improves the working efficiency. Digital network graphics is more precise, which can prevent human errors and ensure the accuracy of the model. So it is proved to be a new work mode in modeling water distribution network.%为提高给水管网水力模型的精确性和可信度,减少管网建模初期基础资料收集的工作量,在给水管网建模过程中引入GPS实测.以东北某特大城市为例,通过全站仪结合GPS的方法,采用GPS-RTK模式,对水源节点及压力监测点进行高精度的三维测量,并且获取管道阻力和阀门阻力实测中压力表和阀门的标高,其精度远高于传统估算方法的.GPS可做到区域内多点同时同步测量,简化了大范围内管线测量的诸多工作程序,极大地提高了工作效率;同时还提高了数字化管网图形精度,在全微机操作条件下避免了人为误差,确保了模型精度,是管网数字化的一种全新作业方式.

  16. Visual perception of axes of head rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mattijs Arnoldussen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Registration of ego-motion is important to accurately navigate through space. Movements of the head and eye relative to space are registered through the vestibular system and optical flow, respectively. Here, we address three questions concerning the visual registration of self-rotation. 1. Eye-in-head movements provide a link between the motion signals received by sensors in the moving eye and sensors in the moving head. How are these signals combined into an ego-rotation percept? We combined optic flow of simulated forward and rotational motion of the eye with different levels of eye-in-head rotation for a stationary head. We dissociated simulated gaze rotation and head rotation by different levels of eye-in-head pursuit.We found that perceived rotation matches simulated head- not gaze-rotation. This rejects a model for perceived self-rotation that relies on the rotation of the gaze line. Rather, eye-in-head signals serve to transform the optic flow’s rotation information, that specifies rotation of the scene relative to the eye, into a rotation relative to the head. This suggests that transformed visual self-rotation signals may combine with vestibular signals.2. Do transformed visual self-rotation signals reflect the arrangement of the semicircular canals (SCC? Previously, we found sub-regions within MST and V6+ that respond to the speed of the simulated head rotation. Here, we re-analyzed those BOLD signals for the presence of a spatial dissociation related to the axes of visually simulated head rotation, such as have been found in sub-cortical regions of various animals. Contrary, we found a rather uniform BOLD response to simulated rotation along the three SCC axes.3. We investigated if subject’s sensitivity to the direction of the head rotation axis shows SCC axes specifcity. We found that sensitivity to head rotation is rather uniformly distributed, suggesting that in human cortex, visuo-vestibular integration is not arranged into

  17. Assessing soil hydraulic characteristics using HYPROP and BEST: a comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitinger, Georg; Obojes, Nikolaus; Lassabatère, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of ecohydrological characteristics with high spatial resolution is a prerequisite for large-scale hydrological modelling. Data on soil hydraulic characteristics are of major importance, but measurements are often seen as time consuming and costly. In order to accurately model grassland productivity and in particular evapotranspiration, soil sampling and infiltration experiments at 25 grassland sites ranging from 900m to 2300m a.s.l. were conducted in the long term socio-ecological research (LTSER) site Stubai Valley, Tyrolean Alps, Austria, covering 265 km². Here we present a comparison of two methods to determine important hydrological properties of soils: (1) the evaporation method HYPROP (Hydraulic Property Analyzer; UMS Munich, 2010), and (2) the BEST-model (Beerkan Estimation of Soil Transfer Parameters; Lassabatère et al. (2006)), each determining the soil hydraulic characteristics and in particular the water retention curve. For the most abundant soil types we compared the pf-curves calculated from HYPROP data suing the Van Genuchten equation to the ones resulting from the comparatively time efficient BEST approach to find out if the latter is a suitable method to determine pf curves of alpine grassland soils. Except for the soil type Rendzina, the comparison of HYPROP and BEST showed slightly variations in the pF curves and resulting hydraulic characteristics. At the starting point BEST curves presented a slower dehydration, HYPROP a fast and continuous water loss. HYPROP analyses showed the highest variability in the measured values of Rendzina. Regarding BEST, the Alluvial Soils showed the highest variability. To assess equivalence between HYPROP and BEST we deduced several hydraulic characteristics from the pF curves, e.g. saturated water content, field capacity, permanent wilting point, pore size distribution, and minimum water retention. The comparison of HYPROP and BEST revealed that the results of soil water characteristics may depend on

  18. Impact of sludge layer geometry on the hydraulic performance of a waste stabilization pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouedraogo, Faissal R; Zhang, Jie; Cornejo, Pablo K; Zhang, Qiong; Mihelcic, James R; Tejada-Martinez, Andres E

    2016-08-01

    Improving the hydraulic performance of waste stabilization ponds (WSPs) is an important management strategy to not only ensure protection of public health and the environment, but also to maximize the potential reuse of valuable resources found in the treated effluent. To reuse effluent from WSPs, a better understanding of the factors that impact the hydraulic performance of the system is needed. One major factor determining the hydraulic performance of a WSP is sludge accumulation, which alters the volume of the pond. In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was applied to investigate the impact of sludge layer geometry on hydraulic performance of a facultative pond, typically used in many small communities throughout the developing world. Four waste stabilization pond cases with different sludge volumes and distributions were investigated. Results indicate that sludge distribution and volume have a significant impact on wastewater treatment efficiency and capacity. Although treatment capacity is reduced with accumulation of sludge, the latter may induce a baffling effect which causes the flow to behave closer to that of plug flow reactor and thus increase treatment efficiency. In addition to sludge accumulation and distribution, the impact of water surface level is also investigated through two additional cases. Findings show that an increase in water level while keeping a constant flow rate can result in a significant decrease in the hydraulic performance by reducing the sludge baffling effect, suggesting a careful monitoring of sludge accumulation and water surface level in WSP systems.

  19. Primary system thermal hydraulics of future Indian fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velusamy, K., E-mail: kvelu@igcar.gov.in [Thermal Hydraulics Section, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Natesan, K.; Maity, Ram Kumar; Asokkumar, M.; Baskar, R. Arul; Rajendrakumar, M.; Sarathy, U. Partha; Selvaraj, P.; Chellapandi, P. [Thermal Hydraulics Section, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Kumar, G. Senthil; Jebaraj, C. [AU-FRG Centre for CAD/CAM, Anna University, Chennai 600 025 (India)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • We present innovative design options proposed for future Indian fast reactor. • These options have been validated by extensive CFD simulations. • Hotspot factors in fuel subassembly are predicted by parallel CFD simulations. • Significant safety improvement in the thermal hydraulic design is quantified. - Abstract: As a follow-up to PFBR (Indian prototype fast breeder reactor), many FBRs of 500 MWe capacity are planned. The focus of these future FBRs is improved economy and enhanced safety. They are envisaged to have a twin-unit concept. Design and construction experiences gained from PFBR project have provided motivation to achieve an optimized design for future FBRs with significant design changes for many critical components. Some of the design changes include, (i) provision of four primary pipes per primary sodium pump, (ii) inner vessel with single torus lower part, (iii) dome shape roof slab supported on reactor vault, (iv) machined thick plate rotating plugs, (v) reduced main vessel diameter with narrow-gap cooling baffles and (vi) safety vessel integrated with reactor vault. This paper covers thermal hydraulic design validation of the chosen options with respect to hot and cold pool thermal hydraulics, flow requirement for main vessel cooling, inner vessel temperature distribution, safety analysis of primary pipe rupture event, adequacy of decay heat removal capacity by natural convection cooling, cold pool transient thermal loads and thermal management of top shield and reactor vault.

  20. Hydraulic basis for the evolution of photosynthetic productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoffoni, Christine; Chatelet, David S; Pasquet-Kok, Jessica; Rawls, Michael; Donoghue, Michael J; Edwards, Erika J; Sack, Lawren

    2016-05-27

    Clarifying the evolution and mechanisms for photosynthetic productivity is a key to both improving crops and understanding plant evolution and habitat distributions. Current theory recognizes a role for the hydraulics of water transport as a potential determinant of photosynthetic productivity based on comparative data across disparate species. However, there has never been rigorous support for the maintenance of this relationship during an evolutionary radiation. We tested this theory for 30 species of Viburnum, diverse in leaf shape and photosynthetic anatomy, grown in a common garden. We found strong support for a fundamental requirement for leaf hydraulic capacity (Kleaf) in determining photosynthetic capacity (Amax), as these traits diversified across this lineage in tight coordination, with their proportionality modulated by the climate experienced in the species' range. Variation in Kleaf arose from differences in venation architecture that influenced xylem and especially outside-xylem flow pathways. These findings substantiate an evolutionary basis for the coordination of hydraulic and photosynthetic physiology across species, and their co-dependence on climate, establishing a fundamental role for water transport in the evolution of the photosynthetic rate.

  1. Hydraulic Conductivity Estimate via Tracer Test and Ensemble Kalman Filter Data Assimilation: Theoretical and Numerical Fundamentals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crestani, E.; Camporese, M.; Salandin, P.

    2011-12-01

    Hydraulic properties of natural aquifers, such as porosity, hydraulic conductivity, and storativity, exhibit an erratic spatial variability at different scales that is difficult to recognize without expensive in situ sampling campaigns, laboratory analyses, and, when available, spatially distributed pumping tests. Nevertheless, the importance of the heterogeneous structure of natural formations on solute transport is well recognized, being the non-Fickian evolution of contaminant plumes and the relevant dispersive phenomena controlled by the variability of the hydraulic conductivity K at the local scale. Tracer test analyses have been widely adopted to identify the complex distribution of in situ hydraulic properties. In particular, the use of geophysical methods like the borehole Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) have been in rapid increase, due to their potential to accurately describe the spatio-temporal evolution of the injected solute. Under the assumptions that the solute spreads as a passive tracer and with high values of the Peclet number, the plume evolution is controlled by the porosity and the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity. Combining the Lagrangian formulation of transport and the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation technique, the purpose of this study is to infer the spatial distribution of K at the local scale from a sequence of time-lapse concentration imaging. The capabilities of the proposed approach are investigated simulating various assimilation experiments via synthetic tracer tests in a three-dimensional finite domain reproducing a heterogeneous aquifer. In a first scenario, all the available concentration measurements are assimilated and the entire hydraulic conductivity field is updated, while in the remaining scenarios the K values are updated only in a limited number of nodes by assimilating the concentrations in these same nodes, the hydraulic conductivity in the rest of the domain being the result of a

  2. Design optimization of harvester head and actuation system of forest harvester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben Ole; Hansen, Michael R.; Mouritsen, Ole Ø.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is on the analysis and subsequent efficiency optimization of a forrest harvester. As basis for the optimization the existing machine has undergone substantial experimental testing with a view to determine the loading that the harvester head is subjected to and also the corresponding ef...... efficiency of the hydraulic actuation system during a typical working cycle....

  3. Technical and Economical Evaluations of Canola Harvesting Losses in Different Maturity Stages Using Three Different Combine Harverster Heads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Taghinazhad

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapeseed cultivation in Iran is growing rapidly while this product has been facing specific problems. Every year a significant portion of edible oil is imported to the country from other countries. Despite this deficit, a great amount of canola is being lost every year. Therefore, in compliance with technical points, adding a suitable platform to the exisiting machineries may reduce the losses. A field study was conducted in Moghan Agricultural Research Centre to study the technical and economical characteristics of harvesting machineries and evaluate Canola harvesting losses in different maturity stages, using three different combine harvester heads. The experiments were conducted in a completely randomized\tsplit split plot design with four replications. The main plot included seed maturity stage at three levels: A 60%, B 70% and C 80%, and the subplot was the harvester’s ground speed at three levels: A 1.5, B 2.5 and C 3.5 km h-1. The sub-subplot was combine head type with three forms: A Mechanical, B Hydraulically Joybar and C Hydraulically Biso's Head. The results of ANOVA showed that maximum cutter bar losses occurred with Mechanical Head (5.36% while the loss of Hydraulically Joybar's and Biso's head were 4.28 and 4.13 %, respectively. The results also showed that the maximum cutter bar losses occurred when 80% of seeds were matured and adequate time for canola harvesting was 70% of seeds maturity. The results of analysing the effects of harvesting ground speeds showed that the maximum cutter bar losses occurred with the speed of 3.5 km h-1. Finally, the results showed that the minimum cutter bar loss was obtained with Hydraulically Joybar's head considering the benefit per cost ratio. The cost for Mechanical head and Hydraulically Biso's head were 13500 and 262500 Rial ha-1, respectively.

  4. Very Low Head Turbine Deployment in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, P.; Williams, C.; Sasseville, Remi; Anderson, N.

    2014-03-01

    The Very Low Head (VLH) turbine is a recent turbine technology developed in Europe for low head sites in the 1.4 - 4.2 m range. The VLH turbine is primarily targeted for installation at existing hydraulic structures to provide a low impact, low cost, yet highly efficient solution. Over 35 VLH turbines have been successfully installed in Europe and the first VLH deployment for North America is underway at Wasdell Falls in Ontario, Canada. Deployment opportunities abound in Canada with an estimated 80,000 existing structures within North America for possible low-head hydro development. There are several new considerations and challenges for the deployment of the VLH turbine technology in Canada in adapting to the hydraulic, environmental, electrical and social requirements. Several studies were completed to determine suitable approaches and design modifications to mitigate risk and confirm turbine performance. Diverse types of existing weirs and spillways pose certain hydraulic design challenges. Physical and numerical modelling of the VLH deployment alternatives provided for performance optimization. For this application, studies characterizing the influence of upstream obstacles using water tunnel model testing as well as full-scale prototype flow dynamics testing were completed. A Cold Climate Adaptation Package (CCA) was developed to allow year-round turbine operation in ice covered rivers. The CCA package facilitates turbine extraction and accommodates ice forces, frazil ice, ad-freezing and cold temperatures that are not present at the European sites. The Permanent Magnet Generator (PMG) presents some unique challenges in meeting Canadian utility interconnection requirements. Specific attention to the frequency driver control and protection requirements resulted in a driver design with greater over-voltage capability for the PMG as well as other key attributes. Environmental studies in Europe included fish friendliness testing comprised of multiple in

  5. Effects of volute geometry and impeller orbit on the hydraulic performance of a centrifugal pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flack, R. D.; Lanes, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Overall performance data was taken for a Plexiglas water pump with a logarithmic spiral volute and rectangular cross sectioned flow channels. Parametric studies were made in which the center of the impeller was offset from the design center of the volute. The rig was also designed such that the impeller was allowed to synchronously orbit by a fixed amount about any center. The studies indicate that decreasing the tongue clearance decreases the head at low flowrates and increases the head at high flowrates. Also, decreasing the volute area in the first half of the volute and holding the tongue clearance the same, resulted in a decreased head for low flowrates but performance at high flowrates was not affected. Finally, the overall hydraulic performance was not affected by the impeller orbitting about the volute center.

  6. Hydraulic Monitoring of Low-Permeability Argillite at the Meuse/Haute Marne Underground Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delay, Jacques; Cruchaudet, Martin

    ANDRA (Agence Nationale pour la Gestion de Déchets Radioactifs) has developed an electromagnetic permanent gauge (EPG) for long term monitoring of pore pressures in low permeability Callovo-Oxfordian argillites. The EPG is a pressure gauge that is permanently cemented into a borehole with no wire or tubing connections. The EPG transmits its data electromagnetically through the rock. Improvements in batteries have extended the life of the EPG to six years or more. Data from EPG installations in two holes near ANDRAs underground laboratory provide information on hydraulic conductivity and head. The heads in the argillites of the laboratory site are higher than heads in the two encasing carbonate units. These anomalous overpressures provide evidence for the very low permeability of the rock. Possible mechanisms for the overpressure include osmotic flows due to chemical potential gradients or delayed responses to the evolution of the regional groundwater hydrodynamics.

  7. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF A HYDRAULIC PISTON

    OpenAIRE

    Santos De La Cruz, Eulogio; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos; Rojas Lazo, Oswaldo; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos; Yenque Dedios, Julio; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos; Lavado Soto, Aurelio; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos

    2014-01-01

    A hydraulic system project includes the design, materials selection and construction of the hydraulic piston, hydraulic circuit and the joint with the pump and its accesories. This equiment will be driven by the force of moving fluid, whose application is in the devices of machines, tools, printing, perforation, packing and others. El proyecto de un sistema hidráulico, comprende el diseño, selección de materiales y construcción del pistón hidráulico, circuito hidráulico y el ensamble con l...

  8. Bubble visualization in a simulated hydraulic jump

    CERN Document Server

    Witt, Adam; Shen, Lian

    2013-01-01

    This is a fluid dynamics video of two- and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations carried out at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory. A transient hydraulic jump is simulated using OpenFOAM, an open source numerical solver. A Volume of Fluid numerical method is employed with a realizable k-epsilon turbulence model. The goal of this research is to model the void fraction and bubble size in a transient hydraulic jump. This fluid dynamics video depicts the air entrainment characteristics and bubble behavior within a hydraulic jump of Froude number 4.82.

  9. Layered clustering multi-fault diagnosis for hydraulic piston pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jun; Wang, Shaoping; Zhang, Haiyan

    2013-04-01

    Efficient diagnosis is very important for improving reliability and performance of aircraft hydraulic piston pump, and it is one of the key technologies in prognostic and health management system. In practice, due to harsh working environment and heavy working loads, multiple faults of an aircraft hydraulic pump may occur simultaneously after long time operations. However, most existing diagnosis methods can only distinguish pump faults that occur individually. Therefore, new method needs to be developed to realize effective diagnosis of simultaneous multiple faults on aircraft hydraulic pump. In this paper, a new method based on the layered clustering algorithm is proposed to diagnose multiple faults of an aircraft hydraulic pump that occur simultaneously. The intensive failure mechanism analyses of the five main types of faults are carried out, and based on these analyses the optimal combination and layout of diagnostic sensors is attained. The three layered diagnosis reasoning engine is designed according to the faults' risk priority number and the characteristics of different fault feature extraction methods. The most serious failures are first distinguished with the individual signal processing. To the desultory faults, i.e., swash plate eccentricity and incremental clearance increases between piston and slipper, the clustering diagnosis algorithm based on the statistical average relative power difference (ARPD) is proposed. By effectively enhancing the fault features of these two faults, the ARPDs calculated from vibration signals are employed to complete the hypothesis testing. The ARPDs of the different faults follow different probability distributions. Compared with the classical fast Fourier transform-based spectrum diagnosis method, the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can diagnose the multiple faults, which occur synchronously, with higher precision and reliability.

  10. Hydraulic Travel Time Tomography Appraisal Using Synthetic Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauchler, R.; Cheng, J.; Dietrich, P.; Everett, M.; Johnson, B.

    2003-12-01

    Hydraulic tomography is an aquifer characterization method allowing the two and three dimensional spatial identification of hydraulic properties in the subsurface. Such information is essential for rigorous analysis of a variety of engineering, geotechnical and hydrogeological problems within the context of water resources management. We propose a tomographic approach providing the inversion of travel times of multiwell slug tests. The inversion is based on the relation between the travel times of a recorded transient pressure curve and the diffusivity of the geological medium. Usually, just one value of a measured hydraulic signal, mostly the peak time, is used as the data for the inversion in order to reconstruct the diffusivity field of the investigated system. This situation is not satisfying because much information is lost. Therefore, we have developed a transformation factor allowing to apply our approach to several travel times characterizing each signal. Thereby, each travel time is inverted separately. The main focus is to appraise the influence of the various travel times on the inversion results. It can be assumed that early travel times are dominated by preferential flow along fast, high permeability paths, while the inversion results based on late travel times reflect an integration of the received signal over many flow paths. Synthetic data sets were created using the Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code (FEHM) from Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data base of the inversion comprises simulated slug tests, in which the position of the sources (injection ports) and the receivers (observation ports) isolated with packers, are varied between the tests. We also investigate the effects of input parameters such as the number of source-receiver positions used, borehole storage and permeability distribution. The hydraulic tomography appraisal shows a strong dependence of the inversion results on the used travel times and input parameters. Results of

  11. Head Injuries in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play a crucial role in injury prevention and initial treatment when injuries occur at school. The role of school nurses includes being knowledgeable about the management of head injuries, including assessment and initial treatment. The school nurse must be familiar with the outcomes of a head injury and know when further evaluation…

  12. Hydraulic Fracturing and the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayatollahy Tafti, T.; Aminzadeh, F.; Jafarpour, B.; de Barros, F.

    2013-12-01

    In this presentation, we highlight two key environmental concerns of hydraulic fracturing (HF), namely induced seismicity and groundwater contamination (GC). We examine the induced seismicity (IS) associated with different subsurface fluid injection and production (SFIP) operations and the key operational parameters of SFIP impacting it. In addition we review the key potential sources for possible water contamination. Both in the case of IS and GC we propose modeling and data analysis methods to quantify the risk factors to be used for monitoring and risk reduction. SFIP include presents a risk in hydraulic fracturing, waste water injection, enhanced oil recovery as well as geothermal energy operations. Although a recent report (NRC 2012) documents that HF is not responsible for most of the induced seismicities, we primarily focus on HF here. We look into vaious operational parameters such as volume and rate of water injection, the direction of the well versus the natural fracture network, the depth of the target and the local stress field and fault system, as well as other geological features. The latter would determine the potential for triggering tectonic related events by small induced seismicity events. We provide the building blocks for IS risk assessment and monitoring. The system we propose will involve adequate layers of complexity based on mapped seismic attributes as well as results from ANN and probabilistic predictive modeling workflows. This leads to a set of guidelines which further defines 'safe operating conditions' and 'safe operating zones' which will be a valuable reference for future SFIP operations. We also illustrate how HF can lead to groundwater aquifer contamination. The source of aquifer contamination can be the hydrocarbon gas or the chemicals used in the injected liquid in the formation. We explore possible pathways of contamination within and discuss the likelihood of contamination from each source. Many of the chemical compounds used

  13. Hydraulic Tomography and High-Resolution Slug Testing to Determine Hydraulic Conductivity Distributions - Year 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    comparison of phase values from a numerical model, two homogeneous analytical solutions, and the spatially weighted raytrace average for three...investigating involves the spatially weighted raytracing method. For a given set of raypaths the path lengths through each zone must be computed only once

  14. Eddy current analysis of thin film recording heads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenton, D.; Cendes, Z. J.

    1984-03-01

    Due to inherently thin pole tips which enhance the sharpness of read/write pulses, thin-film magnetic recording heads provide a unique potential for increasing disk file capacity. However, the very feature of these heads which makes them attractive in the recording process, namely, their small size, also makes thin-film heads difficult to study experimentally. For this reason, a finite element simulation of the thin-film head has been developed to provide the magnetic field distribution and the resistance/inductance characteristics of these heads under a variety of conditions. A study based on a one-step multipath eddy current procedure is reported. This procedure may be used in thin film heads to compute the variation of magnetic field with respect to frequency. Computations with the IBM 3370 head show that a large phase shift occurs due to eddy currents in the frequency range 1-10 MHz.

  15. Study on Characteristics of Hydraulic Servo System for Force Control of Hydraulic Robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyo-gon; Han, Changsoo [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong-won [Korea University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sangdeok [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Because a hydraulic actuator has high power and force densities, this allows the weight of the robot's limbs to be reduced. This allows for good dynamic characteristics and high energy efficiency. Thus, hydraulic actuators are used in some exoskeleton robots and quadrupedal robots that require high torque. Force control is useful for robot compliance with a user or environment. However, force control of a hydraulic robot is difficult because a hydraulic servo system is highly nonlinear from a control perspective. In this study, a nonlinear model was used to develop a simulation program for a hydraulic servo system consisting of a servo valve, transmission lines, and a cylinder. The problems and considerations with regard to the force control performance for a hydraulic servo system were investigated. A force control method using the nonlinear model was proposed, and its effect was evaluated with the simulation program.

  16. Static and dynamic stress analyses of the prototype high head Francis runner based on site measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X.; Oram, C.; Sick, M.

    2014-03-01

    More efforts are put on hydro-power to balance voltage and frequency within seconds for primary control in modern smart grids. This requires hydraulic turbines to run at off-design conditions. especially at low load or speed-no load. Besides. the tendency of increasing power output and decreasing weight of the turbine runners has also led to the high level vibration problem of the runners. especially high head Francis runners. Therefore. it is important to carry out the static and dynamic stress analyses of prototype high head Francis runners. This paper investigates the static and dynamic stresses on the prototype high head Francis runner based on site measurements and numerical simulations. The site measurements are performed with pressure transducers and strain gauges. Based on the measured results. computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for the flow channel from stay vane to draft tube cone are performed. Static pressure distributions and dynamic pressure pulsations caused by rotor-stator interaction (RSI) are obtained under various operating conditions. With the CFD results. static and dynamic stresses on the runner at different operating points are calculated by means of the finite element method (FEM). The agreement between simulation and measurement is analysed with linear regression method. which indicates that the numerical result agrees well with that of measurement. Furthermore. the maximum static and dynamic stresses on the runner blade are obtained at various operating points. The relations of the maximum stresses and the power output are discussed in detail. The influences of the boundary conditions on the structural behaviour of the runner are also discussed.

  17. Water Hydraulic 2/2 Directional Valve with Plane Piston Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Yongjun; YANG Huayong; WANG Zuwen

    2009-01-01

    Due to the fire resistance and environmental compatibility, using water as the working fluid in hydraulic circuits is receiving an increasing attention by both manufactures and users. This hydraulic directional valve is developed. When new water hydraulic directional valve is designed and manufactured, this paper introduces a water hydraulic 2/2 directional valve and its principle. The valve is composed of a hydraulically operated seat valve and a magnetic 3/2 direction valve. Aimed at the serious leakage and impact generating easily in reversing suddenly, an improved structure of water space seal is changed to direct seal, compaction force between main valve spool and main valve pocket was logically designed and damper in pilot valve port is matched with sensitive cavity in main valve. From the view of flow control, the methods of cavitation resistance of the directional water hydraulic valve are investigated. The computational fluid dynamics approaches are applied to obtain static pressure distributions and cavitation images in the channel of the main stage of the valve with two kinds of structure. The results show that the method of optimized spout can effectively restrain cavitation. The work provides some useful reference for developing water hydraulic control valve with the Dower noise and lower vibration. Meantime, the structural parameters are optimized on the basis of information obtained from simulation. Static test, dynamic test and life test are accomplished, and the results show that the water hydraulic directional valve possesses good property, its pressure loss is 1.1 MPa lower, switching time is shorter than 0.025 s, and its strike crest is 0.8 MPa lower. The valve possess fine dynamic performance with the characteristic rapidly action and lower implusion.

  18. Evaluation of actual and estimated hydraulic conductivity of sands with different gradation and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabalar, Ali Firat; Akbulut, Nurullah

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of sands with different gradation and grain shape were estimated experimentally at a relative density (Dr) of about 40 % and a 22 ± 2 °C of constant temperature. Narli Sand (NS) with 0.67 of sphericity (S) and 0.72 of roundness (R), and Crushed Stone Sand (CSS) with 0.55 of S and 0.15 of R values were artificially graded into sixteen different grain-size fractions (4.75-2, 2-1.18, 1.18-0.6, 0.6-0.425, 0.425-0.3, 0.3-0.075, 4.75-0.075, 2-0.075, 1.18-0.075, 0.6-0.075, 0.425-0.075, 4.75-0.6, 2-0.6, 4.75-0.425, 2-0.425, 1.18-0.425 mm). Hydraulic conductivities of the NS estimated by use of constant head test ranged from 1.61 to 0.01 cm/s, whilst those of the CSS estimated by the same test ranged from 2.45 to 0.012 cm/s. It was observed that the hydraulic conductivity values of the NS are lower than those of the CSS samples, which is likely to be the result of differences in shape, particularly in R values. The results clearly demonstrated that the hydraulic conductivity can be significantly influenced by grading characteristics (d10, d20, d30, d50, d60, cu, cc, n, Io). Furthermore, comparisons between results obtained in the present study and hydraulic conductivity estimated with other formulas available in the literature were made. The comparisons indicated that the best estimation of hydraulic conductivity changes based on the gradation and shape properties of the sands tested.

  19. A fully-coupled geomechanics and flow model for hydraulic fracturing and reservoir engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charoenwongsa, S.; Kazemi, H.; Miskimins, J.; Fakcharoenphol [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2010-07-01

    A fully coupled geomechanics flow model was used to assess how the changes in pore pressure and temperature influence rock stresses in tight gas reservoirs. The finite difference method was used to develop simulations for phases, components, and thermal stresses. A wave component was used to model the propagation of the strain displacement front as well as changes in stress with time. Fluid and heat flow volumes were modelled separately from rock formation properties. The influence of hydraulic fracturing on stress distributions surrounding the fracture was investigated as well as the effect of filter cake and filtrate. Results of the study showed that significant changes in shear stresses near hydraulic fractures occur as a result of hydraulic fracture face displacement perpendicular to the fracture face. While temperature effects also caused changes in stress distributions, changes in pore pressure did not significantly impact shear stresses as the filtrate did not travel very far into the reservoir. 17 refs., 17 figs.

  20. Development of coupled neutronics/thermal–hydraulics test case for HPLWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, P.; Gamtsemlidze, I. D.; Bahdanovich, R. B.; Nikonov, S. P.; Smirnov, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    The High-Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is the European concept of a supercritical water reactor (SCWR) which is one of the most promising and innovative designs of the Generation IV nuclear reactor concepts. The thermal–hydraulics behavior of supercritical water is significantly different from water at sub-critical pressure because of the difference in the specific heat value. Coupled analysis of HPLWR assembly neutronics and thermal–hydraulics has become important because of the strong influence of the water density on the neutron spectrum and power distribution. Programs MCU (Monte-Carlo Universal) and ATHLET (Analysis of Thermal-hydraulics of Leaks and Transients) were used for better estimation of power and temperature distribution in HPLWR assembly.

  1. Gas diffusion-derived tortuosity governs saturated hydraulic conductivity in sandy soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masis Melendez, Federico; Deepagoda Thuduwe Kankanamge Kelum, Chamindu; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen

    2014-01-01

    Accurate prediction of saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) is essential for the development of better distributed hydrological models and area-differentiated risk assessment of chemical leaching. The saturated hydraulic conductivity is often estimated from basic soil properties such as particle...... size distribution or, more recently, soil-air permeability. However, similar links to soil gas diffusivity (Dp/Do) have not been fully explored even though gas diffusivity is a direct measure of connectivity and tortuosity of the soil pore network. Based on measurements for a coarse sandy soil....../Do model to measured data, and subsequently linked to the cementation exponent of the wellestablished Revil and Cathles predictive model for saturated hydraulic conductivity. Furthermore, a two-parameter model, analogue to the Kozeny-Carman equation, was developed for the Ksat - Dp/Do relationships. All 44...

  2. Depth-discrete specific storage in fractured sedimentary rock using steady-state and transient single-hole hydraulic tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Patryk M.; Cherry, John A.; Parker, Beth L.

    2016-11-01

    A method is presented for obtaining depth-discrete values of specific storage (Ss) from single-hole hydraulic tests in fractured rock boreholes using straddle packers (1.5-17 m test intervals). Low flow constant head (CH) step tests analyzed using the Thiem method provide transmissivity (T) values free from non-Darcian error. Short-term, constant-rate pumping tests (0.5-2 h) analyzed using the Cooper-Jacob approximation of the Theis method provide S from the hydraulic diffusivity using the Darcian T value from the CH step test. This synergistic use of two types of hydraulic tests avoids the common source of error when pumping tests (injection or withdrawal) are conducted at higher flow rates and thereby induce non-Darcian flow resulting in the underestimation of T. Other errors, such as well bore storage and leakage, can also substantially influence S by causing a shift in the time axis of the Cooper-Jacob semi-log plot. In this approach, the Darcian T values from the CH step tests are used in the analysis of the transient pumping test data for calculating S throughout the pumping test using the Cooper-Jacob approximation to minimize all of the aforementioned errors, resulting in more representative S values. The effect of these non-idealities on the measured drawdown is illustrated using the Theis equation with the Darcian T and S values to calculate drawdown for comparison to measured data. The Ss values for tests in sandstone obtained from this approach are more consistent with confined aquifer conditions than values derived from the traditional Cooper-Jacob method, and are within the range of field and lab values presented from a compilation of literature values for fractured sandstone. (10-7-10-5 m-1) This method for obtaining Ss values from short-interval, straddle packer tests improves the estimation of both K and Ss and provides opportunity to study their spatial distribution in fractured rock.

  3. Parallel Simulation of 3-D Turbulent Flow Through Hydraulic Machinery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐宇; 吴玉林

    2003-01-01

    Parallel calculational methods were used to analyze incompressible turbulent flow through hydraulic machinery. Two parallel methods were used to simulate the complex flow field. The space decomposition method divides the computational domain into several sub-ranges. Parallel discrete event simulation divides the whole task into several parts according to their functions. The simulation results were compared with the serial simulation results and particle image velocimetry (PIV) experimental results. The results give the distribution and configuration of the complex vortices and illustrate the effectiveness of the parallel algorithms for numerical simulation of turbulent flows.

  4. Steady thermal hydraulic analysis for a molten salt reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Dalin; QIU Suizheng; LIU Changliang; SU Guanghui

    2008-01-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) can meet the demand of transmutation and breeding. In this study, theoretical calculation of steady thermal hydraulic characteristics of a graphite-moderated channel type MSR is conducted. The DRAGON code is adopted to calculate the axial and radial power factor firstly. The flow and heat transfer model in the fuel salt and graphite are developed on basis of the fundamental mass, momentum and energy equations. The results show the detailed flow distribution in the core, and the temperature profiles of the fuel salt, inner and outer wall in the nine typical elements along the axial flow direction are also obtained.

  5. Three dimensional neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled simulation of MSR in steady state condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jianjun; Wang, Chenglong [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); An, Hongzhen [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center, Ministry of Environmental Protection of the People' s Republic of China, Beijing 100082 (China); Zhang, Daling, E-mail: dlzhang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Qiu, Suizheng; Su, Guanghui; Tian, Wenxi; Wu, Yingwei [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Developed a three dimensional coupled code for MSR. • Investigated the neutron distribution and thermal-hydraulic characters of the core under steady state condition. • Analyzed the influence of inlet temperature and inlet velocity to thermal-hydraulics characteristics of the reactor. - Abstract: MSR (molten salt reactor) uses liquid molten salt as the coolant and fuel solvent, making it the only liquid reactor among the six generation IV reactor types. As a liquid reactor the physical properties of the reactor are significantly influenced by the fuel salt flow therefore conventional analysis methods applied in solid fuel reactors are not applicable for this type of reactors. The present work developed a three dimensional neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled code and applied it to investigate the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the core in steady state condition based on neutron diffusion theory and numerical heat transfer. The code consists of two group neutron diffusion equations for fast and thermal neutron fluxes and six group balance equations for delayed neutron precursors. The temperature distribution, neutron fluxes and delayed neutron precursors distribution of the core in steady state conditions was studied, and the result analyzed when inlet temperature and velocity were changed. From simulation it was found that the inlet temperature has little influence to neutron distribution however inlet velocity affects the delayed neutron distribution in steady state condition. The results provide some valuable information in design and research of this kind of reactor.

  6. Parker Hybrid Hydraulic Drivetrain Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collett, Raymond [Parker-Hannifin Corporation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Howland, James [Parker-Hannifin Corporation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Venkiteswaran, Prasad [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2014-03-31

    This report examines the benefits of Parker Hannifin hydraulic hybrid brake energy recovery systems used in commercial applications for vocational purposes. A detailed background on the problem statement being addressed as well as the solution set specific for parcel delivery will be provided. Objectives of the demonstration performed in high start & stop applications included opportunities in fuel usage reduction, emissions reduction, vehicle productivity, and vehicle maintenance. Completed findings during the demonstration period and parallel investigations with NREL, CALSTART, along with a literature review will be provided herein on this research area. Lastly, results identified in the study by third parties validated the savings potential in fuel reduction of on average of 19% to 52% over the baseline in terms of mpg (Lammert, 2014, p11), Parker data for parcel delivery vehicles in the field parallels this at a range of 35% - 50%, emissions reduction of 17.4% lower CO2 per mile and 30.4% lower NOx per mile (Gallo, 2014, p15), with maintenance improvement in the areas of brake and starter replacement, while leaving room for further study in the area of productivity in terms of specific metrics that can be applied and studied.

  7. Thermal hydraulics development for CASL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowrie, Robert B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-07

    This talk will describe the technical direction of the Thermal-Hydraulics (T-H) Project within the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Department of Energy Innovation Hub. CASL is focused on developing a 'virtual reactor', that will simulate the physical processes that occur within a light-water reactor. These simulations will address several challenge problems, defined by laboratory, university, and industrial partners that make up CASL. CASL's T-H efforts are encompassed in two sub-projects: (1) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), (2) Interface Treatment Methods (ITM). The CFD subproject will develop non-proprietary, scalable, verified and validated macroscale CFD simulation tools. These tools typically require closures for their turbulence and boiling models, which will be provided by the ITM sub-project, via experiments and microscale (such as DNS) simulation results. The near-term milestones and longer term plans of these two sub-projects will be discussed.

  8. Effects of the hydraulic conductivity microstructure on macrodispersivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Dato, Mariaines; de Barros, Felipe P. J.; Fiori, Aldo; Bellin, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Heterogeneity of the hydraulic properties is one of the main causes of the seemingly random distribution of solute concentration observed in contaminated aquifers, with macrodispersivity providing a global measure of spreading. Earlier studies on transport of solutes in heterogeneous formations, either theoretical or numerical, expressed dispersivity as a function of the geostatistical properties of the hydraulic conductivity K. In most cases, K follows a second-order statistical characterization, which may not be adequate when heterogeneity is high. In this work, we adopt the Multi-Indicator Model-Self Consistent Approach (MIMSCA) to compute the longitudinal and transverse macrodispersivity. This methodology enables to model the K field by using geological inclusions of different shapes and orientation (defined here as the microstructure), while replicating the heterogeneous macrostructure obtained by the second-order statistics. The above scheme attempts to reproduce the effect on macrodispersion of different distribution and orientation of local facies, and for instance it may represent the orientation and spatial features of the layers that are often observed in aquifers. The relevant impact of the microstructure on effective conductivity, longitudinal and transverse macrodispersivities is analyzed and discussed, for both binary and lognormally distributed K fields.

  9. Transputer Control of Hydraulic Actuators and Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conrad, Finn

    1996-01-01

    Results from a Danish mechatronics research program entitled IMCIA - Intelligent Control and Intelligent Actuators. The objective is development of intelligent actuators for intelligent motion control. A mechatronics test facility with a transputer controlled hydraulic robot suiteable for real...

  10. Concept Evaluation for Hydraulic Yaw System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkier, Søren; Pedersen, Henrik C.; Andersen, Torben Ole

    2013-01-01

    a suspension system on a car, leading the loads away from the turbine structure. However, to realize a soft hydraulic yaw system a new design concept must be found. As a part of the development of the new concept a preliminary concept evaluation has been conducted, evaluating seven different hydraulic yaw...... concepts, ranging from a one-to-one copy of the electrical drive (electrical drives replaced by hydraulic dittos), to floating suspension systems mounted on hydraulic cylinders. Rough calculations of size and consequences of the different systems are presented ending up with the final concept for further...... investigation. Loads and yaw demands are based on the IEC 61400-1 standard for wind turbine design, and the loads for this examination are extrapolated from the HAWC2 aeroelastic design code. The concepts are based on a 5 MW off-shore turbine....

  11. HYDRAULICS, Des Moines COUNTY, IOWA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydraulic data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydrologic procedures for estimating flood discharges for a flood insurance...

  12. ON THE THEORIES OF HYDRAULIC GEOMETRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vijay P. SINGH

    2003-01-01

    Hydraulic geometry is of fundamental importance in planning, design, and management of river engineering and training works. Although some concepts of hydraulic geometry were proposed toward the end of the nineteenth century, the real impetus toward formulating a theory of hydraulic geometry was provided by the work of Leopold and Maddock (1953). A number of theories have since been proposed.Some of the theories are interrelated but others are based on quite different principles. All theories,however, assume that the river flow is steady and uniform and the river tends to attain a state of equilibrium or quasi-equilibrium. The differences are due to the differences in hydraulic mechanisms that the theories employ to explain the attainment of equilibrium by the river.

  13. Stream restoration hydraulic design course: lecture notes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newbury, R

    2002-01-01

    Steam restoration encompasses a broad range of activities and disciplines. This lecture series is designed for practitioners who must fit habitat improvement works in the hydraulics of degraded channels...

  14. Drawing a pictogram operator - hydraulic stowing assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bukhgol' ts, V.P.; Dinershtein, V.A.

    1984-11-01

    Hydraulic stowing is widely used during the extraction of coal from seams prone to spontaneous ignition or from seams situated under preserved structures. Experience has shown that the presence of a considerable number of controlling and measuring devices on hydraulic stowing assemblies results in erratic operations. The authors, after examining the controls of the hydraulic stowing complexes, recommend that all functions which the operator might perform badly or not at all should be controlled automatically. The operator must, however, have access to manual controls which should be included in the system in order to achieve an effective and trouble free operation. The authors propose a pictogram to explain the relationship between the human operator and the hydraulic complex, based on structural diagrams. The system developed, which was tried out at the Koksovaya mine, increased the efficiency of the complex and reduced the work load of the operator. 3 references.

  15. HYDRAULICS, Des Moines COUNTY, IOWA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydraulic data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydrologic procedures for estimating flood discharges for a flood insurance...

  16. Hydraulic fracturing chemicals and fluids technology

    CERN Document Server

    Fink, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    When classifying fracturing fluids and their additives, it is important that production, operation, and completion engineers understand which chemical should be utilized in different well environments. A user's guide to the many chemicals and chemical additives used in hydraulic fracturing operations, Hydraulic Fracturing Chemicals and Fluids Technology provides an easy-to-use manual to create fluid formulations that will meet project-specific needs while protecting the environment and the life of the well. Fink creates a concise and comprehensive reference that enables the engineer to logically select and use the appropriate chemicals on any hydraulic fracturing job. The first book devoted entirely to hydraulic fracturing chemicals, Fink eliminates the guesswork so the engineer can select the best chemicals needed on the job while providing the best protection for the well, workers and environment. Pinpoints the specific compounds used in any given fracturing operation Provides a systematic approach to class...

  17. Transputer Control of Hydraulic Actuators and Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conrad, Finn

    1996-01-01

    Results from a Danish mechatronics research program entitled IMCIA - Intelligent Control and Intelligent Actuators. The objective is development of intelligent actuators for intelligent motion control. A mechatronics test facility with a transputer controlled hydraulic robot suiteable for real...

  18. Is inversion based high resolution characterization of spatially heterogeneous river bed hydraulic conductivity needed and possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Kurtz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available River-aquifer exchange fluxes influence local and regional water balances and affect groundwater and river water quality and quantity. Unfortunately, river-aquifer exchange fluxes tend to be strongly spatially variable and it is an open research question to which degree river bed heterogeneity has to be represented in a~model in order to achieve reliable estimates of river-aquifer exchange fluxes. This research question is addressed in this paper with help of synthetic simulation experiments, which mimic the Limmat aquifer in Zurich (Switzerland, where river-aquifer exchange fluxes and groundwater management activities play an important role. The solution of the unsaturated-saturated subsurface hydrological flow problem including river-aquifer interaction is calculated for ten different synthetic realities where the strongly heterogeneous river bed hydraulic conductivities (L are perfectly known. Hydraulic head data (100 in the default scenario are sampled from the synthetic realities. In subsequent data assimilation experiments, where L is unknown now, the hydraulic head data are used as conditioning information, with help of the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF. For each of the ten synthetic realities, four different ensembles of L are tested in the experiments with EnKF; one ensemble estimates high resolution L-fields with different L values for each element, and the other three ensembles estimate effective L values for 5, 3 or 2 zones. The calibration of higher resolution L-fields (i.e., fully heterogeneous or 5 zones gives better results than the calibration of L for only 3 or 2 zones in terms of reproduction of states, stream-aquifer exchange fluxes and parameters. Effective L for a limited number of zones cannot always reproduce the true states and fluxes well and results in biased estimates of net exchange fluxes between aquifer and stream. Also in case only 10 head data are used for conditioning, the high resolution L-fields outperform the

  19. 46 CFR 112.50-3 - Hydraulic starting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydraulic starting. 112.50-3 Section 112.50-3 Shipping... POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Diesel and Gas Turbine Engine Driven Generator Sets § 112.50-3 Hydraulic starting. A hydraulic starting system must meet the following: (a) The hydraulic starting system must be...

  20. 21 CFR 870.2780 - Hydraulic, pneumatic, or photoelectric plethysmographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydraulic, pneumatic, or photoelectric... § 870.2780 Hydraulic, pneumatic, or photoelectric plethysmographs. (a) Identification. A hydraulic... using hydraulic, pneumatic, or photoelectric measurement techniques. (b) Classification. Class...