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Sample records for hydration dependent deformation

  1. Nanostructural Deformation Analysis of Calcium Silicate Hydrate in Portland Cement Paste by Atomic Pair Distribution Function

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Bae, Sungchul; Kanematsu, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    The deformation of nanostructure of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) in Portland cement (PC) paste under compression was characterized by the atomic pair distribution function (PDF), measured using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The PDF of the PC paste exhibited a unique deformation behavior for a short-range order below 2.0 nm, close to the size of the C-S-H globule, while the deformation for a long-range order was similar to that of a calcium hydroxide phase measured by Bragg peak shift. Th...

  2. Constitutive model with time-dependent deformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette

    1998-01-01

    In many geological and Engineering problems it is necessary to transform information from one scale to another. Data collected at laboratory scale are often used to evaluate field problems on a much larger scale. This is certainly true for geological problems where extreme scale differences...... are common in time as well as size. This problem is adressed by means of a new constitutive model for soils. It is able to describe the behavior of soils at different deformation rates. The model defines time-dependent and stress-related deformations separately. They are related to each other and they occur...... simultanelously. The model is based on concepts from elasticity and viscoplasticity theories. In addition to Hooke's law for the elastic behavior, the framework for the viscoplastic behavior consists, in the general case (two-dimensional or three-dimensional), of a yield surface, an associated flow rule...

  3. Nanostructural Deformation Analysis of Calcium Silicate Hydrate in Portland Cement Paste by Atomic Pair Distribution Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Suzuki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The deformation of nanostructure of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H in Portland cement (PC paste under compression was characterized by the atomic pair distribution function (PDF, measured using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The PDF of the PC paste exhibited a unique deformation behavior for a short-range order below 2.0 nm, close to the size of the C-S-H globule, while the deformation for a long-range order was similar to that of a calcium hydroxide phase measured by Bragg peak shift. The compressive deformation of the C-S-H nanostructure was comprised of three stages with different interactions between globules. This behavior would originate from the granular nature of C-S-H, which deforms with increasing packing density by slipping the interfaces between globules, rearranging the overall C-S-H nanostructure. This new approach will lead to increasing applications of the PDF technique to understand the deformation mechanism of C-S-H in PC-based materials.

  4. View-Dependent Streamline Deformation and Exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Xin; Edwards, John; Chen, Chun-Ming; Shen, Han-Wei; Johnson, Chris R.; Wong, Pak Chung

    2016-07-01

    Occlusion presents a major challenge in visualizing 3D flow and tensor fields using streamlines. Displaying too many streamlines creates a dense visualization filled with occluded structures, but displaying too few streams risks losing important features. We propose a new streamline exploration approach by visually manipulating the cluttered streamlines by pulling visible layers apart and revealing the hidden structures underneath. This paper presents a customized view-dependent deformation algorithm and an interactive visualization tool to minimize visual cluttering for visualizing 3D vector and tensor fields. The algorithm is able to maintain the overall integrity of the fields and expose previously hidden structures. Our system supports both mouse and direct-touch interactions to manipulate the viewing perspectives and visualize the streamlines in depth. By using a lens metaphor of different shapes to select the transition zone of the targeted area interactively, the users can move their focus and examine the vector or tensor field freely.

  5. Temperature dependence of optically induced cell deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Anatol; Kiessling, Tobias R.; Stange, Roland; Kaes, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of any material change with temperature, hence this must be true for cellular material. In biology many functions are known to undergo modulations with temperature, like myosin motor activity, mechanical properties of actin filament solutions, CO2 uptake of cultured cells or sex determination of several species. As mechanical properties of living cells are considered to play an important role in many cell functions it is surprising that only little is known on how the rheology of single cells is affected by temperature. We report the systematic temperature dependence of single cell deformations in Optical Stretcher (OS) measurements. The temperature is changed on a scale of about 20 minutes up to hours and compared to defined temperature shocks in the range of milliseconds. Thereby, a strong temperature dependence of the mechanics of single suspended cells is revealed. We conclude that the observable differences arise rather from viscosity changes of the cytosol than from structural changes of the cytoskeleton. These findings have implications for the interpretation of many rheological measurements, especially for laser based approaches in biological studies.

  6. Grain orientation dependence of deformation twinning in pure Cu subjected to dynamic plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, C.S.; Tao, N.R.; Lu, K.

    2009-01-01

    A clear grain orientation dependence of deformation twinning has been identified in coarse-grained copper subjected to dynamic plastic deformation. Deformation twins tend to occur in grains with orientations near the [0 0 1] corner but not in grains near the [1 0 1] corner, which can be explained...

  7. Particle-Dependent Deformations of Lorentz Symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Amelino-Camelia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available I report results suggesting that it is possible to introduce laws of relativistic kinematics endowing different types of particles with suitably different deformed-Lorentz-symmetry properties. I also consider some possible applications of these results, among which I highlight those relevant for addressing a long-standing challenge in the description of composite particles, such as atoms, within quantum-gravity-inspired scenarios with Planck-scale deformations of Lorentz symmetry. Some of the new elements here introduced in the formulation of relativistic kinematics appear to also provide the starting point for the development of a correspondingly novel mathematical formulation of spacetime-symmetry algebras.

  8. Influence of Hydrated Lime on the Properties and Permanent Deformation of the Asphalt Concrete Layers in Pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Tameemi Ahmed F.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Flexible or asphalt concrete pavement is the paving system most widely adopted all over the world. It has been recognized that there are many different types of the factors affecting the performance and durability of asphalt concrete pavement, including the service conditions, such as: the variation of temperature from mild to extremes and the repeated excessive axle loading as well as the inadequate quality of the raw materials. All of these when combined together are going to accelerate the occurrence of distresses in flexible pavement such as permanent deformation and fatigue cracking. As the result, there has an urgent need to enhance the ability of asphalt concrete mixture to resist distresses happened in pavement. Use of additives is one of the techniques adopted to improve pavement properties. It has been found that hydrated lime might be one of the effective additives because it is widely available and relatively cheap compared to other modifiers like polymers. This paper presents an experimental study of the hydrated-lime modified asphalt concrete mixtures. Five different percentages of the hydrated lime additive were investigated, namely (1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 and 3 percent. The hydrated lime additive was used as partial replacement of limestone filler by total weight of the aggregate. The designed Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA concretes are for the application of three pavement courses, i.e. Surface, Leveling and Base. These mixtures are designed and tested following Marshall procedure and uniaxial repeated loading to evaluate permanent deformation at different temperatures of 20°C, 40°C and 60°C. The experimental results show that the addition of hydrated lime as a partial replacement of ordinary limestone mineral filler results a significant improvement on mechanical properties and the resistant to permanent deformation of the designed asphalt concrete mixtures.

  9. Localization in inelastic rate dependent shearing deformations

    KAUST Repository

    Katsaounis, Theodoros

    2016-09-18

    Metals deformed at high strain rates can exhibit failure through formation of shear bands, a phenomenon often attributed to Hadamard instability and localization of the strain into an emerging coherent structure. We verify formation of shear bands for a nonlinear model exhibiting strain softening and strain rate sensitivity. The effects of strain softening and strain rate sensitivity are first assessed by linearized analysis, indicating that the combined effect leads to Turing instability. For the nonlinear model a class of self-similar solutions is constructed, that depicts a coherent localizing structure and the formation of a shear band. This solution is associated to a heteroclinic orbit of a dynamical system. The orbit is constructed numerically and yields explicit shear localizing solutions. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  10. Physico-chemical characterization of the temperature dependent hydration kinetics of Gleditsia sinensis gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Hong-Lei; Lin, Xue-Jiao; Zhang, Wei-Ming; Sun, Da-Feng; Jiang, Jian-Xin

    2013-11-01

    The physico-chemical properties and hydration kinetics of Gleditsia sinensis gum were investigated to evaluate its temperature dependence. The increase of temperature resulted in improved solubility of G. sinensis gum, and the dissolved galactomannan showed decreased degree of galactose substitution (DSGal) and increased molecular weight (p0.96), and the hydration index t0.8 at different temperatures varied in the range of 51-302 min. It was found that galactomannan with low DSGal and high molecular weight exhibited slow hydration rate and poor solubility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Temperature- and pressure-dependent structural transformation of methane hydrates in salt environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Donghoon; Cha, Minjun; Yang, Youjeong; Choi, Seunghyun; Woo, Yesol; Lee, Jong-Won; Ahn, Docheon; Im, Junhyuck; Lee, Yongjae; Han, Oc Hee; Yoon, Ji-Ho

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the stability of volatile species and their compounds under various surface and subsurface conditions is of great importance in gaining insights into the formation and evolution of planetary and satellite bodies. We report the experimental results of the temperature- and pressure-dependent structural transformation of methane hydrates in salt environments using in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, and Raman spectroscopy. We find that under pressurized and concentrated brine solutions methane hydrate forms a mixture of type I clathrate hydrate, ice, and hydrated salts. Under a low-pressure condition, however, the methane hydrates are decomposed through a rapid sublimation of water molecules from the surface of hydrate crystals, while NaCl · 2H2O undergoes a phase transition into a crystal growth of NaCl via the migration of salt ions. In ambient pressure conditions, the methane hydrate is fully decomposed in brine solutions at temperatures above 252 K, the eutectic point of NaCl · 2H2O.

  12. Hydration, hydration, hydration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miller, Veronica S; Bates, Graham P

    2010-01-01

    .... Although the importance of adequate hydration in combating heat stress is universally recognized, studies in a range of worker groups have demonstrated a disturbingly poor hydration level in a high...

  13. Temperature-dependent VNIR spectroscopy of hydrated Na-carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Federico; Carli, Cristian; De Angelis, Simone; Beck, Pierre; Brissaud, Olivier; Schmitt, Bernard; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Piccioni, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    The surfaces of the Galilean icy satellites Europa, Ganymede and Callisto, dominated by water ice, also show substantial amounts of non-water-ice compounds. These satellites will be the subject of close exploration by the ESA JUICE mission and the NASA Europa Multiple-Flyby Mission, which will focus on Ganymede and Europa, respectively. Among non-water-ice compounds thought to exist on the surfaces of the Jovian icy satellites, hydrated salt minerals have been proposed to exist as a by-product of endogenic processes. Safe detection of these minerals shall rely on laboratory spectroscopic analysis of these materials carried out under appropriate environmental conditions. Here we report on laboratory measurements, carried out in the framework of a Europlanet Transnational Access (TA) 2020 proposal approved in 2016, on two hydrated sodium carbonates, namely sodium carbonate monohydrate (Na2CO3·1H2O) and sodium carbonate decahydrate (Na2CO3·10H2O). Spectral profiles of these compounds were obtained in the visible and near-infrared (VNIR) spectral domain, taking advantage of the Cold Surfaces spectroscopy facility at the Institut de Planétologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG), where such compounds can be measured under cryogenic conditions indicative of real planetary surfaces. Carbonates were first sieved so as to separate them in three different grain size ranges: 20-50 μm, 75-100 μm, and 125-150 μm. These grain sizes have been chosen to: (1) be indicative of typical regoliths known or expected to exist on the surface of the icy satellites, and (2) avoid overlapping between ranges, therefore minimizing particles contamination among the dimensional classes. Each grain size was then measured with the Spectro-Gonio-Radiometer facility in the overall 0.5-4.0 μm spectral range, with spectral sampling increasing with increasing wavelength. For each sample, the overall 93-279 K temperature ramp was acquired in 11 steps varying from 10 K to 25 K, imposed by time

  14. Bohr Hamiltonian with deformation-dependent mass term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonatsos, Dennis, E-mail: bonat@inp.demokritos.g [Institute of Nuclear Physics, N.C.S.R. ' Demokritos' , GR-15310 Aghia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Georgoudis, P.; Lenis, D. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, N.C.S.R. ' Demokritos' , GR-15310 Aghia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Minkov, N. [Institute of Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigrad Road, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Quesne, C. [Physique Nucleaire Theorique et Physique Mathematique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus de la Plaine CP229, Boulevard du Triomphe, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-01-25

    The Bohr Hamiltonian describing the collective motion of atomic nuclei is modified by allowing the mass to depend on the nuclear deformation. Exact analytical expressions are derived for spectra and wave functions in the case of a gamma-unstable Davidson potential, using techniques of supersymmetric quantum mechanics. Numerical results in the Xe-Ba region are discussed.

  15. Orientation dependence of the deformation microstructure in compressed aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, G.M.; Godfrey, A.; Hong, Chuanshi

    2012-01-01

    The orientation dependence of the deformation microstructure has been investigated in aluminum compressed to 20% reduction. The dislocation boundaries formed can be classified, as for tension, into one of three types: dislocation cells (Type 2), and extended planar boundaries near (Type 1) or not...

  16. Speed and Strain of Polypyrrole Actuators: Dependence on Cation Hydration Number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jafeen, Mohamed J.M.; Careem, Mohamed A.; Skaarup, Steen

    2010-01-01

    Polypyrrole films have been characterized by simultaneous cyclic voltammetry driven force-displacement measurements. The aim was to clarify the role of cations in the electrolyte on the speed of response and on the strain of the film. The strain as a function of actuation frequency was studied in...... frequencies, the strain depends almost exclusively on insertion of strongly solvated cations and therefore depends on the hydration number of the cations: Li+ (hydration number ~5.4) gives more strain than Na+ (~4.4) and much more than Cs+ (~0) as predicted by the model....

  17. Stiffening effects of riboflavin/UVA corneal collagen cross-linking is hydration dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatami-Marbini, H; Rahimi, A

    2015-04-13

    The collagen cross-linking is a relatively new treatment option for strengthening the cornea, delaying, and in some cases stopping the progression of keratoconus. The uniaxial tensile experiments are among the most commonly used techniques to assess the effectiveness of this therapeutic option in enhancing tensile properties. In the present study, we investigated the possible effects of hydration on stiffening effects of corneal collagen cross-linking procedure, as measured by the uniaxial tensile testing method. For this purpose, after cross-linking bovine corneas, we let the strips to dehydrate in air or swell in a solution until their thickness reached an average thickness of 0.5, 0.7, 0.9, 1.1, and 1.5 mm. Using thickness as a representative of hydration, we divided corneal strips into five different groups and measured their stress-strain behavior by conducting uniaxial tensile experiments in mineral oil. It was observed that the collagen cross-linking treatment and hydration together affect the tensile behavior of the bovine cornea. While corneal collagen cross-linking resulted in a significant increase in the tensile stress-strain response of each thickness group (Pcollagen cross-linked samples showed a significantly stiffer response (Pcollagen cross-linked bovine cornea at different levels of hydration. The results of the present research confirmed that the amount of mechanical stiffening of the corneal collagen cross-linking, as measured by uniaxial tensile testing, strongly depends on the hydration. Therefore, it is concluded that uniaxial tensile experiments could only be used to assess stiffening effects of the collagen cross-linking treatment if the hydration of specimens is fully controlled. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A finite element implementation for biphasic contact of hydrated porous media under finite deformation and sliding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongqiang; Shah, Mitul; Spilker, Robert L

    2014-03-01

    The study of biphasic soft tissue contact is fundamental to understand the biomechanical behavior of human diarthrodial joints. However, to date, only few biphasic finite element contact analyses for three-dimensional physiological geometries under finite deformation have been developed. The objective of this article is to develop a hyperelastic biphasic contact implementation for finite deformation and sliding problem. An augmented Lagrangian method was used to enforce the continuity of contact traction and fluid pressure across the contact interface. The finite element implementation was based on a general purpose software, COMSOL Multiphysics. The accuracy of the implementation is verified using example problems, for which solutions are available by alternative analyses. The implementation was proven to be robust and able to handle finite deformation and sliding.

  19. Hydration-dependent dynamics of human telomeric oligonucleotides in the picosecond timescale: A neutron scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiani, F.; Longo, M.; Orecchini, A.; Comez, L.; De Francesco, A.; Muthmann, M.; Teixeira, S. C. M.; Petrillo, C.; Sacchetti, F.; Paciaroni, A.

    2015-07-01

    The dynamics of the human oligonucleotide AG3(T2AG3)3 has been investigated by incoherent neutron scattering in the sub-nanosecond timescale. A hydration-dependent dynamical activation of thermal fluctuations in weakly hydrated samples was found, similar to that of protein powders. The amplitudes of such thermal fluctuations were evaluated in two different exchanged wave-vector ranges, so as to single out the different contributions from intra- and inter-nucleotide dynamics. The activation energy was calculated from the temperature-dependent characteristic times of the corresponding dynamical processes. The trends of both amplitudes and activation energies support a picture where oligonucleotides possess a larger conformational flexibility than long DNA sequences. This additional flexibility, which likely results from a significant relative chain-end contribution to the average chain dynamics, could be related to the strong structural polymorphism of the investigated oligonucleotides.

  20. Hydration-dependent dynamics of human telomeric oligonucleotides in the picosecond timescale: A neutron scattering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastiani, F.; Comez, L.; Sacchetti, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); CNR, Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Unità di Perugia, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Longo, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Elettra—Sincrotrone Trieste, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Orecchini, A.; Petrillo, C.; Paciaroni, A., E-mail: alessandro.paciaroni@fisica.unipg.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); De Francesco, A. [CNR-IOM OGG c/o Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS20156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Muthmann, M. [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Outstation at Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum, Lichtenbergstrasse 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Teixeira, S. C. M. [EPSAM, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Institut Laue–Langevin, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS20156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2015-07-07

    The dynamics of the human oligonucleotide AG{sub 3}(T{sub 2}AG{sub 3}){sub 3} has been investigated by incoherent neutron scattering in the sub-nanosecond timescale. A hydration-dependent dynamical activation of thermal fluctuations in weakly hydrated samples was found, similar to that of protein powders. The amplitudes of such thermal fluctuations were evaluated in two different exchanged wave-vector ranges, so as to single out the different contributions from intra- and inter-nucleotide dynamics. The activation energy was calculated from the temperature-dependent characteristic times of the corresponding dynamical processes. The trends of both amplitudes and activation energies support a picture where oligonucleotides possess a larger conformational flexibility than long DNA sequences. This additional flexibility, which likely results from a significant relative chain-end contribution to the average chain dynamics, could be related to the strong structural polymorphism of the investigated oligonucleotides.

  1. Physical properties of hydrated tissue determined by surface interferometry of laser-induced thermoelastic deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dark, Marta L.; Perelman, Lev T.; Itzkan, Irving; Schaffer, Jonathan L.; Feld, Michael S.

    2000-02-01

    Knee meniscus is a hydrated tissue; it is a fibrocartilage of the knee joint composed primarily of water. We present results of interferometric surface monitoring by which we measure physical properties of human knee meniscal cartilage. The physical response of biological tissue to a short laser pulse is primarily thermomechanical. When the pulse is shorter than characteristic times (thermal diffusion time and acoustic relaxation time) stresses build and propagate as acoustic waves in the tissue. The tissue responds to the laser-induced stress by thermoelastic expansion. Solving the thermoelastic wave equation numerically predicts the correct laser-induced expansion. By comparing theory with experimental data, we can obtain the longitudinal speed of sound, the effective optical penetration depth and the Grüneisen coefficient. This study yields information about the laser-tissue interaction and determines properties of the meniscus samples that could be used as diagnostic parameters.

  2. Deformation and hydration state of the lithospheric mantle beneath the Styrian Basin (Pannonian Basin, Eastern Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradi, L. E.; Hidas, K.; Kovács, I. J.; Klébesz, R.; Szabo, C.

    2016-12-01

    In the Carpathian-Pannonian Region, Neogene alkali basaltic volcanism occurred in six volcanic fields, from which the Styrian Basin Volcanic Field (SBVF) is the westernmost one. In this study, we present new petrographic and crystal preferred orientation (CPO) data, and structural hydroxyl ("water") contents of upper mantle xenoliths from 12 volcanic outcrops across the SBVF. The studied xenoliths are mostly coarse granular lherzolites, amphiboles are present in almost every sample and often replace pyroxenes and spinels. The peridotites are highly annealed, olivines and pyroxenes do not show significant amount of intragranular deformation. Despite the annealed texture of the peridotites, olivine CPO is unambiguous, and varies between [010]-fiber, orthogonal and [100]-fiber symmetry. The CPO of pyroxenes is coherent with coeval deformation with olivine, showing [100]OL distributed subparallel to [001]OPX. The CPO of amphiboles suggest postkinematic epitaxial overgrowth on the precursor pyroxenes. The "water" content of the studied xenoliths exhibit rather high values, up to 10, 290 and 675 ppm in olivine, ortho- and clinopyroxene, respectively. Ortho- and clinopyroxene pairs show equilibrium in all samples, however "water" loss in olivines is observed in several xenoliths. The xenoliths show equilibrium temperatures from 850 to 1100 °C, which corresponds to lithospheric mantle depths between 30 and 60 km. Equilibrium temperatures show correlation with the varying CPO symmetries and grain size: coarser grained xenoliths with [100]-fiber and orthorhombic symmetry appear in the high temperature (>1000 °C) xenoliths, which is characteristic for asthenospheric origin. Most of the samples display transitional CPO symmetry between [010]-fiber and orthogonal, which indicate extensive lithospheric deformation under varying stress field from transtensional to transpressional settings. Based on the estimated seismic properties of the studied samples, a significant part of

  3. Confocal spectroscopic imaging measurements of depth dependent hydration dynamics in human skin in-vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, P.; Hashemi, M.; Hoppe, S.; Wessel, S.; Hagens, R.; Jaspers, S.; Wenck, H.; Rübhausen, M.

    2017-11-01

    We present confocal spectroscopic imaging measurements applied to in-vivo studies to determine the depth dependent hydration profiles of human skin. The observed spectroscopic signal covers the spectral range from 810 nm to 2100 nm allowing to probe relevant absorption signals that can be associated with e.g. lipid and water-absorption bands. We employ a spectrally sensitive autofocus mechanism that allows an ultrafast focusing of the measurement spot on the skin and subsequently probes the evolution of the absorption bands as a function of depth. We determine the change of the water concentration in m%. The water concentration follows a sigmoidal behavior with an increase of the water content of about 70% within 5 μm in a depth of about 14 μm. We have applied our technique to study the hydration dynamics of skin before and after treatment with different concentrations of glycerol indicating that an increase of the glycerol concentration leads to an enhanced water concentration in the stratum corneum. Moreover, in contrast to traditional corneometry we have found that the application of Aluminium Chlorohydrate has no impact to the hydration of skin.

  4. Confocal spectroscopic imaging measurements of depth dependent hydration dynamics in human skin in-vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Behm

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present confocal spectroscopic imaging measurements applied to in-vivo studies to determine the depth dependent hydration profiles of human skin. The observed spectroscopic signal covers the spectral range from 810 nm to 2100 nm allowing to probe relevant absorption signals that can be associated with e.g. lipid and water-absorption bands. We employ a spectrally sensitive autofocus mechanism that allows an ultrafast focusing of the measurement spot on the skin and subsequently probes the evolution of the absorption bands as a function of depth. We determine the change of the water concentration in m%. The water concentration follows a sigmoidal behavior with an increase of the water content of about 70% within 5 μm in a depth of about 14 μm. We have applied our technique to study the hydration dynamics of skin before and after treatment with different concentrations of glycerol indicating that an increase of the glycerol concentration leads to an enhanced water concentration in the stratum corneum. Moreover, in contrast to traditional corneometry we have found that the application of Aluminium Chlorohydrate has no impact to the hydration of skin.

  5. On the time-dependent inelastic deformation of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L.; Beaudoin, A. J.; MacEwen, S. R.; Kocks, U. F.

    2004-06-01

    The research by Prof. Paul Dawson has done much to further the use of constitutive models based on internal state variables toward applications of industrial relevance. Two particular models examined by Dawson are one based on the "mechanical threshold", developed by Kocks and co-workers and another based on the "hardness", advanced by Hart and co-workers The first of these is intended to describe bulk plastic flow, and is associated with the notion of percolation of dislocations. The second is a phenomenological model that includes anelasticity and gives reliable prediction of stress relaxation. In this work, we examine the time-dependent inelastic deformation of the aluminum alloy AA 5182-H19 — during the manufacturing process, but also under in-service conditions. Assessment is made through evolution of both mechanical properties and geometry. A constitutive model based on two internal variables is proposed. One variable is the mechanical threshold stress, dominating for the bulk plastic flow; the other is due to the operation of dynamic pile-ups, providing microplasticity and based on a modification to Hart's model by H. Garmestani. These two state parameters are not directly related to distinct mechanisms of flow resistance in this solution-hardened alloy, but rather to long-range and short-range dislocation motions. As a result, this model can characterize both the large scale plastic flow and subsequent transient processes having very low strain rate, such as stress relaxation and time-dependent springback.

  6. Mechanical instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, J.; Ning, F.; Trinh, T.T.; Kjelstrup, S.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; He, J.; Skallerud, B.H.; Zhang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Despite observations of massive methane release and geohazards associated with gas hydrate instability in nature, as well as ductile flow accompanying hydrate dissociation in artificial polycrystalline methane hydrates in the laboratory, the destabilising mechanisms of gas hydrates under deformation

  7. DEFORMATION DEPENDENT TUL MULTI-STEP DIRECT MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WIENKE,H.; CAPOTE, R.; HERMAN, M.; SIN, M.

    2007-04-22

    The Multi-Step Direct (MSD) module TRISTAN in the nuclear reaction code EMPIRE has been extended in order to account for nuclear deformation. The new formalism was tested in calculations of neutron emission spectra emitted from the {sup 232}Th(n,xn) reaction. These calculations include vibration-rotational Coupled Channels (CC) for the inelastic scattering to low-lying collective levels, ''deformed'' MSD with quadrupole deformation for inelastic scattering to the continuum, Multi-Step Compound (MSC) and Hauser-Feshbach with advanced treatment of the fission channel. Prompt fission neutrons were also calculated. The comparison with experimental data shows clear improvement over the ''spherical'' MSD calculations and JEFF-3.1 and JENDL-3.3 evaluations.

  8. In vivo cartilage deformation after different types of activity and its dependence on physical training status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, F; Lemberger, B; Gratzke, C; Hudelmaier, M; Glaser, C; Englmeier, K-H; Reiser, M

    2005-02-01

    Knowledge of the deformational behaviour of articular cartilage in vivo is required to understand the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis and the mechanical target environment of prospective cartilage transplant recipients. To study the in vivo deformational behaviour of patellar and femorotibial cartilage for different types of physiological activities; and to test the hypothesis that in vivo deformation of cartilage is modified by intense physical exercise. Magnetic resonance imaging and 3D digital image analysis were used to determine cartilage volume before and after physical activity in the patella of 12 volunteers (knee bends, squatting, normal gait, running, cycling). Deformation of femorotibial cartilage was investigated in 10 subjects (knee bends, static compression, high impact loading). Patellar cartilage deformation after knee bends was compared in seven professional weight lifters, seven sprinters, and 14 untrained volunteers. Patellar cartilage deformation was -5.9% after knee bends, -4.7% after squatting, -2.8% after normal walking, -5.0% after running, and -4.5% after cycling. The pattern of patellar cartilage deformation corresponded to the range of motion involved in the particular activity. Tibial cartilage deformation was greatest under high impact loading (-7%), but small for other activities. No significant difference was found between athletes and non-athletic controls. Patellar cartilage deformation shows a "dose dependent" response, where more intense loading leads to greater deformation. Relatively little deformation was observed in the femorotibial joint, except during high impact activities. The findings provide no evidence that adult human cartilage properties are amendable to training effects in vivo.

  9. IMPACT OF DYNAMICAL HYDRATION SHELL AROUND HA PROTEIN ON NONLINEAR CONCENTRATION DEPENDENT T-RAYS ABSORPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YIWEN SUN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available T-rays is sensitive to covalently cross-linked proteins and can be used to probe unique dynamic properties of water surrounding a protein. In this paper, we demonstrate the unique absorption properties of the dynamic hydration shells determined by hemagglutinin (HA protein in terahertz frequency. We study the changes arising from different concentrations in detail and show that nonlinear absorption coefficient is induced by the dynamic hydration water. The binary and ternary component model were used to interpret the nonlinearity absorption behaviors and predict the thickness of the hydration shells around the HA protein in aqueous phase.

  10. No decreased erythrocyte deformability in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes, either by filtration or by ektacytometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, N. H.; van Arkel, E. C.; Hardeman, M. R.; Bilo, H. J.; Michels, R. P.; Vreeken, J.

    1993-01-01

    A lower erythrocyte deformability, which causes impairment of the microcirculation, is postulated to contribute to diabetic organ complications. Erythrocyte deformability was measured in four groups of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic subjects and 30 controls by filtration and ektacytometry.

  11. Temperature dependence of the rate constant for reactions of hydrated electrons with H, OH and H2O2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Sehested, K.; Løgager, T.

    1994-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the rate constants, for the reactions of hydrated electrons with H atoms, OH radicals and H2O2 has been determined. The reaction with H atoms, studied in the temperature range 20-250-degrees-C gives k(20-degrees-C) = 2.4 x 10(10) M-1 s-1 and the activation energy E...... of hydrated electron with H2PO4- was determined to k(20-degrees-C) = 1.5 x 10(7) M-1 s-1 and E(A) = 7.4 kJ mol-1 (1.8 kcal mol-1) in the temperature range 20-200-degrees-C....

  12. Examples of deformation-dependent flow simulations of conjunctive use with MF-OWHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Hanson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The dependency of surface- and groundwater flows and aquifer hydraulic properties on deformation induced by changes in aquifer head is not accounted for in the standard version of MODFLOW. A new USGS integrated hydrologic model, MODFLOW-OWHM, incorporates this dependency by linking subsidence and mesh deformation with changes in aquifer transmissivity and storage coefficient, and with flows that also depend on aquifer characteristics and land-surface geometry. This new deformation-dependent approach is being used for the further development of the integrated Central Valley hydrologic model (CVHM in California. Preliminary results from this application and from hypothetical test cases of similar systems show that changes in canal flows, stream seepage, and evapotranspiration from groundwater (ETgw are sensitive to deformation. Deformation feedback has been shown to also have an indirect effect on conjunctive surface- and groundwater use components with increased stream seepage and streamflows influencing surface-water deliveries and return flows. In the Central Valley model, land subsidence may significantly degrade the ability of the major canals to deliver surface water from the Delta to the San Joaquin and Tulare basins. Subsidence can also affect irrigation demand and ETgw, which, along with altered surface-water supplies, causes a feedback response resulting in changed estimates of groundwater pumping for irrigation. This modeling feature also may improve the impact assessment of dewatering-induced land subsidence/uplift (following irrigation pumping or coal-seam gas extraction on surface receptors, inter-basin transfers, and surface infrastructure integrity.

  13. Time-dependent deformation of titanium metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, C. A.; Bahei-El-din, Y. A.; Mirdamadi, M.

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element program called VISCOPAC was developed and used to conduct a micromechanics analysis of titanium metal matrix composites. The VISCOPAC program uses a modified Eisenberg-Yen thermo-viscoplastic constitutive model to predict matrix behavior under thermomechanical fatigue loading. The analysis incorporated temperature-dependent elastic properties in the fiber and temperature-dependent viscoplastic properties in the matrix. The material model was described and the necessary material constants were determined experimentally. Fiber-matrix interfacial behavior was analyzed using a discrete fiber-matrix model. The thermal residual stresses due to the fabrication cycle were predicted with a failed interface, The failed interface resulted in lower thermal residual stresses in the matrix and fiber. Stresses due to a uniform transverse load were calculated at two temperatures, room temperature and an elevated temperature of 650 C. At both temperatures, a large stress concentration was calculated when the interface had failed. The results indicate the importance of accuracy accounting for fiber-matrix interface failure and the need for a micromechanics-based analytical technique to understand and predict the behavior of titanium metal matrix composites.

  14. Dye coupling in hypothalamic slices: dependence on in vivo hydration state and osmolality of incubation medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbett, P; Hatton, G I

    1984-12-01

    Electrotonic coupling is one mechanism which may coordinate the electrophysiological activity of a population of neurons. By measuring the incidence of dye coupling, we have investigated whether conditions that stimulate hormone secretion by hypothalamic magnocellular neuroendocrine cells affect coupling between these neurons. Neurons in the magnocellular regions of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), in slices prepared from normally hydrated or chronically dehydrated male rats, were intracellularly injected with the fluorescent dye Lucifer Yellow CH. The dye coupling index (DCI), the ratio of the number of dye-coupled neurons to the total number of filled cells, was determined for each treatment group. The DCI for slices from dehydrated animals incubated in 310 milliosmoles/kg of medium (0.121) was significantly lower than that for slices for hydrated animals incubated in medium of the same osmolality (0.333). This decrease was reversed when slices from dehydrates were incubated in medium having an osmolality of 340 milliosmoles/kg (DCI = 0.307). There was also evidence for an interaction between slices incubated in the same chamber: the DCI in slices from dehydrated animals was significantly higher (0.475) when slices from normally hydrated rats were also present in the incubation chamber. Based on these data and on cited evidence, we suggest that the osmolality of the extracellular fluid and the local concentration of sex steroid hormones may influence dye coupling in the PVN.

  15. Piezoelectric and deformation potential effects of strain-dependent luminescence in semiconductor quantum well structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Aihua; Peng, Mingzeng; Willatzen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    , in the framework of the 6 × 6 k·p Hamiltonian for the valence states, to directly assess the interplay between the spin-orbit coupling and the strain-induced deformation potential for the interband momentum-matrix element. We numerically addressed problems of both the infinite and IQWs with piezoelectric fields...... to elucidate the effects of the piezoelectric potential and the deformation potential on the strain-dependent luminescence. The experimentally measured photoluminescence variatio½n as a function of pressure can be qualitatively explained by the theoretical results....

  16. Effect of deformation and orientation on spin orbit density dependent nuclear potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rajni; Kumar, Raj; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2017-11-01

    Role of deformation and orientation is investigated on spin-orbit density dependent part VJ of nuclear potential (VN=VP+VJ) obtained within semi-classical Thomas Fermi approach of Skyrme energy density formalism. Calculations are performed for 24-54Si+30Si reactions, with spherical target 30Si and projectiles 24-54Si having prolate and oblate shapes. The quadrupole deformation β2 is varying within range of 0.023 ≤ β2 ≤0.531 for prolate and -0.242 ≤ β2 ≤ -0.592 for oblate projectiles. The spin-orbit dependent potential gets influenced significantly with inclusion of deformation and orientation effect. The spin-orbit barrier and position gets significantly influenced by both the sign and magnitude of β2-deformation. Si-nuclei with β220. The possible role of spin-orbit potential on barrier characteristics such as barrier height, barrier curvature and on the fusion pocket is also probed. In reference to prolate and oblate systems, the angular dependence of spin-orbit potential is further studied on fusion cross-sections.

  17. Temperature-dependent mechanical deformation of silicon at the nanoscale: Phase transformation versus defect propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran, M. S. R. N., E-mail: kiran.mangalampalli@anu.edu.au; Tran, T. T.; Smillie, L. A.; Subianto, D.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Australian Capital Territory, Canberra 2601 (Australia); Haberl, B. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Australian Capital Territory, Canberra 2601 (Australia); Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2015-05-28

    This study uses high-temperature nanoindentation coupled with in situ electrical measurements to investigate the temperature dependence (25–200 °C) of the phase transformation behavior of diamond cubic (dc) silicon at the nanoscale. Along with in situ indentation and electrical data, ex situ characterizations, such as Raman and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, have been used to reveal the indentation-induced deformation mechanisms. We find that phase transformation and defect propagation within the crystal lattice are not mutually exclusive deformation processes at elevated temperature. Both can occur at temperatures up to 150 °C but to different extents, depending on the temperature and loading conditions. For nanoindentation, we observe that phase transformation is dominant below 100 °C but that deformation by twinning along (111) planes dominates at 150 °C and 200 °C. This work, therefore, provides clear insight into the temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in dc-Si at the nanoscale and helps to clarify previous inconsistencies in the literature.

  18. Alloying effect on grain-size dependent deformation twinning in nanocrystalline Cu-Zn alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X. L.; Xu, W. Z.; Zhou, H.; Moering, J. A.; Narayan, J.; Zhu, Y. T.

    2015-01-01

    Grain-size dependency of deformation twinning has been previously reported in nanocrystalline face-centred-cubic metals, which results in an optimum grain-size range for twin formation. Here, we report, for the first time in experiments, the observed optimum grain sizes for deformation twins in nanocrystalline Cu-Zn alloys which slightly increase with increasing Zn content. This result agrees with the reported trend but is much weaker than predicted by stacking-fault-energy based models. Our results indicate that alloying changes the relationship between the stacking-fault and twin-fault energy and therefore affects the optimum grain size for deformation twinning. These observations should be also applicable to other alloy systems.

  19. Relationship between Creep Property and Loading-Rate Dependence of Strength of Artificial Methane-Hydrate-Bearing Toyoura Sand under Triaxial Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuniyuki Miyazaki

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Methane hydrate is anticipated to be a promising energy resource. It is essential to consider the mechanical properties of a methane hydrate reservoir to ensure sustainable production, since its mechanical behavior may affect the integrity of the production well, the occurrence of geohazards, and gas productivity. In particular, the creep property of methane-hydrate-bearing sediment is thought to have great significance in the long-term prediction of the mechanical behaviors of a reservoir. In earlier studies, triaxial compression tests were conducted on artificial methane-hydrate-bearing Toyoura sand under three axial-loading conditions, i.e., constant-strain-rate test, constant-stress-rate test, and creep (constant-stress test. In this paper, the time-dependent properties of the methane-hydrate-bearing Toyoura sand observed in these tests were quantitatively discussed and found to be almost in agreement. The creep life obtained from the creep tests had a reasonably strong correlation with the loading-rate dependencies of strength, obtained from the constant-strain-rate tests and constant-stress-rate tests based on a simple hypothesis. The findings are expected to be used to develop a constitutive model considering the time-dependent behaviors of hydrate-bearing soil in future studies, and to improve the reliability of long-term prediction of the geomechanical response to gas extraction from a reservoir.

  20. Elastic stresses and plastic deformations in 'Santa Clara' tomato fruits caused by package dependent compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PEREIRA ADRIANA VARGAS

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the fruit compression behavior aiming to develop new tomato packages. Deformations caused by compression forces were observed inside packages and in individual 'Santa Clara' tomato fruit. The forces applied by a transparent acrylic lever to the fruit surface caused pericarp deformation and the flattened area was proportional to the force magnitude. The deformation was associated to the reduction in the gas volume (Vg, caused by expulsion of the air from the loculus cavity and reduction in the intercellular air volume of the pericarp. As ripening advanced, smaller fractions of the Vg reduced by the compressive force were restored after the stress was relieved. The lack of complete Vg restoration was an indication of permanent plastic deformations of the stressed cells. Vg regeneration (elastic recovery was larger in green fruits than in the red ones. The ratio between the applied force and the flattened area (flattening pressure, which depends on cell turgidity, decreased during ripening. Fruit movements associated with its depth in the container were observed during storage in a transparent glass container (495 x 355 x 220 mm. The downward movement of the fruits was larger in the top layers because these movements seem to be driven by a summation of the deformation of many fruits in all layers.

  1. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  2. Hydration and distance dependence of intermolecular shearing between collagen molecules in a model microfibril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautieri, Alfonso; Pate, Monica I; Vesentini, Simone; Redaelli, Alberto; Buehler, Markus J

    2012-08-09

    In vertebrates, collagen tissues are the main component responsible for force transmission. In spite of the physiological importance of these phenomena, force transmission mechanisms are still not fully understood, especially at smaller scales, including in particular collagen molecules and fibrils. Here we investigate the mechanism of molecular sliding between collagen molecules within a fibril, by shearing a central molecule in a hexagonally packed bundle mimicking the collagen microfibril environment, using varied lateral distance between the molecules in both dry and solvated conditions. In vacuum, the central molecule slides under a stick-slip mechanism that is due to the characteristic surface profile of collagen molecules, enhanced by the breaking and reformation of H-bonds between neighboring collagen molecules. This mechanism is consistently observed for varied lateral separations between molecules. The high shearing force (>7 nN) found for the experimentally observed intermolecular distance (≈1.1 nm) suggests that in dry samples the fibril elongation mechanism relies almost exclusively on molecular stretching, which may explain the higher stiffnesses found in dry fibrils. When hydrated, the slip-stick behavior is observed only below 1.3 nm of lateral distance, whereas above 1.3 nm the molecule shears smoothly, showing that the water layer has a strong lubricating effect. Moreover, the average force required to shear is approximately the same in solvated as in dry conditions (≈2.5 nN), which suggests that the role of water at the intermolecular level includes the transfer of load between molecules. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Time-dependent deformation at elevated temperatures in basalt from El Hierro, Stromboli and Teide volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, P. M.; Fahrner, D.; Harnett, C. E.; Fazio, M.

    2014-12-01

    Time dependent deformation describes the process whereby brittle materials deform at a stress level below their short-term material strength (Ss), but over an extended time frame. Although generally well understood in engineering (where it is known as static fatigue or "creep"), knowledge of how rocks creep and fail has wide ramifications in areas as diverse as mine tunnel supports and the long term stability of critically loaded rock slopes. A particular hazard relates to the instability of volcano flanks. A large number of flank collapses are known such as Stromboli (Aeolian islands), Teide, and El Hierro (Canary Islands). Collapses on volcanic islands are especially complex as they necessarily involve the combination of active tectonics, heat, and fluids. Not only does the volcanic system generate stresses that reach close to the failure strength of the rocks involved, but when combined with active pore fluid the process of stress corrosion allows the rock mass to deform and creep at stresses far lower than Ss. Despite the obvious geological hazard that edifice failure poses, the phenomenon of creep in volcanic rocks at elevated temperatures has yet to be thoroughly investigated in a well controlled laboratory setting. We present new data using rocks taken from Stromboli, El Heirro and Teide volcanoes in order to better understand the interplay between the fundamental rock mechanics of these basalts and the effects of elevated temperature fluids (activating stress corrosion mechanisms). Experiments were conducted over short (30-60 minute) and long (8-10 hour) time scales. For this, we use the method of Heap et al., (2011) to impose a constant stress (creep) domain deformation monitored via non-contact axial displacement transducers. This is achieved via a conventional triaxial cell to impose shallow conditions of pressure (<25 MPa) and temperature (<200 °C), and equipped with a 3D laboratory seismicity array (known as acoustic emission, AE) to monitor the micro

  4. Time-dependent solution for reorientation of rotating tidally deformed visco-elastic bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haiyang; van der Wal, Wouter; Vermeersen, Bert

    2017-04-01

    Many icy satellites or planets contain features which suggest a (past) reorientation of the body, such as the tiger stripes on Enceladus and the heart-shaped Sputnik Planum on Pluto. Most of these icy bodies are tidally locked and this creates a large tidal bulge which is about three times of its centrifugal (equatorial) bulge. To study the reorientation of such rotating tidally deformed body is complicated and most previous studies apply the so-called fluid limit method. The fluid limit approach ignores the viscous response of the body and assumes that it immediately reaches its fluid limit when simulating the reorientation due to a changing load. As a result, this method can only simulate cases when the change in the load is much slower than the dominant viscous modes of the body. For other kinds of load, for instance, a Heaviside load due to an impact which creates an instant relocation of mass, it does not give us a prediction of how the reorientation is accomplished (e.g. How fast? Along which path?). We establish a new method which can give an accurate time-dependent solution for reorientation of rotating tidally deformed bodies. Our method can be applied both semi-analytically or numerically (with finite element method) to include features such as lateral heterogeneity or non-linear material. We also present an extension of our method to simulate the effect of a fossil bulge. With our method, we show that reorientation of a tidally deformed body driven by a positive mass anomaly near the poles has a preference for rotating around the tidal axis instead of towards it, contrary to predictions in previous studies. References Hu, H., W. van der Wal and L.L.A. Vermeersen (2017). A numerical method for reorientation of rotating tidally deformed visco-elastic bodies. Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, doi:10.1002/2016JE005114, 2016JE005114. Matsuyama, I. and Nimmo, F. (2007). Rotational stability of tidally deformed planetary bodies. Journal of Geophysical

  5. Hydration lubrication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klein, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The hydration lubrication paradigm, whereby hydration layers are both strongly held by the charges they surround, and so can support large pressures without being squeezed out, and at the same time...

  6. Theoretical study of temperature dependence and Rayleigh scattering properties of chloride hydration clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shuai; Huang, Teng; Liu, Yi-Rong; Xu, Kang-Ming; Zhang, Yang; Lv, Yu-Zhou; Huang, Wei

    2014-09-28

    Cl(-)(H2O)n (n = 5-6) clusters were investigated using a basin hopping (BH) method coupled with density functional theory (DFT). Structures, energetics, thermodynamics, and vibrational frequencies were obtained using high level ab initio calculations. DF-LMP2 (second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory using local and density fitting approximations) with an appropriate basis set were employed for final optimization and frequency calculation, which has been benchmarked in a recent study. The global minimum of Cl(-)(H2O)5 was verified and the new competitive local minimum of Cl(-)(H2O)6 was offered. Considering the increasing complexity of the large system and the high flexibility of the hydrogen bonding environment, Boltzmann averaged Gibbs free energy was provided taking into account the contributions of local minima on the potential energy surface. Finally, the temperature dependence of the conformational population for isomers of Cl(-)(H2O)n (n = 5-6) and Rayleigh scattering properties of Cl(-)(H2O)n (n = 1-6) have been investigated systematically for the first time.

  7. Temperature dependence of the deformation behavior of 316 stainless steel after low temperature neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel-Robertson, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    The effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on the tensile behavior of 316 stainless steel have been investigated. A single heat of solution annealed 316 was irradiated to 7 and 18 dpa at 60, 200, 330, and 400{degrees}C. The tensile properties as a function of dose and as a function of temperature were examined. Large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, strain to necking, and strain hardening capacity were seen in this irradiation experiment. The magnitudes of the changes are dependent on both irradiation temperature and neutron dose. Irradiation can more than triple the yield strength over the unirradiated value and decrease the strain to necking (STN) to less than 0.5% under certain conditions. A maximum increase in yield strength and a minimum in the STN occur after irradiation at 330{degrees}C but the failure mode remains ductile.

  8. The dependence of electronic transport on compressive deformation of C{sub 60} molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H. [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China)], E-mail: lihuilmy@hotmail.com; Zhang, X.Q. [Physics Department, Ocean University of China, Qingdao (China)

    2008-06-02

    The dependence of electronic transport on compressive deformation of C{sub 60} molecule is studied theoretically in this work. Brenner's 'second generation' empirical potential is used to describe the many-body short-range interatomic interactions for C{sub 60} in the molecular dynamics simulations. Our results demonstrate that C{sub 60} can be compressed up to a strain {epsilon}=0.31 before collapsing. Electronic transport under an applied bias is calculated by using a self-consistent field approach coupled with non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. The transmission probability, conductance gap, and conductance spectrum are found to be sensitive to the compression. The peak value of conductance decreases with the increase of strain until the C{sub 60} is compressed up to a strain {epsilon}=0.31.

  9. Chemically tuned linear energy transfer dependent quenching in a deformable, radiochromic 3D dosimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høye, Ellen Marie; Skyt, Peter Sandegaard; Balling, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Most solid-state detectors, including 3D dosimeters, show lower signal in the Bragg peak than expected, a process termed quenching. The purpose of this study was to investigate how variation in chemical composition of a recently developed radiochromic, silicone-based 3D dosimeter influences...... the observed quenching in proton beams. The dependency of dose response on linear energy transfer, as calculated through Monte Carlo simulations of the dosimeter, was investigated in 60 MeV proton beams. We found that the amount of quenching varied with the chemical composition: peak-to-plateau ratios (1cm...... into the plateau) ranged from 2.2 to 3.4, compared to 4.3 using an ionization chamber. The dose response, and thereby the quenching, was predominantly influenced by the curing agent concentration, which determined the dosimeter’s deformation properties. The dose response was found to be linear at all depths. All...

  10. Does a deformation of special relativity imply energy dependent photon time delays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, J. M.; Cortés, J. L.; Relancio, J. J.

    2018-01-01

    Theoretical arguments in favor of energy dependent photon time delays from a modification of special relativity (SR) have met with recent gamma ray observations that put severe constraints on the scale of such deviations. We review the case of the generality of this theoretical prediction in the case of a deformation of SR and find that, at least in the simple model based on the analysis of photon worldlines which is commonly considered, there are many scenarios compatible with a relativity principle which do not contain a photon time delay. This will be the situation for any modified dispersion relation which reduces to E=\\vert p\\vert for photons, independently of the quantum structure of spacetime. This fact opens up the possibility of a phenomenologically consistent relativistic generalization of SR with a new mass scale many orders of magnitude below the Planck mass.

  11. Stability Analysis of Methane Hydrate-Bearing Soils Considering Dissociation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromasa Iwai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the methane hydrate dissociation process may lead to unstable behavior such as large ground deformations, uncontrollable gas production, etc. A linear instability analysis was performed in order to investigate which variables have a significant effect on the onset of the instability behavior of methane hydrate-bearing soils subjected to dissociation. In the analysis a simplified viscoplastic constitutive equation is used for the soil sediment. The stability analysis shows that the onset of instability of the material system mainly depends on the strain hardening-softening parameter, the degree of strain, and the permeability for water and gas. Then, we conducted a numerical analysis of gas hydrate-bearing soil considering hydrate dissociation in order to investigate the effect of the parameters on the system. The simulation method used in the present study can describe the chemo-thermo-mechanically coupled behaviors such as phase changes from hydrates to water and gas, temperature changes and ground deformation. From the numerical results, we found that basically the larger the permeability for water and gas is, the more stable the simulation results are. These results are consistent with those obtained from the linear stability analysis.

  12. Chemically tuned linear energy transfer dependent quenching in a deformable, radiochromic 3D dosimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høye, Ellen Marie; Skyt, Peter S; Balling, Peter; Muren, Ludvig P; Taasti, Vicki T; Swakoń, Jan; Mierzwińska, Gabriela; Rydygier, Marzena; Bassler, Niels; Petersen, Jørgen B B

    2017-02-21

    Most solid-state detectors, including 3D dosimeters, show lower signal in the Bragg peak than expected, a process termed quenching. The purpose of this study was to investigate how variation in chemical composition of a recently developed radiochromic, silicone-based 3D dosimeter influences the observed quenching in proton beams. The dependency of dose response on linear energy transfer, as calculated through Monte Carlo simulations of the dosimeter, was investigated in 60 MeV proton beams. We found that the amount of quenching varied with the chemical composition: peak-to-plateau ratios (1 cm into the plateau) ranged from 2.2 to 3.4, compared to 4.3 using an ionization chamber. The dose response, and thereby the quenching, was predominantly influenced by the curing agent concentration, which determined the dosimeter's deformation properties. The dose response was found to be linear at all depths. All chemical compositions of the dosimeter showed dose-rate dependency; however this was not dependent on the linear energy transfer. Track-structure theory was used to explain the observed quenching effects. In conclusion, this study shows that the silicone-based dosimeter has potential for use in measuring 3D-dose-distributions from proton beams.

  13. Emergence of coherent localized structures in shear deformations of temperature dependent fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Katsaounis, Theodoros

    2016-11-25

    Shear localization occurs in various instances of material instability in solid mechanics and is typically associated with Hadamard-instability for an underlying model. While Hadamard instability indicates the catastrophic growth of oscillations around a mean state, it does not by itself explain the formation of coherent structures typically observed in localization. The latter is a nonlinear effect and its analysis is the main objective of this article. We consider a model that captures the main mechanisms observed in high strain-rate deformation of metals, and describes shear motions of temperature dependent non-Newtonian fluids. For a special dependence of the viscosity on the temperature, we carry out a linearized stability analysis around a base state of uniform shearing solutions, and quantitatively assess the effects of the various mechanisms affecting the problem: thermal softening, momentum diffusion and thermal diffusion. Then, we turn to the nonlinear model, and construct localized states - in the form of similarity solutions - that emerge as coherent structures in the localization process. This justifies a scenario for localization that is proposed on the basis of asymptotic analysis in \\\\cite{KT}.

  14. Emergence of Coherent Localized Structures in Shear Deformations of Temperature Dependent Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsaounis, Theodoros; Olivier, Julien; Tzavaras, Athanasios E.

    2017-04-01

    Shear localization occurs in various instances of material instability in solid mechanics and is typically associated with Hadamard-instability for an underlying model. While Hadamard instability indicates the catastrophic growth of oscillations around a mean state, it does not by itself explain the formation of coherent structures typically observed in localization. The latter is a nonlinear effect and its analysis is the main objective of this article. We consider a model that captures the main mechanisms observed in high strain-rate deformation of metals, and describes shear motions of temperature dependent non-Newtonian fluids. For a special dependence of the viscosity on the temperature, we carry out a linearized stability analysis around a base state of uniform shearing solutions, and quantitatively assess the effects of the various mechanisms affecting the problem: thermal softening, momentum diffusion and thermal diffusion. Then, we turn to the nonlinear model, and construct localized states—in the form of similarity solutions—that emerge as coherent structures in the localization process. This justifies a scenario for localization that is proposed on the basis of asymptotic analysis in Katsaounis and Tzavaras (SIAM J Appl Math 69:1618-1643, 2009).

  15. Elastic wave speeds and moduli in polycrystalline ice Ih, si methane hydrate, and sll methane-ethane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgerud, M.B.; Waite, W.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Nur, A.

    2009-01-01

    We used ultrasonic pulse transmission to measure compressional, P, and shear, S, wave speeds in laboratory-formed polycrystalline ice Ih, si methane hydrate, and sll methane-ethane hydrate. From the wave speed's linear dependence on temperature and pressure and from the sample's calculated density, we derived expressions for bulk, shear, and compressional wave moduli and Poisson's ratio from -20 to 15??C and 22.4 to 32.8 MPa for ice Ih, -20 to 15??C and 30.5 to 97.7 MPa for si methane hydrate, and -20 to 10??C and 30.5 to 91.6 MPa for sll methane-ethane hydrate. All three materials had comparable P and S wave speeds and decreasing shear wave speeds with increasing applied pressure. Each material also showed evidence of rapid intergranular bonding, with a corresponding increase in wave speed, in response to pauses in sample deformation. There were also key differences. Resistance to uniaxial compaction, indicated by the pressure required to compact initially porous samples, was significantly lower for ice Ih than for either hydrate. The ice Ih shear modulus decreased with increasing pressure, in contrast to the increase measured in both hydrates ?? 2009.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Strain Rate and Temperature Dependent Response of an Epoxy Resin Undergoing Large Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamrakar, Sandeep; Ganesh, Raja; Sockalingam, Subramani; Haque, Bazle Z.; Gillespie, John W.

    2018-01-01

    Experimental investigation of the effect of strain rate and temperature on large inelastic deformation of an epoxy resin is presented. Uniaxial compression tests were conducted on DER 353 epoxy resin at strain rates ranging from 0.001 to 12,000/s. Experimental results showed significant rate sensitivity in yield stress, which increased from 85 MPa at 0.001/s to 220 MPa at 12,000/s strain rate. Thermal softening became more prominent as the strain rate was increased, resulting in complete absence of strain hardening at high strain rates. Rise in temperature under high strain rate, due to adiabatic heating, was estimated to increase above glass transition temperature (T g ). A series of compression tests carried out at temperatures ranging from ambient to T g + 80 °C showed yield stress vanishing at T g . Above T g , the epoxy became completely rubbery elastic at quasi-static loading rate. Epoxy became less sensitive to strain rate as the temperature was increased further above T g . The strain rate and temperature dependent yield behavior of the epoxy resin is predicted using Ree-Eyring model.

  17. Evaluation of digital model accuracy and time-dependent deformation of alginate impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesur, M G; Omurlu, I K; Ozer, T

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of digital models produced with the three-dimensional dental scanner, and to test the dimensional stability of alginate impressions for durations of immediately (T0), 1 day (T1), and 2 days (T2). A total of sixty impressions were taken from a master model with an alginate, and were poured into plaster models in three different storage periods. Twenty impressions were directly scanned (negative digital models), after which plaster models were poured and scanned (positive digital models) immediately. The remaining 40 impressions were poured after 1 and 2 days. In total, 9 points and 11 linear measurements were used to analyze the plaster models, and negative and positive digital models. Time-dependent deformation of the alginate impressions and the accuracy of the conventional plaster models and digital models were evaluated separately. Plaster models, negative and positive digital models showed significant differences in nearly all measurements at T (0), T (1), and T (2) times (P 0.05), but they demonstrated statistically significant differences at T (2) time (P digital models offer a high degree of validity when compared to measurements on positive digital models and plaster models; differences between the techniques are clinically acceptable. Direct scanning of the impressions is practicable method for orthodontists.

  18. Monitoring thermally induced structural deformation and framework decomposition of ZIF-8 through in situ temperature dependent measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ben; Mei, Yingjie; Xiao, Zhenyu; Kang, Zixi; Wang, Rongming; Sun, Daofeng

    2017-10-18

    ZIF-8 is an easily synthesized porous material which is widely applied in gas storage/separation, catalysis, and nanoarchitecture fabrication. Thermally induced atomic displacements and the resultant framework deformation/collapse significantly influence the application of ZIF-8, and therefore, in situ temperature dependent FTIR spectroscopy was utilized to study the framework changes during heating in the oxidative environment. The results suggest that ZIF-8 undergoes three transition stages, which are the lattice expansion stage below 200 °C, the "reversible" structural deformation stage from 200 to 350 °C, and the decomposition/collapse stage over 350 °C. Our research indicates that the Zn-N bond breaks at a temperature of 350 °C in the oxidant environment, leading to a drastic deformation of the ZIF-8 structure.

  19. Alloy-dependent deformation behavior of highly ductile nanocrystalline AuCu thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmiller, Jochen [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 10, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Spolenak, Ralph [Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 10, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Gruber, Patric A., E-mail: patric.gruber@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-02-10

    Nanocrystalline thin films on compliant substrates become increasingly important for the development of flexible electronic devices. In this study, nanocrystalline AuCu thin films on polyimide substrate were tested in tension while using a synchrotron-based in situ testing technique. Analysis of X-ray diffraction profiles allowed identifying the underlying deformation mechanisms. Initially, elastic and microplastic deformation is observed, followed by dislocation-mediated shear band formation, and eventually macroscopic crack formation. Particularly the influence of alloy composition, heat-treatment, and test temperature were investigated. Generally, a highly ductile behavior is observed. However, high Cu concentrations, annealing, and/or large plastic strains lead to localized deformation and hence reduced ductility. On the other hand, enhanced test temperature allows for a delocalized deformation and extended ductility.

  20. Numerical simulations of sand production in interbedded hydrate-bearing sediments during depressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Shun; Lin, Jeen-Shang; Myshakin, Evgeniy; Seol, Yongkoo; Collett, Timothy S.; Boswell, Ray

    2017-01-01

    Geomechanical behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments during gas production is complex, involving changes in hydrate-dependent mechanical properties. When interbedded clay layers are present, the complexity is more pronounced because hydrate dissociation tends to occur preferentially in the sediments adjacent to the clay layers due to clay layers acting as a heat source. This would potentially lead to shearing deformation along the sand/clay contacts and may contribute to solid migration, which hindered past field-scale gas production tests. This paper presents a near-wellbore simulation of sand/clay interbedded hydrate-bearing sediments that have been subjected to depressurization and discusses the effect of clay layers on sand production.

  1. Association among active seafloor deformation, mound formation, and gas hydrate growth and accumulation within the seafloor of the Santa Monica Basin, offshore California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, C.K.; Normark, W.R.; Ussler, W.; Caress, D.W.; Keaten, R.

    2008-01-01

    Seafloor blister-like mounds, methane migration and gas hydrate formation were investigated through detailed seafloor surveys in Santa Monica Basin, offshore of Los Angeles, California. Two distinct deep-water (??? 800??m water depth) topographic mounds were surveyed using an autonomous underwater vehicle (carrying a multibeam sonar and a chirp sub-bottom profiler) and one of these was explored with the remotely operated vehicle Tiburon. The mounds are > 10??m high and > 100??m wide dome-shaped bathymetric features. These mounds protrude from crests of broad anticlines (~ 20??m high and 1 to 3??km long) formed within latest Quaternary-aged seafloor sediment associated with compression between lateral offsets in regional faults. No allochthonous sediments were observed on the mounds, except slumped material off the steep slopes of the mounds. Continuous streams of methane gas bubbles emanate from the crest of the northeastern mound, and extensive methane-derived authigenic carbonate pavements and chemosynthetic communities mantle the mound surface. The large local vertical displacements needed to produce these mounds suggests a corresponding net mass accumulation has occurred within the immediate subsurface. Formation and accumulation of pure gas hydrate lenses in the subsurface is proposed as a mechanism to blister the seafloor and form these mounds. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Design of polarization-dependent, flexural-torsional deformation in photo responsive liquid crystalline polymer networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew L; Lee, Kyung Min; White, Timothy J; Vaia, Richard A

    2014-03-07

    Light responsive materials that exhibit wirelessly actuated, multidimensional deformation are excellent candidates for programmable matter applications such as morphing structures or soft robotics. A central challenge to designing adaptive structures from these materials is the ability accurately predict three dimensional deformations. Previous modeling efforts have focused almost exclusively on pure bending. Herein we examine key material parameters affecting light driven flexural-torsional response in azobenzene functionalized liquid crystal polymer networks. We show that a great deal of control can be obtained by specifying material alignment and actuating the material with polarized light. Insight gained from the theoretical framework here lays the foundation for more extensive modeling efforts to combine polarization controlled flexural-torsional deformations with complex geometry, boundary conditions, and loading conditions.

  3. Local membrane deformations activate Ca2+-dependent K+ and anionic currents in intact human red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Dyrda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mechanical, rheological and shape properties of red blood cells are determined by their cortical cytoskeleton, evolutionarily optimized to provide the dynamic deformability required for flow through capillaries much narrower than the cell's diameter. The shear stress induced by such flow, as well as the local membrane deformations generated in certain pathological conditions, such as sickle cell anemia, have been shown to increase membrane permeability, based largely on experimentation with red cell suspensions. We attempted here the first measurements of membrane currents activated by a local and controlled membrane deformation in single red blood cells under on-cell patch clamp to define the nature of the stretch-activated currents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The cell-attached configuration of the patch-clamp technique was used to allow recordings of single channel activity in intact red blood cells. Gigaohm seal formation was obtained with and without membrane deformation. Deformation was induced by the application of a negative pressure pulse of 10 mmHg for less than 5 s. Currents were only detected when the membrane was seen domed under negative pressure within the patch-pipette. K(+ and Cl(- currents were strictly dependent on the presence of Ca(2+. The Ca(2+-dependent currents were transient, with typical decay half-times of about 5-10 min, suggesting the spontaneous inactivation of a stretch-activated Ca(2+ permeability (PCa. These results indicate that local membrane deformations can transiently activate a Ca(2+ permeability pathway leading to increased [Ca(2+](i, secondary activation of Ca(2+-sensitive K(+ channels (Gardos channel, IK1, KCa3.1, and hyperpolarization-induced anion currents. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The stretch-activated transient PCa observed here under local membrane deformation is a likely contributor to the Ca(2+-mediated effects observed during the normal aging process of red blood cells, and

  4. Modeling the Nonlinear, Strain Rate Dependent Deformation of Shuttle Leading Edge Materials with Hydrostatic Stress Effects Included

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis method based on a deformation (as opposed to damage) approach has been developed to model the strain rate dependent, nonlinear deformation of woven ceramic matrix composites, such as the Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) material used on the leading edges of the Space Shuttle. In the developed model, the differences in the tension and compression deformation behaviors have also been accounted for. State variable viscoplastic equations originally developed for metals have been modified to analyze the ceramic matrix composites. To account for the tension/compression asymmetry in the material, the effective stress and effective inelastic strain definitions have been modified. The equations have also been modified to account for the fact that in an orthotropic composite the in-plane shear response is independent of the stiffness in the normal directions. The developed equations have been implemented into LS-DYNA through the use of user defined subroutines (UMATs). Several sample qualitative calculations have been conducted, which demonstrate the ability of the model to qualitatively capture the features of the deformation response present in woven ceramic matrix composites.

  5. Modeling the Nonlinear, Strain Rate Dependent Deformation of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites With Hydrostatic Stress Effects Included

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis method based on a deformation (as opposed to damage) approach has been developed to model the strain rate dependent, nonlinear deformation of woven ceramic matrix composites with a plain weave fiber architecture. In the developed model, the differences in the tension and compression response have also been considered. State variable based viscoplastic equations originally developed for metals have been modified to analyze the ceramic matrix composites. To account for the tension/compression asymmetry in the material, the effective stress and effective inelastic strain definitions have been modified. The equations have also been modified to account for the fact that in an orthotropic composite the in-plane shear stiffness is independent of the stiffness in the normal directions. The developed equations have been implemented into a commercially available transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA, through the use of user defined subroutines (UMATs). The tensile, compressive, and shear deformation of a representative plain weave woven ceramic matrix composite are computed and compared to experimental results. The computed values correlate well to the experimental data, demonstrating the ability of the model to accurately compute the deformation response of woven ceramic matrix composites.

  6. Thickness-Dependent Strain Effect on the Deformation of the Graphene-Encapsulated Au Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangli Ye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The strain effect on graphene-encapsulated Au nanoparticles is investigated. A finite-element calculation is performed to simulate the strain distribution and morphology of the monolayer and multilayer graphene-encapsulated Au nanoparticles, respectively. It can be found that the inhomogeneous strain and deformation are enhanced with the increasing shrinkage of the graphene shell. Moreover, the strain distribution and deformation are very sensitive to the layer number of the graphene shell. Especially, the inhomogeneous strain at the interface between the graphene shell and encapsulated Au nanoparticles is strongly tuned by the graphene thickness. For the mono- and bilayer graphene-encapsulated Au nanoparticles, the dramatic shape transformation can be observed. However, with increasing the graphene thickness further, there is hardly deformation for the encapsulated Au nanoparticles. These simulated results indicate that the strain and deformation can be designed by the graphene layer thickness, which provides an opportunity to engineer the structure and morphology of the graphene-encapsulated nanoparticles.

  7. Friction and scale-dependent deformation processes of large experimental carbonate faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesei, Telemaco; Carpenter, Brett M.; Giorgetti, Carolina; Scuderi, Marco M.; Sagy, Amir; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Collettini, Cristiano

    2017-07-01

    We studied the frictional behaviour and deformation products of large (20 cm × 20 cm bare surfaces) experimental limestone faults. We sheared samples in a direct shear configuration, with an imposed normal force of 40-200 kN and shear velocity of 10 μm/s. The steady-state shearing of these surfaces yielded a coefficient of friction 0.7friction of the same material, μ∼0.6. Frictional healing, studied via slide-hold-slide tests, is null (Δμ≤0 upon re-shear). Moreover, sliding of these surfaces is accompanied by dilatation and production of grooves, gouge striations and fault mirrors. These products are entirely analogous to slip surface phenomena found on natural limestone-bearing faults at both the macroscale and at the microscale. We infer that high friction, accompanied by dilatant deformation, and null frictional healing are the macroscopic effect of brittle damage on the sliding surface, constrained by the strength of the rock and by fast healing processes in the gouge. Simultaneously to brittle failure, plastic deformation occurs on the sliding surface and inside the intact rock via nanoparticle formation (mirrors) and twinning at the micron scale. Because of the similarity between experimental and natural structures, we suggest that sliding of carbonate-bearing faults in the uppermost crust could be characterized by high friction, fast healing and strongly dilatant deformation, which would help to explain shallow seismicity frequently documented in carbonatic terrains such as the Northern Apennines of Italy.

  8. Microscopic Origin of Strain Hardening in Methane Hydrate

    OpenAIRE

    Jihui Jia; Yunfeng Liang; Takeshi Tsuji; Sumihiko Murata; Toshifumi Matsuoka

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported for a long time that methane hydrate presents strain hardening, whereas the strength of normal ice weakens with increasing strain after an ultimate strength. However, the microscopic origin of these differences is not known. Here, we investigated the mechanical characteristics of methane hydrate and normal ice by compressive deformation test using molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that methane hydrate exhibits strain hardening only if the hydrate is confined to ...

  9. Droplet deformation and alignment for high-efficiency polarization-dependent holographic polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal reflection gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondiglia, V P; Sutherland, R L; Natarajan, L V; Lloyd, P F; Bunning, T J

    2008-08-15

    Droplet deformation and alignment are achieved in holographic polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal reflection gratings by applying an in situ shear during recording. High diffraction efficiency (99%) is obtained for light polarized parallel to the shear, with nearly zero efficiency for perpendicular polarization, and no increase of incoherent scattering. Permanent polarization dependence is related to stress-induced morphology changes of liquid-crystal droplets that are frozen by polymerization. The system is studied by electron microscopy and modeled by anisotropic coupled-wave and scattering theory. The morphology is consistent with the theory of small deformations of liquid droplets in fluid flow. Diffraction efficiency measurements are in agreement with theory incorporating this morphology as well as concomitant orientation and alignment of liquid-crystal molecules.

  10. Engineering estimation of time-dependent deformation characteristics as bending moment relaxation and released unfolding motion of creased paperboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Sh

    2017-02-01

    Paperboards are recognized to be important raw materials for packaging industry due to their advantages such as high strength-to-weight ratio, recyclability. Regarding the development of advanced packaging materials and the requirement of smart formed products, a study of sheet’s response behaviour is necessary for expanding the advanced converting industry. After introducing a couple of past research works concerned crease technologies, a fundamental mechanisms of crease deformation is reviewed using the scoring depth and the folding angle of a paperboard. Since one of important forming characteristics is a time-dependent stress relaxation or time-delayed strain during a fold/unfold process, the author’s experimental approaches for estimating a short term (less than 10 seconds) dynamic deformation behaviour of creased paperboard are discussed.

  11. Hydration of an active shear zone: Interactions between deformation, metasomatism and magmatism - the spinel-lherzolites from the Montferrier (southern France) Oligocene basalts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabanes, N.; Briqueu, L.

    1987-01-01

    Geochemical and textural investigations have been simultaneously performed on spinel-lherzolite xenoliths from the Oligo-Miocene alkali basalts of Montferrier (southern France). All the investigated samples have undergone a deformation very particular by intense shearing under high stresses (up to 1.75 kbar), low temperatures (less than or equal to900/sup 0/C) and strain rates of about 10/sup -18/ to 10/sup -15/ s/sup -1/. Mineral chemistry reveals that the Montferrier lherzolites are fragments of an undepleted relatively shallow upper mantle level located at a depth of 50 km (15 kbar). Moreover, Na and Ti enrichment in diopside would reflect a metasomatic event, also emphasized by the common occurrence of pargasite in 50-70% of the investigated samples. Crystallization of this amphibole is attributed to a hydrous infiltration which is related in time and space to the deformation. Indeed, amphibole is preferentially concentrated in strongly deformed zones and in kink-band boundaries of orthopyroxene porphyroclasts. Moreover, the grain boundaries were used by the pervasive agent to percolate into the lherzolite: significant chemical variations (increase in MgO: 15% and decrease in Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/: 55%) are observed within the range of 7-5 ..mu..m adjacent to the grain boundary. Finally, Sr isotopic data (/sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr) demonstrate that the amphibole, i.e. the metasomatic agent, is genetically related to the host lava of the xenoliths. Thus, the hydrous silicate liquid from which the amphibole has crystallized may be an early percolation of the ascending alkali magma.

  12. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    . faulting and fluid migration, and 4. trapping of free gas beneath a hydrate seal. Experiments are being conducted to assess the impact of gas hydrate on sediment behavior, particularly with respect to slope failure and other potential geohazards....K. Paull, R. Matsumoto, P.J. Wallace, and W.P. Dillon (Eds.), Proceedings ODP, Scientific Results, v. 164 College Station, TX (Ocean Drilling Program), pp. 179-191. Dallimore, S. R., T. Uchida, and T. S. Collett, 1999, Summary, in S. R. Dallimore, T...

  13. Point Canonical Transformation versus Deformed Shape Invariance for Position-Dependent Mass Schrödinger Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Quesne

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available On using the known equivalence between the presence of a position-dependent mass (PDM in the Schrödinger equation and a deformation of the canonical commutation relations, a method based on deformed shape invariance has recently been devised for generating pairs of potential and PDM for which the Schrödinger equation is exactly solvable. This approach has provided the bound-state energy spectrum, as well as the ground-state and the first few excited-state wavefunctions. The general wavefunctions have however remained unknown in explicit form because for their determination one would need the solutions of a rather tricky differential-difference equation. Here we show that solving this equation may be avoided by combining the deformed shape invariance technique with the point canonical transformation method in a novel way. It consists in employing our previous knowledge of the PDM problem energy spectrum to construct a constant-mass Schrödinger equation with similar characteristics and in deducing the PDM wavefunctions from the known constant-mass ones. Finally, the equivalence of the wavefunctions coming from both approaches is checked.

  14. Point Canonical Transformation versus Deformed Shape Invariance for Position-Dependent Mass Schrödinger Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesne, Christiane

    2009-04-01

    On using the known equivalence between the presence of a position-dependent mass (PDM) in the Schrödinger equation and a deformation of the canonical commutation relations, a method based on deformed shape invariance has recently been devised for generating pairs of potential and PDM for which the Schrödinger equation is exactly solvable. This approach has provided the bound-state energy spectrum, as well as the ground-state and the first few excited-state wavefunctions. The general wavefunctions have however remained unknown in explicit form because for their determination one would need the solutions of a rather tricky differential-difference equation. Here we show that solving this equation may be avoided by combining the deformed shape invariance technique with the point canonical transformation method in a novel way. It consists in employing our previous knowledge of the PDM problem energy spectrum to construct a constant-mass Schrödinger equation with similar characteristics and in deducing the PDM wavefunctions from the known constant-mass ones. Finally, the equivalence of the wavefunctions coming from both approaches is checked.

  15. Deformation Induced Martensitic Transformation and Its Initial Microstructure Dependence in a High Alloyed Duplex Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Lin; Huang, Tian Lin; Wang, Yu Hui

    2017-01-01

    Deformation induced martensitic transformation (DIMT) usually occurs in metastable austenitic stainless steels. Recent studies have shown that DIMT may occur in the austenite phase of low alloyed duplex stainless steels. The present study demonstrates that DIMT can also take place in a high alloyed...... Fe–23Cr–8.5Ni duplex stainless steel, which exhibits an unexpectedly rapid transformation from γ-austenite into α′-martensite. However, an inhibited martensitic transformation has been observed by varying the initial microstructure from a coarse alternating austenite and ferrite band structure...

  16. Nonlocal size dependency in nonlinear instability of axially loaded exponential shear deformable FG-CNT reinforced nanoshells under heat conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahmani, S.; Fattahi, A. M.

    2017-05-01

    The present study deals with size-dependent nonlinear instability characteristics of functionally graded carbon nanotube (FG-CNT) reinforced composite shells at nanoscale subjected to axial compression combined with through-thickness heat conduction. To take size dependency into account, Eringen's nonlocal continuum elasticity is incorporated to a novel shear deformation shell theory including a refined exponential distribution for transverse shear strain. In addition to the uniform distribution (UD) of CNT reinforcements, three FG patterns are also considered, namely FG-A, FG-V and FG-X. Also, on the basis of polynomial series, the temperature variation due to the through-thickness heat conduction is estimated. Via a perturbation-based boundary layer-type solving procedure, explicit expressions for nonlocal equilibrium curves are proposed relevant to the prebuckling and postbuckling regimes of FG-CNT exponential shear deformable nanoshells with temperature-dependent and temperature-independent material properties. It is observed that by taking the nonlocality size effect into consideration, the influence of the through-thickness heat conduction on the nonlinear axial instability response of FG-CNT reinforced nanoshells becomes more significant.

  17. The contrasting roles of creep and stress relaxation in the time-dependent deformation during in-situ cooling of a nickel-base single crystal superalloy

    OpenAIRE

    Panwisawas, Chinnapat; D?Souza, Neil; David M. Collins; Bhowmik, Ayan

    2017-01-01

    Time dependent plastic deformation in a single crystal nickel-base superalloy during cooling from casting relevant temperatures has been studied using a combination of in-situ neutron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and modelling. Visco-plastic deformation during cooling was found to be dependent on the stress and constraints imposed to component contraction during cooling, which mechanistically comprises creep and stress relaxation. Creep results in progressive work hardening w...

  18. Ab initio calculations of pressure-dependence of high-order elastic constants using finite deformations approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosyagin, I.; Lugovskoy, A. V.; Krasilnikov, O. M.; Vekilov, Yu. Kh.; Simak, S. I.; Abrikosov, I. A.

    2017-11-01

    We present a description of a technique for ab initio calculations of the pressure dependence of second- and third-order elastic constants. The technique is based on an evaluation of the corresponding Lagrangian stress tensor derivative of the total energy assuming finite size of the deformations. Important details and parameters of the calculations are highlighted. Considering body-centered cubic Mo as a model system, we demonstrate that the technique is highly customizable and can be used to investigate non-linear elastic properties under high-pressure conditions.

  19. Entangled polymer chain melts: orientation and deformation dependent tube confinement and interchain entanglement elasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussman, Daniel [University of Pennsylvania; Schweizer, Kenneth [University of Illinois

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenological reptation-tube model is based on a single chain perspective and was originally proposed to explain the remarkable viscoelastic properties of dense entangled polymer liquids. However, simulations over the last two decades have revealed a fundamental tension in the model: it assumes that bonded, single-chain backbone stresses are the sole polymer contribution to the slowly relaxing component of stress storage and elasticity, but mounting evidence suggests that at the local level of forces it is interchain contributions that dominate, as in simple liquids. Here we show that based on a chain model constructed at the level of self-consistently determined primitive paths, an explicit force-level treatment of the correlated intermolecular contributions to stress that arise from chain uncrossability can essentially quantitatively predict the entanglement plateau modulus associated with the soft rubbery response of polymer liquids. Analogies to transient localization and elasticity in glass-forming liquids are identified. Predictions for the effect of macroscopic deformation and anisotropic orientational order on the tube diameter are also made. Based on the interchain stress perspective the theory reproduces some aspects of the rheological response to shear and extensional deformations associated with the single chain tube model.

  20. Entangled polymer chain melts: Orientation and deformation dependent tube confinement and interchain entanglement elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Daniel M.; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2013-12-01

    The phenomenological reptation-tube model is based on a single chain perspective and was originally proposed to explain the remarkable viscoelastic properties of dense entangled polymer liquids. However, simulations over the last two decades have revealed a fundamental tension in the model: it assumes that bonded, single-chain backbone stresses are the sole polymer contribution to the slowly relaxing component of stress storage and elasticity, but mounting evidence suggests that at the local level of forces it is interchain contributions that dominate, as in simple liquids. Here we show that based on a chain model constructed at the level of self-consistently determined primitive paths, an explicit force-level treatment of the correlated intermolecular contributions to stress that arise from chain uncrossability can essentially quantitatively predict the entanglement plateau modulus associated with the soft rubbery response of polymer liquids. Analogies to transient localization and elasticity in glass-forming liquids are identified. Predictions for the effect of macroscopic deformation and anisotropic orientational order on the tube diameter are also made. Based on the interchain stress perspective the theory reproduces some aspects of the rheological response to shear and extensional deformations associated with the single chain tube model.

  1. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  2. Spin- and deformation-dependent orbital M1 strength in rare-earth nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarriguren, P.; Moya de Guerra, E. (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Estructura de la Materia); Nojarov, R.; Faessler, A. (Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik)

    1994-02-01

    The M1 excitations in three isotope chains, [sup 142,146,148,150]Nd, [sup 144,148,150,152,154]Sm, and [sup 156,158]Gd, are studied within the quasi-particle random-phase approximation using a mean field given by a deformed Woods-Saxon potential and including quadrupole-quadrupole and spin-spin residual interactions. A residual rotation-vibration coupling ensures the exclusion of the spurious state. The behaviour of the M1 strength distribution is studied systematically in the whole range of experimentally explored excitation energies and compared with the large variety of experimental information. The double-peaked structure of the spin M1 strength distribution found experimentally in several nuclei is qualitatively reproduced and interpreted as isoscalar and isovector peaks. (author).

  3. Quantitative description of the flow-stress dependence of aluminum alloys at the stage of steady flow upon hot deformation on the Zener–Hollomon parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churyumov, A. Yu.; Teleshov, V. V.

    2017-09-01

    The deformation behavior of a 1981 aluminum alloy has been studied using a complex for simulating thermomechanical processes in the temperature range of 200-400°C at a deformation rate in the range of 0.001-10 s-1. The models of the relationships between the flow stress, temperature, and deformation rate have been constructed using a power-law dependence, exponential dependence, and hyperbolic-sine function on the Zener-Hollomon parameter ( Z). In the calculations according to the power-law and exponential equations, discrepancies between the calculated and experimental values of the Zener-Hollomon parameter have been revealed at low and high values. These discrepancies are caused by the fact that the experimentally obtained dependences of the flow stress on the Z parameter over the entire range of its change with a single magnitude of the effective activation energy of the plastic deformation consist of two linear parts that correspond to the hot and warm deformation and have different magnitudes of the effective activation energy of plastic deformation with a lower value of the activation energy for hot deformation.

  4. Modelling time-dependent mechanical behaviour of softwood using deformation kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang; Svensson, Staffan

    2010-01-01

    The time-dependent mechanical behaviour (TDMB) of softwood is relevant, e.g., when wood is used as building material where the mechanical properties must be predicted for decades ahead. The established mathematical models should be able to predict the time-dependent behaviour. However, these models...... are not always based on the actual physical processes causing time-dependent behaviour and the physical interpretation of their input parameters is difficult. The present study describes the TDMB of a softwood tissue and its individual tracheids. A model is constructed with a local coordinate system that follows...

  5. Mechanical instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianyang; Ning, Fulong; Trinh, Thuat T.; Kjelstrup, Signe; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; He, Jianying; Skallerud, Bjørn H.; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    Despite observations of massive methane release and geohazards associated with gas hydrate instability in nature, as well as ductile flow accompanying hydrate dissociation in artificial polycrystalline methane hydrates in the laboratory, the destabilising mechanisms of gas hydrates under deformation and their grain-boundary structures have not yet been elucidated at the molecular level. Here we report direct molecular dynamics simulations of the material instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates under mechanical loading. The results show dislocation-free brittle failure in monocrystalline hydrates and an unexpected crossover from strengthening to weakening in polycrystals. Upon uniaxial depressurisation, strain-induced hydrate dissociation accompanied by grain-boundary decohesion and sliding destabilises the polycrystals. In contrast, upon compression, appreciable solid-state structural transformation dominates the response. These findings provide molecular insight not only into the metastable structures of grain boundaries, but also into unusual ductile flow with hydrate dissociation as observed during macroscopic compression experiments. PMID:26522051

  6. Effect of Structural Heterogeneity of 17Mn1Si Steel on the Temperature Dependence of Impact Deformation and Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Moiseenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a theoretical and experimental study of the relationship between the microstructural parameters, mechanical properties, and impact deformation and fracture of steels using the example of 17Mn1Si pipe steel. A model for the behavior of a polycrystalline grain conglomerate under impact loading at different temperatures was proposed within a cellular automata framework. It was shown that the intensity of dissipation processes explicitly depends on temperature and these processes play an important role in stress relaxation at the boundaries of structural elements. The Experimental study reveals the relationship between pendulum impact test temperature and the deformation/fracture energy of the steel. The impact toughness was shown to decrease almost linearly with the decreasing test temperature, which agrees with the fractographic analysis data confirming the increase in the fraction of brittle fracture in this case. It was shown with the aid of the proposed model and numerical simulations that the use of the excitable cellular automata method and an explicit account of test temperature through the possibility of energy release at internal interfaces help to explain the experimentally observed features of impact failure at different temperatures.

  7. An efficient size-dependent shear deformable shell model and molecular dynamics simulation for axial instability analysis of silicon nanoshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahmani, S; Aghdam, M M; Bahrami, M

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the size-dependent behavior of structures at nanoscale is essential in order to have an effective design of nanosystems. In the current investigation, the surface elasticity theory is extended to study the nonlinear buckling and postbuckling response of axially loaded silicon cylindrical naoshells. Thereby, an efficient size-dependent shear deformable shell model is developed including the size effect of surface free energy. A boundary layer theory of shell buckling in conjunction with a perturbation-based solution methodology is employed to predict the size dependency in the buckling loads and postbuckling behavior of silicon nanoshells having various thicknesses. After that, on the basis of the Tersoff empirical potential, a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is performed for a silicon cylindrical nanoshell with thickness of four times of silicon lattice constant, the critical buckling load and critical shortening of which are extracted and compared with those of the developed non-classical shell model. It is demonstrated that by taking the effects of surface free energy into account, a very good agreement is achieved between the results of the developed size-dependent continuum shell model and those of MD simulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  9. Observed gas hydrate morphologies in marine sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Roberts, J.; Druce, M. [Geotek Ltd., Daventry, Northamptonshire (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    The morphology of gas hydrate in marine sediments determines the basic physical properties of the sediment-hydrate matrix and provides information regarding the formation of gas hydrate deposits, and the nature of the disruption that will occur on dissociation. Small-scale morphology is useful in estimating the concentrations of gas hydrate from geophysical data. It is also important for predicting their response to climate change or commercial production. Many remote techniques for gas hydrate detection and quantification depend on hydrate morphology. In this study, morphology of gas hydrate was examined in HYACINTH pressure cores from recent seagoing expeditions. Visual and infrared observations from non-pressurized cores were also used. The expeditions and pressure core analysis were described in detail. This paper described the difference between two types of gas hydrate morphologies, notably pore-filling and grain-displacing. Last, the paper addressed the impact of hydrate morphology. It was concluded that a detailed morphology of gas hydrate is an essential component for a full understanding of the past, present, and future of any gas hydrate environment. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Methane hydrate formation in partially water-saturated Ottawa sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    Bulk properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediment strongly depend on whether hydrate forms primarily in the pore fluid, becomes a load-bearing member of the sediment matrix, or cements sediment grains. Our compressional wave speed measurements through partially water-saturated, methane hydrate-bearing Ottawa sands suggest hydrate surrounds and cements sediment grains. The three Ottawa sand packs tested in the Gas Hydrate And Sediment Test Laboratory Instrument (GHASTLI) contain 38(1)% porosity, initially with distilled water saturating 58, 31, and 16% of that pore space, respectively. From the volume of methane gas produced during hydrate dissociation, we calculated the hydrate concentration in the pore space to be 70, 37, and 20% respectively. Based on these hydrate concentrations and our measured compressional wave speeds, we used a rock physics model to differentiate between potential pore-space hydrate distributions. Model results suggest methane hydrate cements unconsolidated sediment when forming in systems containing an abundant gas phase.

  11. A finite element technique for non-deterministic thermal deformation analyses including temperature dependent material properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, W. R., Jr.; Walston, W. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A technique utilizing the finite element displacement method is developed for the static analysis of structures subjected to non-deterministic thermal loading in which the material properties, assumed isotropic, are temperature dependent. Matrix equations are developed for the first two statistical moments of the displacements using a third order series expansion for the displacements in terms of the random temperatures. Sample problems are included to demonstrate the range of applicability of the third order series solutions. These solutions are compared with results from Monte Carlo analyses and also, for some problems, with solutions obtained by numerically integrating equations for the statistical properties of the displacements. In general, it is shown that the effect of temperature dependent material properties can have a significant effect on the covariances of the displacements.

  12. Microscopic Origin of Strain Hardening in Methane Hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jihui; Liang, Yunfeng; Tsuji, Takeshi; Murata, Sumihiko; Matsuoka, Toshifumi

    2016-03-24

    It has been reported for a long time that methane hydrate presents strain hardening, whereas the strength of normal ice weakens with increasing strain after an ultimate strength. However, the microscopic origin of these differences is not known. Here, we investigated the mechanical characteristics of methane hydrate and normal ice by compressive deformation test using molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that methane hydrate exhibits strain hardening only if the hydrate is confined to a certain finite cross-sectional area that is normal to the compression direction. For normal ice, it does not present strain hardening under the same conditions. We show that hydrate guest methane molecules exhibit no long-distance diffusion when confined to a finite-size area. They appear to serve as non-deformable units that prevent hydrate structure failure, and thus are responsible for the strain-hardening phenomenon.

  13. Influence of Proteoglycan on Time-Dependent Mechanical Behaviors of Articular Cartilage under Constant Total Compressive Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Teruo; Sakai, Nobuo; Sawae, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Koji; Ihara, Maki

    Articular cartilage has biphasic property based on high water content. It is generally believed that the proteoglycan supports the compressive load, but the detailed loading mechanism has not yet been clarified. In this study, first we observed the changes in compressive stress and strain of articular cartilage under constant total compressive deflection. We evaluated the changes in modulus of elasticity, which was estimated from the stress-strain relation in equilibrium state. To examine the role of proteoglycan in compressed articular cartilage, we compared the time-dependent viscoelastic behaviors in both the intact cartilage and the cartilage treated with chondoroitinase ABC under constant total compressive deformation. We could confirm that the peak stress after compression and the modulus of elasticity at equilibrium were reduced after the digestion of proteoglycan. Next, we observed the changes in local strain in both articular cartilage specimens with and without chondroitinase treatment by monitoring the position of stained chondrocyte in the confocal laser scanning microscope. These visualized images indicated that the local strain changed time-dependently and depth-dependently. The digested cartilage showed the quicker change in movement and larger thinning in surface layer than the intact cartilage. These results indicate that the proteoglycan contributes to the compressive load-carrying capacity and controls the permeability.

  14. Natural Gas Hydrates

    OpenAIRE

    Ersland, Geir

    2010-01-01

    The experimental set-up with the MRI monitoring apparatus was capable of forming large quantities of methane hydrates in sandstone pores and monitor hydrate growth patterns for various initial conditions. Spontaneous conversion of methane hydrate to carbon dioxide hydrate occurred when methane hydrate, in porous media, was exposed to liquid carbon dioxide. The MRI images did not detect any significant increase in signal in the hydrate saturated cores that would indicate the presence of free w...

  15. Time-dependent nonlinear finite element modeling of the elastic and plastic deformation in SiGe heterostructured nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoui, A.; Sahtout, F. K.; Vlahovic, B.

    2017-01-01

    The study of strain and stress distributions and relaxation mechanisms during epitaxial deposition of ultra-thin film heterostructures is of critical importance for nanoelectronic materials. It provides guidance for the control of structures at the nanometer scale and insights into the underlying physics. In this paper, we present a time-dependent nonlinear finite element model, which realistically simulates the evolution of elastic and plastic deformation in SiGe heterostructured nanomaterials during epitaxial deposition. Dynamic elements have been used to simulate the layer-by-layer deposition and growth rate as well as chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) planarization. The thickness of add-on and etched-off layers was limited to few nanometers depending on the final epitaxial layer thickness and its growth rate. The material plastic behavior is described by the Von Mises yield criterion coupled with isotropic work hardening conditions and the Levy-Mises flow rule. The model has been successfully applied to the growth of ultra-thin (15 nm) strained-Si/ S i1 -xG ex /Si(001) heterostructures. Depth and time dependent elastic and plastic stress and strain in the growing layers are quantified and the relaxation mechanisms are deduced. From the calculated elastic and plastic strain fields, we derived the relaxation factor, plastic strain rate, dislocation glide velocity, misfit, and threading dislocation density as well as several structural properties such as lattice parameters and misfit dislocation spacing and length. These were found in close agreement with published experimental data. The simulation was able to show at which step of the growth process and how often yielding events occur. Plastic deformation and so the nucleation and multiplication of dislocations appeared to occur consistently during growth of the graded-layer. The simulation was also able to predict that CMP of the SiGe-cap followed by a regrowth step will indeed further relax the graded layer

  16. Hydraulic and Mechanical Effects from Gas Hydrate Conversion and Secondary Gas Hydrate Formation during Injection of CO2 into CH4-Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, N.; Deusner, C.; Kossel, E.; Schicks, J. M.; Spangenberg, E.; Priegnitz, M.; Heeschen, K. U.; Abendroth, S.; Thaler, J.; Haeckel, M.

    2014-12-01

    The injection of CO2 into CH4-hydrate-bearing sediments has the potential to drive natural gas production and simultaneously sequester CO2 by hydrate conversion. The process aims at maintaining the in situ hydrate saturation and structure and causing limited impact on soil hydraulic properties and geomechanical stability. However, to increase hydrate conversion yields and rates it must potentially be assisted by thermal stimulation or depressurization. Further, secondary formation of CO2-rich hydrates from pore water and injected CO2 enhances hydrate conversion and CH4 production yields [1]. Technical stimulation and secondary hydrate formation add significant complexity to the bulk conversion process resulting in spatial and temporal effects on hydraulic and geomechanical properties that cannot be predicted by current reservoir simulation codes. In a combined experimental and numerical approach, it is our objective to elucidate both hydraulic and mechanical effects of CO2 injection and CH4-CO2-hydrate conversion in CH4-hydrate bearing soils. For the experimental approach we used various high-pressure flow-through systems equipped with different online and in situ monitoring tools (e.g. Raman microscopy, MRI and ERT). One particular focus was the design of triaxial cell experimental systems, which enable us to study sample behavior even during large deformations and particle flow. We present results from various flow-through high-pressure experimental studies on different scales, which indicate that hydraulic and geomechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments are drastically altered during and after injection of CO2. We discuss the results in light of the competing processes of hydrate dissociation, hydrate conversion and secondary hydrate formation. Our results will also contribute to the understanding of effects of temperature and pressure changes leading to dissociation of gas hydrates in ocean and permafrost systems. [1] Deusner C, Bigalke N, Kossel E

  17. Multicomponent modelling of Portland cement hydration reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ukrainczyk, N.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    The prospect of cement and concrete technologies depends on more in depth understanding of cement hydration reactions. Hydration reaction models simulate the development of the microstructures that can finally be used to estimate the cement based material properties that influence performance and

  18. Desalination utilizing clathrate hydrates (LDRD final report).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Greathouse, Jeffery A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Majzoub, Eric H. (University of Missouri, Columbia, MO)

    2008-01-01

    Advances are reported in several aspects of clathrate hydrate desalination fundamentals necessary to develop an economical means to produce municipal quantities of potable water from seawater or brackish feedstock. These aspects include the following, (1) advances in defining the most promising systems design based on new types of hydrate guest molecules, (2) selection of optimal multi-phase reactors and separation arrangements, and, (3) applicability of an inert heat exchange fluid to moderate hydrate growth, control the morphology of the solid hydrate material formed, and facilitate separation of hydrate solids from concentrated brine. The rate of R141b hydrate formation was determined and found to depend only on the degree of supercooling. The rate of R141b hydrate formation in the presence of a heat exchange fluid depended on the degree of supercooling according to the same rate equation as pure R141b with secondary dependence on salinity. Experiments demonstrated that a perfluorocarbon heat exchange fluid assisted separation of R141b hydrates from brine. Preliminary experiments using the guest species, difluoromethane, showed that hydrate formation rates were substantial at temperatures up to at least 12 C and demonstrated partial separation of water from brine. We present a detailed molecular picture of the structure and dynamics of R141b guest molecules within water cages, obtained from ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and Raman spectroscopy. Density functional theory calculations were used to provide an energetic and molecular orbital description of R141b stability in both large and small cages in a structure II hydrate. Additionally, the hydrate of an isomer, 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, does not form at ambient conditions because of extensive overlap of electron density between guest and host. Classical molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory trials support the results for the isomer hydrate. Molecular dynamics simulations

  19. Surface-Facet-Dependent Phonon Deformation Potential in Individual Strained Topological Insulator Bi2Se3 Nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuan; Zhou, Xu; Jin, Han; Li, Cai-Zhen; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Liu, Kaihui; Yu, Dapeng; Dressel, Martin; Liao, Zhi-Min

    2015-10-27

    Strain is an important method to tune the properties of topological insulators. For example, compressive strain can induce superconductivity in Bi2Se3 bulk material. Topological insulator nanostructures are the superior candidates to utilize the unique surface states due to the large surface to volume ratio. Therefore, it is highly desirable to monitor the local strain effects in individual topological insulator nanostructures. Here, we report the systematical micro-Raman spectra of single strained Bi2Se3 nanoribbons with different thicknesses and different surface facets, where four optical modes are resolved in both Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectral lines. A striking anisotropy of the strain dependence is observed in the phonon frequency of strained Bi2Se3 nanoribbons grown along the ⟨112̅0⟩ direction. The frequencies of the in-plane Eg(2) and out-of-plane A1g(1) modes exhibit a nearly linear blue-shift against bending strain when the nanoribbon is bent along the ⟨112̅0⟩ direction with the curved {0001} surface. In this case, the phonon deformation potential of the Eg(2) phonon for 100 nm-thick Bi2Se3 nanoribbon is up to 0.94 cm(–1)/%, which is twice of that in Bi2Se3 bulk material (0.52 cm(–1)/%). Our results may be valuable for the strain modulation of individual topological insulator nanostructures.

  20. THE PRESENCE OF POSTURAL DEFORMITIES OF THE YOUTH DEPENDING ON THE LEVEL OF PARENTS KNOWLADGE ABOUT DEFICIENT BODY POSTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Bogdanović

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this study is deterimining the presence of postural deformities in sagittal view (defi cient kyphotic and lordotic body posture of the youth depanding on the level of parents knowladge about defi cient body posture. The complete content of the program was conducted in the territory of the city of Kragujevac in several elementary schools, comprising 299 students of the 5th grade and their parents. The object of this study was to determine the number of students with defi cient kyphotic and lordotic body posture, to determine the presence of dis arrangements depanding on the gender and to determine the presence of kyphotic and lordotic deformity depanding on the parents level of information about defi ciant body posture among children. Kyphotic deformity of the examiners of male population is mostly present in the group of parents who are poorly informed about body posture defi ciency. Regarding examiners of female population , the presence of deformation is equally divided on the group of parents who expressed themselves as being very well, those who are undecided and those who are poorly informed. The more signifi cant presence of kyphotic deformity is at examiners of male population than at the examiners of female population while the higher presence of lordotic deformity is at the examiners of female population. Regarding female population we can observe the highest presence of deformation in the group of parents who are undecided while the other groups are very equabal by the presence of deformation. Stated measures impose a statement that it is necessary to continuosly work on both - children education and parents education aiming to recognize posture defi ciency and physical deformation of school and preschool population and all of this with the object of reducing the deformation and on time detecting certain disarrangements and taking adaquate measures for its senctuary

  1. Measured temperature and pressure dependence of Vp and Vs in compacted, polycrystalline sI methane and sII methane-ethane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgerud, M.B.; Waite, W.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Nur, A.

    2003-01-01

    We report on compressional- and shear-wave-speed measurements made on compacted polycrystalline sI methane and sII methane-ethane hydrate. The gas hydrate samples are synthesized directly in the measurement apparatus by warming granulated ice to 17??C in the presence of a clathrate-forming gas at high pressure (methane for sI, 90.2% methane, 9.8% ethane for sII). Porosity is eliminated after hydrate synthesis by compacting the sample in the synthesis pressure vessel between a hydraulic ram and a fixed end-plug, both containing shear-wave transducers. Wave-speed measurements are made between -20 and 15??C and 0 to 105 MPa applied piston pressure.

  2. Measured temperature and pressure dependence of V-p and V-s in compacted, polycrystalline sI methane and sII methane-ethane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgerud, M. B.; Waite, W. F.; Kirby, S. H.; Nur, A.

    2003-01-01

    We report on compressional- and shear-wave-speed measurements made on compacted polycrystalline sI methane and sII methane-ethane hydrate. The gas hydrate samples are synthesized directly in the measurement apparatus by warming granulated ice to 17degreesC in the presence of a clathrate-forming gas at high pressure (methane for sI, 90.2% methane, 9.8% ethane for sII). Porosity is eliminated after hydrate synthesis by compacting the sample in the synthesis pressure vessel between a hydraulic ram and a fixed end-plug, both containing shear-wave transducers. Wave-speed measurements are made between -20 and 15degreesC and 0 to 105 MPa applied piston pressure.

  3. Associative Flow Rule Used to Include Hydrostatic Stress Effects in Analysis of Strain-Rate-Dependent Deformation of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2004-01-01

    designing reliable composite engine cases that are lighter than the metal cases in current use. The types of polymer matrix composites that are likely to be used in such an application have a deformation response that is nonlinear and that varies with strain rate. The nonlinearity and the strain-rate dependence of the composite response are due primarily to the matrix constituent. Therefore, in developing material models to be used in the design of impact-resistant composite engine cases, the deformation of the polymer matrix must be correctly analyzed. However, unlike in metals, the nonlinear response of polymers depends on the hydrostatic stresses, which must be accounted for within an analytical model. By applying micromechanics techniques along with given fiber properties, one can also determine the effects of the hydrostatic stresses in the polymer on the overall composite deformation response. First efforts to account for the hydrostatic stress effects in the composite deformation applied purely empirical methods that relied on composite-level data. In later efforts, to allow polymer properties to be characterized solely on the basis of polymer data, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center developed equations to model the polymers that were based on a non-associative flow rule, and efforts to use these equations to simulate the deformation of representative polymer materials were reasonably successful. However, these equations were found to have difficulty in correctly analyzing the multiaxial stress states found in the polymer matrix constituent of a composite material. To correct these difficulties, and to allow for the accurate simulation of the nonlinear strain-rate-dependent deformation analysis of polymer matrix composites, in the efforts reported here Glenn researchers reformulated the polymer constitutive equations from basic principles using the concept of an associative flow rule. These revised equations were characterized and validated in an

  4. Deoxyribonucleoprotein structure and radiation injury - Cellular radiosensitivity is determined by LET-infinity-dependent DNA damage in hydrated deoxyribonucleoproteins and the extent of its repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lett, J. T.; Peters, E. L.

    1992-01-01

    Until recently, OH radicals formed in bulk nuclear water were believed to be the major causes of DNA damage that results in cell death, especially for sparsely ionizing radiations. That hypothesis has now been challenged, if not refuted. Lethal genomic DNA damage is determined mainly by energy deposition in deoxyribonucleoproteins, and their hydration shells, and charge (energy) transfer processes within those structures.

  5. Dissociation of methane hydrate granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misyura, S. Y.; Donskoy, I. G.; Morozov, V. S.

    2017-09-01

    The methane hydrate dissociation at negative temperatures and under external pressure of 1 bar is studied experimentally. It is shown that the dissociation rate of the gas hydrate depends on the granule diameter and heat transfer. The dissociation curve has an extremum. The dissociation rate initially increases due to the temperature increase and reaches the maximum value and then sharply falls due to the curvature of the granules. When describing dissociation kinetics of the spherical granules, it is important to take into account the granule size and their composition.

  6. The Influence of Temperature on Time-Dependent Deformation and Failure in Granite: A Mesoscale Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, T.; Zhou, G. L.; Heap, Michael J.; Zhu, W. C.; Chen, C. F.; Baud, Patrick

    2017-09-01

    An understanding of the influence of temperature on brittle creep in granite is important for the management and optimization of granitic nuclear waste repositories and geothermal resources. We propose here a two-dimensional, thermo-mechanical numerical model that describes the time-dependent brittle deformation (brittle creep) of low-porosity granite under different constant temperatures and confining pressures. The mesoscale model accounts for material heterogeneity through a stochastic local failure stress field, and local material degradation using an exponential material softening law. Importantly, the model introduces the concept of a mesoscopic renormalization to capture the co-operative interaction between microcracks in the transition from distributed to localized damage. The mesoscale physico-mechanical parameters for the model were first determined using a trial-and-error method (until the modeled output accurately captured mechanical data from constant strain rate experiments on low-porosity granite at three different confining pressures). The thermo-physical parameters required for the model, such as specific heat capacity, coefficient of linear thermal expansion, and thermal conductivity, were then determined from brittle creep experiments performed on the same low-porosity granite at temperatures of 23, 50, and 90 °C. The good agreement between the modeled output and the experimental data, using a unique set of thermo-physico-mechanical parameters, lends confidence to our numerical approach. Using these parameters, we then explore the influence of temperature, differential stress, confining pressure, and sample homogeneity on brittle creep in low-porosity granite. Our simulations show that increases in temperature and differential stress increase the creep strain rate and therefore reduce time-to-failure, while increases in confining pressure and sample homogeneity decrease creep strain rate and increase time-to-failure. We anticipate that the

  7. Controls on the physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments because of the interaction between gas hydrate and porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung W.; Collett, Timothy S.

    2005-01-01

    Physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the pore-scale interaction between gas hydrate and porous media as well as the amount of gas hydrate present. Well log measurements such as proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation and electromagnetic propagation tool (EPT) techniques depend primarily on the bulk volume of gas hydrate in the pore space irrespective of the pore-scale interaction. However, elastic velocities or permeability depend on how gas hydrate is distributed in the pore space as well as the amount of gas hydrate. Gas-hydrate saturations estimated from NMR and EPT measurements are free of adjustable parameters; thus, the estimations are unbiased estimates of gas hydrate if the measurement is accurate. However, the amount of gas hydrate estimated from elastic velocities or electrical resistivities depends on many adjustable parameters and models related to the interaction of gas hydrate and porous media, so these estimates are model dependent and biased. NMR, EPT, elastic-wave velocity, electrical resistivity, and permeability measurements acquired in the Mallik 5L-38 well in the Mackenzie Delta, Canada, show that all of the well log evaluation techniques considered provide comparable gas-hydrate saturations in clean (low shale content) sandstone intervals with high gas-hydrate saturations. However, in shaly intervals, estimates from log measurement depending on the pore-scale interaction between gas hydrate and host sediments are higher than those estimates from measurements depending on the bulk volume of gas hydrate.

  8. Mass fractionation of noble gases in synthetic methane hydrate: Implications for naturally occurring gas hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Stern, Laura; Pohlman, John W.; Ruppel, Carolyn; Moscati, Richard J.; Landis, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of contemporary or longer term (since 15 ka) climate warming, gas hydrates in some settings may presently be dissociating and releasing methane and other gases to the ocean-atmosphere system. A key challenge in assessing the impact of dissociating gas hydrates on global atmospheric methane is the lack of a technique able to distinguish between methane recently released from gas hydrates and methane emitted from leaky thermogenic reservoirs, shallow sediments (some newly thawed), coal beds, and other sources. Carbon and deuterium stable isotopic fractionation during methane formation provides a first-order constraint on the processes (microbial or thermogenic) of methane generation. However, because gas hydrate formation and dissociation do not cause significant isotopic fractionation, a stable isotope-based hydrate-source determination is not possible. Here, we investigate patterns of mass-dependent noble gas fractionation within the gas hydrate lattice to fingerprint methane released from gas hydrates. Starting with synthetic gas hydrate formed under laboratory conditions, we document complex noble gas fractionation patterns in the gases liberated during dissociation and explore the effects of aging and storage (e.g., in liquid nitrogen), as well as sampling and preservation procedures. The laboratory results confirm a unique noble gas fractionation pattern for gas hydrates, one that shows promise in evaluating modern natural gas seeps for a signature associated with gas hydrate dissociation.

  9. Effects of Nanosilica on Early Age Stages of Cement Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forood Torabian Isfahani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of nanosilica on cement hydration have been broadly investigated in the literature and early age cement hydration, as a whole, has been mainly considered, disregarding the substages of the hydration. The hydration of cement is characterized by different substages and nanosilica effect on the hydration could be a result of diverse, even contradictory, behavior of nanosilica in individual stages of the hydration. In this study, effects of nanosilica on different substages of cement hydration are investigated. Isothermal calorimetry results show that at early ages (initial 72 hours the effects of nanosilica depend on the phenomenon by which the hydration is governed: when the hydration is chemically controlled, that is, during initial reaction, dormant period, and acceleratory period, the hydration rate is accelerated by adding nanosilica; when the hydration is governed by diffusion process, that is, during postacceleratory period, the hydration rate is decelerated by adding nanosilica. The Thermal Gravimetric Analysis on the samples at the hardened state (after 28 days of curing reveals that, after adding nanosilica, the hydration degree slightly increased compared to the plain paste.

  10. Geometry- and Length Scale-Dependent Deformation and Recovery on Micro- and Nanopatterned Shape Memory Polymer Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei Li; Low, Hong Yee

    2016-03-30

    Micro- and nanoscale surface textures, when optimally designed, present a unique approach to improve surface functionalities. Coupling surface texture with shape memory polymers may generate reversibly tuneable surface properties. A shape memory polyetherurethane is used to prepare various surface textures including 2 μm- and 200 nm-gratings, 250 nm-pillars and 200 nm-holes. The mechanical deformation via stretching and recovery of the surface texture are investigated as a function of length scales and shapes. Results show the 200 nm-grating exhibiting more deformation than 2 μm-grating. Grating imparts anisotropic and surface area-to-volume effects, causing different degree of deformation between gratings and pillars under the same applied macroscopic strain. Full distribution of stress within the film causes the holes to deform more substantially than the pillars. In the recovery study, unlike a nearly complete recovery for the gratings after 10 transformation cycles, the high contribution of surface energy impedes the recovery of holes and pillars. The surface textures are shown to perform a switchable wetting function. This study provides insights into how geometric features of shape memory surface patterns can be designed to modulate the shape programming and recovery, and how the control of reversibly deformable surface textures can be applied to transfer microdroplets.

  11. Local membrane deformations activate Ca2+-dependent K+ and anionic currents in intact human red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrda, Agnieszka; Cytlak, Urszula; Ciuraszkiewicz, Anna

    2010-01-01

    by such flow, as well as the local membrane deformations generated in certain pathological conditions, such as sickle cell anemia, have been shown to increase membrane permeability, based largely on experimentation with red cell suspensions. We attempted here the first measurements of membrane currents......-activated transient PCa observed here under local membrane deformation is a likely contributor to the Ca(2+)-mediated effects observed during the normal aging process of red blood cells, and to the increased Ca(2+) content of red cells in certain hereditary anemias such as thalassemia and sickle cell anemia.......BACKGROUND: The mechanical, rheological and shape properties of red blood cells are determined by their cortical cytoskeleton, evolutionarily optimized to provide the dynamic deformability required for flow through capillaries much narrower than the cell's diameter. The shear stress induced...

  12. Dependence of deformability of geometries and characteristics of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in canonical 2'-deoxyribonucleotides on DNA conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamarchuk, Gennady V; Shishkin, Oleg V; Gorb, Leonid; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2009-04-01

    The molecular structure and deformability (with respect to average geometry) of methyl ethers of canonical 2'-deoxyribonucleotides thymidine-5'-phosphate (mTMP), 2-deoxycytidine-5'-phosphate (mCMP), 2-deoxyadenosine-5'-phosphate (mAMP) and 2'-deoxyguanosine-5'-phosphate (mGMP) in different types of DNA have been calculated using B3LYP/cc-pvdz method. Comparison of energy at equilibrium conformations of nucleotides and conformations with torsion angles of backbone fixed to average values for different types of DNA reveals that incorporation of nucleotides to A-DNA macromolecules requires the minimum amount of deformation energy. Therefore, this type of DNA should be the least strained from viewpoint of intramolecular deformations of monomers. Modeling of environmental effects within the PCM approach reveals that the immersion of nucleotides in polar medium results in significant decrease of energy differences between anti conformers of all DNTs and syn conformers of mGMP. This also leads to reduction by almost a half nucleotides' deformation energy facilitating formation of DNA macromolecule. Change of DNTs conformation causes switch between different types of intramolecular H bonds. Every type of DNA possesses unique set of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in nucleotides.

  13. Multiscale measurements on temperature-dependent deformation of a textured magnesium alloy with synchrotron x-ray imaging and diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, L.; Bie, B. X.; Li, Q. H.; Sun, T.; Fezzaa, K.; Gong, X. L.; Luo, S. N.

    2017-06-01

    In situ synchrotron x-ray imaging and diffraction are used to investigate deformation of a rolled magnesium alloy under uniaxial compression at room and elevated temperatures along two different directions. The loading axis (LA) is either perpendicular or parallel to the normal direction, and these two cases are referred to as LA⊥ and LAk loading, respectively. Multiscale measurements including stressestrain curves (macroscale), strain fields (mesoscale), and diffraction patterns (microscale) are obtained simultaneously. Due to initial texture, f1012g extension twinning is predominant in the LA⊥ loading, while dislocation motion prevails in the LAk loading. With increasing temperature, fewer f1012g extension twins are activated in the LA⊥ samples, giving rise to reduced strain homogenization, while pyramidal slip becomes readily activated, leading to more homogeneous deformation for the LAk loading. The difference in the strain hardening rates is attributed to that in strain field homogenization for these two loading directions

  14. Time and pressure dependent deformation of microcontact printed channels fabricated using self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiol on gold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jalal Uddin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the replication-based microcontact printing method has been presented to study the deformation effect of different printing times and printing pressures on the microcontact printed structures. Cost-effective microcontact printing channels of self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiol have been prepared on gold surface. The alkanethiol inking the polydimethylsiloxanes stamp effectively forms the self-assembled monolayers on the noble gold surface that protects the metal against etchant solution and thereby forms channel-like structures. To address the deformation issue, variations in the printing time in the range of 30 s–60 min and the printing pressure ranging from 840 to 4200 Pa have been studied. The estimation of differing the channel width and channel space with varying printing time and pressure shows the best resolution structures printed under minimal printing time at atmospheric pressure.

  15. Stability evaluation of hydrate-bearing sediments during thermally-driven hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, T.; Cho, G.; Santamarina, J.; Kim, H.; Lee, J.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrate-bearing sediments may destabilize spontaneously as part of geological processes, unavoidably during petroleum drilling/production operations, or intentionally as part of gas extraction from the hydrate itself. In all cases, high pore fluid pressure generation is anticipated during hydrate dissociation. This study examined how thermal changes destabilize gas hydrate-bearing sediments. First, an analytical formulation was derived for predicting fluid pressure evolution in hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to thermal stimulation without mass transfer. The formulation captures the self-preservation behavior, calculates the hydrate and free gas quantities during dissociation, considering effective stress-controlled sediment compressibility and gas solubility in aqueous phase. Pore fluid pressure generation is proportional to the initial hydrate fraction and the sediment bulk stiffness; is inversely proportional to the initial gas fraction and gas solubility; and is limited by changes in effective stress that cause the failure of the sediment. Second, the analytical formulation for hydrate dissociation was incorporated as a user-defined function into a verified finite difference code (FLAC2D). The underlying physical processes of hydrate-bearing sediments, including hydrate dissociation, self-preservation, pore pressure evolution, gas dissolution, and sediment volume expansion, were coupled with the thermal conduction, pore fluid flow, and mechanical response of sediments. We conducted the simulations for a duration of 20 years, assuming a constant-temperature wellbore transferred heat to the surrounding hydrate-bearing sediments, resulting in dissociation of methane hydrate in the well vicinity. The model predicted dissociation-induced excess pore fluid pressures which resulted in a large volume expansion and plastic deformation of the sediments. Furthermore, when the critical stress was reached, localized shear failure of the sediment around the borehole was

  16. Critical state soil constitutive model for methane hydrate soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, S.; Soga, K.; Yamamoto, K.

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a new constitutive model that simulates the mechanical behavior of methane hydrate-bearing soil based on the concept of critical state soil mechanics, referred to as the "Methane Hydrate Critical State (MHCS) model". Methane hydrate-bearing soil is, under certain geological conditions, known to exhibit greater stiffness, strength and dilatancy, which are often observed in dense soils and also in bonded soils such as cemented soil and unsaturated soil. Those soils tend to show greater resistance to compressive deformation but the tendency disappears when the soil is excessively compressed or the bonds are destroyed due to shearing. The proposed model represents these features by introducing five extra model parameters to the conventional critical state model. It is found that, for an accurate prediction of ground settlement, volumetric yielding plays an important role when hydrate soil undergoes a significant change in effective stresses and hydrate saturation, which are expected during depressurization for methane gas recovery.

  17. Gas hydrate in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2018-01-17

    Gas hydrate is a naturally occurring, ice-like substance that forms when water and gas combine under high pressure and at moderate temperatures. Methane is the most common gas present in gas hydrate, although other gases may also be included in hydrate structures, particularly in areas close to conventional oil and gas reservoirs. Gas hydrate is widespread in ocean-bottom sediments at water depths greater than 300–500 meters (m; 984–1,640 feet [ft]) and is also present in areas with permanently frozen ground (permafrost). Several countries are evaluating gas hydrate as a possible energy resource in deepwater or permafrost settings. Gas hydrate is also under investigation to determine how environmental change may affect these deposits.

  18. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  19. Evolution of Dislocation Subsystem Components During Plastic Deformation Depending on Parameters of Strengthening Phase with L12 Superstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneyko, O. I.; Kovalevskaya, T. A.; Kulaeva, N. A.; Kolupaeva, S. N.; Shalygina, T. A.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents results of mathematical modelling of plastic deformation in dispersion-hardened materials with FCC crystal system and L12 superstructure particles. Research results show that the size and the distance between particles of the strengthening phase affect the strain hardening and the evolution of the dislocation subsystem of the FCC alloy hardened with coherent L12 superstructure particles. It is found that increased size of ordered particles or decreased distance between them enhances the abnormal growth in the flow stress and the density of the dislocation subsystem components. Investigations show that prismatic dislocation loops predominate in the dislocation subsystem of materials having a nano-dispersion strengthening phase.

  20. Reactions of Cg10062, a cis-3-Chloroacrylic Acid Dehalogenase Homologue, with Acetylene and Allene Substrates: Evidence for a Hydration-Dependent Decarboxylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, Jamison P; Johnson, William H; Schroeder, Gottfried K; Whitman, Christian P

    2015-05-19

    Cg10062 is a cis-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (cis-CaaD) homologue from Corynebacterium glutamicum with an unknown function and an uninformative genomic context. It shares 53% pairwise sequence similarity with cis-CaaD including the six active site amino acids (Pro-1, His-28, Arg-70, Arg-73, Tyr-103, and Glu-114) that are critical for cis-CaaD activity. However, Cg10062 is a poor cis-CaaD: it lacks catalytic efficiency and isomer specificity. Two acetylene compounds (propiolate and 2-butynoate) and an allene compound, 2,3-butadienoate, were investigated as potential substrates. Cg10062 functions as a hydratase/decarboxylase using propiolate as well as the cis-3-chloro- and 3-bromoacrylates, generating mixtures of malonate semialdehyde and acetaldehyde. The two activities occur sequentially at the active site using the initial substrate. With 2,3-butadienoate and 2-butynoate, Cg10062 functions as a hydratase and converts both to acetoacetate. Mutations of the proposed water-activating residues (E114Q, E114D, and Y103F) have a range of consequences from a reduction in wild type activity to a switch of activities (i.e., hydratase into a hydratase/decarboxylase or vice versa). The intermediates for the hydration and decarboxylation products can be trapped as covalent adducts to Pro-1 when NaCNBH3 is incubated with the E114D mutant and 2,3-butadienoate or 2-butynoate, and the Y103F mutant and 2-butynoate. Three mechanisms are presented to explain these findings. One mechanism involves the direct attack of water on the substrate, whereas the other two mechanisms use covalent catalysis in which a covalent bond forms between Pro-1 and the hydration product or the substrate. The strengths and weaknesses of the mechanisms and the implications for Cg10062 function are discussed.

  1. New insight into probe-location dependent polarity and hydration at lipid/water interfaces: comparison between gel- and fluid-phases of lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Moirangthem Kiran; Shweta, Him; Khan, Mohammad Firoz; Sen, Sobhan

    2016-09-21

    Environment polarity and hydration at lipid/water interfaces play important roles in membrane biology, which are investigated here using a new homologous series of 4-aminophthalimide-based fluorescent molecules (4AP-Cn; n = 2-10, 12) having different lipophilicities (octanol/water partition coefficient - log P). We show that 4AP-Cn molecules probe a peculiar stepwise polarity (E) profile at the lipid/water interface of the gel-phase (Lβ') DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) bilayer at room temperature, which was not anticipated in earlier studies. However, the same molecules probe only a subtle but continuous polarity change at the interface of water and the fluid-phase (Lα) DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) bilayer at room temperature. Fluorescence quenching experiments indicate that solutes with different log P values adsorb at different depths across DPPC/water and DOPC/water interfaces, which correlate with the polarity profiles observed at the interfaces. Molecular dynamics simulations performed on eight probe-lipid systems (four in each of the DPPC and DOPC bilayers - a total run of 2.6 μs) support experimental results, providing further information on the relative position and angle distributions as well as hydration of probes at the interfaces. Simulation results indicate that besides positions, probe orientations also play an important role in defining the local dielectric environment by controlling the probes' exposure to water at the interfaces especially of the gel-phase DPPC bilayer. The results suggest that 4AP-Cn probes are well suited for studying solvation properties at lipid/water interfaces of gel- and fluid-phases simultaneously.

  2. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  3. Nano-granular texture of cement hydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannidou Katerina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical behavior of concrete crucially depends on cement hydrates, the “glue” of cement. The design of high performance and more environmentally friendly cements demands a deeper understanding of the formation of the multiscale structure of cement hydrates, when they precipitate and densify. We investigate the precipitation and setting of nano-grains of cement hydrates using a combination of Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics numerical simulations and study their texture from nano up to the micron scale. We characterize the texture of cement hydrates using the local volume fraction distribution, the pore size distribution, the scattering intensity and the chord length distribution and we compare them with experiments. Our nano-granular model provides cement structure with realistic texture and mechanics and can be further used to investigate degradation mechanisms.

  4. CO2 Hydration Shell Structure and Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukowski, Samual R; Mitev, Pavlin D; Hermansson, Kersti; Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2017-07-06

    The hydration-shell of CO2 is characterized using Raman multivariate curve resolution (Raman-MCR) spectroscopy combined with ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) vibrational density of states simulations, to validate our assignment of the experimentally observed high-frequency OH band to a weak hydrogen bond between water and CO2. Our results reveal that while the hydration-shell of CO2 is highly tetrahedral, it is also occasionally disrupted by the presence of entropically stabilized defects associated with the CO2-water hydrogen bond. Moreover, we find that the hydration-shell of CO2 undergoes a temperature-dependent structural transformation to a highly disordered (less tetrahedral) structure, reminiscent of the transformation that takes place at higher temperatures around much larger oily molecules. The biological significance of the CO2 hydration shell structural transformation is suggested by the fact that it takes place near physiological temperatures.

  5. The contrasting roles of creep and stress relaxation in the time-dependent deformation during in-situ cooling of a nickel-base single crystal superalloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwisawas, Chinnapat; D'Souza, Neil; Collins, David M; Bhowmik, Ayan

    2017-09-11

    Time dependent plastic deformation in a single crystal nickel-base superalloy during cooling from casting relevant temperatures has been studied using a combination of in-situ neutron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and modelling. Visco-plastic deformation during cooling was found to be dependent on the stress and constraints imposed to component contraction during cooling, which mechanistically comprises creep and stress relaxation. Creep results in progressive work hardening with dislocations shearing the γ' precipitates, a high dislocation density in the γ channels and near the γ/γ' interface and precipitate shearing. When macroscopic contraction is restricted, relaxation dominates. This leads to work softening from a decreased dislocation density and the presence of long segment stacking faults in γ phase. Changes in lattice strains occur to a similar magnitude in both the γ and γ' phases during stress relaxation, while in creep there is no clear monotonic trend in lattice strain in the γ phase, but only a marginal increase in the γ' precipitates. Using a visco-plastic law derived from in-situ experiments, the experimentally measured and calculated stresses during cooling show a good agreement when creep predominates. However, when stress relaxation dominates accounting for the decrease in dislocation density during cooling is essential.

  6. Mechanism of gypsum hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco, G.

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an hypothesis that the mechanism o f gypsum hydration and dehydration is performed through two simultaneous phenomena. In this study we try to clear up this phenomenon using chlorides as accelerators or a mixture of ethanol-methanol as retarders to carry out the gypsum setting. Natural Mexican gypsum samples and a hemihydrate prepared in the laboratory are used. The following analytical techniques are used: MO, DRX, DTA, TG and DTG. In agreement with the obtained results, it can be concluded: that colloid formation depends on the action of accelerators or retarders and the crystals are a consequence of the quantity of hemihydrate formed.

    En el mecanismo de hidratación y deshidratación del yeso existe la hipótesis de que éste se efectúa por dos fenómenos simultáneos. Este estudio intenta esclarecer estos fenómenos, empleando: cloruros como aceleradores o mezcla etanol-metanol como retardadores para efectuar el fraguado del yeso. Se emplean muestras de yeso de origen natural mexicano y hemihydrate preparado en laboratorio; se utilizan técnicas analíticas: MO, DRX, DTA, TG y DTG. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos se puede deducir: que la formación del coloide depende de la acción de los agentes aceleradores o retardadores y que los cristales son consecuencia de la cantidad de hemihidrato formado.

  7. Probing methane hydrate nucleation through the forward flux sampling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yuanfei; Li, Tianshu

    2014-11-26

    Understanding the nucleation of hydrate is the key to developing effective strategies for controlling methane hydrate formation. Here we present a computational study of methane hydrate nucleation, by combining the forward flux sampling (FFS) method and the coarse-grained water model mW. To facilitate the application of FFS in studying the formation of methane hydrate, we developed an effective order parameter λ on the basis of the topological analysis of the tetrahedral network. The order parameter capitalizes the signature of hydrate structure, i.e., polyhedral cages, and is capable of efficiently distinguishing hydrate from ice and liquid water while allowing the formation of different hydrate phases, i.e., sI, sII, and amorphous. Integration of the order parameter λ with FFS allows explicitly computing hydrate nucleation rates and obtaining an ensemble of nucleation trajectories under conditions where spontaneous hydrate nucleation becomes too slow to occur in direct simulation. The convergence of the obtained hydrate nucleation rate was found to depend crucially on the convergence of the spatial distribution for the spontaneously formed hydrate seeds obtained from the initial sampling of FFS. The validity of the approach is also verified by the agreement between the calculated nucleation rate and that inferred from the direct simulation. Analyzing the obtained large ensemble of hydrate nucleation trajectories, we show hydrate formation at 220 K and 500 bar is initiated by the nucleation events occurring in the vicinity of water-methane interface, and facilitated by a gradual transition from amorphous to crystalline structure. The latter provides the direct support to the proposed two-step nucleation mechanism of methane hydrate.

  8. Strain Rate Dependent Deformation of a Polymer Matrix Composite with Different Microstructures Subjected to Off-Axis Loading

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhu, Xiaojun; Chen, Xuefeng; Zhai, Zhi; Yang, Zhibo; Li, Xiang; He, Zhengjia

    2014-01-01

    ... are often subjected to complex loadings under extreme circumstances [3, 4] in which the properties of the PMCs exhibit highly nonlinear and rate dependence, so it is necessary for structural design and an...

  9. Electrical properties of polycrystalline methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Frane, W. L.; Stern, L.A.; Weitemeyer, K.A.; Constable, S.; Pinkston, J.C.; Roberts, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) remote-sensing techniques are demonstrated to be sensitive to gas hydrate concentration and distribution and complement other resource assessment techniques, particularly seismic methods. To fully utilize EM results requires knowledge of the electrical properties of individual phases and mixing relations, yet little is known about the electrical properties of gas hydrates. We developed a pressure cell to synthesize gas hydrate while simultaneously measuring in situ frequency-dependent electrical conductivity (σ). Synthesis of methane (CH4) hydrate was verified by thermal monitoring and by post run cryogenic scanning electron microscope imaging. Impedance spectra (20 Hz to 2 MHz) were collected before and after synthesis of polycrystalline CH4 hydrate from polycrystalline ice and used to calculate σ. We determined the σ of CH4 hydrate to be 5 × 10−5 S/m at 0°C with activation energy (Ea) of 30.6 kJ/mol (−15 to 15°C). After dissociation back into ice, σ measurements of samples increased by a factor of ~4 and Ea increased by ~50%, similar to the starting ice samples.

  10. Geomechanical, Hydraulic and Thermal Characteristics of Deep Oceanic Sandy Sediments Recovered during the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Expedition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohan Cha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the geomechanical, hydraulic and thermal characteristics of natural sandy sediments collected during the Ulleung Basin gas hydrate expedition 2, East Sea, offshore Korea. The studied sediment formation is considered as a potential target reservoir for natural gas production. The sediments contained silt, clay and sand fractions of 21%, 1.3% and 77.7%, respectively, as well as diatomaceous minerals with internal pores. The peak friction angle and critical state (or residual state friction angle under drained conditions were ~26° and ~22°, respectively. There was minimal or no apparent cohesion intercept. Stress- and strain-dependent elastic moduli, such as tangential modulus and secant modulus, were identified. The sediment stiffness increased with increasing confining stress, but degraded with increasing strain regime. Variations in water permeability with water saturation were obtained by fitting experimental matric suction-water saturation data to the Maulem-van Genuchen model. A significant reduction in thermal conductivity (from ~1.4–1.6 to ~0.5–0.7 W·m−1·K−1 was observed when water saturation decreased from 100% to ~10%–20%. In addition, the electrical resistance increased quasi-linearly with decreasing water saturation. The geomechanical, hydraulic and thermal properties of the hydrate-free sediments reported herein can be used as the baseline when predicting properties and behavior of the sediments containing hydrates, and when the hydrates dissociate during gas production. The variations in thermal and hydraulic properties with changing water and gas saturation can be used to assess gas production rates from hydrate-bearing deposits. In addition, while depressurization of hydrate-bearing sediments inevitably causes deformation of sediments under drained conditions, the obtained strength and stiffness properties and stress-strain responses of the sedimentary formation under drained loading conditions

  11. Combustion of Methane Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshandell, Melika

    A significant methane storehouse is in the form of methane hydrates on the sea floor and in the arctic permafrost. Methane hydrates are ice-like structures composed of water cages housing a guest methane molecule. This caged methane represents a resource of energy and a potential source of strong greenhouse gas. Most research related to methane hydrates has been focused on their formation and dissociation because they can form solid plugs that complicate transport of oil and gas in pipelines. This dissertation explores the direct burning of these methane hydrates where heat from the combustion process dissociates the hydrate into water and methane, and the released methane fuels the methane/air diffusion flame heat source. In contrast to the pipeline applications, very little research has been done on the combustion and burning characteristics of methane hydrates. This is the first dissertation on this subject. In this study, energy release and combustion characteristics of methane hydrates were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The experimental study involved collaboration with another research group, particularly in the creation of methane hydrate samples. The experiments were difficult because hydrates form at high pressure within a narrow temperature range. The process can be slow and the resulting hydrate can have somewhat variable properties (e.g., extent of clathration, shape, compactness). The experimental study examined broad characteristics of hydrate combustion, including flame appearance, burning time, conditions leading to flame extinguishment, the amount of hydrate water melted versus evaporated, and flame temperature. These properties were observed for samples of different physical size. Hydrate formation is a very slow process with pure water and methane. The addition of small amounts of surfactant increased substantially the hydrate formation rate. The effects of surfactant on burning characteristics were also studied. One finding

  12. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  13. Size-dependent plastic deformation and failure mechanisms of nanotwinned Ni{sub 3}Al: Insights from an atomistic cracking model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yun-Jiang, E-mail: yjwang@imech.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Tsuchiya, Koichi [Research Center for Strategic Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Dai, L.H., E-mail: lhdai@lnm.imech.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-01-01

    The polycrystalline Ni{sub 3}Al is brittle since the notorious intergranular fracture mode hinders its applications. Here we perform molecular dynamics to highlight the unique role of nanotwin boundary in the plastic deformation and failure mechanisms of Ni{sub 3}Al via an atomistic cracking model. Surprisingly, the strength, ductility and fracture toughness of the nanotwinned Ni{sub 3}Al are revealed to increase simultaneously with reducing twin size, possibly evading a traditional tradeoff between ductility/toughness and strength. A possible quasi-brittle fracture mode in single crystalline Ni{sub 3}Al is recognized as nucleating twinning partials from crack tip. However, the pre-existing twin boundaries can suppress the emission and propagation of successive twinning dislocations. Instead, dislocation avalanches happen and serve as a crack blunting mechanism which leads to the ductile fracture pattern of the nanotwinned Ni{sub 3}Al. A size-dependent transition of fracture mode from dislocation nucleation to shear localization is observed as twin becomes very small. A physical model combined with energetics analysis is provided to rationalize the transition. Our atomistic insights are in qualitative agreement with recent observations of improved strength and ductility of Ni{sub 3}Al with disordered nanotwinned structure after severe plastic deformation.

  14. Experimental Identification and Simulation of Time and/or Rate Dependent Reversible and Irreversible Deformation Regions for both a Titanium and Nickel Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Sellers, Cory

    2013-01-01

    In this paper time and/or rate dependent deformation regions are experimentally mapped out as a function of temperature. It is clearly demonstrated that the concept of a threshold stress (a stress that delineate reversible and irreversible behavior) is valid and necessary at elevated temperatures and corresponds to the classical yield stress at lower temperatures. Also the infinitely slow modulus, (Es) i.e. the elastic modulus of the material if it was loaded at an infinitely slow strain rate, and the "dynamic modulus", modulus, Ed, which represents the modulus of the material if it is loaded at an infinitely fast rate are used to delineate rate dependent from rate independent regions. As demonstrated at elevated temperatures there is a significant difference between the two modulus values, thus indicating both significant time-dependence and rate dependence. In the case of the nickel-based super alloy, ME3, this behavior is also shown to be grain size specific. Consequently, at higher temperatures viscoelastic behavior exist below k (i.e., the threshold stress) and at stresses above k the behavior is viscoplastic. Finally a multi-mechanism, stress partitioned viscoelastic model, capable of being consistently coupled to a viscoplastic model is characterized over the full temperature range investigated for Ti-6-4 and ME3.

  15. Numerical analysis of wellbore instability in gas hydrate formation during deep-water drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huaiwen; Cheng, Yuanfang; Li, Qingchao; Yan, Chuanliang; Han, Xiuting

    2018-02-01

    Gas hydrate formation may be encountered during deep-water drilling because of the large amount and wide distribution of gas hydrates under the shallow seabed of the South China Sea. Hydrates are extremely sensitive to temperature and pressure changes, and drilling through gas hydrate formation may cause dissociation of hydrates, accompanied by changes in wellbore temperatures, pore pressures, and stress states, thereby leading to wellbore plastic yield and wellbore instability. Considering the coupling effect of seepage of drilling fluid into gas hydrate formation, heat conduction between drilling fluid and formation, hydrate dissociation, and transformation of the formation framework, this study established a multi-field coupling mathematical model of the wellbore in the hydrate formation. Furthermore, the influences of drilling fluid temperatures, densities, and soaking time on the instability of hydrate formation were calculated and analyzed. Results show that the greater the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and hydrate formation is, the faster the hydrate dissociates, the wider the plastic dissociation range is, and the greater the failure width becomes. When the temperature difference is greater than 7°C, the maximum rate of plastic deformation around the wellbore is more than 10%, which is along the direction of the minimum horizontal in-situ stress and associated with instability and damage on the surrounding rock. The hydrate dissociation is insensitive to the variation of drilling fluid density, thereby implying that the change of the density of drilling fluids has a minimal effect on the hydrate dissociation. Drilling fluids that are absorbed into the hydrate formation result in fast dissociation at the initial stage. As time elapses, the hydrate dissociation slows down, but the risk of wellbore instability is aggravated due to the prolonged submersion in drilling fluids. For the sake of the stability of the wellbore in deep

  16. Mechanical behavior of a composite interface: Calcium-silicate-hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palkovic, Steven D.; Moeini, Sina; Büyüköztürk, Oral, E-mail: obuyuk@mit.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Yip, Sidney [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-07-21

    The generalized stacking fault (GSF) is a conceptual procedure historically used to assess shear behavior of defect-free crystalline structures through molecular dynamics or density functional theory simulations. We apply the GSF technique to the spatially and chemically complex quasi-layered structure of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the fundamental nanoscale binder within cementitious materials. A failure plane is enforced to calculate the shear traction-displacement response along a composite interface containing highly confined water molecules, hydroxyl groups, and calcium ions. GSF simulations are compared with affine (homogeneous) shear simulations, which allow strain to localize naturally in response to the local atomic environment. Comparison of strength and deformation behavior for the two loading methods shows the composite interface controls bulk shear deformation. Both models indicate the maximum shear strength of C-S-H exhibits a normal-stress dependency typical of cohesive-frictional materials. These findings suggest the applicability of GSF techniques to inhomogeneous structures and bonding environments, including other layered systems such as biological materials containing organic and inorganic interfaces.

  17. Hydration testing of athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppliger, Robert A; Bartok, Cynthia

    2002-01-01

    Dehydration not only reduces athletic performance, but also places athletes at risk of health problems and even death. For athletes, monitoring hydration has significant value in maximising performance during training and competition. It also offers medical personnel the opportunity to reduce health risks in situations where athletes engage in intentional weight loss. Simple non-invasive techniques, including weight monitoring and urine tests, can provide useful information. Bioimpedance methods tend to be easy to use and fairly inexpensive, but generally lack the precision and accuracy necessary for hydration monitoring. Blood tests appear to be the most accurate monitoring method, but are impractical because of cost and invasiveness. Although future research is needed to determine which hydration tests are the most accurate, we encourage sports teams to develop and implement hydration monitoring protocols based on the currently available methods. Medical personnel can use this information to maximise their team's athletic performance and minimise heat- and dehydration-related health risks to athletes.

  18. Electrical properties of methane hydrate + sediment mixtures: The σ of CH4 Hydrate + Sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Frane, Wyatt L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stern, Laura A. [U. S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Constable, Steven [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); Weitemeyer, Karen A. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); National Oceanography Centre Southampton (United Kingdom), Univ. of Southampton Waterfront Campus, Southampton (United Kingdom); Smith, Megan M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Roberts, Jeffery J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-30

    Knowledge of the electrical properties of multicomponent systems with gas hydrate, sediments, and pore water is needed to help relate electromagnetic (EM) measurements to specific gas hydrate concentration and distribution patterns in nature. We built a pressure cell capable of measuring in situ electrical properties of multicomponent systems such that the effects of individual components and mixing relations can be assessed. We first established the temperature-dependent electrical conductivity (σ) of pure, single-phase methane hydrate to be ~5 orders of magnitude lower than seawater, a substantial contrast that can help differentiate hydrate deposits from significantly more conductive water-saturated sediments in EM field surveys. We report σ measurements of two-component systems in which methane hydrate is mixed with variable amounts of quartz sand or glass beads. Sand by itself has low σ but is found to increase the overall σ of mixtures with well-connected methane hydrate. Alternatively, the overall σ decreases when sand concentrations are high enough to cause gas hydrate to be poorly connected, indicating that hydrate grains provide the primary conduction path. Our measurements suggest that impurities from sand induce chemical interactions and/or doping effects that result in higher electrical conductivity with lower temperature dependence. Finally, these results can be used in the modeling of massive or two-phase gas-hydrate-bearing systems devoid of conductive pore water. Further experiments that include a free water phase are the necessary next steps toward developing complex models relevant to most natural systems.

  19. Experimental Research on the Mechanical Properties of Methane Hydrate-Ice Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Feng Yu; Yanghui Li; Weiguo Liu; Yongchen Song

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical properties of methane hydrate are important to the stability of borehole and methane extraction from a methane hydrate reservoir. In this study, a series of triaxial compression tests were carried out on laboratory-formed methane hydrate-ice mixtures with various methane hydrate contents. Axial loading was conducted at an axial strain rate of 1.33%/min and a constant temperature of −10 °C. The results indicate that: (1) the deformation behavior is strongly affected by confining...

  20. Thermo-elastic plane deformations in doubly-connected domains with temperature and pressure which depend of the thermal conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Cimatti

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new weak formulation for the plane problem of thermoelastic theory in multiply-connected domains. This permits to avoid the difficulties connected with the Cesaro-Volterra boundary conditions in the related elliptic boundary-value problem. In the second part we consider a nonlinear version of the problem assuming that the thermal conductivity depends not only on the temperature but also on the pressure. Recent studies reveals that this situation can occur in practice. A theorem of existence and uniqueness is proved for this problem.

  1. Experimental Research on the Mechanical Properties of Methane Hydrate-Ice Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Yu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of methane hydrate are important to the stability of borehole and methane extraction from a methane hydrate reservoir. In this study, a series of triaxial compression tests were carried out on laboratory-formed methane hydrate-ice mixtures with various methane hydrate contents. Axial loading was conducted at an axial strain rate of 1.33%/min and a constant temperature of −10 °C. The results indicate that: (1 the deformation behavior is strongly affected by confining pressure and methane hydrate content; (2 the failure strength significantly increases with confining pressure when confining pressure is less than 10 MPa, and decreases with methane hydrate content; (3 the cohesion decreases with methane hydrate content, while the internal friction angle increases with methane hydrate content; (4 the strength of ice specimens are higher than that of methane hydrate-ice mixture specimens; Based on the experimental data, the relationship among failure strength, confining pressure and methane hydrate content was obtained, and a modified Mohr-Coulomb criterion considering the influence of methane hydrate content on shear strength was proposed.

  2. Methane gas hydrate effect on sediment acoustic and strength properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, W.J.; Waite, W.F.; Mason, D.H.; Gilbert, L.Y.; Pecher, I.A.

    2007-01-01

    To improve our understanding of the interaction of methane gas hydrate with host sediment, we studied: (1) the effects of gas hydrate and ice on acoustic velocity in different sediment types, (2) effect of different hydrate formation mechanisms on measured acoustic properties (3) dependence of shear strength on pore space contents, and (4) pore pressure effects during undrained shear.A wide range in acoustic p-wave velocities (Vp) were measured in coarse-grained sediment for different pore space occupants. Vp ranged from less than 1 km/s for gas-charged sediment to 1.77–1.94 km/s for water-saturated sediment, 2.91–4.00 km/s for sediment with varying degrees of hydrate saturation, and 3.88–4.33 km/s for frozen sediment. Vp measured in fine-grained sediment containing gas hydrate was substantially lower (1.97 km/s). Acoustic models based on measured Vp indicate that hydrate which formed in high gas flux environments can cement coarse-grained sediment, whereas hydrate formed from methane dissolved in the pore fluid may not.The presence of gas hydrate and other solid pore-filling material, such as ice, increased the sediment shear strength. The magnitude of that increase is related to the amount of hydrate in the pore space and cementation characteristics between the hydrate and sediment grains. We have found, that for consolidation stresses associated with the upper several hundred meters of sub-bottom depth, pore pressures decreased during shear in coarse-grained sediment containing gas hydrate, whereas pore pressure in fine-grained sediment typically increased during shear. The presence of free gas in pore spaces damped pore pressure response during shear and reduced the strengthening effect of gas hydrate in sands.

  3. N-Acetylcysteine plus Saline Hydration versus Saline Hydration

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) in patients undergoing coronary angiography pretreated with N-acetylcysteine NAC plus saline hydration or saline hydration alone and to determine the association between various risk factors and RCIN. Methods: Patients were ...

  4. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.

    2014-07-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  5. Hydration for recreational sport and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenefick, Robert W; Cheuvront, Samuel N

    2012-11-01

    This review presents recommendations for fluid needs and hydration assessment for recreational activity. Fluid needs are based on sweat losses, dependent on intensity and duration of the activity, and will vary among individuals. Prolonged aerobic activity is adversely influenced by dehydration, and heat exposure will magnify this effect. Fluid needs predicted for running 5-42 km at recreational paces show that fluid losses are sport drinks, gels, bars) can benefit high-intensity (≤ 1 h) and less-intense, long-duration activity (≥ 1 h). Spot measures of urine color or urine-specific gravity to assess hydration status have limitations. First morning urine concentration and body mass with gross thirst perception can be simple ways to assess hydration status. © 2012 International Life Sciences Institute.

  6. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  7. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate

  8. Plastic deformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitter, de L.U.

    1937-01-01

    § 1. Plastic deformation of solid matter under high confining pressures has been insufficiently studied. Jeffreys 1) devotes a few paragraphs to deformation of solid matter as a preface to his chapter on the isostasy problem. He distinguishes two properties of solid matter with regard to its

  9. Antifreeze proteins: Adsorption to ice, silica and gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Huang; Brown, Alan; Wathen, Brent; Ripmeester, John A.; Walker, VIrginia K.

    2005-07-01

    Certain organisms survive under freezing conditions that could otherwise prove fatal by the synthesis of antifreeze proteins (AFPs). AFPs adsorb to the surface of microscopic ice crystals and prevent further ice growth, resulting in a noncolligative freezing point depression. Type I AFP from the winter flounder (wfAFP) is an alfa-helical, alanine-rich serum protein that helps protect against innoculative freezing from ice-laden seas. The AFP of a moth from the boreal forest, Choristoneura fumiferana (Cf), is a beta-helical threonine-rich protein that helps prevent freezing at the overwintering, caterpillar stage. In contrast, the beta-roll AFP from the grass, Lolium perenne (Lp), confers little freezing point depression and the plants readily freeze. Remarkably, AFPs also adsorb to tetrahyrofuran (THF) hydrate, changing the hydrate's octahedral morphology and, as well, inhibiting the growth of THF and gas hydrates. The hyperactive CfAFP, with 30-100 times the activity of wfAFP toward ice, showed far greater nucleation inhibition for THF hydrate than did a commercial hydrate inhibitor, poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP). Active AFPs were also judged to be superior to PVP in that they inhibited the memory effect, a phenomenon whereby hydrate reforms at a faster rate soon after melting. An inactive mutant wfAFP, with an amino acid substitution at the ice-binding site, also reduced the growth of THF hydrate but was ineffective at suppressing hydrate reformation. These results suggest that the molecular properties important for ice adsorption and inhibition of hydrate reformation may be similar, and are distinct from those required for hydrate growth inhibition. The different AFPs also show markedly different aggregations on a third hydrophilic substrate, silica. Together these studies suggest that AFP adsorption to ice, hydrates and silica depends on the overall structure, specific residues and protein-protein interactions. (Author)

  10. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  11. NMR Studies of Protein Hydration and Protein-Ligand Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yuan

    Water on the surface of a protein is called hydration water. Hydration water is known to play a crucial role in a variety of biological processes including protein folding, enzymatic activation, and drug binding. Although the significance of hydration water has been recognized, the underlying mechanism remains far from being understood. This dissertation employs a unique in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique to study the mechanism of protein hydration and the role of hydration in alcohol-protein interactions. Water isotherms in proteins are measured at different temperatures via the in-situ NMR technique. Water is found to interact differently with hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups on the protein. Water adsorption on hydrophilic groups is hardly affected by the temperature, while water adsorption on hydrophobic groups strongly depends on the temperature around 10 C, below which the adsorption is substantially reduced. This effect is induced by the dramatic decrease in the protein flexibility below 10 C. Furthermore, nanosecond to microsecond protein dynamics and the free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of protein hydration are studied as a function of hydration level and temperature. A crossover at 10 C in protein dynamics and thermodynamics is revealed. The effect of water at hydrophilic groups on protein dynamics and thermodynamics shows little temperature dependence, whereas water at hydrophobic groups has stronger effect above 10 C. In addition, I investigate the role of water in alcohol binding to the protein using the in-situ NMR detection. The isotherms of alcohols are first measured on dry proteins, then on proteins with a series of controlled hydration levels. The free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of alcohol binding are also determined. Two distinct types of alcohol binding are identified. On the one hand, alcohols can directly bind to a few specific sites on the protein. This type of binding is independent of temperature and can be

  12. Study on p-Wave Attenuation in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Based on BISQ Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanhui Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In hydrate-bearing sediments, the elastic wave attenuation characteristics depend on the elastic properties of the sediments themselves on the one hand, and on the other hand, they also depend on the hydrate occurrence state and hydrate saturation. Since the hydrate-bearing sediments always have high porosity, so they show significant porous medium characteristics. Based on the BISQ porous medium model which is the most widely used model to study the attenuation characteristics in the porous media, we focused on p-wave attenuation in hydrate-bearing sediments in Shenhu Area, South China Sea, especially in specific seismic frequency range, which lays a foundation for the identification of gas hydrates by using seismic wave attenuation in Shenhu Area, South China Sea. Our results depict that seismic wave attenuation is an effective attribute to identify gas hydrates.

  13. Transient and steady state creep response of ice I and magnesium sulfate hydrate eutectic aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, C.; Cooper, R.F.; Goldsby, D.L.; Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Using uniaxial compression creep experiments, we characterized the transient and steady state deformation behaviors of eutectic aggregates of system ice I and MgSO4 11H2O (MS11; meridianiite), which has significance because of its likely presence on moons of the outer solar system. Synthetic samples of eutectic liquid bulk composition, which produce eutectic colonies containing 0.35-0.50 volume fraction MS11, were tested as functions of colony size and lamellar spacing, temperature (230-250 K), and confining pressure (0.1 and 50 MPa) to strains ???0.2. Up to a differential stress of 6 MPa, the ice I-MS11 aggregates display an order of magnitude higher effective viscosity and higher stress sensitivity than do aggregates of pure polycrystalline ice at the same conditions. The creep data and associated microstructural observations demonstrate, however, that the aggregates are additionally more brittle than pure ice, approaching rate-independent plasticity that includes rupture of the hydrate phase at 6-8 MPa, depending on the scale of the microstructure. Microstructures of deformed samples reveal forms of semibrittle flow in which the hydrate phase fractures while the ice phase deforms plastically. Semibrittle flow in the icy shell of a planetary body would truncate the lithospheric strength envelope and thereby decrease the depth to the brittle-ductile transition by 55% and reduce the failure limit for compressional surface features from 10 to ???6 MPa. A constitutive equation that includes eutectic colony boundary sliding and intracolony flow is used to describe the steady state rheology of the eutectic aggregates. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Gas hydrate formation in deep-sea sediments - on the role of sediment-mechanical process determination; Gashydratbildung in Tiefseesedimenten - zur Rolle der sedimentmechanischen Prozesssteuerung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feeser, V. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Geologisch-Palaeontologisches Inst.

    1997-12-31

    Slope failures in gas hydrate regions are encountered throughout the oceans. The stability of seafloor slopes can be assessed and predicted by means of calculation methods based on mechanical laws and parameters which describe the deformation behaviour and/or mechanical strength of the slope-forming sediments. Thermodynamic conditions conducive to the formation of gas hydrates in marine sediments differ from conditions prevailing in exclusively water-filled systems. The present contribution describes the relevant energetic conditions on the basis of a simple spherical model giving due consideration to petrographic parameters. Depending on pore size distribution, lithological stress conditions, pore water pressure, and sediment strength gas hydrates will either develop as a cementing phase or as segregated lenses. (MSK) [Deutsch] In den Weltmeeren ereignen sich immer wieder Hangrutschungen in Gashydratgebieten. Die zur Beurteilung und Prognonse von Hangstabilitaeten zu verwendenden Berechnungsverfahren erfordern Stoffgesetze und Parameter, welche das Deformations-und/oder Festigkeitsverhalten der hangbildenden Sedimente beschreiben. Die thermodynamischen Bildungsbedingungen von Gashydraten in marinen Sedimenten unterscheiden sich von den Bedingungen in ausschliesslich wassergefuellten Systemen. Unter Einbeziehung petrographischer Eigenschaften werden die energetischen Bedingungen beschrieben. Dazu dient ein einfaches Kugelmodell. Je nach vorhandenem Porenraumspektrum, lithostatischen Spannungsverhaeltnissen, Porenwasserdruck und Sedimentfestigkeit wachsen Gashydrate als Porenraumzement oder als segregierte Linsen.

  15. Contracture deformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deformity - contracture ... Contracture can be caused by any of the following: Brain and nervous system disorders, such as cerebral ... Follow your health care provider's instructions for treating contracture at home. Treatments may include: Doing exercises and ...

  16. Terrestrial Laser Scanner Two-Face Measurements for Analyzing the Elevation-Dependent Deformation of the Onsala Space Observatory 20-m Radio Telescope's Main Reflector in a Bundle Adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Christoph; Schunck, David; Nothnagel, Axel; Haas, Rüdiger; Wennerbäck, Lars; Olofsson, Henrik; Hammargren, Roger; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2017-08-09

    For accurate astronomic and geodetic observations based on radio telescopes, the elevation-dependent deformation of the radio telescopes' main reflectors should be known. Terrestrial laser scanning has been used for determining the corresponding changes of focal lengths and areal reflector deformations at several occasions before. New in this publication is the situation in which we minimize systematic measurement errors by an improved measurement and data-processing concept: Sampling the main reflector in both faces of the laser scanner and calibrating the laser scanner in situ in a bundle adjustment. This concept is applied to the Onsala Space Observatory 20-m radio telescope: The focal length of the main reflector decreases by 9.6 mm from 85 ∘ to 5 ∘ elevation angle. Further local deformations of the main reflector are not detected.

  17. Terrestrial Laser Scanner Two-Face Measurements for Analyzing the Elevation-Dependent Deformation of the Onsala Space Observatory 20-m Radio Telescope’s Main Reflector in a Bundle Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunck, David; Nothnagel, Axel; Haas, Rüdiger; Wennerbäck, Lars; Olofsson, Henrik; Hammargren, Roger; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2017-01-01

    For accurate astronomic and geodetic observations based on radio telescopes, the elevation-dependent deformation of the radio telescopes’ main reflectors should be known. Terrestrial laser scanning has been used for determining the corresponding changes of focal lengths and areal reflector deformations at several occasions before. New in this publication is the situation in which we minimize systematic measurement errors by an improved measurement and data-processing concept: Sampling the main reflector in both faces of the laser scanner and calibrating the laser scanner in situ in a bundle adjustment. This concept is applied to the Onsala Space Observatory 20-m radio telescope: The focal length of the main reflector decreases by 9.6 mm from 85∘ to 5∘ elevation angle. Further local deformations of the main reflector are not detected. PMID:28792449

  18. The effect of hydrate promoters on gas uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chun-Gang; Yu, Yi-Song; Ding, Ya-Long; Cai, Jing; Li, Xiao-Sen

    2017-08-16

    Gas hydrate technology is considered as a promising technology in the fields of gas storage and transportation, gas separation and purification, seawater desalination, and phase-change thermal energy storage. However, to date, the technology is still not commercially used mainly due to the low gas hydrate formation rate and the low gas uptake. In this study, the effect of hydrate promoters on gas uptake was systematically studied and analyzed based on hydrate-based CH4 storage and CO2 capture from CO2/H2 gas mixture experiments. Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and gas chromatography (GC) were employed to analyze the microstructures and gas compositions. The results indicate that the effect of the hydrate promoter on the gas uptake depends on the physical and chemical properties of the promoter and gas. A strong polar ionic promoter is not helpful towards obtaining the ideal gas uptake because a dense hydrate layer is easily formed at the gas-liquid interface, which hinders gas diffusion from the gas phase to the bulk solution. For a weak polar or non-polar promoter, the gas uptake depends on the dissolution characteristics among the different substances in the system. The lower the mutual solubility among the substances co-existing in the system, the higher the independence among the substances in the system; this is so that each phase has an equal chance to occupy the hydrate cages without or with small interactions, finally leading to a relatively high gas uptake.

  19. Particle Strength of Bayer Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjier, J. L.; Marten, D. F. G.

    Because of the proposed use of fluid bed calciners at the Kaiser Aluminum Baton Rouge Works, studies into the strength of alumina and alumina trihydrate from eight different alumina plants were initiated. It was found in the course of these studies that the particle strength of Bayer hydrate depended on the precipitation process conditions under which it was produced. A series of laboratory precipitation tests was conducted to determine the effect on particle strength of process variables such as seed charge, temperature, caustic concentration and seed recycle. It is concluded from these studies that relative particle strength of alumina trihydrate, as measured by a modified Forsythe-Hertwig Apparatus, can be predicted from a knowledge of the precipitation process conditions.

  20. Exploitation of marine gas hydrates: Benefits and risks (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallmann, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    Vast amounts of natural gas are stored in marine gas hydrates deposited at continental margins. The global inventory of carbon bound as methane in gas hydrates is currently estimated as 1000 × 500 Gt. Large-scale national research projects located mostly in South-East Asia but also in North America and Europe are aiming to exploit these ice-like solids as new unconventional resource of natural gas. Japan, South Korea and other Asian countries are taking the lead because their national waters harbor exploitable gas hydrate deposits which could be developed to reduce the dependency of these nations on costly LGN imports. In 2013, the first successful production test was performed off Japan at water depths of ca. 1000 m demonstrating that natural gas can be released and produced from marine hydrates by lowering the pressure in the sub-seabed hydrate reservoirs. In an alternative approach, CO2 from coal power plans and other industrial sources is used to release natural gas (methane) from hydrates while CO2 is bound and stored in the sub-surface as solid hydrate. These new approaches and technologies are still in an early pre-commercial phase; the costs of field development and gas production exceed the value of natural gas being produced from the slowly dissociating hydrates. However, new technologies are currently under development in the German SUGAR project and elsewhere to reduce costs and enhance gas production rates such that gas hydrates may become commercially exploitable over the coming decade(s). The exploitation of marine gas hydrates may help to reduce CO2 emissions from the fossil fuel sector if the produced natural gas is used to replace coal and/or LNG. Hydrate development could also provide important incentives for carbon capture technologies since CO2 can be used to produce natural gas from hydrates. However, leakage of gas may occur during the production process while slope failure may be induced by the accompanying dissociation/conversion of gas

  1. Variability of global left ventricular deformation analysis using vendor dependent and independent two-dimensional speckle-tracking software in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Niels; Ali, Sophia; Olsen, Niels T

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of myocardial deformation by two-dimensional speckle-tracking is useful for clinical and research purposes. However, differences may exist among different ultrasound machines, software packages, frame rates, and observers....

  2. The strength and rheology of methane clathrate hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.; Zhang, W.

    2003-01-01

    Methane clathrate hydrate (structure I) is found to be very strong, based on laboratory triaxial deformation experiments we have carried out on samples of synthetic, high-purity, polycrystalline material. Samples were deformed in compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress, ??), at conditions of confining pressure P = 50 and 100 MPa, strain rate 4.5 ?? 10-8 ??? ?? ??? 4.3 ?? 10-4 s-1, temperature 260 ??? T ??? 287 K, and internal methane pressure 10 ??? PCH4 ??? 15 MPa. At steady state, typically reached in a few percent strain, methane hydrate exhibited strength that was far higher than expected on the basis of published work. In terms of the standard high-temperature creep law, ?? = A??ne-(E*+PV*)/RT the rheology is described by the constants A = 108.55 MPa-n s-1, n = 2.2, E* = 90,000 J mol-1, and V* = 19 cm3 mol-1. For comparison at temperatures just below the ice point, methane hydrate at a given strain rate is over 20 times stronger than ice, and the contrast increases at lower temperatures. The possible occurrence of syntectonic dissociation of methane hydrate to methane plus free water in these experiments suggests that the high strength measured here may be only a lower bound. On Earth, high strength in hydrate-bearing formations implies higher energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure. In the outer solar system, if Titan has a 100-km-thick near-surface layer of high-strength, low-thermal conductivity methane hydrate as has been suggested, its interior is likely to be considerably warmer than previously expected.

  3. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  4. Methane Clathrate Hydrate Prospecting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, N.; Romanovsky, V.

    2003-01-01

    A method of prospecting for methane has been devised. The impetus for this method lies in the abundance of CH4 and the growing shortages of other fuels. The method is intended especially to enable identification of subpermafrost locations where significant amounts of methane are trapped in the form of methane gas hydrate (CH4(raised dot)6H2O). It has been estimated by the U.S. Geological Survey that the total CH4 resource in CH4(raised dot) 6H2O exceeds the energy content of all other fossil fuels (oil, coal, and natural gas from non-hydrate sources). Also, CH4(raised dot)6H2O is among the cleanest-burning fuels, and CH4 is the most efficient fuel because the carbon in CH4 is in its most reduced state. The method involves looking for a proxy for methane gas hydrate, by means of the combination of a thermal-analysis submethod and a field submethod that does not involve drilling. The absence of drilling makes this method easier and less expensive, in comparison with prior methods of prospecting for oil and natural gas. The proposed method would include thermoprospecting in combination with one more of the other non-drilling measurement techniques, which could include magneto-telluric sounding and/or a subsurface-electrical-resistivity technique. The method would exploit the fact that the electrical conductivity in the underlying thawed region is greater than that in the overlying permafrost.

  5. Internal flow and deformation of a liquid CO2 drop rising through water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steytler, Louis L.; Pearlstein, Arne J.

    2012-11-01

    We report computations of the steady axisymmetric flow in and around a deformable liquid drop of CO2 ascending through a water column under the action of buoyancy, a problem relevant to risk assessment for sub-seabed carbon sequestration and storage. In these initial computations, we consider several drop densities, corresponding to different depths in the ocean, and neglect dissolution of CO2 into the surrounding water and formation of a hydrate film at the drop/water interface. The results, which extend our previous work (Bozzi et al., J. Fluid Mech. 336, 1-32, 1997) to the case in which the dynamic viscosities of the dispersed and continuous phases are unequal, show that the degree of deformation and internal circulation depend strongly on drop size. Supported by the International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research, sponsored by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology.

  6. Influence of corneal hydration on optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twa, Michael D.; Vantipalli, Srilatha; Singh, Manmohan; Li, Jiasong; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    Corneal biomechanical properties are influenced by several factors, including intraocular pressure, corneal thickness, and viscoelastic responses. Corneal thickness is directly proportional to tissue hydration and can influence corneal stiffness, but there is no consensus on the magnitude or direction of this effect. We evaluated the influence of corneal hydration on dynamic surface deformation responses using optical coherence elastography (OCE). Fresh rabbit eyes (n=10) were prepared by removing the corneal epithelium and dropping with 0.9% saline every 5 minutes for 1 hour, followed by 20% dextran solution every 5 minutes for one hour. Corneal thickness was determined from structural OCT imaging and OCE measurements were performed at baseline and every 20 minutes thereafter. Micron-scale deformations were induced at the apex of the corneal tissue using a spatially-focused (150μm) short-duration (corneal thickness due to hydration process. Corneal thickness rapidly increased and remained constant following epithelium removal and changed little thereafter. Likewise, corneal stiffness changed little over the first hour and then decreased sharply after Dextran application (thickness: -46% [-315/682 μm] RR: - 24% [-0.7/2.88 ms-1]; GV: -19% [-0.6/3.2 m/s]). Corneal thickness and corneal stiffness (RR) were well correlated (R2 = .66). Corneal biomechanical properties are highly correlated with tissue hydration over a wide range of corneal thickness and these changes in corneal stiffness are quantifiable using OCE.

  7. Angular Limb Deformities: Growth Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarrel, Taralyn M

    2017-08-01

    Angular limb deformities are common in foals; however, the importance of the deformity and if treatment is required depend on the degree of deformity relative to normal conformation for stage of growth, the breed and discipline expectations, age, and response to conservative therapies. This article addresses the importance of the foal conformation examination to determine which foals need surgical intervention to correct an angular deformity and when. Techniques for surgical growth retardation include the transphyseal staple, screw and wire transphyseal bridge, and transphyseal screw. Appropriate timing for intervention for each location and complications associated with each procedure are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of hydrate formation on the elastic properties of unconsolidated sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydzy, Marisa B.

    Natural gas hydrates exist in unconsolidated marine or permafrost sediments and can adopt many morphologies. In this study, the effect of hydrate formation on the wave velocities of unconsolidated sediment was investigated in a series of laboratory studies, with particular focus on the extent to which the initial water saturation controls the manner in which hydrate is distributed, and thus the extent to which hydrate formation increases the wave velocity in sands. Ultrasonic p- and s-wave velocities (vp, vs) were measured in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in hydrate-bearing Ottawa Sand F110 during hydrate formation and dissociation. vp and vs were determined as functions of gas hydrate saturation (Sh). Hydrates were formed out of solution using tetrahydrofuran (THF) and through CH 4 injection into partially water-saturated samples. For the latter, samples with low and high initial water saturation (Swi) were tested. The recorded velocities exhibited a noticeable dependence on Swi. At low Swi (~20%) the hydrate stiffened the sediment and increased the ultrasonic velocities dramatically. Comparing measured velocities to those calculated with existing rock physics models links the initial water saturation, which determines the gas-water distribution in the sediment and hence the location of initial hydrate formation, to the evolution of wave velocity during hydrate formation. We concluded that at low Swi, the water is evenly distributed and located at the grain contacts. The resulting hydrate cements the grains, dramatically increasing the wave velocities even at low hydrate saturations. To test the dependence of the initial water distribution on the initial water saturation, micro X-ray CT images were also acquired of partially saturated glass-bead packs without hydrate but with varying amounts of water. At low water saturations, water occurred as bridges between adjacent glass beads or was located at the glass-bead contacts. At high water

  9. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  10. Ab initio modelling of methane hydrate thermophysical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jendi, Z M; Servio, P; Rey, A D

    2016-04-21

    The key thermophysical properties of methane hydrate were determined using ab initio modelling. Using density functional theory, the second-order elastic constants, heat capacity, compressibility, and thermal expansion coefficient were calculated. A wide and relevant range of pressure-temperature conditions were considered, and the structures were assessed for stability using the mean square displacement and radial distribution functions. Methane hydrate was found to be elastically isotropic with a linear dependence of the bulk modulus on pressure. Equally significant, multi-body interactions were found to be important in hydrates, and water-water interactions appear to strongly influence compressibility like in ice Ih. While the heat capacity of hydrate was found to be higher than that of ice, the thermal expansion coefficient was significantly lower, most likely due to the lower rigidity of hydrates. The mean square displacement gave important insight into stability, heat capacity, and elastic moduli, and the radial distribution functions further confirmed stability. The presented results provide a much needed atomistic thermoelastic characterization of methane hydrates and are essential input for the large-scale applications of hydrate detection and production.

  11. Dipolar response of hydrated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2012-02-28

    The paper presents an analytical theory and numerical simulations of the dipolar response of hydrated proteins in solution. We calculate the effective dielectric constant representing the average dipole moment induced at the protein by a uniform external field. The dielectric constant shows a remarkable variation among the proteins, changing from 0.5 for ubiquitin to 640 for cytochrome c. The former value implies a negative dipolar susceptibility, that is a dia-electric dipolar response and negative dielectrophoresis. It means that ubiquitin, carrying an average dipole of ≃240 D, is expected to repel from the region of a stronger electric field. This outcome is the result of a negative cross-correlation between the protein and water dipoles, compensating for the positive variance of the intrinsic protein dipole in the overall dipolar susceptibility. In contrast to the neutral ubiquitin, charged proteins studied here show para-electric dipolar response and positive dielectrophoresis. The study suggests that the dipolar response of proteins in solution is strongly affected by the coupling of the protein surface charge to the hydration water. The protein-water dipolar cross-correlations are long-ranged, extending ~2 nm from the protein surface into the bulk. A similar correlation length of about 1 nm is seen for the electrostatic potential produced by the hydration water inside the protein. The analysis of numerical simulations suggests that the polarization of the protein-water interface is highly heterogeneous and does not follow the standard dielectric results for cavities carved in dielectrics. The polarization of the water shell gains in importance, relative to the intrinsic protein dipole, at high frequencies, above the protein Debye peak. The induced interfacial dipole can be either parallel or antiparallel to the protein dipole, depending on the distribution of the protein surface charge. As a result, the high-frequency absorption of the protein solution can

  12. Deformation microstructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, N.; Huang, X.; Hughes, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Microstructural characterization and modeling has shown that a variety of metals deformed by different thermomechanical processes follows a general path of grain subdivision, by dislocation boundaries and high angle boundaries. This subdivision has been observed to very small structural scales...... of the order of 10 nm, produced by deformation under large sliding loads. Limits to the evolution of microstructural parameters during monotonic loading have been investigated based on a characterization by transmission electron microscopy. Such limits have been observed at an equivalent strain of about 10...

  13. Multi-property characterization chamber for geophysical-hydrological investigations of hydrate bearing sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seol, Yongkoo, E-mail: Yongkoo.Seol@netl.doe.gov; Choi, Jeong-Hoon; Dai, Sheng [National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown, West Virginia 26507 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    With the increase in the interest of producing natural gas from methane hydrates as well as potential risks of massive hydrate dissociation in the context of global warming, studies have recently shifted from pure hydrate crystals to hydrates in sediments. Such a research focus shift requires a series of innovative laboratory devices that are capable of investigating various properties of hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS). This study introduces a newly developed high pressure testing chamber, i.e., multi-property characterization chamber (MPCC), that allows simultaneous investigation of a series of fundamental properties of HBS, including small-strain stiffness (i.e., P- and S-waves), shear strength, large-strain deformation, stress-volume responses, and permeability. The peripheral coolant circulation system of the MPCC permits stable and accurate temperature control, while the core holder body, made of aluminum, enables X-ray computer tomography scanning to be easily employed for structural and morphological characterization of specimens. Samples of hydrate-bearing sediments are held within a rubber sleeve inside the chamber. The thick sleeve is more durable and versatile than thin membranes while also being much softer than oedometer-type chambers that are incapable of enabling flow tests. Bias introduced by the rubber sleeve during large deformation tests are also calibrated both theoretically and experimentally. This system provides insight into full characterization of hydrate-bearing sediments in the laboratory, as well as pressure core technology in the field.

  14. Rate-dependent serrated flow and plastic deformation in Ti45Zr16Be20Cu10Ni9 bulk amorphous alloy during nanoindentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar Misra, Sung Woo Sohn, Won Tae Kim and Do Hyang Kim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The plastic deformation of Ti45Zr16Be20Cu10Ni9 bulk metallic glass has been investigated by nanoindentation performed with loads ranging from 10 to 200 mN in a wide range of loading rates. The plastic flow in the alloy exhibited conspicuous serrations at low loading rates. The serrations, however, became less prominent as the rate of indentation increased. Atomic force microscopy showed a significant pile-up of materials around the indents, indicating that a highly localized plastic deformation occurred under nanoindentation. The possible mechanism governing the plastic deformation in bulk metallic glass specimens is tentatively discussed in terms of strain-induced free volume.

  15. Microstructural Analysis of Orientation-Dependent Recovery and Recrystallization in a Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Deformed by Compression at a High Strain Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Zhang, Yubin; Mishin, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of the microstructure and texture during annealing of a modified ferritic/martensitic 9Cr-1Mo steel compressed by dynamic plastic deformation (DPD) to a strain of 2.3 has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. It is found that ...

  16. Synthesis of polycrystalline methane hydrate, and its phase stability and mechanical properties at elevated pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    Test specimens of methane hydrate were grown under static conditions by combining cold, pressurized CH4 gas with H2O ice grains, then warming the system to promote the reaction CH4 (g) + 6H2O (s???l) ??? CH4??6H2O. Hydrate formation evidently occurs at the nascent ice/liquid water interface, and complete reaction was achieved by warming the system above 271.5 K and up to 289 K, at 25-30 MPa, for approximately 8 hours. The resulting material is pure methane hydrate with controlled grain size and random texture. Fabrication conditions placed the H2O ice well above its melting temperature before reaction completed, yet samples and run records showed no evidence for bulk melting of the ice grains. Control experiments using Ne, a non-hydrate-forming gas, verified that under otherwise identical conditions, the pressure reduction and latent heat associated with ice melting is easily detectable in our fabrication apparatus. These results suggest that under hydrate-forming conditions, H2O ice can persist metastably at temperatures well above its melting point. Methane hydrate samples were then tested in constant-strain-rate deformation experiments at T= 140-200 K, Pc= 50-100 MPa, and ????= 10-4-10-6 s-1. Measurements in both the brittle and ductile fields showed that methane hydrate has measurably different strength than H2O ice, and work hardens to a higher degree compared to other ices as well as to most metals and ceramics at high homologous temperatures. This work hardening may be related to a changing stoichiometry under pressure during plastic deformation; x-ray analyses showed that methane hydrate undergoes a process of solid-state disproportionation or exsolution during deformation at conditions well within its conventional stability field.

  17. Gas Hydrate Petroleum System Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, T. S.

    2012-12-01

    In a gas hydrate petroleum system, the individual factors that contribute to the formation of gas hydrate accumulations, such as (1) gas hydrate pressure-temperature stability conditions, (2) gas source, (3) gas migration, and (4) the growth of the gas hydrate in suitable host sediment can identified and quantified. The study of know and inferred gas hydrate accumulations reveal the occurrence of concentrated gas hydrate is mostly controlled by the presence of fractures and/or coarser grained sediments. Field studies have concluded that hydrate grows preferentially in coarse-grained sediments because lower capillary pressures in these sediments permit the migration of gas and nucleation of hydrate. Due to the relatively distal nature of the deep marine geologic settings, the overall abundance of sand within the shallow geologic section is usually low. However, drilling projects in the offshore of Japan, Korea, and in the Gulf of Mexico has revealed the occurrence of significant hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs. The 1999/2000 Japan Nankai Trough drilling confirmed occurrence of hydrate-bearing sand-rich intervals (interpreted as turbidite fan deposits). Gas hydrate was determined to fill the pore spaces in these deposits, reaching saturations up to 80% in some layers. A multi-well drilling program titled "METI Toaki-oki to Kumano-nada" also identified sand-rich reservoirs with pore-filling hydrate. The recovered hydrate-bearing sand layers were described as very-fine- to fine-grained turbidite sand layers measuring from several centimeters up to a meter thick. However, the gross thickness of the hydrate-bearing sand layers were up to 50 m. In 2010, the Republic of Korea conducted the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate (UBGH2) Drilling Expedition. Seismic data clearly showed the development of a thick, potential basin wide, sedimentary sections characterized by mostly debris flows. The downhole LWD logs and core data from Site UBGH2-5 reveal that each debris flows is

  18. Diurnally-Varying Lunar Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Hurley, D.; Retherford, K. D.; Mandt, K.; Greathouse, T. K.; Farrell, W. M.; Vilas, F.

    2016-12-01

    Dayside, non-polar lunar hydration signatures have been observed by a handful of instruments and present insights into the lunar water cycle. In this study, we utilize the unique measurements from the current Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission to study the phenomenon of diurnally-varying dayside lunar hydration. The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) onboard LRO senses a strong far-ultraviolet water absorption edge indicating hydration in small abundances in the permanently shadowed regions as well as on the lunar dayside. We report on diurnal variability in hydration in different terrain types. We investigate the importance of different sources of hydration, including solar wind bombardment and meteoroid bombardment, by observing trends during magnetotail and meteor stream crossings.

  19. Hydrated Electron Transfer to Nucleobases in Aqueous Solutions Revealed by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Mei; Fu, Aiyun; Yang, Hongfang; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-08-03

    We present an ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation study into the transfer dynamics of an excess electron from its cavity-shaped hydrated electron state to a hydrated nucleobase (NB)-bound state. In contrast to the traditional view that electron localization at NBs (G/A/C/T), which is the first step for electron-induced DNA damage, is related only to dry or prehydrated electrons, and a fully hydrated electron no longer transfers to NBs, our AIMD simulations indicate that a fully hydrated electron can still transfer to NBs. We monitored the transfer dynamics of fully hydrated electrons towards hydrated NBs in aqueous solutions by using AIMD simulations and found that due to solution-structure fluctuation and attraction of NBs, a fully hydrated electron can transfer to a NB gradually over time. Concurrently, the hydrated electron cavity gradually reorganizes, distorts, and even breaks. The transfer could be completed in about 120-200 fs in four aqueous NB solutions, depending on the electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs and the structural fluctuation of the solution. The transferring electron resides in the π*-type lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the NB, which leads to a hydrated NB anion. Clearly, the observed transfer of hydrated electrons can be attributed to the strong electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs over the hydrated electron cavity, which is the driving force, and the transfer dynamics is structure-fluctuation controlled. This work provides new insights into the evolution dynamics of hydrated electrons and provides some helpful information for understanding the DNA-damage mechanism in solution. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Flow assurance intervention, hydrates remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Christopher S. [Oceaneering International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the issues of removing hydrates in sub sea flow lines and associated equipment with an Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) of opportunity and a multi-service-vessel (MSV). The paper is split into three topics: the equipment used with the ROV, assessing the interface points and handling fluids produced from drawing down the pressure. Each section is explained thoroughly and backed up with real world experience. The equipment section details information from actual jobs performed and why the particular components were utilized. The system is generally contained in an ROV mounted skid. Pumps are utilized to draw down the pressure inside the hydrated section of equipment, removing one of the three necessary components for hydrates formation. Once the section is pumped down, several options exist for handling the fluids pumped out of the system: pumping to surface, re-injection into the well, or injection into an operating flow line. This method of hydrates remediation is both economical and timely. Hydrate blockages form in low temperatures and high pressures. Reducing the pressure or increasing the temperature so the conditions lie to the right of the hydrate dissociation curve will slowly decompose the blockage. Depressurization and the use of MEG or methanol will give favorable conditions to remove the hydrate plug. Oceaneering has the capabilities to remove hydrates using the FRS in conjunction with an installation vessel to dispose of the gas and fluid removed from the flow line. Hydrate remediation techniques should be implemented into the initial design to reduce costs later. The cost of stopped production combined with the day rate for equipment needed for hydrate removal outweighs the costs if no technique is utilized. (author)

  1. Polycrystalline methane hydrate: Synthesis from superheated ice, and low-temperature mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    1998-01-01

    We describe a new and efficient technique to grow aggregates of pure methane hydrate in quantities suitable for physical and material properties testing. Test specimens were grown under static conditions by combining cold, pressurized CH4 gas with granulated H2O ice, and then warming the reactants to promote the reaction CH4(g) + 6H2O(s???1) ??? CH4??6H2O (methane hydrate). Hydrate formation evidently occurs at the nascent ice/liquid water interface on ice grain surfaces, and complete reaction was achieved by warming the system above the ice melting point and up to 290 K, at 25-30 MPa, for approximately 8 h. The resulting material is pure, cohesive, polycrystalline methane hydrate with controlled grain size and random orientation. Synthesis conditions placed the H2O ice well above its melting temperature while reaction progressed, yet samples and run records showed no evidence for bulk melting of the unreacted portions of ice grains. Control experiments using Ne, a non-hydrate-forming gas, showed that under otherwise identical conditions, the pressure reduction and latent heat associated with ice melting are easily detectable in our fabrication apparatus. These results suggest that under hydrate-forming conditions, H2O ice can persist metastably to temperatures well above its ordinary melting point while reacting to form hydrate. Direct observations of the hydrate growth process in a small, high-pressure optical cell verified these conclusions and revealed additional details of the hydrate growth process. Methane hydrate samples were then tested in constant-strain-rate deformation experiments at T = 140-200 K, Pc = 50-100 MPa, and ?? = 10-4 10-6 s-1. Measurements in both the brittle and ductile fields showed that methane hydrate has measurably different strength than H2O ice, and work hardens to an unusually high degree compared to other ices as well as to most metals and ceramics at high homologous temperatures. This work hardening may be related to a changing

  2. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  3. Shifting Focus: From Hydration for Performance to Hydration for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Erica T

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, literature on hydration biomarkers has evolved considerably - from (de)hydration assessment towards a more global definition of biomarkers of hydration in daily life. This shift in thinking about hydration markers was largely driven by investigating the differences that existed between otherwise healthy individuals whose habitual, ad-libitum drinking habits differ, and by identifying physiological changes in low-volume drinkers who subsequently increase their water intake. Aside from obvious differences in urinary volume and concentration, a growing body of evidence is emerging that links differences in fluid intake with small, but biologically significant, differences in vasopressin (copeptin), glomerular filtration rate, and markers of metabolic dysfunction or disease. Taken together, these pieces of the puzzle begin to form a picture of how much water intake should be considered adequate for health, and represent a shifting focus from hydration for performance, toward hydration for health outcomes. This narrative review outlines the key areas of research in which the global hydration process - including water intake, urinary hydration markers, and vasopressin - has been associated with health outcomes, focusing on kidney and metabolic endpoints. It will also provide a commentary on how various hydration biomarkers may be used in hydration for health assessment. Finally, if adequate water intake can play a role in maintaining health, how might we tell if we are drinking enough? Urine output is easily measured, and can take into account differences in daily physical activity, climate, dietary solute load, and other factors that influence daily water needs. Today, targets have been proposed for urine osmolality, specific gravity, and color that may be used by researchers, clinicians, and individuals as simple indicators of optimal hydration. However, there remain a large number of incomplete or unanswered research questions regarding the

  4. Dependence of the frequency spectrum of small amplitude vibrations superimposed on finite deformations of a nonlinear, cylindrical elastic body on residual stress

    KAUST Repository

    Gorb, Yuliya

    2010-11-01

    We model and analyze the response of nonlinear, residually stressed elastic bodies subjected to small amplitude vibrations superimposed upon large deformations. The problem derives from modeling the use of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging to interrogate atherosclerotic plaques in vivo in large arteries. The goal of this investigation is twofold: (i) introduce a modeling framework for residual stress that unlike traditional Fung type classical opening angle models may be used for a diseased artery, and (ii) investigate the sensitivity of the spectra of small amplitude high frequency time harmonic vibrations superimposed on a large deformation to the details of the residual stress stored in arteries through a numerical simulation using physiologic parameter values under both low and high blood pressure loadings. The modeling framework also points the way towards an inverse problem using IVUS techniques to estimate residual stress in healthy and diseased arteries. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Orientation-dependent tensile deformation and damage of a T700 carbon fiber/epoxy composite: A synchrotron-based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bie, B. X.; Huang, J. Y.; Fan, D.; Sun, T.; Fezzaa, K.; Xiao, X. H.; Qi, M. L.; Luo, S. N.

    2017-09-01

    Uniaxial tensile experiments are conducted on a T700 carbon fiber/epoxy composite along various offaxis angles. Stressestrain curves are measured along with strain fields mapped via synchrotron x-ray digital image correlation, as well as computerized tomography. Elastic modulus and tensile strength decrease with increasing off-axis angles, while fracture strain exhibits a nonmonotonic trend as a combined result of tensile strength decrease and fracture mode transition. At high off-axis angles, strain field mapping demonstrates distinct tensile and shear strain localizations and deformation bands approximately along the fiber directions, while deformation is mainly achieved via continuous growth of tensile strain at low off-axis angles. Roughness of fracture planes decreases exponentially as the off-axis angle increases. The stressestrain curves, strain fields, tomography and fractographs show consistent features, and reveal a fracture mode transition from mainly tension (fiber fracture) to in-plane shear (interface debonding).

  6. The temperature hydration kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Oroian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the hydration kinetics of lentil seeds (Lens culinaris in water at different temperatures (25, 32.5, 40, 55, 70 and 80 °C for assessing the adequacy of models for describing the absorption phenomena during soaking. The diffusion coefficient values were calculated using Fick’s model for spherical and hemispherical geometries and the values were in the range of 10−6 m2/s. The experimental data were fitted to Peleg, Sigmoidal, Weibull and Exponential models. The models adequacy was determined using regression coefficients (R2, root mean square error (RMSE and reduced chi-square (χ2. The Peleg model is the suitable one for predicting the experimental data. Temperature had a positive and significant effect on the water absorption capacities and absorption was an endothermic process.

  7. Compression behaviour of anhydrous and hydrate forms of sodium naproxen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaj, Ledjan; Censi, Roberta; Gashi, Zehadin; Di Martino, Piera

    2010-05-10

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the technological properties and the compression behaviour of the anhydrous and hydrate solid forms of sodium naproxen. Among the hydrates, the following forms were studied: the monohydrate (MSN), obtained by dehydrating a dihydrated form (DSN) in each turn obtained by exposing the anhydrous form at 55% RH; a dihydrated form (CSN) obtained by crystallizing sodium naproxen from water, the tetrahydrated form (TSN) obtained by exposing the anhydrous form at 75% RH. The physico-chemical (crystalline form and water content), the micromeritic (crystal morphology and particle size) and the mechanical properties (Carr's index, apparent particle density, compression behaviour, elastic recovery and strength of compact) were evaluated. We made every effort to reduce differences in crystal habit, particle size and distribution, and amount of absorbed water among the samples, so that the only factors affecting their technological behaviour would be the degree of hydration and the crystalline structure. This study demonstrates a correlation between the compression behaviour and the water molecules present in the crystalline structures. The sites where water molecules are accommodated in the crystalline structure behave like weak points where the crystalline lattice yields under compression. The crystal deformability is proportional to the number of water molecules in these sites; the higher the water content, the higher the deformability, because the densification behaviour changes from a predominantly elastic deformation to a plastic behaviour. The deformability is responsible for a higher densification tendency that favours larger interparticle bonding areas that may explain the better tabletability of TSN and CSN. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Further chemical studies on controlling gas hydrate formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelland, M.A.; Svartaas, T.M.; Dybvik, L.A. [Rogalandsforskning, Stavanger (Norway)

    1995-03-01

    Gas hydrates are clathrates in which water molecules form a hydrogen bonded network enclosing roughly spherical cavities that are filled with gas molecules. They are a menace to the oil industry in several areas, one example being their potential blocking of production lines and processing equipment. This paper reviews new technology for combating the problem. Natural gas hydrates form in several structures depending on the gas molecules, their size relative to the cavity, and the relative stability of the structures. At high pressures, gas hydrates can be stable well above the melting point of ice. Pipeline blocking can be overcome in many ways: (1) insulate the pipeline, (2) reduce pressure, (3) remove water, (4) use chemicals. These techniques are expensive. Today only thermodynamic inhibitors such as methanol or ethylene glycol are used, but cheaper methods are sought for. Kinetic Inhibitors are chemicals able to (1) delay hydrate nucleation, or (2) delay hydrate crystal growth. Anti-Agglomerators are chemicals able to prevent agglomeration of hydrates. The suitability of the various inhibitor types are discussed. It is concluded from laboratory tests that the best kinetic inhibitors are chemicals (5000 ppm) which prevent hydrate nucleation for several days at ca. 10{sup o}C subcooling, or chemicals that delay visual hydrate growth for 24 hrs at 10 {sup o}C subcooling. The best anti-agglomerators are chemicals preventing agglomeration at 30-40% water cuts at from 3{sup o}C upwards and so far tested in the pressure range 40-95 bar. 5 refs., 18 figs.

  9. Low-δD hydration rinds in Yellowstone perlites record rapid syneruptive hydration during glacial and interglacial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, Ilya N.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2016-01-01

    Hydration of silicic volcanic glass forms perlite, a dusky, porous form of altered glass characterized by abundant “onion-skin” fractures. The timing and temperature of perlite formation are enigmatic and could plausibly occur during eruption, during post-eruptive cooling, or much later at ambient temperatures. To learn more about the origin of natural perlite, and to fingerprint the hydration waters, we investigated perlitic glass from several synglacial and interglacial rhyolitic lavas and tuffs from the Yellowstone volcanic system. Perlitic cores are surrounded by a series of conchoidal cracks that separate 30- to 100-µm-thick slivers, likely formed in response to hydration-induced stress. H2O and D/H profiles confirm that most D/H exchange happens together with rapid H2O addition but some smoother D/H variations may suggest separate minor exchange by deuterium atom interdiffusion following hydration. The hydrated rinds (2–3 wt% H2O) transition rapidly (within 30 µm, or by 1 wt% H2O per 10 µm) to unhydrated glass cores. This is consistent with quenched “hydration fronts” where H2O diffusion coefficients are strongly dependent on H2O concentrations. The chemical, δ18O, and δD systematics of bulk glass records last equilibrium between ~110 and 60 °C without chemical exchange but with some δ18O exchange. Similarly, the δ18O of water extracted from glass by rapid heating suggests that water was added to the glass during cooling at hydration at temperatures as low as 60 °C; prolonged exposure to high temperature of 175°–225° during water addition is less likely as the glass would lose alkalies and should alter to clays within days. A compilation of low-temperature hydration diffusion coefficients suggests ~2 orders of magnitude higher rates of diffusion at 60–110 °C temperatures, compared with values expected from extrapolation of high-temperature (>400 °C) experimental data. The thick hydration rinds in perlites, measuring

  10. Historical methane hydrate project review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Frye, Matt; Goldberg, Dave; Husebo, Jarle; Koh, Carolyn; Malone, Mitch; Shipp, Craig; Torres, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In 1995, U.S. Geological Survey made the first systematic assessment of the volume of natural gas stored in the hydrate accumulations of the United States. That study, along with numerous other studies, has shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world greatly exceeds the volume of known conventional gas resources. However, gas hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of gas hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various gas hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural gas hydrates, and (5) analyzing the effects of methane hydrate on drilling safety.Methane hydrates are naturally occurring crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid water-­‐lattice holds gas molecules in a cage-­‐like structure. The gas and water becomes a solid under specific temperature and pressure conditions within the Earth, called the hydrate stability zone. Other factors that control the presence of methane hydrate in nature include the source of the gas included within the hydrates, the physical and chemical controls on the migration of gas with a sedimentary basin containing methane hydrates, the availability of the water also included in the hydrate structure, and the presence of a suitable host sediment or “reservoir”. The geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrates have become collectively known as the “methane hydrate petroleum system”, which has become the focus of numerous hydrate research programs.Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated

  11. X-ray CT Observations of Methane Hydrate Distribution Changes over Time in a Natural Sediment Core from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.

    2010-03-01

    When maintained under hydrate-stable conditions, methane hydrate in laboratory samples is often considered a stable and immobile solid material. Currently, there do not appear to be any studies in which the long-term redistribution of hydrates in sediments has been investigated in the laboratory. These observations are important because if the location of hydrate in a sample were to change over time (e.g. by dissociating at one location and reforming at another), the properties of the sample that depend on hydrate saturation and pore space occupancy would also change. Observations of hydrate redistribution under stable conditions are also important in understanding natural hydrate deposits, as these may also change over time. The processes by which solid hydrate can move include dissociation, hydrate-former and water migration in the gas and liquid phases, and hydrate formation. Chemical potential gradients induced by temperature, pressure, and pore water or host sediment chemistry can drive these processes. A series of tests were performed on a formerly natural methane-hydrate-bearing core sample from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, in order to observe hydrate formation and morphology within this natural sediment, and changes over time using X-ray computed tomography (CT). Long-term observations (over several weeks) of methane hydrate in natural sediments were made to investigate spatial changes in hydrate saturation in the core. During the test sequence, mild buffered thermal and pressure oscillations occurred within the sample in response to laboratory temperature changes. These oscillations were small in magnitude, and conditions were maintained well within the hydrate stability zone.

  12. Finite difference modelling of scattered hydrates and its implications in gas-hydrate exploration

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dewangan, P.; Ramprasad, T.; Ramana, M.V.

    ,4 , in contrast to laterally continuous reflection as observed in low-frequency data. This observation can be explained by the size of the Fresnel zone 5 , which is defined as the lateral distance over which the reflection signal is aver- aged. The size... having larger Fresnel zone show continuous BSR from the scat- tered hydrates 6 . Moreover, BSRs appear weak in high- frequency seismic data in contrast to strong reflection observed in the low-frequency seismics. This frequency dependence of BSR...

  13. Volume change associated with formation and dissociation of hydrate in sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn; Lee, J.Y.; Santamarina, J.C.

    2017-01-01

    Gas hydrate formation and dissociation in sediments are accompanied by changes in the bulk volume of the sediment and can lead to changes in sediment properties, loss of integrity for boreholes, and possibly regional subsidence of the ground surface over areas where methane might be produced from gas hydrate in the future. Experiments on sand, silts, and clay subject to different effective stress and containing different saturations of hydrate formed from dissolved phase tetrahydrofuran are used to systematically investigate the impact of gas hydrate formation and dissociation on bulk sediment volume. Volume changes in low specific surface sediments (i.e., having a rigid sediment skeleton like sand) are much lower than those measured in high specific surface sediments (e.g., clay). Early hydrate formation is accompanied by contraction for all soils and most stress states in part because growing gas hydrate crystals buckle skeletal force chains. Dilation can occur at high hydrate saturations. Hydrate dissociation under drained, zero lateral strain conditions is always associated with some contraction, regardless of soil type, effective stress level, or hydrate saturation. Changes in void ratio during formation-dissociation decrease at high effective stress levels. The volumetric strain during dissociation under zero lateral strain scales with hydrate saturation and sediment compressibility. The volumetric strain during dissociation under high shear is a function of the initial volume average void ratio and the stress-dependent critical state void ratio of the sediment. Other contributions to volume reduction upon hydrate dissociation are related to segregated hydrate in lenses and nodules. For natural gas hydrates, some conditions (e.g., gas production driven by depressurization) might contribute to additional volume reduction by increasing the effective stress.

  14. Visual observation of gas hydrates nucleation and growth at a water - organic liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoporev, Andrey S.; Semenov, Anton P.; Medvedev, Vladimir I.; Sizikov, Artem A.; Gushchin, Pavel A.; Vinokurov, Vladimir A.; Manakov, Andrey Yu.

    2018-03-01

    Visual observation of nucleation sites of methane and methane-ethane-propane hydrates and their further growth in water - organic liquid - gas systems with/without surfactants was carried out. Sapphire Rocking Cell RCS6 with transparent sapphire cells was used. The experiments were conducted at the supercooling ΔTsub = 20.2 °C. Decane, toluene and crude oils were used as organics. Gas hydrate nucleation occurred on water - metal - gas and water - sapphire - organic liquid three-phase contact lines. At the initial stage of growth hydrate crystals rapidly covered the water - gas or water - organics interfaces (depending on the nucleation site). Further hydrate phase accrete on cell walls (sapphire surface) and into the organics volume. At this stage, growth was accompanied by water «drawing out» from under initial hydrate film formed at water - organic interface. Apparently, it takes place due to water capillary inflow in the reaction zone. It was shown that the hydrate crystal morphology depends on the organic phase composition. In the case of water-in-decane emulsion relay hydrate crystallization was observed in the whole sample, originating most likely due to the hydrate crystal intergrowth through decane. Contacts of such crystals with adjacent water droplets result in rapid hydrate crystallization on this droplet.

  15. Experimental study of methane replacement in gas hydrate by carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronov, V P; Gorodetskii, E E; Muratov, A R

    2010-09-30

    The process of replacement of methane molecules in clathrate hydrate by carbon dioxide is studied experimentally. The dependence of the replacement extent on the concentration of the gas mixture coexisting with the hydrate is determined. The kinetics of the replacement is governed by two relaxation modes with a characteristic time ratio of about 10.

  16. On the thermodynamical admissibility of the triphasic theory of charged hydrated tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huyghe, J.M.; Wilson, W.; Malakpoor, K.

    2009-01-01

    The triphasic theory on soft charged hydrated tissues (Lai, W. M., Hou, J. S., and Mow, V. C., 1991, "A Triphasic Theory for the Swelling and Deformation Behaviors of Articular Cartilage," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 113, pp. 245-258) attributes the swelling propensity of articular cartilage to three

  17. Proton affinities of hydrated molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadbeigi, Younes

    2016-09-01

    Proton affinities (PA) of non-hydrated, M, and hydrated forms, M(H2O)1,2,3, of 20 organic molecules including alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones and amines were calculated by the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. For homogeneous families, linear correlations were observed between PAs of the M(H2O)1,2,3 and the PAs of the non-hydrated molecules. Also, the absolute values of the hydration enthalpies of the protonated molecules decreased linearly with the PAs. The correlation functions predicted that for an amine with PA amine with PA > 1100 kJ/mol the PA(M(H2O)) is smaller than the PA.

  18. A Circuit Model of Real Time Human Body Hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asogwa, Clement Ogugua; Teshome, Assefa K; Collins, Stephen F; Lai, Daniel T H

    2016-06-01

    Changes in human body hydration leading to excess fluid losses or overload affects the body fluid's ability to provide the necessary support for healthy living. We propose a time-dependent circuit model of real-time human body hydration, which models the human body tissue as a signal transmission medium. The circuit model predicts the attenuation of a propagating electrical signal. Hydration rates are modeled by a time constant τ, which characterizes the individual specific metabolic function of the body part measured. We define a surrogate human body anthropometric parameter θ by the muscle-fat ratio and comparing it with the body mass index (BMI), we find theoretically, the rate of hydration varying from 1.73 dB/min, for high θ and low τ to 0.05 dB/min for low θ and high τ. We compare these theoretical values with empirical measurements and show that real-time changes in human body hydration can be observed by measuring signal attenuation. We took empirical measurements using a vector network analyzer and obtained different hydration rates for various BMI, ranging from 0.6 dB/min for 22.7 [Formula: see text] down to 0.04 dB/min for 41.2 [Formula: see text]. We conclude that the galvanic coupling circuit model can predict changes in the volume of the body fluid, which are essential in diagnosing and monitoring treatment of body fluid disorder. Individuals with high BMI would have higher time-dependent biological characteristic, lower metabolic rate, and lower rate of hydration.

  19. Hydration in soccer: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo; Guerra Isabela; Barros Turíbio Leite de

    2003-01-01

    Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. Th...

  20. Diffusive, Displacive Deformations and Local Phase Transformation Govern the Mechanics of Layered Crystals: The Case Study of Tobermorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Lei; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh

    2017-07-19

    Understanding the deformation mechanisms underlying the mechanical behavior of materials is the key to fundamental and engineering advances in materials' performance. Herein, we focus on crystalline calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) as a model system with applications in cementitious materials, bone-tissue engineering, drug delivery and refractory materials, and use molecular dynamics simulation to investigate its loading geometry dependent mechanical properties. By comparing various conventional (e.g. shear, compression and tension) and nano-indentation loading geometries, our findings demonstrate that the former loading leads to size-independent mechanical properties while the latter results in size-dependent mechanical properties at the nanometer scales. We found three key mechanisms govern the deformation and thus mechanics of the layered C-S-H: diffusive-controlled and displacive-controlled deformation mechanisms, and strain gradient with local phase transformations. Together, these elaborately classified mechanisms provide deep fundamental understanding and new insights on the relationship between the macro-scale mechanical properties and underlying molecular deformations, providing new opportunities to control and tune the mechanics of layered crystals and other complex materials such as glassy C-S-H, natural composite structures, and manmade laminated structures.

  1. Chemomechanics of acidic ionomers: Hydration isotherms and physical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauth, P.; Sgreccia, E.; Di Vona, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    The hydration isotherms of various ionomers (Nafion, Sulfonated Poly-Ether-Ether-Ketone, Sulfonated Poly-Phenyl-Sulfone) were measured and described by a thermodynamic model, assuming ideality and a linear relation between the thermodynamic osmotic pressure and the volume of the internal electrolytic solution. The only two parameters used are related to measurable physical properties: the deformation parameter, inversely proportional to the elastic modulus of the ionomer, and the free volume parameter. The experimental trends are well reproduced by the model, showing that it captures the main physical features and is suitable for semi-quantitative analysis of ionomer hydration. It indicates that the ionomers behave in good approximation like elastic solids in the studied range of water activities (0 dehydration at low humidity, which should increase their durability.

  2. Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krason, J.; Finley, P.

    1988-01-01

    The summaries of regional basin analyses document that potentially economic accumulations of gas hydrates can be formed in both active and passive margin settings. The principal requirement for gas hydrate formation in either setting is abundant methane. Passive margin sediments with high sedimentation rates and sufficient sedimentary organic carbon can generate large quantities of biogenic methane for hydrate formation. Similarly, active margin locations near a terrigenous sediment source can also have high methane generation potential due to rapid burial of adequate amounts of sedimentary organic matter. Many active margins with evidence of gas hydrate presence correspond to areas subject to upwelling. Upwelling currents can enhance methane generation by increasing primary productivity and thus sedimentary organic carbon. Structural deformation of the marginal sediments at both active and passive sites can enhance gas hydrate formation by providing pathways for migration of both biogenic and thermogenic gas to the shallow gas hydrate stability zone. Additionally, conventional hydrocarbon traps may initially concentrate sufficient amounts of hydrocarbons for subsequent gas hydrate formation.

  3. A Nonlinear Elastic Model for Triaxial Compressive Properties of Artificial Methane-Hydrate-Bearing Sediment Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Yamaguchi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A constitutive model for marine sediments containing natural gas hydrate is essential for the simulation of the geomechanical response to gas extraction from a gas-hydrate reservoir. In this study, the triaxial compressive properties of artificial methane-hydrate-bearing sediment samples reported in an earlier work were analyzed to examine the applicability of a nonlinear elastic constitutive model based on the Duncan-Chang model. The presented model considered the dependences of the mechanical properties on methane hydrate saturation and effective confining pressure. Some parameters were decided depending on the type of sand forming a specimen. The behaviors of lateral strain versus axial strain were also formulated as a function of effective confining pressure. The constitutive model presented in this study will provide a basis for an elastic analysis of the geomechanical behaviors of the gas-hydrate reservoir in the future study, although it is currently available to a limited extent.

  4. Measurements of Water Permeability in Unconsolidated Porous Media with Methane Hydrate Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Sen Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Permeability is one of the key factors that determine the fluids flow capacity and production potential of hydrate deposits. In this study, an experimental setup is developed to investigate the flow properties of the porous media, and the permeabilities to water are measured in the unconsolidated porous media with or without hydrate deposition in the pores. A specialized method of precisely controlling the amount of injected methane gas is employed to form methane hydrate in the core sample, and the hydrate formation process is described by the change characteristics of the gas and hydrate saturations. It is found that the residual gas plays an obstructive role in the water flow and it tends to slightly reduce the water permeability in the porous media, especially under high pressure conditions. After hydrate formation in the core sample, relatively steady flow state can be obtained under suitable water injection rate Q at which hydrate dissociation rate is very slow. The absolute permeability of the porous sample is reduced from 49.2 to 1.2 Darcies when the hydrate saturation increases from 0 to 9.3% in this study, indicating a strong dependence of k on the hydrate saturation.

  5. Decomposition of Protein Experimental Compressibility into Intrinsic and Hydration Shell Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadarlat, Voichita M.; Post, Carol Beth

    2006-01-01

    The experimental determination of protein compressibility reflects both the protein intrinsic compressibility and the difference between the compressibility of water in the protein hydration shell and bulk water. We use molecular dynamics simulations to explore the dependence of the isothermal compressibility of the hydration shell surrounding globular proteins on differential contributions from charged, polar, and apolar protein-water interfaces. The compressibility of water in the protein hydration shell is accounted for by a linear combination of contributions from charged, polar, and apolar solvent-accessible surfaces. The results provide a formula for the deconvolution of experimental data into intrinsic and hydration contributions when a protein of known structure is investigated. The physical basis for the model is the variation in water density shown by the surface-specific radial distribution functions of water molecules around globular proteins. The compressibility of water hydrating charged atoms is lower than bulk water compressibility, the compressibility of water hydrating apolar atoms is somewhat larger than bulk water compressibility, and the compressibility of water around polar atoms is about the same as the compressibility of bulk water. We also assess whether hydration water compressibility determined from small compound data can be used to estimate the compressibility of hydration water surrounding proteins. The results, based on an analysis from four dipeptide solutions, indicate that small compound data cannot be used directly to estimate the compressibility of hydration water surrounding proteins. PMID:16997864

  6. Adsorption Mechanism of Inhibitor and Guest Molecules on the Surface of Gas Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2015-09-23

    The adsorption of guest and kinetic inhibitor molecules on the surface of methane hydrate is investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the free energy profile for transferring a solute molecule from bulk water to the hydrate surface for various molecules. Spherical solutes with a diameter of ∼0.5 nm are significantly stabilized at the hydrate surface, whereas smaller and larger solutes exhibit lower adsorption affinity than the solutes of intermediate size. The range of the attractive force is subnanoscale, implying that this force has no effect on the macroscopic mass transfer of guest molecules in crystal growth processes of gas hydrates. We also examine the adsorption mechanism of a kinetic hydrate inhibitor. It is found that a monomer of the kinetic hydrate inhibitor is strongly adsorbed on the hydrate surface. However, the hydrogen bonding between the amide group of the inhibitor and water molecules on the hydrate surface, which was believed to be the driving force for the adsorption, makes no contribution to the adsorption affinity. The preferential adsorption of both the kinetic inhibitor and the spherical molecules to the surface is mainly due to the entropic stabilization arising from the presence of cavities at the hydrate surface. The dependence of surface affinity on the size of adsorbed molecules is also explained by this mechanism.

  7. Thermal conductivity measurements in porous mixtures of methane hydrate and quartz sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; deMartin, B.J.; Kirby, S.H.; Pinkston, J.; Ruppel, C.D.

    2002-01-01

    Using von Herzen and Maxwell's needle probe method, we measured thermal conductivity in four porous mixtures of quartz sand and methane gas hydrate, with hydrate composing 0, 33, 67 and 100% of the solid volume. Thermal conductivities were measured at a constant methane pore pressure of 24.8 MPa between -20 and +15??C, and at a constant temperature of -10??C between 3.5 and 27.6 MPa methane pore pressure. Thermal conductivity decreased with increasing temperature and increased with increasing methane pore pressure. Both dependencies weakened with increasing hydrate content. Despite the high thermal conductivity of quartz relative to methane hydrate, the largest thermal conductivity was measured in the mixture containing 33% hydrate rather than in hydrate-free sand. This suggests gas hydrate enhanced grain-to-grain heat transfer, perhaps due to intergranular contact growth during hydrate synthesis. These results for gas-filled porous mixtures can help constrain thermal conductivity estimates in porous, gas hydrate-bearing systems.

  8. Low-δD hydration rinds in Yellowstone perlites record rapid syneruptive hydration during glacial and interglacial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, Ilya N.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2016-11-01

    Hydration of silicic volcanic glass forms perlite, a dusky, porous form of altered glass characterized by abundant "onion-skin" fractures. The timing and temperature of perlite formation are enigmatic and could plausibly occur during eruption, during post-eruptive cooling, or much later at ambient temperatures. To learn more about the origin of natural perlite, and to fingerprint the hydration waters, we investigated perlitic glass from several synglacial and interglacial rhyolitic lavas and tuffs from the Yellowstone volcanic system. Perlitic cores are surrounded by a series of conchoidal cracks that separate 30- to 100-µm-thick slivers, likely formed in response to hydration-induced stress. H2O and D/H profiles confirm that most D/H exchange happens together with rapid H2O addition but some smoother D/H variations may suggest separate minor exchange by deuterium atom interdiffusion following hydration. The hydrated rinds (2-3 wt% H2O) transition rapidly (within 30 µm, or by 1 wt% H2O per 10 µm) to unhydrated glass cores. This is consistent with quenched "hydration fronts" where H2O diffusion coefficients are strongly dependent on H2O concentrations. The chemical, δ18O, and δD systematics of bulk glass records last equilibrium between 110 and 60 °C without chemical exchange but with some δ18O exchange. Similarly, the δ18O of water extracted from glass by rapid heating suggests that water was added to the glass during cooling at 400 °C) experimental data. The thick hydration rinds in perlites, measuring hundreds of microns, preserve the original D/H values of hydrating water as a recorder of paleoclimate conditions. Measured δD values in perlitic lavas are -150 to -191 or 20-40 ‰ lower than glass hydrated by modern Yellowstone waters. This suggests that Yellowstone perlites record the low-δD signature of glacial ice. Cooling calculations, combined with the observed high water diffusion coefficients noted for 60-150 °C, suggest that if sufficient hot

  9. Confined Water in Layered Silicates: The Origin of Anomalous Thermal Expansion Behavior in Calcium-Silicate-Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, N M Anoop; Wang, Bu; Falzone, Gabriel; Le Pape, Yann; Neithalath, Narayanan; Pilon, Laurent; Bauchy, Mathieu; Sant, Gaurav

    2016-12-28

    Water, under conditions of nanoscale confinement, exhibits anomalous dynamics, and enhanced thermal deformations, which may be further enhanced when such water is in contact with hydrophilic surfaces. Such heightened thermal deformations of water could control the volume stability of hydrated materials containing nanoconfined structural water. Understanding and predicting the thermal deformation coefficient (TDC, often referred to as the CTE, coefficient of thermal expansion), which represents volume changes induced in materials under conditions of changing temperature, is of critical importance for hydrated solids including: hydrogels, biological tissues, and calcium silicate hydrates, as changes in their volume can result in stress development, and cracking. By pioneering atomistic simulations, we examine the physical origin of thermal expansion in calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the binding agent in concrete that is formed by the reaction of cement with water. We report that the TDC of C-S-H shows a sudden increase when the CaO/SiO2 (molar ratio; abbreviated as Ca/Si) exceeds 1.5. This anomalous behavior arises from a notable increase in the confinement of water contained in the C-S-H's nanostructure. We identify that confinement is dictated by the topology of the C-S-H's atomic network. Taken together, the results suggest that thermal deformations of hydrated silicates can be altered by inducing compositional changes, which in turn alter the atomic topology and the resultant volume stability of the solids.

  10. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.

    1999-01-01

    Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations...... and experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6...

  11. Nitrogen-assisted Three-phase Equilibrium in Hydrate Systems Composed of Water, Methane, Carbon Dioxide, and Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, K.; Flemings, P. B.; DiCarlo, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Guest molecule exchange is a new and promising methane hydrate production technique in which methane gas is produced by injection of another gas without requiring depressurization or thermal stimulation. The technique is generally associated with injection of carbon dioxide, but injection of nitrogen and carbon dioxide mixtures are the most efficient and economical. However, thermodynamic behavior of injection mixtures is poorly understood, and it is unclear how nitrogen affects the exchange process. Here, we describe thermodynamic stability of hydrate systems that contain water, methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen. We present a series of ternary and quaternary phase diagrams and show the impact nitrogen has on hydrate stability. Our results demonstrate that nitrogen can either stabilize hydrate, de-stabilize hydrate, or produce three-phase equilibrium (gas, water, and hydrate) depending on its relative abundance. At low abundance nitrogen forms hydrate and directly contributes to the exchange process. At high abundance nitrogen de-stabilizes hydrate akin to traditional hydrate inhibitors, such as salt, alcohol, or mono-ethylene glycol. We show how the dual properties of nitrogen lead to three-phase equilibrium and how three-phase equilibrium may explain much of the behavior observed in methane production from nitrogen-rich injections. We apply our analysis to laboratory experiments and the methane hydrate field test on the northern Alaskan slope at Ignik Sikumi. These results can be extended to analyze dynamic evolution of mixed hydrate systems.

  12. [Treatment of chin deformities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera Serna, Eduardo; Scola Pliego, Esteban; Mir Ulldemolins, Nuria; Martínez Morán, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    Facial beauty depends on the form, proportion and position of its various units. The chin is the most prominent element of the lower third of the face, both in the frontal view and in profile. The surgical approach to chin deformities did not start until the second half of the twentieth century. The development of silicone prostheses and the emergence of sliding genioplasty offered surgeons a whole new range of options to modify the size and position of the chin. We have performed a historical review of chin surgery, the multiple aesthetic analyses available and the advantages and disadvantages of the different alloplastic materials and osteotomies. To do so, a comprehensive search through current scientific literature on the topic has been carried out, focusing on large series, long-term follow-up studies, research in animal models and medical evidence. As happens in almost any topic in facial plastic surgery, no strong evidence useful in ENT practice for handling chin deformities can be found in today's scientific literature. Ethnicity influences the aesthetic analysis; the type and degree of deformity to be corrected will determine the allo-plastic augmentation of the chin or the suitability of osteotomy. Porous polyethylene (Medpor, Porex Surgical, Newman, Ca, USA) and solid silicone (Silastic, Michigan Medical Corporation, Santa Barbara, Ca, USA) show a clear advantage over other alloplastic materials. Moderate-to-severe retrogenia benefits from sliding genioplasty strategies rather than prosthetic enlargement.

  13. Density dependence of the yield of hydrated electrons in the low-LET radiolysis of supercritical water at 400 °C: influence of the geminate recombination of subexcitation-energy electrons prior to thermalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesungnoen, Jintana; Sanguanmith, Sunuchakan; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2013-10-21

    Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the yield of hydrated electrons (eaq(-)) in the low-linear energy transfer radiolysis of supercritical water at 400 °C as a function of water density over the range of ~0.15 to 0.6 g cm(-3). Very good agreement was found between our calculations and picosecond pulse radiolysis experimental data at ~60 ps and 1 ns at high density (>0.35 g cm(-3)). At densities lower than ~0.35 g cm(-3), our eaq(-) yields were lower than the experimental data, especially at ~60 ps. However, if we incorporated into the simulations a prompt geminate electron-cation (H2O˙(+)) recombination (prior thermalization of the electron) that decreased as the density decreased, our computed eaq(-) yields at ~60 ps and 1 ns compared fairly well with the experimental data for the entire density range studied.

  14. Hydrated interfacial ions and electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Charged particles such as hydrated ions and transient hydrated electrons, the simplest anionic reducing agents in water, and the special hydronium and hydroxide ions at water interfaces play an important role in many fields of science, such as atmospheric chemistry, radiation chemistry, and biology, as well as biochemistry. This article focuses on these species near hydrophobic interfaces of water, such as the air or vacuum interface of water or water protein/membrane interfaces. Ions at interfaces as well as solvated electrons have been reviewed frequently during the past decade. Although all species have been known for some time with seemingly familiar features, recently the picture in all cases became increasingly diffuse rather than clearer. The current account gives a critical state-of-the art overview of what is known and what remains to be understood and investigated about hydrated interfacial ions and electrons.

  15. Composition Dependence of Phase Stability, Deformation Mechanisms, and Mechanical Properties of the CoCrFeMnNi High-Entropy Alloy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasan, C. C.; Deng, Y.; Pradeep, K. G.; Yao, M. J.; Springer, H.; Raabe, D.

    2014-10-01

    The proposal of configurational entropy maximization to produce massive solid-solution (SS)-strengthened, single-phase high-entropy alloy (HEA) systems has gained much scientific interest. Although most of this interest focuses on the basic role of configurational entropy in SS formability, setting future research directions also requires the overall property benefits of massive SS strengthening to be carefully investigated. To this end, taking the most promising CoCrFeMnNi HEA system as the starting point, we investigate SS formability, deformation mechanisms, and the achievable mechanical property ranges of different compositions and microstructural states. A comparative assessment of the results with respect to room temperature behavior of binary Fe-Mn alloys reveals only limited benefits of massive SS formation. Nevertheless, the results also clarify that the compositional requirements in this alloy system to stabilize the face-centered cubic (fcc) SS are sufficiently relaxed to allow considering nonequiatomic compositions and exploring improved strength-ductility combinations at reduced alloying costs.

  16. The physical and mechanical properties and local deformation micromechanisms in materials with different dependence of hardness on the depth of print

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, Yu. I.; Tyurin, A. I.; Aslanyan, E. G.; Pirozhkova, T. S.; Vasyukov, V. M.

    2017-09-01

    The size hardness effects are studied via the micro- and nanoindentation methods over the wide range of the depth of print h (from dozens of nanometers to several dozen micrometers) for several classes of materials, such as ionic and covalent single crystals (sapphire, silicon, lithium fluoride); metals (single-crystal Al, polycrystalline Cu, Ni, and Nb); ceramics (high-strength nanostructured TZP-ceramic based on the natural zirconium dioxide-baddeleyite mineral); amorphous materials (fused quartz); and polymers (polycarbonate and polytetrafluoroethylene). As is shown, some of them possess severe size hardness effects, whereas the others reveal the weak ones or even a lack of these effects. The thermoactivation analysis is implemented, as well, and the activating and energy characteristics of local deformation processes induced by an indenter are compared with the dominant plasticity micromechanisms of the studied materials at different stages of the print formation and with the size peculiarities. The materials with low hardness coefficients and meeting the requirements of ISO 14577 and GOST R 8.748-2011 standards in the nanohardness measurements are highlighted, as well. In the established load ranges, these materials are the promising candidates for their use as reference samples, which are designed to ensure the uniformity of the hardness measurements at the nano- and microscales, as well as for calibrating and testing the nanoindentometers.

  17. A novel deformation mechanism for superplastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muto, H.; Sakai, M. (Toyohashi Univ. of Technology (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science)

    1999-01-01

    Uniaxial compressive creep tests with strain value up to -0.1 for a [beta]-spodumene glass ceramic are conducted at 1060 C. From the observation of microstructural changes between before and after the creep deformations, it is shown that the grain-boundary sliding takes place via cooperative movement of groups of grains rather than individual grains under the large-scale-deformation. The deformation process and the surface technique used in this work are not only applicable to explain the deformation and flow of two-phase ceramics but also the superplastic deformation. (orig.) 12 refs.

  18. THE EFFECT OF GAS HYDRATES DISSOCIATION AND DRILLING FLUIDS INVASION UPON BOREHOLE STABILITY IN OCEANIC GAS HYDRATES-BEARING SEDIMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, F.; Wu, N.; Jiang, G.; Zhang, L.

    2009-12-01

    Under the condition of over-pressure drilling, the solid-phase and liquid-phase in drilling fluids immediately penetrate into the oceanic gas hydrates-bearing sediment, which causes the water content surrounding the borehole to increase largely. At the same time, the hydrates surrounding borehole maybe quickly decompose into water and gas because of the rapid change of temperature and pressure. The drilling practices prove that this two factors may change the rock characteristics of wellbore, such as rock strength, pore pressure, resistivity, etc., and then affect the logging response and evaluation, wellbore stability and well safty. The invasion of filtrate can lower the angle of friction and weaken the cohesion of hydrates-bearing sediment,which is same to the effect of invading into conventional oil and gas formation on borehole mechnical properties. The difference is that temperature isn’t considered in the invasion process of conventional formations while in hydrates-bearing sediments, it is a factor that can not be ignored. Temperature changes can result in hydrates dissociating, which has a great effect on mechanical properties of borehole. With the application of numerical simulation method, we studied the changes of pore pressure and variation of water content in the gas hydrates-bearing sediment caused by drilling fluid invasion under pressure differential and gas hydrate dissociation under temperature differential and analyzed their influence on borehole stability.The result of simulation indicated that the temperature near borehole increased quickly and changed hardly any after 6 min later. About 1m away from the borehole, the temperature of formation wasn’t affected by the temperature change of borehole. At the place near borehole, as gas hydrate dissociated dramatically and drilling fluid invaded quickly, the pore pressure increased promptly. The degree of increase depends on the permeability and speed of temperature rise of formation around

  19. Evolution of a spherical hydrate-free inclusion in a porous matrix filled with methane hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiberkin, Kirill; Lyubimov, Dmitry V; Lyubimova, Tatyana P; Zikanov, Oleg

    2014-02-01

    The behavior of a small isolated hydrate-free inclusion (a gas bubble) within a porous matrix filled with methane hydrate and either water or methane gas is analyzed. Simplifying assumptions of spherical symmetry, an infinite uniform porous medium, and negligible effects of background temperature and pressure variations focus the investigation on the features of the dynamics of a single bubble determined by a phase transition. Two solutions are presented: an exact solution of the Stefan problem obtained when the effects of gas and water flow are neglected, and a numerical solution of the full problem. The solutions are in good agreement with each other and with known asymptotic dependencies, confirming that the effects of inertia and convection transport can be neglected in the case of small inclusions. It is found that, after an initial adjustment, the radius of any small bubble decreases with time following a self-similar solution of the Stefan problem. The lifetime of a bubble is evaluated as a function of initial radius and the system's physical parameters. Possible effects of such inclusions on the filtration of methane to the surface and other aspects of the dynamics of hydrate-bearing deposits are discussed.

  20. Experimental Study of Methane Hydrates in Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smirnov Vyacheslav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of gas hydrate formation in porous space of coal has been studied. The experiments conducted have proven the possibility of methane gas hydrate formation in moist coal. It has been demonstrated that the decomposition points of methane gas hydrates in coal are near to the phase equilibrium curve for bulk methane hydrate. Only part of water absorbed by coal can be involved in the methane gas hydrate formation. With the increase in gas pressure increases the amount of gas hydrate formed in natural coal. For formation of hydrates at a positive temperature, the pressure in the system has to be at least 2 MPa. At the same time the speed of formation and decomposition of gas hydrates in coal is big enough.

  1. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lina

    2017-05-13

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10 was conducted for tricalcium silicate (C3S) to interpret long-term hydration process and investigate the formation, structure and properties of C-S-H. Based on results from XRD, IR, SEM, NMR and so forth, loose and dense clusters of C-S-H with analogous C/S ratio were obtained along with the corresponding chemical formulae proposed as Ca5Si4O13∙6.2H2O. Crystalline structure inside C-S-H was observed by TEM, which was allocated at the foil-like proportion as well as the edge of wrinkles of the product. The long-term hydration process of C3S in dilute suspension could be sketchily described as migration of calcium hydroxide and in-situ growth of C-S-H with equilibrium silicon in aqueous solution relatively constant and calcium varied.

  2. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  3. Statistical field theories deformed within different calculi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olemskoi, A. I.; Borysov, S. S.; Shuda, I. A.

    2010-09-01

    Within the framework of basic-deformed and finite-difference calculi, as well as deformation procedures proposed by Tsallis, Abe, and Kaniadakis and generalized by Naudts, we develop field-theoretical schemes of statistically distributed fields. We construct a set of generating functionals and find their connection with corresponding correlators for basic-deformed, finite-difference, and Kaniadakis calculi. Moreover, we introduce pair of additive functionals, which expansions into deformed series yield both Green functions and their irreducible proper vertices. We find as well formal equations, governing by the generating functionals of systems which possess a symmetry with respect to a field variation and are subjected to an arbitrary constrain. Finally, we generalize field-theoretical schemes inherent in concrete calculi in the Naudts manner. From the physical point of view, we study dependences of both one-site partition function and variance of free fields on deformations. We show that within the basic-deformed statistics dependence of the specific partition function on deformation has in logarithmic axes symmetrical form with respect to maximum related to deformation absence; in case of the finite-difference statistics, the partition function takes non-deformed value; for the Kaniadakis statistics, curves of related dependences have convex symmetrical form at small curvatures of the effective action and concave form at large ones. We demonstrate that only moment of the second order of free fields takes non-zero values to be proportional to inverse curvature of effective action. In dependence of the deformation parameter, the free field variance has linearly arising form for the basic-deformed distribution and increases non-linearly rapidly in case of the finite-difference statistics; for more complicated case of the Kaniadakis distribution, related dependence has double-well form.

  4. Zernike polynomial based Rayleigh-Ritz model of a piezoelectric unimorph deformable mirror

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Long, CS

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric bimorph- or unimorph-type deformable mirrors are commonly used in adaptive optics to correct for time-dependent phase aberrations. In the optics community, the surface deformations that deformable mirrors are required to achieve...

  5. 77 FR 40032 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to...

  6. 78 FR 37536 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. The Federal... of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of methane... Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate Research and Development Program. Tentative Agenda: The agenda will...

  7. Thermodynamic Properties of Hydrogen + Tetra-n-Butyl Ammonium Bromide Semi-Clathrate Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Hashimoto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamic stability and hydrogen occupancy on the hydrogen + tetra-n-butyl ammonium bromide semi-clathrate hydrate were investigated by means of Raman spectroscopic and phase equilibrium measurements under the three-phase equilibrium condition. The structure of mixed gas hydrates changes from tetragonal to another structure around 95 MPa and 292 K depending on surrounding hydrogen fugacity. The occupied amount of hydrogen in the semi-clathrate hydrate increases significantly associated with the structural transition. Tetra-n-butyl ammonium bromide semi-clathrate hydrates can absorb hydrogen molecules by a pressure-swing without destroying the hydrogen bonds of hydrate cages at 15 MPa or over.

  8. Relation of submarine landslide to hydrate occurrences in Baiyun Depression, South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yunbao; Zhang, Xiaohua; Wu, Shiguo; Wang, Lei; Yang, Shengxiong

    2018-02-01

    Submarine landslides have been observed in the Baiyun Depression of the South China Sea. The occurrence of hydrates below these landslides indicates that these slope instabilities may be closely related to the massive release of methane. In this study, we used a simple Monte-Carlo model to determine the first-order deformation pattern of a gravitationally destabilizing slope. The results show that a stress concentration occurs due to hydrate dissociation on the nearby glide surface and on top of a gas chimney structure. Upon the dissolution of the gas hydrate, slope failure occurs due to the excess pore pressure generated by the dissociation of the gas hydrates. When gas hydrates dissociate at shallow depths, the excess pore pressure generated can be greater than the total stress acting at those points, along with the forces that resist sliding. Initially, the failure occurs at the toe of the slope, then extends to the interior. Although our investigation focused only on the contribution of hydrate decomposition to submarine landslide, this process is also affected by both the slope material properties and topography.

  9. On the propagation of a quasi-static disturbance in a heterogeneous, deformable, and porous medium with pressure-dependent properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, D.W.

    2011-10-01

    Using an asymptotic technique, valid when the medium properties are smoothly-varying, I derive a semi-analytic expression for the propagation velocity of a quasi-static disturbance traveling within a nonlinear-elastic porous medium. The phase, a function related to the propagation time, depends upon the properties of the medium, including the pressure-sensitivities of the medium parameters, and on pressure and displacement amplitude changes. Thus, the propagation velocity of a disturbance depends upon its amplitude, as might be expected for a nonlinear process. As a check, the expression for the phase function is evaluated for a poroelastic medium, when the material properties do not depend upon the fluid pressure. In that case, the travel time estimates agree with conventional analytic estimates, and with values calculated using a numerical simulator. For a medium with pressure-dependent permeability I find general agreement between the semi-analytic estimates and estimates from a numerical simulation. In this case the pressure amplitude changes are obtained from the numerical simulator.

  10. Simultaneous determination of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat in sI methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat of sI methane hydrate were measured as functions of temperature and pressure using a needle probe technique. The temperature dependence was measured between −20°C and 17°C at 31.5 MPa. The pressure dependence was measured between 31.5 and 102 MPa at 14.4°C. Only weak temperature and pressure dependencies were observed. Methane hydrate thermal conductivity differs from that of water by less than 10 per cent, too little to provide a sensitive measure of hydrate content in water-saturated systems. Thermal diffusivity of methane hydrate is more than twice that of water, however, and its specific heat is about half that of water. Thus, when drilling into or through hydrate-rich sediment, heat from the borehole can raise the formation temperature more than 20 per cent faster than if the formation's pore space contains only water. Thermal properties of methane hydrate should be considered in safety and economic assessments of hydrate-bearing sediment.

  11. Hydration modelling of calcium sulphates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korte, A.C.J.; Eligehausen, R.; Gehlen, C.

    2008-01-01

    The CEMHYD3D model has been extended at the University of Twente in last ten years1,2. At present the cement hydration model is extended for the use of gypsum. Although gypsum was present in the model already, the model was not suitable for high contents of gypsum and did not include the transitions

  12. Hydrated-electron population dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pshenichnikov, MS; Baltuska, A; Wiersma, DA; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Baltuška, Andrius

    2004-01-01

    A detailed frequency-resolved pump-probe study of hydrated electron dynamics, performed with 5-fs pulses, is presented. We show that the experimental data can be successfully described with a model in which the excited state lifetime is similar to50 fs in regular water and similar to70 A in heavy

  13. [NMF and cosmetology of cutaneous hydration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, J-P

    2002-01-01

    In the stratum corneum, the water binds to the intracellular hygroscopic and hydrosoluble substances called "natural moisturizing factors" or NMF. These "natural moisturizing factors" contained in the corneocytes are formed during epidermal differentiation and may represent up to 10 p. cent of the corneocyte mass. They are principally amino acids, carboxylic pyrrolidone acid, lactic acid, urea, glucose and mineral ions. Keratinization plays an important part in the formation of NMF that exhibit strong osmotic potential attracting the water molecules. The binding of water to NMF is the static aspect of cutaneous hydration. The second, dynamic, aspect is related to the selective permeability of the stratum corneum and to its lipid barrier properties, the permeability of which depends on the integrity and nature of the inter-corneocyte lipids and their lamellar organization between the cells. In these conditions, hydration cosmetics rely on two concepts that can be isolated or associated: the supply of hydrophilic substances to the stratum corneum, capable of attracting and retaining water (moisturizer) or capable of restoring the barrier in order to restore normal water loss or of protecting it against aggression (occlusive).

  14. Hydration mechanisms of mineral trioxide aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J

    2007-06-01

    To report the hydration mechanism of white mineral trioxide aggregate (White MTA, Dentsply, Tulsa Dental Products, Tulsa, OK, USA). The chemical constitution of white MTA was studied by viewing the powder in polished sections under the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The hydration of both white MTA and white Portland cement (PC) was studied by characterizing cement hydrates viewed under the SEM, plotting atomic ratios, performing quantitative energy dispersive analyses with X-ray (EDAX) and by calculation of the amount of anhydrous clinker minerals using the Bogue calculation. Un-hydrated MTA was composed of impure tri-calcium and di-calcium silicate and bismuth oxide. The aluminate phase was scarce. On hydration the white PC produced a dense structure made up of calcium silicate hydrate, calcium hydroxide, monosulphate and ettringite as the main hydration products. The un-reacted cement grain was coated with a layer of hydrated cement. In contrast MTA produced a porous structure on hydration. Levels of ettringite and monosulphate were low. Bismuth oxide was present as un-reacted powder but also incorporated with the calcium silicate hydrate. White MTA was deficient in alumina suggesting that the material was not prepared in a rotary kiln. On hydration this affected the production of ettringite and monosulphate usually formed on hydration of PC. The bismuth affected the hydration mechanism of MTA; it formed part of the structure of C-S-H and also affected the precipitation of calcium hydroxide in the hydrated paste. The microstructure of hydrated MTA would likely be weaker when compared with that of PC.

  15. Thermal properties of methane gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, William F.

    2007-01-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline solids in which molecules of a “guest” species occupy and stabilize cages formed by water molecules. Similar to ice in appearance (fig. 1), gas hydrates are stable at high pressures and temperatures above freezing (0°C). Methane is the most common naturally occurring hydrate guest species. Methane hydrates, also called simply “gas hydrates,” are extremely concentrated stores of methane and are found in shallow permafrost and continental margin sediments worldwide. Brought to sea-level conditions, methane hydrate breaks down and releases up to 160 times its own volume in methane gas. The methane stored in gas hydrates is of interest and concern to policy makers as a potential alternative energy resource and as a potent greenhouse gas that could be released from sediments to the atmosphere and ocean during global warming. In continental margin settings, methane release from gas hydrates also is a potential geohazard and could cause submarine landslides that endanger offshore infrastructure. Gas hydrate stability is sensitive to temperature changes. To understand methane release from gas hydrate, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a laboratory investigation of pure methane hydrate thermal properties at conditions relevant to accumulations of naturally occurring methane hydrate. Prior to this work, thermal properties for gas hydrates generally were measured on analog systems such as ice and non-methane hydrates or at temperatures below freezing; these conditions limit direct comparisons to methane hydrates in marine and permafrost sediment. Three thermal properties, defined succinctly by Briaud and Chaouch (1997), are estimated from the experiments described here: - Thermal conductivity, λ: if λ is high, heat travels easily through the material. - Thermal diffusivity, κ: if κ is high, it takes little time for the temperature to rise in the material. - Specific heat, cp: if cp is high, it takes a great deal of heat to

  16. Models for Gas Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Inferred from Hydraulic Permeability and Elastic Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung W.

    2008-01-01

    Elastic velocities and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments strongly depend on how gas hydrate accumulates in pore spaces and various gas hydrate accumulation models are proposed to predict physical property changes due to gas hydrate concentrations. Elastic velocities and permeability predicted from a cementation model differ noticeably from those from a pore-filling model. A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log provides in-situ water-filled porosity and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments. To test the two competing models, the NMR log along with conventional logs such as velocity and resistivity logs acquired at the Mallik 5L-38 well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada, were analyzed. When the clay content is less than about 12 percent, the NMR porosity is 'accurate' and the gas hydrate concentrations from the NMR log are comparable to those estimated from an electrical resistivity log. The variation of elastic velocities and relative permeability with respect to the gas hydrate concentration indicates that the dominant effect of gas hydrate in the pore space is the pore-filling characteristic.

  17. Spreading rate dependent seafloor deformation in response to India-Eurasia collision: results of a hydrosweep survey in the Central Indian Ocean basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; George, P.; Ranade, G.

    ; spreading rate dependence; effect of plate collision; stress regime; CIOB 1. Introduction The Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) is the largest basin in the Indian Ocean, and covers an area of about 7 million km2 (Fig. la). This basin is underlain... from the central part of the CIOB (Kamesh Raju and Ramprasad, 1989; Mukhopadhyay and Khadge, 1992, 1994; Kodagali et al., 1992) call for a thorough analysis of the effect of the stress regime (Weissel et al., 1980; Zoback et al., 1989...

  18. The effect of hydration on the micromechanics of regenerated cellulose fibres from ionic liquid solutions of varying draw ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulota, M; Michud, A; Hummel, M; Hughes, M; Sixta, H

    2016-10-20

    Regenerated cellulose fibres - Ioncell-F, have been prepared with different draw ratios from cellulose solution in 1,5-diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-ene-1-ium acetate ([DBNH]OAc) ionic liquid. Properties of the fibres were investigated in dry and wet conditions. The stiffness of fibres decreased on average 5 times upon the hydration while the tensile strength remained at around 70% of the initial value. The effect of hydration on the deformation mechanisms and mechanical properties was addressed using Raman spectroscopy. Bands located at 1095cm(-1) and 1414cm(-1) corresponding to the glucosidic linkage C-O-C and side groups C-O-H were followed upon straining. Raman band shifts were observed indicating molecular deformations. Moreover, the hydration of fibres altered the shifting rates implying changes in the molecular micromechanics. It is suggested that hydration affects inter-chain hydrogen bonds thus resulting in the slippage of the chains and lower stiffness of fibres. Some discrepancies from the series aggregate model have been observed which is indicative of changes in the deformation mechanisms upon hydration of the fibres. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Geomechanical Behavior of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments in the Ulleung Basin during Methane Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, G. C.; Kim, A. R.; KIM, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The potential of methane hydrate deposits in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea was suggested by the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources between 2000 and 2004. In a few years, a pilot production project is planned as the world's second offshore methane production project. The basin has a water depth of 1500-2300 m; however, the depth of the hydrate occurrence zone is relatively shallow (about 100-200 mbsf) for gas hydrate production. There is high potential for geomechanical stability problems such as seafloor subsidence, differential settlement, effective stress concentrations, marine landslides, and wellbore instability. In this study, 2D axisymmetric numerical modeling is conducted to simulate the depressurization process in the Ulleung Basin for methane gas production. The coupled mechanical-flow-thermal model used for this purpose incorporates the physical processes of hydrate dissociation, the pore fluid flow, thermal advection, and the geomechanical response of hydrate-bearing sediments. Using the coupled model, two high-potential sites are compared with respect to the pore pressure, temperature change, production efficiency, and geomechanical stability. During depressurization, deformation of the sediments around the production well occurs due to the pore pressure difference and the increase in the effective stress in the depressurized region. This tendency becomes more pronounced due to the decrease in the stiffness of the hydrate-bearing sediments, which is caused by hydrate dissociation. In addition, the latent heat induced by methane hydrate dissociation and thermal advection due to the pore fluid flow have greater effects on the dissociation range and pace than do the geomechanical behaviors. Meanwhile, higher production efficiency, a larger latent heat effect and less settlement are induced in the site, which consists of thick sand layers with greater stiffness and permeability levels than mud layers.

  20. Influence of high deformation rate, brain region, transverse compression, and specimen size on rat brain shear stress morphology and magnitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslach, Henry W; Gipple, Jenna M; Leahy, Lauren N

    2017-04-01

    An external mechanical insult to the brain, such as a blast, may create internal stress and deformation waves, which have shear and longitudinal components that can induce combined shear and compression of the brain tissue. To isolate the consequences of such interactions for the shear stress and to investigate the role of the extracellular fluid in the mechanical response, translational shear stretch at 10/s, 60/s, and 100/s translational shear rates under either 0% or 33% fixed transverse compression is applied without preconditioning to rat brain specimens. The specimens from the cerebrum, the cerebellum grey matter, and the brainstem white matter are nearly the full length of their respective regions. The translational shear stress response to translational shear deformation is characterized by the effect that each of four factors, high deformation rate, brain region, transverse compression, and specimen size, have on the shear stress magnitude averaged over ten specimens for each combination of factors. Increasing the deformation rate increases the magnitude of the shear stress at a given translational shear stretch, and as tested by ANOVAs so does applying transverse fixed compression of 33% of the thickness. The stress magnitude differs by the region that is the specimen source: cerebrum, cerebellum or brainstem. The magnitude of the shear stress response at a given deformation rate and stretch depends on the specimen length, called a specimen size effect. Surprisingly, under no compression a shorter length specimen requires more shear stress, but under 33% compression a shorter length specimen requires less shear stress, to meet a required shear deformation rate. The shear specimen size effect calls into question the applicability of the classical shear stress definition to hydrated soft biological tissue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy for Structure-II Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeya, Kei; Zhang, Caihong; Kawayama, Iwao

    2009-01-01

    For the nondestructive inspection of gas hydrates, terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) was applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate and propane hydrate. The absorption of propane hydrate monotonically increases with frequency, similar to the case of ice, while THF hydrate has a charact......For the nondestructive inspection of gas hydrates, terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) was applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate and propane hydrate. The absorption of propane hydrate monotonically increases with frequency, similar to the case of ice, while THF hydrate has...

  2. Seismic reflections associated with submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassen, K.

    1995-12-31

    Gas hydrates are often suggested as a future energy resource. This doctoral thesis improves the understanding of the concentration and distribution of natural submarine gas hydrates. The presence of these hydrates are commonly inferred from strong bottom simulating reflection (BSR). To investigate the nature of BSR, this work uses seismic studies of hydrate-related BSRs at two different locations, one where gas hydrates are accepted to exist and interpreted to be very extensive (in the Beaufort Sea), the other with good velocity data and downhole logs available (offshore Oregon). To ascertain the presence of free gas under the BSR, prestack offset data must supplement near-vertical incidence seismic data. A tentative model for physical properties of sediments partially saturated with gas hydrate and free gas is presented. This model, together with drilling information and seismic data containing the BSR beneath the Oregon margin and the Beaufort Sea, made it possible to better understand when to apply the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) method to constrain BSR gas hydrate and gas models. Distribution of natural gas hydrates offshore Norway and Svalbard is discussed and interpreted as reflections from the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, overlying sediments containing free gas. Gas hydrates inferred to exist at the Norwegian-Svalbard continental margin correlate well with Cenozoic depocenters, and the associated gas is assumed to be mainly biogenic. Parts of that margin have a high potential for natural gas hydrates of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. 235 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Handbook of gas hydrate properties and occurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuustraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.

    1983-12-01

    This handbook provides data on the resource potential of naturally occurring hydrates, the properties that are needed to evaluate their recovery, and their production potential. The first two chapters give data on the naturally occurring hydrate potential by reviewing published resource estimates and the known and inferred occurrences. The third and fourth chapters review the physical and thermodynamic properties of hydrates, respectively. The thermodynamic properties of hydrates that are discussed include dissociation energies and a simplified method to calculate them; phase diagrams for simple and multi-component gases; the thermal conductivity; and the kinetics of hydrate dissociation. The final chapter evaluates the net energy balance of recovering hydrates and shows that a substantial positive energy balance can theoretically be achieved. The Appendices of the Handbook summarize physical and thermodynamic properties of gases, liquids and solids that can be used in designing and evaluating recovery processes of hydrates. 158 references, 67 figures, 47 tables.

  4. Faulting and hydration of the Juan de Fuca plate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedimović, Mladen R.; Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne R.; Carbotte, Suzanne M.; Pablo Canales, J.; Dziak, Robert P.

    2009-06-01

    Multichannel seismic observations provide the first direct images of crustal scale normal faults within the Juan de Fuca plate system and indicate that brittle deformation extends up to ~ 200 km seaward of the Cascadia trench. Within the sedimentary layering steeply dipping faults are identified by stratigraphic offsets, with maximum throws of 110 ± 10 m found near the trench. Fault throws diminish both upsection and seaward from the trench. Long-term throw rates are estimated to be 13 ± 2 mm/kyr. Faulted offsets within the sedimentary layering are typically linked to larger offset scarps in the basement topography, suggesting reactivation of the normal fault systems formed at the spreading center. Imaged reflections within the gabbroic igneous crust indicate swallowing fault dips at depth. These reflections require local alteration to produce an impedance contrast, indicating that the imaged fault structures provide pathways for fluid transport and hydration. As the depth extent of imaged faulting within this young and sediment insulated oceanic plate is primarily limited to approximately Moho depths, fault-controlled hydration appears to be largely restricted to crustal levels. If dehydration embrittlement is an important mechanism for triggering intermediate-depth earthquakes within the subducting slab, then the limited occurrence rate and magnitude of intraslab seismicity at the Cascadia margin may in part be explained by the limited amount of water imbedded into the uppermost oceanic mantle prior to subduction. The distribution of submarine earthquakes within the Juan de Fuca plate system indicates that propagator wake areas are likely to be more faulted and therefore more hydrated than other parts of this plate system. However, being largely restricted to crustal levels, this localized increase in hydration generally does not appear to have a measurable effect on the intraslab seismicity along most of the subducted propagator wakes at the Cascadia margin.

  5. Microscopic Characterization of Brevundimonas diminuta in the Hydrated State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, Gary; Cho, Seok-Jun; Lester, Elisabeth; Rose, David; Sabanyagam, Chandran; Ross, Scott F

    2015-01-01

    Brevundimonas diminuta is the organism most commonly used for challenge testing of sterilizing-grade filter membranes. ASTM F838-05 and PDA Technical Report 26 rely on B. diminuta ATCC #19146 for standard challenge tests used to designate sterilizing-grade filter performance. Despite the importance and widespread use of B. diminuta in filter testing and validation, information about this microorganism in its native hydrated state is limited. In this work, we measure, for the first time, the mechanical property of modulus for B. diminuta cultured in saline lactose broth (as described in ASTM F838-05) via wet atomic force microscopy. For comparison, we also imaged B. diminuta by the traditional method of electron microscopy after capture on a filter and chemical fixation. The modulus of hydrated B. diminuta cells was ∼193 mPa. To put this result into context, a simple model for pore penetration that correlates the role of the Young's modulus of hydrated cells to the penetration of sterilizing-grade filters is proposed. The model confirms the industry experience that pore size is an essential parameter in preventing the penetration of B. diminuta into sterilizing-grade filters. The small microorganism Brevundimonas diminuta is used to characterize the performance of sterilizing-grade filter membranes used in the manufacturing of sterile drug products. Little is known about the size, shape, or elasticity of living bacterial cells, as it is easier to characterize bacteria after chemical fixation in a dry state. In this work, we use atomic force microscopy to determine the size, shape, and deformability of this important microorganism while it is alive and fully hydrated. Additionally, we compare the physical and mechanical properties of B. diminuta measured in wet and dry states. This information can be used to advance our understanding of how filter membranes remove these organisms from fluid streams. © PDA, Inc. 2015.

  6. Well log characterization of natural gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2011-01-01

    In the last 25 years we have seen significant advancements in the use of downhole well logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrate in nature: From an early start of using wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gas hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments to today where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. The most established and well known use of downhole log data in gas hydrate research is the use of electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data (both compressional- and shear-wave data) to make estimates of gas hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. New downhole logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation resistivity log measurements have provided the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly inter-bedded and fracture dominated gas hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing have also allowed for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids (i.e., free-water along with clay and capillary bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms controlling the formation and occurrence of gas hydrate in nature along with data on gas hydrate reservoir properties (i.e., permeabilities) needed to accurately predict gas production rates for various gas hydrate

  7. Physical properties and rock physics models of sediment containing natural and laboratory-formed methane gas hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, W.J.; Pecher, I.A.; Waite, W.F.; Mason, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents results of shear strength and acoustic velocity (p-wave) measurements performed on: (1) samples containing natural gas hydrate from the Mallik 2L-38 well, Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories; (2) reconstituted Ottawa sand samples containing methane gas hydrate formed in the laboratory; and (3) ice-bearing sands. These measurements show that hydrate increases shear strength and p-wave velocity in natural and reconstituted samples. The proportion of this increase depends on (1) the amount and distribution of hydrate present, (2) differences, in sediment properties, and (3) differences in test conditions. Stress-strain curves from the Mallik samples suggest that natural gas hydrate does not cement sediment grains. However, stress-strain curves from the Ottawa sand (containing laboratory-formed gas hydrate) do imply cementation is present. Acoustically, rock physics modeling shows that gas hydrate does not cement grains of natural Mackenzie Delta sediment. Natural gas hydrates are best modeled as part of the sediment frame. This finding is in contrast with direct observations and results of Ottawa sand containing laboratory-formed hydrate, which was found to cement grains (Waite et al. 2004). It therefore appears that the microscopic distribution of gas hydrates in sediment, and hence the effect of gas hydrate on sediment physical properties, differs between natural deposits and laboratory-formed samples. This difference may possibly be caused by the location of water molecules that are available to form hydrate. Models that use laboratory-derived properties to predict behavior of natural gas hydrate must account for these differences.

  8. Improvement of gas hydrate preservation by increasing compression pressure to simple hydrates of methane, ethane, and propane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Masato; Jin, Yusuke; Watanabe, Mizuho; Murayama, Tetsuro; Nagao, Jiro

    2017-09-01

    In this report, we describe the dissociation behavior of gas hydrate grains pressed at 1 and 6 MPa. Certain simple gas hydrates in powder form show anomalous preservation phenomenon under their thermodynamic unstable condition. Investigation of simple hydrates of methane, ethane, and propane reveals that high pressure applied to the gas hydrate particles enhances their preservation effects. Application of high pressure increases the dissociation temperature of methane hydrate and has a restrictive effect against the dissociation of ethane and propane hydrate grains. These improvements of gas hydrate preservation by increasing pressure to the initial gas hydrate particles imply that appropriate pressure applied to gas hydrate particles enhances gas hydrate preservation effects.

  9. Search for memory effects in methane hydrate: structure of water before hydrate formation and after hydrate decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Piers; Soper, Alan K; Thompson, Helen; Westacott, Robin E; Creek, Jefferson L; Hobson, Greg; Koh, Carolyn A

    2005-10-22

    Neutron diffraction with HD isotope substitution has been used to study the formation and decomposition of the methane clathrate hydrate. Using this atomistic technique coupled with simultaneous gas consumption measurements, we have successfully tracked the formation of the sI methane hydrate from a water/gas mixture and then the subsequent decomposition of the hydrate from initiation to completion. These studies demonstrate that the application of neutron diffraction with simultaneous gas consumption measurements provides a powerful method for studying the clathrate hydrate crystal growth and decomposition. We have also used neutron diffraction to examine the water structure before the hydrate growth and after the hydrate decomposition. From the neutron-scattering curves and the empirical potential structure refinement analysis of the data, we find that there is no significant difference between the structure of water before the hydrate formation and the structure of water after the hydrate decomposition. Nor is there any significant change to the methane hydration shell. These results are discussed in the context of widely held views on the existence of memory effects after the hydrate decomposition.

  10. Investigation of hydrate formation and transportability in multiphase flow systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Giovanny A.

    cohesion force (3.32 mN/m). These measurements prove the importance of natural surfactants in crude oil for particle dispersion. An experimental methodology was provided to determine the effectiveness of asphaltenes as a dispersant. Even though hydrate deposition was inferred from the flowloop tests, it could not be verified from these measurements. Custom-made experimental set-ups (a recirculation liquid system, a rocking cell and a lab-scale mini-loop) were used to isolate the hydrate deposi- tion investigation. Besides water, mineral oil 70T and King Ranch condensate were used in combination with water for the deposition investigation. One of the most important deliverables of this thesis was the construction of a lab-scale flowloop that provides insight on deposition phenomenon in multiphase flow, representing the only set-up, reported in the literature, suitable for this investigation. The miniloop can handle gas-liquid flow (maximum flow rates of 10 Nm3/m for gas and 22 GPM for liquid) through a 10 ft. long straight section (2 in. standard tubing). The testing section (30 in. long) was designed to observe hydrate deposition on the wall. Three mechanisms of hydrate deposition were identified: film growth, particles adhering and particle bedding. The maximum water conversions were: 27.5 ml in the rocking cell, 2400 ml in the miniloop with 100 % WC and 250 ml in the miniloop for dispersed water in mineral oil 70T. The measured DP across to the testing section ranged from 0 to 8 in. H2O. Deposits were obtained for different flow regimes, including 100 % LL, stratified, stratified- wavy and slug flow. The maximum deposit thickness was 1.5 in., obtained in the gas flowing section. When deposits form from particle cohesion, they were easy to slough. From all the experimental worked in this thesis, hydrates accumulated depending on the degrees of subcooling of the bulk fluid, film growth (between 3 to 5 F), deposition from a combination of film growth and particle cohesion

  11. A Numerical Model for the Thermomechanical Conditions During Hydration of Early-age Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper; Thorborg, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    In the present study, a macroscopic numerical model for the thermomechanical conditions during hydration of early-age concrete is presented. The formulation is based on a semi-coupled, incremental thermomechanical model where the heat production from the hydration process is expressed in terms...... of the maturity and the thermal activation is expressed by the Arrhenius principle. The material properties are assumed to depend on the hydration process via the maturity. The discretization of the governing equations is accomplished by a control volume formulation involving a time-splitting scheme for the heat...

  12. Dielectric spectroscopy as a sensor of membrane headgroup mobility and hydration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klösgen, B; Reichle, C; Kohlsmann, S

    1996-01-01

    of the zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine headgroup and the hydration water, respectively. Although the contributions of the headgroup and the hydration dipole moments to the dielectric relaxation are found to be situated close together, we succeeded in separating them. In the language of the Debye description, we...... propose to assign the lower frequency portion of the signal response to the relaxation contributed by the headgroups. The respective relaxation frequency is a discrete value in the range of 15-100 MHz and it shows normal temperature dependence. The contribution of the hydration water molecules exhibits...

  13. Lysozyme in water-acetonitrile mixtures: Preferential solvation at the inner edge of excess hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkin, Vladimir A.; Kuchierskaya, Alexandra A.

    2017-06-01

    Preferential solvation/hydration is an effective way for regulating the mechanism of the protein destabilization/stabilization. Organic solvent/water sorption and residual enzyme activity measurements were performed to monitor the preferential solvation/hydration of hen egg-white lysozyme at high and low water content in acetonitrile at 25 °C. The obtained results show that the protein destabilization/stabilization depends essentially on the initial hydration level of lysozyme and the water content in acetonitrile. There are three composition regimes for the dried lysozyme. At high water content, the lysozyme has a higher affinity for water than for acetonitrile. The residual enzyme activity values are close to 100%. At the intermediate water content, the dehydrated lysozyme has a higher affinity for acetonitrile than for water. A minimum on the residual enzyme activity curve was observed in this concentration range. At the lowest water content, the organic solvent molecules are preferentially excluded from the dried lysozyme, resulting in the preferential hydration. The residual catalytic activity is ˜80%, compared with that observed after incubation in pure water. Two distinct schemes are operative for the hydrated lysozyme. At high and intermediate water content, lysozyme is preferentially hydrated. However, in contrast to the dried protein, at the intermediate water content, the initially hydrated lysozyme has the increased preferential hydration parameters. At low water content, the preferential binding of the acetonitrile molecules to the initially hydrated lysozyme was detected. No residual enzyme activity was observed in the water-poor acetonitrile. Our data clearly show that the initial hydration level of the protein macromolecules is one of the key factors that govern the stability of the protein-water-organic solvent systems.

  14. Dipolar response of hydrated proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents an analytical theory and numerical simulations of the dipolar response of hydrated proteins. The effective dielectric constant of the solvated protein, representing the average dipole moment induced at the protein by a uniform external field, shows a remarkable variation among the proteins studied by numerical simulations. It changes from 0.5 for ubiquitin to 640 for cytochrome c. The former value implies a negative dipolar susceptibility of ubiquitin, that is a dia-electri...

  15. IMPORTANCE OF HYDRATION IN SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Vasić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Importance of hydration is detrmined by importance of functions of water in the human organism: i.e. regulation of body temperature, transport, excretion of waste materials through urine, digestion of food which is facilititated by saliva and gastric juices, maintenance of flexibility of organs and tissues About 60 % body mass of an adult person (males: 61 %, females: 54 % is made up of water. Water content of a newly born baby reaches 77 %, and it is up to 50 % in adults. It is very important for sportsmen to provide adequate hydration during and after the time of bodily activities. A symptom of water shortage is thirst. However, thirst is a late response of an organism and it occurs when dehydration has already taken place. Minimum in take of fluids in humans should range between one-and-half to two liters. It has been known for a long time that there is no success in sport without proper hydration in a sportsman.

  16. Gas hydrates: Technology status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    In 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) assumed the responsibility for expanding the knowledge base and for developing methods to recover gas from hydrates. These are ice-like mixtures of gas and water where gas molecules are trapped within a framework of water molecules. This research is part of the Unconventional Gas Recovery (UGR) program, a multidisciplinary effort that focuses on developing the technology to produce natural gas from resources that have been classified as unconventional because of their unique geologies and production mechanisms. Current work on gas hydrates emphasizes geological studies; characterization of the resource; and generic research, including modeling of reservoir conditions, production concepts, and predictive strategies for stimulated wells. Complementing this work is research on in situ detection of hydrates and field tests to verify extraction methods. Thus, current research will provide a comprehensive technology base from which estimates of reserve potential can be made, and from which industry can develop recovery strategies. 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Reaction coordinate of incipient methane clathrate hydrate nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Brian C; Knott, Brandon C; Beckham, Gregg T; Wu, David T; Sum, Amadeu K

    2014-11-20

    Nucleation from solution is a ubiquitous phenomenon with relevance to myriad scientific disciplines, including pharmaceuticals, biomineralization, and disease. One prominent example is the nucleation of clathrate hydrates, multicomponent crystalline inclusion compounds relevant to the energy industry where they block pipelines and also constitute a potential vast energy resource. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of incipient hydrate formation remains unknown. Herein, we employ advanced molecular simulation tools (pB histogram, equilibrium path sampling) to provide a statistical-mechanical basis for extracting physical insight into the molecular steps by which clathrates form. Through testing the Mutually Coordinated Guest (MCG) order parameter, we demonstrate that both guest (methane) and host (water) structuring are crucial to accurately describe the nucleation of hydrates and determine a critical nucleus size of MCG-1 = 16 at 255 K and 500 bar. Equipped with a validated (and novel) reaction coordinate, subsequent equilibrium path sampling simulations yield the free energy barrier and nucleation rate. The resulting quantitative nucleation process is described by the MCG clustering mechanism. This constitutes a significant advance in the field of hydrates research, as the fitness of a molecular descriptor has never been statistically verified. More broadly, this work has significance to a wide range of multicomponent nucleation contexts wherein the formation mechanism depends on contributions from both solute and solvent.

  18. Failure of cement hydrates: freeze-thaw and fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Del Gado, Emanuela; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland

    Mechanical and viscoelastic behavior of concrete crucially depends on cement hydrates, the ``glue'' of cement. Even more than the atomistic structure, the mesoscale amorphous texture of cement hydrates over hundreds of nanometers plays a crucial role for material properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nano-scale building units of cement hydrates and on their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles.Our mesoscale model was able to reconcile different experimental results ranging from small-angle neutron scattering, SEM, adsorption/desorption of N2, and water to nanoindentation and gain the new fundamental insights into the microscopic origin of the properties measured. Our results suggest that heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C-S-H, impacting the rheological and mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. In this talk I discuss recent investigation on failure mechanism at the mesoscale of hardened cement paste such as freeze-thaw and fracture. Using correlations between local volume fractions and local stress we provide a link between structural and mechanical heterogeneities during the failure mechanisms.

  19. Deformation-specific and deformation-invariant visual object recognition: pose vs. identity recognition of people and deforming objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Tristan J; Rolls, Edmund T

    2014-01-01

    When we see a human sitting down, standing up, or walking, we can recognize one of these poses independently of the individual, or we can recognize the individual person, independently of the pose. The same issues arise for deforming objects. For example, if we see a flag deformed by the wind, either blowing out or hanging languidly, we can usually recognize the flag, independently of its deformation; or we can recognize the deformation independently of the identity of the flag. We hypothesize that these types of recognition can be implemented by the primate visual system using temporo-spatial continuity as objects transform as a learning principle. In particular, we hypothesize that pose or deformation can be learned under conditions in which large numbers of different people are successively seen in the same pose, or objects in the same deformation. We also hypothesize that person-specific representations that are independent of pose, and object-specific representations that are independent of deformation and view, could be built, when individual people or objects are observed successively transforming from one pose or deformation and view to another. These hypotheses were tested in a simulation of the ventral visual system, VisNet, that uses temporal continuity, implemented in a synaptic learning rule with a short-term memory trace of previous neuronal activity, to learn invariant representations. It was found that depending on the statistics of the visual input, either pose-specific or deformation-specific representations could be built that were invariant with respect to individual and view; or that identity-specific representations could be built that were invariant with respect to pose or deformation and view. We propose that this is how pose-specific and pose-invariant, and deformation-specific and deformation-invariant, perceptual representations are built in the brain.

  20. Deformation-specific and deformation-invariant visual object recognition: pose vs identity recognition of people and deforming objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan J Webb

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available When we see a human sitting down, standing up, or walking, we can recognise one of these poses independently of the individual, or we can recognise the individual person, independently of the pose. The same issues arise for deforming objects. For example, if we see a flag deformed by the wind, either blowing out or hanging languidly, we can usually recognise the flag, independently of its deformation; or we can recognise the deformation independently of the identity of the flag. We hypothesize that these types of recognition can be implemented by the primate visual system using temporo-spatial continuity as objects transform as a learning principle. In particular, we hypothesize that pose or deformation can be learned under conditions in which large numbers of different people are successively seen in the same pose, or objects in the same deformation. We also hypothesize that person-specific representations that are independent of pose, and object-specific representations that are independent of deformation and view, could be built, when individual people or objects are observed successively transforming from one pose or deformation and view to another. These hypotheses were tested in a simulation of the ventral visual system, VisNet, that uses temporal continuity, implemented in a synaptic learning rule with a short-term memory trace of previous neuronal activity, to learn invariant representations. It was found that depending on the statistics of the visual input, either pose-specific or deformation-specific representations could be built that were invariant with respect to individual and view; or that identity-specific representations could be built that were invariant with respect to pose or deformation and view. We propose that this is how pose-specific and pose-invariant, and deformation-specific and deformation-invariant, perceptual representations are built in the brain.

  1. Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability. Progress report, June 16--September 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krason, J.; Finley, P.

    1988-12-31

    The summaries of regional basin analyses document that potentially economic accumulations of gas hydrates can be formed in both active and passive margin settings. The principal requirement for gas hydrate formation in either setting is abundant methane. Passive margin sediments with high sedimentation rates and sufficient sedimentary organic carbon can generate large quantities of biogenic methane for hydrate formation. Similarly, active margin locations near a terrigenous sediment source can also have high methane generation potential due to rapid burial of adequate amounts of sedimentary organic matter. Many active margins with evidence of gas hydrate presence correspond to areas subject to upwelling. Upwelling currents can enhance methane generation by increasing primary productivity and thus sedimentary organic carbon. Structural deformation of the marginal sediments at both active and passive sites can enhance gas hydrate formation by providing pathways for migration of both biogenic and thermogenic gas to the shallow gas hydrate stability zone. Additionally, conventional hydrocarbon traps may initially concentrate sufficient amounts of hydrocarbons for subsequent gas hydrate formation.

  2. The Response of Ω-Loop D Dynamics to Truncation of Trimethyllysine 72 of Yeast Iso-1-cytochrome c Depends on the Nature of Loop Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Levi J.; Seagraves, Sean M.; Khan, Khurshid Alam; Cherney, Melisa M.; Bandi, Swati; Culbertson, Justin E.; Bowler, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    Trimethyllysine 72 (tmK72) has been suggested to play a role in sterically constraining the heme crevice dynamics of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c mediated by the Ω-loop D cooperative substructure (residues 70 to 85). A tmK72A mutation causes a gain in peroxidase activity, a function of cytochrome c that is important early in apoptosis. More than one higher energy state is accessible for the Ω-loop D substructure via tier 0 dynamics. Two of these are alkaline conformers mediated by Lys73 and Lys79. In the current work, the effect of the tmK72A mutation on the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of wild type iso-1-cytochrome c (yWT versus WT*) and on variants carrying a K73H mutation (yWT/K73H versus WT*/K73H) is studied. Whereas the tmK72A mutation confers increased peroxidase activity in wild type yeast iso-1-cytochrome c and increased dynamics for formation of a previously studied His79-heme alkaline conformer, the tmK72A mutation speeds return of the His73-heme alkaline conformer to the native state through destabilization of the His73-heme alkaline conformer relative to the native conformer. These opposing behaviors demonstrate that the response of the dynamics of a protein substructure to mutation depends on the nature of the perturbation to the substructure. For a protein substructure which mediates more than one function of a protein through multiple non-native structures, a mutation could change the partitioning between these functions. The current results suggest that the tier 0 dynamics of Ω-loop D that mediates peroxidase activity has similarities to the tier 0 dynamics required to form the His79-heme alkaline conformer. PMID:25948392

  3. Universal deformation formulas

    OpenAIRE

    Remm, E.; Markl, M.

    2015-01-01

    We give a conceptual explanation of universal deformation formulas for unital associative algebras and prove some results on the structure of their moduli spaces. We then generalize universal deformation formulas to other types of algebras and their diagrams.

  4. DTM: Deformable Template Matching

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hyungtae; Kwon, Heesung; Robinson, Ryan M.; Nothwang, William D.

    2016-01-01

    A novel template matching algorithm that can incorporate the concept of deformable parts, is presented in this paper. Unlike the deformable part model (DPM) employed in object recognition, the proposed template-matching approach called Deformable Template Matching (DTM) does not require a training step. Instead, deformation is achieved by a set of predefined basic rules (e.g. the left sub-patch cannot pass across the right patch). Experimental evaluation of this new method using the PASCAL VO...

  5. LASER BIOLOGY: Optomechanical tests of hydrated biological tissues subjected to laser shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omel'chenko, A. I.; Sobol', E. N.

    2008-03-01

    The mechanical properties of a matrix are studied upon changing the size and shape of biological tissues during dehydration caused by weak laser-induced heating. The cartilage deformation, dehydration dynamics, and hydraulic conductivity are measured upon laser heating. The hydrated state and the shape of samples of separated fascias and cartilaginous tissues were controlled by using computer-aided processing of tissue images in polarised light.

  6. Hydration of swelling clays: multi-scale sequence of hydration and determination of macroscopic energies from microscopic properties; Hydratation des argiles gonflantes: sequence d'hydratation multi-echelle determination des energies macroscopiques a partir des proprietes microscopiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salles, F

    2006-10-15

    Smectites have interesting properties which make them potential candidates for engineered barriers in deep geological nuclear waste repository: low permeability, swelling and cations retention. The subject of this thesis consists in the determination of the relationship between hydration properties, swelling properties and cations mobility in relation with confinement properties of clayey materials. The aim is to understand and to predict the behaviour of water in smectites, following two research orientations: the mechanistic aspects and the energetic aspects of the hydration of smectites. We worked on the Na-Ca montmorillonite contained in the MX80 bentonite, with the exchanged homo ionic structure (saturated with alkaline cations and calcium cations). The approach crosses the various scales (microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic) and implied the study of the various components of the system (layer-cation-water), by using original experimental methods (thermo-poro-metry and electric conductivity for various relative humidities (RH) and electrostatic calculations. Initially, the dry state is defined by SCTA (scanning calorimetry thermal analysis). Then a classical characterization of the smectite porosity for the dry state is carried out using mercury intrusion and nitrogen adsorption. We evidenced the existence of a meso-porosity which radius varies from 2 to 10 nm depending on the compensating cation. The thermo-poro-metry and conductivity experiments performed at various hydration states made it possible to follow the increase in the pore sizes and the cations mobility as a function of the hydration state. We highlight in particular the existence of an osmotic mesoscopic swelling for low RH (approximately 50-60%RH for Li and Na). By combining the results of thermo-poro-metry, X-ray diffraction and electric conductivity, we are able to propose a complete hydration sequence for each cation, showing the crucial role of the compensating cation in the hydration of

  7. Volatile inventories in clathrate hydrates formed in the primordial nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousis, Olivier; Lunine, Jonathan I; Picaud, Sylvain; Cordier, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The examination of ambient thermodynamic conditions suggests that clathrate hydrates could exist in the Martian permafrost, on the surface and in the interior of Titan, as well as in other icy satellites. Clathrate hydrates are probably formed in a significant fraction of planetesimals in the solar system. Thus, these crystalline solids may have been accreted in comets, in the forming giant planets and in their surrounding satellite systems. In this work, we use a statistical thermodynamic model to investigate the composition of clathrate hydrates that may have formed in the primordial nebula. In our approach, we consider the formation sequence of the different ices occurring during the cooling of the nebula, a reasonable idealization of the process by which volatiles are trapped in planetesimals. We then determine the fractional occupancies of guests in each clathrate hydrate formed at a given temperature. The major ingredient of our model is the description of the guest-clathrate hydrate interaction by a spherically averaged Kihara potential with a nominal set of parameters, most of which are fitted to experimental equilibrium data. Our model allows us to find that Kr, Ar and N2 can be efficiently encaged in clathrate hydrates formed at temperatures higher than approximately 48.5 K in the primitive nebula, instead of forming pure condensates below 30 K. However, we find at the same time that the determination of the relative abundances of guest species incorporated in these clathrate hydrates strongly depends on the choice of the parameters of the Kihara potential and also on the adopted size of cages. Indeed, by testing different potential parameters, we have noted that even minor dispersions between the different existing sets can lead to non-negligible variations in the determination of the volatiles trapped in clathrate hydrates formed in the primordial nebula. However, these variations are not found to be strong enough to reverse the relative abundances

  8. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  9. Anaerobic oxidation of methane above gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, NE Pacific Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treude, T.; Boetius, A.; Knittel, K.

    2003-01-01

    At Hydrate Ridge (HR), Cascadia convergent margin, surface sediments contain massive gas hydrates formed from methane that ascends together with fluids along faults from deeper reservoirs. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), mediated by a microbial consortium of archaea and sulfate...

  10. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate–saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate–bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  11. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...... prehydration may occur. In the report both theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during water vapour exposure is nucleation controlled....

  12. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermannová, Lada; Schneider, Bohdan

    2015-11-01

    Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon-donor hydrogen bonds, OH-π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations.

  13. Illuminating solid gas storage in confined spaces - methane hydrate formation in porous model carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchardt, Lars; Nickel, Winfried; Casco, Mirian; Senkovska, Irena; Bon, Volodymyr; Wallacher, Dirk; Grimm, Nico; Krause, Simon; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín

    2016-07-27

    Methane hydrate nucleation and growth in porous model carbon materials illuminates the way towards the design of an optimized solid-based methane storage technology. High-pressure methane adsorption studies on pre-humidified carbons with well-defined and uniform porosity show that methane hydrate formation in confined nanospace can take place at relatively low pressures, even below 3 MPa CH4, depending on the pore size and the adsorption temperature. The methane hydrate nucleation and growth is highly promoted at temperatures below the water freezing point, due to the lower activation energy in ice vs. liquid water. The methane storage capacity via hydrate formation increases with an increase in the pore size up to an optimum value for the 25 nm pore size model-carbon, with a 173% improvement in the adsorption capacity as compared to the dry sample. Synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction measurements (SXRPD) confirm the formation of methane hydrates with a sI structure, in close agreement with natural hydrates. Furthermore, SXRPD data anticipate a certain contraction of the unit cell parameter for methane hydrates grown in small pores.

  14. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermannová, Lada; Schneider, Bohdan

    2015-01-01

    Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon–donor hydrogen bonds, OH–π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations. PMID:26527137

  15. Flows due to pressure induced dissociation-formation of gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo, J. R.; Kwon, S.; Saur, R.; Loekman, S.; Luzi, G.; Rauh, C.; Wierschem, A.; Delgado, A.

    2017-10-01

    During the last decade, Gas Hydrates (GH) have attracted the interest of the scientific community for engineering applications. Carbon dioxide hydrate (CO2H), for instance, may play an important role for capture and sequestration methods in order to reduce global climate change. Despite the extensive literature, the transport phenomena involved during CO2H formation are not yet fully understood. CO2 transfer from gas or liquid phase to the bulk of water is expected to happen not only by molecular diffusion but also driven by natural convective currents induced by CO2 dissolution in water. Using particle tracer methods, we experimentally characterize the flow velocity of the bulk of water during CO2H formation. For that purpose, CO2H is grown inside an optical cell with a volume of 12 mL at various pressures and temperatures. Due to CO2 dissolution, convection currents are noticed prior to hydrate formation. Our experimental results point to a significant correlation between this process and the subsequent hydrate formation. Two well-differentiated hydrate growth patterns were observed depending on the hydrate induction time and the corresponding CO2 concentration distribution inside water. For long induction times, CO2 can be provided from the water phase resulting in rapid growth. Short induction times resulted in slow growth at the interface creating a solid barrier accompanied by a significant drop in the flow velocity. In some cases, the hydrate layer appeared to be unstable and convection could restart.

  16. Observed correlation between the depth to base and top of gas hydrate occurrence from review of global drilling data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Michael; Collett, Timothy S.

    2017-01-01

    A global inventory of data from gas hydrate drilling expeditions is used to develop relationships between the base of structure I gas hydrate stability, top of gas hydrate occurrence, sulfate-methane transition depth, pressure (water depth), and geothermal gradients. The motivation of this study is to provide first-order estimates of the top of gas hydrate occurrence and associated thickness of the gas hydrate occurrence zone for climate-change scenarios, global carbon budget analyses, or gas hydrate resource assessments. Results from publically available drilling campaigns (21 expeditions and 52 drill sites) off Cascadia, Blake Ridge, India, Korea, South China Sea, Japan, Chile, Peru, Costa Rica, Gulf of Mexico, and Borneo reveal a first-order linear relationship between the depth to the top and base of gas hydrate occurrence. The reason for these nearly linear relationships is believed to be the strong pressure and temperature dependence of methane solubility in the absence of large difference in thermal gradients between the various sites assessed. In addition, a statistically robust relationship was defined between the thickness of the gas hydrate occurrence zone and the base of gas hydrate stability (in meters below seafloor). The relationship developed is able to predict the depth of the top of gas hydrate occurrence zone using observed depths of the base of gas hydrate stability within less than 50 m at most locations examined in this study. No clear correlation of the depth to the top and base of gas hydrate occurrences with geothermal gradient and sulfate-methane transition depth was identified.

  17. Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge F. Gabitto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Methane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 1016 m3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detected by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed.

  18. 78 FR 26337 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ... Management's Lower 48 Assessment; Results of Consortium for Ocean Leadership Workshop; Update on International Activity; FY 2013 Methane Hydrate Program Activities and Plans; Draft Interagency Roadmap; Methane...

  19. Separation of water through gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boch Andersen, Torben; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goal...... of the project was to formulate an alternative separation concept, which can replace the traditional water evaporation process in the sugar production. Work with the separation concept showed that gas hydrates can be used for water separation. The process is not suitable for sugar production because of large...

  20. Observations related to tetrahydrofuran and methane hydrates for laboratory studies of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.Y.; Yun, T.S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction among water molecules, guest gas molecules, salts, and mineral particles determines the nucleation and growth behavior of gas hydrates in natural sediments. Hydrate of tetrahydrofuran (THF) has long been used for laboratory studies of gas hydrate-bearing sediments to provide close control on hydrate concentrations and to overcome the long formation history of methane hydrate from aqueous phase methane in sediments. Yet differences in the polarizability of THF (polar molecule) compared to methane (nonpolar molecule) raise questions about the suitability of THF as a proxy for methane in the study of hydrate-bearing sediments. From existing data and simple macroscale experiments, we show that despite its polar nature, THF's large molecular size results in low permittivity, prevents it from dissolving precipitated salts, and hinders the solvation of ions on dry mineral surfaces. In addition, the interfacial tension between water and THF hydrate is similar to that between water and methane hydrate. The processes that researchers choose for forming hydrate in sediments in laboratory settings (e.g., from gas, liquid, or ice) and the pore-scale distribution of the hydrate that is produced by each of these processes likely have a more pronounced effect on the measured macroscale properties of hydrate-bearing sediments than do differences between THF and methane hydrates themselves.

  1. Waters of Hydration of Cupric Hydrates: A Comparison between Heating and Absorbance Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2011-01-01

    The empirical formulas of four cupric hydrates are determined by measuring the absorbance in aqueous solution. The Beer-Lambert Law is verified by constructing a calibration curve of absorbance versus known Cu[superscript 2+](aq) concentration. A solution of the unknown hydrate is prepared by using 0.2-0.3 g of hydrate, and water is added such…

  2. A realistic molecular model of cement hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellenq, Roland J-M; Kushima, Akihiro; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh; Van Vliet, Krystyn J; Buehler, Markus J; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-22

    Despite decades of studies of calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H), the structurally complex binder phase of concrete, the interplay between chemical composition and density remains essentially unexplored. Together these characteristics of C-S-H define and modulate the physical and mechanical properties of this "liquid stone" gel phase. With the recent determination of the calcium/silicon (C/S = 1.7) ratio and the density of the C-S-H particle (2.6 g/cm(3)) by neutron scattering measurements, there is new urgency to the challenge of explaining these essential properties. Here we propose a molecular model of C-S-H based on a bottom-up atomistic simulation approach that considers only the chemical specificity of the system as the overriding constraint. By allowing for short silica chains distributed as monomers, dimers, and pentamers, this C-S-H archetype of a molecular description of interacting CaO, SiO2, and H2O units provides not only realistic values of the C/S ratio and the density computed by grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation of water adsorption at 300 K. The model, with a chemical composition of (CaO)(1.65)(SiO2)(H2O)(1.75), also predicts other essential structural features and fundamental physical properties amenable to experimental validation, which suggest that the C-S-H gel structure includes both glass-like short-range order and crystalline features of the mineral tobermorite. Additionally, we probe the mechanical stiffness, strength, and hydrolytic shear response of our molecular model, as compared to experimentally measured properties of C-S-H. The latter results illustrate the prospect of treating cement on equal footing with metals and ceramics in the current application of mechanism-based models and multiscale simulations to study inelastic deformation and cracking.

  3. Theoretical modeling insights into elastic wave attenuation mechanisms in marine sediments with pore-filling methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Moreno, H.; Sahoo, S. K.; Best, A. I.

    2017-03-01

    The majority of presently exploitable marine methane hydrate reservoirs are likely to host hydrate in disseminated form in coarse grain sediments. For hydrate concentrations below 25-40%, disseminated or pore-filling hydrate does not increase elastic frame moduli, thus making impotent traditional seismic velocity-based methods. Here, we present a theoretical model to calculate frequency-dependent P and S wave velocity and attenuation of an effective porous medium composed of solid mineral grains, methane hydrate, methane gas, and water. The model considers elastic wave energy losses caused by local viscous flow both (i) between fluid inclusions in hydrate and pores and (ii) between different aspect ratio pores (created when hydrate grows); the inertial motion of the frame with respect to the pore fluid (Biot's type fluid flow); and gas bubble damping. The sole presence of pore-filling hydrate in the sediment reduces the available porosity and intrinsic permeability of the sediment affecting Biot's type attenuation at high frequencies. Our model shows that attenuation maxima due to fluid inclusions in hydrate are possible over the entire frequency range of interest to exploration seismology (1-106 Hz), depending on the aspect ratio of the inclusions, whereas maxima due to different aspect ratio pores occur only at sonic to ultrasound frequencies (104-106 Hz). This frequency response imposes further constraints on possible hydrate saturations able to reproduce broadband elastic measurements of velocity and attenuation. Our results provide a physical basis for detecting the presence and amount of pore-filling hydrate in seafloor sediments using conventional seismic surveys.

  4. Hydration in soccer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. The rates that carbohydrate and water are absorbed by the organism are limited by the rates of gastric emptying and intestinal absorption. The composition of drinks offered to the players should be influenced by the relative importance of the need of supplying carbohydrates or water; it should be remembered that the depletion of carbohydrate can result in fatigue and decrease of performance, but it is not usually a life-threatening condition. The addition of carbohydrate in these drinks increases the concentrations of blood glucose, increases the use of external fuel through the increase of the glucose oxidation in the muscles and it spares muscle glycogen. So, the ingestion of carbohydrate before and during the exercise can delay the emergence of fatigue and increase the players' performance. Several tactics can be used to avoid dehydration, like hyperhydration before exercise and player's acclimatization. The ideal situation to restore the player's fluid losses is between the sessions of exercises. Since soccer is a sport with quite peculiar characteristics related to hydration, the players should be concerned and educated about the importance of fluid ingestion before, during and after the exercise.

  5. Treatment of hallux valgus deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraissler, Lukas; Konrads, Christian; Hoberg, Maik; Rudert, Maximilian; Walcher, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Hallux valgus deformity is a very common pathological condition which commonly produces painful disability. It is characterised as a combined deformity with a malpositioning of the first metatarsophalangeal joint caused by a lateral deviation of the great toe and a medial deviation of the first metatarsal bone.Taking the patient's history and a thorough physical examination are important steps. Anteroposterior and lateral weight-bearing radiographs of the entire foot are crucial for adequate assessment in the treatment of hallux valgus.Non-operative treatment of the hallux valgus cannot correct the deformity. However, insoles and physiotherapy in combination with good footwear can help to control the symptoms.There are many operative techniques for hallux valgus correction. The decision on which surgical technique is used depends on the degree of deformity, the extent of degenerative changes of the first metatarsophalangeal joint and the shape and size of the metatarsal bone and phalangeal deviation. The role of stability of the first tarsometatarsal joint is controversial.Surgical techniques include the modified McBride procedure, distal metatarsal osteotomies, metatarsal shaft osteotomies, the Akin osteotomy, proximal metatarsal osteotomies, the modified Lapidus fusion and the hallux joint fusion. Recently, minimally invasive percutaneous techniques have gained importance and are currently being evaluated more scientifically.Hallux valgus correction is followed by corrective dressings of the great toe post-operatively. Depending on the procedure, partial or full weight-bearing in a post-operative shoe or cast immobilisation is advised. Post-operative radiographs are taken in regular intervals until osseous healing is achieved. Cite this article: Fraissler L, Konrads C, Hoberg M, Rudert M, Walcher M. Treatment of hallux valgus deformity. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:295-302. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000005.

  6. IMPORTANCE OF HYDRATION IN SPORTS

    OpenAIRE

    Goran Vasić; Dragoslav Jakonić

    2008-01-01

    Importance of hydration is detrmined by importance of functions of water in the human organism: i.e. regulation of body temperature, transport, excretion of waste materials through urine, digestion of food which is facilititated by saliva and gastric juices, maintenance of flexibility of organs and tissues About 60 % body mass of an adult person (males: 61 %, females: 54 %) is made up of water. Water content of a newly born baby reaches 77 %, and it is up to 50 % in adults. It is very importa...

  7. Hydration recommendations for sport 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montain, Scott J

    2008-01-01

    Fluid replacement remains an important strategy for preserving exercise performance as dehydration in excess of 2% of body weight consistently impairs aerobic exercise performance. Too much of a good thing, however, can have negative health consequences as persistent drinking in excess of sweating rate can induce symptomatic exercise associated hyponatremia. This short review highlights new position stands and/or policy statements regarding fluid replacement for sport, evidence that laboratory findings translate to team sport performance, and current hydration practices of athletes. It is culminated with practical strategies for drinking appropriately during physical activity.

  8. Nucleus pulposus deformation in response to rotation at L1-2 and L4-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazey, Peter J; Song, Swithin; Price, Roger I; Singer, Kevin P

    2013-06-01

    Spinal rotation couples with lateral flexion as a composite movement. Few data report the in vivo mechanical deformation of the nucleus pulposus following sustained rotation. MRI provides a non-invasive method of examining nucleus pulposus deformation by mapping the hydration signal distribution within the intervertebral disc. T1 weighted coronal and sagittal lumbar images and T2 weighted axial images at L1-2 and L4-5 were obtained from 10 asymptomatic subjects (mean age 29, range: 24-34 years) in sustained flexed and extended positions plus combined positions of left rotation with flexion and extension. Nucleus pulposus deformation was tracked by mapping the change in hydration profiles from coronal and sagittal pixel measurements. An average sagittal change in position of 44° (SD 14.5°) from flexion to extension was recorded between L1 and S1 (range: 18°- 60°) resulting in a mean anterior nucleus pulposus deformation of 16% of disc hydration profile (range: 3.5%-19%) in 19/20 discs. When rotation was combined with either flexion or extension, mean coronal deformation was 4.8% (SD-5.1%; range: 0.4%-15%). Lateral nucleus pulposus deformation direction varied in rotation (44% deformed left and 56% deformed right). Intersegmental lateral flexion direction more strongly predicted nucleus pulposus deformation direction with 75% deforming contralaterally. Nucleus pulposus deformation direction in young subjects was more predictable following sagittal position change than in rotation combined with flexion or extension. Deformation magnitude was reduced in rotated positions. Intersegmental lateral flexion was a stronger predictor of nucleus pulposus deformation direction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A new estimate of the volume and distribution of gas hydrate in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, U.; Cook, A.

    2016-12-01

    In spite of the wealth of information gained over the last several decades about gas hydrate in the northern Gulf of Mexico, there is still considerable uncertainty about the distribution and volume of gas hydrate. In our assessment we build a dataset of basin-wide gas hydrate distribution and thickness, as appraised from publicly available petroleum industry well logs within the gas hydrate stability zone (HSZ), and subsequently develop a Monte Carlo to determine the volumetric estimate of gas hydrate using the dataset. We evaluate the presence of gas hydrate from electrical resistivity well logs, and categorized possible reservoir type (either sand or clay) based on the gamma ray response and resistivity curve characteristics. Out of the 798 wells with resistivity well log data within the HSZ we analyzed, we found evidence of gas hydrate in 124 wells. In this research we present a new stochastic estimate of the gas hydrate volume in the northern Gulf of Mexico guided by our well log dataset. For our Monte Carlo simulation, we divided our assessment area of 200,000 km2 into 1 km2 grid cells. Our volume assessment model incorporates variables unique to our well log dataset such as the likelihood of gas hydrate occurrence, fraction of the HSZ occupied by gas hydrate, reservoir type, and gas hydrate saturation depending on the reservoir, in each grid cell, in addition to other basic variables such as HSZ thickness and porosity. Preliminary results from our model suggests that the total volume of gas at standard temperature and pressure in gas hydrate in the northern Gulf of Mexico is in the range of 430 trillion cubic feet (TCF) to 730 TCF, with a mean volume of 585 TCF. While the reservoir distribution from our well log dataset found gas hydrate in sand reservoirs in 30 wells out of the 124 wells with evidence of gas hydrate ( 24%), we find sand reservoirs contain over half of the total volume of gas hydrate in the Gulf of Mexico, as a result of the relatively high

  10. Effects of Nanosilica on Early Age Stages of Cement Hydration

    OpenAIRE

    Forood Torabian Isfahani; Elena Redaelli; Weiwen Li; Yaru Sun

    2017-01-01

    Effects of nanosilica on cement hydration have been broadly investigated in the literature and early age cement hydration, as a whole, has been mainly considered, disregarding the substages of the hydration. The hydration of cement is characterized by different substages and nanosilica effect on the hydration could be a result of diverse, even contradictory, behavior of nanosilica in individual stages of the hydration. In this study, effects of nanosilica on different substages of cement hydr...

  11. Hydration number of alkali metal ions determined by insertion in a conducting polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Steen

    2008-01-01

    of all other water molecules whose properties are still influenced significantly by the cation. Knowing the hydration number is important when considering, for instance, the transport of Na+ and K+ in biological cell membranes, since their different behavior may depend on the details of ion hydration....... The solvation of alkali metal ions has been discussed for many years without a clear consensus. This work presents a systematic study of the hydration numbers of the 5 alkali metal ions, using the electrochemical insertion of the ions in a conducting polymer (polypyrrole containing the large immobile anion DBS...... direct calculation of the number of M+ ions entering the film, and therefore the inserted M+ mass. The mass of the water molecules is calculated as a difference. The results yield the following primary hydration numbers: Li+: 5.5-5.6; Na+: 4.0-4.1; K+: 2.0-2.5; Rb+: 0.6-1.2; Cs+: ~0. The most important...

  12. Determination of membrane hydration numbers of alkali metal ions by insertion in a conducting polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Steen; Junaid Mohamed Jafeen, Mohamed; Careem, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    , and a secondary (or outer) solvation shell, consisting of all other water molecules whose properties are still influenced significantly by the cation. Knowing the hydration number is important when considering, for instance, the transport of Na+ and K+ in biological cell membranes, since their different behavior...... may depend on the details of ion hydration. Although the solvation of alkali metal ions in aqueous solution has been discussed for many years, there is still no clear consensus. Part of the discrepancy is simply that different methods measure over different time scales, and therefore do...... not necessarily define the same hydration shell. This work presents a systematic study of one special variant of the hydration numbers of the 5 alkali metal ions, using the electrochemical insertion of the ions in a conducting polymer (polypyrrole containing the large immobile anion DBS-). The technique...

  13. Molecular dynamics study of thermal-driven methane hydrate dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Niall J; Phelan, Gráinne M

    2009-08-21

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the thermal-driven breakup of both spherical methane hydrate nanocrystallites (with radii of approximately 18 and 21 A) and planar methane hydrate interfaces in liquid water at 280-340 K. The melting temperatures of each cluster were estimated, and dissociation was observed to be strongly dependent on temperature, with higher dissociation rates at larger overtemperatures vis-a-vis melting. For the 18 and 21 A radius nanocrystals, breakup was also seen to be dependent on cluster size, and different methane compositions (85%, 95%, and 100% of maximum theoretical occupation) in the planar case also lead to slight differences in the initial dissociation rate. In all cases, the diffusion of the methane into the surrounding liquid water was found to be an important step limiting the overall rate of breakup. A simple coupled mass and heat transfer model has been devised for both the spherical and planar hydrate systems that explains these findings, and distinguishes between the role of the overall thermal driving force and methane diffusional mass transfer in controlling the break-up rate.

  14. Investigations into surfactant/gas hydrate relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Rudy; Zhang, Guochang; Dearman, Jennifer; Woods, Charles [Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Gas hydrates have unique physical properties portending useful industrial applications of gas storage, gas separation, or water desalination. When gas hydrates were found in the early 1990s to occur naturally and abundantly in seafloors, three other primary interests and concerns emerged: potential new energy source, climate threat from their greenhouse gases, and seafloor instabilities. This paper presents research showing how anionic synthetic surfactants helped develop an industrial gas hydrate storage process for natural gas and how naturally-occurring in-situ anionic biosurfactants influence the formation and placement of gas hydrates in ocean sediments. The catalytic effects, mechanisms, and surface specificities imparted by synthetic surfactants in the gas storage process and imparted by biosurfactants in porous media are discussed. The Bacillus subtilis bacterium that is indigenous to gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico was cultured in the laboratory. Its biosurfactant was separated and found to catalyze gas hydrates in porous media. The experiments indicate that seafloor-biosurfactants can be produced rapidly in-situ to achieve threshold concentrations whereby hydrates are promoted. The biosurfactants accumulate and promote hydrate formation on specific mineral surfaces such as sodium montmorillonite. (author)

  15. Dynamics of a photoexcited hydrated electron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pshenichnikov, M.S.; Baltuška, A.; Wiersma, D.A.; Kärtner, F.X.

    2004-01-01

    Combining photon-echo and frequency-resolved pump-probe techniques with extremely short laser pulses that consist of only few optical cycles, we investigate the dynamics of the equilibrated hydrated electron. The pure dephasing time of the hydrated electron deduced from the photon-echo measurements

  16. Gas hydrate inhibition of drilling fluid additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaolan, L.; Baojiang, S.; Shaoran, R. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Dongying (China). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates that form during offshore well drilling can have adverse impacts on well operational safety. The hydrates typically form in the risers and the annulus between the casing and the drillstring, and can stop the circulation of drilling fluids. In this study, experiments were conducted to measure the effect of drilling fluid additives on hydrate inhibition. Polyalcohols, well-stability control agents, lubricating agents, and polymeric materials were investigated in a stirred tank reactor at temperatures ranging from -10 degree C to 60 degrees C. Pressure, temperature, and torque were used to detect onset points of hydrate formation and dissociation. The inhibitive effect of the additives on hydrate formation was quantified. Phase boundary shifts were measured in terms of temperature difference or sub-cooling gained when chemicals were added to pure water. Results showed that the multiple hydroxyl groups in polyalcohol chemicals significantly inhibited hydrate formation. Polymeric and polyacrylamide materials had only a small impact on hydrate formation, while sulfonated methyl tannins were found to increase hydrate formation. 6 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  17. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Clathrate Hydrates on Specialised Hardware Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian R. Trott

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Classical equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD simulations have been performed to investigate the computational performance of the Simple Point Charge (SPC and TIP4P water models applied to simulation of methane hydrates, and also of liquid water, on a variety of specialised hardware platforms, in addition to estimation of various equilibrium properties of clathrate hydrates. The FPGA-based accelerator MD-GRAPE 3 was used to accelerate substantially the computation of non-bonded forces, while GPU-based platforms were also used in conjunction with CUDA-enabled versions of the LAMMPS MD software packages to reduce computational time dramatically. The dependence of molecular system size and scaling with number of processors was also investigated. Considering performance relative to power consumption, it is seen that GPU-based computing is quite attractive.

  19. Dynamic grain growth during superplastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinovich, M.Kh. [Ufa State Aviation-Technical Univ. (Russian Federation); Trifonov, V.G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ufa (Russian Federation). Inst. for Metals Superplasticity Problems

    1996-05-01

    Superplastic deformation (SPD) causes the accelerated anisotropic grain growth. This process results in the formation of structure which is quasistable during superplastic deformation and unstable after deformation. The degree of instability is determined by the size of grains, their shape coefficient which depends on the nature of an alloy and is equal to 1.1--1.5 after SPD, and by the unbalance of triple junctions at boundaries. Alloying of metals can affect the thermodynamic force and mechanism of dynamic anisotropic grain growth and correspondingly influence the parameters of superplasticity in alloys.

  20. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the

  1. Hydration shells exchange charge with their protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abitan, Haim; Lindgård, Per-Anker; Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2010-01-01

    Investigation of the interaction between a protein and its hydration shells is an experimental and theoretical challenge. Here, we used ultrasonic pressure waves in aqueous solutions of a protein to explore the conformational states of the protein and its interaction with its hydration shells....... In our experiments, the amplitude of an ultrasonic pressure wave is gradually increased (0–20 atm) while we simultaneously measure the Raman spectra from the hydrated protein (β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme). We detected two types of spectral changes: first, up to 70% increase in the intensity...... the presence of an ultrasonic pressure, a protein and its hydration shells are in thermodynamic and charge equilibrium, i.e. a protein and its hydration shells exchange charges. The ultrasonic wave disrupts these equilibria which are regained within 30–45 min after the ultrasonic pressure is shut off....

  2. Variation of corneal refractive index with hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young L; Walsh, Joseph T Jr.; Goldstick, Thomas K; Glucksberg, Matthew R [Biomedical Engineering Department, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2004-03-07

    We report the effect of changes in the corneal hydration on the refractive index of the cornea. Using optical coherence tomography (OCT), the geometrical thickness and the group refractive index of the bovine cornea were derived simultaneously as the corneal hydration was varied. The corneal hydration was then calculated from the corneal thickness. The group refractive index of the cornea increased non-linearly as the cornea dehydrated. In addition, a simple mathematical model was developed, based on the assumption that changes in corneal hydration occur only in the interfibrilar space with constant water content within the collagen fibrils. Good agreement between the experimental results and the mathematical model supports the assumption. The results also demonstrate that the measurement of refractive index is a quantitative indicator of corneal hydration.

  3. Deformed Fredkin spin chain with extensive entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salberger, Olof; Udagawa, Takuma; Zhang, Zhao; Katsura, Hosho; Klich, Israel; Korepin, Vladimir

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a new spin chain which is a deformation of the Fredkin spin chain and has a phase transition between bounded and extensive entanglement entropy scaling. In this chain, spins have a local interaction of three nearest neighbors. The Hamiltonian is frustration-free and its ground state can be described analytically as a weighted superposition of Dyck paths that depends on a deformation parameter t. In the purely spin 1/2 case, whenever t\

  4. Evaluation of various Deformable Image Registrations for Point and Volume Variations

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Su Chul; Park, Seungwoo; Lee, Soon Sung; Jung, Haijo; Kim, Mi-Sook; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Ji, Young Hoon; Yi, Chul Young; Kim, Kum Bae

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of deformable image registration (DIR) has a significant dosimetric impact in radiation treatment planning. We evaluated accuracy of various DIR algorithms using variations of the deformation point and volume. The reference image (Iref) and volume (Vref) was first generated with virtual deformation QA software (ImSimQA, Oncology System Limited, UK). We deformed Iref with axial movement of deformation point and Vref depending on the types of deformation that are the deformation1 is to increase the Vref (relaxation) and the deformation 2 is to decrease . The deformed image (Idef) and volume (Vdef) acquired by ImSimQA software were inversely deformed to Iref and Vref using DIR algorithms. As a result, we acquired deformed image (Iid) from Idef and volume (Vid) from Vdef. The DIR algorithms were the Horn Schunk optical flow (HS), Iterative Optical Flow (IOF), Modified Demons (MD) and Fast Demons (FD) with the Deformable Image Registration and Adaptive Radiotherapy Toolkit (DIRART) of MATLAB. The imag...

  5. Mechanics of deformable bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Sommerfeld, Arnold Johannes Wilhelm

    1950-01-01

    Mechanics of Deformable Bodies: Lectures on Theoretical Physics, Volume II covers topics on the mechanics of deformable bodies. The book discusses the kinematics, statics, and dynamics of deformable bodies; the vortex theory; as well as the theory of waves. The text also describes the flow with given boundaries. Supplementary notes on selected hydrodynamic problems and supplements to the theory of elasticity are provided. Physicists, mathematicians, and students taking related courses will find the book useful.

  6. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  7. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated

  8. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-06-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  9. Structure, dynamics, and reactivity of hydrated electrons by ab initio molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsalek, Ondrej; Uhlig, Frank; VandeVondele, Joost; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2012-01-17

    Understanding the properties of hydrated electrons, which were first observed using pulse radiolysis of water in 1962, is crucial because they are key species in many radiation chemistry processes. Although time-resolved spectroscopic studies and molecular simulations have shown that an electron in water (prepared, for example, by water photoionization) relaxes quickly to a localized, cavity-like structure ∼2.5 Å in radius, this picture has recently been questioned. In another experimental approach, negatively charged water clusters of increasing size were studied with photoelectron and IR spectroscopies. Although small water clusters can bind an excess electron, their character is very different from bulk hydrated species. As data on electron binding in liquid water have become directly accessible experimentally, the cluster-to-bulk extrapolations have become a topic of lively debate. Quantum electronic structure calculations addressing experimental measurables have, until recently, been largely limited to small clusters; extended systems were approached mainly with pseudopotential calculations combining a classical description of water with a quantum mechanical treatment of the excess electron. In this Account, we discuss our investigations of electrons solvated in water by means of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. This approach, applied to a model system of a negatively charged cluster of 32 water molecules, allows us to characterize structural, dynamical, and reactive aspects of the hydrated electron using all of the system's valence electrons. We show that under ambient conditions, the electron localizes into a cavity close to the surface of the liquid cluster. This cavity is, however, more flexible and accessible to water molecules than an analogous area around negatively charged ions. The dynamical process of electron attachment to a neutral water cluster is strongly temperature dependent. Under ambient conditions, the electron relaxes in the

  10. [Bone tissue morphological structure in congenital deformations of the jaws].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkanov, A V; Panin, M G; Shipkova, T P; Chumakov, A A; Komnova, Z D

    2001-01-01

    Morphological structure of bone tissue was studied in various types of congenital deformations of the jaws. Morphological changes in the bone with deformations and the severity of these disorders depended not so much on the type on the deformation, but mainly on its severity, which can be explained by a drastic increase of functional exercise because of impaired occlusion and impossibility of proper chewing. Decelerated weak restructuring of bone tissue and imperfect osteogenesis in deformed bone, similar in various types of deformations, were demonstrated on morphological material. These changes can affect the regenerative potential of the bone in operated zones.

  11. Atomistic simulations of cation hydration in sodium and calcium montmorillonite nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guomin; Neretnieks, Ivars; Holmboe, Michael

    2017-08-01

    During the last four decades, numerous studies have been directed to the swelling smectite-rich clays in the context of high-level radioactive waste applications and waste-liners for contaminated sites. The swelling properties of clay mineral particles arise due to hydration of the interlayer cations and the diffuse double layers formed near the negatively charged montmorillonite (MMT) surfaces. To accurately study the cation hydration in the interlayer nanopores of MMT, solvent-solute and solvent-clay surface interactions (i.e., the solvation effects and the shape effects) on the atomic level should be taken into account, in contrast to many recent electric double layer based methodologies using continuum models. Therefore, in this research we employed fully atomistic simulations using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the software package GROMACS along with the CLAYFF forcefield and the SPC/E water model. We present the ion distributions and the deformation of the hydrated coordination structures, i.e., the hydration shells of Na+ and Ca2+ in the interlayer, respectively, for MMT in the first-layer, the second-layer, the third-layer, the fourth-layer, and the fifth-layer (1W, 2W, 3W, 4W, and 5W) hydrate states. Our MD simulations show that Na+ in Na-MMT nanopores have an affinity to the ditrigonal cavities of the clay layers and form transient inner-sphere complexes at about 3.8 Å from clay midplane at water contents less than the 5W hydration state. However, these phenomena are not observed in Ca-MMT regardless of swelling states. For Na-MMT, each Na+ is coordinated to four water molecules and one oxygen atom of the clay basal-plane in the first hydration shell at the 1W hydration state, and with five to six water molecules in the first hydration shell within a radius of 3.1 Å at all higher water contents. In Ca-MMT, however each Ca2+ is coordinated to approximately seven water molecules in the first hydration shell at the 1W hydration state and

  12. Clathrate hydrate tuning for technological purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Profio, Pietro; Germani, Raimondo; Savelli, Gianfranco

    2010-05-01

    Gas hydrates are being increasingly considered as convenient media for gas storage and transportation as the knowledge of their properties increases, in particular as relates to methane and hydrogen. Clathrate hydrates may also represent a feasible sequestration technology for carbon dioxide, due to a well defined P/T range of stability, and several research programs are addressing this possibility. Though the understanding of the molecular structure and supramolecular interactions which are responsible of most properties of hydrates have been elucitated in recent years, the underlying theoretical physico-chemical framework is still poor, especially as relates to the role of "conditioners" (inhibitors and promoters) from the molecular/supramolecular point of view. In the present communication we show some results from our research approach which is mainly focused on the supramolecular properties of clathrate hydrate systems - and their conditioners - as a way to get access to a controlled modulation of the formation, dissociation and stabilization of gas hydrates. In particular, this communication will deal with: (a) a novel, compact apparatus for studying the main parameters of formation and dissociation of gas hydrates in a one-pot experiment, which can be easily and rapidly carried out on board of a drilling ship;[1] (b) the effects of amphiphile molecules (surfactants) as inhibitors or promoters of gas hydrate formation;[2] (c) a novel nanotechnology for a reliable and quick production of hydrogen hydrates, and its application to fuel cells;[3,4] and (d) the development of a clathrate hydrate tecnology for the sequestration and geological storage of man-made CO2, possibly with concomitant recovery of natural gas from NG hydrate fields. Furthermore, the feasibility of catalyzing the reduction of carbon dioxide to energy-rich species by hydrates is being investigated. [1] Di Profio, P., Germani, R., Savelli, G., International Patent Application PCT/IT2006

  13. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a

  14. Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

    2011-04-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with

  15. Hydration and Nanoconfined Water: Insights from Computer Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, Laureano M; Rodríguez Fris, J A; Morini, Marcela A; Sierra, M Belén; Accordino, S A; Montes de Oca, J M; Pedroni, Viviana I; Appignanesi, Gustavo A

    2015-01-01

    results for protein hydration and, particularly, some preliminary studies on membrane hydration. Finally, calculations of a local hydrophobicity measure of relevance for binding and self-assembly are also presented. We then conclude with a few words of further emphasis on the relevance of this kind of knowledge to biology and to the design of new materials by highlighting the context-dependent and non-additive nature of different non-covalent interactions in an aqueous nanoenvironment, an issue that is usually greatly overlooked.

  16. Parametric study of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sand, silt, and clay sediments: 1. Electromagnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.Y.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2010-01-01

    The marked decrease in bulk electrical conductivity of sediments in the presence of gas hydrates has been used to interpret borehole electrical resistivity logs and, to a lesser extent, the results of controlled source electromagnetic surveys to constrain the spatial distribution and predicted concentration of gas hydrate in natural settings. Until now, an exhaustive laboratory data set that could be used to assess the impact of gas hydrate on the electromagnetic properties of different soils (sand, silt, and clay) at different effective stress and with different saturations of hydrate has been lacking. The laboratory results reported here are obtained using a standard geotechnical cell and the hydrate-formed tetrahydrofuran (THF), a liquid that is fully miscible in water and able to produce closely controlled saturations of hydrate from dissolved phase. Both permittivity and electrical conductivity are good indicators of the volume fraction of free water in the sediment, which is in turn dependent on hydrate saturation. Permittivity in the microwave frequency range is particularly predictive of free water content since it is barely affected by ionic concentration, pore structure, and surface conduction. Electrical conductivity (or resistivity) is less reliable for constraining water content or hydrate saturation: In addition to fluid-filled porosity, other factors, such as the ionic concentration of the pore fluid and possibly other conduction effects (e.g., surface conduction in high specific surface soils having low conductivity pore fluid), also influence electrical conductivity.

  17. Variational approach and deformed derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weberszpil, J.; Helayël-Neto, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that there exists a possible relationship between q-deformed algebras in two different contexts of Statistical Mechanics, namely, the Tsallis' framework and the Kaniadakis' scenario, with a local form of fractional-derivative operators for fractal media, the so-called Hausdorff derivatives, mapped into a continuous medium with a fractal measure. Here, in this paper, we present an extension of the traditional calculus of variations for systems containing deformed-derivatives embedded into the Lagrangian and the Lagrangian densities for classical and field systems. The results extend the classical Euler-Lagrange equations and the Hamiltonian formalism. The resulting dynamical equations seem to be compatible with those found in the literature, specially with mass-dependent and with nonlinear equations for systems in classical and quantum mechanics. Examples are presented to illustrate applications of the formulation. Also, the conserved ​Noether current is worked out.

  18. Hydration Properties of Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag (GGBS Under Different Hydration Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua LIU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The hydration properties of various cementitious materials containing Ground Granulated Blast-furnace Slag (GGBS, two alkali-activated slag cements (AAS-1 and AAS-2 in which sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide act as alkaline activators respectively, supersulfated cement (SSC and slag Portland cement(PSC, are compared with ordinary Portland cement (OPC to investigate the effect of activating environment on the hydration properties in this study by determining the compressive strength of the pastes, the hydration heat of binders within 96 hours, and the hydration products at age of 28 days. The results show that C-S-H gels are the main hydrated products for all cementitious systems containing GGBS. Ca(OH2 is the hydration products of OPC and PSC paste. However, ettringite and gypsum crystals instead of Ca(OH2 are detected in SSC paste. Additionally, tobermorite, a crystalline C-S-H, and calcite are hydrated products in AAS-1. Tobermorite, cowlesite and calcite are hydrated products of AAS-2 as well. Based on strength results, AAS-1 paste exhibits the highest compressive strength followed by POC, PSC, SSC in order at all testing ages and AAS-2 give the lowest compressive strength except for the early age at 3 days, which is higher than SSC but still lower than PSC. From hydration heat analysis, alkalinity in the reaction solution is a vital factor influencing the initial hydration rate and the initial hydration rate from higher to lower is AAS-2, AAS-1, OPC, PSC and SSC. Although AAS possesses a faster reaction rate in the initial hours, cumulative hydration heat of AAS is comparably lower than that of OPC, but higher than those of PSC and SSC in turn, which indicates that the hydration heat of clinkers is much higher than that of slag.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.14934

  19. Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

    2011-12-31

    This project seeks to understand regional differences in gas hydrate systems from the perspective of as an energy resource, geohazard, and long-term climate influence. Specifically, the effort will: (1) collect data and conceptual models that targets causes of gas hydrate variance, (2) construct numerical models that explain and predict regional-scale gas hydrate differences in 2-dimensions with minimal 'free parameters', (3) simulate hydrocarbon production from various gas hydrate systems to establish promising resource characteristics, (4) perturb different gas hydrate systems to assess potential impacts of hot fluids on seafloor stability and well stability, and (5) develop geophysical approaches that enable remote quantification of gas hydrate heterogeneities so that they can be characterized with minimal costly drilling. Our integrated program takes advantage of the fact that we have a close working team comprised of experts in distinct disciplines. The expected outcomes of this project are improved exploration and production technology for production of natural gas from methane hydrates and improved safety through understanding of seafloor and well bore stability in the presence of hydrates. The scope of this project was to more fully characterize, understand, and appreciate fundamental differences in the amount and distribution of gas hydrate and how this would affect the production potential of a hydrate accumulation in the marine environment. The effort combines existing information from locations in the ocean that are dominated by low permeability sediments with small amounts of high permeability sediments, one permafrost location where extensive hydrates exist in reservoir quality rocks and other locations deemed by mutual agreement of DOE and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations were Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location was Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the project was to understand

  20. Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2009-12-09

    Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

  1. Influence of temperature on methane hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Wu, Qingbai; Mu, Cuicui

    2017-08-11

    During gas hydrate formation process, a phase transition of liquid water exists naturally, implying that temperature has an important influence on hydrate formation. In this study, methane hydrate was formed within the same media. The experimental system was kept at 1.45, 6.49, and 12.91 °C respectively, and then different pressurization modes were applied in steps. We proposed a new indicator, namely the slope of the gas flow rates against time (dν g /dt), to represent the intrinsic driving force for hydrate formation. The driving force was calculated as a fixed value at the different stages of formation, including initial nucleation/growth, secondary nucleation/growth, and decay. The amounts of gas consumed at each stage were also calculated. The results show that the driving force during each stage follows an inverse relation with temperature, whereas the amount of consumed gas is proportional to temperature. This opposite trend indicates that the influences of temperature on the specific formation processes and final amounts of gas contained in hydrate should be considered separately. Our results also suggest that the specific ambient temperature under which hydrate is formed should be taken into consideration, when explaining the formation of different configurations and saturations of gas hydrates in natural reservoirs.

  2. Electrical properties of methane hydrate + sediment mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Frane, Wyatt L.; Stern, Laura A.; Weitemeyer, Karen A.; Constable, Steven; Roberts, Jeffery J.

    2011-01-01

    As part of our DOE-funded proposal to characterize gas hydrate in the Gulf of Mexico using marine electromagnetic methods, a collaboration between SIO, LLNL, and USGS with the goal of measuring the electrical properties of lab-created methane (CH4) hydrate and sediment mixtures was formed. We examined samples with known characteristics to better relate electrical properties measured in the field to specific gas hydrate concentration and distribution patterns. Here we discuss first-ever electrical conductivity (σ) measurements on unmixed CH4 hydrate (Du Frane et al., 2011): 6 x 10-5 S/m at 5 °C, which is ~5 orders of magnitude lower than seawater. This difference allows electromagnetic (EM) techniques to distinguish highly resistive gas hydrate deposits from conductive water saturated sediments in EM field surveys. More recently, we performed measurements on CH4 hydrate mixed with sediment and we also discuss those initial findings here. Our results on samples free of liquid water are important for predicting conductivity of sediments with pores highly saturated with gas hydrate, and are an essential starting point for comprehensive mixing models.

  3. Problems of ecological and technical safety by exploration and production of natural gas hydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Chen

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Gas hydrates - the firm crystal connections form water (liquid water, ice, water vapor and low-molecular waterproof natural gases (mainly methane whose crystal structure effectively compresses gas e.s.: each cubic meter of hydrate can yield over 160 m3 of methane.In present time, the exploitation of the Messoyahsk (Russia and Mallik (Canada deposits of gas hydrates is conducted actively. The further perfection of prospecting methods in the field of studying gas hydrates containing sediments depends on the improvement of geophysical and the well test research, among which native-state core drilling is one of the major. Sampling a native-state core from gas hydrates sediments keeps not only the original composition but structural - textural features of their construction.Despite of the appeal to use gas hydrates as a perspective and ecologically pure fuel possessing huge resources, the investigation and development of their deposits can lead to a number of negative consequences connected with hazards arising from the maintenance of their technical and ecological safety of carrying out. Scales of the arising problems can change from local to regional and even global.

  4. Environmental drivers of spatial and temporal variation in infaunal communities at methane hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanyà i Llovet, N.; Snelgrove, P. V.

    2016-02-01

    Methane hydrates support unique infauna that varies from one hydrate area to another, therefore chemosynthetic environments could increase beta diversity in deep-sea environments. Our results show that oligochaetes, rather than dorvilleid polychaetes or Capitella spp. that characterize other cold seeps, dominate Barkley hydrates infauna off British Columbia (Canada). Most studies of faunal distribution of chemosynthetic environments focus on toxic effects of sulfur or limited oxygen, however, our study demonstrates that the contrasting food quality in hydrate patch mosaics also influences faunal distribution patterns. Food quality in the methane outcrop differs from adjacent sediments in a higher chl/phaeo ratio, lower lipid class diversity, high hydrocarbons (HC) and the presence of wax esters/steryl esters (WE/SE). Mean grain size, chl/phaeo ration, HC, WE/SE, triacylglycerides (TAG) and phospholipids (PL) appear primarily responsible for infaunal distribution patterns. The spatial extent of methane influence on food quality and community structure extends at least 20 m beyond the actual outcrop. The absence of temporal variation in infaunal community structure suggests a strong dependence on methane as a food source, even in relatively shallow hydrates ( 900 m depth). Our data on environmental drivers of community structure, spatial extent, and temporal variation may prove valuable to managers interested in extraction of methane from hydrate sites as a potential source of energy.

  5. Comparative atomic-scale hydration of the ceramide and phosphocholine headgroup in solution and bilayer environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillams, Richard J.; Lorenz, Christian D.; McLain, Sylvia E.

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have used neutron diffraction to elucidate the hydration of the ceramide and the phosphatidylcholine headgroup in solution. These solution studies provide bond-length resolution information on the system, but are limited to liquid samples. The work presented here investigates how the hydration of ceramide and phosphatidylcholine headgroups in a solution compares with that found in a lipid bilayer. This work shows that the hydration patterns seen in the solution samples provide valuable insight into the preferential location of hydrating water molecules in the bilayer. There are certain subtle differences in the distribution, which result from a combination of the lipid conformation and the lipid-lipid interactions within the bilayer environment. The lipid-lipid interactions in the bilayer will be dependent on the composition of the bilayer, whereas the restricted exploration of conformational space is likely to be applicable in all membrane environments. The generalized description of hydration gathered from the neutron diffraction studies thus provides good initial estimation for the hydration pattern, but this can be further refined for specific systems.

  6. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release as much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  7. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by Maurer Technology, Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. We plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. We also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. We are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. We hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, our goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

  8. Motion Planning Under Uncertainty In Highly Deformable Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sachin; van den, Jur; Alterovitz, Berg Ron

    2011-06-01

    Many tasks in robot-assisted surgery, food handling, manufacturing, and other applications require planning and controlling the motions of manipulators or other devices that must interact with highly deformable objects. We present a unified approach for motion planning under uncertainty in deformable environments that maximizes probability of success by accounting for uncertainty in deformation models, noisy sensing, and unpredictable actuation. Unlike prior planners that assume deterministic deformations or treat deformations as a type of small perturbation, our method explicitly considers the uncertainty in large, time-dependent deformations. Our method requires a simulator of deformable objects but places no significant restrictions on the simulator used. We use a sampling-based motion planner in conjunction with the simulator to generate a set of candidate plans based on expected deformations. Our method then uses the simulator and optimal control to numerically estimate time-dependent state distributions based on uncertain parameters (e.g. deformable material properties or actuation errors). We then select the plan with the highest estimated probability of successfully avoiding obstacles and reaching the goal region. Using FEM-based simulation of deformable tissues, we demonstrate the ability of our method to generate high quality plans in two medical-inspired scenarios: (1) guiding bevel-tip steerable needles through slices of deformable tissue around obstacles for minimally invasive biopsies and drug-delivery, and (2) manipulating planar tissues to align interior points at desired coordinates for precision treatment.

  9. Heterogeneous Hydration of p53/MDM2 Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Water-mediated interactions play critical roles in biomolecular recognition processes. Explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the variational implicit-solvent model (VISM) are used to study those hydration properties during binding for the biologically important p53/MDM2 complex. Unlike simple model solutes, in such a realistic and heterogeneous solute–solvent system with both geometrical and chemical complexity, the local water distribution sensitively depends on nearby amino acid properties and the geometric shape of the protein. We show that the VISM can accurately describe the locations of high and low density solvation shells identified by the MD simulations and can explain them by a local coupling balance of solvent–solute interaction potentials and curvature. In particular, capillary transitions between local dry and wet hydration states in the binding pocket are captured for interdomain distance between 4 to 6 Å, right at the onset of binding. The underlying physical connection between geometry and polarity is illustrated and quantified. Our study offers a microscopic and physical insight into the heterogeneous hydration behavior of the biologically highly relevant p53/MDM2 system and demonstrates the fundamental importance of hydrophobic effects for biological binding processes. We hope our study can help to establish new design rules for drugs and medical substances. PMID:24803860

  10. Hydration of hyaluronan: effects on structural and thermodynamic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albèr, Cathrine; Engblom, Johan; Falkman, Peter; Kocherbitov, Vitaly

    2015-03-19

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a frequently occurring biopolymer with a large variety of functions in nature. During the past 60 years, there have been numerous reports on structural and dynamic behavior of HA in water. Nevertheless, studies covering a wider concentration range are still lacking. In this work, we use isothermal scanning sorption calorimetry for the first time to investigate hydration-induced transitions in HA (sodium hyaluronate, 17 kDa). From this method, we obtain the sorption isotherm and the enthalpy and the entropy of hydration. Thermotropic events are evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and structure analysis is performed with X-ray scattering (SWAXS) and light and scanning electron microscopy. During isothermal hydration, HA exhibits a glass transition, followed by crystallization and subsequent dissolution of HA crystals and formation of a one-phase solution. Structural analysis reveals that the crystal may be indexed on an orthorhombic unit cell with space group P212121. Crystallization of HA was found to occur either through endothermic or exothermic processes, depending on the temperature and water content. We propose a mechanism of crystallization that explains this phenomenon based on the interplay between the hydrophobic effect and strengthening of hydrogen bonds during formation of crystals. The combined results were used to construct a binary phase diagram for the HA-water system.

  11. Ocean circulation promotes methane release from gas hydrate outcrops at the NEPTUNE Canada Barkley Canyon node

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Laurenz; Barnes, Christopher; Best, Mairi; Chapman, Ross; Pirenne, Benoît; Thomson, Richard; Vogt, Joachim

    2012-08-01

    The NEPTUNE Canada cabled observatory network enables non-destructive, controlled experiments and time-series observations with mobile robots on gas hydrates and benthic community structure on a small plateau of about 1 km2 at a water depth of 870 m in Barkley Canyon, about 100 km offshore Vancouver Island, British Columbia. A mobile Internet operated vehicle was used as an instrument platform to monitor and study up to 2000 m2 of sediment surface in real-time. In 2010 the first mission of the robot was to investigate the importance of oscillatory deep ocean currents on methane release at continental margins. Previously, other experimental studies have indicated that methane release from gas hydrate outcrops is diffusion-controlled and should be much higher than seepage from buried hydrate in semipermeable sediments. Our results show that periods of enhanced bottom currents associated with diurnal shelf waves, internal semidiurnal tides, and also wind-generated near-inertial motions can modulate methane seepage. Flow dependent destruction of gas hydrates within the hydrate stability field is possible from enhanced bottom currents when hydrates are not covered by either seafloor biota or sediments. The calculated seepage varied between 40-400 μmol CH4 m-2 s-1. This is 1-3 orders of magnitude higher than dissolution rates of buried hydrates through permeable sediments and well within the experimentally derived range for exposed gas hydrates under different hydrodynamic boundary conditions. We conclude that submarine canyons which display high hydrodynamic activity can become key areas of enhanced seepage as a result of emerging weather patterns due to climate change.

  12. Diffeomorphic Statistical Deformation Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Sass; Hansen, Mads/Fogtman; Larsen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a new method for constructing diffeomorphic statistical deformation models in arbitrary dimensional images with a nonlinear generative model and a linear parameter space. Our deformation model is a modified version of the diffeomorphic model introduced by Cootes et al....... The modifications ensure that no boundary restriction has to be enforced on the parameter space to prevent folds or tears in the deformation field. For straightforward statistical analysis, principal component analysis and sparse methods, we assume that the parameters for a class of deformations lie on a linear...... manifold and that the distance between two deformations are given by the metric introduced by the L2-norm in the parameter space. The chosen L2-norm is shown to have a clear and intuitive interpretation on the usual nonlinear manifold. Our model is validated on a set of MR images of corpus callosum...

  13. Dissociation of Natural and Artificial Methane Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misyura S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Present work deals with natural and artificial methane hydrate dissociation. The heating of the powder produced due to the temperature difference between the external air and the powder. The dissociation rate was determined by gravimetric method. The range of the partial self-preservation for the natural hydrate is significantly longer than for the artificial one and moved to higher temperatures. The destruction of the natural sample is slower than the artificial one. The time-averaged dissociation rate for the artificial sample is equal to 1,25 %/s and for the natural hydrate corresponds to 0,59 %/s.

  14. Tapping methane hydrates for unconventional natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    Methane hydrate is an icelike form of concentrated methane and water found in the sediments of permafrost regions and marine continental margins at depths far shallower than conventional oil and gas. Despite their relative accessibility and widespread occurrence, methane hydrates have never been tapped to meet increasing global energy demands. With rising natural gas prices, production from these unconventional gas deposits is becoming economically viable, particularly in permafrost areas already being exploited for conventional oil and gas. This article provides an overview of gas hydrate occurrence, resource assessment, exploration, production technologies, renewability, and future challenges.

  15. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Archer, D.

    2007-01-01

    Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO<...

  16. A positron annihilation study of hydrated DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warman, J. M.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1986-01-01

    Positron annihilation measurements are reported for hydrated DNA as a function of water content and as a function of temperature (20 to -180.degree. C) for samples containing 10 and 50% wt of water. The ortho-positronium mean lifetime and its intensity show distinct variations with the degree...... of hydration and with temperature for the 50% sample. The 10% water sample was relatively insensitive to temperature variation. The results indicate that hydrated DNA containing up to 10% water behaves as a rigid crystalline solid but that the rigidity markedly decreases with a further increase in water...

  17. Effects of polar solvents on the fracture resistance of dentin: Role of water hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, R O; Nalla, R K; Balooch, M; Ager III, J W; Kruzic, J J; Kinney, J H

    2004-12-10

    Although healthy dentin is invariably hydrated in vivo, from a perspective of examining the mechanisms of fracture in dentin, it is interesting to consider the role of water hydration. Furthermore, it is feasible that exposure to certain polar solvents, e.g., those found in clinical adhesives, can induce dehydration. In the present study, in vitro deformation and fracture experiments, the latter involving a resistance-curve (R-curve) approach (i.e., toughness evolution with crack extension), were conducted in order to assess changes in the constitutive and fracture behavior induced by three common solvents - acetone, ethanol and methanol. In addition, nanoindentation-based experiments to evaluate the deformation behavior at the level of individual collagen fibers and ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy to evaluate changes in bonding were performed. The results indicate a reversible effect of chemical dehydration, with increased fracture resistance, strength, and stiffness associated with lower hydrogen bonding ability of the solvent. These results are analyzed both in terms of intrinsic and extrinsic toughening phenomena to further understand the micromechanisms of fracture in dentin and the specific role of water hydration.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Effect on Hydrate Formation in Spray Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of reaction condition on hydrate formation were conducted in spray reactor. The temperature, pressure, and gas volume of reaction on hydrate formation were measured in pure water and SDS solutions at different temperature and pressure with a high-pressure experimental rig for hydrate formation. The experimental data and result reveal that additives could improve the hydrate formation rate and gas storage capacity. Temperature and pressure can restrict the hydrate formation. Lower temperature and higher pressure can promote hydrate formation, but they can increase production cost. So these factors should be considered synthetically. The investigation will promote the advance of gas storage technology in hydrates.

  19. The interaction of climate change and methane hydrates: Climate-Hydrates Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.; Kessler, John D.

    2017-01-01

    Gas hydrate, a frozen, naturally-occurring, and highly-concentrated form of methane, sequesters significant carbon in the global system and is stable only over a range of low-temperature and moderate-pressure conditions. Gas hydrate is widespread in the sediments of marine continental margins and permafrost areas, locations where ocean and atmospheric warming may perturb the hydrate stability field and lead to release of the sequestered methane into the overlying sediments and soils. Methane ...

  20. Hydration and nutrition knowledge in adolescent swimmers. Does water intake affect urine hydration markers after swimming?

    OpenAIRE

    Altavilla, Cesare; Prats Moya, Soledad; Caballero, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Little data exists regarding nutritional knowledge and hydration in adolescent swimmers. The aim of this study was to assess the level of nutrition and hydration knowledge and to describe the fluid balance in adolescent swimmers during training. A study was carried out with a cross-sectional descriptive part and a longitudinal part with repeated measurements over five swimming sessions. Eighty-six adolescent swimmers completed a questionnaire to assess their sport nutrition and hydration know...

  1. Hydration education: developing, piloting and evaluating a hydration education package for general practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    McCotter, L; Douglas, P; Laur, C; Gandy, J.; Fitzpatrick, L; Rajput-Ray, M; Ray, S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To (1) assess the hydration knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of doctors; (2) develop an evidence-based training package; and (3) evaluate the impact of the training package. Design Educational intervention with impact evaluation. Setting Cambridgeshire, UK. Participants General practitioners (GPs (primary care physicians)). Interventions Hydration and healthcare training. Main outcome measures Hydration KAP score before and immediately after the training session. Results Kn...

  2. A Hydrate Database: Vital to the Technical Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Sloan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates may contain more energy than all the combined other fossil fuels, causing hydrates to be a potentially vital aspect of both energy and climate change. This article is an overview of the motivation, history, and future of hydrate data management using a CODATA vehicle to connect international hydrate databases. The basis is an introduction to the Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML to connect various hydrate databases. The accompanying four articles on laboratory hydrate data by Smith et al., on field hydrate data by L?wner et al., on hydrate modeling by Wang et al., and on construction of a Chinese gas hydrate system by Xiao et al. provide details of GHML in their respective areas.

  3. Hydration kinetics, physicochemical composition, and textural changes of transgenic corn kernels of flint, semi-flint, and dent varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Celuppi Marques

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The hydration kinetics of transgenic corn types flint DKB 245PRO, semi-flint DKB 390PRO, and dent DKB 240PRO was studied at temperatures of 30, 40, 50, and 67 °C. The concentrated parameters model was used, and it fits the experimental data well for all three cultivars. The chemical composition of the corn kernels was also evaluated. The corn cultivar influenced the initial rate of absorption and the water equilibrium concentration, and the dent corn absorbed more water than the other cultivars at the four temperatures analyzed. The effect of hydration on the kernel texture was also studied, and it was observed that there was no significant difference in the deformation force required for all three corn types analyzed with longer hydration period.

  4. Towards Commercial Gas Production from Hydrate Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Dawe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade global natural gas consumption has steadily increased since many industrialized countries are substituting natural gas for coal to generate electricity. There is also significant industrialization and economic growth of the heavily populated Asian countries of India and China. The general consensus is that there are vast quantities of natural gas trapped in hydrate deposits in geological systems, and this has resulted in the emerging importance of hydrates as a potential energy resource and an accompanying proliferation of recent studies on the technical and economic feasibility of gas production from hydrates. There are then the associated environmental concerns. This study reviews the state of knowledge with respect to natural gas hydrates and outlines remaining challenges and knowledge gaps.

  5. ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrate Production Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoderbek, David [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Farrell, Helen [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Howard, James [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Raterman, Kevin [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Silpngarmlert, Suntichai [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Martin, Kenneth [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Smith, Bruce [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Klein, Perry [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-06-30

    Work began on the ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrates Production Test (DOE award number DE-NT0006553) on October 1, 2008. This final report summarizes the entire project from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013.

  6. Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Savidge

    2008-10-31

    The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

  7. Worldwide distribution of subaquatic gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Ginsburg, G.D.; Soloviev, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    Sediments containing natural gas hydrates occur worldwide on continental and insular slopes and rises of active and passive margins, on continental shelves of polar regions, and in deep-water (> 300 m) environments of inland lakes and seas. The potential amount of methane in natural gas hydrates is enormous, with current estimates at about 1019 g of methane carbon. Subaquatic gas hydrates have been recovered in 14 different areas of the world, and geophysical and geochemical evidence for them has been found in 33 other areas. The worldwide distribution of natural gas hydrates is updated here; their global importance to the chemical and physical properties of near-surface subaquatic sediments is affirmed. ?? 1993 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Free Communications, Oral Presentations: Hydration Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Susan Yeargin

    2012-01-01

      Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN Context: Hydration status is among several variables measured to determine risk of exertional heat illness during pre-participation exams for preseason practices in summer months...

  9. Vibrational dynamics of hydration water in amylose

    CERN Document Server

    Cavatorta, F; Albanese, G; Angelini, N

    2002-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamical properties of hydration water associated with amylose helices, based on low-temperature vibrational spectra collected using the TOSCA inelastic spectrometer at ISIS. The structural constraints of the polysaccharidic chains favour the formation of a high-density structure for water, which has been suggested by Imberty and Perez on the basis of conformational analysis. According to this model, hydration water can only enter the pores formed by six adjacent helices and completely fills the pores at a hydration level of about 0.27-g water/g dry amylose. Our measurements show that the dynamical behaviour of hydration water is similar to that observed in high-density amorphous ice. (orig.)

  10. Physical properties of sediment containing methane gas hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, W.J.; Waite, W.F.; Mason, D.H.; Gilbert, L.Y.

    2005-01-01

    A study conducted by the US Geological Survey (USGS) on the formation, behavior, and properties of mixtures of gas hydrate and sediment is presented. The results show that the properties of host material influence the type and quantity of hydrates formed. The presence of hydrate during mechanical shear tests affects the measured sediment pore pressure. Sediment shear strength may be increased more than 500 percent by intact hydrate, but greatly weakened if the hydrate dissociates.

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of Methane Hydrate Reservoirs: Effects of Reservoir Parameters on Gas Productivity and Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. J.; Gaddipati, M.; Nyayapathi, L.

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a parametric study on production rates of natural gas from gas hydrates by the method of depressurization, using CMG STARS. Seven factors/parameters were considered as perturbations from a base-case hydrate reservoir description based on Problem 7 of the International Methane Hydrate Reservoir Simulator Code Comparison Study led by the Department of Energy and the USGS. This reservoir is modeled after the inferred properties of the hydrate deposit at the Prudhoe Bay L-106 site. The included sensitivity variables were hydrate saturation, pressure (depth), temperature, bottom-hole pressure of the production well, free water saturation, intrinsic rock permeability, and porosity. A two-level (L=2) Plackett-Burman experimental design was used to study the relative effects of these factors. The measured variable was the discounted cumulative gas production. The discount rate chosen was 15%, resulting in the gas contribution to the net present value of a reservoir. Eight different designs were developed for conducting sensitivity analysis and the effects of the parameters on the real and discounted production rates will be discussed. The breakeven price in various cases and the dependence of the breakeven price on the production parameters is given in the paper. As expected, initial reservoir temperature has the strongest positive effect on the productivity of a hydrate deposit and the bottom-hole pressure in the production well has the strongest negative dependence. Also resulting in a positive correlation is the intrinsic permeability and the initial free water of the formation. Negative effects were found for initial hydrate saturation (at saturations greater than 50% of the pore space) and the reservoir porosity. These negative effects are related to the available sensible heat of the reservoir, with decreasing productivity due to decreasing available sensible heat. Finally, we conclude that for the base case reservoir, the break-even price (BEP

  12. Dominant Alcohol-Protein Interaction via Hydration-Enabled Enthalpy-Driven Binding Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yuan; Kleinhammes, Alfred; Tang, Pei; Xu, Yan; Wu, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Water plays an important role in weak associations of small drug molecules with proteins. Intense focus has been on binding-induced structural changes in the water network surrounding protein binding sites, especially their contributions to binding thermodynamics. However, water is also tightly coupled to protein conformations and dynamics, and so far little is known about the influence of water-protein interactions on ligand binding. Alcohols are a type of low-affinity drugs, and it remains unclear how water affects alcohol-protein interactions. Here, we present alcohol adsorption isotherms under controlled protein hydration using in-situ NMR detection. As functions of hydration level, Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of binding were determined from the temperature dependence of isotherms. Two types of alcohol binding were found. The dominant type is low-affinity nonspecific binding, which is strongly dependent on temperature and the level of hydration. At low hydration levels, this nonspecific binding only occurs above a threshold of alcohol vapor pressure. An increased hydration level reduces this threshold, with it finally disappearing at a hydration level of h~0.2 (g water/g protein), gradually shifting alcohol binding from an entropy-driven to an enthalpy-driven process. Water at charged and polar groups on the protein surface was found to be particularly important in enabling this binding. Although further increase in hydration has smaller effects on the changes of binding enthalpy and entropy, it results in significant negative change in Gibbs free energy due to unmatched enthalpy-entropy compensation. These results show the crucial role of water-protein interplay in alcohol binding. PMID:25856773

  13. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  14. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Runyon; Mike Globe; Kent Newsham; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling

  15. Exploitation of subsea gas hydrate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas hydrates are considered to be a potential energy resource in the future. They occur in permafrost areas as well as in subsea sediments and are stable at high pressure and low temperature conditions. According to estimations the amount of carbon bonded in natural gas hydrates worldwide is two times larger than in all known conventional fossil fuels. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e.g. depressurization and/or injection of carbon dioxide) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR«. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into a numerical model. The physics of the process leads to strong non-linear couplings between hydraulic fluid flow, hydrate dissociation and formation, hydraulic properties of the sediment, partial pressures and seawater solution of components and the thermal budget of the system described by the heat equation. This paper is intended to provide an overview of the recent development regarding the production of natural gas from subsea gas hydrate reservoirs. It aims at giving a broad insight into natural gas hydrates and covering relevant aspects of the exploitation process. It is focused on the thermodynamic principles and technological approaches for the exploitation. The effects occurring during natural gas production within hydrate filled sediment layers are identified and discussed by means of numerical simulation results. The behaviour of relevant process parameters such as pressure, temperature and phase saturations is described and compared for different strategies. The simulations are complemented by calculations for different safety relevant problems.

  16. The Spherical Deformation Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobolth, Asgar

    2003-01-01

    Miller et al. (1994) describe a model for representing spatial objects with no obvious landmarks. Each object is represented by a global translation and a normal deformation of a sphere. The normal deformation is defined via the orthonormal spherical-harmonic basis. In this paper we analyse...... the spherical deformation model in detail and describe how it may be used to summarize the shape of star-shaped three-dimensional objects with few parameters. It is of interest to make statistical inference about the three-dimensional shape parameters from continuous observations of the surface and from...

  17. Pediatric Thumb Flexion Deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreve, Mark; Chu, Alice

    2016-03-01

    Pediatric trigger thumb and congenital clasped thumb are the two most common pediatric thumb flexion deformities. Both might appear similar, however, they are caused by varying etiologies, and treatment is vastly different. Pediatric trigger thumb is due to a size mismatch of the flexor tendon and the thumb pulley system, develops over time, typically manifests as a locked interphalangeal joint, and is treated with observation or surgical release. Congenital clasped thumb, although presenting in varying degrees of severity, is due to a congenital absence or hypoplasia of one or more of the thumb extensors and is treated with either splinting for supple deformities or surgery for more complex deformities.

  18. [Progress in Raman spectroscopic measurement of methane hydrate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Zhu, Li-hua; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Long-jun

    2009-09-01

    Complex thermodynamics and kinetics problems are involved in the methane hydrate formation and decomposition, and these problems are crucial to understanding the mechanisms of hydrate formation and hydrate decomposition. However, it was difficult to accurately obtain such information due to the difficulty of measurement since methane hydrate is only stable under low temperature and high pressure condition, and until recent years, methane hydrate has been measured in situ using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy, a non-destructive and non-invasive technique, is used to study vibrational modes of molecules. Studies of methane hydrate using Raman spectroscopy have been developed over the last decade. The Raman spectra of CH4 in vapor phase and in hydrate phase are presented in this paper. The progress in the research on methane hydrate formation thermodynamics, formation kinetics, decomposition kinetics and decomposition mechanism based on Raman spectroscopic measurements in the laboratory and deep sea are reviewed. Formation thermodynamic studies, including in situ observation of formation condition of methane hydrate, analysis of structure, and determination of hydrate cage occupancy and hydration numbers by using Raman spectroscopy, are emphasized. In the aspect of formation kinetics, research on variation in hydrate cage amount and methane concentration in water during the growth of hydrate using Raman spectroscopy is also introduced. For the methane hydrate decomposition, the investigation associated with decomposition mechanism, the mutative law of cage occupancy ratio and the formulation of decomposition rate in porous media are described. The important aspects for future hydrate research based on Raman spectroscopy are discussed.

  19. Structural characteristics of hydration sites in lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soda, Kunitsugu; Shimbo, Yudai; Seki, Yasutaka; Taiji, Makoto

    2011-06-01

    A new method is presented for determining the hydration site of proteins, where the effect of structural fluctuations in both protein and hydration water is explicitly considered by using molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). The whole hydration sites (HS) of lysozyme are composed of 195 single HSs and 38 clustered ones (CHS), and divided into 231 external HSs (EHS) and 2 internal ones (IHS). The largest CHSs, 'Hg' and 'Lβ', are the IHSs having 2.54 and 1.35 mean internal hydration waters respectively. The largest EHS, 'Clft', is located in the cleft region. The real hydration structure of a CHS is an ensemble of multiple structures. The transition between two structures occurs through recombinations of some H-bonds. The number of the experimental X-ray crystal waters is nearly the same as that of the estimated MDS hydration waters for 70% of the HSs, but significantly different for the rest of HSs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of individual hydration strategies for athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Ronald J; Shirreffs, Susan M

    2008-10-01

    Athletes are encouraged to begin exercise well hydrated and to consume sufficient amounts of appropriate fluids during exercise to limit water and salt deficits. Available evidence suggests that many athletes begin exercise already dehydrated to some degree, and although most fail to drink enough to match sweat losses, some drink too much and a few develop hyponatremia. Some simple advice can help athletes assess their hydration status and develop a personalized hydration strategy that takes account of exercise, environment, and individual needs. Preexercise hydration status can be assessed from urine frequency and volume, with additional information from urine color, specific gravity, or osmolality. Change in hydration during exercise can be estimated from the change in body mass that occurs during a bout of exercise. Sweat rate can be estimated if fluid intake and urinary losses are also measured. Sweat salt losses can be determined by collection and analysis of sweat samples, but athletes losing large amounts of salt are likely to be aware of the taste of salt in sweat and the development of salt crusts on skin and clothing where sweat has evaporated. An appropriate drinking strategy will take account of preexercise hydration status and of fluid, electrolyte, and substrate needs before, during, and after a period of exercise. Strategies will vary greatly between individuals and will also be influenced by environmental conditions, competition regulations, and other factors.

  1. Surfactant effects on SF6 hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo Ram; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Ryu, Young Bok; Lee, Man Sig; Kim, Young Seok; Englezos, Peter; Kim, Myung Hyun; Kim, Yang Do

    2009-03-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) has been widely used in a variety of industrial processes, but it is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. For this reason, it is necessary to separate or collect it from waste gas streams. One separation method is through hydrate crystal formation. In this study, SF(6) hydrate was formed in aqueous surfactant solutions of 0.00, 0.01, 0.05, 0.15 and 0.20 wt% to investigate the effects of surfactants on the hydrate formation rates. Three surfactants, Tween 20 (Tween), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LABS), were tested in a semi-batch stirred vessel at the constant temperature and pressures of 276.2 K and 0.78 MPa, respectively. All surfactants showed kinetic promoter behavior for SF(6) hydrate formation. It was also found that SF(6) hydrate formation proceeded in two stages with the second stage being the most rapid. In situ Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that the increased gas consumption rate with the addition of surfactant was possibly due to the increased gas filling rate in the hydrate cavity.

  2. Tectonic deformation in southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David D.

    1993-01-01

    Our objectives were to use modem geodetic data, especially those derived from space techniques like Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), and the Global Positioning System (GPS) to infer crustal deformation in southern California and relate it to plate tectonics and earthquake hazard. To do this, we needed to collect some original data, write computer programs to determine positions of survey markers from geodetic observables, interpret time dependent positions in terms of velocity and earthquake caused episodic displacements, and construct a model to explain these velocities and displacements in terms of fault slip and plate movements.

  3. Determination of friction coefficient between copper semi-finished and plastic deformation tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazac, Alin Marian; Baciu, Constantin; Bernevig-Sava, Mihai Adrian; Baciu, Raluca Elena; Lupu-Poliac, Margareta; Bejinariu, Costicǎ

    2017-04-01

    Knowing the friction coefficient to plastic deformation is needed because on the basis of it is estimated the necessary deformation forces depending on which is chosen the deformation machine, is determined manner in which deformation occurs and according to this is established the deformation technology. The paper presents theoretical and experimental conditions for determining the friction coefficient between semi-finished deformation tools, in the case of plastic deformation of the copper by rings pressing method. Also, are explained, processed and discussed the results of experimental tests.

  4. Initiation of gas-hydrate pockmark in deep-water Nigeria: Geo-mechanical analysis and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboulot, V.; Sultan, N.; Imbert, P.; Ker, S.

    2016-01-01

    A review of recent literature shows that two geomorphologically different types of pockmarks, contribute to gas seepage at the seafloor. Type-1 pockmarks are defined as seafloor craters associated to fluid seepage and are the most classical type referred to as ;pockmarks; in the literature. In contrast, Type-2 pockmarks reveal a complex seafloor morphology that may result from the formation/decomposition of gas hydrates in underlying sedimentary layers. Interpretation of very-high-resolution seismic data, sedimentological analyses and geotechnical measurements acquired from the Eastern Niger Submarine Delta reveal that Type-2 pockmarks are associated to the presence at depth of a conical body of massive gas hydrates. Based on acquired data, theoretical analysis and numerical modelling, it was possible to propose a novel geo-mechanical mechanism controlling the irregular seafloor deformations associated to Type-2 pockmark and to show that pockmark shapes and sizes are directly linked to the initial growth and distribution of sub-seafloor gas hydrates. The study illustrates the role of gas hydrates formation in the fracturation, deformation of the subsurface sediment and the formation of Type-2 pockmarks.

  5. Hydration during intense exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, R J; Meyer, N L

    2013-01-01

    Hydration status has profound effects on both physical and mental performance, and sports performance is thus critically affected. Both overhydration and underhydration - if sufficiently severe - will impair performance and pose a risk to health. Athletes may begin exercise in a hypohydrated state as a result of incomplete recovery from water loss induced in order to achieve a specific body mass target or due to incomplete recovery from a previous competition or training session. Dehydration will also develop in endurance exercise where fluid intake does not match water loss. The focus has generally been on training rather than on competition, but sweat loss and fluid replacement in training may have important implications. Hypohydration may impair training quality and may also increase stress levels. It is unclear whether this will have negative effects (reduced training quality, impaired immunity) or whether it will promote a greater adaptive response. Hypohydration and the consequent hyperthermia, however, can enhance the effectiveness of a heat acclimation program, resulting in improved endurance performance in warm and temperate environments. Drinking in training may be important in enhancing tolerance of the gut when athletes plan to drink in competition. The distribution of water between body water compartments may also be important in the initiation and promotion of cellular adaptations to the training stimulus. Copyright © 2013 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. HYDRATION PATTERN IN THE HEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Hue

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available To investigate thermal response, hydration behaviour and performance over flatwater kayaking races in tropical conditions (36.8°C and 68 % rh. Five internationally-ranked subjects participated in the 2012 Surfski Ocean Racing World Cup in Guadeloupe to the “Ze Caribbean Race 2012” [i.e., a 35-km downwind race]. Core temperature (T°C and heart rate (HR were measured using portable telemetry units whereas water intake was deduced from backpacks absorption. The kayakers were asked to rate both their comfort sensation and thermal sensation on a scale before and after the race. The performance was related to an increase in T°C, high HR and low water intake (WI; and (2 high values of final T°C were related to high pre T°C and greater increases in T°C being obtained with low pre T°C and (3 WI being related to high pre T°C. The present study demonstrated that the fastest kayakers were those able to paddle at the highest intensities, increasing their T°C and drinking little water without any interference from thermal sensations. Water intake was positively related to pre-race T°C, which reinforces the importance of beginning surfski races with a low T°C. This study demonstrated that well-trained kayakers drinking ad libitum were able to anticipate their intensity/heat storage ratio to prevent heat illness and severe dehydration and maintain high performance.

  7. Extremely deformable structures

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a new research stimulus has derived from the observation that soft structures, such as biological systems, but also rubber and gel, may work in a post critical regime, where elastic elements are subject to extreme deformations, though still exhibiting excellent mechanical performances. This is the realm of ‘extreme mechanics’, to which this book is addressed. The possibility of exploiting highly deformable structures opens new and unexpected technological possibilities. In particular, the challenge is the design of deformable and bi-stable mechanisms which can reach superior mechanical performances and can have a strong impact on several high-tech applications, including stretchable electronics, nanotube serpentines, deployable structures for aerospace engineering, cable deployment in the ocean, but also sensors and flexible actuators and vibration absorbers. Readers are introduced to a variety of interrelated topics involving the mechanics of extremely deformable structures, with emphasis on ...

  8. Deformations of singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Stevens, Jan

    2003-01-01

    These notes deal with deformation theory of complex analytic singularities and related objects. The first part treats general theory. The central notion is that of versal deformation in several variants. The theory is developed both in an abstract way and in a concrete way suitable for computations. The second part deals with more specific problems, specially on curves and surfaces. Smoothings of singularities are the main concern. Examples are spread throughout the text.

  9. Hydrate pingoes at Nyegga: some characteristic features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovland, M.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrate pingoes were observed on the seafloor during two different remotely operated vehicle (ROV)-dives, conducted by Statoil at complex-pockmark G11, at Nyegga, off Mid-Norway. Confirmation that these structures actually represent hydrate ice-cored sediment mounds (pingoes), was done by other investigators (Ivanov et al., 2006). Because it is expected that hydrate pingoes represent relatively dynamic seafloor topographic structures and that their shape and size most probably will change over relatively short time, it is important to know how to recognise them visually. Hovland and Svensen (2006) highlighted five different characteristic aspects that define hydrate pingoes on the sea floor: 1) They are dome- or disc-shaped features, which may attain any size from ~0.5 m in height and upwards. Inside pockmark G11, they were up to 1 m high. 2) They are circular or oval in plan view and may attain lateral sizes on the seafloor ranging upwards from ~0.5 m. Inside G11 they had lengths of several metres and widths of up to 4 m. 3) They have dense communities of organisms growing on their surfaces. At G11, they were overgrown with small pogonophoran tube-worms. 4) They have patches of white or grey bacterial mats growing on their surface, indicating advection (seepage) of reduced pore-waters. 5) They have small pits and patches of fluidized sediments on their surface, indicating pit corrosion of the sub-surface gas hydrate. Because gas hydrates often form in high-porosity, near-surface sediments, where water is readily available, it is thought that they will build up at locations where gases are actively migrating upwards from depth. However, gas hydrates are not stable in the presence of ambient seawater, as seawater is deficient in guest molecule gases (normally methane). Therefore, they tend to build up below surface above conduits for gas flow from depth. But, the near-surface hydrate ice-lenses will continually be corroded by seawater circulating into the sediments

  10. Using magnetic resonance imaging to monitor CH4 hydrate formation and spontaneous conversion of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Bernard A; Stevens, Jim; Howard, James J; Graue, Arne; Kvamme, Bjorn; Aspenes, Erick; Ersland, Geir; Husebø, Jarle; Zornes, David R

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was used to monitor and quantify methane hydrate formation and exchange in porous media. Conversion of methane hydrate to carbon dioxide hydrate, when exposed to liquid carbon dioxide at 8.27 MPa and approximately 4 degrees C, was experimentally demonstrated with MRI data and verified by mass balance calculations of consumed volumes of gases and liquids. No detectable dissociation of the hydrate was measured during the exchange process.

  11. Electrical conductivity of lab-formed methane hydrate + sand mixtures; technical developments and new results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.; Du Frane, W. L.; Weitemeyer, K. A.; Constable, S.; Roberts, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) measurement techniques used in permafrost and marine wells show that electrical conductivity (σ) of gas-hydrate-bearing zones is typically lower than that of surrounding sediments. However, while σ has been measured on analogue materials, it has seldom been studied on methane hydrate, the most common gas hydrate in the shallow geosphere. Additional petrophysical information - such as mixing relations and/or compositions of individual components - is also needed to more accurately relate σ to quantitative estimates of gas hydrate in EM-surveyed regions. To help address these needs, we first quantified the electrical properties of lab-formed methane hydrate at geologically relevant temperatures and pressures (Du Frane et al. GRL, 2011; also AGU 2011). A high-pressure cell was constructed to form hydrate from melting granular ice (made from distilled-deionized water) in the presence of pressurized CH4 gas, while measuring frequency-dependent impedance (Z) and σ. Final samples were pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate with excess CH4 gas but no excess H2O. The hydrate was then either quenched for grain-scale assessment by cryogenic SEM imaging, or dissociated in situ for further Z and σ measurement. Du Frane et al. [GRL, 2011] reported σ of methane hydrate to range from 10-5 to 10-4 S/m between -15 and 15°C, with activation energy (Ea) of 30.6 kJ/mol. In comparison, σ of the dissociated ice byproduct was ~400% higher with ~50% higher Ea. Measurements were then performed on methane hydrate mixed with known amounts of a standard quartz sand (Oklahoma #1, ~125 μm grain size) or similarly-sized silica glass beads in proportions ranging 10 to 90 vol. % relative to the hydrate phase. Several samples were dissociated at temperatures below -3°C for Z and σ measurement of the resulting ice/sand mixtures, and all samples were imaged for phase distribution. Adding sand complicated Z spectra for frequencies 1MHz. However, the impedance at the

  12. Distinguishing between hydrated, partially hydrated or unhydrated clinker in hardened concrete using microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valcke, S.L.A.; Rooij, M.R. de; Visser, J.H.M.; Nijland, T.G.

    2010-01-01

    Hydration of clinker particles is since long a topic of interest in both designing and optimizing cement composition and its quantity used in concrete. The interest for carefully observing and also quantifying the type or stage of clinker hydration in hardened cement paste is twofold. Firstly, the

  13. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  14. Fingerprinting Molecular Relaxation in Deformed Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Lam, Christopher N.; Chen, Wei-Ren; Wang, Weiyu; Liu, Jianning; Liu, Yun; Porcar, Lionel; Stanley, Christopher B.; Zhao, Zhichen; Hong, Kunlun; Wang, Yangyang

    2017-07-01

    The flow and deformation of macromolecules is ubiquitous in nature and industry, and an understanding of this phenomenon at both macroscopic and microscopic length scales is of fundamental and practical importance. Here, we present the formulation of a general mathematical framework, which could be used to extract, from scattering experiments, the molecular relaxation of deformed polymers. By combining and modestly extending several key conceptual ingredients in the literature, we show how the anisotropic single-chain structure factor can be decomposed by spherical harmonics and experimentally reconstructed from its cross sections on the scattering planes. The resulting wave-number-dependent expansion coefficients constitute a characteristic fingerprint of the macromolecular deformation, permitting detailed examinations of polymer dynamics at the microscopic level. We apply this approach to survey a long-standing problem in polymer physics regarding the molecular relaxation in entangled polymers after a large step deformation. The classical tube theory of Doi and Edwards predicts a fast chain retraction process immediately after the deformation, followed by a slow orientation relaxation through the reptation mechanism. This chain retraction hypothesis, which is the keystone of the tube theory for macromolecular flow and deformation, is critically examined by analyzing the fine features of the two-dimensional anisotropic spectra from small-angle neutron scattering by entangled polystyrenes. We show that the unique scattering patterns associated with the chain retraction mechanism are not experimentally observed. This result calls for a fundamental revision of the current theoretical picture for nonlinear rheological behavior of entangled polymeric liquids.

  15. Fingerprinting Molecular Relaxation in Deformed Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The flow and deformation of macromolecules is ubiquitous in nature and industry, and an understanding of this phenomenon at both macroscopic and microscopic length scales is of fundamental and practical importance. Here, we present the formulation of a general mathematical framework, which could be used to extract, from scattering experiments, the molecular relaxation of deformed polymers. By combining and modestly extending several key conceptual ingredients in the literature, we show how the anisotropic single-chain structure factor can be decomposed by spherical harmonics and experimentally reconstructed from its cross sections on the scattering planes. The resulting wave-number-dependent expansion coefficients constitute a characteristic fingerprint of the macromolecular deformation, permitting detailed examinations of polymer dynamics at the microscopic level. We apply this approach to survey a long-standing problem in polymer physics regarding the molecular relaxation in entangled polymers after a large step deformation. The classical tube theory of Doi and Edwards predicts a fast chain retraction process immediately after the deformation, followed by a slow orientation relaxation through the reptation mechanism. This chain retraction hypothesis, which is the keystone of the tube theory for macromolecular flow and deformation, is critically examined by analyzing the fine features of the two-dimensional anisotropic spectra from small-angle neutron scattering by entangled polystyrenes. We show that the unique scattering patterns associated with the chain retraction mechanism are not experimentally observed. This result calls for a fundamental revision of the current theoretical picture for nonlinear rheological behavior of entangled polymeric liquids.

  16. Hydro-bio-geomechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments from Nankai Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamarina, J.C.; Dai, Shifeng; Terzariol, M.; Jang, Jeonghwan; Waite, William F.; Winters, William J.; Nagao, J.; Yoneda, J.; Konno, Y.; Fujii, T.; Suzuki, K.

    2015-01-01

    Natural hydrate-bearing sediments from the Nankai Trough, offshore Japan, were studied using the Pressure Core Characterization Tools (PCCTs) to obtain geomechanical, hydrological, electrical, and biological properties under in situ pressure, temperature, and restored effective stress conditions. Measurement results, combined with index-property data and analytical physics-based models, provide unique insight into hydrate-bearing sediments in situ. Tested cores contain some silty-sands, but are predominantly sandy- and clayey-silts. Hydrate saturations Sh range from 0.15 to 0.74, with significant concentrations in the silty-sands. Wave velocity and flexible-wall permeameter measurements on never-depressurized pressure-core sediments suggest hydrates in the coarser-grained zones, the silty-sands where Sh exceeds 0.4, contribute to soil-skeletal stability and are load-bearing. In the sandy- and clayey-silts, where Sh < 0.4, the state of effective stress and stress history are significant factors determining sediment stiffness. Controlled depressurization tests show that hydrate dissociation occurs too quickly to maintain thermodynamic equilibrium, and pressure–temperature conditions track the hydrate stability boundary in pure-water, rather than that in seawater, in spite of both the in situ pore water and the water used to maintain specimen pore pressure prior to dissociation being saline. Hydrate dissociation accompanied with fines migration caused up to 2.4% vertical strain contraction. The first-ever direct shear measurements on never-depressurized pressure-core specimens show hydrate-bearing sediments have higher sediment strength and peak friction angle than post-dissociation sediments, but the residual friction angle remains the same in both cases. Permeability measurements made before and after hydrate dissociation demonstrate that water permeability increases after dissociation, but the gain is limited by the transition from hydrate saturation

  17. Thermodynamic properties of methane hydrate in quartz powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronov, Vitaly P; Gorodetskii, Evgeny E; Safonov, Sergey S

    2007-10-04

    Using the experimental method of precision adiabatic calorimetry, the thermodynamic (equilibrium) properties of methane hydrate in quartz sand with a grain size of 90-100 microm have been studied in the temperature range of 260-290 K and at pressures up to 10 MPa. The equilibrium curves for the water-methane hydrate-gas and ice-methane hydrate-gas transitions, hydration number, latent heat of hydrate decomposition along the equilibrium three-phase curves, and the specific heat capacity of the hydrate have been obtained. It has been experimentally shown that the equilibrium three-phase curves of the methane hydrate in porous media are shifted to the lower temperature and high pressure with respect to the equilibrium curves of the bulk hydrate. In these experiments, we have found that the specific heat capacity of the hydrate, within the accuracy of our measurements, coincides with the heat capacity of ice. The latent heat of the hydrate dissociation for the ice-hydrate-gas transition is equal to 143 +/- 10 J/g, whereas, for the transition from hydrate to water and gas, the latent heat is 415 +/- 15 J/g. The hydration number has been evaluated in the different hydrate conditions and has been found to be equal to n = 6.16 +/- 0.06. In addition, the influence of the water saturation of the porous media and its distribution over the porous space on the measured parameters has been experimentally studied.

  18. Hydration of urea and alkylated urea derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaatze, Udo

    2018-01-07

    Compressibility data and broadband dielectric spectra of aqueous solutions of urea and some of its alkylated derivatives have been evaluated to yield their numbers Nh of hydration water molecules per molecule of solute. Nh values in a broad range of solute concentrations are discussed and are compared to hydration numbers of other relevant molecules and organic ions. Consistent with previous results, it is found that urea differs from other solutes in its unusually small hydration number, corresponding to just one third of the estimated number of nearest neighbor molecules. This remarkable hydration behavior is explained by the large density φH of hydrogen bonding abilities offered by the urea molecule. In terms of currently discussed models of reorientational motions and allied dynamics in water and related associating liquids, the large density φH causes a relaxation time close to that of undisturbed water with most parts of water encircling the solute. Therefore only a small part of disturbed ("hydration") water is left around each urea molecule. Adding alkyl groups to the basic molecule leads to Nh values which, within the series of n-alkylurea derivatives, progressively increase with the number of methyl groups per solute. With n-butylurea, Nh from dielectric spectra, in conformity with many other organic solutes, slightly exceeds the number of nearest neighbors. Compared to such Nh values, hydration numbers from compressibility data are substantially smaller, disclosing incorrect assumptions in the formula commonly used to interpret the experimental compressibilities. Similar to other series of organic solutes, effects of isomerization have been found with alkylated urea derivatives, indicating that factors other than the predominating density φH of hydrogen bond abilities contribute also to the hydration properties.

  19. Hydration education: developing, piloting and evaluating a hydration education package for general practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCotter, L; Douglas, P; Laur, C; Gandy, J; Fitzpatrick, L; Rajput-Ray, M; Ray, S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To (1) assess the hydration knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of doctors; (2) develop an evidence-based training package; and (3) evaluate the impact of the training package. Design Educational intervention with impact evaluation. Setting Cambridgeshire, UK. Participants General practitioners (GPs (primary care physicians)). Interventions Hydration and healthcare training. Main outcome measures Hydration KAP score before and immediately after the training session. Results Knowledge gaps of doctors identified before the teaching were the definition of dehydration, European Food Safety Authority water intake recommendations, water content of the human body and proportion of water from food and drink. A face-to-face teaching package was developed on findings from the KAP survey and literature search. 54 questionnaires were completed before and immediately after two training sessions with GPs. Following the training, total hydration KAP scores increased significantly (phydration care to allow policymakers to incorporate hydration awareness and care with greater precision in local and national policies. PMID:27927656

  20. Numerical modelling of hydration reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijmoed, Johannes C.; John, Timm

    2017-04-01

    Mineral reactions are generally accompanied by volume changes. Observations in rocks and thin section indicate that this often occurred by replacement reactions involving a fluid phase. Frequently, the volume of the original rock or mineral seems to be conserved. If the density of the solid reaction products is higher than the reactants, the associated solid volume decrease generates space for a fluid phase. In other words, porosity is created. The opposite is true for an increase in solid volume during reaction, which leads to a porosity reduction. This slows down and may even stop the reaction if it needs fluid as a reactant. Understanding the progress of reactions and their rates is important because reaction generally changes geophysical and rock mechanical properties which will therefore affect geodynamical processes and seismic properties. We studied the case of hydration of eclogite to blueschist in a subduction zone setting. Eclogitized pillow basalt structures from the Tian-Shan orogeny are transformed to blueschist on the rims of the pillow (van der Straaten et al., 2008). Fluid pathways existed between the pillow structures. The preferred hypothesis of blueschist formation is to supply the fluid for hydration from the pillow margins progressing inward. Using numerical modelling we simulate this coupled reaction-diffusion process. Porosity and fluid pressure evolution are coupled to local thermodynamic equilibrium and density changes. The first rim of blueschist that forms around the eclogite pillow increases volume to such a degree that the system is clogged and the reaction stops. Nevertheless, the field evidence suggests the blueschist formation continued. To prevent the system from clogging, a high incoming pore fluid pressure on the pillow boundaries is needed along with removal of mass from the system to accommodate the volume changes. The only other possibility is to form blueschist from any remaining fluid stored in the core of the pillow

  1. High-Altitude Hydration System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazynski, Scott E.; Orndoff, Evelyne; Bue, Grant C.; Schaefbauer, Mark E.; Urban, Kase

    2010-01-01

    Three methods are being developed for keeping water from freezing during high-altitude climbs so that mountaineers can remain hydrated. Three strategies have been developed. At the time of this reporting two needed to be tested in the field and one was conceptual. The first method is Passive Thermal Control Using Aerogels. This involves mounting the fluid reservoir of the climber s canteen to an inner layer of clothing for better heat retention. For the field test, bottles were mounted to the inner fleece layer of clothing, and then aerogel insulation was placed on the outside of the bottle, and circumferentially around the drink straw. When climbers need to drink, they can pull up the insulated straw from underneath the down suit, take a sip, and then put it back into the relative warmth of the suit. For the field test, a data logger assessed the temperatures of the water reservoir, as well as near the tip of the drink straw. The second method is Passive Thermal Control with Copper-Shielded Drink Straw and Aerogels, also mounted to inner layers of clothing for better heat retention. Braided wire emanates from the inside of the fleece jacket layer, and continues up and around the drink straw in order to use body heat to keep the system-critical drink straw warm enough to keep water in the liquid state. For the field test, a data logger will be used to compare this with the above concept. The third, and still conceptual, method is Active Thermal Control with Microcontroller. If the above methods do not work, microcontrollers and tape heaters have been identified that could keep the drink straw warm even under extremely cold conditions. Power requirements are not yet determined because the thermal environment inside the down suit relative to the external environment has not been established. A data logger will be used to track both the external and internal temperatures of the suit on a summit day.

  2. Mechanical biocompatibility of highly deformable biomedical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Edoardo; Ehret, Alexander E

    2015-08-01

    Mismatch of mechanical properties between highly deformable biomedical materials and adjacent native tissue might lead to short and long term health impairment. The capability of implants to deform at the right level, i.e. similar to the macroscopic mechanical response of the surrounding biological materials, is often associated with dissimilar microstructural deformation mechanisms. This mismatch on smaller length scales might lead to micro-injuries, cell damage, inflammation, fibrosis or necrosis. Hence, the mechanical biocompatibility of soft implants depends not only on the properties and composition of the implant material, but also on its organization, distribution and motion at one or several length scales. The challenges related to the analysis and attainment of mechanical biocompatibility are illustrated with two examples: prosthetic meshes for hernia and pelvic repair and electrospun scaffolds for tissue engineering. For these material systems we describe existing methods for characterization and analysis of the non-linear response to uniaxial and multiaxial stress states, its time and history dependence, and the changes in deformation behavior associated with tissue in-growth and material resorption. We discuss the multi-scale deformation behavior of biomaterials and adjacent tissue, and indicate major interdisciplinary questions to be addressed in future research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Kinetics of formation and dissociation of gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manakov, A. Yu; Penkov, N. V.; Rodionova, T. V.; Nesterov, A. N.; Fesenko, E. E., Jr.

    2017-09-01

    The review covers a wide range of issues related to the nucleation, growth and dissociation of gas hydrates. The attention is focused on publications of the last 10-15 years. Along with the mathematical models used to describe these processes, the results of relevant experimental studies are surveyed. Particular sections are devoted to the gas hydrate self-preservation effect, the water memory effect in the hydrate formation, development of catalysts for hydrate formation and the effect of substances dissolved in the aqueous phase on the formation of hydrates. The main experimental techniques used to study gas hydrates are briefly considered. The bibliography includes 230 references.

  4. Complex admixtures of clathrate hydrates in a water desalination method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Blake A [San Francisco, CA; Bradshaw, Robert W [Livermore, CA; Dedrick, Daniel E [Berkeley, CA; Anderson, David W [Riverbank, CA

    2009-07-14

    Disclosed is a method that achieves water desalination by utilizing and optimizing clathrate hydrate phenomena. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds of gas and water that desalinate water by excluding salt molecules during crystallization. Contacting a hydrate forming gaseous species with water will spontaneously form hydrates at specific temperatures and pressures through the extraction of water molecules from the bulk phase followed by crystallite nucleation. Subsequent dissociation of pure hydrates yields fresh water and, if operated correctly, allows the hydrate-forming gas to be efficiently recycled into the process stream.

  5. Experimental Determination of Refractive Index of Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bylov, Martin; Rasmussen, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The refractive indexes of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate have been experimentally determined. The refractive indexes were determined in an indirect manner making use of the fact that two non-absorbing materials will have the same refractive index if they cannot be distinguished visually....... For methane hydrate (structure I) the refractive index was found to be 1.346 and for natural gas hydrate (structure II) it was found to be 1.350. The measurements further suggest that the gas hydrate growth rate increases if the water has formed hydrates before. The induction time, on the other hand, seems...

  6. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom

  7. Neutron powder diffraction studies as a function of temperature of structure II hydrate formed from propane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawn, C.J.; Rondinone, A.J.; Chakoumakos, B.C.; Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Ishii, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction data confirm that hydrate samples synthesized with propane crystallize as structure type II hydrate. The structure has been modeled using rigid-body constraints to describe C3H8 molecules located in the eight larger polyhedral cavities of a deuterated host lattice. Data were collected at 12, 40, 100, 130, 160, 190, 220, and 250 K and used to calculate the thermal expansivity from the temperature dependence of the lattice parameters. The data collected allowed for full structural refinement of atomic coordinates and the atomic-displacement parameters.

  8. Natural gas hydrate formation and inhibition in gas/crude oil/aqueous systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraboina, Nagu; Pachitsas, Stylianos; von Solms, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    in comparison with that in pure water. This observed hydrate inhibition potential shows significant variation depending on the type of crude oil. The influence of crude oil composition (saturates, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes) on this behavior was probably due to the existence of a combination of different...... inhibition mechanisms and potentially a competition among inhibition-promotion mechanisms. Moreover, the hydrate formation time has been determined at different water cuts in each crude oil and it was found that the inhibition capability increases with an increase in the oil content. The effect...... can contribute to the safe operation of sub sea pipelines in the oil and gas industry....

  9. A moisture and electric coupling stimulated ionic polymer-metal composite actuator with controllable deformation behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Jie; Zhu, Zicai; Wang, Yanjie; Chen, Hualing; Bian, Changsheng; Luo, Bin; Li, Dichen

    2018-02-01

    Ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) actuator can generate large and rapid deformation based on ion migration under a relatively low driving voltage. Under full hydrated conditions, the deformation is always prone to relaxation. At room humidity conditions, the deformation increases substantially at the early stage of actuation, and then decreases gradually. Generally, most researchers considered that the change of water content or relative humidity mainly leads to the deformation instabilities, which severely limits the practical applications of IPMC. In this Letter, a novel actuation mode is proposed to control the deformation behavior of IPMC by employing moisture as an independent or collaborative incentive source together with the electric field. The deformation response is continuously measured under electric field, electric field-moisture coupling stimulus and moisture stimulus. The result shows that moisture can be a favorable driving factor for IPMC actuation. Such an electric field-moisture coupling stimulus can avoid the occurrence of deformation instabilities and guarantee a superior controllable deformation in IPMC actuation. This research provides a new method to obtain stable and large deformation of IPMC, which is of great significance for the guidance of material design and application for IPMC and IPMC-type iEAP materials.

  10. Role of taurine accumulation in keratinocyte hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeke, Guido; Siefken, Wilfried; Carstensen, Stefanie; Springmann, Gunja; Bleck, Oliver; Steinhart, Hans; Höger, Peter; Wittern, Klaus-Peter; Wenck, Horst; Stäb, Franz; Sauermann, Gerhard; Schreiner, Volker; Doering, Thomas

    2003-08-01

    Epidermal keratinocytes are exposed to a low water concentration at the stratum corneum-stratum granulosum interface. When epithelial tissues are osmotically perturbed, cellular protection and cell volume regulation is mediated by accumulation of organic osmolytes such as taurine. Previous studies reported the presence of taurine in the epidermis of several animal species. Therefore, we analyzed human skin for the presence of the taurine transporter (TAUT) and studied the accumulation of taurine as one potential mechanism protecting epidermal keratinocytes from dehydration. According to our results, TAUT is expressed as a 69 kDa protein in human epidermis but not in the dermis. For the epidermis a gradient was evident with maximal levels of TAUT in the outermost granular keratinocyte layer and lower levels in the stratum spinosum. No TAUT was found in the basal layer or in the stratum corneum. Keratinocyte accumulation of taurine was induced by experimental induction of skin dryness via application of silica gel to human skin. Cultured human keratinocytes accumulated taurine in a concentration- and osmolarity-dependent manner. TAUT mRNA levels were increased after exposure of human keratinocytes to hyperosmotic culture medium, indicating osmosensitive TAUT mRNA expression as part of the adaptation of keratinocytes to hyperosmotic stress. Keratinocyte uptake of taurine was inhibited by beta-alanine but not by other osmolytes such as betaine, inositol, or sorbitol. Accumulation of taurine protected cultured human keratinocytes from both osmotically induced and ultraviolet-induced apoptosis. Our data indicate that taurine is an important epidermal osmolyte required to maintain keratinocyte hydration in a dry environment.

  11. Channeling of protons through radial deformed carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borka Jovanović, V.; Borka, D.; Galijaš, S. M. D.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we have presented a theoretical investigation of the channeling of 1 GeV protons with the radial deformed (10, 0) single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). We have calculated channeling potential within the deformed nanotubes. For the first time we presented theoretically obtained spatial and angular distributions of channeled protons with radially deformed SWNT. We used a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation technique. We show that the spatial and angular distributions depend strongly of level of radial deformation of nanotube. These results may be useful for nanotube characterization and production and guiding of nanosized ion beams.

  12. Gas Hydrates and Perturbed Permafrost: Can Thermokarst Lakes Leak Hydrate-Derived Methane?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, C.; Walter, K.; Pohlman, J.; Wooller, M.

    2008-12-01

    Thermokarst lakes are common features in the continuous permafrost of Siberia, the Alaskan North Slope, and the Canadian Arctic and have been intensely studied as the loci of rapid and substantial methane flux to the atmosphere. Previous numerical modeling has constrained the conditions under which deep thermokarst lakes can develop organic-rich thaw bulbs (talik) tens of meters thick, and seismic surveys have imaged thaw bulbs more than 75 m thick beneath some thermokarst lakes. Microbial processes active in talik organic material are likely the predominant source for thermokarst methane emissions, although coalbed methane and methane associated with conventional hydrocarbons may contribute in some geologic settings. Here we evaluate the possibility that another source--methane released from dissociating gas hydrate--could contribute to methane emissions from these lakes. Temperatures within and beneath thermokarst lakes are significantly warmer than those in surrounding permafrost, and these relatively warm conditions can persist to depths several times greater than the thickness of the thaw bulb. For a 95-m-thick thaw bulb and a geothermal gradient consistent with the regional top of gas hydrate stability at ~200 m depth, the warmer temperatures beneath a thermokarst lake could lead to destabilization of up to 75 m of gas hydrate. Arguably, the presence of gas hydrate near the top of the stability zone in permafrost regions has not yet been observed. Nonetheless, the potential dissociation of such relatively shallow gas hydrate and the widespread availability in terrestrial settings of high permeability conduits (e.g., faults, sandy strata) that could facilitate the migration of hydrate-derived methane to the surface render this an important topic for future investigation. The susceptibility of permafrost gas hydrate zones to thermal perturbations is in sharp contrast to the situation in conventional marine hydrate provinces. There, gas hydrate first dissociates

  13. Deformation of Lawsonite at High Pressure and High Temperature - Implications for Low Velocity Layers in Subduction Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiguet, E.; Hilairet, N.; Wang, Y.; Gillet, P.

    2014-12-01

    During subduction, the hydrated oceanic crust undergoes a series of metamorphic reactions and transform gradually to blueschists and eclogite at depths of 20-50 km. Detailed seismic observations of subduction zones suggest a complex layered structure with the presence of a Low Velocity Layer (LVL) related to the oceanic crust [1] persisting to considerable depths (100- 250 km).While the transformation from blueschist to eclogite [2] and the presence of glaucophane up to 90-100 km [3] could explain some of these observations, the presence of LVL at greater depths could be related to the presence of the hydrous mineral lawsonite (CaAl2(Si2O7)(OH)2 H2O). Its stability field extends to 8.5 GPa and 1100K corresponding to depths up to 250 km in cold hydrous part of subducting slabs [4]. Because these regions undergo large and heterogeneous deformation, lawsonite plasticity and crystal preferred orientation (CPOs) may strongly influence the dynamic of subduction zones and the seismic properties. We present a deformation study at high presssure and high temperature on lawsonite. Six samples were deformed at 4-10 GPa and 600K to 1000K using a D-DIA apparatus [5] at 13-BMD at GSECARS beamline, APS, in axial compression up to 30% deformation with strain rates of 3.10-4s-1 to 6.10-6s-1. We measured in-situ lattice strains (a proxy for macroscopic stress), texture and strain using synchrotron radiations and calculated the macroscopic stress using lawsonite elastic properties [6]. Results from lattice strain analysis show a dependence of flow stress with temperature and strain rate. Texture analysis coupled with transmission electron microscopy showed that dislocation creep is the dominant deformation mechanism under our deformation conditions. [1] Abers, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 176, 323-330, 2000 [2] Helffrich et al., Journal of Geophysical Research, 94, 753-763, 1989 [3] Bezacier et al., Tectonophysics, 494, 201-210, 2010 [4] Schmidt & Poli, Earth and Planetary

  14. Hydration, charge, size, and shape characteristics of peptides from their CZE analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirotti, Marta B; Piaggio, Maria V; Deiber, Julio A

    2008-02-01

    A CZE model is presented for peptide characterization on the basis of well-established physicochemical equations. The effective mobility is used as basic data in the model to estimate relevant peptide properties such as, for instance, hydration, net and total electrical charge numbers, hydrodynamic size and shape, particle average orientation, and pH-microenvironment from the charge regulation phenomenon. Therefore 102 experimental effective mobilities of different peptides are studied and discussed in relation to previous work. An equation for the estimation of peptide hydration as a function of ionizing, polar, and non-polar amino acid residues is included in the model. It is also shown that the shape-orientation factor of peptides may be either lower or higher than one, and its value depends on a complex interplay among total charge number, molar mass, hydration, and amino acid sequence.

  15. The influence of temperature, pressure, salinity and capillary force on the formation of methane hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhao Duan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We present here a thermodynamic model for predicting multi-phase equilibrium of methane hydrate liquid and vapor phases under conditions of different temperature, pressure, salinity and pore sizes. The model is based on the 1959 van der Waals–Platteeuw model, angle-dependent ab initio intermolecular potentials, the DMW-92 equation of state and Pitzer theory. Comparison with all available experimental data shows that this model can accurately predict the effects of temperature, pressure, salinity and capillary radius on the formation and dissociation of methane hydrate. Online calculations of the p–T conditions for the formation of methane hydrate at given salinities and pore sizes of sediments are available on: www.geochem-model.org/models.htm.

  16. Evaluation of distributed parameters mathematical models applied to grain hydration with volume change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolin, Douglas J.; Jorge, Regina Maria M.; Jorge, Luiz Mario M.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have taken into account the volume change of foods that undergo hydration or drying. However, the simplest boundary condition at the surface is usually considered to facilitate the solution of variable volume models. This paper presents a model of moisture diffusion in soybean grains that considers the volume change of these grains when absorbing water and also the dependence of diffusivity on moisture content. The boundary condition of equality of diffusive and convective flows on the surface was used and compared with two other approaches commonly found in the literature of grain hydration. This boundary condition was also applied to the case of constant volume of the grains and it was concluded that there are significant differences when the change in volume is taken into account. An analysis of the diffusion coefficients determined as functions of moisture content, temperature, and hydration time is presented for the best model.

  17. Influence of amorphous silica on the hydration in ultra-high performance concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oertel, Tina, E-mail: tina.oertel@isc.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer–Institute for Silicate Research ISC, Neunerplatz 2, 97082 Würzburg (Germany); Inorganic Chemistry I, Universität Bayreuth, Universitätsstr. 30, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Helbig, Uta, E-mail: uta.helbig@th-nuernberg.de [Crystallography and X-ray Methods, Technische Hochschule Nürnberg Georg Simon Ohm, Wassertorstraße 10, 90489 Nürnberg (Germany); Hutter, Frank [Fraunhofer–Institute for Silicate Research ISC, Neunerplatz 2, 97082 Würzburg (Germany); Kletti, Holger [Building Materials, Bauhaus–Universität Weimar, Coudraystr. 11, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Sextl, Gerhard [Fraunhofer–Institute for Silicate Research ISC, Neunerplatz 2, 97082 Würzburg (Germany); Chemical Technology of Advanced Materials, Julius Maximilian Universität, Röntgenring 11, 97070 Würzburg (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Amorphous silica particles (silica) are used in ultra-high performance concretes to densify the microstructure and accelerate the clinker hydration. It is still unclear whether silica predominantly increases the surface for the nucleation of C–S–H phases or dissolves and reacts pozzolanically. Furthermore, varying types of silica may have different and time dependent effects on the clinker hydration. The effects of different silica types were compared in this study by calorimetric analysis, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, in situ X-ray diffraction and compressive strength measurements. The silica component was silica fume, pyrogenic silica or silica synthesized by a wet-chemical route (Stoeber particles). Water-to-cement ratios were 0.23. Differences are observed between the silica for short reaction times (up to 3 days). Results indicate that silica fume and pyrogenic silica accelerate alite hydration by increasing the surface for nucleation of C–S–H phases whereas Stoeber particles show no accelerating effect.

  18. Methane hydrates in nature - Current knowledge and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated effort, the United States Congress enacted the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. At the same time, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan launched a research program to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. India, China, the Republic of Korea, and other nations also have established large methane hydrate research and development programs. Government-funded scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrates in nature. Numerous studies have shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world may exceed the volume of known organic carbon sources. However, methane hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge, and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of methane hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various methane hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural methane hydrates, (5) analyzing the methane hydrate role as a geohazard, (6) establishing the means to detect and characterize methane hydrate accumulations using geologic and geophysical data, and (7) establishing the thermodynamic phase equilibrium properties of methane hydrates as a function of temperature, pressure, and gas composition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) combined their efforts in 2012 to assess the contributions that scientific drilling has made and could continue to make to advance

  19. Post-laminectomy deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Stumpf Lutz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present the deformities and evaluate the results of their treatment. Methods: Retrospective study of patients with deformity following surgical access to the spinal canal. Fifteen patients who met the inclusion criteria were included. Patients without complete data in medical records were excluded. Results: Fourteen patients underwent surgical treatment and one patient received conservative treatment with vest type TLSO. The average angle of kyphosis correction was 87° preoperatively to 38° postoperatively, while the associated scoliosis correction was 69° preoperatively to 23° postoperatively. Conclusions: The prevention of deformity should be emphasized to avoid laminectomy alone, while laminoplasty should be the procedure of choice for canal access in surgeries where there is no need for resection of the posterior elements.

  20. Breast deformities and mastopexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahabedian, Maurice Y

    2011-04-01

    LEARNING OBJECTIONS: After reviewing this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Appreciate the diversity of approaches for the correction of breast deformities and mastopexy. 2. Review the salient literature. 3. Understand patient selection criteria and indications. Breast deformities and mastopexy continue to challenge plastic surgeons. Deformities such as Poland syndrome, tuberous breast, gynecomastia, and other congenital conditions are uncommon; therefore, management experience is often limited. Various techniques have been described, with no general consensus regarding optimal management. Mastopexy has become more common and is performed both with and without augmentation mammaplasty. However, a variety of techniques are available, and a thorough understanding of the indications, patient selection criteria, and techniques is important to optimize outcomes. This article will review these and other conditions to provide a better understanding of the current available data and evidence for these operations.

  1. Autogenous Deformation of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autogenous deformation of concrete can be defined as the free deformation of sealed concrete at a constant temperature. A number of observed problems with early age cracking of high-performance concretes can be attributed to this phenomenon. During the last 10 years , this has led to an increased...... focus on autogenous deformation both within concrete practice and concrete research. Since 1996 the interest has been significant enough to hold international, yearly conferences entirely devoted to this subject. The papers in this publication were presented at two consecutive half-day sessions...... at the American Concrete Institute’s Fall Convention in Phoenix, Arizona, October 29, 2002. All papers have been reviewed according to ACI rules. This publication, as well as the sessions, was sponsored by ACI committee 236, Material Science of Concrete. The 12 presentations from 8 different countries indicate...

  2. Predicting hydration energies for multivalent ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2014-01-01

    We have predicted the free energy of hydration for 40 monovalent and multivalent cations and anions using density functional theory and the implicit solvent model COnductor like Screening MOdel for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS) at the Becke-Perdew (BP)/Triple zeta valence with polarization functions...... errors. Our results indicate that quantum chemical calculations combined with COSMO-RS solvent treatment is a reliable method for treating multivalent ions in solution, provided one hydration shell of explicit water molecules is included for metal cations. The accuracy is not high enough to allow...... absolute predictions of hydration energies but could be used to investigate trends for several ions, thanks to the low computational cost, in particular for ligand exchange reactions....

  3. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel O.; Walsh, Michael M.

    1999-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel in order to mix its respective portion of liquid water with the corresponding portion of the stream. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  4. Propane hydrate nucleation: Experimental investigation and correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    In this work the nucleation kinetics of propane gas hydrate has been investigated experimentally using a stirred batch reactor. The experiments have been performed isothermally recording the pressure as a function of time. Experiments were conducted at different stirring rates, but in the same...... supersaturation region. The experiments showed that the gas dissolution rate rather than the induction time of propane hydrate is influenced by a change in agitation. This was especially valid at high stirring rates when the water surface was severely disturbed.Addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP...... the presence of additives. In most cases reasonable agreement between the data and the model could be obtained. The results revealed that especially the effective surface energy between propane hydrate and water is likely to change when the stirring rate varies from very high to low. The prolongation...

  5. Effects of Impermeable Boundaries on Gas Production from Hydrate Accumulations in the Shenhu Area of the South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on currently available data from site measurements and the preliminary estimates of the gas production potential from the hydrate accumulations at the SH7 site in the Shenhu Area using the depressurization method with a single horizontal well placed in the middle of the Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL, the dependence of production performance on the permeabilities of the overburden (OB and underburden (UB layers was investigated in this modeling study. The simulation results indicated that the temperature and the pressure of the HBL were affected by the permeabilities of OB and UB and the effect of depressurization with impermeable OB and UB was significantly stronger than that with permeable boundaries. Considering the percentage of hydrate dissociation, the gas production rate and the gas-to-water ratio, the hydrate deposit with impermeable OB and UB was expected to be the potential gas production target.

  6. Simulation of Methane Recovery from Gas Hydrates Combined with Storing Carbon Dioxide as Hydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Janicki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the medium term, gas hydrate reservoirs in the subsea sediment are intended as deposits for carbon dioxide (CO2 from fossil fuel consumption. This idea is supported by the thermodynamics of CO2 and methane (CH4 hydrates and the fact that CO2 hydrates are more stable than CH4 hydrates in a certain P-T range. The potential of producing methane by depressurization and/or by injecting CO2 is numerically studied in the frame of the SUGAR project. Simulations are performed with the commercial code STARS from CMG and the newly developed code HyReS (hydrate reservoir simulator especially designed for hydrate processing in the subsea sediment. HyReS is a nonisothermal multiphase Darcy flow model combined with thermodynamics and rate kinetics suitable for gas hydrate calculations. Two scenarios are considered: the depressurization of an area 1,000 m in diameter and a one/two-well scenario with CO2 injection. Realistic rates for injection and production are estimated, and limitations of these processes are discussed.

  7. Estimation of seismic attenuation of gas hydrate bearing sediments from multi-channel seismic data: A case study from Krishna-Godavari offshore basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dewangan, P.; Mandal, R.; Jaiswal, P.; Ramprasad, T.; Sriram, G.

    thickness of water column. The estimated effective Q-values, along the inline and crossline seismic profiles, depend on several factors such as gas hydrate, free gas and the complex fault system. The combined interpretation of the quality factor...

  8. Thermogravimetric study on the hydration of reactive magnesia and silica mixture at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Fei, E-mail: fj232@cam.ac.uk; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2013-08-20

    Highlights: • The characteristics of reactive MgO vary significantly in terms of their impurity content and reactivity depending on their sources and calcination conditions. • The synthesis of magnesium silicate hydrate (MSH) is affected by the characteristics of the precursors, i.e., MgO and silica. • The reaction process in the MgO–SiO{sub 2}–H{sub 2}O system can be followed by TGA, and is essential to develop MSH-based materials. - Abstract: The synthesis of magnesium silicate hydrate (MSH), which has wide applications in both construction and environmental fields, has been studied for decades. However, it is known that the characteristics of magnesia (MgO) vary significantly depending on their calcination conditions, which is expected to affect their performance in the MgO–SiO{sub 2}–H{sub 2}O system. This paper investigated the effect of different MgO and silica sources on the formation of magnesium silicate hydrate (MSH) at room temperature. The hydration process was studied by mixing commercial reactive MgO and silica powders with water and curing for 1, 7 and 28 days. The hydration products were analysed with the help of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimatric analysis (TGA). The results showed the continuous consumption of MgO and the existence of MSH and brucite and other minor phases such as magnesite and calcite. It is found that the Mg and Si sources have significant effect on the hydration process of MgO–SiO{sub 2}–H{sub 2}O system. The reaction degree is controlled by the availability of dissolved Mg and Si in the solution. The former is determined by the reactivity of MgO and the latter is related to the reactivity of the silica as well as the pH of the system.

  9. Irrigation port hydration in phacoemulsification surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki H

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hisaharu Suzuki,1 Yoichiro Masuda,2 Yuki Hamajima,1 Hiroshi Takahashi3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Nippon Medical School Musashikosugi Hospital, Kawasaki City, Kanagawa, 2Department of Ophthalmology, The Jikei University, Katsushika Medical Center, Tokyo, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan Background: In most cases, hydration is performed by water injection into the stromal tissue with a needle. The technique is simple, however it is sometimes troublesome.Purpose: We describe a simple technique for hydrating the corneal stroma in cataract surgery using an irrigation port.Patients and methods: The technique began by pushing the irrigation port against the corneal stroma for a few seconds during phacoemulsification, which generated edema in the corneal incision that subsequently prevented leakage. This procedure is called the hydration using irrigation port (HYUIP technique. A total of 60 eyes were randomized and placed in two groups, 30 eyes underwent surgeries using the HYUIP technique (HYUIP group and 30 eyes underwent surgeries without the HYUIP technique (control. The three points evaluated during each surgery included 1 the occurrence of anterior chamber collapse during the pulling out of the I/A tip after inserting the intraocular lens, 2 the need for conventional hydration, and 3 watertight completion at the end stage of surgery.Results: The anterior chamber collapse and the need for conventional hydration were significantly smaller in the HYUIP group compared to the control group. Regarding the self-sealing completion, no significant difference was observed between the two groups.Conclusion: The HYUIP technique is an effective method for creating self-sealing wound. In addition, this technique helps to prevent anterior chamber collapse. Keywords: cataract surgery, hydration, irrigation and aspiration, phacoemulsification, wound, self-sealing 

  10. Heat treatment deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bavaro, A. (Soliveri SpA, Caravaggio (Italy))

    1990-02-01

    Types and causes of heat treatement derived isotropic and anisotropic dilatancies in ferrous materials are reviewed. The concepts are developed in such a way as to allow extension to all materials exhibiting martensitic tempering behaviour. This paper intends to illustrate the basic processes of dimensional variations undergone by the materials under heat treatments. The parametric analysis includes an analysis of the interactions amongst the parameters themselves. The relative importance of each parameter is assessed in order to determine methods to attenuate deformation action. Simplified examples are offered to provide technicians explanations as to why specific deformations occur and indications on improved materials working techniques.

  11. Nail Deformities and Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, James Rory J

    2015-12-01

    A variety of nail deformities commonly presents in the primary care office. An understanding of nail anatomy coupled with inspection of the nails at routine office visits can reveal undetected disorders. Some problems are benign, and treatment should be attempted by the primary care provider, such as onychomycosis, paronychia, or ingrown toenails. For conditions such as benign melanonychia, longitudinal ridges, isolated Beau lines, and onycholysis, clinicians may offer reassurance to patients who are concerned about the change in their nails. For deformities such as early pterygium or clubbing, a thorough evaluation and referral to an appropriate specialist may be warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Joining by plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mori, Ken-ichiro; Bay, Niels; Fratini, Livan

    2013-01-01

    As the scale and complexity of products such as aircraft and cars increase, demand for new functional processes to join mechanical parts grows. The use of plastic deformation for joining parts potentially offers improved accuracy, reliability and environmental safety as well as creating opportuni......As the scale and complexity of products such as aircraft and cars increase, demand for new functional processes to join mechanical parts grows. The use of plastic deformation for joining parts potentially offers improved accuracy, reliability and environmental safety as well as creating...

  13. Hydration and nutrition knowledge in adolescent swimmers. Does water intake affect urine hydration markers after swimming?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Altavilla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Little data exists regarding nutritional knowledge and hydration in adolescent swimmers. The aim of this study was to assess the level of nutrition and hydration knowledge and to describe the fluid balance in adolescent swimmers during training. A study was carried out with a cross-sectional descriptive part and a longitudinal part with repeated measurements over five swimming sessions. Eighty-six adolescent swimmers completed a questionnaire to assess their sport nutrition and hydration knowledge. Fluid balance and urine hydration markers were studied during training. Swimmers showed a limited nutrition knowledge (33.26 % ± SD 12.59 and meagre hydration knowledge (28.61 % ± SD 28.59. Females showed lower scores than male swimmers in nutrition and hydration knowledge. Based on urine specific gravity, swimmers started the training close to the euhydrated threshold (1.019 g/mL ± SD 0.008. Although urine specific gravity and urine colour were reduced after the training, there were minimal changes in body mass (-0.12 Kg ± SD 0.31. Sweat loss (2.67 g/min ± SD 3.23 and the net changes in the fluid balance (-0.22 % ± SD 0.59 were low. The poor knowledge in nutrition and hydration encountered in the swimmers can justify the development of a strategy to incorporate nutritional education programmes for this group. Body water deficit from swimming activity seems to be easily replaced with the water intake to maintain hydration. After the training, the urine of swimmers was diluted regardless of their water intake. Dilution of urine did not reflect real hydration state in swimming.

  14. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  15. Morphology of methane hydrate host sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K.W.; Feng, H.; Tomov, S.; Winters, W.J.; Eaton, M.; Mahajan, D.

    2005-01-01

    The morphological features including porosity and grains of methane hydrate host sediments were investigated using synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) technique. The sediment sample was obtained during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 164 on the Blake Ridge at water depth of 2278.5 m. The CMT experiment was performed at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source facility. The analysis gave ample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity. The method was found to be highly effective for the study of methane hydrate host sediments.

  16. What are gas hydrates?: Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Y.C.; Waite, W.; Boswell, R.; Dallimore, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The English chemistry pioneer Sir Humphry Davy first combined gas and water to produce a solid substance in his lab in 1810. For more than a century after that landmark moment, a small number of scientists catalogued various solid “hydrates” formed by combining water with an assortment of gases and liquids. Sloan and Koh (2007) review this early research, which was aimed at discerning the chemical structures of gas hydrates (Fig. 1.1), as well as the pressures and temperatures at which they are stable. Because no practical applications were found for these synthetic gas hydrates, they remained an academic curiosity.

  17. Arctic Gas hydrate, Environment and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mienert, Jurgen; Andreassen, Karin; Bünz, Stefan; Carroll, JoLynn; Ferre, Benedicte; Knies, Jochen; Panieri, Giuliana; Rasmussen, Tine; Myhre, Cathrine Lund

    2015-04-01

    Arctic methane hydrate exists on land beneath permafrost regions and offshore in shelf and continental margins sediments. Methane or gas hydrate, an ice-like substrate, consists mainly of light hydrocarbons (mostly methane from biogenic sources but also ethane and propane from thermogenic sources) entrapped by a rigid cage of water molecules. The pressure created by the overlying water and sediments offshore stabilizes the CH4 in continental margins at a temperature range well above freezing point; consequently CH4 exists as methane ice beneath the seabed. Though the accurate volume of Arctic methane hydrate and thus the methane stored in hydrates throughout the Quaternary is still unknown it must be enormous if one considers the vast regions of Arctic continental shelves and margins as well as permafrost areas offshore and on land. Today's subseabed methane hydrate reservoirs are the remnants from the last ice age and remain elusive targets for both unconventional energy and as a natural methane emitter influencing ocean environments and ecosystems. It is still contentious at what rate Arctic warming may govern hydrate melting, and whether the methane ascending from the ocean floor through the hydrosphere reaches the atmosphere. As indicated by Greenland ice core records, the atmospheric methane concentration rose rapidly from ca. 500 ppb to ca. 750 ppb over a short time period of just 150 years at the termination of the younger Dryas period ca. 11600 years ago, but the dissociation of large quantities of methane hydrates on the ocean floor have not been documented yet (Brook et al., 2014 and references within). But with the major projected warming and sea ice melting trend (Knies et al., 2014) one may ask, for how long will CH4 stay trapped in methane hydrates if surface and deep-ocean water masses will warm and permafrost continuous to melt (Portnov et al. 2014). How much of the Arctic methane will be consumed by the micro- and macrofauna, how much will

  18. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foropoulos, J. Jr.; Avens, L.R.; Trujillo, E.A.

    1992-03-24

    A process is described for preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride.

  19. Synergistic kinetic inhibition of natural gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraboina, Nagu; Malmos, Christine; von Solms, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Rocking cells were used to investigate the natural gas hydrate formation and decomposition in the presence of kinetic inhibitor, Luvicap. In addition, the influence of poly ethylene oxide (PEO) and NaCl on the performance of Luvicap was investigated using temperature ramping and isothermal...... experiments. Luvicap decreased the hydrate nucleation temperature in ramping and increased the hydrate nucleation time at fixed temperatures. The presence of PEO and NaCl enhanced the nucleation inhibition strength of Luvicap. However the addition of Luvicap promoted the hydrate growth after nucleation. PEO...... does not affect hydrate growth whereas NaCl reduced the hydrate growth both in the presence and absence of Luvicap. In addition complex two-stage hydrate growth was observed in the presence of Luvicap. Moreover, the hydrate formed in the presence of inhibitor took longer time/higher temperature...

  20. Hydration Properties of Soybean Protein Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Remondetto

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydration properties of soybean isolates with different processing conditions (heat treatments, pH and protein concentrations were studied. Degree of denaturation,, solubility in water, in 0.2mol/L NaCl, and in media of different sodium dodecyl sulfate concentrations, viscosity and water imbibing capacity of the different samples were determinated and correlated. Treatments at temperatures higher than 80ºC denatured 11S and 7S proteins, leading to exposure of hydrophobic groups, which produced insoluble aggregates either in water or in high ionic strength media. These isolates possessed high water imbibing capacities and gave rise to viscous dispersions. Significant correlations were obtained between hydration properties and the "m" coefficient as calculated by a power law equation relating viscosity with the protein concentration of the dispersion. This "m" coefficient also correlated with the denaturation enthalpy of the protein isolates. On the basis of these results, it might be suggested that the "m" coefficient - dependent of the hydrodynamic behaviour of the particles - was a good estimator of the degree of protein denaturation.Estudaram-se as propriedades de hidratação de isolados de soja com diferentes condições de procesamento (tratamentos térmicos, pH e concentração de proteínas. Para diferentes amostras determinaram-se e correlacionaram-se o gráu de desnaturalização, a solubilidade em água, em 0,2mol/L NaCl e em diferentes concentrações de dodecil sulfato de sódio, viscosidade e capacidade de absorção de água. Os tratamentos a temperaturas superiores aos 80ºC desnaturaram as fracções 11S e 7S, provocando a exposição de grupos hidrofóbicos os que produziram agregados insolúveis, em água como em solução com alta força iónica. Estes isolados posuiam alta capacidade de absorção de água e dispersões com alta viscosidade. Achou-se uma correlação significativa entre as propriedades de hidratação e o

  1. Microbial Community Structure and Diversity in Hydrate Ridge Gas Hydrates (Cascadia Margin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lösekann, T.; Knittel, K.; Boetius, A.; Amann, R.

    2003-04-01

    Here, we present the first quantitative study investigating microorganisms physically associated with Hydrate Ridge gas hydrates. Previous studies have shown that the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in methane enriched surface sediments of Hydrate Ridge is apparently mediated by highly structured microbial consortia (Boetius et al., 2000). These AOM consortia consist of an inner core of methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME2-group) and an outer shell of sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus group). However, recently other microbial associations have been found capable of oxidizing methane anaerobically (e.g. Michaelis et al., 2002; Orphan et al., 2002). Only little is known about microorganisms mediating AOM in direct association with gas hydrates (Lanoil et al., 2001). The microbial community in pure melted gas hydrates sampled at the southern summit of Hydrate Ridge, coast off Oregon (USA), was analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Additionally, microbial diversity was studied using 16S rDNA clone libraries for Bacteria and Archaea. First FISH experiments confirm the abundance of AMNE1-group archaea and ANME2-group archaea in pure melted Hydrate Ridge gas hydrates. The abundance of these AOM mediating groups seems to be orders of magnitude lower than in the gas hydrate surrounding sediment. ANME1-cells were detected as filamentous free-living rods. Archaea of the ANME2-group were found in associations. In contrast to the known highly structured Hydrate ridge consortia, these cells are only loosly aggregated. The obtained molecular data will be compared with results of previous studies, which dealt with the microbial diversity in methane enriched surface sediments of Hydrate Ridge. References: Boetius, A., Ravenschlag, K. , Schubert, C., Rickert, D., Widdel, F., Gieseke, A., Amann, R., Jørgensen, B. B., Witte, U. &Pfannkuche, O.: A marine microbial consortium apparently mediating anaerobic oxidation of methane. Nature 407, 623

  2. The Effect of Synthetic Hydrated Calcium Aluminate Additive on the Hydration Properties of OPC

    OpenAIRE

    Jolanta Doneliene; Anatolijus Eisinas; Kestutis Baltakys; Agne Bankauskaite

    2016-01-01

    The effect of synthetic CAH (130°C; 8 h; CaO/(SiO2 + Al2O3) = 0.55; Al2O3/(SiO2 + Al2O3) = 0.1, 0.15) with different crystallinity on the hydration kinetics of OPC at early stages of hydration was investigated. Also, the formation mechanism of compounds during OPC hydration was highlighted. It was determined that the synthetic CAH accelerated the initial reaction and shortened the induction period. Also, the second and third exothermic reactions begun earlier, and, during the latter reaction,...

  3. DNA Basepair Step Deformability Inferred from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lankaš, Filip; Šponer, Jiří; Langowski, Jörg; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2003-01-01

    The sequence-dependent DNA deformability at the basepair step level was investigated using large-scale atomic resolution molecular dynamics simulation of two 18-bp DNA oligomers: d(GCCTATAAACGCCTATAA) and d(CTAGGTGGATGACTCATT...

  4. Towards classical spectrum generating algebras for f-deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kullock, Ricardo, E-mail: ricardokullock@gmail.com [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Aplicação Fernando Rodrigues da Silveira, Departamento de Ciências da Natureza, Rua Santa Alexandrina 288, 20261-232, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Latini, Danilo [Department of Mathematics and Physics and INFN, Roma Tre University, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Rome (Italy)

    2016-01-28

    In this paper we revise the classical analog of f-oscillators, a generalization of q-oscillators given in Man'ko et al. (1997) [8], in the framework of classical spectrum generating algebras (SGA) introduced in Kuru and Negro (2008) [9]. We write down the deformed Poisson algebra characterizing the entire family of non-linear oscillators and construct its general solution algebraically. The latter, covering the full range of f-deformations, shows an energy dependence both in the amplitude and the frequency of the motion. - Highlights: • We study the classical analog of f-deformed oscillators. • We use the classical spectrum generating algebra. • The deformed trajectories have energy dependent frequencies. • The method leads to exact results for any acceptable f-deformation.

  5. Estimation of the global inventory of methane hydrates in marine sediments using transfer functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Piñero

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of gas hydrates in marine sediments is essentially controlled by the accumulation of particulate organic carbon (POC which is microbially converted into methane, the thickness of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ where methane can be trapped, the sedimentation rate (SR that controls the time that POC and the generated methane stays within the GHSZ, and the delivery of methane from deep-seated sediments by ascending pore fluids and gas into the GHSZ. Recently, Wallmann et al. (2012 presented transfer functions to predict the gas hydrate inventory in diffusion-controlled geological systems based on SR, POC and GHSZ thickness for two different scenarios: normal and full compacting sediments. We apply these functions to global data sets of bathymetry, heat flow, seafloor temperature, POC input and SR, estimating a global mass of carbon stored in marine methane hydrates from 3 to 455 Gt of carbon (GtC depending on the sedimentation and compaction conditions. The global sediment volume of the GHSZ in continental margins is estimated to be 60–67 × 1015 m3, with a total of 7 × 1015 m3 of pore volume (available for GH accumulation. However, seepage of methane-rich fluids is known to have a pronounced effect on gas hydrate accumulation. Therefore, we carried out a set of systematic model runs with the transport-reaction code in order to derive an extended transfer function explicitly considering upward fluid advection. Using averaged fluid velocities for active margins, which were derived from mass balance considerations, this extended transfer function predicts the enhanced gas hydrate accumulation along the continental margins worldwide. Different scenarios were investigated resulting in a global mass of sub-seafloor gas hydrates of ~ 550 GtC. Overall, our systematic approach allows to clearly and quantitatively distinguish between the effect of biogenic methane generation from POC and

  6. Adsorption of water and carbon dioxide on hematite and consequences for possible hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvamme, Bjørn; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Kivelae, Pilvi-Helina

    2012-04-07

    The interest in carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery is increasing proportional to the decline in naturally driven oil production and also due to the increasing demand for reduced emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Transport of carbon dioxide in offshore pipelines involves high pressure and low temperatures, conditions which may lead to formation of hydrates from residual water dissolved in carbon dioxide and carbon dioxide. The critical question is whether the water at certain temperatures and pressures will drop out as liquid droplets first, and then form hydrates, or alternatively, adsorb on the pipeline surfaces, and subsequently form hydrates heterogeneously. In this work, we used several different basis sets of density functional theory in ab initio calculations to estimate the charge distribution of hematite (the dominating component of rust) crystals. These rust particles were embedded in water and chemical potential for adsorbed water molecules was estimated through thermodynamic integration and compared to similar estimates for water clusters of the same size. While the generated charges were not unique, the use of high order approximations and different basis sets provides a range of likely charge distributions. Values obtained for the chemical potential of water in different surroundings indicated that it would be thermodynamically favorable for water to adsorb on hematite, and that evaluation of potential carbon dioxide hydrate formation conditions and kinetics should be based on this formation mechanism. Depending on the basis set and approximations, the estimated gain for water to adsorb on the hematite surface rather than condense as droplets varied between -1.7 kJ mole(-1) and -3.4 kJ mole(-1). The partial charge distribution on the hematite surface is incompatible with the hydrate structure, and thus hydrates will be unable to attach to the surface. The behavior of water outside the immediate vicinity of hematite (beyond 3

  7. Gas hydrates in shallow deposits of the Amsterdam mud volcano, Anaximander Mountains, Northeastern Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape, Thomas; Kasten, Sabine; Zabel, Matthias; Bahr, André; Abegg, Friedrich; Hohnberg, Hans-Jürgen; Bohrmann, Gerhard

    2010-06-01

    proportions of light hydrocarbons in shallow hydrates even at the summit of the AMV, and possibly also of other MVs in the region. Depending on their crystallographic structure, however, hydrates will already decompose and release hydrocarbon masses if sediment temperatures exceed ca. 19.3°C and 21.0°C, respectively. Based on observations from other mud volcanoes, the common occurrence of such temperatures induced by heat flux from below into the immediate subsurface appears likely for the AMV.

  8. Carbon Cycling in Gas Hydrate Systems and Consideration of the Time Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, G. R.; Snyder, G. T.

    2003-12-01

    Enormous amounts of microbial CH4 reside in gas hydrate, dissolved gas and free gas bubbles in marine sediment. Global carbon cycle models and paleoenvironmental studies habitually neglect this CH4, although its distribution clearly depends on carbon fluxes to and from the ocean, and external conditions, especially temperature. As we begin to appropriately connect this large, dynamic seafloor CH4 cycle into broad Earth systems science, we are faced with some major conceptual problems, including how amounts, distributions, and fluxes from selected boreholes can be extrapolated globally. Well-reasoned commentary on this issue has led to the prevailing idea of typical gas hydrate systems on passive (low fluid flux) and active (high fluid flux) margins. The Ocean Drilling Program has now targeted three locations explicitly to characterize the amount, distribution and biogeochemical cycling in marine gas hydrate systems: Blake Ridge (passive), Hydrate Ridge (active), and Peru Trench (active). Although much work remains, in situ gas profiles and detailed pore water concentration profiles of many species have now been generated at all three locations. The gas hydrate zone at the Blake Ridge lies beneath a relatively thick interval of SO4 reduction, and holds large amounts of CH4 fairly well dispersed in pore space surrounded by very fresh waters greatly enriched in I but only moderately enriched in PO4 and ammonia. By contrast, the gas hydrate zone at the Peru Trench site lies beneath a relatively thin interval of SO4 reduction, and holds relatively low amounts of CH4 in moderately fresh waters moderately enriched in I but greatly enriched in PO4 and ammonia. Amounts and distribution of gas and pore water species at Hydrate Ridge lie somewhere between, although the most striking generalization is the variability in all components across this area. Our most basic conclusion from this emerging data is that we must move beyond classifying gas hydrate systems on physical

  9. Gas hydrate occurrence and Morpho-structures along Chilean margin

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas Cordero, Ivan De La Cruz

    2009-01-01

    2007/2008 During the last decades, the scientific community spent many efforts to study the gas hydrates in oceanic and permafrost environments. In fact, the gas hydrate occurrence has a global significance because of the potential energy resource represented by the large amount of hydrocarbon trapped in the hydrate phase. Moreover, it may play a role in global climate change, and it is also study because of the hazard that accumulations of gas hydrate may cause to drilling and seabed inst...

  10. Marine Gas Hydrates - An Untapped Non-conventional Energy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Marine Gas Hydrates - An Untapped Non-conventional Energy Resource · Slide 2 · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Gas Hydrate Stability Zone · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Exploration of gas hydrates (seismic) · Characteristics of BSR · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Distribution of Gas Hydrates in KG ...

  11. Anisotropic plasmas from axion and dilaton deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donos, Aristomenis [Centre for Particle Theory and Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University,South Rd., Durham (United Kingdom); Gauntlett, Jerome P. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College,Prince Consort Rd., London (United Kingdom); Sosa-Rodriguez, Omar [Centre for Particle Theory and Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University,South Rd., Durham (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-02

    We construct black hole solutions of type IIB supergravity that are holographically dual to anisotropic plasmas arising from deformations of an infinite class of four-dimensional CFTs. The CFTs are dual to AdS{sub 5}×X{sub 5}, where X{sub 5} is an Einstein manifold, and the deformations involve the type IIB axion and dilaton, with non-trivial periodic dependence on one of the spatial directions of the CFT. At low temperatures the solutions approach smooth domain wall solutions with the same AdS{sub 5}×X{sub 5} solution appearing in the far IR. For sufficiently large deformations an intermediate scaling regime appears which is governed by a Lifshitz-like scaling solution. We calculate the DC thermal conductivity and some components of the shear viscosity tensor.

  12. Marginally Deformed Starobinsky Gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Codello, A.; Joergensen, J.; Sannino, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We show that quantum-induced marginal deformations of the Starobinsky gravitational action of the form $R^{2(1 -\\alpha)}$, with $R$ the Ricci scalar and $\\alpha$ a positive parameter, smaller than one half, can account for the recent experimental observations by BICEP2 of primordial tensor modes....

  13. Methods of gas hydrate concentration estimation with field examples

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumar, D.; Dash, R.; Dewangan, P.

    gas hydrate, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, doi:10.1029/2005GL022607. Waite, W., Helgerud, M. B., Nur, A., Pinksto, J. C., Stern, L., and Kirby, S., 2000. Laboratory measurements of compressional and shear wave speeds through methane hydrate: In Gas Hydrates...

  14. Hydrate bearing clayey sediments: Formation and gas production concepts

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Jaewon

    2016-06-20

    Hydro-thermo-chemo and mechanically coupled processes determine hydrate morphology and control gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments. Force balance, together with mass and energy conservation analyses anchored in published data provide robust asymptotic solutions that reflect governing processes in hydrate systems. Results demonstrate that hydrate segregation in clayey sediments results in a two-material system whereby hydrate lenses are surrounded by hydrate-free water-saturated clay. Hydrate saturation can reach ≈2% by concentrating the excess dissolved gas in the pore water and ≈20% from metabolizable carbon. Higher hydrate saturations are often found in natural sediments and imply methane transport by advection or diffusion processes. Hydrate dissociation is a strongly endothermic event; the available latent heat in a reservoir can sustain significant hydrate dissociation without triggering ice formation during depressurization. The volume of hydrate expands 2-to-4 times upon dissociation or CO2single bondCH4 replacement. Volume expansion can be controlled to maintain lenses open and to create new open mode discontinuities that favor gas recovery. Pore size is the most critical sediment parameter for hydrate formation and gas recovery and is controlled by the smallest grains in a sediment. Therefore any characterization must carefully consider the amount of fines and their associated mineralogy.

  15. HYDRATION IN THE SAND SHRIMP CRANGON SEPTEMSPINOSA: RELATION TO DIET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, J Ross; Jeffries, H Perry

    1976-06-01

    Tissue hydration in the estuarine sand shrimp Crangon septemspinosa is correlated with nutritional conditions. Hydration levels of shrimp who are ingesting food remain normal. In starved shrimp or in individuals who are not ingesting adequate amounts of food, hydration levels are high. Presumably, water replaces metabolized tissues.

  16. Mechanisms Leading to Co-Existence of Gas Hydrate in Ocean Sediments [Part 2 of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Steven; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-12-31

    saturations. Large volumes (of order one pore volume) of gaseous and aqueous phases must be transported into the gas hydrate stability zone. The driver for this transport is the pressure sink induced by a reduction in occupied pore volume that accompanies the formation of hydrate from gas and water. Pore-scale imbibition models and bed-scale multiphase flow models indicate that the rate-limiting step in converting gas to hydrate is the supply of water to the hydrate stability zone. Moreover, the water supply rate is controlled by capillarity-driven flux for conditions typical of the Alaska North Slope. A meter-scale laboratory experiment confirms that significant volumes of fluid phases move into the hydrate stability zone and that capillarity is essential for the water flux. The model shows that without capillarity-driven flux, large saturations of hydrate cannot form. The observations of thick zones of large saturation at Mallik and Mt Elbert thus suggest that the primary control on these systems is the rate of transport of gaseous and aqueous phases, driven by the pressure sink at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. A key finding of our project is the elucidation of ?capillary fracturing? as a dominant gas transport mechanism in low-permeability media. We initially investigate this phenomenon by means of grain-scale simulations in which we extended a discrete element mechanics code (PFC, by Itasca) to incorporate the dynamics of first singlephase and then multiphase flow. A reductionist model on a square lattice allows us to determine some of the fundamental dependencies of the mode of gas invasion (capillary fingering, viscous fingering, and fracturing) on the parameters of the system. We then show that the morphology of the gas-invaded region exerts a fundamental control on the fabric of methane hydrate formation, and on the overpressures caused by methane hydrate dissociation. We demonstrate the existence of the different invasion regimes by means of controlled

  17. Mechanisms Leading to Co-Existence of Gas Hydrate in Ocean Sediments [Part 1 of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Steven; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-12-31

    saturations. Large volumes (of order one pore volume) of gaseous and aqueous phases must be transported into the gas hydrate stability zone. The driver for this transport is the pressure sink induced by a reduction in occupied pore volume that accompanies the formation of hydrate from gas and water. Pore-scale imbibition models and bed-scale multiphase flow models indicate that the rate-limiting step in converting gas to hydrate is the supply of water to the hydrate stability zone. Moreover, the water supply rate is controlled by capillarity-driven flux for conditions typical of the Alaska North Slope. A meter-scale laboratory experiment confirms that significant volumes of fluid phases move into the hydrate stability zone and that capillarity is essential for the water flux. The model shows that without capillarity-driven flux, large saturations of hydrate cannot form. The observations of thick zones of large saturation at Mallik and Mt Elbert thus suggest that the primary control on these systems is the rate of transport of gaseous and aqueous phases, driven by the pressure sink at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. A key finding of our project is the elucidation of ?capillary fracturing? as a dominant gas transport mechanism in low-permeability media. We initially investigate this phenomenon by means of grain-scale simulations in which we extended a discrete element mechanics code (PFC, by Itasca) to incorporate the dynamics of first single-phase and then multiphase flow. A reductionist model on a square lattice allows us to determine some of the fundamental dependencies of the mode of gas invasion (capillary fingering, viscous fingering, and fracturing) on the parameters of the system. We then show that the morphology of the gas-invaded region exerts a fundamental control on the fabric of methane hydrate formation, and on the overpressures caused by methane hydrate dissociation. We demonstrate the existence of the different invasion regimes by means of controlled

  18. A thermal comparator sensor for measuring autogenous deformation in hardening Portland cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Thomas; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2003-01-01

    of the thermal comparator is based on thermal expansion of aluminium. A particular characteristic of the measuring system is the fixation of the thermal comparator sensor to the deforming specimen. The modular system ensures effective thermostatic control of the hydrating cement paste samples. The technique......This paper describes a simple and accurate experimental device specially developed to measure autogenous deformation in hardening cement-based materials. The measuring system consists of a so-called thermal comparator sensor and a modular thermostatically controlled system. The operating principle...

  19. Investigation of the hydration and bioactivity of radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine and MTA Angelus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Josette; Sorrentino, François; Damidot, Denis

    2013-05-01

    calcium silicate was higher for Biodentine™ than for TCS-20-Z owing to its optimized particle size distribution, the presence of CaCO₃ and the use of CaCl₂. Tricalcium calcium silicate in MTA hydrated even more slowly than TCS-20-Z as evident from the size of reaction rim representative of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) around tricalcium silicate grains and the calorimetry measurements. On the other hand, calcium oxide contained in MTA Angelus™ hydrated very fast inducing an intense exothermic reaction. Calcium hydroxide was produced as a by-product of reaction in all hydrated cements but in greater quantities in MTA due to the hydration of calcium oxide. This lead to less dense microstructure than the one observed for both Biodentine™ and TCS-20-Z. All the materials were bioactive and allowed the deposition of hydroxyapatite on the cement surface in the presence of simulated body fluid and the radiopacity was greater than 3mm aluminum thickness. All the cement pastes tested were composed mainly of tricalcium silicate and a radiopacifier. The laboratory manufactured cement contained no other additives. Biodentine™ included calcium carbonate which together with the additives in the mixing liquid resulted in a material with enhanced chemical properties relative to TCS-20-Z prototype cement. On the other hand MTA Angelus™ displayed the presence of calcium, aluminum and silicon oxides in the un-hydrated powder. These phases are normally associated with the raw materials indicating that the clinker of MTA Angelus™ is incompletely sintered leading to a potential important variability in its mineralogy depending on the sintering conditions. As a consequence, the amount of tricalcium silicate is less than in the two other cements leading to a slower reaction rate and more porous microstructure. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Deformation of chlorite in naturally deformed low-grade rocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bons, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    The intracrystalline deformation of chlorite in naturally deformed low-grade rocks was investigated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). As in other phyllosilicates, the deformation of chlorite is dominated by the (001) slip plane. Slip along this plane is very easy through the generation

  1. The fate of fluid inclusions during high-temperature experimental deformation of olivine aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Matthew J.; Zimmerman, Mark E.; Teyssier, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Torsion experiments on initially wet and dry olivine aggregates at equivalent deformation conditions investigated the fate of fluid inclusions (FIs) during high-temperature deformation. Wet samples were produced by adding water to San Carlos olivine powders before hot pressing; those hot pressed without water are considered dry. After hot pressing, wet and dry aggregates have comparable grain sizes, but wet aggregates have more abundant primary FIs. Talc jackets were fitted around some wet and dry samples prior to deformation to hydrate samples during deformation via talc dehydration at elevated temperature, whereas other samples were deformed without talc. At similar strain rates (~1.0 × 10-4 s-1), the peak shear stress for the dry sample (no talc) was 190-220 MPa, whereas all other samples reached 180 MPa; the strengths of wet (± talc) and dry (+ talc) specimens appear similar. Deformed samples reveal abundant FIs, reduced grain size, shape preferred orientation of olivine, and a pervasive low-angle fabric (C') to the shear plane defined by aligned FIs. Samples deformed with talc have FI-rich and FI-depleted domains; where FIs are abundant, the C' fabric is better developed and grain size is smaller. Electron backscatter diffraction pole figures suggest that olivine deformed in the dislocation creep regime via the (010)[100] slip system. Results of these experiments suggest that FIs are redistributed during dislocation creep, leading to the development of grain-scale, high-diffusivity pathways.

  2. Magnetic properties of nickel halide hydrates including deuteration effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeFotis, G.C., E-mail: gxdefo@wm.edu [Chemistry Department, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA, 23187 United States (United States); Van Dongen, M.J.; Hampton, A.S.; Komatsu, C.H.; Trowell, K.T.; Havas, K.C.; Davis, C.M.; DeSanto, C.L. [Chemistry Department, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA, 23187 United States (United States); Hays, K.; Wagner, M.J. [Chemistry Department, George Washington University, Washington, DC, 20052 United States (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic measurements on variously hydrated nickel chlorides and bromides, including deuterated forms, are reported. Results include locations and sizes of susceptibility maxima, T{sub max} and χ{sub max}, ordering temperatures T{sub c}, Curie constants and Weiss theta in the paramagnetic regime, and primary and secondary exchange interactions from analysis of low temperature data. For the latter a 2D Heisenberg model augmented by interlayer exchange in a mean-field approximation is applied. Magnetization data to 16 kG as a function of temperature show curvature and hysteresis characteristics quite system dependent. For four materials high field magnetization data to 70 kG at 2.00 K are also obtained. Comparison is made with theoretical relations for spin-1 models. Trends are apparent, primarily that T{sub max} of each bromide hydrate is less than for the corresponding chloride, and that for a given halide nD{sub 2}O (n=1 or 2) deuterates exhibit lesser T{sub max} than do nH{sub 2}O hydrates. A monoclinic unit cell determined from powder X-ray diffraction data on NiBr{sub 2}·2D{sub 2}O is different from and slightly larger than that of NiBr{sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O. This provides some rationale for the difference in magnetic properties between these. - Highlights: • The magnetism of Ni(II) chloride and bromide dihydrates and monohydrates is studied. • Effects of replacing H{sub 2}O by D{sub 2}O are examined for both hydration states and both halides. • Exchange interactions in bromides are weaker than in corresponding chlorides. • Exchange interactions are weaker in D{sub 2}O than in corresponding H{sub 2}O containing systems. • The unit cell of NiBr{sub 2}·2D{sub 2}O is different from and slightly larger than that of NiBr{sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O.

  3. 75 FR 9886 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. ACTION: Notice of open... Office of Fossil Energy to the Office of Science 4:45 p.m.-5 p.m. Final Announcements and Adjourn Public...

  4. Pentagonal dodecahedron methane hydrate cage and methanol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    petroleum industry as it plugs the oil flow.12 Restric- tion of hydrate plug ... Interaction energy ( E) for cluster formation has been determined using .... Interaction energies are mentioned in table 2 for all three 1CH4@512 cage, 1CH4@512-methanol clus- ter and 1CH4@512-methanol-Na. + cluster systems. Formation of ...

  5. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Archer, D

    2007-01-01

    .... The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2...

  6. [Terminal phase hydration, pain and delirium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heick, A.

    2009-01-01

    Hydration of the terminal patient may relieve confusion and complaints of "dry mouth". But it may worsen oedema of the brain, lungs, and extremities, worsen terminal rattling and cause a need for frequent changing of diapers. The decision of whether and how to treat a dying patient with fluids sh...

  7. HYDRATION STRUCTURE AND WATER EXCHANGE DYNAMICS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    was carried out for Fe(II) in water using the 2-body potential and its 3-body correction function to study hydration structure of the Fe(II) ion. Furthermore, the present study investigates the water exchange processes around the Fe(II) ion in the aqueous solution. Emphasis is given on the illumination of the structural changes at ...

  8. Gypsum hydration: a theoretical and experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Qingliang; Brouwers, Jos; de Korte, A.C.J.; Fischer, H.B; Bode, K.A.

    2009-01-01

    Calcium sulphate dihydrate (CaSO4·2H2O or gypsum) is used widely as building material because of its excellent fire resistance, aesthetics, and low price. Hemihydrate occurs in two formations of α- and β-type. Among them β-hemihydrate is mainly used to produce gypsum plasterboard since the hydration

  9. Gold(III)-Catalyzed Hydration of Phenylacetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, J. Michelle; Tzeel, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    A guided inquiry-based experiment exploring the regioselectivity of the hydration of phenylacetylene is described. The experiment uses an acidic gold(III) catalyst in a benign methanol/water solvent system to introduce students to alkyne chemistry and key principles of green chemistry. The experiment can be easily completed in approximately 2 h,…

  10. Postural deformities in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doherty, K.M.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Peralta, M.C.; Silveira-Moriyama, L.; Azulay, J.P.; Gershanik, O.S.; Bloem, B.R.

    2011-01-01

    Postural deformities are frequent and disabling complications of Parkinson's disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonism. These deformities include camptocormia, antecollis, Pisa syndrome, and scoliosis. Recognition of specific postural syndromes might have differential diagnostic value in patients

  11. Microbial Communities from Methane Hydrate-Bearing Deep Marine Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, David William; Fujita, Yoshiko; Delwiche, Mark Edmond; Blackwelder, David Bradley; Colwell, Frederick Scott; Uchida, T.

    2002-08-01

    Microbial communities in cores obtained from methane hydrate-bearing deep marine sediments (down to more than 300 m below the seafloor) in the forearc basin of the Nankai Trough near Japan were characterized with cultivation-dependent and -independent techniques. Acridine orange direct count data indicated that cell numbers generally decreased with sediment depth. Lipid biomarker analyses indicated the presence of viable biomass at concentrations greater than previously reported for terrestrial subsurface environments at similar depths. Archaeal lipids were more abundant than bacterial lipids. Methane was produced from both acetate and hydrogen in enrichments inoculated with sediment from all depths evaluated, at both 10 and 35°C. Characterization of 16S rRNA genes amplified from the sediments indicated that archaeal clones could be discretely grouped within the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota domains. The bacterial clones exhibited greater overall diversity than the archaeal clones, with sequences related to the Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and green nonsulfur groups. The majority of the bacterial clones were either members of a novel lineage or most closely related to uncultured clones. The results of these analyses suggest that the microbial community in this environment is distinct from those in previously characterized methane hydrate-bearing sediments.

  12. Strain rate viscoelastic analysis of soft and highly hydrated biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirella, A; Mattei, G; Ahluwalia, A

    2014-10-01

    Measuring the viscoelastic behavior of highly hydrated biological materials is challenging because of their intrinsic softness and labile nature. In these materials, it is difficult to avoid prestress and therefore to establish precise initial stress and strain conditions for lumped parameter estimation using creep or stress-relaxation (SR) tests. We describe a method ( ɛ˙M or epsilon dot method) for deriving the viscoelastic parameters of soft hydrated biomaterials which avoids prestress and can be used to rapidly test degradable samples. Standard mechanical tests are first performed compressing samples using different strain rates. The dataset obtained is then analyzed to mathematically derive the material's viscoelastic parameters. In this work a stable elastomer, polydimethylsiloxane, and a labile hydrogel, gelatin, were first tested using the ɛ˙M, in parallel SR was used to compare lumped parameter estimation. After demonstrating that the elastic parameters are equivalent and that the estimation of short-time constants is more precise using the proposed method, the viscoelastic behavior of porcine liver was investigated using this approach. The results show that the constitutive parameters of hepatic tissue can be quickly quantified without the application of any prestress and before the onset of time-dependent degradation phenomena. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Gas hydrates distribution in the Shenhu area, northern South China Sea: comparisons between the eight drilling sites with gashydrate petroleum system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, M.; Yang, R.; Wang, H.; Sha, Z.; Liang, J.; Wu, N.; Qiao, S.; Cong, X.

    2016-07-01

    The results of the first marine gas hydrate drilling expedition of Guangzhou Marine Geological Survey (GMGS-1) in northern continental slope of the South China Sea revealed a variable distribution of gas hydrates in the Shenhu area. In this study, comparisons between the eight sites with gas-hydrate petroleum system were used to analyze and re-examine hydrate potential. In the Shenhu gas hydrate drilling area, all the sites were located in a suitable low-temperature, high-pressure environment. Biogenic and thermogenic gases contributed to the formation of hydrates. Gas chimneys and some small-scale faults (or micro-scale fractures) compose the migration pathways for gas-bearing fluids. Between these sites, there are three key differences: the seafloor temperatures and pressures; geothermal gradient and sedimentary conditions. Variations of seafloor temperatures and pressures related to water depths and geothermal gradient would lead to changes in the thickness of gas hydrate stability zones. Although the lithology and grain size of the sediments were similar, two distinct sedimentary units were identified for the first time through seismic interpretation, analysis of deep-water sedimentary processes, and the Cm pattern (plotted one-percentile and median values from grain-size analyses), implying the heterogeneous sedimentary conditions above Bottom Simulating Reflectors (BSRs). Based on the analyses of forming mechanisms and sedimentary processes, these two fine-grained sedimentary units have different physical properties. Fine-grained turbidites (Unit I) with thin-bedded chaotic reflectors at the bottom acted as the host rocks for hydrates; whereas, finegrained sediments related to soft-sediment deformation (Unit II) characterized by thick continuous reflectors at the top would serve as regional homogeneous caprocks. Low-flux methane that migrated upwards along chimneys could be enriched preferentially in fine-grained turbidites, resulting in the formation of

  14. Direct measurement of methane hydrate composition along the hydrate equilibrium boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    The composition of methane hydrate, namely nW for CH 4??nWH2O, was directly measured along the hydrate equilibrium boundary under conditions of excess methane gas. Pressure and temperature conditions ranged from 1.9 to 9.7 MPa and 263 to 285 K. Within experimental error, there is no change in hydrate composition with increasing pressure along the equilibrium boundary, but nW may show a slight systematic decrease away from this boundary. A hydrate stoichiometry of n W = 5.81-6.10 H2O describes the entire range of measured values, with an average composition of CH4??5.99(??0.07) H2O along the equilibrium boundary. These results, consistent with previously measured values, are discussed with respect to the widely ranging values obtained by thermodynamic analysis. The relatively constant composition of methane hydrate over the geologically relevant pressure and temperature range investigated suggests that in situ methane hydrate compositions may be estimated with some confidence. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  15. Clathrate Hydrates for Thermal Energy Storage in Buildings: Overview of Proper Hydrate-Forming Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Castellani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing energy costs are at the origin of the great progress in the field of phase change materials (PCMs. The present work aims at studying the application of clathrate hydrates as PCMs in buildings. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline structures in which guest molecules are enclosed in the crystal lattice of water molecules. Clathrate hydrates can form also at ambient pressure and present a high latent heat, and for this reason, they are good candidates for being used as PCMs. The parameter that makes a PCM suitable to be used in buildings is, first of all, a melting temperature at about 25 °C. The paper provides an overview of groups of clathrate hydrates, whose physical and chemical characteristics could meet the requirements needed for their application in buildings. Simulations with a dynamic building simulation tool are carried out to evaluate the performance of clathrate hydrates in enhancing thermal comfort through the moderation of summer temperature swings and, therefore, in reducing energy consumption. Simulations suggest that clathrate hydrates have a potential in terms of improvement of indoor thermal comfort and a reduction of energy consumption for cooling. Cooling effects of 0.5 °C and reduced overheating hours of up to 1.1% are predicted.

  16. Physicochemical properties and thermal stability of quercetin hydrates in the solid state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghetti, G.S., E-mail: greicefarm@yahoo.com.br [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga 2752, CEP 90.610-000, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Carini, J.P. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga 2752, CEP 90.610-000, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Honorato, S.B.; Ayala, A.P. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Caixa Postal 6030, CEP 60.455-970, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Moreira, J.C.F. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Instituto de Ciencias Basicas da Saude, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2600, CEP 90035-003, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Bassani, V.L. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga 2752, CEP 90.610-000, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2012-07-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quercetin raw materials may present different degree of hydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal stability of quercetin in the solid state depends on its degree of hydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quercetin dehydrate is thermodynamically more stable than the other crystal forms. - Abstract: In the present work three samples of quercetin raw materials (QCTa, QCTb and QCTc), purchased from different Brazilian suppliers, were characterized employing scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, simultaneous thermogravimetry and infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and variable temperature-powder X-ray diffraction, in order to know their physicochemical properties, specially the thermal stability in solid state. The results demonstrated that the raw materials of quercetin analyzed present distinct crystalline structures, ascribed to the different degree of hydration of their crystal lattice. The thermal stability of these quercetin raw materials in the solid state was highly dependent on their degree of hydration, where QCTa (quercetin dihydrate) was thermodynamically more stable than the other two samples.

  17. MORPHOLOGY OF METHANE HYDRATE HOST SEDIMENTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JONES,K.W.; FENG,H.; TOMOV,S.; WINTER,W.J.; EATON,M.; MAHAJAN,D.

    2004-12-01

    Results from simulated experiments in several laboratories show that host sediments influence hydrate formation in accord with known heterogeneity of host sediments at sites of gas hydrate occurrence (1). For example, in Mackenzie Delta, NWT Canada (Mallik 2L-38 well), coarser-grained units (pore-filling model) are found whereas in the Gulf of Mexico, the found hydrate samples do not appear to be lithologically controlled. We have initiated a systematic study of sediments, initially focusing on samples from various depths at a specific site, to establish a correlation with hydrate occurrence (or variations thereof) to establish differences in their microstructure, porosity, and other associated properties. The synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) set-up at the X-27A tomography beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory was used as a tool to study sediments from Blake Ridge at three sub bottom depths of 0.2, 50, and 667 meters. Results from the tomographic analysis of the deepest sample (667 m) are presented here to illustrate how tomography can be used to obtain new insights into the structures of methane hydrate host sediments. The investigation shows the internal grain/pore space resolution in the microstructure and a 3-D visualization of the connecting pathways obtained following data segmentation into pore space and grains within the sediment sample. The analysis gives the sample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity, as well. An earlier report on the experimental program has been given by Mahajan et al. (2).

  18. Geomechanical response of permafrost-associated hydrate deposits to depressurization-induced gas production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutqvist, J.; Moridis, G.J.; Grover, T.; Collett, T.

    2009-02-01

    In this simulation study, we analyzed the geomechanical response during depressurization production from two known hydrate-bearing permafrost deposits: the Mallik (Northwest Territories, Canada) deposit and Mount Elbert (Alaska, USA) deposit. Gas was produced from these deposits at constant pressure using horizontal wells placed at the top of a hydrate layer (HL), located at a depth of about 900 m at the Mallik and 600 m at the Mount Elbert. The simulation results show that general thermodynamic and geomechanical responses are similar for the two sites, but with substantially higher production and more intensive geomechanical responses at the deeper Mallik deposit. The depressurization-induced dissociation begins at the well bore and then spreads laterally, mainly along the top of the HL. The depressurization results in an increased shear stress within the body of the receding hydrate and causes a vertical compaction of the reservoir. However, its effects are partially mitigated by the relatively stiff permafrost overburden, and compaction of the HL is limited to less than 0.4%. The increased shear stress may lead to shear failure in the hydrate-free zone bounded by the HL overburden and the downward-receding upper dissociation interface. This zone undergoes complete hydrate dissociation, and the cohesive strength of the sediment is low. We determined that the likelihood of shear failure depends on the initial stress state as well as on the geomechanical properties of the reservoir. The Poisson's ratio of the hydrate-bearing formation is a particularly important parameter that determines whether the evolution of the reservoir stresses will increase or decrease the likelihood of shear failure.

  19. Spectroscopic investigation of cement hydrate phases and their chloride binding properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping

    This thesis investigates the chloride binding properties of the hydrate phases present in Portland cement paste and the relationships between chloride binding capacity and the structure of these phases, using primarily NMR spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, XRD, thermal analysis, and chemical analysis. It provides important basic data and new insights into the effects of the structure of the individual hydrate phases on their chloride binding properties, and the atomic level structural states and dynamic behavior of the bound chloride in the cement hydrate crystals and at the solid/solution interface. The chloride binding capacity depends on the structure and surface properties of the individual hydrates. Portlandite and AFm surfaces have high affinity for chloride due to their positive zeta-potentials. For C-S-H samples, the chloride binding capacity increases with increasing C/S ratio due to increased numbers of surface Ca-OH sites and decreased polymerization of silicate chains. Aluminum substitution in C-S-H is unfavorable for chloride binding due to reduced layer charge and increased chain polymerization. For all hydrate phases the mechanism of chloride binding is not simply electrostatic attraction. Formation of metal-chloride clusters in the solution and sorption in the Stem layer may contribute substantially. The bound chlorides near the cement hydrate surfaces are in water solvated environments similar to those in the bulk solution and are in rapid exchange (>2kHz) with free chloride in the bulk solution. The chloride concentration near the surfaces is much higher than in the equilibrium bulk solution, and the reorientational frequency of the water molecules solvating the bound chloride is slower than those in the bulk solution. Chloride has a well-defined structural site in Friedel's salt. In solid solutions between Friedel's salt and hydroxyl-AFm, chloride occurs predominantly in Cl-rich domains except at high OH-contents.

  20. The relation between hydration and mechanical behavior of bovine cornea in tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatami-Marbini, Hamed; Rahimi, Abdolrasol

    2014-08-01

    The cornea is a transparent soft tissue covering the front of the eye. The biomechanical properties of the cornea have been commonly investigated by uniaxial tensile and inflation testing methods. The cornea like many other hydrated tissue swells when immersed in an ionic solution. Previous studies on hydrated tissues have shown that mechanical properties and hydration are closely related. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of thickness (hydration) variation due to swelling/dehydration on non-linear stress-strain response of the bovine cornea. Corneal strips were first air-dried and then soaked in a bathing solution until they reached an average thickness ranging from 0.3mm to 1.1mm. Based on their thickness, the samples were divided into different groups and uniaxial tests were performed to measure tensile properties. All experiments were done in mineral oil to prevent any hydration gain or loss during the tests. It was observed that swollen corneas had softer tensile properties in comparison with dehydrated ones. In particular, there was a significant difference between elastic tangent modulus of different groups (P<0.05). It was also shown that tensile behavior of bovine strips at any thickness within the range of 0.4-1.1mm can be obtained from a single experiment conducted on samples with known thickness (hydration). The findings of the present study confirm that mechanical properties obtained from uniaxial tensile experiments are strongly dependent on thickness (water amount) of samples; therefore, careful attention must be taken in interpreting previous studies which did not fully control the thickness of specimens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cosmetic and Functional Nasal Deformities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nasal complaints. Nasal deformity can be categorized as “cosmetic” or “functional.” Cosmetic deformity of the nose results in a less ... taste , nose bleeds and/or recurrent sinusitis . A cosmetic or functional nasal deformity may occur secondary to ...

  2. Comparison of rescue techniques for failed chloral hydrate sedation for magnetic resonance imaging scans--additional chloral hydrate vs intranasal dexmedetomidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenhua; Wang, Zixin; Song, Xingrong; Fan, Yanting; Tian, Hang; Li, Bilian

    2016-03-01

    Chloral hydrate, a commonly used sedative in children during noninvasive diagnostic procedures, is associated with side effects like prolonged sedation, paradoxical excitement, delirium, and unpleasant taste. Dexmedetomidine, a highly selective α-2 agonist, has better pharmacokinetic properties than chloral hydrate. We conducted this prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial to evaluate efficacy of intranasal dexmedetomidine with that of a second oral dose of chloral hydrate for rescue sedation during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in infants. One hundred and fifty infants (age group: 1-6 months), who were not adequately sedated after initial oral dose of 50 mg · kg(-1) chloral hydrate, were randomly divided into three groups with the following protocol for each group. Group C: second oral dose chloral hydrate 25 mg · kg(-1); Group L and Group H: intranasal dexmedetomidine in a dosage of 1 and 2 mcg · kg(-1), respectively. Status of sedation, induction time, time to wake up, vital signs, oxygen saturation, and recovery characteristics were recorded. Successful rescue sedation in Groups C, L, and H were achieved in 40 (80%), 47 (94%), and 49 (98%) of infants, respectively, on an intention to treat analysis, and the proportion of infants successfully sedated in Group H was more than that of Group L (P ˂ 0.01). There were no significant differences in sedation induction time; however, the time to wake up was significantly shorter in Group L as compared to that in Group C or H (P < 0.01). No significant adverse hemodynamic or hypoxemic effects were observed in the study. Intranasal dexmedetomidine induced satisfactory rescue sedation in 1- to 6-month-old infants during MRI study, and appears to cause sedation in a dose-dependent manner. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. On the Theory of Formation of a Gas Hydrate in a Heat-Insulated Space Compacted with Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagapov, V. Sh.; Chiglintseva, A. S.; Belova, S. V.

    2017-09-01

    The formation of a gas hydrate in a closed adiabatic space saturated with snow and a gas in the initial state is considered. The formation of a gas hydrate in this gas-snow system in the case where in the initial state it has a negative temperature was investigated. It was established that, depending on the initial snow saturation of the indicated system, a gas hydrate can be formed in it at both negative and positive temperatures as well as at the melting point of ice. It is shown that there exists any initial snow saturation of the gas-snow system at which the hydrate saturation of the heat-insulated space reaches a maximum value depending on its initial temperature and pressure. It was established that the intensity of hydrate formation in this space increases with increase in the pressure in it and decrease in its temperature. Charts of different possible final states of the gas-snow system depending on its initial temperature, pressure, and snow saturation were constructed.

  4. Solid state interconversion between anhydrous norfloxacin and its hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongcharoen, Wanchai; Byrn, Stephen R; Sutanthavibul, Narueporn

    2008-01-01

    This work is focused on characterizing and evaluating the solid state interconversion of norfloxacin (NF) hydrates. Four stoichiometric NF hydrates, dihydrate, hemipentahydrate, trihydrate, pentahydrate and a disordered NF state, were generated by various methods and characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD), thermal analysis and Karl Fisher titrimetry. XRPD patterns of all NF hydrates exhibited crystalline structures. NF hydrate conversion was studied with respect to mild elevated temperature and various degrees of moisture levels. NF hydrates transformed to anhydrous NF Form A after gentle heating at 60 degrees C for 48 h except dihydrate and trihydrate where mixture in XRPD patterns between anhydrous NF Form A and former structures existed. Desiccation of NF hydrates at 0% RH for 7 days resulted in only partial removal of water molecules from the hydrated structures. The hydrated transitional phase and the disordered NF state were obtained from the incomplete dehydration of NF hydrates after thermal treatment and pentahydrate NF after desiccation, respectively. Anhydrous NF Form A and NF hydrates transformed to pentahydrate NF when exposed to high moisture environment except dihydrate. In conclusion, surrounding moisture levels, temperatures and the duration of exposure strongly influenced the interconversion pathways and stoichiometry of anhydrous NF and its hydrates. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Pediatric breast deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Kerry; Fernandez, Sarah; Iteld, Larry; Panthaki, Zubin; Armstrong, Milton B; Thaller, Seth

    2006-05-01

    Congenital breast anomalies represent a relatively common set of disorders encountered by pediatric plastic surgeons with a spectrum of severity that ranges widely from the relatively benign polythelia to the very complex disorders such as Poland's syndrome and tuberous breast deformities. While the former can be treated in a single surgical setting with minimal morbidity, the more complicated disorders often require a staged reconstructive algorithm. Some disorders also require a multidisciplinary management for both workup and management. Although rarely a source of functional morbidity, these physical deformities are often a significant source of psychological stress for the adolescent male or female who feels alienated from their peers. The purpose of this article is to review the most common congenital breast disorders including the diagnosis, workup, and management especially the timing of surgical intervention as guided by normal developmental milestones.

  6. [Babies with cranial deformity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feijen, Michelle M W; Claessens, Edith A W M Habets; Dovens, Anke J Leenders; Vles, Johannes S; van der Hulst, Rene R W J

    2009-01-01

    Plagiocephaly was diagnosed in a baby aged 4 months and brachycephaly in a baby aged 5 months. Positional or deformational plagio- or brachycephaly is characterized by changes in shape and symmetry of the cranial vault. Treatment options are conservative and may include physiotherapy and helmet therapy. During the last two decades the incidence of positional plagiocephaly has increased in the Netherlands. This increase is due to the recommendation that babies be laid on their backs in order to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. We suggest the following: in cases of positional preference of the infant, referral to a physiotherapist is indicated. In cases of unacceptable deformity of the cranium at the age 5 months, moulding helmet therapy is a possible treatment option.

  7. Carbon dioxid sequestration in natural gas hydrates: Thermodynamic considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicks, J. M.; Beeskow-Strauch, B.; Luzi, M.; Girod, M.; Erzinger, J.

    2009-12-01

    Due to the increasing energy demands natural gas hydrates become more and more of interest. The huge amount of hydrocarbons - mainly CH4 - stored in natural hydrate reservoirs suggest the use of natural gas hydrates as an energy resource. However, the combustion of this fossil fuel results in an undesired increase of CO2 in the atmosphere. Therefore, a combination of CH4 production on the one hand and the CO2 sequestration on the other hand seems to be ideal. Several investigations regarding the exchange reaction of CH4 with CO2 using pure methane hydrates and pure CO2 or CO2-N2-mixtures have been performed as laboratory studies in the past. Some showed exchange rates up to 85% and concluded that the driving force of this exchange reaction is the higher stability of CO2 hydrates compared to methane hydrates (e.g. Park et al. 2006). However, natural conditions may differ: natural gas hydrates may contain higher hydrocarbons or H2S, which have significant impact in terms of a higher stability of the mixed hydrate phase compared to pure CH4- and CO2-hydrates. Primary results of our investigations on the exchange reaction of a mixed CH4-C3H8-hydrate with CO2 indicates that although the stability of mixed CH4-C3H8-hydrate is significantly shifted to higher temperatures and lower pressures compared to pure CH4-, mixed CH4-CO2- and pure CO2-hydrates, it changes in the presence of CO2 from a structure II hydrate phase to form a structure I CH4-CO2-hydrate which subsequently transforms to CO2-hydrate. This process starts at the interface between gas and hydrate and continues slowly into the bulk phase. These observation lead to the following conclusions: - The driving force of the exchange reaction is less the stability with respect to temperature and pressure conditions of the hydrate phase but rather the chemical equilibrium state in terms of concentration gradients between hydrate and surrounding gas phase - After the initial formation of a CO2-CH4- or CO2 hydrate layer

  8. Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gay Hydrate Production Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. D. White; B. P. McGrail; S. K. Wurstner

    2009-06-30

    Displacing natural gas and petroleum with carbon dioxide is a proven technology for producing conventional geologic hydrocarbon reservoirs, and producing additional yields from abandoned or partially produced petroleum reservoirs. Extending this concept to natural gas hydrate production offers the potential to enhance gas hydrate recovery with concomitant permanent geologic sequestration. Numerical simulation was used to assess a suite of carbon dioxide injection techniques for producing gas hydrates from a variety of geologic deposit types. Secondary hydrate formation was found to inhibit contact of the injected CO{sub 2} regardless of injectate phase state, thus diminishing the exchange rate due to pore clogging and hydrate zone bypass of the injected fluids. Additional work is needed to develop methods of artificially introducing high-permeability pathways in gas hydrate zones if injection of CO{sub 2} in either gas, liquid, or micro-emulsion form is to be more effective in enhancing gas hydrate production rates.

  9. Preservation phenomena of methane hydrate in pore spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachikubo, Akihiro; Takeya, Satoshi; Chuvilin, Evgeny; Istomin, Vladimir

    2011-10-21

    Dissociation processes of methane hydrate synthesized with glass beads were investigated using powder X-ray diffraction and calorimetry. Methane hydrate formed with coarse glass beads dissociated quickly at 150-200 K; in this temperature range methane hydrate dissociates at atmospheric pressure. In contrast, methane hydrate formed with glass beads less than a few microns in size showed very high stability up to just below the melting point of ice, even though this temperature is well outside the zone of thermodynamic stability of the hydrate. The rate-determining steps for methane hydrate dissociation within pores are also discussed. The experimental results suggest that methane hydrate existing naturally within the pores of fine particles such as mud at low temperatures would be significantly more stable than expected thermodynamically. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  10. Characterization of un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate™ and MTA Angelus™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J; Sorrentino, F; Damidot, D

    2015-04-01

    BioAggregate™ is a novel material introduced for use as a root-end filling material. It is tricalcium silicate-based, free of aluminium and uses tantalum oxide as radiopacifier. BioAggregate contains additives to enhance the material performance. The purpose of this research was to characterize the un-hydrated and hydrated forms of BioAggregate using a combination of techniques, verify whether the additives if present affect the properties of the set material and compare these properties to those of MTA Angelus™. Un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate and MTA Angelus were assessed. Un-hydrated cement was tested for chemical composition, specific surface area, mineralogy and kinetics of hydration. The set material was investigated for mineralogy, microstructure and bioactivity. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopic analysis, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and isothermal calorimetry were employed. The specific surface area was investigated using a gas adsorption method with nitrogen as the probe. BioAggregate was composed of tricalcium silicate, tantalum oxide, calcium phosphate and silicon dioxide and was free of aluminium. On hydration, the tricalcium silicate produced calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide. The former was deposited around the cement grains, while the latter reacted with the silicon dioxide to form additional calcium silicate hydrate. This resulted in reduction of calcium hydroxide in the aged cement. MTA Angelus reacted in a similar fashion; however, since it contained no additives, the calcium hydroxide was still present in the aged cement. Bioactivity was demonstrated by deposition of hydroxyapatite. BioAggregate exhibited a high specific surface area. Nevertheless, the reactivity determined by isothermal calorimetry appeared to be slow compared to MTA Angelus. The tantalum oxide as opposed to bismuth oxide was inert, and tantalum was not leached in solution. BioAggregate exhibited

  11. A coupled THMC model of a heating and hydration laboratory experiment in unsaturated compacted FEBEX bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.; Fernandez, A.M.

    2010-05-01

    Unsaturated compacted bentonite is foreseen by several countries as a backfill and sealing material in high-level radioactive waste repositories. The strong interplays between thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes during the hydration stage of a repository call for fully coupled THMC models. Validation of such THMC models is prevented by the lack of comprehensive THMC experiments and the difficulties of experimental methods to measure accurately the chemical composition of bentonite porewater. We present here a non-isothermal multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive solute transport model for a deformable medium of a heating and hydration experiment performed on a sample of compacted FEBEX bentonite. Besides standard solute transport and geochemical processes, the model accounts for solute cross diffusion and thermal and chemical osmosis. Bentonite swelling is solved with a state-surface approach. The THM model is calibrated with transient temperature, water content and porosity data measured at the end of the experiment. The reactive transport model is calibrated with porewater chemical data derived from aqueous extract data. Model results confirm that thermal osmosis is relevant for the hydration of FEBEX bentonite while chemical osmosis can be safely neglected. Dilution and evaporation are the main processes controlling the concentration of conservative species. Dissolved cations are mostly affected by calcite dissolution-precipitation and cation exchange reactions. Dissolved sulphate is controlled by gypsum/anhydrite dissolution-precipitation. pH is mostly buffered by protonation/deprotonation via surface complexation. Computed concentrations agree well with inferred aqueous extract data at all sections except near the hydration boundary where cation data are affected by a sampling artifact. The fit of Cl{sup -} data is excellent except for the data near the heater. The largest deviations of the model from inferred aqueous

  12. Deformation and fracture of emulsion-filled gels: Effect of oil content and deformation speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sala, G.; Vliet, van T.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Aken, van G.A.; Velde, van de F.

    2009-01-01

    The large deformation properties of gelatine, ¿-carrageenan and whey protein isolate (WPI) gels filled with bound and unbound oil droplets were studied as a function of compression speed. The rheological properties of the gel matrices controlled the compression speed-dependency of the gels

  13. In-situ gas hydrate hydrate saturation estimated from various well logs at the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed detailed analysis and interpretation of available 2-D and 3-D seismic data and proposed a viable method for identifying sub-permafrost gas hydrate prospects within the gas hydrate stability zone in the Milne Point area of northern Alaska. To validate the predictions of the USGS and to acquire critical reservoir data needed to develop a long-term production testing program, a well was drilled at the Mount Elbert prospect in February, 2007. Numerous well log data and cores were acquired to estimate in-situ gas hydrate saturations and reservoir properties.Gas hydrate saturations were estimated from various well logs such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), P- and S-wave velocity, and electrical resistivity logs along with pore-water salinity. Gas hydrate saturations from the NMR log agree well with those estimated from P- and S-wave velocity data. Because of the low salinity of the connate water and the low formation temperature, the resistivity of connate water is comparable to that of shale. Therefore, the effect of clay should be accounted for to accurately estimate gas hydrate saturations from the resistivity data. Two highly gas hydrate-saturated intervals are identified - an upper ???43 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 54% and a lower ???53 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 50%; both zones reach a maximum of about 75% saturation. ?? 2009.

  14. The big fat LARS - a LArge Reservoir Simulator for hydrate formation and gas production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeskow-Strauch, Bettina; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Giese, Ronny; Luzi-Helbing, Manja; Priegnitz, Mike; Klump, Jens; Thaler, Jan; Abendroth, Sven

    2013-04-01

    differences between gaseous and dissolved methane (Zimmer et al., 2011). Gas hydrate is formed using a confined pressure of 12-15 MPa and a fluid pressure of 8-11 MPa with a set temperature of 275 K. The duration of the formation process depends on the required hydrate saturation and is usually in a range of several weeks. The subsequent decomposition experiments aiming at testing innovative production scenarios such as the application of a borehole tool for thermal stimulation of hydrate via catalytic oxidation of methane within an autothermal catalytic reactor (Schicks et al. 2011). Furthermore, experiments on hydrate decomposition via pressure reduction are performed to mimic realistic scenarios such as found during the production test in Mallik (Yasuda and Dallimore, 2007). In the near future it is planned to scale up existing results on CH4-CO2 exchange efficiency (e.g. Strauch and Schicks, 2012) by feeding CO2 to the hydrate reservoir. All experiments are due to the gain of high-resolution spatial and temporal data predestined as a base for numerical modeling. References Schicks, J. M., Spangenberg, E., Giese, R., Steinhauer, B., Klump, J., Luzi, M., 2011. Energies, 4, 1, 151-172. Zimmer, M., Erzinger, J., Kujawa, C., 2011. Int. J. of Greenhouse Gas Control, 5, 4, 995-1001. Yasuda, M., Dallimore, S. J., 2007. Jpn. Assoc. Pet. Technol., 72, 603-607. Beeskow-Strauch, B., Schicks, J.M., 2012. Energies, 5, 420-437.

  15. Numerical simulation of gas hydrate exploitation from subsea reservoirs in the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2017-04-01

    Natural gas (methane) is the most environmental friendly source of fossil energy. When coal is replace by natural gas in power production the emission of carbon dioxide is reduced by 50 %. The vast amount of methane assumed in gas hydrate deposits can help to overcome a shortage of fossil energy resources in the future. To increase their potential for energy applications new technological approaches are being discussed and developed worldwide. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e. g. depressurization and/or carbon dioxide injection) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR - Submarine Gas Hydrate Reservoirs«. In order to simulate the exploitation of hydrate-bearing sediments in the subsea, an in-house simulation model HyReS which is implemented in the general-purpose software COMSOL Multiphysics is used. This tool turned out to be especially suited for the flexible implementation of non-standard correlations concerning heat transfer, fluid flow, hydrate kinetics, and other relevant model data. Partially based on the simulation results, the development of a technical concept and its evaluation are the subject of ongoing investigations, whereby geological and ecological criteria are to be considered. The results illustrate the processes and effects occurring during the gas production from a subsea gas hydrate deposit by depressurization. The simulation results from a case study for a deposit located in the Black Sea reveal that the production of natural gas by simple depressurization is possible but with quite low rates. It can be shown that the hydrate decomposition and thus the gas production strongly depend on the geophysical properties of the reservoir, the mass and heat transport within the reservoir, and

  16. Geologic implications of gas hydrates in the offshore of India: results of the National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Boswell, Ray; Cochran, J.R.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Lall, Malcolm; Mazumdar, Aninda; Ramana, Mangipudi Venkata; Ramprasad, Tammisetti; Riedel, Michael; Sain, Kalachand; Sathe, Arun Vasant; Vishwanath, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 (NGHP-01) is designed to study the occurrence of gas hydrate along the passive continental margin of the Indian Peninsula and in the Andaman convergent margin, with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. The NGHP-01 expedition established the presence of gas hydrates in the Krishna-Godavari and Mahanadi Basins, and the Andaman Sea. The expedition discovered in the Krishna-Godavari Basin one of the thickest gas hydrate accumulations ever documented, in the Andaman Sea one of the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zones in the world, and established the existence of a fully developed gas hydrate petroleum system in all three basins.

  17. Effects of Geomechanical Mechanism on the Gas Production Behavior: A Simulation Study of Class-3 Type Four-Way-Closure Ridge Hydrate Deposit Offshore Southwestern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Chiu, Yung-Cheng; Huang, Yi-Jyun; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2017-04-01

    The future energy police of Taiwan will heavily rely on the clean energy, including renewable energy and low-carbon energy, to meet the target of mitigating CO2 emission. In addition to developing the renewable energies like solar and wind resources, Taiwan will increase the natural gas consumption to obtain enough electrical power with low-carbon emission. The vast resources of gas hydrates recognized in southwestern offshore Taiwan makes a great opportunity for Taiwan to have own energy resources in the future. Therefore, Taiwan put significant efforts on the evaluation of gas hydrate reserves recently. Production behavior of natural gas dissociated from gas hydrate deposits is an important issue to the hydrate reserves evaluation. The depressurization method is a useful engineering recovery method for gas production from a class-3 type hydrate deposit. The dissociation efficiency will be affected by the pressure drawdown disturbance. However, when the pore pressure of hydrate deposits is depressurized for gas production, the rock matrix will surfer more stresses and the formation deformation might be occurred. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of geomechanical mechanism on the gas production from a class-3 hydrate deposit using depressurization method. The case of a class-3 type hydrate deposit of Four-Way-Closure Ridge was studied. In this study a reservoir simulator, STARS, was used. STARS is a multiphase flow, heat transfer, geo-chemical and geo-mechanical mechanisms coupling simulator which is capable to simulate the dissociation/reformation of gas hydrate and the deformation of hydrate reservoirs and overburdens. The simulating ability of STARTS simulator was validated by duplicating the hydrate comparison projects of National Energy Technology Lab. The study target, Four-Way-Closure (FWC) Ridge hydrate deposit, was discovered by the bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs). The geological parameters were collected from the geological and

  18. Hydration patterns and salting effects in sodium chloride solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weifeng; Mu, Yuguang

    2011-10-07

    The salting effects of 2M sodium chloride electrolyte are studied based on a series of model solutes with properties ranging from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. Generally, hydrophobic solutes will be salted out and hydrophilic solutes will be salted in by NaCl solution. The solvation free energy changes are highly correlated with Kirkwood-Buff integrals. The underlying mechanism resorts to the preferential binding of ions and water to solutes. Our results demonstrate that the salting effect not only depends on the salt's position in Hofmeister series, but also on the solutes' specifics. Taking the hydration free energies of solutes and ions as independent variables, a schematic diagram of salting effects is suggested. The resolved multifaceted salting effects rely on the sensitive balance of the tripartite interaction among solutes, ions, and water. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  19. High-pressure Brillouin study on methane hydrate

    CERN Document Server

    Sasaki, S; Suwa, I; Kume, T; Shimizu, H

    2002-01-01

    Acoustic velocities and adiabatic elastic constants of structure I of methane hydrate (MH) have been determined as a function of pressure up to 0.6 GPa at 23 deg. C by the high-pressure Brillouin spectroscopy developed for a single molecular crystal. The pressure dependence of the acoustic velocities of MH is very similar to that of ice-Ih except for the longitudinal acoustic (LA) velocity. The value of the LA velocity along the (100) direction of MH at 0.02 GPa is 3.63 km s sup - sup 1 which is about 7% lower than the average of the LA velocities in the ice-Ih phase at -35.5 deg. C and atmospheric pressure.

  20. Effects of hydration on blood rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, George A; Tangney, Christine C; Rosenson, Robert S

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of oral fluid intake on blood rheology of 17 healthy adults following a 12-14 hour overnight fast from food and drink. An oral fluid load of 500 ml was consumed every 30 minutes for 2 hours. Blood viscosity values at shear rates of 1, 10 and 100 s(-1) were reduced (p<0.05 to p<0.01) at 30 and 120 minutes following hydration; however, these differences were not significant after hematocrit correction. With fluid intake, both uncorrected and corrected viscous component of blood viscoelasticity at oscillatory shear rate of 1 s(-1) and at a constant frequency of 2 Hz were reduced (p<0.05 to p<0.001) at all time points as compared to fasting values. The corrected elastic component of blood viscoelasticity increased 90 minutes after hydration (p<0.05). An overnight fast is accompanied by rheological abnormalities that are altered by fluid intake.

  1. Methane hydrates and contemporary climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2011-01-01

    As the evidence for warming climate became better established in the latter part of the 20th century (IPCC 2001), some scientists raised the alarm that large quantities of methane (CH4) might be liberated by widespread destabilization of climate-sensitive gas hydrate deposits trapped in marine and permafrost-associated sediments (Bohannon 2008, Krey et al. 2009, Mascarelli 2009). Even if only a fraction of the liberated CH4 were to reach the atmosphere, the potency of CH4 as a greenhouse gas (GHG) and the persistence of its oxidative product (CO2) heightened concerns that gas hydrate dissociation could represent a slow tipping point (Archer et al. 2009) for Earth's contemporary period of climate change.

  2. Experimental techniques for cement hydration studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Luttge

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cement hydration kinetics is a complex problem of dissolution, nucleation and growth that is still not well understood, particularly in a quantitative way. While cement systems are unique in certain aspects they are also comparable to natural mineral systems. Therefore, geochemistry and particularly the study of mineral dissolution and growth may be able to provide insight and methods that can be utilized in cement hydration research. Here, we review mainly what is not known or what is currently used and applied in a problematic way. Examples are the typical Avrami approach, the application of Transition State Theory (TST to overall reaction kinetics and the problem of reactive surface area. Finally, we suggest an integrated approach that combines vertical scanning interferometry (VSI with other sophisticated analytical techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM and theoretical model calculations based on a stochastic treatment.

  3. Acoustic Determination of Methane Hydrate Disssociation Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The compounds are also known to form as a skin on rising methane bubbles, as reported by Rehder et al. [1], Heeschen et al. [2], and Sauter et al. [3...discrepancy. First, during the experi- ment the video monitor used to measure brine column height became clouded with an oily film which was released from...which would result in 12% to 28% error in bulk modulus measurement. The oily substance released from the hydrate samples is an indicator of a second

  4. Serrano charged up for hydrates battle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flatern, R. von

    2001-07-01

    The plugging of pipelines by paraffin and hydrate formations is an obstacle still to be overcome in the transportation of gases in deep cold water. However, a new flow assurance technique is soon to be installed in Shell's Serrano and Oregano fields in the Gulf of Mexico and this is expected to eventually impact on the entire offshore industry: it is this development which is discussed. The system uses electricity to heat the pipelines.

  5. Bioimpedance in medicine: Measuring hydration influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlubik, J.; Hlubik, P.; Lhotska, L.

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the paper is to present results of our ongoing research focused on the influence of body hydration on the body impedance measurements and also on the influence of the frequency used for the measurement. The question is why to measure human body composition and if these values have beneficial results. First goal of the work deals with a question of measuring human body composition. The performed measurements showed certain influence which must be verified by repeated experiments.

  6. Mid-space-independent deformable image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aganj, Iman; Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Reuter, Martin; Sabuncu, Mert Rory; Fischl, Bruce

    2017-05-15

    Aligning images in a mid-space is a common approach to ensuring that deformable image registration is symmetric - that it does not depend on the arbitrary ordering of the input images. The results are, however, generally dependent on the mathematical definition of the mid-space. In particular, the set of possible solutions is typically restricted by the constraints that are enforced on the transformations to prevent the mid-space from drifting too far from the native image spaces. The use of an implicit atlas has been proposed as an approach to mid-space image registration. In this work, we show that when the atlas is aligned to each image in the native image space, the data term of implicit-atlas-based deformable registration is inherently independent of the mid-space. In addition, we show that the regularization term can be reformulated independently of the mid-space as well. We derive a new symmetric cost function that only depends on the transformation morphing the images to each other, rather than to the atlas. This eliminates the need for anti-drift constraints, thereby expanding the space of allowable deformations. We provide an implementation scheme for the proposed framework, and validate it through diffeomorphic registration experiments on brain magnetic resonance images. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The interaction of climate change and methane hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.; Kessler, John D.

    2017-01-01

    Gas hydrate, a frozen, naturally-occurring, and highly-concentrated form of methane, sequesters significant carbon in the global system and is stable only over a range of low-temperature and moderate-pressure conditions. Gas hydrate is widespread in the sediments of marine continental margins and permafrost areas, locations where ocean and atmospheric warming may perturb the hydrate stability field and lead to release of the sequestered methane into the overlying sediments and soils. Methane and methane-derived carbon that escape from sediments and soils and reach the atmosphere could exacerbate greenhouse warming. The synergy between warming climate and gas hydrate dissociation feeds a popular perception that global warming could drive catastrophic methane releases from the contemporary gas hydrate reservoir. Appropriate evaluation of the two sides of the climate-methane hydrate synergy requires assessing direct and indirect observational data related to gas hydrate dissociation phenomena and numerical models that track the interaction of gas hydrates/methane with the ocean and/or atmosphere. Methane hydrate is likely undergoing dissociation now on global upper continental slopes and on continental shelves that ring the Arctic Ocean. Many factors—the depth of the gas hydrates in sediments, strong sediment and water column sinks, and the inability of bubbles emitted at the seafloor to deliver methane to the sea-air interface in most cases—mitigate the impact of gas hydrate dissociation on atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations though. There is no conclusive proof that hydrate-derived methane is reaching the atmosphere now, but more observational data and improved numerical models will better characterize the climate-hydrate synergy in the future.

  8. The interaction of climate change and methane hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.; Kessler, John D.

    2017-03-01

    Gas hydrate, a frozen, naturally-occurring, and highly-concentrated form of methane, sequesters significant carbon in the global system and is stable only over a range of low-temperature and moderate-pressure conditions. Gas hydrate is widespread in the sediments of marine continental margins and permafrost areas, locations where ocean and atmospheric warming may perturb the hydrate stability field and lead to release of the sequestered methane into the overlying sediments and soils. Methane and methane-derived carbon that escape from sediments and soils and reach the atmosphere could exacerbate greenhouse warming. The synergy between warming climate and gas hydrate dissociation feeds a popular perception that global warming could drive catastrophic methane releases from the contemporary gas hydrate reservoir. Appropriate evaluation of the two sides of the climate-methane hydrate synergy requires assessing direct and indirect observational data related to gas hydrate dissociation phenomena and numerical models that track the interaction of gas hydrates/methane with the ocean and/or atmosphere. Methane hydrate is likely undergoing dissociation now on global upper continental slopes and on continental shelves that ring the Arctic Ocean. Many factors—the depth of the gas hydrates in sediments, strong sediment and water column sinks, and the inability of bubbles emitted at the seafloor to deliver methane to the sea-air interface in most cases—mitigate the impact of gas hydrate dissociation on atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations though. There is no conclusive proof that hydrate-derived methane is reaching the atmosphere now, but more observational data and improved numerical models will better characterize the climate-hydrate synergy in the future.

  9. Intermolecular Hydrogen Transfer in Isobutane Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Sugahara

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Electron spin resonance (ESR spectra of butyl radicals induced with γ-ray irradiation in the simple isobutane (2-methylpropane hydrate (prepared with deuterated water were investigated. Isothermal annealing results of the γ-ray-irradiated isobutane hydrate reveal that the isobutyl radical in a large cage withdraws a hydrogen atom from the isobutane molecule through shared hexagonal-faces of adjacent large cages. During this “hydrogen picking” process, the isobutyl radical is apparently transformed into a tert-butyl radical, while the sum of isobutyl and tert-butyl radicals remains constant. The apparent transformation from isobutyl to tert-butyl radicals is an irreversible first-order reaction and the activation energy was estimated to be 35 ± 3 kJ/mol, which was in agreement with the activation energy (39 ± 5 kJ/mol of hydrogen picking in the γ-ray-irradiated propane hydrate with deuterated water.

  10. Estimates of biogenic methane production rates in deep marine sediments at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia margin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, F S; Boyd, S; Delwiche, M E; Reed, D W; Phelps, T J; Newby, D T

    2008-06-01

    Methane hydrate found in marine sediments is thought to contain gigaton quantities of methane and is considered an important potential fuel source and climate-forcing agent. Much of the methane in hydrates is biogenic, so models that predict the presence and distribution of hydrates require accurate rates of in situ methanogenesis. We estimated the in situ methanogenesis rates in Hydrate Ridge (HR) sediments by coupling experimentally derived minimal rates of methanogenesis to methanogen biomass determinations for discrete locations in the sediment column. When starved in a biomass recycle reactor, Methanoculleus submarinus produced ca. 0.017 fmol methane/cell/day. Quantitative PCR (QPCR) directed at the methyl coenzyme M reductase subunit A gene (mcrA) indicated that 75% of the HR sediments analyzed contained methane produced/g sediment/day for the samples with fewer methanogens than the QPCR method could detect. The actual rates could vary depending on the real number of methanogens and various seafloor parameters that influence microbial activity. However, our calculated rate is lower than rates previously reported for such sediments and close to the rate derived using geochemical modeling of the sediments. These data will help to improve models that predict microbial gas generation in marine sediments and determine the potential influence of this source of methane on the global carbon cycle.

  11. Gas Hydrates of Coal Layers as a Methane Source in the Atmosphere and Mine Working

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyrdin Valery

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Living conditions of gas hydrates of a methane in a coal matrix as one of possible forms of finding of molecules of a methane in coal layers are considered. However, gas hydrates are formed not in all mineral coals even under the thermobaric conditions corresponding to their equilibrium state as the minimum humidity and the corresponding pore width are necessary for each brand of coal for formation of gas hydrate. It is shown that it depends on electric electrical dipole moment of a macromolecule of coal. Coals of brands K, D, Zh were considered. The electric field created by the surface of coal does not allow molecules of water to carry out threedimensional driving, and they keep on an internal surface of a time. By means of theoretical model operation a dipole - dipole interaction of molecules of water with the steam surface of coal values of energy of fiber interaction for various functional groups located in coal “fringe” which size for the first and second layers does not allow molecules of water to participate in formation of gas hydrates are received. For coals of brands K, Zh, D, considering distribution of a time on radiuses, the percent of moisture, which cannot share in education solid coal of gas solutions, is calculated.

  12. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics studies of Pb(ii) micro hydrated gas phase clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Pimentel, C. I.; Amaro-Estrada, J. I.; Saint-Martin, H.; Ramírez-Solís, A.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, a theoretical investigation was made to assess the coordination properties of Pb(ii) in [Pb(H2O)n]2+ clusters, with n = 4, 6, 8, 12, and 29, as well as to study proton transfer events, by means of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ-pp/6-311G level of theory, that were calibrated in comparison with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ-PP/aug-cc-pVDZ calculations. Hemidirected configurations were found in all cases; the radial distribution functions (RDFs) produced well defined first hydration shells (FHSs) for n = 4,6,8, and 12, that resulted in a coordination number CN = 4, whereas a clear-cut FHS was not found for n = 29 because the RDF did not have a vacant region after the first maximum; however, three water molecules remained directly interacting with the Pb ion for the whole simulation, while six others stayed at average distances shorter than 4 Å but dynamically getting closer and farther, thus producing a CN ranging from 6 to 9, depending on the criterion used to define the first hydration shell. In agreement with experimental data and previous calculations, proton transfer events were observed for n ≤8 but not for n ≥12 . For an event to occur, a water molecule in the second hydration shell had to make a single hydrogen bond with a water molecule in the first hydration shell.

  13. Coarse-grained model of water diffusion and proton conductivity in hydrated polyelectrolyte membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V., E-mail: aneimark@rutgers.edu [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 98 Brett Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8058 (United States)

    2016-01-07

    Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we simulate nanoscale segregation, water diffusion, and proton conductivity in hydrated sulfonated polystyrene (sPS). We employ a novel model [Lee et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11(9), 4395-4403 (2015)] that incorporates protonation/deprotonation equilibria into DPD simulations. The polymer and water are modeled by coarse-grained beads interacting via short-range soft repulsion and smeared charge electrostatic potentials. The proton is introduced as a separate charged bead that forms dissociable Morse bonds with the base beads representing water and sulfonate anions. Morse bond formation and breakup artificially mimics the Grotthuss mechanism of proton hopping between the bases. The DPD model is parameterized by matching the proton mobility in bulk water, dissociation constant of benzenesulfonic acid, and liquid-liquid equilibrium of water-ethylbenzene solutions. The DPD simulations semi-quantitatively predict nanoscale segregation in the hydrated sPS into hydrophobic and hydrophilic subphases, water self-diffusion, and proton mobility. As the hydration level increases, the hydrophilic subphase exhibits a percolation transition from isolated water clusters to a 3D network. The analysis of hydrophilic subphase connectivity and water diffusion demonstrates the importance of the dynamic percolation effect of formation and breakup of temporary junctions between water clusters. The proposed DPD model qualitatively predicts the ratio of proton to water self-diffusion and its dependence on the hydration level that is in reasonable agreement with experiments.

  14. Raman microspectroscopic and dynamic vapor sorption characterization of hydration in collagen and dermal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qihong; Andrew Chan, K L; Zhang, Guojin; Gillece, Timothy; Senak, Laurence; Moore, David J; Mendelsohn, Richard; Flach, Carol R

    2011-09-01

    Water is an integral part of collagen's triple helical and higher order structure. Studies of model triple helical peptides have revealed the presence of repetitive intrachain, interchain, and intermolecular water bridges (Bella et al., Structure 1995, 15, 893-906). In addition, an extended cylinder of hydration is thought to be responsible for collagen fiber assembly. Confocal Raman spectroscopy and dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) measurements of human Type I collagen and pigskin dermis were performed to probe relative humidity (RH)-dependent differences in the nature and level of collagen hydration. Raman spectra were also acquired as a function of time for both Type I collagen and pigskin dermis samples upon exchange of a 100% RH H(2) O to deuterium oxide (D(2) O) environment. Alterations in Amide I and III modes were consistent with anticipated changes in hydrogen bonding strength as RH increased and upon H → D exchange. Of note is the identification of a Raman spectral marker (band at 938 cm(-1) ) which appears to be sensitive to alterations in collagen-bound water. Analysis of DVS isotherms provided a quantitative measure of adsorbed and absorbed water vapor consistent with the Raman results. The development of a Raman spectral marker of collagen hydration in intact tissue is relevant to diverse fields of study ranging from the evaluation of therapeutics for wound healing to hydration of aging skin. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Gas Hydrates of Coal Layers as a Methane Source in the Atmosphere and Mine Working

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrdin, Valery; Shepeleva, Sofya; Kim, Tatiana

    2017-11-01

    Living conditions of gas hydrates of a methane in a coal matrix as one of possible forms of finding of molecules of a methane in coal layers are considered. However, gas hydrates are formed not in all mineral coals even under the thermobaric conditions corresponding to their equilibrium state as the minimum humidity and the corresponding pore width are necessary for each brand of coal for formation of gas hydrate. It is shown that it depends on electric electrical dipole moment of a macromolecule of coal. Coals of brands K, D, Zh were considered. The electric field created by the surface of coal does not allow molecules of water to carry out threedimensional driving, and they keep on an internal surface of a time. By means of theoretical model operation a dipole - dipole interaction of molecules of water with the steam surface of coal values of energy of fiber interaction for various functional groups located in coal "fringe" which size for the first and second layers does not allow molecules of water to participate in formation of gas hydrates are received. For coals of brands K, Zh, D, considering distribution of a time on radiuses, the percent of moisture, which cannot share in education solid coal of gas solutions, is calculated.

  16. From hydration repulsion to dry adhesion between asymmetric hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces.