WorldWideScience

Sample records for hydrates comparative analysis

  1. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  2. Gas Hydrate Petroleum System Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, T. S.

    2012-12-01

    In a gas hydrate petroleum system, the individual factors that contribute to the formation of gas hydrate accumulations, such as (1) gas hydrate pressure-temperature stability conditions, (2) gas source, (3) gas migration, and (4) the growth of the gas hydrate in suitable host sediment can identified and quantified. The study of know and inferred gas hydrate accumulations reveal the occurrence of concentrated gas hydrate is mostly controlled by the presence of fractures and/or coarser grained sediments. Field studies have concluded that hydrate grows preferentially in coarse-grained sediments because lower capillary pressures in these sediments permit the migration of gas and nucleation of hydrate. Due to the relatively distal nature of the deep marine geologic settings, the overall abundance of sand within the shallow geologic section is usually low. However, drilling projects in the offshore of Japan, Korea, and in the Gulf of Mexico has revealed the occurrence of significant hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs. The 1999/2000 Japan Nankai Trough drilling confirmed occurrence of hydrate-bearing sand-rich intervals (interpreted as turbidite fan deposits). Gas hydrate was determined to fill the pore spaces in these deposits, reaching saturations up to 80% in some layers. A multi-well drilling program titled "METI Toaki-oki to Kumano-nada" also identified sand-rich reservoirs with pore-filling hydrate. The recovered hydrate-bearing sand layers were described as very-fine- to fine-grained turbidite sand layers measuring from several centimeters up to a meter thick. However, the gross thickness of the hydrate-bearing sand layers were up to 50 m. In 2010, the Republic of Korea conducted the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate (UBGH2) Drilling Expedition. Seismic data clearly showed the development of a thick, potential basin wide, sedimentary sections characterized by mostly debris flows. The downhole LWD logs and core data from Site UBGH2-5 reveal that each debris flows is

  3. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  4. Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gay Hydrate Production Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. D. White; B. P. McGrail; S. K. Wurstner

    2009-06-30

    Displacing natural gas and petroleum with carbon dioxide is a proven technology for producing conventional geologic hydrocarbon reservoirs, and producing additional yields from abandoned or partially produced petroleum reservoirs. Extending this concept to natural gas hydrate production offers the potential to enhance gas hydrate recovery with concomitant permanent geologic sequestration. Numerical simulation was used to assess a suite of carbon dioxide injection techniques for producing gas hydrates from a variety of geologic deposit types. Secondary hydrate formation was found to inhibit contact of the injected CO{sub 2} regardless of injectate phase state, thus diminishing the exchange rate due to pore clogging and hydrate zone bypass of the injected fluids. Additional work is needed to develop methods of artificially introducing high-permeability pathways in gas hydrate zones if injection of CO{sub 2} in either gas, liquid, or micro-emulsion form is to be more effective in enhancing gas hydrate production rates.

  5. Prevention of contrast nephropathy by furosemide with matched hydration: the MYTHOS (Induced Diuresis With Matched Hydration Compared to Standard Hydration for Contrast Induced Nephropathy Prevention) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenzi, Giancarlo; Ferrari, Cristina; Marana, Ivana; Assanelli, Emilio; De Metrio, Monica; Teruzzi, Giovanni; Veglia, Fabrizio; Fabbiocchi, Franco; Montorsi, Piero; Bartorelli, Antonio L

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of furosemide-forced diuresis and intravenous saline infusion matched with urine output, using a novel dedicated device designed for contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) prevention. CIN is a frequent cause of acute kidney injury associated with increased morbidity and mortality. A total of 170 consecutive patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) undergoing coronary procedures were randomized to either furosemide with matched hydration (FMH group, n = 87) or to standard intravenous isotonic saline hydration (control group; n = 83). The FMH group received an initial 250-ml intravenous bolus of normal saline over 30 min followed by an intravenous bolus (0.5 mg/kg) of furosemide. Hydration infusion rate was automatically adjusted to precisely replace the patient's urine output. When a urine output rate >300 ml/h was obtained, patients underwent the coronary procedure. Matched fluid replacement was maintained during the procedure and for 4 h post-treatment. The definition of CIN was a ≥25% or ≥0.5 mg/dl rise in serum creatinine over baseline. In the FMH group, no device- or therapy-related complications were observed. Four (4.6%) patients in the FMH group developed CIN versus 15 (18%) controls (p = 0.005). A lower incidence of cumulative in-hospital clinical complications was also observed in FMH-treated patients than in controls (8% vs. 18%; p = 0.052). In patients with CKD undergoing coronary procedures, furosemide-induced high urine output with matched hydration significantly reduces the risk of CIN and may be associated with improved in-hospital outcome. (Induced Diuresis With Matched Hydration Compared to Standard Hydration for Contrast Induced Nephropathy Prevention [MYTHOS]; NCT00702728). Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Protein pharmacophore selection using hydration-site analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bingjie; Lill, Markus A.

    2012-01-01

    Virtual screening using pharmacophore models is an efficient method to identify potential lead compounds for target proteins. Pharmacophore models based on protein structures are advantageous because a priori knowledge of active ligands is not required and the models are not biased by the chemical space of previously identified actives. However, in order to capture most potential interactions between all potentially binding ligands and the protein, the size of the pharmacophore model, i.e. number of pharmacophore elements, is typically quite large and therefore reduces the efficiency of pharmacophore based screening. We have developed a new method to select important pharmacophore elements using hydration-site information. The basic premise is that ligand functional groups that replace water molecules in the apo protein contribute strongly to the overall binding affinity of the ligand, due to the additional free energy gained from releasing the water molecule into the bulk solvent. We computed the free energy of water released from the binding site for each hydration site using thermodynamic analysis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Pharmacophores which are co-localized with hydration sites with estimated favorable contributions to the free energy of binding are selected to generate a reduced pharmacophore model. We constructed reduced pharmacophore models for three protein systems and demonstrated good enrichment quality combined with high efficiency. The reduction in pharmacophore model size reduces the required screening time by a factor of 200–500 compared to using all protein pharmacophore elements. We also describe a training process using a small set of known actives to reliably select the optimal set of criteria for pharmacophore selection for each protein system. PMID:22397751

  7. Nucleation rate analysis of methane hydrate from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuhara, Daisuke; Barnes, Brian C; Suh, Donguk; Knott, Brandon C; Beckham, Gregg T; Yasuoka, Kenji; Wu, David T; Sum, Amadeu K

    2015-01-01

    Clathrate hydrates are solid crystalline structures most commonly formed from solutions that have nucleated to form a mixed solid composed of water and gas. Understanding the mechanism of clathrate hydrate nucleation is essential to grasp the fundamental chemistry of these complex structures and their applications. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is an ideal method to study nucleation at the molecular level because the size of the critical nucleus and formation rate occur on the nano scale. Various analysis methods for nucleation have been developed through MD to analyze nucleation. In particular, the mean first-passage time (MFPT) and survival probability (SP) methods have proven to be effective in procuring the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size for monatomic systems. This study assesses the MFPT and SP methods, previously used for monatomic systems, when applied to analyzing clathrate hydrate nucleation. Because clathrate hydrate nucleation is relatively difficult to observe in MD simulations (due to its high free energy barrier), these methods have yet to be applied to clathrate hydrate systems. In this study, we have analyzed the nucleation rate and critical nucleus size of methane hydrate using MFPT and SP methods from data generated by MD simulations at 255 K and 50 MPa. MFPT was modified for clathrate hydrate from the original version by adding the maximum likelihood estimate and growth effect term. The nucleation rates calculated by MFPT and SP methods are within 5%, and the critical nucleus size estimated by the MFPT method was 50% higher, than values obtained through other more rigorous but computationally expensive estimates. These methods can also be extended to the analysis of other clathrate hydrates.

  8. Stability Analysis of Methane Hydrate-Bearing Soils Considering Dissociation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromasa Iwai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the methane hydrate dissociation process may lead to unstable behavior such as large ground deformations, uncontrollable gas production, etc. A linear instability analysis was performed in order to investigate which variables have a significant effect on the onset of the instability behavior of methane hydrate-bearing soils subjected to dissociation. In the analysis a simplified viscoplastic constitutive equation is used for the soil sediment. The stability analysis shows that the onset of instability of the material system mainly depends on the strain hardening-softening parameter, the degree of strain, and the permeability for water and gas. Then, we conducted a numerical analysis of gas hydrate-bearing soil considering hydrate dissociation in order to investigate the effect of the parameters on the system. The simulation method used in the present study can describe the chemo-thermo-mechanically coupled behaviors such as phase changes from hydrates to water and gas, temperature changes and ground deformation. From the numerical results, we found that basically the larger the permeability for water and gas is, the more stable the simulation results are. These results are consistent with those obtained from the linear stability analysis.

  9. Hydration, hydration, hydration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miller, Veronica S; Bates, Graham P

    2010-01-01

    .... Although the importance of adequate hydration in combating heat stress is universally recognized, studies in a range of worker groups have demonstrated a disturbingly poor hydration level in a high...

  10. A DFT-based comparative equilibrium study of thermal dehydration and hydrolysis of CaCl₂ hydrates and MgCl₂ hydrates for seasonal heat storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Amar Deep; Nedea, Silvia; Zondag, Herbert; Rindt, Camilo; Smeulders, David

    2016-04-21

    Salt hydrates store solar energy in chemical form via a reversible dehydration-hydration reaction. However, as a side reaction to dehydration, hydrolysis (HCl formation) may occur in chloride based salt hydrates (specially in MgCl2 hydrates), affecting the durability of the storage system. The mixture of CaCl2 and MgCl2 hydrates has been shown experimentally to have exceptional cycle stability and improved kinetics. However, the optimal operating conditions for the mixture are unknown. To understand the appropriate balance between dehydration and hydrolysis kinetics in the mixtures, it is essential to gain in-depth insight into the mixture components. We present a GGA-DFT level study to investigate the various gaseous structures of CaCl2 hydrates and to understand the relative stability of their conformers. The hydration strength and relative stability of conformers are dominated by electrostatic interactions. A wide network of intramolecular homonuclear and heteronuclear hydrogen bonds is observed in CaCl2 hydrates. Equilibrium product concentrations are obtained during dehydration and hydrolysis reactions under various temperature and pressure conditions. The trend of the dehydration curve with temperature in CaCl2 hydrates is similar to the experiments. Comparing these results to those of MgCl2 hydrates, we find that CaCl2 hydrates are more resistant towards hydrolysis in the temperature range of 273-800 K. Specifically, the present study reveals that the onset temperatures of HCl formation, a crucial design parameter for MgCl2 hydrates, are lower than for CaCl2 hydrates except for the mono-hydrate.

  11. Urinary incontinence and hydration: A population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis-Gray, Marcella; Wu, Jennifer M; Markland, Alayne

    2017-04-18

    To determine if there is an association between urinary incontinence (UI) and an objective measure of hydration status in men and women in a nationwide, population-based sample. We utilized data from the 2009 to 2010 and 2011 to 2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES), cross sectional surveys of the US non-institutionalized population. Our primary outcome was moderate/severe UI measured using a validated scale. Our exposure of interest was hydration status. Urine osmolality ≥ 800 mOsm/kg defined dehydration versus adequate hydration (kidney disease, the interaction of age with osmolality, and hysterectomy (women only). Among the 11 482 total subjects, 9497 (83%-4882 men and 4615 women) had both UI and urine osmolality data. Compared to women, men were less likely to report UI (5.9% vs 18.9%; P incontinence in men or women. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Dynamics tromal hydration during phacoemulsification: a comparative study with experimental data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Özyol

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To present a different approach called dynamic stromal hydration. Though common, conventional hydration technique should be standardized to ascertain wound integrity at the time of stromal hydration during cataract surgery. No explicit criteria exist to suggest that hydration of wound edges is adequate. METHODS: This study was designed as prospective, randomized, comparative study. Leakage sites were detected by continuous irrigation. At that point, stromal hydration was performed in consideration of the leakage points. The wound edges were hydrated until no further leakage could be visually detected. Trypan blue 0.0125% was applied over the wound sites, and each wound was individually observed for leakage. On the day after surgery, Seidel's test was performed to assess wound integrity.RESULTS: All 120 eyes in the experimental group were evaluated, including all 360 wound sites-120 left side ports, 120 right side ports, and 120 main incisions-as were all 120 eyes in the control group. Though the dye test revealed leakage of aqueous humour from only 29 wound sites of 22 eyes(8.0% of 360 woundsin the experimental group, leakage appeared in 41 wound sites of 30 eyes(11.3% of 360 woundsin the control group. When groups were compared in terms of leakage, the difference was statistically different(P=0.042.CONCLUSION: Dynamic stromal hydration-meaning standardized conventional stromal hydration-is a direct observational technique that allows the easy evaluation of wound integrity at the time of stromal hydration by way of observing wound dynamics.

  13. A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Intranasal Midazolam and Chloral Hydrate for Procedural Sedation in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Marie Christy Sharafine; Mathew, John; Varghese, Ajoy Mathew; Kurien, Mary; Mathew, George Ani

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intranasal midazolam and chloral hydrate syrup for procedural sedation in children. Prospective randomized placebo-controlled trial (double blind, double dummy). Tertiary care hospital over 18 months. Eighty-two children, 1 to 6 years old, undergoing auditory brainstem response testing were randomized to receive either intranasal midazolam with oral placebo or chloral hydrate syrup with placebo nasal spray. Intranasal midazolam was delivered at 0.5 mg/kg (100 mcg per spray) and oral syrup at 50 mg/kg. Children not sedated at 30 minutes had a second dose at half the initial dose. The primary outcomes measured were safety and efficacy. Secondary outcomes were time to onset of sedation, parental separation, nature of parental separation, parental satisfaction, audiologist's satisfaction, time to recovery, and number of attempts. Forty-one children were in each group, and no major adverse events were noted. The chloral hydrate group showed earlier onset of sedation (66%) compared with the intranasal midazolam group (33%). Significant difference in time to recovery was noted in the chloral hydrate group (78 minutes) versus the intranasal midazolam group (108 minutes). The parents' and audiologist's satisfaction was higher for chloral hydrate (95% and 75%) than for intranasal midazolam (49% and 29%, respectively). Overall, sedation was 95% with chloral hydrate versus 51% with intranasal midazolam. Both drugs maintained sedation. Intranasal midazolam and chloral hydrate are both safe and efficacious for pediatric procedural sedation. Chloral hydrate was superior to intranasal midazolam, with an earlier time to onset of sedation, a faster recovery, better satisfaction among parents and the audiologist, and successful sedation. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  14. Comparative atomic-scale hydration of the ceramide and phosphocholine headgroup in solution and bilayer environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillams, Richard J.; Lorenz, Christian D.; McLain, Sylvia E.

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have used neutron diffraction to elucidate the hydration of the ceramide and the phosphatidylcholine headgroup in solution. These solution studies provide bond-length resolution information on the system, but are limited to liquid samples. The work presented here investigates how the hydration of ceramide and phosphatidylcholine headgroups in a solution compares with that found in a lipid bilayer. This work shows that the hydration patterns seen in the solution samples provide valuable insight into the preferential location of hydrating water molecules in the bilayer. There are certain subtle differences in the distribution, which result from a combination of the lipid conformation and the lipid-lipid interactions within the bilayer environment. The lipid-lipid interactions in the bilayer will be dependent on the composition of the bilayer, whereas the restricted exploration of conformational space is likely to be applicable in all membrane environments. The generalized description of hydration gathered from the neutron diffraction studies thus provides good initial estimation for the hydration pattern, but this can be further refined for specific systems.

  15. Hydrate formation during wet granulation studied by spectroscopic methods and multivariate analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anna; Rantanen, Jukka; Karjalainen, Milja

    2002-01-01

    ) Raman spectroscopy was compared with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) in following hydrate formation of drugs during wet granulation (off-line). To perform an at-line process analysis, the effect of water addition was monitored by NIR spectroscopy and principal components analysis (PCA). The changes...... gave information related to the drug molecule itself. The XRPD confirmed the spectroscopic results. PCA with three principal components explained 99.9 of the spectral variation in the second derivative NIR spectra. CONCLUSIONS: Both CCD Raman and NIR spectroscopic methods can be applied to monitoring...... in the crystal arrangements were verified by using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). RESULTS: Hydrate formation of theophylline and caffeine could be followed by CCD Raman spectroscopy. The NIR and Raman spectroscopic results were consistent with each other. NIR revealed the state of water, and Raman spectroscopy...

  16. Sodium bicarbonate-based hydration prevents contrast-induced nephropathy: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamhane Umesh

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contrast-induced nephropathy is the leading cause of in-hospital acute renal failure. This side effect of contrast agents leads to increased morbidity, mortality, and health costs. Ensuring adequate hydration prior to contrast exposure is highly effective at preventing this complication, although the optimal hydration strategy to prevent contrast-induced nephropathy still remains an unresolved issue. Former meta-analyses and several recent studies have shown conflicting results regarding the protective effect of sodium bicarbonate. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of normal saline versus sodium bicarbonate for prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy. Methods The study searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane databases, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts database, ISI Web of Science (until 15 December 2008, and conference proceedings for randomized controlled trials that compared normal saline with sodium bicarbonate-based hydration regimen regarding contrast-induced nephropathy. Random-effects models were used to calculate summary odds ratios. Results A total of 17 trials including 2,633 subjects were pooled. Pre-procedural hydration with sodium bicarbonate was associated with a significant decrease in the rate of contrast-induced nephropathy (odds ratios 0.52; 95% confidence interval 0.34–0.80, P = 0.003. Number needed to treat to prevent one case of contrast-induced nephropathy was 16 (95% confidence interval 10–34. No significant differences in the rates of post-procedure hemodialysis (P = 0.20 or death (P = 0.53 was observed. Conclusion Sodium bicarbonate-based hydration was found to be superior to normal saline in prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy in this updated meta-analysis.

  17. Strain rate viscoelastic analysis of soft and highly hydrated biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirella, A; Mattei, G; Ahluwalia, A

    2014-10-01

    Measuring the viscoelastic behavior of highly hydrated biological materials is challenging because of their intrinsic softness and labile nature. In these materials, it is difficult to avoid prestress and therefore to establish precise initial stress and strain conditions for lumped parameter estimation using creep or stress-relaxation (SR) tests. We describe a method ( ɛ˙M or epsilon dot method) for deriving the viscoelastic parameters of soft hydrated biomaterials which avoids prestress and can be used to rapidly test degradable samples. Standard mechanical tests are first performed compressing samples using different strain rates. The dataset obtained is then analyzed to mathematically derive the material's viscoelastic parameters. In this work a stable elastomer, polydimethylsiloxane, and a labile hydrogel, gelatin, were first tested using the ɛ˙M, in parallel SR was used to compare lumped parameter estimation. After demonstrating that the elastic parameters are equivalent and that the estimation of short-time constants is more precise using the proposed method, the viscoelastic behavior of porcine liver was investigated using this approach. The results show that the constitutive parameters of hepatic tissue can be quickly quantified without the application of any prestress and before the onset of time-dependent degradation phenomena. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities: Volume 13: Basin analysis, formation and stability of gas hydrates of the Nankai Trough: Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciesnik, M.; Krason, J.

    1989-05-01

    Geological factors controlling the formation, stability, and distribution of gas hydrates were investigated by basin analysis of the Nankai Trough region. The Nankai Trough is located beneath the western Pacific, south of the Japanese islands Shikoku and central Kyushu. Geological, geophysical, and geochemical data from the region were assembled and critically evaluated to develop consistent interpretations of the relationships of geological environments and gas hydrates. This study was performed for the US Department of Energy Morgantown Energy Technology Center by Geoexplorers International, Inc., as part of a worldwide evaluation of 21 offshore sites where the presence of gas hydrates has been confirmed or inferred. 60 refs., 26 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Sensitivity analysis of P-waves and S-waves to gas hydrate in the Shenhu area using OBS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lei; Liu, Xueqin; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Huaishan; Zhang, Jing; Li, Zizheng; Wang, Jianhua

    2018-02-01

    Compared to towed streamers, ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) obtain both S-wave data and richer wavefield information. In this paper, the induced polarization method is used to conduct wavefield separation on OBS data obtained from the Shenhu area in the South China Sea. A comparison of the changes in P- and S-waves, and a comprehensive analysis of geological factors within the area, enable analysis and description of the occurrence of natural gas hydrate in the study area. Results show an increase in P-wave velocity when natural gas hydrate exists in the formation, whereas the S-wave velocity remains almost constant, as S-waves can only propagate through the rock skeleton. Therefore, the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) response of the P-wave is better than that of the S-wave in the frequency analysis profile. In a wide-angle section, the refractive wave of the hydrate layer is evident when using P-wave components but identification is difficult with S-wave components. This velocity model illustrates the sensitivity of P- and S-wave components to gas hydrate. The use of this polarization method and results of analysis provide technical and theoretical support for research on hydrate deposits and other geological features in the Shenhu area.

  20. Evaluation and review of body fluids saliva, sweat and tear compared to biochemical hydration assessment markers within blood and urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villiger, M; Stoop, R; Vetsch, T; Hohenauer, E; Pini, M; Clarys, P; Pereira, F; Clijsen, R

    2018-01-01

    Evaluating and testing hydration status is increasingly requested by rehabilitation, sport, military and performance-related activities. Besides commonly used biochemical hydration assessment markers within blood and urine, which have their advantages and limitations in collection and evaluating hydration status, there are other potential markers present within saliva, sweat or tear. This literature review focuses on body fluids saliva, sweat and tear compared to blood and urine regarding practicality and hydration status influenced by fluid restriction and/or physical activity. The selected articles included healthy subjects, biochemical hydration assessment markers and a well-described (de)hydration procedure. The included studies (n=16) revealed that the setting and the method of collecting respectively accessing body fluids are particularly important aspects to choose the optimal hydration marker. To obtain a sample of saliva is one of the simplest ways to collect body fluids. During exercise and heat exposures, saliva composition might be an effective index but seems to be highly variable. The collection of sweat is a more extensive and time-consuming technique making it more difficult to evaluate dehydration and to make a statement about the hydration status at a particular time. The collection procedure of tear fluid is easy to access and causes very little discomfort to the subject. Tear osmolarity increases with dehydration in parallel to alterations in plasma osmolality and urine-specific gravity. But at the individual level, its sensitivity has to be further determined.

  1. Quantification of synthesized hydration products using synchrotron microtomography and spectral analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deboodt, Tyler; Ideker, Jason H.; Isgor, O. Burkan; Wildenschild, Dorthe

    2017-12-01

    The use of x-ray computed tomography (CT) as a standalone method has primarily been used to characterize pore structure, cracking and mechanical damage in cementitious systems due to low contrast in the hydrated phases. These limitations have resulted in the inability to extract quantifiable information on such phases. The goal of this research was to address the limitations caused by low contrast and improving the ability to distinguish the four primary hydrated phases in portland cement; C-S-H, calcium hydroxide, monosulfate, and ettringite. X-ray CT on individual layers, binary mixtures of phases, and quaternary mixtures of phases to represent a hydrated portland cement paste were imaged with synchrotron radiation. Known masses of each phase were converted to a volume and compared to the segmented image volumes. It was observed that adequate contrast in binary mixing of phases allowed for segmentation, and subsequent image analysis indicated quantifiable volumes could be extracted from the tomographic volume. However, low contrast was observed when C-S-H and monosulfate were paired together leading to difficulties segmenting in an unbiased manner. Quantification of phases in quaternary mixtures included larger errors than binary mixes due to histogram overlaps of monosulfate, C-S-H, and calcium hydroxide.

  2. In-vacuum micro-PIXE analysis of biological specimens in frozen-hydrated state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tylko, G. [Materials Research Group, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa)]. E-mail: tylko@zuk.iz.uj.edu.pl; Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, J. [Materials Research Group, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Przybylowicz, W.J. [Materials Research Group, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa)

    2007-07-15

    The first in-vacuum measurements of biological specimens in frozen-hydrated state using proton microbeam have been performed at Materials Research Group, iThemba LABS, South Africa. A commercially available cryotransfer system used in electron microscopy has been adapted for this purpose. The analyzed material was frozen in propane cooled by liquid nitrogen, fractured, carbon coated and transferred onto the cold stage (100 K) in the nuclear microprobe chamber. Micro-PIXE and simultaneous proton backscattering was performed using 3 MeV proton beam. Monitoring of water vapour composition during the proton bombardment showed good stability of the analyzed material. Quantitative results were obtained by standardless method, tested using 20% gelatine standards with added PbCl{sub 2}. The differences between the concentrations obtained for frozen-hydrated and next freeze-dried specimens and the value calculated on the basis of weighted mass of PbCl{sub 2} added to gelatine were statistically insignificant. Leaf tissue of Senecio anomalochrous and larvae of Chysolina pardalina were used as examples of plant and animal tissue. Quantitative elemental mapping of frozen-hydrated specimens compared with subsequent analysis of the same areas after freeze-drying revealed the same distribution pattern in both cases.

  3. Furosemide with saline hydration for prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy in patients undergoing coronary angiography: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Nana; Zhao, Jiegang; Li, Zhuanzhen; Dong, Pingshuan; Wang, Shaoxin; Zhao, Yuwei; Wang, Liping; Wang, Hongyun

    2015-01-23

    The clinical efficacy of furosemide administration in preventing contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) remains uncertain. This meta-analysis was designed to update data on the incidence of CIN with additional furosemide treatment beyond saline hydration in comparison with hydration alone in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). A computerized literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases was performed. Trials were eligible if they enrolled patients undergoing coronary angiography and randomly allocated participants to receive furosemide administration in addition to saline hydration or saline hydration alone. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for combinations of studies. Five trials involving 1294 patients (640 for additional furosemide treatment and 654 for hydration alone) were included in the meta-analysis. In the synthesis of data, additional furosemide administration had little impact on the incidence of CIN post-PCI compared with peri-procedural saline hydration alone (OR=0.96; 95% CI 0.33-2.84, p=0.95). Moreover, as for the subsequent need for dialysis, there was no statistical significant difference between the 2 groups (OR=1.01; 95% CI 0.38-2.67, p=0.99). Sensitivity analyses did not show any relevant influence on the overall results. There was no publication bias in the meta-analysis. Furosemide administration did not achieve additional benefit beyond saline hydration in reducing the incidence of CIN in patients undergoing PCI.

  4. Heat Transfer Analysis of Methane Hydrate Sediment Dissociation in a Closed Reactor by a Thermal Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjun Yang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The heat transfer analysis of hydrate-bearing sediment involved phase changes is one of the key requirements of gas hydrate exploitation techniques. In this paper, experiments were conducted to examine the heat transfer performance during hydrate formation and dissociation by a thermal method using a 5L volume reactor. This study simulated porous media by using glass beads of uniform size. Sixteen platinum resistance thermometers were placed in different position in the reactor to monitor the temperature differences of the hydrate in porous media. The influence of production temperature on the production time was also investigated. Experimental results show that there is a delay when hydrate decomposed in the radial direction and there are three stages in the dissociation period which is influenced by the rate of hydrate dissociation and the heat flow of the reactor. A significant temperature difference along the radial direction of the reactor was obtained when the hydrate dissociates and this phenomenon could be enhanced by raising the production temperature. In addition, hydrate dissociates homogeneously and the temperature difference is much smaller than the other conditions when the production temperature is around the 10 °C. With the increase of the production temperature, the maximum of ΔToi grows until the temperature reaches 40 °C. The period of ΔToi have a close relation with the total time of hydrate dissociation. Especially, the period of ΔToi with production temperature of 10 °C is twice as much as that at other temperatures. Under these experimental conditions, the heat is mainly transferred by conduction from the dissociated zone to the dissociating zone and the production temperature has little effect on the convection of the water in the porous media.

  5. A comparative study of the modelling of cement hydration and cement-rock laboratory experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David, E-mail: savaged@me.com [Quintessa Ltd., The Hub, 14 Station Road, Henley-on-Thames, RG9 1AY (United Kingdom); Soler, Josep M. [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Yamaguchi, Kohei; Walker, Colin; Honda, Akira; Inagaki, Manabu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1194 (Japan); Watson, Claire; Wilson, James; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., The Hub, 14 Station Road, Henley-on-Thames, RG9 1AY (United Kingdom); Gaus, Irina; Rueedi, Joerg [Nagra, Hardstrasse 73, Wettingen CH-5430 (Switzerland)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > A modelling intercomparison has shown that the dominant reaction pathways are well understood. > However, significant differences in model parameterisation produced similar results. > The modelling showed that there is benefit in keeping the numerical models as simple as possible. - Abstract: The use of cement and concrete as fracture grouting or as tunnel seals in a geological disposal facility for radioactive wastes creates potential issues concerning chemical reactivity. From a long-term safety perspective, it is desirable to be able model these interactions and changes quantitatively. The 'Long-term Cement Studies' (LCS) project was formulated with an emphasis on in situ field experiments with more realistic boundary conditions and longer time scales compared with former experiments. As part of the project programme, a modelling inter-comparison has been conducted, involving the modelling of two experiments describing cement hydration on one hand and cement-rock reaction on the other, with teams representing the NDA (UK), Posiva (Finland), and JAEA (Japan). This modelling exercise showed that the dominant reaction pathways in the two experiments are fairly well understood and are consistent between the different modelling teams, although significant differences existed amongst the precise parameterisation (e.g. reactive surface areas, dependences of rate upon pH, types of secondary minerals), and in some instances, processes (e.g. partition of alkali elements between solids and liquid during cement hydration; kinetic models of cement hydration). It was not conclusive if certain processes such as surface complexation (preferred by some modellers, but not by others) played a role in the cement-rock experiment or not. These processes appear to be more relevant at early times in the experiment and the evolution at longer timescales was not affected. The observed permeability profile with time could not be matched. The fact that no secondary

  6. Analysis of Factors Influencing Hydration Site Prediction Based on Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Water contributes significantly to the binding of small molecules to proteins in biochemical systems. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based programs such as WaterMap and WATsite have been used to probe the locations and thermodynamic properties of hydration sites at the surface or in the binding site of proteins generating important information for structure-based drug design. However, questions associated with the influence of the simulation protocol on hydration site analysis remain. In this study, we use WATsite to investigate the influence of factors such as simulation length and variations in initial protein conformations on hydration site prediction. We find that 4 ns MD simulation is appropriate to obtain a reliable prediction of the locations and thermodynamic properties of hydration sites. In addition, hydration site prediction can be largely affected by the initial protein conformations used for MD simulations. Here, we provide a first quantification of this effect and further indicate that similar conformations of binding site residues (RMSD hydration site predictions. PMID:25252619

  7. Hydration of calcium aluminate cement determined by thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinherrová, Lenka; Trník, Anton

    2017-07-01

    Calcium aluminate cements (CACs) are a very important type of non-Portland or special cements. Since they are considerably more expensive, they are not used as a simple substitute for Portland cement. Their structure allows them to achieve high compressive strength. They resist very well to high temperatures and temperature changes, or also to chemical attacks. The original motivation, why the CACs were developed, was the idea of finding new cement chemistries that would be more resistant to sulfate attack then Portland cements. Nowadays, the main usage of the CACs is in high temperatures applications. In this paper, we study the hydration of a CAC up to one year of age to control what happens in CACs structure during aging. The variety in the main products of hydration is studied using differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry in the temperature range from 25 °C to 1000 °C with a heating rate of 5 °C/min in an argon atmosphere. The basic physical and mechanical properties are also determined.

  8. Sensitivity Analysis of Methane Hydrate Reservoirs: Effects of Reservoir Parameters on Gas Productivity and Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. J.; Gaddipati, M.; Nyayapathi, L.

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a parametric study on production rates of natural gas from gas hydrates by the method of depressurization, using CMG STARS. Seven factors/parameters were considered as perturbations from a base-case hydrate reservoir description based on Problem 7 of the International Methane Hydrate Reservoir Simulator Code Comparison Study led by the Department of Energy and the USGS. This reservoir is modeled after the inferred properties of the hydrate deposit at the Prudhoe Bay L-106 site. The included sensitivity variables were hydrate saturation, pressure (depth), temperature, bottom-hole pressure of the production well, free water saturation, intrinsic rock permeability, and porosity. A two-level (L=2) Plackett-Burman experimental design was used to study the relative effects of these factors. The measured variable was the discounted cumulative gas production. The discount rate chosen was 15%, resulting in the gas contribution to the net present value of a reservoir. Eight different designs were developed for conducting sensitivity analysis and the effects of the parameters on the real and discounted production rates will be discussed. The breakeven price in various cases and the dependence of the breakeven price on the production parameters is given in the paper. As expected, initial reservoir temperature has the strongest positive effect on the productivity of a hydrate deposit and the bottom-hole pressure in the production well has the strongest negative dependence. Also resulting in a positive correlation is the intrinsic permeability and the initial free water of the formation. Negative effects were found for initial hydrate saturation (at saturations greater than 50% of the pore space) and the reservoir porosity. These negative effects are related to the available sensible heat of the reservoir, with decreasing productivity due to decreasing available sensible heat. Finally, we conclude that for the base case reservoir, the break-even price (BEP

  9. Gravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetric studies on glycerin-induced skin hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ae-Ri Cho; Moon, Hee Kyung

    2007-11-01

    A thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were carried out to characterize the water property and an alteration of lipid phase transition of stratum corneum (SC) by glycerin. In addition, the relationship between steady state skin permeation rate and skin hydration in various concentrations of glycerin was investigated. Water vapor absorption-desorption was studied in the hairless mouse stratum corneum. Dry SC samples were exposed to different conc. of glycerin (0-50%) followed by exposure to dry air and the change in weight property was monitored over time by use of TGA. In DSC study, significant decrease in DeltaH of the lipid transition in 10% glycerin and water treated sample: the heat of lipid transition of normal, water, 10% glycerin treated SC were 6.058, 4.412 and 4.316 mJ/mg, respectively. In 10% glycerin treated SCs, the Tc of water shifts around 129 degrees C, corresponding to the weakly bound secondary water. In 40% glycerin treated SC, the Tc of water shifts to 144 degrees C corresponding to strongly bound primary water. There was a good correlation between the hydration property of the skin and the steady state skin flux with the correlation coefficient (r2=0.94). As the hydration increased, the steady state flux increased. As glycerin concentration increased, hydration property decreased. High diffusivity induced by the hydration effect of glycerin and water could be the major contributing factor for the enhanced skin permeation of nicotinic acid (NA).

  10. Hydration sites of unpaired RNA bases: a statistical analysis of the PDB structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carugo Oliviero

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydration is crucial for RNA structure and function. X-ray crystallography is the most commonly used method to determine RNA structures and hydration and, therefore, statistical surveys are based on crystallographic results, the number of which is quickly increasing. Results A statistical analysis of the water molecule distribution in high-resolution X-ray structures of unpaired RNA nucleotides showed that: different bases have the same penchant to be surrounded by water molecules; clusters of water molecules indicate possible hydration sites, which, in some cases, match those of the major and minor grooves of RNA and DNA double helices; complex hydrogen bond networks characterize the solvation of the nucleotides, resulting in a significant rigidity of the base and its surrounding water molecules. Interestingly, the hydration sites around unpaired RNA bases do not match, in general, the positions that are occupied by the second nucleotide when the base-pair is formed. Conclusions The hydration sites around unpaired RNA bases were found. They do not replicate the atom positions of complementary bases in the Watson-Crick pairs.

  11. Stability analysis on production well in the hydrate-bearing sediments during depressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A. R.; Cho, G. C.; KIM, S. J.; Lee, J. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Methane hydrate has great potential as a new energy source and has been studied for scientific and technical advances. Among the production methods for methane recovery, depressurization has been proven as the most effective and productive method through the previous production test and numerical studies. However, the significant mechanical responses of hydrate-bearing sediment such as large volume contraction, and subsidence are possibly generated during methane production induced by depressurization. Moreover, this phenomenon is further exacerbated by strength and stiffness reduction in the hydrate-bearing sediments (HBS) as hydrate dissociation advances. As a result, the highest compressive strength is concentrated in the vicinity of the production wellbore and the wellhead. Therefore, it is essential to be addressed and evaluated that the mechanical responses of HBS and the stability analysis of the production well during depressurization and hydrate dissociation in order to prevent destruction of the production facilities and consequent leakage of the methane gas. In this study, a reservoir-scale THM coupled simulation using FLAC3D was conducted to evaluate the mechanical responses of HBS and the stability of the wellbore during the methane production by depressurization at the Ulleung Basin. The structural design and the mechanical properties including the dimensions of wellbore components, and interface properties related to the interaction behavior between the sediment and the wellbore, were considered in the three-dimensional model.

  12. Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II logging-while-drilling data acquisition and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Wyung W.; Zyrianova, Margarita V.; Mrozewski, Stefan A.; Guerin, Gilles; Cook, Ann E.; Goldberg, Dave S.

    2012-01-01

    One of the objectives of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II (GOM JIP Leg II) was the collection of a comprehensive suite of logging-while-drilling (LWD) data within gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in order to make accurate estimates of the concentration of gas hydrates under various geologic conditions and to understand the geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate at each of the sites drilled during this expedition. The LWD sensors just above the drill bit provided important information on the nature of the sediments and the occurrence of gas hydrate. There has been significant advancements in the use of downhole well-logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrate in nature: From using electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gas hydrate occurrences in wells to where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. Recent integrated sediment coring and well-log studies have confirmed that electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data can yield accurate gas hydrate saturations in sediment grain supported (isotropic) systems such as sand reservoirs, but more advanced log analysis models are required to characterize gas hydrate in fractured (anisotropic) reservoir systems. In support of the GOM JIP Leg II effort, well-log data montages have been compiled and presented in this report which includes downhole logs obtained from all seven wells drilled during this expedition with a focus on identifying and characterizing the potential gas-hydrate-bearing sedimentary section in each of the wells. Also presented and reviewed in this report are the gas-hydrate saturation and sediment porosity logs for each of the wells as calculated from available downhole well logs.

  13. Association of plasma adiponectin levels with cellular hydration state measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikawa T

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Takahiro Yoshikawa,1 Hiroshi Kanazawa21Department of Sports Medicine, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, JapanBackground: It is widely recognized that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD includes a variety of extra pulmonary complications and comorbidities. Recently, adiponectin was shown to regulate cellular metabolism in humans. Cellular hydration state is affected by a variety of hormonal factors and regulates cellular metabolic state. Therefore, this study was designed to determine whether adiponectin is a possible factor involved in cellular hydration state in COPD.Methods: Thirty patients with COPD and 41 age-matched controls participated in the study. Plasma levels of total and high molecular weight (HMW adiponectin were measured and anthropometry and pulmonary function tests were conducted. Intracellular water (ICW, extracellular water (ECW, and ECW/ICW ratio, which are parameters of cellular hydration state, were measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis.Results: Higher levels of total and HMW adiponectin in plasma were found in patients with COPD compared with levels in controls. A significant inverse correlation was observed between body mass index and plasma levels of total and HMW adiponectin in the control group. However, this significant correlation was not observed in patients with COPD. The plasma levels of total and HMW adiponectin were also not significantly correlated with any pulmonary function parameters in patients with COPD. Regarding the state of cellular hydration, the plasma levels of total adiponectin were inversely correlated with the ECW/ICW ratio and positively with ICW values in patients with COPD. Moreover, closer correlations were found between these parameters and plasma HMW adiponectin levels.Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest a novel association of the plasma

  14. Effects of Nanosilica on Early Age Stages of Cement Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forood Torabian Isfahani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of nanosilica on cement hydration have been broadly investigated in the literature and early age cement hydration, as a whole, has been mainly considered, disregarding the substages of the hydration. The hydration of cement is characterized by different substages and nanosilica effect on the hydration could be a result of diverse, even contradictory, behavior of nanosilica in individual stages of the hydration. In this study, effects of nanosilica on different substages of cement hydration are investigated. Isothermal calorimetry results show that at early ages (initial 72 hours the effects of nanosilica depend on the phenomenon by which the hydration is governed: when the hydration is chemically controlled, that is, during initial reaction, dormant period, and acceleratory period, the hydration rate is accelerated by adding nanosilica; when the hydration is governed by diffusion process, that is, during postacceleratory period, the hydration rate is decelerated by adding nanosilica. The Thermal Gravimetric Analysis on the samples at the hardened state (after 28 days of curing reveals that, after adding nanosilica, the hydration degree slightly increased compared to the plain paste.

  15. Offshore Antarctic Peninsula Gas Hydrate Reservoir Characterization by Geophysical Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Giustiniani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A gas hydrate reservoir, identified by the presence of the bottom simulating reflector, is located offshore of the Antarctic Peninsula. The analysis of geophysical dataset acquired during three geophysical cruises allowed us to characterize this reservoir. 2D velocity fields were obtained by using the output of the pre-stack depth migration iteratively. Gas hydrate amount was estimated by seismic velocity, using the modified Biot-Geerstma-Smit theory. The total volume of gas hydrate estimated, in an area of about 600 km2, is in a range of 16 × 109–20 × 109 m3. Assuming that 1 m3 of gas hydrate corresponds to 140 m3 of free gas in standard conditions, the reservoir could contain a total volume that ranges from 1.68 to 2.8 × 1012 m3 of free gas. The interpretation of the pre-stack depth migrated sections and the high resolution morpho-bathymetry image allowed us to define a structural model of the area. Two main fault systems, characterized by left transtensive and compressive movement, are recognized, which interact with a minor transtensive fault system. The regional geothermal gradient (about 37.5 °C/km, increasing close to a mud volcano likely due to fluid-upwelling, was estimated through the depth of the bottom simulating reflector by seismic data.

  16. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Compare the Efficacy of Three Different Methods of Maternal Hydration for Oligohydramnios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelamma Patil

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oligohydramnios is defined as an Amniotic Fluid Index (AFI of less than normal for that gestational age. It is mainly associated with increased perinatal morbidity and mortality due to cord compression, fetal distress, pulmonary hypoplasia. So, an effective medical therapy is very important to prevent the complications. Aim and Objectives: To compare efficacy of maternal hydration with oral water, 1Lof Ringer Lactate (RL + 1Lof 5% Dextrose (5% D and 2L of 0.45% Normal saline (0.45% NS in increasing AFI in patients with oligohydramnios. Material and Methods: Patients who had been diagnosed as oligohydramnios (with AFI<8cm by Ultrasonography (USG were included in the study. Both Fetal Growth Restriction (FGR with oligohydramnios and idiopathic oligohydramnios were studied. Totally 108 cases were allocated into 3 groups depending on the computer generated randomized table. Group A was given oral hydration i.e., 2L of water in 2 hours. Group B received 1L RL+ 1L 5% D in 2 hours intravenously and Group C was given 2L0.45% NS in 2 hours intravenously. AFI and Symphysiofundal Height (SFH was assessed after 2 hours and 24 hours after the hydration therapy. Results: All the types of hydration therapy had significant increase in AFI and SFH at 2 hours and 24 hours. In group A, mean increased from 4.91 ± 1.58 to 5.88 ± 1.86 and 6.49 ± 2.22 at 2 hours and 24 hours respectively. Similarly in group B, mean increased from 4.98 ± 1.86 to 5.79 ± 1.89, 6.18 ± 2.23 at 2 and 24 hours respectively. In group C, mean value increased from 5.58 ± 1.31 to 7.32 ± 1.40, 8.32 ± 1.77 at 2 hours and 24 hours. There was significant increase in group C when compared to other two groups and there was no statistically significant difference between group A and group B. There was significant rise in SFH in all the three groups at 2 hours and 24 hours. Both FGR with oligohydramnios and idiopathic oligohydramnios responded well to any type of hydration, but 0

  17. A study to compare the effectiveness of temazepam and a chloral hydrate/hydroxyzine combination in sedating paediatric dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsinidou, K G; Curzon, M E; Sapsford, D J

    1992-12-01

    The study compared the effectiveness of temazepam and a mixture of chloral hydrate and hydroxyzine in sedating 20 young children aged 20 to 60 months (mean age 38.7 months). All the children exhibited negative behaviour during a screening visit and required at least two visits for restorative treatment with the use of sedation. The children were assigned randomly to receive either 50 mg/kg of chloral hydrate with 25 mg of hydroxyzine or 0.3 mg/kg of temazepam for the first visit, and the alternate regimen for the second visit, in a double-blind manner. Pulse rate and blood oxygen saturation levels were monitored before, during and after the operative procedures. All the treatment sessions were video-recorded and evaluated independently by three paediatric dentists for the degree of crying, movement, sleep and overall behaviour during specific procedures and at specific time intervals. The results showed no statistically significant differences between the two pharmacologic regimens with regard to crying, movement, sleep and overall behaviour. No significant difference in behaviour was found related to either the order of administration of the drugs or to the sex of the patients. It was concluded that 0.3 mg/kg temazepam and a mixture of 50 mg/kg chloral hydrate with 25 mg hydroxyzine had similar sedative effects on the children receiving dental treatment.

  18. Bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA) for measuring the hydration status in young elite synchronized swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Marginet, Marta; Castizo-Olier, Jorge; Rodríguez-Zamora, Lara; Iglesias, Xavier; Rodríguez, Ferran A; Chaverri, Diego; Brotons, Daniel; Irurtia, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    The assessment of body hydration is a complex process, and no measurement is valid for all situations. Bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA) has emerged as a relatively novel technique for assessing hydration status in sports. We applied BIVA a) to determine hydration changes evoked by an intense synchronized swimming (SS) training session; b) to characterize the sample of young elite swimmers in relation with a nonathletic reference population; and c) to generate its 50%, 75% and 95% percentiles of the bioelectrical variables. Forty-nine elite SS female swimmers of two age categories, comen (Co: 13.9 ± 0.9 years, n = 34) and junior (Jr: 16.3 ± 0.6 years, n = 15), performed a long, high intensity training session. Body mass (BM) and bioelectrical variables (R, resistance; Xc, reactance; PA, phase angle; and Z, impedance module) were assessed pre- and post-training. BIVA was used to characterize 1) the distribution pattern of the bioelectrical vector (BIA vector) for both age groups, and 2) pre- to post-training BIA vector migration. Bioelectrical variables were also correlated with BM change values. Most swimmers were mostly located outside the 75% and some beyond the 95% percentile of the bioelectrical tolerance ellipses of the general population. The BIA vector showed statistically significant differences in both Co (T2 = 134.7, p = 0.0001) and Jr (T2 = 126.2, p hydration status of these young elite female swimmers was affected by the execution of intense training sessions. From a methodological perspective, BIVA appears to be sensitive enough to detect subtle hydration changes, but further research is needed to ensure its validity and reliability. Moreover, these findings highlight the importance of ensuring adequate fluid intake during training in young SS athletes.

  19. Hydration Properties of Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag (GGBS Under Different Hydration Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua LIU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The hydration properties of various cementitious materials containing Ground Granulated Blast-furnace Slag (GGBS, two alkali-activated slag cements (AAS-1 and AAS-2 in which sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide act as alkaline activators respectively, supersulfated cement (SSC and slag Portland cement(PSC, are compared with ordinary Portland cement (OPC to investigate the effect of activating environment on the hydration properties in this study by determining the compressive strength of the pastes, the hydration heat of binders within 96 hours, and the hydration products at age of 28 days. The results show that C-S-H gels are the main hydrated products for all cementitious systems containing GGBS. Ca(OH2 is the hydration products of OPC and PSC paste. However, ettringite and gypsum crystals instead of Ca(OH2 are detected in SSC paste. Additionally, tobermorite, a crystalline C-S-H, and calcite are hydrated products in AAS-1. Tobermorite, cowlesite and calcite are hydrated products of AAS-2 as well. Based on strength results, AAS-1 paste exhibits the highest compressive strength followed by POC, PSC, SSC in order at all testing ages and AAS-2 give the lowest compressive strength except for the early age at 3 days, which is higher than SSC but still lower than PSC. From hydration heat analysis, alkalinity in the reaction solution is a vital factor influencing the initial hydration rate and the initial hydration rate from higher to lower is AAS-2, AAS-1, OPC, PSC and SSC. Although AAS possesses a faster reaction rate in the initial hours, cumulative hydration heat of AAS is comparably lower than that of OPC, but higher than those of PSC and SSC in turn, which indicates that the hydration heat of clinkers is much higher than that of slag.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.14934

  20. Desalination utilizing clathrate hydrates (LDRD final report).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Greathouse, Jeffery A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Majzoub, Eric H. (University of Missouri, Columbia, MO)

    2008-01-01

    show that R141b hydrate is stable at temperatures up to 265K, while the isomer hydrate is only stable up to 150K. Despite hydrogen bonding between guest and host, R141b molecules rotated freely within the water cage. The Raman spectrum of R141b in both the pure and hydrate phases was also compared with vibrational analysis from both computational methods. In particular, the frequency of the C-Cl stretch mode (585 cm{sup -1}) undergoes a shift to higher frequency in the hydrate phase. Raman spectra also indicate that this peak undergoes splitting and intensity variation as the temperature is decreased from 4 C to -4 C.

  1. Amplitude versus offset analysis to marine seismic data acquired in Nankai Trough, offshore Japan where methane hydrate exists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hato, M.; Inamori, T.; Matsuoka, T.; Shimizu, S.

    2003-04-01

    Occurrence of methane hydrates in the Nankai Trough, located off the south-eastern coast of Japan, was confirmed by the exploratory test well drilling conducted by Japan’s Ministry of International Trade and Industry in 1999. Confirmation of methane hydrate has given so big impact to the Japan's future energy strategy and scientific and technological interest was derived from the information of the coring and logging results at the well. Following the above results, Japan National Oil Corporation (JNOC) launched the national project, named as MH21, for establishing the technology of methane hydrate exploration and related technologies such as production and development. As one of the research project for evaluating the total amount of the methane hydrate, Amplitude versus Offset (AVO) was applied to the seismic data acquired in the Nankai Trough area. The main purpose of the AVO application is to evaluate the validity of delineation of methane hydrate-bearing zones. Since methane hydrate is thought to accompany with free-gas in general just below the methane hydrate-bearing zones, the AVO has a possibility of describing the presence of free-gas. The free-gas is thought to be located just below the base of methane hydrate stability zone which is characterized by the Bottom Simulating Reflectors (BSRs) on the seismic section. In this sense, AVO technology, which was developed as gas delineation tools, can be utilized for methane hydrate exploration. The result of AVO analysis clearly shows gas-related anomaly below the BSRs. Appearance of the AVO anomaly has so wide variety. Some of the anomalies might not correspond to the free-gas existence, however, some of them may show free-gas. We are now going to develop methodology to clearly discriminate free-gas from non-gas zone by integrating various types of seismic methods such as seismic inversion and seismic attribute analysis.

  2. Mössbauer, XRD, and Complex Thermal Analysis of the Hydration of Cement with Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vili Lilkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydration of cement with and without fly ash is studied with Mössbauer spectroscopy, XRD, and thermal analysis. Iron in cement is present as Fe3+-ions and occupies two octahedral positions, with close isomer shifts and quadrupole splittings. Iron in fly ash is present as Fe2+ and Fe3+, and the Mössbauer spectra display three doublets—two for Fe3+ in octahedral coordination and one for Fe2+. A third doublet was registered in the hydrating plain cement pastes after the 5th day, due to Fe3+ in tetrahedral coordination in the structure of the newly formed monosulphate aluminate. In cement pastes with fly ash, the doublet of tetrahedral iron is formed earlier because the quantity of ettringite and portlandite is low and more monosulphate crystallizes. No Fe(OH3 phase forms during hydration of C4AF. The fly ash displays pozzolanic properties, which lead to lowering of the portlandite quantity in the cement mixtures and increasing of the high temperature products.

  3. Bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA for measuring the hydration status in young elite synchronized swimmers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Carrasco-Marginet

    Full Text Available The assessment of body hydration is a complex process, and no measurement is valid for all situations. Bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA has emerged as a relatively novel technique for assessing hydration status in sports. We applied BIVA a to determine hydration changes evoked by an intense synchronized swimming (SS training session; b to characterize the sample of young elite swimmers in relation with a nonathletic reference population; and c to generate its 50%, 75% and 95% percentiles of the bioelectrical variables.Forty-nine elite SS female swimmers of two age categories, comen (Co: 13.9 ± 0.9 years, n = 34 and junior (Jr: 16.3 ± 0.6 years, n = 15, performed a long, high intensity training session. Body mass (BM and bioelectrical variables (R, resistance; Xc, reactance; PA, phase angle; and Z, impedance module were assessed pre- and post-training. BIVA was used to characterize 1 the distribution pattern of the bioelectrical vector (BIA vector for both age groups, and 2 pre- to post-training BIA vector migration. Bioelectrical variables were also correlated with BM change values.Most swimmers were mostly located outside the 75% and some beyond the 95% percentile of the bioelectrical tolerance ellipses of the general population. The BIA vector showed statistically significant differences in both Co (T2 = 134.7, p = 0.0001 and Jr (T2 = 126.2, p < 0.001. Both groups were also bioelectrically different (T2 = 17.6, p < 0.001. After the training session, a decrease in BM (p = 0.0001 and an increase in BIA variables (p = 0.01 was observed. BIVA also showed a significant pre-post vector migration both in Co (T2 = 82.1; p < 0.001 and Jr (T2 = 41.8; p < 0.001. No correlations were observed between BM changes and bioelectrical variables.BIVA showed specific bioelectrical characteristics in young elite SS athletes. Considering the decrease in BM and the migration of the BIA vector, we conclude that the homeostatic hydration status of these

  4. Comparison of hydration and nutritional status between young and elderly hemodialysis patients through bioimpedance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Eun; Jo, In Young; Lee, Song Mi; Kim, Woo Jeong; Choi, Hoon Young; Ha, Sung Kyu; Kim, Hyung Jong; Park, Hyeong Cheon

    2015-01-01

    The number of elderly people on dialysis is increasing rapidly. Fluid overload and malnutrition status are serious problems in elderly dialysis patients. We aimed to compare the hydration and nutritional status through bioimpedance analysis (BIA) between young and elderly hemodialysis (HD) patients and to analyze risk factors related to fluid overload and malnutrition status in these patients. We conducted a cross-sectional study, in which 82 HD (males 42, mean age 58.7±12.9 years) patients were enrolled. We collected different types of data: laboratory data, such as serum creatinine, albumin, total iron-binding capacity, hemoglobin, total cholesterol; anthropometric data, such as hand grip strength (HGS); BIA data, such as intracellular water, skeletal muscle mass, body cell mass, bone mineral content, phase angle (PhA), extra cellular water (ECW)/total body water (TBW) ratio; and malnutrition-inflammation score (MIS), which is a traditional nutritional parameter for dialysis patients. All patients were stratified into two groups according to their age: young (<65 years [n=54]) and elderly (≥65 years [n=28]). Total iron-binding capacity and HGS were significantly lower in elderly HD patients than in young HD patients (198.9±35.6 vs 221.4±52.1 mcg/dL; and 22.4±10.3 vs 36.4±23.2 kg, respectively) (P<0.05). Also, intracellular water and PhA measured by BIA were significantly lower (18.3±4.0 vs 20.3±4.2 L [P=0.043]; and 4.0±1.0 vs 4.9±1.2° [P=0.002], respectively), and ECW/TBW were higher in elderly HD patients (0.40±0.01 vs 0.39±0.01 [P=0.001]). ECW/TBW was positively associated with age (P<0.001) and the presence of diabetes (P<0.001) and was negatively associated with sex (P=0.001), albumin (P<0.001), urine volume (P=0.042), HGS (P<0.001), and PhA by BIA (P<0.001). MIS was negatively related to sex (P=0.001), albumin (P<0.001), HGS (P=0.001), and PhA (P<0.001) in HD patients. On multivariate analysis, older age (P=0.031), the presence of diabetes (P=0

  5. Numerical analysis of wellbore instability in gas hydrate formation during deep-water drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huaiwen; Cheng, Yuanfang; Li, Qingchao; Yan, Chuanliang; Han, Xiuting

    2018-02-01

    Gas hydrate formation may be encountered during deep-water drilling because of the large amount and wide distribution of gas hydrates under the shallow seabed of the South China Sea. Hydrates are extremely sensitive to temperature and pressure changes, and drilling through gas hydrate formation may cause dissociation of hydrates, accompanied by changes in wellbore temperatures, pore pressures, and stress states, thereby leading to wellbore plastic yield and wellbore instability. Considering the coupling effect of seepage of drilling fluid into gas hydrate formation, heat conduction between drilling fluid and formation, hydrate dissociation, and transformation of the formation framework, this study established a multi-field coupling mathematical model of the wellbore in the hydrate formation. Furthermore, the influences of drilling fluid temperatures, densities, and soaking time on the instability of hydrate formation were calculated and analyzed. Results show that the greater the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and hydrate formation is, the faster the hydrate dissociates, the wider the plastic dissociation range is, and the greater the failure width becomes. When the temperature difference is greater than 7°C, the maximum rate of plastic deformation around the wellbore is more than 10%, which is along the direction of the minimum horizontal in-situ stress and associated with instability and damage on the surrounding rock. The hydrate dissociation is insensitive to the variation of drilling fluid density, thereby implying that the change of the density of drilling fluids has a minimal effect on the hydrate dissociation. Drilling fluids that are absorbed into the hydrate formation result in fast dissociation at the initial stage. As time elapses, the hydrate dissociation slows down, but the risk of wellbore instability is aggravated due to the prolonged submersion in drilling fluids. For the sake of the stability of the wellbore in deep

  6. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  7. Increasing the sensitivity of headspace analysis of low volatility solutes through water removal by hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hui-Chao; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Wei, Chao-Hai; Barnes, Donald

    2014-05-23

    This paper reports on the development of a new headspace analytical technique that is based on water removal by hydrate formation (WRHF). By adding anhydrous salt, the liquid water in an aqueous sample will be removed leaving behind volatile analytes that are fully vaporized at temperatures well below their boiling points. With WRHF, the amount of sample in the headspace can be significantly increased, thereby dramatically improving the detection sensitivity. The technique reduces the risk of possible column damage in gas chromatography (GC) systems. The technique was applied to the determination of phenol at different stages of a coking wastewater treatment plant. The results showed that up to mL-levels of sample solution can be used in WRHF HS-GC analysis when 5g of CaCl2 were used as the anhydrous salt. The detection sensitivity for phenol content was 500 times greater than that in earlier HS-GC work that did not incorporate hydrate formation. The proposed WRHF headspace analysis technique is simple and practical, making it a useful tool for quantifying low concentrations of volatile analytes in aqueous samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Hydration lubrication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klein, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The hydration lubrication paradigm, whereby hydration layers are both strongly held by the charges they surround, and so can support large pressures without being squeezed out, and at the same time...

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of hydrates formation in drilling activities; Analise termodinamica da formacao de hidratos em atividades de perfuracao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Joao Marcelo Mussi; Rossi, Luciano Fernando dos Santos; Morales, Rigoberto E.M. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], e-mail: joaommussi@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: lfrossi@cefetpr.br, e-mail: rmorales@cefetpr.br

    2006-07-01

    The present work has for objective to present an analysis of hydrates formation in drilling activities. This analysis presents a study of the state conditions for gas hydrates formation in inhibitors containing systems (salts and alcohols, separately). To describe the nonidealities of liquid phase in electrolytic solutions, the activity coefficient model of Debye-Hueckel is used, as [4], and to describe the influence of alcohols in the activity of water, the UNQUAC model is used, as Parrish and Prausnitz. The hydrate phase is described by thermodynamic statistic model of van der Waals and Platteeuw, and the gaseous phase fugacities are modeled by the Peng-Robinson Equation of State. Some results are presented for saline inhibitors, and for methanol and ethyleneglycol. (author)

  10. In-situ gas hydrate hydrate saturation estimated from various well logs at the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed detailed analysis and interpretation of available 2-D and 3-D seismic data and proposed a viable method for identifying sub-permafrost gas hydrate prospects within the gas hydrate stability zone in the Milne Point area of northern Alaska. To validate the predictions of the USGS and to acquire critical reservoir data needed to develop a long-term production testing program, a well was drilled at the Mount Elbert prospect in February, 2007. Numerous well log data and cores were acquired to estimate in-situ gas hydrate saturations and reservoir properties.Gas hydrate saturations were estimated from various well logs such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), P- and S-wave velocity, and electrical resistivity logs along with pore-water salinity. Gas hydrate saturations from the NMR log agree well with those estimated from P- and S-wave velocity data. Because of the low salinity of the connate water and the low formation temperature, the resistivity of connate water is comparable to that of shale. Therefore, the effect of clay should be accounted for to accurately estimate gas hydrate saturations from the resistivity data. Two highly gas hydrate-saturated intervals are identified - an upper ???43 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 54% and a lower ???53 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 50%; both zones reach a maximum of about 75% saturation. ?? 2009.

  11. Analysis of vaginal microbicide film hydration kinetics by quantitative imaging refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Matthew; Grab, Sheila; Rohan, Lisa; Katz, David; Wax, Adam

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a quantitative imaging refractometry technique, based on holographic phase microscopy, as a tool for investigating microscopic structural changes in water-soluble polymeric materials. Here we apply the approach to analyze the structural degradation of vaginal topical microbicide films due to water uptake. We implemented transmission imaging of 1-mm diameter film samples loaded into a flow chamber with a 1.5×2 mm field of view. After water was flooded into the chamber, interference images were captured and analyzed to obtain high resolution maps of the local refractive index and subsequently the volume fraction and mass density of film material at each spatial location. Here, we compare the hydration dynamics of a panel of films with varying thicknesses and polymer compositions, demonstrating that quantitative imaging refractometry can be an effective tool for evaluating and characterizing the performance of candidate microbicide film designs for anti-HIV drug delivery.

  12. Analysis of vaginal microbicide film hydration kinetics by quantitative imaging refractometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Rinehart

    Full Text Available We have developed a quantitative imaging refractometry technique, based on holographic phase microscopy, as a tool for investigating microscopic structural changes in water-soluble polymeric materials. Here we apply the approach to analyze the structural degradation of vaginal topical microbicide films due to water uptake. We implemented transmission imaging of 1-mm diameter film samples loaded into a flow chamber with a 1.5×2 mm field of view. After water was flooded into the chamber, interference images were captured and analyzed to obtain high resolution maps of the local refractive index and subsequently the volume fraction and mass density of film material at each spatial location. Here, we compare the hydration dynamics of a panel of films with varying thicknesses and polymer compositions, demonstrating that quantitative imaging refractometry can be an effective tool for evaluating and characterizing the performance of candidate microbicide film designs for anti-HIV drug delivery.

  13. Relative permeability of hydrate-bearing sediments from percolation theory and critical path analysis: theoretical and experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daigle, Hugh [University of Texas at Austin; Rice, Mary Anna [North Carolina State University; Daigle, Hugh

    2015-12-14

    Relative permeabilities to water and gas are important parameters for accurate modeling of the formation of methane hydrate deposits and production of methane from hydrate reservoirs. Experimental measurements of gas and water permeability in the presence of hydrate are difficult to obtain. The few datasets that do exist suggest that relative permeability obeys a power law relationship with water or gas saturation with exponents ranging from around 2 to greater than 10. Critical path analysis and percolation theory provide a framework for interpreting the saturation-dependence of relative permeability based on percolation thresholds and the breadth of pore size distributions, which may be determined easily from 3-D images or gas adsorption-desorption hysteresis. We show that the exponent of the permeability-saturation relationship for relative permeability to water is related to the breadth of the pore size distribution, with broader pore size distributions corresponding to larger exponents. Relative permeability to water in well-sorted sediments with narrow pore size distributions, such as Berea sandstone or Toyoura sand, follows percolation scaling with an exponent of 2. On the other hand, pore-size distributions determined from argon adsorption measurements we performed on clays from the Nankai Trough suggest that relative permeability to water in fine-grained intervals may be characterized by exponents as large as 10 as determined from critical path analysis. We also show that relative permeability to the gas phase follows percolation scaling with a quadratic dependence on gas saturation, but the threshold gas saturation for percolation changes with hydrate saturation, which is an important consideration in systems in which both hydrate and gas are present, such as during production from a hydrate reservoir. Our work shows how measurements of pore size distributions from 3-D imaging or gas adsorption may be used to determine relative permeabilities.

  14. Validity of Urine Specific Gravity when Compared to Plasma Osmolality as a Measure of Hydration Status in Male and Female NCAA Collegiate Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerfield, Lesley M.; McAnulty, Steven R.; McBride, Jeffrey M.; Zwetsloot, Jennifer J.; Austin, Melanie D.; Mehlhorn, Jonathan D.; Calhoun, Mason C.; Young, Juliane O.; Haines, Traci L.; Utter, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the response of urine specific gravity (Usg) and urine osmolality (Uosm) when compared to plasma osmolality (Posm) from euhydration to 3% dehydration and then a 2-hr rehydration period in male and female collegiate athletes. Fifty-six National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) wrestlers (mean ± SEM); height 1.75 ± 0.01 m, age 19.3 ± 0.2 years, and body mass (BM) 78.1 ± 1.8 kg and twenty-six NCAA women’s soccer athletes; height 1.64 ± 0.01 m, age 19.8 ± 0.3 years, and BM 62.2 ± 1.2 kg were evaluated. Hydration status was obtained by measuring changes in Posm, Uosm, Usg and BM. Male and female subjects dehydrated to achieve an average BM loss of 2.9 ± 0.09% and 1.9 ± 0.03%, respectively. Using the medical diagnostic decision model, the sensitivity of Usg was high in both the hydrated and dehydrated state for males (92%) and females (80%). However, the specificity of Usg was low in both the hydrated and dehydrated states for males (10% and 6%, respectively) and females (29% and 40%, respectively). No significant correlations were found between Usg and Posm during either the hydrated or dehydrated state for males or females. Based on these results, the use of Usg as a field measure of hydration status in male and female collegiate athletes should be used with caution. Considering that athletes deal with hydration status on a regular basis, the reported low specificity of Usg suggests that athletes could be incorrectly classified leading to the unnecessary loss of competition. PMID:26694503

  15. Acoustic and Shear-Wave Velocities in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Offshore Southwestern Taiwan: Tomography, Converted Waves Analysis and Reverse-Time Migration of OBS Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Schnurle

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A 2.5-D combined seismic reflection and refraction survey has been conducted in the accretionary complex offshore of southwestern Taiwan where BSRs (Bottom Simulating Reflectors are highly concentrated and geochemical signals for the presence of gas hydrate are strong. In this study, we perform velocity analysis of the 6 4-component OBS (Ocean-Bottom Seismometer records along the southernmost transect of this seismic experiment. We utilize 3 independent methods in order to accurately determine the acoustic and shear-wave velocities of the sediments: 1-D Root Mean Square (RMS analysis of the P-P and P-S reflected events on individual datumed components, 2-D inversion of the P-P and P-S reflected and refracted events along the in-line transect, and 3-D acoustic inversion of the first arrivals. The principal sources of bias in the determination of the velocities are the 3-dimentional nature of the topography and the complexity of the underlying structures. The three methods result in consistent velocity profiles. Rapid lateral and vertical variations of the velocities are observed. We then investigate the large scale gas hydrate content through rock physic modeling: at the vertical of each OBS, shear-waves velocities are utilized to estimate the water-filled porosities, and the acoustic velocities predicted for a set of gas hydrate, quartz and clay contents are compared to the observed profiles.

  16. Comparison of hydration and nutritional status between young and elderly hemodialysis patients through bioimpedance analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee JE

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jung Eun Lee,1,2 In Young Jo,3 Song Mi Lee,3 Woo Jeong Kim,3 Hoon Young Choi,2,4 Sung Kyu Ha,4 Hyung Jong Kim,5 Hyeong Cheon Park2,4 1Department of Internal Medicine, Yongin Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 2Severance Institute for Vascular and Metabolic Research, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 3Department of Nutrition Services, Gangnam Severance Hospital, 4Department of Internal Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, 5Department of Internal Medicine, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam, Korea Background: The number of elderly people on dialysis is increasing rapidly. Fluid overload and malnutrition status are serious problems in elderly dialysis patients. We aimed to compare the hydration and nutritional status through bioimpedance analysis (BIA between young and elderly hemodialysis (HD patients and to analyze risk factors related to fluid overload and malnutrition status in these patients.Method: We conducted a cross-sectional study, in which 82 HD (males 42, mean age 58.7±12.9 years patients were enrolled. We collected different types of data: laboratory data, such as serum creatinine, albumin, total iron-binding capacity, hemoglobin, total cholesterol; anthropometric data, such as hand grip strength (HGS; BIA data, such as intracellular water, skeletal muscle mass, body cell mass, bone mineral content, phase angle (PhA, extra cellular water (ECW/total body water (TBW ratio; and malnutrition-inflammation score (MIS, which is a traditional nutritional parameter for dialysis patients. All patients were stratified into two groups according to their age: young (<65 years [n=54] and elderly (≥65 years [n=28].Results: Total iron-binding capacity and HGS were significantly lower in elderly HD patients than in young HD patients (198.9±35.6 vs 221.4±52.1 mcg/dL; and 22.4±10.3 vs 36.4±23.2 kg, respectively (P<0.05. Also, intracellular water and Ph

  17. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Analysis of Cisplatin with Hydration and Mannitol Diuresis: The Contribution of Urine Cisplatin Concentration to Nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Keizo; Okada, Akira; Oe, Hiroyuki; Hirasaki, Mika; Hamori, Mami; Nishimura, Asako; Shibata, Nobuhito; Sugioka, Nobuyuki

    2017-09-14

    Forced diuresis, high-volume hydration with diuresis, is widely used as a prophylactic treatment against cisplatin nephrotoxicity. However, the details of the underlying mechanisms and the optimal protocol of forced diuresis remain unclear. The present study investigated the alterations in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (nephrotoxicity) of cisplatin with forced diuresis treatment. Cisplatin (5 mg/kg) was intravenously injected to rats (5 rats/group, except for control group in pharmacodynamic study, n = 13) treated with or without forced diuresis 2-h pre- and post-hydration with 10% mannitol at different infusion rates (0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 mL/h). The unbound cisplatin concentrations in plasma and urine, and the platinum amount in the kidney were monitored in the pharmacokinetic studies. The plasma creatinine concentration was evaluated as an index of nephrotoxicity in the pharmacodynamic studies. Forced diuresis treatment did not significantly alter the plasma cisplatin pharmacokinetics but dramatically decreased the urine concentration of unbound cisplatin and its accumulation into the kidneys in a dose-dependent manner, and correspondingly, nephrotoxicity was dose-dependently attenuated by forced diuresis. The pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic analysis suggested that the urine cisplatin concentration has a comparable impact on the cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity to that in plasma, probably owing to the reabsorption of cisplatin from urine, which can be attenuated by forced diuresis. These results indicated that the nephroprotective effect of forced diuresis is a pharmacokinetic-based drug-drug interaction possibly due to the inhibition of cisplatin reabsorption from urine. Monitoring of urine cisplatin concentration may lead to the optimization of a forced diuresis protocol with mannitol.

  18. Oral Chloral Hydrate Compare with Rectal Thiopental in Pediatric Procedural Sedation and Analgesia; a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Azizkhani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The increasing use of diagnostic imaging in pediatric medicine has resulted in growing need for procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA to minimize motion artifacts during procedures. The drug of choice in pediatric PSA was not introduced till now. The aim of the present study was comparison of oral chloral hydrate (OCH and rectal sodium thiopental (RST in pediatric PSA.Methods: In the present randomized clinical trial, 2-6 years old pediatrics who referred for performing brain computed tomography scan was enrolled and were randomly divided in to two groups. OCH (50mg/kg and RST (25mg/kg were prescribed and a trained nurse recorded the time from drug prescription to receiving the conscious sedation (onset of action, the total time period which the patient has the Ramsay score≥4 (duration of action, and adverse effect of agents. Mann-Whitney U test and chi-squared test, and Non-parametric analysis of covariance (ANCOVA were used for comparisons. Results: One hundred and forty children were entered to two groups of OCH and RST, randomly. The patients of two groups had similar age, sex, weight, and baseline vital signs except for diastolic blood pressure (p<0.001. The onset of action in OCH and RST groups were 24.5±6.1and 28.7±5.2 minutes, respectively (p<0.001. Duration of action in OCH and RST groups were 12.9±2.8 minutes and 13.7±2.6 minutes, respectively (p=0.085. Non parametric ANCOVA revealed that only diastolic blood pressure was affected by drug prescription (p=0.001. In 11(15.7% patients in RST group, diarrhea was observed during 24 hours (p=0.001. Oxygen desaturation was observed only in two patients, both in OCH group. Conclusion: Each of the sedative has advantages and disadvantages that should be considered when selecting one for inducing short-term sedation. It seems that rectal sodium thiopental and oral chloral hydrate are equally effective in pediatric PSA and based on patient’s condition we can administrate

  19. Short hydration regimen with magnesium supplementation prevents cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in lung cancer: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Teppei; Uozu, Sakurako; Isogai, Sumito; Hayashi, Masamichi; Goto, Yasuhiro; Nakanishi, Toru; Imaizumi, Kazuyoshi

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate renal function in lung cancer patients who were administered cisplatin with continuous higher-volume hydration (CH) or a short hydration (SH) regimen. We retrospectively evaluated patients with lung cancer who were treated with chemotherapy regimens including >50 mg/m2 of cisplatin between August 2007 and March 2015. Between August 2007 and December 2012, patients received a continuous higher-volume hydration regimen without magnesium (Mg) supplementation (CH group), and after May 2013, patients received a short hydration regimen with Mg supplementation (SH group). To evaluate the factors influencing serum creatinine (SCr) increase during the first course of cisplatin chemotherapy, univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted. A total of 122 patients were evaluated, 62 patients in the CH group and 60 patients in the SH group. Grade 1 (National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events; version 4.0) or higher SCr increases were more frequently observed in the CH group than in the SH group after the first cycle (P = 0.01, Fisher's exact test) and for all cycles (P = 0.03). Multivariate analysis revealed that short hydration (odds ratio (OR), 0.30; 95% confidence internal (CI) (0.11-0.75), P = 0.01) and estimated creatinine clearance (eCcr) of ≥70 mL/min (OR, 0.25; 95% CI (0.088-0.69), P = 0.008) were associated with a significantly reduced risk for cisplatin-induced grade 1 or higher SCr increase. Our study suggested that a short hydration method with Mg supplementation and eCcr of ≥70 mL/min reduced the risk of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

  20. Comparative study of the hydration systems formed during interactions of hydrogen phosphate dianions with putrescine, nor-putrescine and magnesium dications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figlerowicz, M.; Utzig, E.; Alejska, M.; Bratek-Wiewiórowska, M. D.; Wiewiórowski, M.

    1997-10-01

    A comparative study of hydration systems, formed as a result of the interaction between hydrogen phosphate dianions and three naturally occurring cations (putrescine (Put), its nor-homologue (nPut) and magnesium), is presented. On the basis of X-ray data and IR, NMR and calorimetric measurements, we have determined how the structure and physicochemical properties of the cations influence the system of phosphate residue hydration. Our study demonstrates that the stability of the hydration systems depends not only on the character of the bonds used by water to link with other salt components (coordinate or hydrogen bonds), but also on the location of the water molecules in the crystal lattice. In addition, contrary to magnesium salts, the dehydration of diamine (Put and nPut) hydrogen phosphates is reversible. Both dehydration and rehydration processes take place in the solid state. During rehydration, the crystalline anhydrous salt absorbs water molecules from the atmosphere. This leads to the reconstruction of the hydrated salt structure; this means that the salt which is the product of rehydration is identical with that obtained by crystallization from water solution.

  1. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermannová, Lada; Schneider, Bohdan

    2015-11-01

    Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon-donor hydrogen bonds, OH-π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations.

  2. The analysis of magnesium oxide hydration in three-phase reaction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaojia; Guo, Lin; Chen, Chen; Liu, Quan; Li, Tie; Zhu, Yimin

    2014-05-01

    In order to investigate the magnesium oxide hydration process in gas-liquid-solid (three-phase) reaction system, magnesium hydroxide was prepared by magnesium oxide hydration in liquid-solid (two-phase) and three-phase reaction systems. A semi-empirical model and the classical shrinking core model were used to fit the experimental data. The fitting result shows that both models describe well the hydration process of three-phase system, while only the semi-empirical model right for the hydration process of two-phase system. The characterization of the hydration product using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) was performed. The XRD and SEM show hydration process in the two-phase system follows common dissolution/precipitation mechanism. While in the three-phase system, the hydration process undergo MgO dissolution, Mg(OH)2 precipitation, Mg(OH)2 peeling off from MgO particle and leaving behind fresh MgO surface.

  3. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermannová, Lada; Schneider, Bohdan

    2015-01-01

    Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon–donor hydrogen bonds, OH–π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations. PMID:26527137

  4. Analysis of Hydration-Mechanical-Durability Properties of Metakaolin Blended Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yong Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Metakaolin (MK is a highly active pozzolanic material and MK is increasingly used in producing high performance concrete. This study presents an integrated hydration-mechanical-durability model for evaluating various properties of metakaolin blended concrete. First, a blended hydration model is proposed for simulating the hydration of composite binders containing MK that considers the dilution effect and pozzolanic reaction due to metakaolin addition. The interactions between the metakaolin reaction and cement hydration were taken into account by means of the contents of calcium hydroxide and capillary water in hydrating the composite binder. The reaction degrees of cement and metakaolin were calculated using the hydration model. Second, the gel-space ratio of the MK blended concrete was determined based on the reaction degrees of the composite binders and proportions of concrete mix. Moreover, concrete compressive strength was calculated using the gel-space ratio. Third, the volumetric phase fractions were calculated based on the reaction degrees of the binders. Chloride penetrability of metakaolin blended concrete was analyzed through the capillary porosity of concrete. The proposed integrated hydration-mechanical-durability model is valuable for the material design of metakaolin blended concrete.

  5. Validity of Urine Specific Gravity When Compared With Plasma Osmolality as a Measure of Hydration Status in Male and Female NCAA Collegiate Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerfield, Lesley M; McAnulty, Steven R; McBride, Jeffrey M; Zwetsloot, Jennifer J; Austin, Melanie D; Mehlhorn, Jonathan D; Calhoun, Mason C; Young, Juliane O; Haines, Traci L; Utter, Alan C

    2016-08-01

    Sommerfield, LM, McAnulty, SR, McBride, JM, Zwetsloot, JJ, Austin, MD, Mehlhorn, JD, Calhoun, MC, Young, JO, Haines, TL, and Utter, AC. Validity of urine specific gravity when compared with plasma osmolality as a measure of hydration status in male and female NCAA collegiate athletes. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2219-2225, 2016-The purpose of this study was to evaluate the response of urine specific gravity (Usg) and urine osmolality (Uosm) when compared with plasma osmolality (Posm) from euhydration to 3% dehydration and then a 2-hour rehydration period in male and female collegiate athletes. Fifty-six National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) wrestlers (mean ± SEM); height 1.75 ± 0.01 m, age 19.3 ± 0.2 years, and body mass (BM) 78.1 ± 1.8 kg and 26 NCAA women's soccer athletes; height 1.64 ± 0.01 m, age 19.8 ± 0.3 years, and BM 62.2 ± 1.2 kg were evaluated. Hydration status was obtained by measuring changes in Posm, Uosm, Usg, and BM. Male and female subjects dehydrated to achieve an average BM loss of 2.9 ± 0.09% and 1.9 ± 0.03%, respectively. Using the medical diagnostic decision model, the sensitivity of Usg was high in both the hydrated and dehydrated state for males (92%) and females (80%). However, the specificity of Usg was low in both the hydrated and dehydrated states for males (10 and 6%, respectively) and females (29 and 40%, respectively). No significant correlations were found between Usg and Posm during either the hydrated or dehydrated state for males or females. Based on these results, the use of Usg as a field measure of hydration status in male and female collegiate athletes should be used with caution. Considering that athletes deal with hydration status on a regular basis, the reported low specificity of Usg suggests that athletes could be incorrectly classified leading to the unnecessary loss of competition.

  6. Initiation of gas-hydrate pockmark in deep-water Nigeria: Geo-mechanical analysis and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboulot, V.; Sultan, N.; Imbert, P.; Ker, S.

    2016-01-01

    A review of recent literature shows that two geomorphologically different types of pockmarks, contribute to gas seepage at the seafloor. Type-1 pockmarks are defined as seafloor craters associated to fluid seepage and are the most classical type referred to as ;pockmarks; in the literature. In contrast, Type-2 pockmarks reveal a complex seafloor morphology that may result from the formation/decomposition of gas hydrates in underlying sedimentary layers. Interpretation of very-high-resolution seismic data, sedimentological analyses and geotechnical measurements acquired from the Eastern Niger Submarine Delta reveal that Type-2 pockmarks are associated to the presence at depth of a conical body of massive gas hydrates. Based on acquired data, theoretical analysis and numerical modelling, it was possible to propose a novel geo-mechanical mechanism controlling the irregular seafloor deformations associated to Type-2 pockmark and to show that pockmark shapes and sizes are directly linked to the initial growth and distribution of sub-seafloor gas hydrates. The study illustrates the role of gas hydrates formation in the fracturation, deformation of the subsurface sediment and the formation of Type-2 pockmarks.

  7. Sensitivity Analysis of Parameters Governing the Recovery of Methane from Natural Gas Hydrate Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Giraldo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring gas hydrates are regarded as an important future source of energy and considerable efforts are currently being invested to develop methods for an economically viable recovery of this resource. The recovery of natural gas from gas hydrate deposits has been studied by a number of researchers. Depressurization of the reservoir is seen as a favorable method because of its relatively low energy requirements. While lowering the pressure in the production well seems to be a straight forward approach to destabilize methane hydrates, the intrinsic kinetics of CH4-hydrate decomposition and fluid flow lead to complex processes of mass and heat transfer within the deposit. In order to develop a better understanding of the processes and conditions governing the production of methane from methane hydrates it is necessary to study the sensitivity of gas production to the effects of factors such as pressure, temperature, thermal conductivity, permeability, porosity on methane recovery from naturally occurring gas hydrates. A simplified model is the base for an ensemble of reservoir simulations to study which parameters govern productivity and how these factors might interact.

  8. Comprehensive Study of Hydrated IDPs: X-Ray Diffraction, IR Spectroscopy and Electron Microscopic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Nozaki, W.; Tomeoka, K.

    2003-01-01

    Chondritic hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) comprise up to 50% of all IDPs collected in the stratosphere(1). Although much is known about the mineralogy, chemistry and carbon abundance of hydrated IDPs (2-4) controversies still exist regarding their formation, history, and relationship to other primitive solar system materials. Hydrated IDPs are generally believed to be derived from asteroidal sources that have undergone some degree of aqueous alteration. However, the high C contents of hydrated IDPs (by 2 to 6X CI levels (3,4) indicate that they are probably not derived from the same parent bodies sampled by the known chondritic meteorites. We report the comprehensive study of individual hydrated IDPs. The strong depletion in Ca (I) has been used as a diagnostic feature of hydrated IDPs. The particles are embedded in elemental sulfur or low viscosity epoxy and ultramicrotomed thin sections are observed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray detector (EDX) followed by other measurements including: 1) FTIR microspectroscopy to understand the significant constraints on the organic functionality and the nature of the C-bearing phases and 2) powder X-ray difiaction using a synchrotron X-ray source to understand the bulk mineralogy of the particles.

  9. Electron density analysis of the effects of sugars on the structure of lipid bilayers at low hydration - a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenné, T.; Kent, B.; Koster, K.L.; Garvey, C.J.; Bryant, G. (ANSTO); (USD); (ANU); (RMIT)

    2012-02-06

    Small angle X-ray scattering is used to study the effects of sugars on membranes during dehydration. Previous work has shown that the bilayer and chain-chain repeat spacings of DPPC bilayers are relatively unaffected by the presence of sugars. In this work we present a preliminary analysis of the electron density profiles of DPPC in the presence of sugars at low hydration. The difficulties of determining the correct phasing are discussed. Sugars and other small solutes have been shown to have an important role in improving the tolerance of a range of species to desiccation and freezing. In particular it has been shown that sugars can stabilize membranes in the fluid membrane phase during dehydration, and in the fully dehydrated state. Equivalently, at a particular hydration, the presence of sugars lowers the transition temperature between the fluid and gel phases. There are two competing models for explaining the effects of sugars on membrane phase transition temperatures. One, designated the water replacement hypothesis (WRH) states that sugars hydrogen bond to phospholipid headgroups, thus hindering the fluid-gel phase transition. One version of this model suggests that certain sugars (such as trehalose) achieve the measured effects by inserting between the phospholipid head groups. An alternative model explains the observed effects of sugars in terms of the sugars effect on the hydration repulsion that develops between opposing membranes during dehydration. The hydration repulsion leads to a lateral compressive stress in the bilayer which squeezes adjacent lipids more closely together, resulting in a transition to the gel phase. When sugars are present, their osmotic and volumetric effects reduce the hydration repulsion, reduce the compressive stress in the membranes, and therefore tend to maintain the average lateral separation between lipids. This model is called the hydration forces explanation (HFE). We recently showed that neither mono- nor di

  10. Combustion of Methane Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshandell, Melika

    from the experimental component of the research was that hydrates can burn completely, and that they burn most rapidly just after ignition and then burn steadily when some of the water in the dissociated zone is allowed to drain away. Excessive surfactant in the water creates a foam layer around the hydrate that acts as an insulator. The layer prevents sufficient heat flux from reaching the hydrate surface below the foam to release additional methane and the hydrate flame extinguishes. No self-healing or ice-freezing processes were observed in any of the combustion experiments. There is some variability, but a typical hydrate flame is receiving between one and two moles of water vapor from the liquid dissociated zone of the hydrate for each mole of methane it receives from the dissociating solid region. This limits the flame temperature to approximately 1800 K. In the theoretical portion of the study, a physical model using an energy balance from methane combustion was developed to understand the energy transfer between the three phases of gas, liquid and solid during the hydrate burn. Also this study provides an understanding of the different factors impacting the hydrate's continuous burn, such as the amount of water vapor in the flame. The theoretical study revealed how the water layer thickness on the hydrate surface, and its effect on the temperature gradient through the dissociated zone, plays a significant role in the hydrate dissociation rate and methane release rate. Motivated by the above mentioned observation from the theoretical analysis, a 1-D two-phase numerical simulation based on a moving front model for hydrate dissociation from a thermal source was developed. This model was focused on the dynamic growth of the dissociated zone and its effect on the dissociation rate. The model indicated that the rate of hydrate dissociation with a thermal source is a function of the dissociated zone thickness. It shows that in order for a continuous dissociation and

  11. Methane Venting in Gas Hydrate Potential Area Offshore of SW Taiwan: Evidence of Gas Analysis of Water Column Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsanyao Frank Yang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Water column samples were collected systematically in several potential gas hydrate areas offshore of SW Taiwan for analysis of dissolved gases. Some these samples show unusually high dissolved methane concentrations at sites A, B, C, and H of cruise ORI-765. The profiles of helium concentrations in the dissolved gases of the water column also exhibit consistent results with an increasing trend toward the seafloor. The 3He/4He ratios range from 0.2 to 0.4 times that of the atmospheric air ratio after air correction, which fall in the range of typical crustal gas composition and are similar to those of on-shore mud volcanoes in SW Taiwan. This indicates that gases are venting actively from the seafloor in the region and may share similar gas sources to on-shore mud volcanoes. The venting gases are considered to have originated from dissociation of gas hydrates and/or a deeper gas reservoir.

  12. BANK RATING. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batrancea Ioan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Banks in Romania offers its customers a wide range of products but which involves both risk taking. Therefore researchers seek to build rating models to help managers of banks to risk of non-recovery of loans and interest. In the following we highlight rating Raiffeisen Bank, BCR-ERSTE Bank and Transilvania Bank, based on the models CAAMPL and Stickney making a comparative analysis of the two rating models.

  13. Mineralogical analysis of the Oppia quadrangle of asteroid (4) Vesta: Evidence for occurrence of moderate-reflectance hydrated minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, F.; Frigeri, A.; Combe, J.-Ph.; Zambon, F.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Longobardo, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Nathues, A.; Garry, W. B.; Blewett, D. T.; Pieters, C. M.; Palomba, E.; Stephan, K.; McFadden, L. A.; McSween, H. Y.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2015-10-01

    Quadrangle Av-10 'Oppia' is one of five quadrangles that cover the equatorial region of asteroid (4) Vesta. This quadrangle is notable for the broad, spectrally distinct ejecta that extend south of the Oppia crater. These ejecta exhibit the steepest ('reddest') visible spectral slope observed across the asteroid and have distinct color properties as seen in multispectral composite images. Compared to previous works that focused on the composition and nature of unusual ('orange') ejecta found on Vesta, here we take into account a broader area that includes several features of interest, with an emphasis on mineralogy as inferred from data obtained by Dawn's Visible InfraRed mapping spectrometer (VIR). Our analysis shows that the older northern and northeastern part of Av-10 is dominated by howardite-like material, while the younger southwestern part, including Oppia and its ejecta blanket, has a markedly eucritic mineralogy. The association of the mineralogical information with the geologic and topographic contexts allows for the establishment of relationships between the age of the main formations observed in this quadrangle and their composition. A major point of interest in the Oppia quadrangle is the spectral signature of hydrous material seen at the local scale. This material can be mapped by using high-resolution VIR data, combined with multispectral image products from the Dawn Framing Camera (FC) so as to enable a clear correlation with specific geologic features. Hydrated mineral phases studied previously on Vesta generally correlate with low-albedo material delivered by carbonaceous asteroids. However, our analysis shows that the strongest OH signature in Av-10 is found in a unit west of Oppia, previously mapped as 'light mantle material' and showing moderate reflectance and a red visible slope. With the available data we cannot yet assess the presence of water in this material. However, we offer a possible explanation for its origin.

  14. Mineralogical Analysis of the Oppia Quadrangle of Asteroid (4) Vesta: Evidence for Occurrence of Moderate-Reflectance Hydrated Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, F.; Frigeri, A.; Combe, J.-Ph.; Zambon, F.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Longobardo, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Nathues, A.; Garry, W. B.; hide

    2015-01-01

    Quadrangle Av-10 'Oppia' is one of five quadrangles that cover the equatorial region of asteroid (4) Vesta. This quadrangle is notable for the broad, spectrally distinct ejecta that extend south of the Oppia crater. These ejecta exhibit the steepest ('reddest') visible spectral slope observed across the asteroid and have distinct color properties as seen in multispectral composite images. Compared to previous works that focused on the composition and nature of unusual ('orange') ejecta found on Vesta, here we take into account a broader area that includes several features of interest, with an emphasis on mineralogy as inferred from data obtained by Dawn's Visible InfraRed mapping spectrometer (VIR). Our analysis shows that the older northern and northeastern part of Av-10 is dominated by howardite-like material, while the younger southwestern part, including Oppia and its ejecta blanket, has a markedly eucritic mineralogy. The association of the mineralogical information with the geologic and topographic contexts allows for the establishment of relationships between the age of the main formations observed in this quadrangle and their composition. A major point of interest in the Oppia quadrangle is the spectral signature of hydrous material seen at the local scale. This material can be mapped by using high-resolution VIR data, combined with multispectral image products from the Dawn Framing Camera (FC) so as to enable a clear correlation with specific geologic features. Hydrated mineral phases studied previously on Vesta generally correlate with low-albedo material delivered by carbonaceous asteroids. However, our analysis shows that the strongest OH signature in Av-10 is found in a unit west of Oppia, previously mapped as 'light mantle material' and showing moderate reflectance and a red visible slope. With the available data we cannot yet assess the presence of water in this material. However, we offer a possible explanation for its origin.

  15. The Association of Hydration Status with Physical Signs, Symptoms and Survival in Advanced Cancer—The Use of Bioelectrical Impedance Vector Analysis (BIVA) Technology to Evaluate Fluid Volume in Palliative Care: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayland, Catriona R.; Mason, Stephen; Cox, Trevor F.; Varro, Andrea; Ellershaw, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Hydration in advanced cancer is a controversial area; however, current hydration assessments methods are poorly developed. Bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA) is an accurate hydration tool; however its application in advanced cancer has not been explored. This study used BIVA to evaluate hydration status in advanced cancer to examine the association of fluid status with symptoms, physical signs, renal biochemical measures and survival. Materials and methods An observational study of 90 adults with advanced cancer receiving care in a UK specialist palliative care inpatient unit was conducted. Hydration status was assessed using BIVA in addition to assessments of symptoms, physical signs, performance status, renal biochemical measures, oral fluid intake and medications. The association of clinical variables with hydration was evaluated using regression analysis. A survival analysis was conducted to examine the influence of hydration status and renal failure. Results The hydration status of participants was normal in 43 (47.8%), 'more hydrated' in 37 (41.1%) and 'less hydrated' in 10 (11.1%). Lower hydration was associated with increased symptom intensity (Beta = -0.29, p = 0.04) and higher scores for physical signs associated with dehydration (Beta = 10.94, p = 0.02). Higher hydration was associated with oedema (Beta = 2.55, phydrated' patients (44 vs. 68 days; p = 0.049) and in pre-renal failure (44 vs. 100 days; p = 0.003). Conclusions In advanced cancer, hydration status was associated with clinical signs and symptoms. Hydration status and pre-renal failure were independent predictors of survival. Further studies can establish the utility of BIVA as a standardised hydration assessment tool and explore its potential research application, in order to inform the clinical management of fluid balance in patients with advanced cancer. PMID:27673684

  16. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    . faulting and fluid migration, and 4. trapping of free gas beneath a hydrate seal. Experiments are being conducted to assess the impact of gas hydrate on sediment behavior, particularly with respect to slope failure and other potential geohazards....K. Paull, R. Matsumoto, P.J. Wallace, and W.P. Dillon (Eds.), Proceedings ODP, Scientific Results, v. 164 College Station, TX (Ocean Drilling Program), pp. 179-191. Dallimore, S. R., T. Uchida, and T. S. Collett, 1999, Summary, in S. R. Dallimore, T...

  17. Airline Safety: A Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    S.TP OFR O T PEIDCV E Airline Safety: A Comparative Analysis TRlES IS1j0’~fJ 6. PERFORMING 01G. REPORT NUMBER AU TNOR( ) Sign . CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER...accidents. Perhaps because of an airline’s understandable sensitivity to public knowledge of its accidents, one has little assurance that each airline...62,169 0 Royal Air Maroc 81,451 0 80,861 0 (Morocco) Royal Nepal 11,885 0 19,785 0 SAA (South Africa) 57,226 0 61,618 0 SAHSA (Honduras) 32,658 0 34,894 0

  18. Characterization of un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate™ and MTA Angelus™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J; Sorrentino, F; Damidot, D

    2015-04-01

    BioAggregate™ is a novel material introduced for use as a root-end filling material. It is tricalcium silicate-based, free of aluminium and uses tantalum oxide as radiopacifier. BioAggregate contains additives to enhance the material performance. The purpose of this research was to characterize the un-hydrated and hydrated forms of BioAggregate using a combination of techniques, verify whether the additives if present affect the properties of the set material and compare these properties to those of MTA Angelus™. Un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate and MTA Angelus were assessed. Un-hydrated cement was tested for chemical composition, specific surface area, mineralogy and kinetics of hydration. The set material was investigated for mineralogy, microstructure and bioactivity. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopic analysis, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and isothermal calorimetry were employed. The specific surface area was investigated using a gas adsorption method with nitrogen as the probe. BioAggregate was composed of tricalcium silicate, tantalum oxide, calcium phosphate and silicon dioxide and was free of aluminium. On hydration, the tricalcium silicate produced calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide. The former was deposited around the cement grains, while the latter reacted with the silicon dioxide to form additional calcium silicate hydrate. This resulted in reduction of calcium hydroxide in the aged cement. MTA Angelus reacted in a similar fashion; however, since it contained no additives, the calcium hydroxide was still present in the aged cement. Bioactivity was demonstrated by deposition of hydroxyapatite. BioAggregate exhibited a high specific surface area. Nevertheless, the reactivity determined by isothermal calorimetry appeared to be slow compared to MTA Angelus. The tantalum oxide as opposed to bismuth oxide was inert, and tantalum was not leached in solution. BioAggregate exhibited

  19. Analysis of cubic and orthorhombic C3A hydration in presence of gypsum and lime

    KAUST Repository

    Kirchheim, A. P.

    2009-02-26

    Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used to study the microstructural changes and phase development that take place during the hydration of cubic (pure) and orthorhombic (Na-doped) tricalcium aluminate (C3A) and gypsum in the absence and presence of lime. The results demonstrate that important differences occur in the hydration of each C3A polymorph and gypsum when no lime is added; orthorhombic C3A reacts faster with gypsum than the cubic phase, forming longer ettringite needles; however, the presence of lime slows down the formation of ettringite in the orthorhombic sample. Additional rheometric tests showed the possible effects on the setting time in these cementitious mixes.

  20. Analysis of the hydration water around bovine serum albumin using terahertz coherent synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, Jordan W; Meliga, Stefano; Ferachou, Denis; Cinque, Gianfelice; Zeitler, J Axel; Falconer, Robert J

    2014-01-09

    Terahertz spectroscopy was used to study the absorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in water. The Diamond Light Source operating in a low alpha mode generated coherent synchrotron radiation that covered a useable spectral bandwidth of 0.3-3.3 THz (10-110 cm(-1)). As the BSA concentration was raised, there was a nonlinear change in absorption inconsistent with Beer's law. At low BSA concentrations (0-1 mM), the absorption remained constant or rose slightly. Above a concentration of 1 mM BSA, a steady decrease in absorption was observed, which was followed by a plateau that started at 2.5 mM. Using a overlapping hydration layer model, the hydration layer was estimated to extend 15 Å from the protein. Calculation of the corrected absorption coefficient (αcorr) for the water around BSA by subtracting the excluded volume of the protein provides an alternative approach to studying the hydration layer that provides evidence for complexity in the population of water around BSA.

  1. Miniaturized biosignature analysis reveals implications for the formation of cold seep carbonates at Hydrate Ridge (off Oregon, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Leefmann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Methane-related carbonates from Hydrate Ridge typically show several macroscopically distinguishable mineral phases, namely whitish aragonite, lucent aragonite, and gray micrite. The relationship of these phases to particular microorganisms or biogeochemical processes is as yet unclear. We used a miniaturized biomarker technique on mg samples, combined with factor analysis and subsequent electron microprobe analysis, to study lipid biomarkers and chemical compositions of the individual phases. This allows us to identify particular mechanisms involved in the formation of the different carbonate precipitates. Our combined analysis of biomarkers and petrographic traits shows that most of the lipids related to the anaerobic oxidation of methane (>90% by weight are concentrated within only a minor compartment (~20% by volume of the Hydrate Ridge carbonates, the whitish aragonite. The patterns indicate that the whitish aragonite represents fossilized biofilms of methanotrophic consortia containing mainly archaea of the ANME-2 group and sulfate reducing bacteria, whereas the precipitation of the lucent aragonite may have lacked the immediate proximity of microorganisms during formation. By contrast, the gray micrite formed by incorporation of allochthonous organic and inorganic matter during carbonate precipitation induced by the anaerobic oxidation of methane involving ANME-1 archaea.

  2. The use of moderated mediated analysis to study the influence of hypo-hydration on working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Hayley A; Benton, David

    2016-07-13

    To date, dehydration has been typically reported to infl uence psychological parameters when there has been at least a 2% loss of body mass, although there has been little examination of those going about their everyday lives, those who have lost less than 1% of body mass. In such situations factors such as the initial hydration status and individual differences in the response to a reduced fl uid intake are likely to be infl uential. Yet to study the complexity added by such additional variables novel methods of statistical analysis are required. The present study describes the use of moderated mediation, an approach that asks various questions: fi rstly, is drinking infl uential?; secondly, does a mediator (e.g.,thirst) sit between an independent and dependent variable?; and thirdly, does an effect only occur under certain conditions such as initial osmolality? In the study, 118 subjects were exposed to 30 °C for four hours during which they half drank 300 ml water. The serial sevens test of working memory was performed before and at the end of the procedure. A 0.6% loss of body mass reduced the effi ciency of working memory. Those who consumed water had better working memory; working memory was worse in participants who lost more body mass or became thirstier, but only in those with higher levels of baseline osmolality. Small variations in hydration status infl uenced cognitive functioning although there were individual differences in the response. The parameters that influence an adverse response to hypo-hydration need to be established to allow giving appropriate advice.

  3. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  4. Nanostructural Deformation Analysis of Calcium Silicate Hydrate in Portland Cement Paste by Atomic Pair Distribution Function

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Bae, Sungchul; Kanematsu, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    The deformation of nanostructure of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) in Portland cement (PC) paste under compression was characterized by the atomic pair distribution function (PDF), measured using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The PDF of the PC paste exhibited a unique deformation behavior for a short-range order below 2.0 nm, close to the size of the C-S-H globule, while the deformation for a long-range order was similar to that of a calcium hydroxide phase measured by Bragg peak shift. Th...

  5. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate

  6. The degree of hydration assessment of blended cement pastes by differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis. Morphological evolution of the solid phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteagudo, S.M., E-mail: sm.monteagudo@alumnos.upm.es [Departamento de Ingeniería Civil: Construcción, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Moragues, A., E-mail: amoragues@caminos.upm.es [Departamento de Ingeniería Civil: Construcción, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Gálvez, J.C., E-mail: jaime.galvez@upm.es [Departamento de Ingeniería Civil: Construcción, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Casati, M.J., E-mail: mariajesus.casati@upm.es [Departamento de Vehículos Aeroespaciales, Escuela de Ingeniería Aeronáutica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain); Reyes, E., E-mail: encarnacion.reyes@upm.es [Departamento de Ingeniería Civil: Construcción, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2014-09-20

    Highlights: • A proposal of hydration degree calculation for blended cement pastes is presented. • The method is based both on the contributions of various authors and on DTA–TG results. • Paste and mortar specimens with BFS, FA and SF mineral admixtures were used. • The evaluation of CH gives information on hydration and pozzolanic reactions. • The assessment of α provides an insight into future strength evolution. - Abstract: The degree of hydration assessment of cement paste from differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis data has been performed by several authors that have offered a number of proposals for technical application to blended cements. In this paper, two calculation methods are studied in detail. Then, a proposal of the degree of hydration calculation for blended cements, based on the analysis of experimental results of DTA–TG, is presented. The proposed method combines the contributions of the authors and allows straightforward calculation of the degree of hydration from the experimental results. Validation of the methodology was performed by macroscopic and microstructural tests through paste and mortar specimens with blast furnace slag, flying ash and silica fume mineral admixtures bei(g)ng used. Tests of scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive analyser on paste specimens, and of mechanical strength on mortar specimens with the same percentages of substitution, were performed. They showed good agreement with the information derived from the differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis data.

  7. Nanostructural analysis of water distribution in hydrated multicomponent gels using thermal analysis and NMR relaxometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codoni, Doroty; Belton, Peter; Qi, Sheng

    2015-06-01

    Highly complex, multicomponent gels and water-containing soft materials have varied applications in biomedical, pharmaceutical, and food sciences, but the characterization of these nanostructured materials is extremely challenging. The aim of this study was to use stearoyl macrogol-32 glycerides (Gelucire 50/13) gels containing seven different species of glycerides, PEG, and PEG-esters, as model, complex, multicomponent gels, to investigate the effect of water content on the micro- and nanoarchitecture of the gel interior. Thermal analysis and NMR relaxometry were used to probe the thermal and diffusional behavior of water molecules within the gel network. For the highly concentrated gels (low water content), the water activity was significantly lowered due to entrapment in the dense gel network. For the gels with intermediate water content, multiple populations of water molecules with different thermal responses and diffusion behavior were detected, indicating the presence of water in different microenvironments. This correlated with the network architecture of the freeze-dried gels observed using SEM. For the gels with high water content, increased quantities of water with similar diffusion characteristics as free water could be detected, indicating the presence of large water pockets in these gels. The results of this study provide new insights into structure of Gelucire gels, which have not been reported before because of the complexity of the material. They also demonstrate that the combination of thermal analysis and NMR relaxometry offers insights into the structure of soft materials not available by the use of each technique alone. However, we also note that in some instances the results of these measurements are overinterpreted and we suggest limitations of the methods that must be considered when using them.

  8. Hydration and self-association of caffeine molecules in aqueous solution: Comparative effects of sucrose and β-cyclodextrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejri, Mondher; BenSouissi, Abdelfattah; Aroulmoji, Vincent; Rogé, Barbara

    2009-07-01

    The UV-spectra of pure caffeine were measured and two quite differentiated hyper- or hypo-chromic effects were observed as concentration was increased. The first one was explained as due to caffeine-water molecule interaction and the second as originating from dimer formation and staking of caffeine molecules. The effects of sucrose and β-cyclodextrin on the hydration and the self-association of caffeine were also examined by UV spectroscopy. Sucrose was found to enhance the self-association of caffeine molecules by attracting and structuring water molecules around itself. The caffeine-caffeine hydrophobic interactions were promoted in such hydrophilic environment and so was the stacking. The molecular aggregation leads to reducing the electronic mobility and so is the case for the mesomeric effect in the heterogeneous cycle. This could explain the hypo-chromic phenomenon observed when sucrose concentration was increased. β-Cyclodextrin shows a distinct behaviour because of its ability to form inclusion complexes with various hydrophobic guest molecules. This ability enhances the solubility of caffeine molecules throughout the inclusion interactions and prevents the caffeine self-association.

  9. [Comparative analysis in artificial nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csomós, Akos; Okrös, Ilona

    2003-03-23

    It is well known to Hungarian experts in the field of nutrition that hospital inpatients in this country do not have the required nutrition. To compare data of intensive care national costing analysis from England and intensive care unit in County Hospital, Eger, Hungary in order to advise a cost effective nutrition protocol. English data were extracted from the report of Intensive Care National Cost Block Programme, year 1999. The Hungarian data were obtained by top down method from annual costing report of the same year. The authors used Purchasing Power Parity to make international cost comparison between these countries. In proportion to Purchasing Power Parity, the hospital budget per patient for nutrition is more than double in England than in the studied intensive care unit in Hungary. Intensive care units in England spend 1% on nutrition, 13% on drugs and 10% on disposables. There is only 0.2% spent on nutrition, 29.8% on drugs and 8% on disposables in the studied intensive care unit in Hungary. Cost of nutrition per patient day is HUF 117 in Hungary, which is even lower than the hospital budget per patient day for nutrition. On the basis of the above findings and literature review as well, the authors set up a cost effective nutrition guideline: 1. Identify malnourished patient. 2. Nutrition can be delayed for 4-5 days in not malnourished patient. 3. Enteral nutrition should always be the first choice. 4. Total parenteral nutrition is beneficial only if given over at least 7 days. 5) It is cost effective to prevent nosocomial infections even at higher cost.

  10. Methane hydrate pore saturation evaluation from geophysical logging and pressure core analysis, at the first offshore production test site in the eastern Nankai Trough, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, T.; Suzuki, K.; Takayama, T.; Konno, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Egawa, K.; Ito, T.; Nagao, J.

    2013-12-01

    On March 2013, the first offshore production test form methane hydrate (MH) concentrated zone (MHCZ) was conducted by the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resource Development in Japan (MH21) at the AT1 site located in the north-western slope of Daini-Atsumi Knoll in the eastern Nankai Trough, Japan. Before the production test, extensive geophysical logging and pressure coring using Hybrid Pressure Coring System were conducted in 2012 at monitoring well (AT1-MC) and coring well (AT1-C), in order to obtain basic information for the MH reservoir characterization. MH pore saturation (Sh) is one of the important basic parameters not only for reservoir characterization, but also the resource assessment. However, precise evaluation of Sh from geophysical logging is still challenging technical issue. The MHCZ confirmed by the geophysical logging at AT1-MC has a turbidite assemblage (from several tens of centimeters to a few meters) with 60 m of gross thickness; it is composed of lobe/sheet type sequences in the upper part, and relatively thick channel sand sequences in the lower part. In this study, the Sh evaluated from geophysical logging data were compared with those evaluated from pressure core analysis. Resistivity logs and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log were used for the Sh evaluation by geophysical logging. Standard Archie equation was applied for Sh evaluation from resistivity log, while density magnetic resonance (DMR) method was used for Sh evaluation from NMR log. The Sh from pressure core samples were evaluated using the amount of dissociated gas volume, together with core sample bulk volume, measured porosity, net sand intervals, and assumed methane solubility in pore water. In the upper part of the MHCZ, Sh estimated from resistivity log showed distinct difference in value between sand and mud layers, compared to Sh from NMR log. Resistivity log has higher vertical resolution than NMR log, so it is favorable for these kinds of thin bed

  11. High concentration hydrate in disseminated forms obtained in Shenhu area, north slope of South China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S.; Wu, N.; Zhang, G.; Liang, J.; Lu, J. [Guangzhou Marine Geology Survey, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, H. [China Geological Survey, Beijing (China); Su, X. [China Univ. of Geosciences, Beijing (China); Schultheiss, P.; Holland, M. [Geotek, Daventry (United Kingdom); Rose, K. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The geological and tectonic settings, the temperature and pressure regimes, and the methane-generating potential from the thick organic-rich sediments of the north slope of the South China Seas are all favorable properties for gas hydrate formation. The Guangzhou Marine Geological Survey (GMGS) has been performing geological, geophysical and geochemical investigations for gas hydrate in the northern South China Sea since 2001. In order to determine the nature and distribution of gas hydrates, a gas hydrate drilling expedition was initiated in the Shenhu area of the north slope of the South China Sea in April and June of 2007. The purpose of the expedition was to detect gas hydrates and quantify its nature, distribution and concentration. The study involved the use of different observation and measurement techniques to provide multiple lines of evidence for gas hydrate. Pressure cores provided benchmark spot measurements of actual methane concentration, gas hydrate concentration, and background chlorinity. In order to detect the presence of dissociating/dissociated gas hydrate throughout the hole, infrared imaging of non-pressurized cores were utilized. Porewater freshening analysis from chlorinity variations was employed to quantify the gas hydrate at the centimeter scale. Gas hydrate saturations from the pressure and non-pressurized cores within the cored intervals were then compared to the resistivity, acoustic, and other well logs for a complete hydrate picture of the borehole. The expedition also involved the collection of samples from both non-pressure and pressure cores that were likely to contain gas hydrate and preserved them in liquid nitrogen. The paper discussed the general operations and strategy; coring plan; preservation of gas hydrate samples in liquid nitrogen; core temperature measurement; porewater sampling, porewater analysis, and gas hydrate from porewater freshening. Other procedures that were discussed included gas sampling and analyses

  12. Natural Gas Hydrates

    OpenAIRE

    Ersland, Geir

    2010-01-01

    The experimental set-up with the MRI monitoring apparatus was capable of forming large quantities of methane hydrates in sandstone pores and monitor hydrate growth patterns for various initial conditions. Spontaneous conversion of methane hydrate to carbon dioxide hydrate occurred when methane hydrate, in porous media, was exposed to liquid carbon dioxide. The MRI images did not detect any significant increase in signal in the hydrate saturated cores that would indicate the presence of free w...

  13. Hydration mechanisms of mineral trioxide aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J

    2007-06-01

    To report the hydration mechanism of white mineral trioxide aggregate (White MTA, Dentsply, Tulsa Dental Products, Tulsa, OK, USA). The chemical constitution of white MTA was studied by viewing the powder in polished sections under the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The hydration of both white MTA and white Portland cement (PC) was studied by characterizing cement hydrates viewed under the SEM, plotting atomic ratios, performing quantitative energy dispersive analyses with X-ray (EDAX) and by calculation of the amount of anhydrous clinker minerals using the Bogue calculation. Un-hydrated MTA was composed of impure tri-calcium and di-calcium silicate and bismuth oxide. The aluminate phase was scarce. On hydration the white PC produced a dense structure made up of calcium silicate hydrate, calcium hydroxide, monosulphate and ettringite as the main hydration products. The un-reacted cement grain was coated with a layer of hydrated cement. In contrast MTA produced a porous structure on hydration. Levels of ettringite and monosulphate were low. Bismuth oxide was present as un-reacted powder but also incorporated with the calcium silicate hydrate. White MTA was deficient in alumina suggesting that the material was not prepared in a rotary kiln. On hydration this affected the production of ettringite and monosulphate usually formed on hydration of PC. The bismuth affected the hydration mechanism of MTA; it formed part of the structure of C-S-H and also affected the precipitation of calcium hydroxide in the hydrated paste. The microstructure of hydrated MTA would likely be weaker when compared with that of PC.

  14. New insights in professional horse racing; "in-race" heart rate data, elevated fracture risk, hydration, nutritional and lifestyle analysis of elite professional jockeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, John; Cheng, Hoi Lun; Poon, Eric Tsz-Chun

    2017-03-01

    Weight-making practices have been shown to impair musculoskeletal and physiological function of jockeys. This study investigated the "in-race" heart rate (HR) responses and hydration status during competitive racing, as well as selected physiological and lifestyle parameters of professional jockeys based in Hong Kong. "In-race" HR responses and early morning hydration status of 20 male jockeys were examined in hot and moderate climactic occasions. Additionally, bone mineral density (BMD), dietary intake and lifestyle choices were assessed. Osteopenia was observed in the calcanei of jockeys (left: 0.51 ± 0.06; right: 0.46 ± 0.12 g · cm-2). Energy and protein intake were significantly lower on a race day compared to a non-race day (P hydration status and nutritional intake, which can significantly enhance the fracture risk. Further research should develop exercise and nutrition guidelines for optimising their skeletal health.

  15. Comparative Chromatographic Analysis and Pharmacodynamic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The laboratory analysis of the Garcinia Kolanuts extracts showed receptors inhibition of Beta adrenergic sites, adenosine, melatonin, opiate, purine, calcium channel L-type and 5HT5A. Conclusion: Garcinia kolanut extract exhibits a combined effects of all the known antiglaucoma drugs used in comparison. NQJHM Vol.

  16. Assessment of hydration status by urinary analysis of elite junior taekwon-do athletes in preparing for competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Mehmet; Guler, Gokcen

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess over time the hydration status of taekwon-do athletes during a preparatory camp. Measures of urine osmolality, conductivity, specific gravity and colour were made on the first urine sample passed by the participants (n = 32) in the morning before breakfast. The urinary measurements were made on samples collected at the beginning of the camp, 5 days later and one day before competition. Body mass was also measured at the same instants. Body mass (mean +/- s) was essentially the same on each of the measurement days (62.6 +/- 12.2, 62.7 +/- 12.3 and 62.2 +/- 12.6 kg, respectively). Mean urine osmolality at the beginning of the camp was relatively high (998 +/- 171 mOsmol . kg-1), suggesting that a significant number of the athletes were already hypohydrated. However, no significant differences were detected in urine osmolality at the three time points during the study. There were no significant differences in any of the four methods of urine analysis during the study (P > 0.05). The average values for all samples were 989 +/- 205 mOsmol . kg-1 for osmolality, 25.5 +/- 6.7 mS . cm-1 for conductivity, 1.017 +/- 0.010 g . cm-3 for specific gravity and 4 +/- 1 arbitrary units for colour. Correlation analysis between the different methods suggested moderately good agreement (correlation coefficient = 0.5-0.7) between all four measurement techniques (P athletes were slightly hypohydrated in the morning on each of the test days, but there was no evidence to suggest that most of the athletes further restricted their fluid intake to make weight. In addition, it appears that each of the four methods used gave essentially the same estimate of hydration status of these athletes.

  17. Spectral phasor analysis of LAURDAN fluorescence in live A549 lung cells to study the hydration and time evolution of intracellular lamellar body-like structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malacrida, Leonel; Astrada, Soledad; Briva, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Using LAURDAN spectral imaging and spectral phasor analysis we concurrently studied the growth and hydration state of subcellular organelles (lamellar body-like, LB-like) from live A549 lung cancer cells at different post-confluence days. Our results reveal a time dependent two-step process...

  18. Observed gas hydrate morphologies in marine sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Roberts, J.; Druce, M. [Geotek Ltd., Daventry, Northamptonshire (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    The morphology of gas hydrate in marine sediments determines the basic physical properties of the sediment-hydrate matrix and provides information regarding the formation of gas hydrate deposits, and the nature of the disruption that will occur on dissociation. Small-scale morphology is useful in estimating the concentrations of gas hydrate from geophysical data. It is also important for predicting their response to climate change or commercial production. Many remote techniques for gas hydrate detection and quantification depend on hydrate morphology. In this study, morphology of gas hydrate was examined in HYACINTH pressure cores from recent seagoing expeditions. Visual and infrared observations from non-pressurized cores were also used. The expeditions and pressure core analysis were described in detail. This paper described the difference between two types of gas hydrate morphologies, notably pore-filling and grain-displacing. Last, the paper addressed the impact of hydrate morphology. It was concluded that a detailed morphology of gas hydrate is an essential component for a full understanding of the past, present, and future of any gas hydrate environment. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Quantitative analysis of the hydration of lithium salts in water using multivariate curve resolution of near-infrared spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barba, M. Isabel [Group of Research in Applied Thermal Engineering-CREVER, Mechanical Engineering Dept. (Spain); Larrechi, M. Soledad, E-mail: mariasoledad.larrechi@urv.cat [Analytical and Organic Chemistry Dept., Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain); Coronas, Alberto [Group of Research in Applied Thermal Engineering-CREVER, Mechanical Engineering Dept. (Spain)

    2016-05-05

    The hydration process of lithium iodide, lithium bromide, lithium chloride and lithium nitrate in water was analyzed quantitatively by applying multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) to their near infrared spectra recorded between 850 nm and 1100 nm. The experiments were carried out using solutions with a salt mass fraction between 0% and 72% for lithium bromide, between 0% and 67% for lithium nitrate and between 0% and 62% for lithium chloride and lithium iodide at 323.15 K, 333.15 K, 343.15 K and 353.15 K, respectively. Three factors were determined for lithium bromide and lithium iodide and two factors for the lithium chloride and lithium nitrate by singular value decomposition (SVD) of their spectral data matrices. These factors are associated with various chemical environments in which there are aqueous clusters containing the ions of the salts and non-coordinated water molecules. Spectra and concentration profiles of non-coordinated water and cluster aqueous were retrieved by MCR-ALS. The amount of water involved in the process of hydration of the various salts was quantified. The results show that the water absorption capacity increases in the following order LiI < LiBr < LiNO{sub 3} < LiCl. The salt concentration at which there is no free water in the medium was calculated at each one of the temperatures considered. The values ranged between 62.6 and 65.1% for LiBr, 45.5–48.3% for LiCl, 60.4–61.2% for LiI and 60.3–63.7% for LiNO{sub 3}. These values are an initial approach to determining the concentration as from which crystal formation is favored. - Highlights: • Quantitative analysis of the hydration of lithium salts in water. • The absorption capacity of the electrolytes in function of the salt is evaluated. • The lithium salt concentration is estimated when the crystal formation is favored.

  20. Local Structure and Dynamics of Hydration Water in Intrinsically Disordered Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-08-27

    Hydration water around protein surface plays a key role in structure, folding and dynamics of proteins. Intrinsically disordered proteins lack secondary and/or tertiary structure in their native state. Thus, characterizing the local structure and dynamics of hydration water around disordered proteins is challenging for both experimentalists and theoreticians. The local structure, orientation and dynamics of hydration water in the vicinity of intrinsically disordered proteins is investigated through molecular dynamics simulations. The analysis of the hydration capacity reveals that the disordered proteins have much larger binding capacity for hydration water than globular proteins. The surface and radial distribution of water molecules around the disordered proteins depict a similar trend. The local structure of the hydration water evaluated in terms of the tetrahedral order parameter, shows a higher order among the water molecules surrounding disordered proteins/regions. The residence time of water molecules clearly exhibits slow dynamics of hydration water around the surface of disordered proteins/regions as compared to globular proteins. The orientation of water molecules is found to be distinctly different for ordered and disordered proteins/regions. This analysis provides a better insight into the structure and dynamics of hydration water around disordered proteins.

  1. Hydration characteristics and compressive strength of hardened cement pastes containing nano-metakaolin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M.A. El-Gamal

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study the effect of inclusion of nano-metakaolin (NMK to ordinary Portland cement (OPC on the hydration characteristics and microstructure of hardened OPC–NMK pastes was studied. The OPC–NMK blends were prepared by the partial substitution of OPC by NMK (4, 6, 10 and 15 weight %. The fresh pastes were made using an initial water/solid (W/S ratio of 0.27 by weight and then hydrated for various time intervals. At the end of each hydration time, the hardened blended cement pastes were tested for compressive strength, free lime content, combined water content, X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The compressive strength results revealed that the inclusion of nano-metakaolin into OPC improved the mechanical properties of NMK–OPC pastes during almost all ages of hydration, especially with the paste containing 10 wt% NMK. The compressive strength values obtained for OPC paste blended with 4% silica fume (SF and 6% NMK are comparable to those of the neat OPC paste. The DSC thermograms and XRD diffractograms obtained for some selected hardened pastes indicated the formation of amorphous calcium silicate hydrates, calcium sulfoaluminate hydrates, calcium aluminate hydrate and calcium hydroxide. SEM micrographs showed the formation of a dense microstructure for the hardened OPC–NMK and OPC–NMK-SF pastes as compared to the neat OPC paste after 90 days of hydration.

  2. Nanostructural Deformation Analysis of Calcium Silicate Hydrate in Portland Cement Paste by Atomic Pair Distribution Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Suzuki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The deformation of nanostructure of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H in Portland cement (PC paste under compression was characterized by the atomic pair distribution function (PDF, measured using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The PDF of the PC paste exhibited a unique deformation behavior for a short-range order below 2.0 nm, close to the size of the C-S-H globule, while the deformation for a long-range order was similar to that of a calcium hydroxide phase measured by Bragg peak shift. The compressive deformation of the C-S-H nanostructure was comprised of three stages with different interactions between globules. This behavior would originate from the granular nature of C-S-H, which deforms with increasing packing density by slipping the interfaces between globules, rearranging the overall C-S-H nanostructure. This new approach will lead to increasing applications of the PDF technique to understand the deformation mechanism of C-S-H in PC-based materials.

  3. Analysis of formation pressure test results in the Mount Elbert methane hydrate reservoir through numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, M.; Sato, A.; Funatsu, K.; Ouchi, H.; Masuda, Y.; Narita, H.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    Targeting the methane hydrate (MH) bearing units C and D at the Mount Elbert prospect on the Alaska North Slope, four MDT (Modular Dynamic Formation Tester) tests were conducted in February 2007. The C2 MDT test was selected for history matching simulation in the MH Simulator Code Comparison Study. Through history matching simulation, the physical and chemical properties of the unit C were adjusted, which suggested the most likely reservoir properties of this unit. Based on these properties thus tuned, the numerical models replicating "Mount Elbert C2 zone like reservoir" "PBU L-Pad like reservoir" and "PBU L-Pad down dip like reservoir" were constructed. The long term production performances of wells in these reservoirs were then forecasted assuming the MH dissociation and production by the methods of depressurization, combination of depressurization and wellbore heating, and hot water huff and puff. The predicted cumulative gas production ranges from 2.16??106m3/well to 8.22??108m3/well depending mainly on the initial temperature of the reservoir and on the production method.This paper describes the details of modeling and history matching simulation. This paper also presents the results of the examinations on the effects of reservoir properties on MH dissociation and production performances under the application of the depressurization and thermal methods. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. FTIR analysis of the interaction of arbutin with dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine in anhydrous and hydrated states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frías, M A; Díaz, S B; Ale, N M; Ben Altabef, A; Disalvo, E A

    2006-11-01

    In this paper, the interaction of arbutin with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers was studied by FTIR spectrometry. The results show that arbutin interacts in different extents with the phosphate and carbonyl groups of membranes in the gel state, the liquid crystalline state or subjected to osmotic stress. The effect, in the presence of water, on the antisymmetric stretching of the phosphate groups is qualitatively similar to that found with other molecules composed by a glucose moiety such as trehalose and sucrose. However, significant differences were found between these compounds and arbutin in the carbonyl region. Arbutin displaces the PO2- antisymmetric stretching to lower frequencies in lipids dispersed in water. This indicates strong hydrogen bonding. In contrast, in the solid state, this frequency increases. The effect on the carbonyl groups varies depending on the hydration state of the bilayer, which is achieved by changing the phase state of the bilayer or by osmotic stress. The hydrocarbon region is not affected by arbutin in the excess of water. However, symmetric and antisymmetric stretching of CH2 and CH3 are strongly affected in the dry state.

  5. Discrete element analysis of the mechanical properties of deep-sea methane hydrate-bearing soils considering interparticle bond thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mingjing; He, Jie; Wang, Jianfeng; Zhou, Yaping; Zhu, Fangyuan

    2017-12-01

    Due to increasing global energy demands, research is being conducted on the mechanical properties of methane hydrate-bearing soils (MHBSs), from which methane hydrate (MH) will be explored. This paper presents a numerical approach to study the mechanical properties of MHBSs. The relationship between the level of MH saturation and the interparticle bond thickness is first obtained by analyzing the scanning electron microscope images of MHBS samples, in which is the bridge connecting the micromechanical behavior captured by the DEM with the macroscopic properties of MHBSs. A simplified thermal-hydromechanical (THM) bond model that considers the different bond thicknesses is then proposed to describe the contact behavior between the soil particles and those incorporated into the discrete element method (DEM). Finally, a series of biaxial compression tests are carried out with different MH saturations under different effective confining pressures to analyze the mechanical properties of deep-sea MHBSs. The results of the DEM numerical simulation are also compared with the findings from triaxial compression tests. The results show that the macromechanical properties of deep-sea MHBSs can be qualitatively captured by the proposed DEM. The shear strength, cohesion, and volumetric contraction of deep-sea MHBSs increase with increasing MH saturation, although its influence on the internal friction angle is obscure. The shear strength and volumetric contraction increase with increasing effective confining pressure. The peak shear strength and the dilation of MHBSs increase as the critical bond thickness increases, while the residual deviator stress largely remains the same at a larger axial strain. With increasing the axial strain, the percentage of broken bonds increases, along with the expansion of the shear band.

  6. Dry heat treatment affects wheat bran surface properties and hydration kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Pieter J; Hemdane, Sami; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2016-07-15

    Heat stabilization of wheat bran aims at inactivation of enzymes which may cause rancidity and processability issues. Such treatments may however cause additional unanticipated phenomena which may affect wheat bran technological properties. In this work, the impact of toasting on wheat bran hydration capacity and hydration kinetics was studied. Hydration properties were assessed using the Enslin-Neff and drainage centrifugation water retention capacity methods, thermogravimetric analysis and contact angle goniometry, next to more traditional methods. While equilibrium hydration properties of bran were not affected by the heat treatment, the rate at which the heat treated bran hydrated was, however, very significantly reduced compared to the untreated bran. This phenomenon was found to originate from the formation of a lipid coating during the treatment rendering the bran surface hydrophobic. These insights help to understand and partially account for the modified processability of heat treated bran in food applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. THCM Coupled Model for Hydrate-Bearing Sediments: Data Analysis and Design of New Field Experiments (Marine and Permafrost Settings)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Marcelo J. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Santamarina, J. Carlos [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-02-14

    Gas hydrates are solid compounds made of water molecules clustered around low molecular weight gas molecules such as methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Methane hydrates form under pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions that are common in sub-permafrost layers and in deep marine sediments. Stability conditions constrain the occurrence of gas hydrates to submarine sediments and permafrost regions. The amount of technically recoverable methane trapped in gas hydrate may exceed 104tcf. Gas hydrates are a potential energy resource, can contribute to climate change, and can cause large-scale seafloor instabilities. In addition, hydrate formation can be used for CO2 sequestration (also through CO2-CH4 replacement), and efficient geological storage seals. The experimental study of hydrate bearing sediments has been hindered by the very low solubility of methane in water (lab testing), and inherent sampling difficulties associated with depressurization and thermal changes during core extraction. This situation has prompted more decisive developments in numerical modeling in order to advance the current understanding of hydrate bearing sediments, and to investigate/optimize production strategies and implications. The goals of this research has been to addresses the complex thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical THCM coupled phenomena in hydrate-bearing sediments, using a truly coupled numerical model that incorporates sound and proven constitutive relations, satisfies fundamental conservation principles. Analytical solutions aimed at verifying the proposed code have been proposed as well. These tools will allow to better analyze available data and to further enhance the current understanding of hydrate bearing sediments in view of future field experiments and the development of production technology.

  8. A prospective randomised trial comparing nasogastric with intravenous hydration in children with bronchiolitis (protocol The comparative rehydration in bronchiolitis study (CRIB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borland Meredith

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bronchiolitis is the most common reason for admission of infants to hospital in developed countries. Fluid replacement therapy is required in about 30% of children admitted with bronchiolitis. There are currently two techniques of fluid replacement therapy that are used with the same frequency-intravenous (IV or nasogastric (NG. The evidence to determine the optimum route of hydration therapy for infants with bronchiolitis is inadequate. This randomised trial will be the first to provide good quality evidence of whether nasogastric rehydration (NGR offers benefits over intravenous rehydration (IVR using the clinically relevant continuous outcome measure of duration of hospital admission. Methods/Design A prospective randomised multi-centre trial in Australia and New Zealand where children between 2 and 12 months of age with bronchiolitis, needing non oral fluid replacement, are randomised to receive either intravenous (IV or nasogastric (NG rehydration. 750 patients admitted to participating hospitals will be recruited, and will be followed daily during the admission and by telephone 1 week after discharge. Patients with chronic respiratory, cardiac, or neurological disease; choanal atresia; needing IV fluid resuscitation; needing an IV for other reasons, and those requiring CPAP or ventilation are excluded. The primary endpoint is duration of hospital admission. Secondary outcomes are complications, need for ICU admission, parental satisfaction, and an economic evaluation. Results will be analysed using t-test for continuous data, and chi squared for categorical data. Non parametric data will be log transformed. Discussion This trial will define the role of NGR and IVR in bronchiolitis Trail registration The trial is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry - ACTRN12605000033640

  9. A prospective randomised trial comparing nasogastric with intravenous hydration in children with bronchiolitis (protocol) The comparative rehydration in bronchiolitis study (CRIB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Bronchiolitis is the most common reason for admission of infants to hospital in developed countries. Fluid replacement therapy is required in about 30% of children admitted with bronchiolitis. There are currently two techniques of fluid replacement therapy that are used with the same frequency-intravenous (IV) or nasogastric (NG). The evidence to determine the optimum route of hydration therapy for infants with bronchiolitis is inadequate. This randomised trial will be the first to provide good quality evidence of whether nasogastric rehydration (NGR) offers benefits over intravenous rehydration (IVR) using the clinically relevant continuous outcome measure of duration of hospital admission. Methods/Design A prospective randomised multi-centre trial in Australia and New Zealand where children between 2 and 12 months of age with bronchiolitis, needing non oral fluid replacement, are randomised to receive either intravenous (IV) or nasogastric (NG) rehydration. 750 patients admitted to participating hospitals will be recruited, and will be followed daily during the admission and by telephone 1 week after discharge. Patients with chronic respiratory, cardiac, or neurological disease; choanal atresia; needing IV fluid resuscitation; needing an IV for other reasons, and those requiring CPAP or ventilation are excluded. The primary endpoint is duration of hospital admission. Secondary outcomes are complications, need for ICU admission, parental satisfaction, and an economic evaluation. Results will be analysed using t-test for continuous data, and chi squared for categorical data. Non parametric data will be log transformed. Discussion This trial will define the role of NGR and IVR in bronchiolitis Trail registration The trial is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry - ACTRN12605000033640 PMID:20515467

  10. Observations related to tetrahydrofuran and methane hydrates for laboratory studies of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.Y.; Yun, T.S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction among water molecules, guest gas molecules, salts, and mineral particles determines the nucleation and growth behavior of gas hydrates in natural sediments. Hydrate of tetrahydrofuran (THF) has long been used for laboratory studies of gas hydrate-bearing sediments to provide close control on hydrate concentrations and to overcome the long formation history of methane hydrate from aqueous phase methane in sediments. Yet differences in the polarizability of THF (polar molecule) compared to methane (nonpolar molecule) raise questions about the suitability of THF as a proxy for methane in the study of hydrate-bearing sediments. From existing data and simple macroscale experiments, we show that despite its polar nature, THF's large molecular size results in low permittivity, prevents it from dissolving precipitated salts, and hinders the solvation of ions on dry mineral surfaces. In addition, the interfacial tension between water and THF hydrate is similar to that between water and methane hydrate. The processes that researchers choose for forming hydrate in sediments in laboratory settings (e.g., from gas, liquid, or ice) and the pore-scale distribution of the hydrate that is produced by each of these processes likely have a more pronounced effect on the measured macroscale properties of hydrate-bearing sediments than do differences between THF and methane hydrates themselves.

  11. Search for memory effects in methane hydrate: structure of water before hydrate formation and after hydrate decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Piers; Soper, Alan K; Thompson, Helen; Westacott, Robin E; Creek, Jefferson L; Hobson, Greg; Koh, Carolyn A

    2005-10-22

    Neutron diffraction with HD isotope substitution has been used to study the formation and decomposition of the methane clathrate hydrate. Using this atomistic technique coupled with simultaneous gas consumption measurements, we have successfully tracked the formation of the sI methane hydrate from a water/gas mixture and then the subsequent decomposition of the hydrate from initiation to completion. These studies demonstrate that the application of neutron diffraction with simultaneous gas consumption measurements provides a powerful method for studying the clathrate hydrate crystal growth and decomposition. We have also used neutron diffraction to examine the water structure before the hydrate growth and after the hydrate decomposition. From the neutron-scattering curves and the empirical potential structure refinement analysis of the data, we find that there is no significant difference between the structure of water before the hydrate formation and the structure of water after the hydrate decomposition. Nor is there any significant change to the methane hydration shell. These results are discussed in the context of widely held views on the existence of memory effects after the hydrate decomposition.

  12. [Progress in Raman spectroscopic measurement of methane hydrate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Zhu, Li-hua; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Long-jun

    2009-09-01

    Complex thermodynamics and kinetics problems are involved in the methane hydrate formation and decomposition, and these problems are crucial to understanding the mechanisms of hydrate formation and hydrate decomposition. However, it was difficult to accurately obtain such information due to the difficulty of measurement since methane hydrate is only stable under low temperature and high pressure condition, and until recent years, methane hydrate has been measured in situ using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy, a non-destructive and non-invasive technique, is used to study vibrational modes of molecules. Studies of methane hydrate using Raman spectroscopy have been developed over the last decade. The Raman spectra of CH4 in vapor phase and in hydrate phase are presented in this paper. The progress in the research on methane hydrate formation thermodynamics, formation kinetics, decomposition kinetics and decomposition mechanism based on Raman spectroscopic measurements in the laboratory and deep sea are reviewed. Formation thermodynamic studies, including in situ observation of formation condition of methane hydrate, analysis of structure, and determination of hydrate cage occupancy and hydration numbers by using Raman spectroscopy, are emphasized. In the aspect of formation kinetics, research on variation in hydrate cage amount and methane concentration in water during the growth of hydrate using Raman spectroscopy is also introduced. For the methane hydrate decomposition, the investigation associated with decomposition mechanism, the mutative law of cage occupancy ratio and the formulation of decomposition rate in porous media are described. The important aspects for future hydrate research based on Raman spectroscopy are discussed.

  13. Methane Clathrate Hydrate Prospecting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, N.; Romanovsky, V.

    2003-01-01

    A method of prospecting for methane has been devised. The impetus for this method lies in the abundance of CH4 and the growing shortages of other fuels. The method is intended especially to enable identification of subpermafrost locations where significant amounts of methane are trapped in the form of methane gas hydrate (CH4(raised dot)6H2O). It has been estimated by the U.S. Geological Survey that the total CH4 resource in CH4(raised dot) 6H2O exceeds the energy content of all other fossil fuels (oil, coal, and natural gas from non-hydrate sources). Also, CH4(raised dot)6H2O is among the cleanest-burning fuels, and CH4 is the most efficient fuel because the carbon in CH4 is in its most reduced state. The method involves looking for a proxy for methane gas hydrate, by means of the combination of a thermal-analysis submethod and a field submethod that does not involve drilling. The absence of drilling makes this method easier and less expensive, in comparison with prior methods of prospecting for oil and natural gas. The proposed method would include thermoprospecting in combination with one more of the other non-drilling measurement techniques, which could include magneto-telluric sounding and/or a subsurface-electrical-resistivity technique. The method would exploit the fact that the electrical conductivity in the underlying thawed region is greater than that in the overlying permafrost.

  14. Hydrogen bond density and strength analysis on hydrated Rutile (110) and Cassiterite (110) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nitin; Kent, Paul; Bandura, Andrei; Wesolowski, David; Kubicki, James; Sofo, Jorge

    2012-02-01

    We study the dynamics of water on the surface of cassiterite (110) and rutile (110) using ab-initio molecular dynamics simulation. Water adsorbs and dissociates on these surfaces. This dynamic equilibrium is dominated by the hydrogen bond (h-bond) network at the surface. The h-bond density analysis shows that adsorbed water molecules form higher average number of h-bonds on rutile (˜2.3) as compared to the cassiterite surface (˜2.1). On the other hand, bridging oxygen atoms form higher average number of h-bonds on cassiterite (˜1.4) than rutile surface (˜1.2). Dissociated species are found to have same average number of hydrogen bonds on both surfaces. As a consequence, the rutile surface has higher density of h-bonds at the surface than cassiterite, however, their strength is lower [N. Kumar et al., J. Chem. Phys. 134, 044706 (2011)]. This delicate balance is responsible for the different dynamical properties of both surfaces.

  15. Etude comparative de la cinétique de la réaction d’hydratation des bétons autoplaçants et des bétons vibrés

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Gargouri

    2014-04-01

    En effet, la nature exothermique de la réaction chimique du ciment peut induire des déformations de dilatation et de contraction. Par ailleurs, la dépression capillaire crée par la consommation d’eau due à l’hydratation du ciment entraine un retrait de dessiccation. Ces déformations peuvent entrainer des micros fissurations pouvant affecter la durabilité de l’ouvrage à long terme surtout pour les ouvrages épais. D’où l’importance d’étudier la cinétique d’hydratation de ses bétons non conventionnels et de les comparer à celle des bétons vibrés traditionnels. L’évolution de la température adiabatique ainsi que la variation en fonction du temps du degré d’hydratation sont déterminées pour le béton autoplaçant et le béton vibré. L’analyse des résultats expérimentaux obtenus montre que le changement de composition modifie considérablement la cinétique de la réaction d’hydratation.

  16. Comparing Techniques for Certified Static Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachera, David; Pichardie, David

    2009-01-01

    A certified static analysis is an analysis whose semantic validity has been formally proved correct with a proof assistant. The recent increasing interest in using proof assistants for mechanizing programming language metatheory has given rise to several approaches for certification of static analysis. We propose a panorama of these techniques and compare their respective strengths and weaknesses.

  17. Coconut Water Does Not Improve Markers of Hydration During Sub-maximal Exercise and Performance in a Subsequent Time Trial Compared with Water Alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peart, Daniel J; Hensby, Andy; Shaw, Matthew P

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare markers of hydration during submaximal exercise and subsequent time trial performance when consuming water (PW) or coconut water (CW). There was also a secondary aim to assess the palatability of CW during exercise and voluntary intake during intense exercise. 10 males (age 27.9 ± 4.9 years, body mass 78.1 ± 10.1kg, average max minute power 300.2 ± 28.2W) completed 60-min of submaximal cycling followed by a 10-km time trial on two occasions. During these trials participants consumed either PW or CW in a randomized manner, drinking a 250 ml of the assigned drink between 10-15 min, 25-30 min and 40-45 min, and then drinking ad libitum from 55-min until the end of the time trial. Body mass and urine osmolality were recorded preexercise and then after 30-min, 60-min, and post time trial. Blood glucose, lactate, heart rate, rate of perceived exertion (RPE; 6-20) and ratings of thirst, sweetness, nausea, fullness and stomach upset (1 =very low/none, 5= very high) were recorded during each drink period. CW did not significantly improve time trial performance compared with PW (971.4 ± 50.5 and 966.6 ± 44.8 s respectively; p = .698) and there was also no significant differences between trials for any of the physiological variables measured. However there were subjective differences between the beverages for taste, resulting in a significantly reduced volume of voluntary intake in the CW trial (115 ± 95.41 ml and 208.7 ± 86.22 ml; p < .001).

  18. A comparative analysis of existing oligonucleotides selection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A computational comparative analysis of the methods used to select oligos is important since the design and quality of the microarray probes are of critical importance for the hybridization experiments as well as subsequent analysis of the ... most are non-intuitive to use and lack important oligo design and software features.

  19. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous analysis showed that cavity size and number on one hand and combinations thickness affect the compressive strength of hollow sandcrete blocks. Series arrangement of the cavities is common but parallel arrangement has been recommended. This research performed a comparative analysis of the compressive ...

  20. A Comparative Study on Error Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Chun

    2015-01-01

    students (N= 54 students from LU; and N= 33 students from AU) participating in the studies, among them 44 are 2nd-year students (n=28 from LU and n=16 from AU) and 43 3rd-year students (n=26 from LU and n=17 from AU). Students’ writing samples were first collected and the errors on the use of comparative...... of the grammatical errors with using comparative sentences is developed, which include comparative item-related errors, comparative result-related errors and blend errors. The results further indicate that these errors could attribute to negative L1 transfer and overgeneralization of grammatical rule and structures......Title: A Comparative Study on Error Analysis Subtitle: - Belgian (L1) and Danish (L1) learners’ use of Chinese (L2) comparative sentences in written production Xiaoli Wu, Chun Zhang Abstract: Making errors is an inevitable and necessary part of learning. The collection, classification and analysis...

  1. 3D seismic analysis of the gas hydrate system and the fluid migration paths in part of the Niger Delta Basin, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinsanpe, Olumuyiwa T.; Adepelumi, Adekunle A.; Benjamin, Uzochukwu K.; Falebita, Dele E.

    2017-12-01

    Comprehensive qualitative and semi-quantitative seismic analysis was carried out on 3-dimensional seismic data acquired in the deepwater compressional and shale diapiric zone of the Niger Delta Basin using an advanced seismic imaging tool. The main aim of this work is to obtain an understanding of the forming mechanism of the gas hydrate system, and the fluid migration paths associated with this part of the basin. The results showed the presence of pockmarks on the seafloor and bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) in the field, indicating the active fluid flux and existence of gas hydrate system in the area. In the area of approximately 195 km2 occupying nearly 24% of the entire study field, three major zones with continuous or discontinuous BSRs of 3 to 7 km in length which are in the northeastern, southern and eastern part of the field respectively were delineated. The BSR is interpreted to be the transition between the free gas zone and the gas hydrate zone. The geologic structures including faults (strike-slip and normal faults), chimneys and diapirs were deduced to be the main conduits for gas migration. It is concluded that the biogenic gases generated in the basin were possibly transported via faults and chimneys by advection processes and subsequently accumulated under low temperature and high pressure conditions in the free gas zone below the BSR forming gas hydrate. A plausible explanation for the presence of the ubiquitous pockmarks of different diameters and sizes in the area is the transportation of the excessive gas to the seafloor through these mapped geologic structures.

  2. Intravenous home hydration in pediatric patients following adenotonsillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Albert H; Kim, Helen

    2002-10-21

    To determine the feasibility, safety and efficacy of intravenous home hydration for pediatric postoperative adenotonsillectomy patients. Nonrandomized control trial of two groups of pediatric patients following adenotonsillectomy--one with (H) and one without postoperative home intravenous hydration (WH). A tertiary care, university-based children's hospital. Administration of 25 cm3 kg-1 of Lactated Ringer's solution once a day for 3 days via an intravenous catheter. Three of 22 patients in the (WH) group and none of the 25 patients in the (H) group required an emergency room admission for dehydration. Difficulty swallowing and activity level were found to be statistically different based on chi2-analysis (Phydration group (H) had a greater swallowing difficulty score (1.4) compared with the nonhydration (WH) group (0.06). The (H) group had a lower activity score (0.2) compared with the (WH) group. Other parameters such as duration of pain, the severity of pain, days until oral feeds could be taken without difficulty, degree of dysphagia, degree of neck, throat, tongue and ear pain were not statistically different between the two groups based on chi2-analysis (Phydration. Increased efficacy from intravenous hydration was not shown based on a number of parameters. Selected patients with a high likelihood to develop dehydration or medically intractable emesis may benefit from intravenous hydration and may avoid emergency room or hospital admission. Bolus infusions of 25 cm3 kg-1 of Lactated Ringer's solution by home care nursing can be implemented safely in pediatric patients.

  3. A Controlled Source Electromagnetic Experiment for Gas Hydrate Assessment: First Results from the Chilean Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalenberg, K.; Willoughby, E.; Yuan, J.; Cairns, G.; Sepulveda, J.; Edwards, N.; Diaz, J.

    2004-05-01

    Gas hydrates in seafloor sediments are recognized as an important future energy resource, a powerful greenhouse gas and the potential cause of submarine landslides. Gas hydrates are ice-like solids consisting of a mixture of water and gas molecules, mainly methane, and are stable at low temperatures and high pressures. They have been found worldwide on continental margins and in permafrost areas. In general, a gas hydrate deposit can be identified on a seismic section by a so-called Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR) which is associated with trapped free gas below the base of the hydrate stability zone (BHSZ), or the depth where the geothermal gradient intersects the hydrate stability curve. However, the area above the BSR is often invisible on seismic sections, which therefore, generally provide no information about hydrate concentration that is essential to resource assessment and hazard evaluation. Measurements of the electrical conductivity of seafloor sediments can be the key to the estimation of gas hydrate concentrations. The relation between conductivity and porosity is given by Archie's law. In the hydrate layer, insulating hydrate forms in pore spaces and replaces conductive pore fluid and subsequently increases the bulk resistivity. Exact conductivity measurements therefore allow estimation of hydrate concentration. A controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method has been developed at the University of Toronto and has been tested on the Cascadia Margin. In March 2003 the group was invited to take part in a Chilean project to explore the gas hydrate deposits along the Chilean Margin. Data have been collected in 3 different areas. The data show little variation within the respective areas and are comparable to those obtained in the Cascadia Margin. At this stage of the data analysis, there is no observed correlation between conductivities and preliminary BSR locations from seismic data. Two scenarios could be the cause for this disagreement: a) Hydrate is

  4. Distinct role of hydration water in protein misfolding and aggregation revealed by fluctuating thermodynamics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2015-04-21

    decrease in solvation free energy, harnessing the monomer solvation free energy earned during the misfolding. The second step, where a compact dimer structure is formed, is driven by direct protein-protein interactions, but again it is accompanied by an increase in solvation free energy. The increased solvation free energy of the dimer will function as the driving force to recruit another Aβ protein in the approach stage of subsequent oligomerizations. The fluctuating thermodynamics analysis of the misfolding and dimerization of the Aβ protein indicates that the interaction of the protein with surrounding water plays a critical role in protein aggregation. Such a water-centric perspective is further corroborated by demonstrating that, for a large number of Aβ mutants and mutants of other protein systems, the change in the experimental aggregation propensity upon mutation has a significant correlation with the protein solvation free energy change. We also find striking discrimination between the positively and negatively charged residues on the protein surface by surrounding water molecules, which is shown to play a crucial role in determining the protein aggregation propensity. We argue that the protein total charge dictates such striking behavior of the surrounding water molecules. Our results provide new insights for understanding and predicting the protein aggregation propensity, thereby offering novel design principles for producing aggregation-resistant proteins for biotherapeutics.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Protein Domain Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Yuzhen; Godzik, Adam

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a set of graph theory-based tools, which we call Comparative Analysis of Protein Domain Organization (CADO), to survey and compare protein domain organizations of different organisms. In the language of CADO, the organization of protein domains in a given organism is shown as a domain graph in which protein domains are represented as vertices, and domain combinations, defined as instances of two domains found in one protein, are represented as edges. CADO provides a new way ...

  6. An Update on Maternal Hydration Strategies for Amniotic Fluid Improvement in Isolated Oligohydramnios and Normohydramnios: Evidence from a Systematic Review of Literature and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Noventa, Marco; Vitagliano, Amerigo; Dall’Asta, Andrea; D’Antona, Donato; Aldrich, Clive J.; Quaranta, Michela; Frusca, Tiziana; Patrelli, Tito Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several trials aimed at evaluating the efficacy of maternal hydration (MH) in increasing amniotic-fluid-volume (AFV) in pregnancies with isolated oligohydramnios or normohydramnos have been conducted. Unfortunately, no evidences support this intervention in routine-clinical-practice. The aim of this systematic-literature-review and meta-analysis was to collect all data regarding proposed strategies and their efficacy in relation to each clinical condition for which MH-therapy was performed with the aim of increasing amniotic-fluid (AF) and improving perinatal outcomes. Materials and Methods A systematic literature search was conducted in electronic-database MEDLINE, EMBASE, ScienceDirect and the Cochrane-Library in the time interval between 1991 and 2014. Following the identification of eligible trials, we estimated the methodological quality of each study (using QADAS-2) and clustered patients according to the following outcome measures: route of administration (oral versus intravenous versus combined), total daily dose of fluids administered (2000), duration of hydration therapy: (1 day, >1 day but 1 week), type of fluid administered (isotonic versus hypotonic versus combination). Results In isolated-oligohydramnios (IO), maternal oral hydration is more effective than intravenous hydration and hypotonic solutions superior to isotonic solutions. The improvement in AFV appears to be time-dependent rather than daily-dose dependent. Regarding normohydramnios pregnancies, all strategies seem equivalent though the administration of hypotonic-fluid appears to have a slightly greater effect than isotonic-fluid. Regarding perinatal outcomes, data is fragmentary and heterogeneous and does not allow us to define the real clinical utility of MH. Conclusions Available data suggests that MH may be a safe, well-tolerated and useful strategy to improve AFV especially in cases of IO. In view of the numerous obstetric situations in which a reduced AFV may pose a threat

  7. An Update on Maternal Hydration Strategies for Amniotic Fluid Improvement in Isolated Oligohydramnios and Normohydramnios: Evidence from a Systematic Review of Literature and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Gizzo

    Full Text Available Several trials aimed at evaluating the efficacy of maternal hydration (MH in increasing amniotic-fluid-volume (AFV in pregnancies with isolated oligohydramnios or normohydramnos have been conducted. Unfortunately, no evidences support this intervention in routine-clinical-practice. The aim of this systematic-literature-review and meta-analysis was to collect all data regarding proposed strategies and their efficacy in relation to each clinical condition for which MH-therapy was performed with the aim of increasing amniotic-fluid (AF and improving perinatal outcomes.A systematic literature search was conducted in electronic-database MEDLINE, EMBASE, ScienceDirect and the Cochrane-Library in the time interval between 1991 and 2014. Following the identification of eligible trials, we estimated the methodological quality of each study (using QADAS-2 and clustered patients according to the following outcome measures: route of administration (oral versus intravenous versus combined, total daily dose of fluids administered (2000, duration of hydration therapy: (1 day, >1 day but 1 week, type of fluid administered (isotonic versus hypotonic versus combination.In isolated-oligohydramnios (IO, maternal oral hydration is more effective than intravenous hydration and hypotonic solutions superior to isotonic solutions. The improvement in AFV appears to be time-dependent rather than daily-dose dependent. Regarding normohydramnios pregnancies, all strategies seem equivalent though the administration of hypotonic-fluid appears to have a slightly greater effect than isotonic-fluid. Regarding perinatal outcomes, data is fragmentary and heterogeneous and does not allow us to define the real clinical utility of MH.Available data suggests that MH may be a safe, well-tolerated and useful strategy to improve AFV especially in cases of IO. In view of the numerous obstetric situations in which a reduced AFV may pose a threat, particularly to the fetus, the possibility

  8. Comparative Analysis of Households' Socioeconomic and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative Analysis of Households' Socioeconomic and Demographic Characteristics and Food Security Status in Urban and Rural Areas of Kwara and Kogi States ... Journal Home > Vol 12, No 3 (2012) > ... Food security is a critical issue in Nigeria today as the country struggles with high rates of food prices and poverty.

  9. Teacher Policy: A Framework for Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatto, Maria Teresa

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines a framework for analysis of teacher focused policy studies within an international and comparative perspective. Using the notion of the professional life cycle of teachers, the article examines examples of key empirical studies that illustrate the impact of policy on addressing such issues as teacher recruitment, education,…

  10. MycoCAP - Mycobacterium Comparative Analysis Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Siew Woh; Ang, Mia Yang; Dutta, Avirup; Tan, Shi Yang; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Heydari, Hamed; Mutha, Naresh V R; Wee, Wei Yee; Wong, Guat Jah

    2015-12-15

    Mycobacterium spp. are renowned for being the causative agent of diseases like leprosy, Buruli ulcer and tuberculosis in human beings. With more and more mycobacterial genomes being sequenced, any knowledge generated from comparative genomic analysis would provide better insights into the biology, evolution, phylogeny and pathogenicity of this genus, thus helping in better management of diseases caused by Mycobacterium spp.With this motivation, we constructed MycoCAP, a new comparative analysis platform dedicated to the important genus Mycobacterium. This platform currently provides information of 2108 genome sequences of at least 55 Mycobacterium spp. A number of intuitive web-based tools have been integrated in MycoCAP particularly for comparative analysis including the PGC tool for comparison between two genomes, PathoProT for comparing the virulence genes among the Mycobacterium strains and the SuperClassification tool for the phylogenic classification of the Mycobacterium strains and a specialized classification system for strains of Mycobacterium abscessus. We hope the broad range of functions and easy-to-use tools provided in MycoCAP makes it an invaluable analysis platform to speed up the research discovery on mycobacteria for researchers. Database URL: http://mycobacterium.um.edu.my.

  11. Comparative analysis of technical efficiencies between compound ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to compare the level of technical efficiency in the compound and non compound farms in Imo state. A multi-stage random sampling technique was used to select 120 food crop farmers from two out of the three agricultural zones in Imo state. Using the Chow (1960) analysis of covariance technique ...

  12. Gas hydrate in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2018-01-17

    Gas hydrate is a naturally occurring, ice-like substance that forms when water and gas combine under high pressure and at moderate temperatures. Methane is the most common gas present in gas hydrate, although other gases may also be included in hydrate structures, particularly in areas close to conventional oil and gas reservoirs. Gas hydrate is widespread in ocean-bottom sediments at water depths greater than 300–500 meters (m; 984–1,640 feet [ft]) and is also present in areas with permanently frozen ground (permafrost). Several countries are evaluating gas hydrate as a possible energy resource in deepwater or permafrost settings. Gas hydrate is also under investigation to determine how environmental change may affect these deposits.

  13. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    revolutionary and new Arctic Drilling Platform in search of gas hydrate and free gas accumulations at depths of approximately 1200 to 2500 ft MD. A secondary objective was the gas-charged sands of the uppermost Campanian interval at approximately 3000 ft. Summary results of geophysical analysis of the well are presented in this report.

  14. Nasogastric Hydration in Infants with Bronchiolitis Less Than 2 Months of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Ed; Bata, Sonny; Rengasamy, Sharmila; Krieser, David; Cheek, John; Jachno, Kim; Babl, Franz E

    2016-11-01

    To determine whether nasogastric hydration can be used in infants less than 2 months of age with bronchiolitis, and characterize the adverse events profile of these infants compared with infants given intravenous (IV) fluid hydration. A descriptive retrospective cohort study of children with bronchiolitis under 2 months of age admitted for hydration at 3 centers over 3 bronchiolitis seasons was done. We determined type of hydration (nasogastric vs IV fluid hydration) and adverse events, intensive care unit admission, and respiratory support. Of 491 infants under 2 months of age admitted with bronchiolitis, 211 (43%) received nonoral hydration: 146 (69%) via nasogastric hydration and 65 (31%) via IV fluid hydration. Adverse events occurred in 27.4% (nasogastric hydration) and 23.1% (IV fluid hydration), difference of 4.3%; 95%CI (-8.2 to 16.9), P = .51. The majority of adverse events were desaturations (21.9% nasogastric hydration vs 21.5% IV fluid hydration, difference 0.4%; [-11.7 to 12.4], P = .95). There were no pulmonary aspirations in either group. Apneas and bradycardias were similar in each group. IV fluid hydration use was positively associated with intensive care unit admission (38.5% IV fluid hydration vs 19.9% nasogastric hydration; difference 18.6%, [5.1-32.1], P = .004); and use of ventilation support (27.7% IV fluid hydration vs 15.1% nasogastric hydration; difference 12.6 [0.3-23], P = .03). Fewer infants changed from nasogastric hydration to IV fluid hydration than from IV fluid hydration to nasogastric hydration (12.3% vs 47.7%; difference -35.4% [-49 to -22], P infants admitted with bronchiolitis. Nasogastric hydration and IV fluid hydration had similar rates of complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Effects of Hydration on Protein of Azurin using Coarse-Grained Method and The Free-Energy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitrasari, Dian; Purqon, Acep

    2017-07-01

    Proteins play important roles in body metabolism. However, to reveal hydration effects, it is cost computing especially for all-atom calculation. Coarse-grained method is one of potential solution to reduce the calculation and computable in longer timescale. Furthermore, the protein of Azurin is interesting protein and potentially applicable to cancer medicine for the stability property reason. We investigate the effects of hydration on Azurin, the conformation and the stabilities. Furthermore, we analyze the free-energy of the conformation system to find the favorable structure using free energy perturbation (FEP) calculation. Our calculation results show that free energy value of azurin is -136.9 kJ/mol. It shows a good agreement with experimental results with relative error index remained at 0.07%.

  16. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated

  17. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-06-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  18. An Analysis on Stability and Deposition Zones of Natural Gas Hydrate in Dongsha Region, North of South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuan Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose several physical/chemical causes to support the seismic results which find presence of Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR at site 1144 and site 1148 in Dongsha Region, North of South China Sea. At site 1144, according to geothermal gradient, the bottom of stability zone of conduction mode is in agreement with BSR. At site 1148, however, the stability zone of conduction mode is smaller than the natural gas presence zone predicted by the BSR. We propose three causes, that is, mixed convection and conduction thermal flow mode, multiple composition of natural gas and overpressure in deep sediment to explain the BSR presence or gas hydrate presence. Further, our numerical simulation results suggest yet another reason for the presence of BSR at site 1144 and site 1148. Because the temperatures in deep sediment calculated from the mixed convection and conduction thermal flow mode are lower than that from the single conduction mode, the bottom of gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ is deeper than the bottom of gas hydrate deposition zone (GHDZ or BSR. The result indicates that occurrence zone of natural is decided by the condition that natural gas concentrate in the zone is greater than its solubility.

  19. Effect of Hydration and Confinement on Micro-Structure of Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadde, Harish Kumar

    Calcium-silicate-hydrate(C-S-H) gel is a primary nano-crystalline phase present in hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) responsible for its strength and creep behavior. Our reliance on cement for infrastructure is global, and there is a need to improve infrastructure life-times. A way forward is to engineer the cement with more durability and long-term strength. The main purpose of this research is to quantify the micro-structure of C-S-H to see if cement can be engineered at various length scales to improve long-term behavior by spatial arrangement. We investigate the micro-structure evolution of C-S-H in cement as a function of hydration time and confinement. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) were used to quantify the material and spatial properties of C-S-H as a function of hydration time. The data obtained from these experiments was used to identify C-S-H phases in cement sample. Pair Distribution Function (PDF) analysis of HD C-S-H phase with different hydration times was done at Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, beamline 11-ID-B. Only nonlinear trends in the atomic ordering of C-S-H gel as a function of hydration time were observed. Solid state 29Si Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was used to quantify the effect of confinement on two types of C-S-H: white cement C-S-H and synthetic C-S-H. NMR spectra revealed that there is no significant difference in the structure of C-S-H due to confinement when compared with unconfined C-S-H. It is also found that there is significant difference in the Si environments of these two types of C-S-H. Though it does seem possible to engineer the cement on atomic scales, all these studies reveal that engineering cement on such a scale requires a more statistically accurate understanding of intricate structure of C-S-H than is currently available.

  20. National Launch System comparative economic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, A.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from an analysis of economic benefits (or losses), in the form of the life cycle cost savings, resulting from the development of the National Launch System (NLS) family of launch vehicles. The analysis was carried out by comparing various NLS-based architectures with the current Shuttle/Titan IV fleet. The basic methodology behind this NLS analysis was to develop a set of annual payload requirements for the Space Station Freedom and LEO, to design launch vehicle architectures around these requirements, and to perform life-cycle cost analyses on all of the architectures. A SEI requirement was included. Launch failure costs were estimated and combined with the relative reliability assumptions to measure the effects of losses. Based on the analysis, a Shuttle/NLS architecture evolving into a pressurized-logistics-carrier/NLS architecture appears to offer the best long-term cost benefit.

  1. Analysis of a Hybrid DC Comparator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Web

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The traditional controllable saturation reactor (CSR consists of single toroidal core, DC (direct current controlled loop (including DC controlled winding and DC biasing source and AC (alternating current excitation loop (including excitation winding and AC source. A detection winding and secondary winding are added up to the CSR configuration and form a hybrid DC comparator. The excitation current is asymmetric waveform when the CSR core is commonly stimulated by both AC and DC biasing sources, which just is the fundamental characteristic for the proposed comparator. Research shows the terminal voltage of the detection winding is asymmetric waveform when the secondary winding of the comparator is open and the CSR core is stimulated both by AC and DC biasing sources. Both theory analysis and experiment verify the feasibility of the differential RMS (root-mean-square between positive and negative half waves of the terminal voltage from the detection winding fitting for the feedback variance to balance DC biasing magnetic potential and form a self-balancing comparator. The zero-flux technique that the primary ampere-turn is equal to the secondary is the function base for the comparator. The operation details of the comparator including the control characteristics both of open-loop and close loop, the satiability judgment criterion, static error property and test range are introduced. The experimental results testify to the truth of the principle of the proposed DC comparator.

  2. Comparative analysis of twelve Dothideomycete plant pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohm, Robin; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-03-11

    The Dothideomycetes are one of the largest and most diverse groups of fungi. Many are plant pathogens and pose a serious threat to agricultural crops grown for biofuel, food or feed. Most Dothideomycetes have only a single host and related Dothideomycete species can have very diverse host plants. Twelve Dothideomycete genomes have currently been sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute and other sequencing centers. They can be accessed via Mycocosm which has tools for comparative analysis

  3. Lattice constants and expansivities of gas hydrates from 10 K up to the stability limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, T. C. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France); Falenty, A.; Kuhs, W. F. [GZG, Abt. Kristallographie, Universität Göttingen, Goldschmidtstrasse 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-02-07

    The lattice constants of hydrogenated and deuterated CH{sub 4}-, CO{sub 2}-, Xe- (clathrate structure type I) and N{sub 2}-hydrates (clathrate structure type II) from 10 K up to the stability limit were established in neutron- and synchrotron diffraction experiments and were used to derive the related thermal expansivities. The following results emerge from this analysis: (1) The differences of expansivities of structure type I and II hydrates are fairly small. (2) Despite the larger guest-size of CO{sub 2} as compared to methane, CO{sub 2}-hydrate has the smaller lattice constants at low temperatures, which is ascribed to the larger attractive guest-host interaction of the CO{sub 2}-water system. (3) The expansivity of CO{sub 2}-hydrate is larger than for CH{sub 4}-hydrate which leads to larger lattice constants for the former at temperatures above ∼150 K; this is likely due to the higher motional degrees of freedom of the CO{sub 2} guest molecules. (4) The cage occupancies of Xe- and CO{sub 2}-hydrates affect significantly the lattice constants. (5) Similar to ice Ih, the deuterated compounds have generally slightly larger lattice constants which can be ascribed to the somewhat weaker H-bonding. (6) Compared to ice Ih, the high temperature expansivities are about 50% larger; in contrast to ice Ih and the empty hydrate, there is no negative thermal expansion at low temperature. (7) A comparison of the experimental results with lattice dynamical work, with models based on an Einstein oscillator model, and results from inelastic neutron scattering suggest that the contribution of the guest atoms’ vibrational energy to thermal expansion is important, most prominently for CO{sub 2}- and Xe-hydrates.

  4. Comparative genome analysis of Enterobacter cloacae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing-Yee Liu

    Full Text Available The Enterobacter cloacae species includes an extremely diverse group of bacteria that are associated with plants, soil and humans. Publication of the complete genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting endophytic E. cloacae subsp. cloacae ENHKU01 provided an opportunity to perform the first comparative genome analysis between strains of this dynamic species. Examination of the pan-genome of E. cloacae showed that the conserved core genome retains the general physiological and survival genes of the species, while genomic factors in plasmids and variable regions determine the virulence of the human pathogenic E. cloacae strain; additionally, the diversity of fimbriae contributes to variation in colonization and host determination of different E. cloacae strains. Comparative genome analysis further illustrated that E. cloacae strains possess multiple mechanisms for antagonistic action against other microorganisms, which involve the production of siderophores and various antimicrobial compounds, such as bacteriocins, chitinases and antibiotic resistance proteins. The presence of Type VI secretion systems is expected to provide further fitness advantages for E. cloacae in microbial competition, thus allowing it to survive in different environments. Competition assays were performed to support our observations in genomic analysis, where E. cloacae subsp. cloacae ENHKU01 demonstrated antagonistic activities against a wide range of plant pathogenic fungal and bacterial species.

  5. The crystal chemistry and structural analysis of uranium oxide hydrates. Final report, May 15, 1995--December 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.L.; Ewing, R.C.

    1998-11-01

    The purpose of this research program was to develop a thorough understanding of the crystal-chemical and crystal-structural systematics of uranyl oxide hydrates which are the initial corrosion products of the UO{sub 2} in spent nuclear fuel and the principal phases in which actinides occur in the near surface environment. The scope of this program has been expanded to include all inorganic phases in which U{sup 6+} plays a significant structural role; currently 183 phases with known crystal structures.

  6. Carbon dioxid sequestration in natural gas hydrates: Thermodynamic considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicks, J. M.; Beeskow-Strauch, B.; Luzi, M.; Girod, M.; Erzinger, J.

    2009-12-01

    Due to the increasing energy demands natural gas hydrates become more and more of interest. The huge amount of hydrocarbons - mainly CH4 - stored in natural hydrate reservoirs suggest the use of natural gas hydrates as an energy resource. However, the combustion of this fossil fuel results in an undesired increase of CO2 in the atmosphere. Therefore, a combination of CH4 production on the one hand and the CO2 sequestration on the other hand seems to be ideal. Several investigations regarding the exchange reaction of CH4 with CO2 using pure methane hydrates and pure CO2 or CO2-N2-mixtures have been performed as laboratory studies in the past. Some showed exchange rates up to 85% and concluded that the driving force of this exchange reaction is the higher stability of CO2 hydrates compared to methane hydrates (e.g. Park et al. 2006). However, natural conditions may differ: natural gas hydrates may contain higher hydrocarbons or H2S, which have significant impact in terms of a higher stability of the mixed hydrate phase compared to pure CH4- and CO2-hydrates. Primary results of our investigations on the exchange reaction of a mixed CH4-C3H8-hydrate with CO2 indicates that although the stability of mixed CH4-C3H8-hydrate is significantly shifted to higher temperatures and lower pressures compared to pure CH4-, mixed CH4-CO2- and pure CO2-hydrates, it changes in the presence of CO2 from a structure II hydrate phase to form a structure I CH4-CO2-hydrate which subsequently transforms to CO2-hydrate. This process starts at the interface between gas and hydrate and continues slowly into the bulk phase. These observation lead to the following conclusions: - The driving force of the exchange reaction is less the stability with respect to temperature and pressure conditions of the hydrate phase but rather the chemical equilibrium state in terms of concentration gradients between hydrate and surrounding gas phase - After the initial formation of a CO2-CH4- or CO2 hydrate layer

  7. In Situ Soft X-ray Spectromicroscopy of Early Tricalcium Silicate Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sungchul; Kanematsu, Manabu; Hernández-Cruz, Daniel; Moon, Juhyuk; Kilcoyne, David; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The understanding and control of early hydration of tricalcium silicate (C3S) is of great importance to cement science and concrete technology. However, traditional characterization methods are incapable of providing morphological and spectroscopic information about in situ hydration at the nanoscale. Using soft X-ray spectromicroscopy, we report the changes in morphology and molecular structure of C3S at an early stage of hydration. In situ C3S hydration in a wet cell, beginning with induction (~1 h) and acceleration (~4 h) periods of up to ~8 h, was studied and compared with ex situ measurements in the deceleration period after 15 h of curing. Analysis of the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure showed that the Ca binding energy and energy splitting of C3S changed rapidly in the early age of hydration and exhibited values similar to calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H). The formation of C–S–H nanoseeds in the C3S solution and the development of a fibrillar C–S–H morphology on the C3S surface were visualized. Following this, silicate polymerization accompanied by C–S–H precipitation produced chemical shifts in the peaks of the main Si K edge and in multiple scattering. However, the silicate polymerization process did not significantly affect the Ca binding energy of C–S–H. PMID:28774096

  8. In Situ Soft X-ray Spectromicroscopy of Early Tricalcium Silicate Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungchul Bae

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The understanding and control of early hydration of tricalcium silicate (C3S is of great importance to cement science and concrete technology. However, traditional characterization methods are incapable of providing morphological and spectroscopic information about in situ hydration at the nanoscale. Using soft X-ray spectromicroscopy, we report the changes in morphology and molecular structure of C3S at an early stage of hydration. In situ C3S hydration in a wet cell, beginning with induction (~1 h and acceleration (~4 h periods of up to ~8 h, was studied and compared with ex situ measurements in the deceleration period after 15 h of curing. Analysis of the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure showed that the Ca binding energy and energy splitting of C3S changed rapidly in the early age of hydration and exhibited values similar to calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H. The formation of C–S–H nanoseeds in the C3S solution and the development of a fibrillar C–S–H morphology on the C3S surface were visualized. Following this, silicate polymerization accompanied by C–S–H precipitation produced chemical shifts in the peaks of the main Si K edge and in multiple scattering. However, the silicate polymerization process did not significantly affect the Ca binding energy of C–S–H.

  9. Solid state interconversion between anhydrous norfloxacin and its hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongcharoen, Wanchai; Byrn, Stephen R; Sutanthavibul, Narueporn

    2008-01-01

    This work is focused on characterizing and evaluating the solid state interconversion of norfloxacin (NF) hydrates. Four stoichiometric NF hydrates, dihydrate, hemipentahydrate, trihydrate, pentahydrate and a disordered NF state, were generated by various methods and characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD), thermal analysis and Karl Fisher titrimetry. XRPD patterns of all NF hydrates exhibited crystalline structures. NF hydrate conversion was studied with respect to mild elevated temperature and various degrees of moisture levels. NF hydrates transformed to anhydrous NF Form A after gentle heating at 60 degrees C for 48 h except dihydrate and trihydrate where mixture in XRPD patterns between anhydrous NF Form A and former structures existed. Desiccation of NF hydrates at 0% RH for 7 days resulted in only partial removal of water molecules from the hydrated structures. The hydrated transitional phase and the disordered NF state were obtained from the incomplete dehydration of NF hydrates after thermal treatment and pentahydrate NF after desiccation, respectively. Anhydrous NF Form A and NF hydrates transformed to pentahydrate NF when exposed to high moisture environment except dihydrate. In conclusion, surrounding moisture levels, temperatures and the duration of exposure strongly influenced the interconversion pathways and stoichiometry of anhydrous NF and its hydrates. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by Maurer Technology, Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. We plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. We also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. We are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. We hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, our goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

  11. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release as much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  12. Inpatient care in Kazakhstan: A comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ainur B; Izekenova, Aigulsum; Abikulova, Akmaral

    2013-07-01

    Reforms in inpatient care are critical for the enhancement of the efficiency of health systems. It still remains the main costly sector of the health system, accounting for more than 60% of all expenditures. Inappropriate and ineffective use of the hospital infrastructure is also a big issue. We aimed to analyze statistical data on health indices and dynamics of the hospital stock in Kazakhstan in comparison with those of developed countries. Study design is comparative quantitative analysis of inpatient care indicators. We used information and analytical methods, content analysis, mathematical treatment, and comparative analysis of statistical data on health system and dynamics of hospital stock in Kazakhstan and some other countries of the world [Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), USA, Canada, Russia, China, Japan, and Korea] over the period 2001-2011. Despite substantial and continuous reductions over the past 10 years, hospitalization rates in Kazakhstan still remain high compared to some developed countries, including those of the OECD. In fact, the hospital stay length for all patients in Kazakhstan in 2011 is around 9.9 days, hospitalization ratio per 100 people is 16.3, and hospital beds capacity is 100 per 10,000 inhabitants. The decreased level of beds may adversely affect both medical organization and health system operations. Alternatives to the existing inpatient care are now being explored. The introduction of the unified national healthcare system allows shifting the primary focus on primary care organizations, which can decrease the demand on inpatient care as a result of improving the health status of people at the primary care level.

  13. Inpatient care in Kazakhstan: A comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainur B Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reforms in inpatient care are critical for the enhancement of the efficiency of health systems. It still remains the main costly sector of the health system, accounting for more than 60% of all expenditures. Inappropriate and ineffective use of the hospital infrastructure is also a big issue. We aimed to analyze statistical data on health indices and dynamics of the hospital stock in Kazakhstan in comparison with those of developed countries. Materials and Methods: Study design is comparative quantitative analysis of inpatient care indicators. We used information and analytical methods, content analysis, mathematical treatment, and comparative analysis of statistical data on health system and dynamics of hospital stock in Kazakhstan and some other countries of the world [Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD, USA, Canada, Russia, China, Japan, and Korea] over the period 2001-2011. Results : Despite substantial and continuous reductions over the past 10 years, hospitalization rates in Kazakhstan still remain high compared to some developed countries, including those of the OECD. In fact, the hospital stay length for all patients in Kazakhstan in 2011 is around 9.9 days, hospitalization ratio per 100 people is 16.3, and hospital beds capacity is 100 per 10,000 inhabitants. Conclusion: The decreased level of beds may adversely affect both medical organization and health system operations. Alternatives to the existing inpatient care are now being explored. The introduction of the unified national healthcare system allows shifting the primary focus on primary care organizations, which can decrease the demand on inpatient care as a result of improving the health status of people at the primary care level.

  14. Comparative analysis of black carbon in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Skjemstad, Jan O.; Czimczik, Claudia I.; Glaser, Bruno; Prentice, Ken M.; Gelinas, Yves; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A. J.

    2001-03-01

    Black carbon (BC), produced by incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and vegetation, occurs ubiquitously in soils and sediments. BC exists as a continuum from partly charred material to highly graphitized soot particles, with no general agreement on clear-cut boundaries of definition or analysis. In a comparative analysis, we measured BC forms in eight soil samples by six established methods. All methods involved removal of the non-BC components from the sample by thermal or chemical means or a combination of both. The remaining carbon, operationally defined as BC, was quantified via mass balance, elemental composition or by exploiting benzenecarboxylic acids as molecular markers or applying 13C MAS NMR (magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy. BC concentrations measured for individual samples vary over 2 orders of magnitude (up to a factor of 571). One possible explanation for this wide range of results is that the individual BC methods rely on operational definitions with clear-cut but different boundaries and developed for specific scientific questions, whereas BC represents a continuum of materials with widely contrasting physicochemical properties. Thus the methods are inherently designed to analytically determine different parts of the continuum, and it is crucial to know how measurements made by different techniques relate to each other. It is clear from this preliminary comparative analysis that a collection of BC reference materials should be established as soon as possible 1 ) to ensure long-term intralaboratory and interlaboratory data quality and 2) to facilitate comparative analyses between different analytical techniques and scientific approaches

  15. Comparison and Analysis of Zinc and Cobalt-Based Systems as Catalytic Entities for the Hydration of Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Edmond Y.; Wong, Sergio E.; Baker, Sarah E.; Bearinger, Jane P.; Koziol, Lucas; Valdez, Carlos A.; Satcher, Joseph H.; Aines, Roger D.; Lightstone, Felice C.

    2013-01-01

    In nature, the zinc metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) efficiently catalyzes the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to bicarbonate under physiological conditions. Many research efforts have been directed towards the development of small molecule mimetics that can facilitate this process and thus have a beneficial environmental impact, but these efforts have met very limited success. Herein, we undertook quantum mechanical calculations of four mimetics, 1,5,9-triazacyclododedacane, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododedacane, tris(4,5-dimethyl-2-imidazolyl)phosphine, and tris(2-benzimidazolylmethyl)amine, in their complexed form either with the Zn2+ or the Co2+ ion and studied their reaction coordinate for CO2 hydration. These calculations demonstrated that the ability of the complex to maintain a tetrahedral geometry and bind bicarbonate in a unidentate manner were vital for the hydration reaction to proceed favorably. Furthermore, these calculations show that the catalytic activity of the examined zinc complexes was insensitive to coordination states for zinc, while coordination states above four were found to have an unfavorable effect on product release for the cobalt counterparts. PMID:23840420

  16. Comparison and analysis of zinc and cobalt-based systems as catalytic entities for the hydration of carbon dioxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmond Y Lau

    Full Text Available In nature, the zinc metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase II (CAII efficiently catalyzes the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2 to bicarbonate under physiological conditions. Many research efforts have been directed towards the development of small molecule mimetics that can facilitate this process and thus have a beneficial environmental impact, but these efforts have met very limited success. Herein, we undertook quantum mechanical calculations of four mimetics, 1,5,9-triazacyclododedacane, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododedacane, tris(4,5-dimethyl-2-imidazolylphosphine, and tris(2-benzimidazolylmethylamine, in their complexed form either with the Zn(2+ or the Co(2+ ion and studied their reaction coordinate for CO2 hydration. These calculations demonstrated that the ability of the complex to maintain a tetrahedral geometry and bind bicarbonate in a unidentate manner were vital for the hydration reaction to proceed favorably. Furthermore, these calculations show that the catalytic activity of the examined zinc complexes was insensitive to coordination states for zinc, while coordination states above four were found to have an unfavorable effect on product release for the cobalt counterparts.

  17. Comparative Analysis of 37 Acinetobacter Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dann Turner

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Members of the genus Acinetobacter are ubiquitous in the environment and the multiple-drug resistant species A. baumannii is of significant clinical concern. This clinical relevance is currently driving research on bacterial viruses infecting A. baumannii, in an effort to implement phage therapy and phage-derived antimicrobials. Initially, a total of 42 Acinetobacter phage genome sequences were available in the international nucleotide sequence databases, corresponding to a total of 2.87 Mbp of sequence information and representing all three families of the order Caudovirales and a single member of the Leviviridae. A comparative bioinformatics analysis of 37 Acinetobacter phages revealed that they form six discrete clusters and two singletons based on genomic organisation and nucleotide sequence identity. The assignment of these phages to clusters was further supported by proteomic relationships established using OrthoMCL. The 4067 proteins encoded by the 37 phage genomes formed 737 groups and 974 orphans. Notably, over half of the proteins encoded by the Acinetobacter phages are of unknown function. The comparative analysis and clustering presented enables an updated taxonomic framing of these clades.

  18. Comparative analysis of solar photovoltaic monitoring systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeti, Siva Ramakrishna; Singh, S. N.

    2017-07-01

    This paper is focused on comparative analysis of photovoltaic (PV) monitoring system for observing the performance and stability of the system. The cost and complexity of existing PV monitoring systems restricted their use to large scale PV plants. Over the past decade, different aspects of the PV monitoring systems were reported in the wide range of literature. In this paper, a comparative analysis of various PV monitoring systems is presented for the first time. It is based on analyzing six main characteristics of PV monitoring system, such as data transfer mechanism, controller, monitoring parameters, sampling interval, program development software and monitoring methods. The comparison of methodologies and the description of implementation process are discussed in this context. The key findings of this study will contribute to the development of a new PV monitoring system. The acquaintance of all these aspects is crucial for the development of effective, low cost, and viable PV monitoring systems for the small and medium scale PV plants without compromising on the desired performance.

  19. Comparative genome analysis of Basidiomycete fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Henrissat, Bernard; Nagy, Laszlo; Brown, Daren; Held, Benjamin; Baker, Scott; Blanchette, Robert; Boussau, Bastien; Doty, Sharon L.; Fagnan, Kirsten; Floudas, Dimitris; Levasseur, Anthony; Manning, Gerard; Martin, Francis; Morin, Emmanuelle; Otillar, Robert; Pisabarro, Antonio; Walton, Jonathan; Wolfe, Ken; Hibbett, David; Grigoriev, Igor

    2013-08-07

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes symbionts, pathogens, and saprotrophs including the majority of wood decaying and ectomycorrhizal species. To better understand the genetic diversity of this phylum we compared the genomes of 35 basidiomycetes including 6 newly sequenced genomes. These genomes span extremes of genome size, gene number, and repeat content. Analysis of core genes reveals that some 48percent of basidiomycete proteins are unique to the phylum with nearly half of those (22percent) found in only one organism. Correlations between lifestyle and certain gene families are evident. Phylogenetic patterns of plant biomass-degrading genes in Agaricomycotina suggest a continuum rather than a dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay. Based on phylogenetically-informed PCA analysis of wood decay genes, we predict that that Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea have properties similar to white rot species, although neither has typical ligninolytic class II fungal peroxidases (PODs). This prediction is supported by growth assays in which both fungi exhibit wood decay with white rot-like characteristics. Based on this, we suggest that the white/brown rot dichotomy may be inadequate to describe the full range of wood decaying fungi. Analysis of the rate of discovery of proteins with no or few homologs suggests the value of continued sequencing of basidiomycete fungi.

  20. Comparative transcriptome analysis of four prymnesiophyte algae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E Koid

    Full Text Available Genomic studies of bacteria, archaea and viruses have provided insights into the microbial world by unveiling potential functional capabilities and molecular pathways. However, the rate of discovery has been slower among microbial eukaryotes, whose genomes are larger and more complex. Transcriptomic approaches provide a cost-effective alternative for examining genetic potential and physiological responses of microbial eukaryotes to environmental stimuli. In this study, we generated and compared the transcriptomes of four globally-distributed, bloom-forming prymnesiophyte algae: Prymnesium parvum, Chrysochromulina brevifilum, Chrysochromulina ericina and Phaeocystis antarctica. Our results revealed that the four transcriptomes possess a set of core genes that are similar in number and shared across all four organisms. The functional classifications of these core genes using the euKaryotic Orthologous Genes (KOG database were also similar among the four study organisms. More broadly, when the frequencies of different cellular and physiological functions were compared with other protists, the species clustered by both phylogeny and nutritional modes. Thus, these clustering patterns provide insight into genomic factors relating to both evolutionary relationships as well as trophic ecology. This paper provides a novel comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of ecologically important and closely related prymnesiophyte protists and advances an emerging field of study that uses transcriptomics to reveal ecology and function in protists.

  1. Comparative transcriptome analysis of four prymnesiophyte algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koid, Amy E; Liu, Zhenfeng; Terrado, Ramon; Jones, Adriane C; Caron, David A; Heidelberg, Karla B

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of bacteria, archaea and viruses have provided insights into the microbial world by unveiling potential functional capabilities and molecular pathways. However, the rate of discovery has been slower among microbial eukaryotes, whose genomes are larger and more complex. Transcriptomic approaches provide a cost-effective alternative for examining genetic potential and physiological responses of microbial eukaryotes to environmental stimuli. In this study, we generated and compared the transcriptomes of four globally-distributed, bloom-forming prymnesiophyte algae: Prymnesium parvum, Chrysochromulina brevifilum, Chrysochromulina ericina and Phaeocystis antarctica. Our results revealed that the four transcriptomes possess a set of core genes that are similar in number and shared across all four organisms. The functional classifications of these core genes using the euKaryotic Orthologous Genes (KOG) database were also similar among the four study organisms. More broadly, when the frequencies of different cellular and physiological functions were compared with other protists, the species clustered by both phylogeny and nutritional modes. Thus, these clustering patterns provide insight into genomic factors relating to both evolutionary relationships as well as trophic ecology. This paper provides a novel comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of ecologically important and closely related prymnesiophyte protists and advances an emerging field of study that uses transcriptomics to reveal ecology and function in protists.

  2. Vibrational dynamics of hydration water in amylose

    CERN Document Server

    Cavatorta, F; Albanese, G; Angelini, N

    2002-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamical properties of hydration water associated with amylose helices, based on low-temperature vibrational spectra collected using the TOSCA inelastic spectrometer at ISIS. The structural constraints of the polysaccharidic chains favour the formation of a high-density structure for water, which has been suggested by Imberty and Perez on the basis of conformational analysis. According to this model, hydration water can only enter the pores formed by six adjacent helices and completely fills the pores at a hydration level of about 0.27-g water/g dry amylose. Our measurements show that the dynamical behaviour of hydration water is similar to that observed in high-density amorphous ice. (orig.)

  3. Probing methane hydrate nucleation through the forward flux sampling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yuanfei; Li, Tianshu

    2014-11-26

    Understanding the nucleation of hydrate is the key to developing effective strategies for controlling methane hydrate formation. Here we present a computational study of methane hydrate nucleation, by combining the forward flux sampling (FFS) method and the coarse-grained water model mW. To facilitate the application of FFS in studying the formation of methane hydrate, we developed an effective order parameter λ on the basis of the topological analysis of the tetrahedral network. The order parameter capitalizes the signature of hydrate structure, i.e., polyhedral cages, and is capable of efficiently distinguishing hydrate from ice and liquid water while allowing the formation of different hydrate phases, i.e., sI, sII, and amorphous. Integration of the order parameter λ with FFS allows explicitly computing hydrate nucleation rates and obtaining an ensemble of nucleation trajectories under conditions where spontaneous hydrate nucleation becomes too slow to occur in direct simulation. The convergence of the obtained hydrate nucleation rate was found to depend crucially on the convergence of the spatial distribution for the spontaneously formed hydrate seeds obtained from the initial sampling of FFS. The validity of the approach is also verified by the agreement between the calculated nucleation rate and that inferred from the direct simulation. Analyzing the obtained large ensemble of hydrate nucleation trajectories, we show hydrate formation at 220 K and 500 bar is initiated by the nucleation events occurring in the vicinity of water-methane interface, and facilitated by a gradual transition from amorphous to crystalline structure. The latter provides the direct support to the proposed two-step nucleation mechanism of methane hydrate.

  4. Nano-granular texture of cement hydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannidou Katerina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical behavior of concrete crucially depends on cement hydrates, the “glue” of cement. The design of high performance and more environmentally friendly cements demands a deeper understanding of the formation of the multiscale structure of cement hydrates, when they precipitate and densify. We investigate the precipitation and setting of nano-grains of cement hydrates using a combination of Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics numerical simulations and study their texture from nano up to the micron scale. We characterize the texture of cement hydrates using the local volume fraction distribution, the pore size distribution, the scattering intensity and the chord length distribution and we compare them with experiments. Our nano-granular model provides cement structure with realistic texture and mechanics and can be further used to investigate degradation mechanisms.

  5. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  6. Comparative Analysis of VNSA Complex Engineering Efforts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Ackerman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The case studies undertaken in this special issue demonstrate unequivocally that, despite being forced to operate clandestinely and facing the pressures of security forces seeking to hunt them down and neutralize them, at least a subset of violent non-state actors (VNSAs are capable of some genuinely impressive feats of engineering. At the same time, success in such endeavours is not guaranteed and VNSAs will undoubtedly face a number of obstacles along the way. A comparative analysis of the cases also reveals new insights about the factors influencing the decision to pursue complex engineering efforts, the implementation of such decisions and the determinants of the ultimate outcome. These result in a set of hypotheses and indicators that, if confirmed by future research, can contribute to both operational and strategic intelligence assessments. Overall, the current study enriches our understanding of how and why VNSAs might engage in complex engineering efforts.

  7. Comparative Genome Analysis of Basidiomycete Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Morin, Emmanuelle; Nagy, Laszlo; Manning, Gerard; Baker, Scott; Brown, Daren; Henrissat, Bernard; Levasseur, Anthony; Hibbett, David; Martin, Francis; Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-19

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes the mushrooms, wood rots, symbionts, and plant and animal pathogens. To better understand the diversity of phenotypes in basidiomycetes, we performed a comparative analysis of 35 basidiomycete fungi spanning the diversity of the phylum. Phylogenetic patterns of lignocellulose degrading genes suggest a continuum rather than a sharp dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay. Patterns of secondary metabolic enzymes give additional insight into the broad array of phenotypes found in the basidiomycetes. We suggest that the profile of an organism in lignocellulose-targeting genes can be used to predict its nutritional mode, and predict Dacryopinax sp. as a brown rot; Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea as white rots.

  8. Controls on the physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments because of the interaction between gas hydrate and porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung W.; Collett, Timothy S.

    2005-01-01

    Physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the pore-scale interaction between gas hydrate and porous media as well as the amount of gas hydrate present. Well log measurements such as proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation and electromagnetic propagation tool (EPT) techniques depend primarily on the bulk volume of gas hydrate in the pore space irrespective of the pore-scale interaction. However, elastic velocities or permeability depend on how gas hydrate is distributed in the pore space as well as the amount of gas hydrate. Gas-hydrate saturations estimated from NMR and EPT measurements are free of adjustable parameters; thus, the estimations are unbiased estimates of gas hydrate if the measurement is accurate. However, the amount of gas hydrate estimated from elastic velocities or electrical resistivities depends on many adjustable parameters and models related to the interaction of gas hydrate and porous media, so these estimates are model dependent and biased. NMR, EPT, elastic-wave velocity, electrical resistivity, and permeability measurements acquired in the Mallik 5L-38 well in the Mackenzie Delta, Canada, show that all of the well log evaluation techniques considered provide comparable gas-hydrate saturations in clean (low shale content) sandstone intervals with high gas-hydrate saturations. However, in shaly intervals, estimates from log measurement depending on the pore-scale interaction between gas hydrate and host sediments are higher than those estimates from measurements depending on the bulk volume of gas hydrate.

  9. Comparative Analysis of Students’ Media Competences Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Fedorov

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzed the results of survey of university students’ media literacy competence (on the base of a classification of indicators of media literacy competence of the audience as an effective tool for comparative analysis of the levels of development of media competence of students of the control and experimental groups: the level of media competence of students who have a one-year training course in the framework of media literacy education courses four times higher than in similar indicators in the control group. Analysis of the results of this survey confirmed the general trend of media contacts of student audience – its orientation to entertainment genres of audiovisual media, visually appealing; positive, active, unmarried, childless, educated, highly qualified characters (primarily – male characters aged 19 to 35 years. These heroes are characteristic optimism, independence, intelligence, emotion. They have an excellent command of the life situation and have a positive impact on the development progress of the plot of a media text.

  10. Comparative metagenome analysis of an Alaskan glacier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhari, Sulbha; Lohia, Ruchi; Grigoriev, Andrey

    2014-04-01

    The temperature in the Arctic region has been increasing in the recent past accompanied by melting of its glaciers. We took a snapshot of the current microbial inhabitation of an Alaskan glacier (which can be considered as one of the simplest possible ecosystems) by using metagenomic sequencing of 16S rRNA recovered from ice/snow samples. Somewhat contrary to our expectations and earlier estimates, a rich and diverse microbial population of more than 2,500 species was revealed including several species of Archaea that has been identified for the first time in the glaciers of the Northern hemisphere. The most prominent bacterial groups found were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. Firmicutes were not reported in large numbers in a previously studied Alpine glacier but were dominant in an Antarctic subglacial lake. Representatives of Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria and Planctomycetes were among the most numerous, likely reflecting the dependence of the ecosystem on the energy obtained through photosynthesis and close links with the microbial community of the soil. Principal component analysis (PCA) of nucleotide word frequency revealed distinct sequence clusters for different taxonomic groups in the Alaskan glacier community and separate clusters for the glacial communities from other regions of the world. Comparative analysis of the community composition and bacterial diversity present in the Byron glacier in Alaska with other environments showed larger overlap with an Arctic soil than with a high Arctic lake, indicating patterns of community exchange and suggesting that these bacteria may play an important role in soil development during glacial retreat.

  11. Hydration testing of athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppliger, Robert A; Bartok, Cynthia

    2002-01-01

    Dehydration not only reduces athletic performance, but also places athletes at risk of health problems and even death. For athletes, monitoring hydration has significant value in maximising performance during training and competition. It also offers medical personnel the opportunity to reduce health risks in situations where athletes engage in intentional weight loss. Simple non-invasive techniques, including weight monitoring and urine tests, can provide useful information. Bioimpedance methods tend to be easy to use and fairly inexpensive, but generally lack the precision and accuracy necessary for hydration monitoring. Blood tests appear to be the most accurate monitoring method, but are impractical because of cost and invasiveness. Although future research is needed to determine which hydration tests are the most accurate, we encourage sports teams to develop and implement hydration monitoring protocols based on the currently available methods. Medical personnel can use this information to maximise their team's athletic performance and minimise heat- and dehydration-related health risks to athletes.

  12. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  13. Prevention of Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury by Furosemide With Matched Hydration in Patients Undergoing Interventional Procedures: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzu, Alessandro; Boscolo Berto, Martina; Belletti, Alessandro; Pasotti, Elena; Cassina, Tiziano; Moccetti, Tiziano; Pedrazzini, Giovanni

    2017-02-27

    The objective of this meta-analysis of randomized trials was to evaluate if the administration of furosemide with matched hydration using the RenalGuard System reduces contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) in patients undergoing interventional procedures. CI-AKI is a serious complication following angiographic procedures and a powerful predictor of unfavorable early and long-term outcomes. Online databases were searched up to October 1, 2016, for randomized controlled trials. The primary outcome was the incidence of CI-AKI, and the secondary outcomes were need for renal replacement therapy, mortality, stroke, and adverse events. A total of four trials (n = 698) published between 2011 and 2016 were included in the analysis and included patients undergoing percutaneous coronary procedures and transcatheter aortic valve replacement. RenalGuard therapy was associated with a lower incidence of CI-AKI compared with control treatment (27 of 348 [7.76%] patients vs. 75 of 350 [21.43%] patients; odds ratio [OR]: 0.31; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.19 to 0.50; I 2  = 4%; p furosemide with matched hydration by the RenalGuard System may reduce the incidence of CI-AKI in high-risk patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention or transcatheter aortic valve replacement. However, further independent high-quality randomized trials should elucidate the effectiveness and safety of this prophylactic intervention in interventional cardiology. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Exploitation of subsea gas hydrate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas hydrates are considered to be a potential energy resource in the future. They occur in permafrost areas as well as in subsea sediments and are stable at high pressure and low temperature conditions. According to estimations the amount of carbon bonded in natural gas hydrates worldwide is two times larger than in all known conventional fossil fuels. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e.g. depressurization and/or injection of carbon dioxide) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR«. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into a numerical model. The physics of the process leads to strong non-linear couplings between hydraulic fluid flow, hydrate dissociation and formation, hydraulic properties of the sediment, partial pressures and seawater solution of components and the thermal budget of the system described by the heat equation. This paper is intended to provide an overview of the recent development regarding the production of natural gas from subsea gas hydrate reservoirs. It aims at giving a broad insight into natural gas hydrates and covering relevant aspects of the exploitation process. It is focused on the thermodynamic principles and technological approaches for the exploitation. The effects occurring during natural gas production within hydrate filled sediment layers are identified and discussed by means of numerical simulation results. The behaviour of relevant process parameters such as pressure, temperature and phase saturations is described and compared for different strategies. The simulations are complemented by calculations for different safety relevant problems.

  15. HYDRATION PROCESS AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CEMENT PASTE WITH RECYCLED CONCRETE POWDER AND SILICA SAND POWDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Topič

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recycled concrete powder (RCP mostly consisting of cement paste could be reused as partial cement replacement. The aim of this paper is to compare hydration and mechanical properties of RCP and two types of silica sand powder (SSP. Comparison of those materials combined with cement can highlight the binder properties of recycled concrete powder. Using of two types of SSP also show an influence of their fines on hydration process and mechanical properties. Particle size analysis and calorimetric measurement were carried out and mechanical properties such as bulk density, dynamic Young’s modulus and compression strength were examine. Calorimetric measurement proves the presence of exposed non-hydrated particles in RCP that can react again. However lower density of old cement paste in RCP overweight the mentioned potential of RCP and mechanical properties are decreasing compared with reference cement paste and cement paste SSP.

  16. Development of individual hydration strategies for athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Ronald J; Shirreffs, Susan M

    2008-10-01

    Athletes are encouraged to begin exercise well hydrated and to consume sufficient amounts of appropriate fluids during exercise to limit water and salt deficits. Available evidence suggests that many athletes begin exercise already dehydrated to some degree, and although most fail to drink enough to match sweat losses, some drink too much and a few develop hyponatremia. Some simple advice can help athletes assess their hydration status and develop a personalized hydration strategy that takes account of exercise, environment, and individual needs. Preexercise hydration status can be assessed from urine frequency and volume, with additional information from urine color, specific gravity, or osmolality. Change in hydration during exercise can be estimated from the change in body mass that occurs during a bout of exercise. Sweat rate can be estimated if fluid intake and urinary losses are also measured. Sweat salt losses can be determined by collection and analysis of sweat samples, but athletes losing large amounts of salt are likely to be aware of the taste of salt in sweat and the development of salt crusts on skin and clothing where sweat has evaporated. An appropriate drinking strategy will take account of preexercise hydration status and of fluid, electrolyte, and substrate needs before, during, and after a period of exercise. Strategies will vary greatly between individuals and will also be influenced by environmental conditions, competition regulations, and other factors.

  17. Surfactant effects on SF6 hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo Ram; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Ryu, Young Bok; Lee, Man Sig; Kim, Young Seok; Englezos, Peter; Kim, Myung Hyun; Kim, Yang Do

    2009-03-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) has been widely used in a variety of industrial processes, but it is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. For this reason, it is necessary to separate or collect it from waste gas streams. One separation method is through hydrate crystal formation. In this study, SF(6) hydrate was formed in aqueous surfactant solutions of 0.00, 0.01, 0.05, 0.15 and 0.20 wt% to investigate the effects of surfactants on the hydrate formation rates. Three surfactants, Tween 20 (Tween), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LABS), were tested in a semi-batch stirred vessel at the constant temperature and pressures of 276.2 K and 0.78 MPa, respectively. All surfactants showed kinetic promoter behavior for SF(6) hydrate formation. It was also found that SF(6) hydrate formation proceeded in two stages with the second stage being the most rapid. In situ Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that the increased gas consumption rate with the addition of surfactant was possibly due to the increased gas filling rate in the hydrate cavity.

  18. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  19. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Runyon; Mike Globe; Kent Newsham; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling

  20. Quantitative X-ray pair distribution function analysis of nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrates: a contribution to the understanding of cement chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grangeon, Sylvain; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Baronnet, Alain; Marty, Nicolas; Poulain, Agnieszka; Elkaïm, Erik; Roosz, Cédric; Gaboreau, Stéphane; Henocq, Pierre; Claret, Francis

    2017-02-01

    The structural evolution of nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) as a function of its calcium to silicon (Ca/Si) ratio has been probed using qualitative and quantitative X-ray atomic pair distribution function analysis of synchrotron X-ray scattering data. Whatever the Ca/Si ratio, the C-S-H structure is similar to that of tobermorite. When the Ca/Si ratio increases from ∼0.6 to ∼1.2, Si wollastonite-like chains progressively depolymerize through preferential omission of Si bridging tetrahedra. When the Ca/Si ratio approaches ∼1.5, nanosheets of portlandite are detected in samples aged for 1 d, while microcrystalline portlandite is detected in samples aged for 1 year. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging shows that the tobermorite-like structure is maintained to Ca/Si > 3.

  1. A Comparative Analysis of Task Modeling Notations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Vanderdonckt

    2012-03-01

    paper a comparative analysis of selected models involving multiple users in an interaction is provided in order to identify concepts which are underexplored in today's multi-user interaction task modeling. This comparative analysis is based on three families of criteria: information criteria, conceptual coverage, and expressiveness. Merging the meta-models of the selected models enables to come up with a broader meta-model that could be instantiated in most situations involving multi-user interaction, like workflow information systems, CSCW.

  2. Predictive and comparative analysis of Ebolavirus proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Qian; Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V

    2015-01-01

    Ebolavirus is the pathogen for Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever (EHF). This disease exhibits a high fatality rate and has recently reached a historically epidemic proportion in West Africa. Out of the 5 known Ebolavirus species, only Reston ebolavirus has lost human pathogenicity, while retaining the ability to cause EHF in long-tailed macaque. Significant efforts have been spent to determine the three-dimensional (3D) structures of Ebolavirus proteins, to study their interaction with host proteins, and to identify the functional motifs in these viral proteins. Here, in light of these experimental results, we apply computational analysis to predict the 3D structures and functional sites for Ebolavirus protein domains with unknown structure, including a zinc-finger domain of VP30, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase catalytic domain and a methyltransferase domain of protein L. In addition, we compare sequences of proteins that interact with Ebolavirus proteins from RESTV-resistant primates with those from RESTV-susceptible monkeys. The host proteins that interact with GP and VP35 show an elevated level of sequence divergence between the RESTV-resistant and RESTV-susceptible species, suggesting that they may be responsible for host specificity. Meanwhile, we detect variable positions in protein sequences that are likely associated with the loss of human pathogenicity in RESTV, map them onto the 3D structures and compare their positions to known functional sites. VP35 and VP30 are significantly enriched in these potential pathogenicity determinants and the clustering of such positions on the surfaces of VP35 and GP suggests possible uncharacterized interaction sites with host proteins that contribute to the virulence of Ebolavirus.

  3. Comparison of sedation by intranasal dexmedetomidine and oral chloral hydrate for pediatric ophthalmic examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qianzhong; Lin, Yiquan; Xie, Zhubin; Shen, Weihua; Chen, Ying; Gan, Xiaoliang; Liu, Yizhi

    2017-06-01

    Pediatric ophthalmic examinations can be conducted under sedation either by chloral hydrate or by dexmedetomidine. The objective was to compare the success rates and quality of ophthalmic examination of children sedated by intranasal dexmedetomidine vs oral chloral hydrate. One hundred and forty-one children aged from 3 to 36 months (5-15 kg) scheduled to ophthalmic examinations were randomly sedated by either intranasal dexmedetomidine (2 μg·kg-1 , n = 71) or oral chloral hydrate (80 mg·kg-1 , n = 70). The primary endpoint was successful sedation to complete the examinations including slit-lamp photography, tonometry, anterior segment analysis, and refractive error inspection. The secondary endpoints included quality of eye position, intraocular pressure, onset time, duration of examination, recovery time, discharge time, any side effects during examination, and within 48 h after discharge. Sixty-one children were sedated by dexmedetomidine with a success rate of 85.9%, which is significantly higher than that by chloral hydrate (64.3%) [OR 3.39, 95% CI: 1.48-7.76, P = 0.003]. Furthermore, children in the dexmedetomidine group displayed better eye position in anterior segment analysis than in chloral hydrate group median difference. All children displayed stable hemodynamics and none suffered hypoxemia in both groups. Oral chloral hydrate induced higher percentages of vomiting and altered bowel habit after discharge than dexmedetomidine. Intranasal dexmedetomidine provides more successful sedation and better quality of ophthalmic examinations than oral chloral hydrate for small children. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Comparative analysis of haplotype association mapping algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pletcher Mathew T

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Finding the genetic causes of quantitative traits is a complex and difficult task. Classical methods for mapping quantitative trail loci (QTL in miceuse an F2 cross between two strains with substantially different phenotype and an interval mapping method to compute confidence intervals at each position in the genome. This process requires significant resources for breeding and genotyping, and the data generated are usually only applicable to one phenotype of interest. Recently, we reported the application of a haplotype association mapping method which utilizes dense genotyping data across a diverse panel of inbred mouse strains and a marker association algorithm that is independent of any specific phenotype. As the availability of genotyping data grows in size and density, analysis of these haplotype association mapping methods should be of increasing value to the statistical genetics community. Results We describe a detailed comparative analysis of variations on our marker association method. In particular, we describe the use of inferred haplotypes from adjacent SNPs, parametric and nonparametric statistics, and control of multiple testing error. These results show that nonparametric methods are slightly better in the test cases we study, although the choice of test statistic may often be dependent on the specific phenotype and haplotype structure being studied. The use of multi-SNP windows to infer local haplotype structure is critical to the use of a diverse panel of inbred strains for QTL mapping. Finally, because the marginal effect of any single gene in a complex disease is often relatively small, these methods require the use of sensitive methods for controlling family-wise error. We also report our initial application of this method to phenotypes cataloged in the Mouse Phenome Database. Conclusion The use of inbred strains of mice for QTL mapping has many advantages over traditional methods. However, there are also

  5. Nonadditive empirical force fields for short-chain linear alcohols: methanol to butanol. Hydration free energetics and Kirkwood-Buff analysis using charge equilibration models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yang; Patel, Sandeep

    2010-09-02

    Building upon the nonadditive electrostatic force field for alcohols based on the CHARMM charge equilibration (CHEQ) formalism, we introduce atom-pair specific solute-solvent Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters for alcohol-water interaction force fields targeting improved agreement with experimental hydration free energies of a series of small molecule linear alcohols as well as ab initio water-alcohol geometries and energetics. We consider short-chain, linear alcohols from methanol to butanol as they are canonical small-molecule organic model compounds to represent the hydroxyl chemical functionality for parametrizing biomolecular force fields for proteins. We discuss molecular dynamics simulations of dilute aqueous solutions of methanol and ethanol in TIP4P-FQ water, with particular discussion of solution densities, structure defined in radial distribution functions, electrostatic properties (dipole moment distributions), hydrogen bonding patterns of water, as well as a Kirkwood-Buff (KB) integral analysis. Calculation of the latter provides an assessment of how well classical force fields parametrized to at least semiquantitatively match experimental hydration free energies capture the microscopic structures of dilute alcohol solutions; the latter translate into macroscopic thermodynamic properties through the application of KB analysis. We find that the CHEQ alcohol force fields of this work semiquantitatively match experimental KB integrals for methanol and ethanol mole fractions of 0.1 and 0.2. The force field combination qualitatively captures the concentration dependence of the alcohol-alcohol and water-water KB integrals, but due to inadequacies in the representation of the microscopic structures in such systems (which cannot be parametrized in any systematic fashion), a priori quantitative description of alcohol-water KB integrals remains elusive.

  6. Non-additive Empirical Force Fields for Short-Chain Linear Alcohols: Methanol to Butanol. Hydration Free Energetics and Kirkwood-Buff Analysis Using Charge Equilibration Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yang; Patel, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    Building upon the nonadditive electrostatic force field for alcohols based on the CHARMM charge equilibration (CHEQ) formalism, we introduce atom-pair specific solute-solvent Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters for alcohol-water interaction force fields targeting improved agreement with experimental hydration free energies of a series of small molecule linear alcohols as well as ab initio water-alcohol geometries and energetics. We consider short-chain, linear alcohols from methanol to butanol as they are canonical small-molecule organic model compounds to represent the hydroxyl chemical functionality for parameterizing biomolecular force fields for proteins. We discuss molecular dynamics simulations of dilute aqueous solutions of methanol and ethanol in TIP4P-FQ water, with particular discussion of solution densities, structure defined in radial distribution functions, electrostatic properties (dipole moment distributions), hydrogen bonding patterns of water, as well as a Kirkwood-Buff (KB) integral analysis. Calculation of the latter provides an assessment of how well classical force fields parameterized to at least semi-quantitatively match experimental hydration free energies capture the microscopic structures of dilute alcohol solutions; the latter translate into macroscopic thermodynamic properties through the application of KB analysis. We find that the CHEQ alcohol force fields of this work semi-quantitatively match experimental KB integrals for methanol and ethanol mole fractions of 0.1 and 0.2. The force field combination qualitatively captures the concentration dependence of the alcohol-alcohol and water-water KB integrals, but due to inadequacies in the representation of the microscopic structures in such systems (which cannot be parameterized in any systematic fashion), a priori quantitative description of alcohol-water KB integrals remains elusive. PMID:20687517

  7. Comparative analysis of safety related site characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan (ed.)

    2010-12-15

    This document presents a comparative analysis of site characteristics related to long-term safety for the two candidate sites for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark (municipality of Oesthammar) and in Laxemar (municipality of Oskarshamn) from the point of view of site selection. The analyses are based on the updated site descriptions of Forsmark /SKB 2008a/ and Laxemar /SKB 2009a/, together with associated updated repository layouts and designs /SKB 2008b and SKB 2009b/. The basis for the comparison is thus two equally and thoroughly assessed sites. However, the analyses presented here are focussed on differences between the sites rather than evaluating them in absolute terms. The document serves as a basis for the site selection, from the perspective of long-term safety, in SKB's application for a final repository. A full evaluation of safety is made for a repository at the selected site in the safety assessment SR-Site /SKB 2011/, referred to as SR-Site main report in the following

  8. Comparative Analysis of Virtual Education Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet KURT

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted in order to make comparative analysis of virtual education applications. The research is conducted in survey model. The study group consists of total 300 institutes providing virtual education in the fall, spring and summer semesters of 2004; 246 in USA, 10 in Australia, 3 in South Africa, 10 in India, 21 in UK, 6 in Japan, 4 in Turkey. The information has been collected by online questionnaire sent to the target mass by e-mail. The questionnaire has been developed in two information categories as personal information and institutes and their virtual education applications. The English web design of the online questionnaire and the database has been prepared by Microsoft ASP codes which is the script language of Microsoft Front Page editor and has been tested on personal web site. The questionnaire has been pre applied in institutions providing virtual education in Australia. The English text of the questionnaire and web site design have been sent to educational technology and virtual education specialists in the countries of the study group. With the feedback received, the spelling mistakes have been corrected and concept and language validity have been completed. The application of the questionnaire has taken 40 weeks during March-November 2004. Only 135 institutes have replied. Two of the questionnaires have been discharged because they included mistaken coding, names of the institutions and countries. Valid 133 questionnaires cover approximately 44% of the study group. Questionnaires saved in the online database have been transferred to Microsoft Excel and then to SPSS by external database connection. In regards of the research objectives, the data collected has been analyzed on computer and by using SPSS statistics package program. In data analysis frequency (f, percentage (% and arithmetic mean ( have been used. In comparisons of country, institute, year, and other variables, che-square test, independent t

  9. Substituent effect on the thermodynamic solubility of structural analogs: relative contribution of crystal packing and hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Shunsuke; Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Shirai, Osamu; Kano, Kenji

    2014-11-01

    Thermodynamic analysis of the solubility of benzoylphenylurea (BPU) derivatives was conducted to investigate the relative importance of crystal packing and hydration for improving solubility with minor structural modification. The contribution of crystal packing to solubility was evaluated from the change in Gibbs energy on the transition from the crystalline to liquid state. Hydration Gibbs energy was estimated using a linear free-energy relationship between octanol-water partition coefficients and gas-water partition coefficients. The established solubility model satisfactorily explained the relative thermodynamic solubility of the model compounds and revealed that crystal packing and hydration equally controlled solubility of the structural analogs. All hydrophobic substituents were undesirable for solubility in terms of hydration, as expected. On the other hand, some of these hydrophobic substituents destabilized crystal packing and improved the solubility of the BPU derivatives when their impact on crystal packing exceeded their negative influence on hydration. The replacement of a single substituent could cause more than a 10-fold enhancement in thermodynamic solubility; this degree of improvement was comparable to that generally achieved by amorphous formulations. Detailed analysis of thermodynamic solubility will allow us to better understand the true substituent effect and design drug-like candidates efficiently. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  10. Comparative analysis of planetary laser ranging concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkx, D.; Bauer, S.; Noomen, R.; Vermeersen, B. L. A.; Visser, P. N.

    2014-12-01

    missions for various combinations of clock and state arc length. Thereby, we quantify the relative capabilities of the one- and two-way laser range systems. In addition, we study the optimal data analysis strategies for these missions, which we apply for LRO orbit determination. Finally, we compare the performance of the laser ranging systems with typical DSN tracking.

  11. Gas hydrates stability zone thickness map of Indian deep offshore areas - A GIS based approach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rastogi, A.; Deka, B.; Bhattacharya, G.C.; Ramprasad, T.; KameshRaju, K.A.; Srinivas, K.; Murty, G.P.S.; Chaubey, A.K.; Ramana, M.V.; Subrahmanyam, V.; Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.; Desa, M.; Paropkari, A.L.; Menezes, A.A.A.; Murty, V.S.N.; Antony, M.K.; SubbaRaju, L.V.; Desa, E.; Veerayya, M.

    hydrate occurrence in offshore regions and around the Indian sub-continent. This was accomplished by estimating the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) thickness from the saptial analysis of the physical parameters that control the formation and stability...

  12. A comparative analysis of influenza vaccination programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Bansal

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The threat of avian influenza and the 2004-2005 influenza vaccine supply shortage in the United States have sparked a debate about optimal vaccination strategies to reduce the burden of morbidity and mortality caused by the influenza virus. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We present a comparative analysis of two classes of suggested vaccination strategies: mortality-based strategies that target high-risk populations and morbidity-based strategies that target high-prevalence populations. Applying the methods of contact network epidemiology to a model of disease transmission in a large urban population, we assume that vaccine supplies are limited and then evaluate the efficacy of these strategies across a wide range of viral transmission rates and for two different age-specific mortality distributions. We find that the optimal strategy depends critically on the viral transmission level (reproductive rate of the virus: morbidity-based strategies outperform mortality-based strategies for moderately transmissible strains, while the reverse is true for highly transmissible strains. These results hold for a range of mortality rates reported for prior influenza epidemics and pandemics. Furthermore, we show that vaccination delays and multiple introductions of disease into the community have a more detrimental impact on morbidity-based strategies than mortality-based strategies. CONCLUSIONS: If public health officials have reasonable estimates of the viral transmission rate and the frequency of new introductions into the community prior to an outbreak, then these methods can guide the design of optimal vaccination priorities. When such information is unreliable or not available, as is often the case, this study recommends mortality-based vaccination priorities.

  13. AUDITOR ROTATION - A CRITICAL AND COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mocanu Mihaela

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper starts out from the challenge regarding auditor tenure launched in 2010 by the Green Paper of the European Commission Audit Policy: Lessons from the Crisis. According to this document, the European Commission speaks both in favor of the mandatory rotation of the audit firm, and in favor of the mandatory rotation of audit partners. Rotation is considered a solution to mitigate threats to independence generated by familiarity, intimidation and self-interest in the context of a long-term audit-client relationship. At international level, there are several studies on auditor rotation, both empirical (e.g. Lu and Sivaramakrishnan, 2009, Li, 2010, Kaplan and Mauldin, 2008, Jackson et al., 2008 and normative in nature (e.g. Marten et al., 2007, Muller, 2006 and Gelter, 2004. The objective of the present paper is to perform a critical and comparative analysis of the regulations on internal and external rotation in force at international level, in the European Union and in the United States of America. Moreover, arguments both in favor and against mandatory rotation are brought into discussion. With regard to the research design, the paper has a normative approach. The main findings are first of all that by comparison, all regulatory authorities require internal rotation at least in the case of public interest entities, while the external rotation is not in the focus of the regulators. In general, the most strict and detailed requirements are those issued by the Securities and Exchange Commission from the United States of America. Second of all, in favor of mandatory rotation speaks the fact that the auditor becomes less resilient in case of divergence of opinions between him and company management, less stimulated to follow his own interest, and more scrupulous in conducting the audit. However, mandatory rotation may also have negative consequences, thus the debate on the opportunity of this regulatory measure remains open-ended.

  14. Hydration of urea and alkylated urea derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaatze, Udo

    2018-01-07

    Compressibility data and broadband dielectric spectra of aqueous solutions of urea and some of its alkylated derivatives have been evaluated to yield their numbers Nh of hydration water molecules per molecule of solute. Nh values in a broad range of solute concentrations are discussed and are compared to hydration numbers of other relevant molecules and organic ions. Consistent with previous results, it is found that urea differs from other solutes in its unusually small hydration number, corresponding to just one third of the estimated number of nearest neighbor molecules. This remarkable hydration behavior is explained by the large density φH of hydrogen bonding abilities offered by the urea molecule. In terms of currently discussed models of reorientational motions and allied dynamics in water and related associating liquids, the large density φH causes a relaxation time close to that of undisturbed water with most parts of water encircling the solute. Therefore only a small part of disturbed ("hydration") water is left around each urea molecule. Adding alkyl groups to the basic molecule leads to Nh values which, within the series of n-alkylurea derivatives, progressively increase with the number of methyl groups per solute. With n-butylurea, Nh from dielectric spectra, in conformity with many other organic solutes, slightly exceeds the number of nearest neighbors. Compared to such Nh values, hydration numbers from compressibility data are substantially smaller, disclosing incorrect assumptions in the formula commonly used to interpret the experimental compressibilities. Similar to other series of organic solutes, effects of isomerization have been found with alkylated urea derivatives, indicating that factors other than the predominating density φH of hydrogen bond abilities contribute also to the hydration properties.

  15. N-Acetylcysteine plus Saline Hydration versus Saline Hydration

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) in patients undergoing coronary angiography pretreated with N-acetylcysteine NAC plus saline hydration or saline hydration alone and to determine the association between various risk factors and RCIN. Methods: Patients were ...

  16. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  17. Comparative pharmacoeconomic analysis of benzathine penicillin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjecting the cost and effectiveness to sensitivity analysis did not change this conclusion. Statistical analysis shows that there is a statistically significant difference in the effectiveness (outcome) of benzathine penicillin and procaine penicillin injection, (56.2%) (χ2 = 48.58, P<0.5), Therefore there is association between ...

  18. Human Capital Development: Comparative Analysis of BRICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardichvili, Alexandre; Zavyalova, Elena; Minina, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this article is to conduct macro-level analysis of human capital (HC) development strategies, pursued by four countries commonly referred to as BRICs (Brazil, Russia, India, and China). Design/methodology/approach: This analysis is based on comparisons of macro indices of human capital and innovativeness of the economy and a…

  19. Evaluation of distributed parameters mathematical models applied to grain hydration with volume change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolin, Douglas J.; Jorge, Regina Maria M.; Jorge, Luiz Mario M.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have taken into account the volume change of foods that undergo hydration or drying. However, the simplest boundary condition at the surface is usually considered to facilitate the solution of variable volume models. This paper presents a model of moisture diffusion in soybean grains that considers the volume change of these grains when absorbing water and also the dependence of diffusivity on moisture content. The boundary condition of equality of diffusive and convective flows on the surface was used and compared with two other approaches commonly found in the literature of grain hydration. This boundary condition was also applied to the case of constant volume of the grains and it was concluded that there are significant differences when the change in volume is taken into account. An analysis of the diffusion coefficients determined as functions of moisture content, temperature, and hydration time is presented for the best model.

  20. Influence of amorphous silica on the hydration in ultra-high performance concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oertel, Tina, E-mail: tina.oertel@isc.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer–Institute for Silicate Research ISC, Neunerplatz 2, 97082 Würzburg (Germany); Inorganic Chemistry I, Universität Bayreuth, Universitätsstr. 30, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Helbig, Uta, E-mail: uta.helbig@th-nuernberg.de [Crystallography and X-ray Methods, Technische Hochschule Nürnberg Georg Simon Ohm, Wassertorstraße 10, 90489 Nürnberg (Germany); Hutter, Frank [Fraunhofer–Institute for Silicate Research ISC, Neunerplatz 2, 97082 Würzburg (Germany); Kletti, Holger [Building Materials, Bauhaus–Universität Weimar, Coudraystr. 11, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Sextl, Gerhard [Fraunhofer–Institute for Silicate Research ISC, Neunerplatz 2, 97082 Würzburg (Germany); Chemical Technology of Advanced Materials, Julius Maximilian Universität, Röntgenring 11, 97070 Würzburg (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Amorphous silica particles (silica) are used in ultra-high performance concretes to densify the microstructure and accelerate the clinker hydration. It is still unclear whether silica predominantly increases the surface for the nucleation of C–S–H phases or dissolves and reacts pozzolanically. Furthermore, varying types of silica may have different and time dependent effects on the clinker hydration. The effects of different silica types were compared in this study by calorimetric analysis, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, in situ X-ray diffraction and compressive strength measurements. The silica component was silica fume, pyrogenic silica or silica synthesized by a wet-chemical route (Stoeber particles). Water-to-cement ratios were 0.23. Differences are observed between the silica for short reaction times (up to 3 days). Results indicate that silica fume and pyrogenic silica accelerate alite hydration by increasing the surface for nucleation of C–S–H phases whereas Stoeber particles show no accelerating effect.

  1. Microbial Community Structure and Diversity in Hydrate Ridge Gas Hydrates (Cascadia Margin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lösekann, T.; Knittel, K.; Boetius, A.; Amann, R.

    2003-04-01

    Here, we present the first quantitative study investigating microorganisms physically associated with Hydrate Ridge gas hydrates. Previous studies have shown that the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in methane enriched surface sediments of Hydrate Ridge is apparently mediated by highly structured microbial consortia (Boetius et al., 2000). These AOM consortia consist of an inner core of methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME2-group) and an outer shell of sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus group). However, recently other microbial associations have been found capable of oxidizing methane anaerobically (e.g. Michaelis et al., 2002; Orphan et al., 2002). Only little is known about microorganisms mediating AOM in direct association with gas hydrates (Lanoil et al., 2001). The microbial community in pure melted gas hydrates sampled at the southern summit of Hydrate Ridge, coast off Oregon (USA), was analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Additionally, microbial diversity was studied using 16S rDNA clone libraries for Bacteria and Archaea. First FISH experiments confirm the abundance of AMNE1-group archaea and ANME2-group archaea in pure melted Hydrate Ridge gas hydrates. The abundance of these AOM mediating groups seems to be orders of magnitude lower than in the gas hydrate surrounding sediment. ANME1-cells were detected as filamentous free-living rods. Archaea of the ANME2-group were found in associations. In contrast to the known highly structured Hydrate ridge consortia, these cells are only loosly aggregated. The obtained molecular data will be compared with results of previous studies, which dealt with the microbial diversity in methane enriched surface sediments of Hydrate Ridge. References: Boetius, A., Ravenschlag, K. , Schubert, C., Rickert, D., Widdel, F., Gieseke, A., Amann, R., Jørgensen, B. B., Witte, U. &Pfannkuche, O.: A marine microbial consortium apparently mediating anaerobic oxidation of methane. Nature 407, 623

  2. Mid- Atlantic Gas Hydrate, Heat Flow, and Basin Analysis: Implications to Hydrocarbon Production in the Carolina Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phrampus, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    The new Mid- and South Atlantic Planning Areas for oil and gas leasing is proposed to open in 2021. This region lacks in contemporary geologic and geophysical petroleum data and has no conventional wells drilled within the proposed leasing area. As such, addressing the hydrocarbon potential of this region is particularly difficult. Here, we use new and legacy multi-channel seismic data with heat flow observations, ocean temperature measurements, and new seismic interpretations of gas hydrate deposits to determine basin-wide heat flow along the Mid- Atlantic. These data reveal a conductive heat flow regime along the continental margin with a lack of fluid flow that is consistent with sea floor spreading rates and cooling oceanic crust. We then use these observations in combination with basal heat flow models and sedimentation records to determine the thermal history of a cross section of the Carolina Trough. These models reveal varying depth of potential hydrocarbon production that begin at ~ 2000 mbsf and extend down to depths greater than 7000 mbsf across the Carolina Trough. These potentially productive depths correspond to varying stratal ages, but all models contain the Late Jurassic, which is a potential analog to the U.S. Gulf Coast's Smackover Formation. Additionally, the timing of hydrocarbon generation reveal that Early through Middle Jurassic evaporite deposits and Late Jurassic tight limestones should have been in place before the Early Jurassic source rocks reached a depth of burial sufficiently deep for the production of hydrocarbons. These potential seals may trap significant quantities of hydrocarbons with in the Jurassic layers, resulting in significant hydrocarbon potential within the Carolina Trough.

  3. Question analysis for Indonesian comparative question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saelan, A.; Purwarianti, A.; Widyantoro, D. H.

    2017-01-01

    Information seeking is one of human needs today. Comparing things using search engine surely take more times than search only one thing. In this paper, we analyzed comparative questions for comparative question answering system. Comparative question is a question that comparing two or more entities. We grouped comparative questions into 5 types: selection between mentioned entities, selection between unmentioned entities, selection between any entity, comparison, and yes or no question. Then we extracted 4 types of information from comparative questions: entity, aspect, comparison, and constraint. We built classifiers for classification task and information extraction task. Features used for classification task are bag of words, whether for information extraction, we used lexical, 2 previous and following words lexical, and previous label as features. We tried 2 scenarios: classification first and extraction first. For classification first, we used classification result as a feature for extraction. Otherwise, for extraction first, we used extraction result as features for classification. We found that the result would be better if we do extraction first before classification. For the extraction task, classification using SMO gave the best result (88.78%), while for classification, it is better to use naïve bayes (82.35%).

  4. Estimating the upper limit of gas production from Class 2 hydrate accumulations in the permafrost: 2. Alternative well designs and sensitivity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moridis, G.; Reagan, M.T.

    2011-01-15

    In the second paper of this series, we evaluate two additional well designs for production from permafrost-associated (PA) hydrate deposits. Both designs are within the capabilities of conventional technology. We determine that large volumes of gas can be produced at high rates (several MMSCFD) for long times using either well design. The production approach involves initial fluid withdrawal from the water zone underneath the hydrate-bearing layer (HBL). The production process follows a cyclical pattern, with each cycle composed of two stages: a long stage (months to years) of increasing gas production and decreasing water production, and a short stage (days to weeks) that involves destruction of the secondary hydrate (mainly through warm water injection) that evolves during the first stage, and is followed by a reduction in the fluid withdrawal rate. A well configuration with completion throughout the HBL leads to high production rates, but also the creation of a secondary hydrate barrier around the well that needs to be destroyed regularly by water injection. However, a configuration that initially involves heating of the outer surface of the wellbore and later continuous injection of warm water at low rates (Case C) appears to deliver optimum performance over the period it takes for the exhaustion of the hydrate deposit. Using Case C as the standard, we determine that gas production from PA hydrate deposits increases with the fluid withdrawal rate, the initial hydrate saturation and temperature, and with the formation permeability.

  5. MANAGEMENT AND COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF DATASET ENSEMBLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geveci, Berk [Senior Director, Scientific Computing

    2010-05-17

    The primary Phase I technical objective was to develop a prototype that demonstrates the functionality of all components required for an end-to-end meta-data management and comparative visualization system.

  6. Comparative analysis of seismic risk assessment methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Kyoo; Kim, Tae Woon; Hwang, Mi Jung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-01

    SRA methodologies are separated into SPSA and SMM. SPSA methodology that has been widely used for seismic risk analysis has two kinds of methodologies such as Zion method and SSMRP method. SPSA methodology is suitable to interfacing with the analysis of internal event. However, the results of SPSA have uncertainties because of uncertainties in seismic hazard analysis and subjective judgement. Zion method specially developed for commercial use is less expensive and less time consuming but more uncertain than SSMRP method, since the former performs the fragility analysis less in detail than the latter. SMM is impossible to interface with the analysis of internal event but the uncertainties that are occurred during seismic hazard analysis is reduced because of the screening using RLE (review level earthquake). Therefore, if SPSA-based SMM methodology is chosen to be developed, the results of SRA will be more reliable and it requires low costs and time. In addition, the new methodology will require the development of a new evaluating code for SRA. (Author) 26 refs., 25 figs., 16 tabs.

  7. Comparing Results from Constant Comparative and Computer Software Methods: A Reflection about Qualitative Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putten, Jim Vander; Nolen, Amanda L.

    2010-01-01

    This study compared qualitative research results obtained by manual constant comparative analysis with results obtained by computer software analysis of the same data. An investigated about issues of trustworthiness and accuracy ensued. Results indicated that the inductive constant comparative data analysis generated 51 codes and two coding levels…

  8. Kinetics and mechanism of ultrasonic-assisted magnesium oxide hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaojia; Nie, Yixing; Jin, Qi; Guo, Lin; Zhao, Jiao; Li, Tie; Zhu, Yimin

    2018-01-01

    The kinetics of ultrasonic-assisted magnesium oxide (MgO) hydration was investigated in the present paper. The degree of hydration at different temperature (298-338K) and reaction time (0.25-3h) was determined by thermal gravity analysis (TGA). And the products of the hydration were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) and Particle Size Distribution analysis (PSD). A coupling model based on characteristic equations for chemical reaction control and inward diffusion control was employed to describe the hydration process. The experimental data indicated that the degree of hydration at 2h under ultrasound reaction condition was 18-25% higher than that of mechanical stirring reaction condition. However, the value was nearly the same at the first hour. Combined with the analysis results of degree of hydration, characterization of products and model fitting, the hydration process was supposed to be a mixed model, which controlled by both chemical reaction and inward diffusion. A reaction mechanism emphasized on the physical effect of ultrasound was proposed, assuming that the hydration product layer was broken and regenerated during the process. The calculated activation energy of 24.2kJmol(-1) corroborated the mechanism proposed in this study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Geomechanical Performance of Hydrate-Bearing Sediment in Offshore Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Holditch; Tad Patzek; Jonny Rutqvist; George Moridis; Richard Plumb

    2008-03-31

    The objective of this multi-year, multi-institutional research project was to develop the knowledge base and quantitative predictive capability for the description of geomechanical performance of hydrate-bearing sediments (hereafter referred to as HBS) in oceanic environments. The focus was on the determination of the envelope of hydrate stability under conditions typical of those related to the construction and operation of offshore platforms. We have developed a robust numerical simulator of hydrate behavior in geologic media by coupling a reservoir model with a commercial geomechanical code. We also investigated the geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS using pore-scale models (conceptual and mathematical) of fluid flow, stress analysis, and damage propagation. The objective of the UC Berkeley work was to develop a grain-scale model of hydrate-bearing sediments. Hydrate dissociation alters the strength of HBS. In particular, transformation of hydrate clusters into gas and liquid water weakens the skeleton and, simultaneously, reduces the effective stress by increasing the pore pressure. The large-scale objective of the study is evaluation of geomechanical stability of offshore oil and gas production infrastructure. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we have developed the numerical model TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate how the formation and disassociation of hydrates in seafloor sediments affects seafloor stability. Several technical papers were published using results from this model. LBNL also developed laboratory equipment and methods to produce realistic laboratory samples of sediments containing gas hydrates so that mechanical properties could be measured in the laboratory. These properties are required to run TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate seafloor stability issues. At Texas A&M University we performed a detailed literature review to determine what gas hydrate formation properties had been measured and reported in the literature. We

  10. Comparative Distributions of Hazard Modeling Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Abdul Wajid

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the comparison among the distributions used in hazard analysis. Simulation technique has been used to study the behavior of hazard distribution modules. The fundamentals of Hazard issues are discussed using failure criteria. We present the flexibility of the hazard modeling distribution that approaches to different distributions.

  11. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF MECHANICAL AND MANUAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aims to analyze the current road traffic data collection methods - comparing both mechanical and manual mode of Traffic Survey simulation - in terms of capabilities and limitations on Nigeria roads using Ogoja (Mbok) Junction and Mfum road in Cross River State as a case study. The tendency of the mechanical ...

  12. Comparative pharmacokinetic analysis with two omeprazole ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pharmacokinetics of omeprazole pharmaceutical products Proceptin® 20mg capsule and Losec® 20mg MUPS tablet were compared in healthy subjects. The study was an open-‐label, randomized, two-‐treatment, two-sequence, two-way crossover, single-dose bioavailability study conducted under fasting conditions ...

  13. Comparative analysis of aggregate agricultural productivity between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-08-23

    Aug 23, 2010 ... used animal manure had a higher aggregate agricultural productivity than the HEIT farmers who used inorganic fertilizer. ... utilization of animal manure be put in place by the government. Key words: Aggregate agricultural .... (Kelly et al., 1995). To compare input productivities across goods or to aggregate.

  14. Comparative analysis of aggregate agricultural productivity between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study compared the aggregate agricultural productivity between the Low External Input Technology (LEIT) and High External Input Technology (HEIT) Farms in Imo State of Nigeria. The state is divided into three agricultural zones, out of which two were randomly selected for the study. Using a multistage sampling ...

  15. Order and disorder in calcium–silicate–hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauchy, M., E-mail: bauchy@mit.edu [Concrete Sustainability Hub, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); MIT-CNRS Joint Laboratory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Qomi, M. J. Abdolhosseini; Ulm, F.-J. [Concrete Sustainability Hub, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Pellenq, R. J.-M. [Concrete Sustainability Hub, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); MIT-CNRS Joint Laboratory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Centre Interdisciplinaire des Nanosciences de Marseille, CNRS and Aix-Marseille University, Campus de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France)

    2014-06-07

    Despite advances in the characterization and modeling of cement hydrates, the atomic order in Calcium–Silicate–Hydrate (C–S–H), the binding phase of cement, remains an open question. Indeed, in contrast to the former crystalline model, recent molecular models suggest that the nanoscale structure of C–S–H is amorphous. To elucidate this issue, we analyzed the structure of a realistic simulated model of C–S–H, and compared the latter to crystalline tobermorite, a natural analogue of C–S–H, and to an artificial ideal glass. The results clearly indicate that C–S–H appears as amorphous, when averaged on all atoms. However, an analysis of the order around each atomic species reveals that its structure shows an intermediate degree of order, retaining some characteristics of the crystal while acquiring an overall glass-like disorder. Thanks to a detailed quantification of order and disorder, we show that, while C–S–H retains some signatures of a tobermorite-like layered structure, hydrated species are completely amorphous.

  16. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  17. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.

    2014-07-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  18. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom

  19. Comparing methods for single paragraph similarity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Benjamin; Dennis, Simon; Kwantes, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this paper is two-fold. First, similarities generated from six semantic models were compared to human ratings of paragraph similarity on two datasets-23 World Entertainment News Network paragraphs and 50 ABC newswire paragraphs. Contrary to findings on smaller textual units such as word associations (Griffiths, Tenenbaum, & Steyvers, 2007), our results suggest that when single paragraphs are compared, simple nonreductive models (word overlap and vector space) can provide better similarity estimates than more complex models (LSA, Topic Model, SpNMF, and CSM). Second, various methods of corpus creation were explored to facilitate the semantic models' similarity estimates. Removing numeric and single characters, and also truncating document length improved performance. Automated construction of smaller Wikipedia-based corpora proved to be very effective, even improving upon the performance of corpora that had been chosen for the domain. Model performance was further improved by augmenting corpora with dataset paragraphs. Copyright © 2010 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  20. Morphology of methane hydrate host sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K.W.; Feng, H.; Tomov, S.; Winters, W.J.; Eaton, M.; Mahajan, D.

    2005-01-01

    The morphological features including porosity and grains of methane hydrate host sediments were investigated using synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) technique. The sediment sample was obtained during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 164 on the Blake Ridge at water depth of 2278.5 m. The CMT experiment was performed at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source facility. The analysis gave ample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity. The method was found to be highly effective for the study of methane hydrate host sediments.

  1. Direct measurement of methane hydrate composition along the hydrate equilibrium boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    The composition of methane hydrate, namely nW for CH 4??nWH2O, was directly measured along the hydrate equilibrium boundary under conditions of excess methane gas. Pressure and temperature conditions ranged from 1.9 to 9.7 MPa and 263 to 285 K. Within experimental error, there is no change in hydrate composition with increasing pressure along the equilibrium boundary, but nW may show a slight systematic decrease away from this boundary. A hydrate stoichiometry of n W = 5.81-6.10 H2O describes the entire range of measured values, with an average composition of CH4??5.99(??0.07) H2O along the equilibrium boundary. These results, consistent with previously measured values, are discussed with respect to the widely ranging values obtained by thermodynamic analysis. The relatively constant composition of methane hydrate over the geologically relevant pressure and temperature range investigated suggests that in situ methane hydrate compositions may be estimated with some confidence. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  2. [Amaranth flour: characteristics, comparative analysis, application possibilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharkov, I M; Miroshnichenko, L A; Zviagin, A A; Bavykina, I A

    2014-01-01

    Amaranth flour--a product of amaranth seeds processing--is a valuable industrial raw material that has an unique chemical composition and may be used for nutrition of people suffering from intolerance to traditional cereals protein, including celiac disease patients. The research aim was to study the composition of amaranth flour of two types compared with semolina which is traditionally used for nutrition by Russian population, as well as to compare the composition of milk amaranth flour porridge with milk semolina porridge. The composition of amaranth whole-ground flour and amaranth flour of premium grade processed from amaranth seeds grown in Voronezh region has been researched. It is to be noted that protein content in amaranth flour was 10.8-24.3% higher than in semolina, and its biological value and NPU-coefficient were higher by 22.65 and 46.51% respectively; lysine score in amaranth flour protein of premium grade came up to 107.54%, and in semolina protein only 40.95%. The level of digestible carbohydrates, including starch, was lower in amaranth flour than in semolina by 2.79-12.85 and 4.76-15.85% respectively, while fiber content was 15.5-30 fold higher. Fat content in amaranth flour of premium grade was 2,4 fold lower than in whole-ground amaranth flour but it was 45% higher than in semolina. The main advantage of amaranth flour protein compared to wheat protein is the predominance of albumins and globulins and a minimal content of prolamines and alpha-gliadin complete absence. The specifics of chemical composition allow the amaranth flour to be recommended for being included into nutrition of both healthy children and adults and also celiac disease patients.

  3. Comparative Analysis of GOCI Ocean Color Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhul Amin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI is the first geostationary ocean color sensor in orbit that provides bio-optical properties from coastal and open waters around the Korean Peninsula at unprecedented temporal resolution. In this study, we compare the normalized water-leaving radiance (nLw products generated by the Naval Research Laboratory Automated Processing System (APS with those produced by the stand-alone software package, the GOCI Data Processing System (GDPS, developed by the Korean Ocean Research & Development Institute (KORDI. Both results are then compared to the nLw measured by the above water radiometer at the Ieodo site. This above-water radiometer is part of the Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AeroNET. The results indicate that the APS and GDPS processed  correlates well within the same image slot where the coefficient of determination (r2 is higher than 0.84 for all the bands from 412 nm to 745 nm. The agreement between APS and the AeroNET data is higher when compared to the GDPS results. The Root-Mean-Squared-Error (RMSE between AeroNET and APS data ranges from 0.24 [mW/(cm2srμm] at 555 nm to 0.52 [mW/(cm2srμm]  at 412 nm while RMSE between AeroNET and GDPS data ranges from 0.47 [mW/(cm2srμm] at 443 nm to 0.69 [mW/(cm2srμm]  at 490 nm.

  4. Suicide by aircraft: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bills, Corey B; Grabowski, Jurek George; Li, Guohua

    2005-08-01

    Suicide is the 11 th leading cause of death in the United States. The objective of this study is to document the characteristics of aviation-related suicides and suicide attempts. Aviation accidents reported by the National Transportation Safety Board between 1983 and 2003 were screened for cases in which suicide was listed as a probable cause. For each suicide case, two accidents were randomly selected as controls, matched on sex of pilot, type of flight, state, and year of occurrence. Mantel-Haenszel summary Chi-square tests were used to compare cases to controls. Conditional logistic regression modeling was performed to assess the association of pilot and flight characteristics with suicide-related crashes. During the 21-yr study period, 37 pilots committed or attempted suicide by aircraft, with 36 resulting in at least one fatality. All the cases were men and involved general aviation flights. Toxicological test results revealed that 24% of the cases had used alcohol and 14% had used other illicit drugs. Underlying factors included domestic and social problems (46%), legal trouble (40%), and pre-existing psychiatric conditions (38%). Compared with controls, suicide cases involved younger pilots (p aircraft (p crashes caused by suicide differ from unintentional aviation accidents in pilot characteristics, crash circumstances, and outcomes.

  5. Comparative Modal Analysis of Sieve Hardware Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    The CMTB Thwacker hardware operates as a testbed analogue for the Flight Thwacker and Sieve components of CHIMRA, a device on the Curiosity Rover. The sieve separates particles with a diameter smaller than 150 microns for delivery to onboard science instruments. The sieving behavior of the testbed hardware should be similar to the Flight hardware for the results to be meaningful. The elastodynamic behavior of both sieves was studied analytically using the Rayleigh Ritz method in conjunction with classical plate theory. Finite element models were used to determine the mode shapes of both designs, and comparisons between the natural frequencies and mode shapes were made. The analysis predicts that the performance of the CMTB Thwacker will closely resemble the performance of the Flight Thwacker within the expected steady state operating regime. Excitations of the testbed hardware that will mimic the flight hardware were recommended, as were those that will improve the efficiency of the sieving process.

  6. A Comparative Analysis of Crime Guns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan E. Collins

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Information is limited on how firearms move from legal possession to illegal possession and use in criminal activities, largely because of data collection capacity and a lack of recent, exhaustive recovery data across jurisdictions. This article includes both an analysis of firearms trace data and prisoner interviews across multiple jurisdictions: New Orleans, Louisiana, Prince George’s County, Maryland, and Chicago, Illinois. Findings indicate that recoveries and trace successes vary across jurisdictions and by type of crime. Jurisdiction regulations were associated with the proportion of guns purchased in state and time to recovery but not with purchaser characteristics. Interviews from imprisoned offenders in two jurisdictions revealed the most common method of obtaining a crime gun was to steal it or buy it off the street.

  7. Comparative analysis of some search engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiwo O. Edosomwan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We compared the information retrieval performances of some popular search engines (namely, Google, Yahoo, AlltheWeb, Gigablast, Zworks and AltaVista and Bing/MSN in response to a list of ten queries, varying in complexity. These queries were run on each search engine and the precision and response time of the retrieved results were recorded. The first ten documents on each retrieval output were evaluated as being ‘relevant’ or ‘non-relevant’ for evaluation of the search engine’s precision. To evaluate response time, normalised recall ratios were calculated at various cut-off points for each query and search engine. This study shows that Google appears to be the best search engine in terms of both average precision (70% and average response time (2 s. Gigablast and AlltheWeb performed the worst overall in this study.

  8. Comparative analysis of cystatin superfamily in platyhelminths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aijiang Guo

    Full Text Available The cystatin superfamily is comprised of cysteine proteinase inhibitors and encompasses at least 3 subfamilies: stefins, cystatins and kininogens. In this study, the platyhelminth cystatin superfamily was identified and grouped into stefin and cystatin subfamilies. The conserved domain of stefins (G, QxVxG was observed in all members of platyhelminth stefins. The three characteristics of cystatins, the cystatin-like domain (G, QxVxG, PW, a signal peptide, and one or two conserved disulfide bonds, were observed in platyhelminths, with the exception of cestodes, which lacked the conserved disulfide bond. However, it is noteworthy that cestode cystatins had two tandem repeated domains, although the second tandem repeated domain did not contain a cystatin-like domain, which has not been previously reported. Tertiary structure analysis of Taenia solium cystatin, one of the cestode cystatins, demonstrated that the N-terminus of T. solium cystatin formed a five turn α-helix, a five stranded β-pleated sheet and a hydrophobic edge, similar to the structure of chicken cystatin. Although no conserved disulfide bond was found in T. solium cystatin, the models of T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin corresponded at the site of the first disulfide bridge of the chicken cystatin. However, the two models were not similar regarding the location of the second disulfide bridge of chicken cystatin. These results showed that T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin had similarities and differences, suggesting that the biochemistry of T. solium cystatin could be similar to chicken cystatin in its inhibitory function and that it may have further functional roles. The same results were obtained for other cestode cystatins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that cestode cystatins constituted an independent clade and implied that cestode cystatins should be considered to have formed a new clade during evolution.

  9. Recognizing chemicals in patents: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Maryam; Wiegandt, David Luis; Schmedding, Florian; Leser, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Recently, methods for Chemical Named Entity Recognition (NER) have gained substantial interest, driven by the need for automatically analyzing todays ever growing collections of biomedical text. Chemical NER for patents is particularly essential due to the high economic importance of pharmaceutical findings. However, NER on patents has essentially been neglected by the research community for long, mostly because of the lack of enough annotated corpora. A recent international competition specifically targeted this task, but evaluated tools only on gold standard patent abstracts instead of full patents; furthermore, results from such competitions are often difficult to extrapolate to real-life settings due to the relatively high homogeneity of training and test data. Here, we evaluate the two state-of-the-art chemical NER tools, tmChem and ChemSpot, on four different annotated patent corpora, two of which consist of full texts. We study the overall performance of the tools, compare their results at the instance level, report on high-recall and high-precision ensembles, and perform cross-corpus and intra-corpus evaluations. Our findings indicate that full patents are considerably harder to analyze than patent abstracts and clearly confirm the common wisdom that using the same text genre (patent vs. scientific) and text type (abstract vs. full text) for training and testing is a pre-requisite for achieving high quality text mining results.

  10. LINGUISTIC AND POLITICAL ANALYSIS: COMPARATIVE ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Alpatov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The article analyses the book on political systems and processes in the East prepared by MGIMO-University authors and edited by Alexei D. Voskressenski in order to show the differences in approach and methods used in linguistics and political science. The author shows two significant differences in present-day stressing that linguistics of the XIX century was closer to the present-day political science? As he believes. The first difference includes monism of political science approach, since the book reveals monistic scale from totalitarianism to democracy, while linguistic has abandoned the monistic view on typology. The second difference is the value-addedness of the political science approach. The value-free norm in linguistics presupposes setting up of a single standard for all speakers in order to reach full mutual understanding. In political science subjective criteria are decisive for evaluation. The article gives examples from the book to prove that political science, compared to linguistics, is not aimed at overcoming contradictions, distinguishing between the terms, avoiding unproved statements and subjective evaluations.

  11. Well log characterization of natural gas-hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2012-01-01

    In the last 25 years there have been significant advancements in the use of well-logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrates in nature: whereas wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs were formerly used to identify gas-hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments, more advanced wireline and logging-while-drilling (LWD) tools are now routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas-hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. Resistivity- and acoustic-logging tools are the most widely used for estimating the gas-hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. Recent integrated sediment coring and well-log studies have confirmed that electrical-resistivity and acoustic-velocity data can yield accurate gas-hydrate saturations in sediment grain-supported (isotropic) systems such as sand reservoirs, but more advanced log-analysis models are required to characterize gas hydrate in fractured (anisotropic) reservoir systems. New well-logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation-resistivity log measurements provide the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly interbedded and fracture-dominated gas-hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing (WFT) also allow for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids(i.e., free water along with clay- and capillary-bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms

  12. Characterization of hydration products of mineral trioxide aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J

    2008-05-01

    To characterize the hydration products of white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Mineral trioxide aggregate, white Portland cement and bismuth oxide were evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and Rietveld XRD. The cements were tested un-hydrated and after hydration and curing for 30 days at 37 degrees C. Analysis of hydrated cement leachate was performed weekly for five consecutive weeks from mixing using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy after which the cements were viewed under the scanning electron microscope to evaluate the cement microstructure. Quantitative energy dispersive analysis with X-ray was performed and atomic ratios were plotted. Both Portland cement and MTA produced calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) and calcium hydroxide (CH) on hydration. The tricalcium aluminate levels were low for MTA which resulted in reduced production of ettringite and monosulphate. On hydration the bismuth level in the hydrated MTA decreased; bismuth oxide replaced the silica in the C-S-H and was leached out once the C-S-H decomposed with time. Both MTA and Portland cement released a high amount of calcium ions which decreased in amount over the 5-week period. The hydration mechanism of MTA is different to that of Portland cement. In MTA the bismuth oxide is bound to the C-S-H and is leached out from the cement with time as the C-S-H decomposes. MTA produces a high proportion of calcium ions from CH a by-product of hydration and also by decomposition of C-S-H. The release of calcium ions reduces with time.

  13. Comparative and demographic analysis of orangutan genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Devin P.; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Warren, Wesley C.; Worley, Kim C.; Nazareth, Lynne V.; Muzny, Donna M.; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Wang, Zhengyuan; Chinwalla, Asif T.; Minx, Pat; Mitreva, Makedonka; Cook, Lisa; Delehaunty, Kim D.; Fronick, Catrina; Schmidt, Heather; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Fulton, Robert S.; Nelson, Joanne O.; Magrini, Vincent; Pohl, Craig; Graves, Tina A.; Markovic, Chris; Cree, Andy; Dinh, Huyen H.; Hume, Jennifer; Kovar, Christie L.; Fowler, Gerald R.; Lunter, Gerton; Meader, Stephen; Heger, Andreas; Ponting, Chris P.; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Alkan, Can; Chen, Lin; Cheng, Ze; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Eichler, Evan E.; White, Simon; Searle, Stephen; Vilella, Albert J.; Chen, Yuan; Flicek, Paul; Ma, Jian; Raney, Brian; Suh, Bernard; Burhans, Richard; Herrero, Javier; Haussler, David; Faria, Rui; Fernando, Olga; Darré, Fleur; Farré, Domènec; Gazave, Elodie; Oliva, Meritxell; Navarro, Arcadi; Roberto, Roberta; Capozzi, Oronzo; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Valle, Giuliano Della; Purgato, Stefania; Rocchi, Mariano; Konkel, Miriam K.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Ullmer, Brygg; Batzer, Mark A.; Smit, Arian F. A.; Hubley, Robert; Casola, Claudio; Schrider, Daniel R.; Hahn, Matthew W.; Quesada, Victor; Puente, Xose S.; Ordoñez, Gonzalo R.; López-Otín, Carlos; Vinar, Tomas; Brejova, Brona; Ratan, Aakrosh; Harris, Robert S.; Miller, Webb; Kosiol, Carolin; Lawson, Heather A.; Taliwal, Vikas; Martins, André L.; Siepel, Adam; RoyChoudhury, Arindam; Ma, Xin; Degenhardt, Jeremiah; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; Mailund, Thomas; Dutheil, Julien Y.; Hobolth, Asger; Schierup, Mikkel H.; Chemnick, Leona; Ryder, Oliver A.; Yoshinaga, Yuko; de Jong, Pieter J.; Weinstock, George M.; Rogers, Jeffrey; Mardis, Elaine R.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Wilson, Richard K.

    2011-01-01

    “Orangutan” is derived from the Malay term “man of the forest” and aptly describes the Southeast Asian great apes native to Sumatra and Borneo. The orangutan species, Pongo abelii (Sumatran) and Pongo pygmaeus (Bornean), are the most phylogenetically distant great apes from humans, thereby providing an informative perspective on hominid evolution. Here we present a Sumatran orangutan draft genome assembly and short read sequence data from five Sumatran and five Bornean orangutan genomes. Our analyses reveal that, compared to other primates, the orangutan genome has many unique features. Structural evolution of the orangutan genome has proceeded much more slowly than other great apes, evidenced by fewer rearrangements, less segmental duplication, a lower rate of gene family turnover and surprisingly quiescent Alu repeats, which have played a major role in restructuring other primate genomes. We also describe the first primate polymorphic neocentromere, found in both Pongo species, emphasizing the gradual evolution of orangutan genome structure. Orangutans have extremely low energy usage for a eutherian mammal1, far lower than their hominid relatives. Adding their genome to the repertoire of sequenced primates illuminates new signals of positive selection in several pathways including glycolipid metabolism. From the population perspective, both Pongo species are deeply diverse; however, Sumatran individuals possess greater diversity than their Bornean counterparts, and more species-specific variation. Our estimate of Bornean/Sumatran speciation time, 400k years ago (ya), is more recent than most previous studies and underscores the complexity of the orangutan speciation process. Despite a smaller modern census population size, the Sumatran effective population size (Ne) expanded exponentially relative to the ancestral Ne after the split, while Bornean Ne declined over the same period. Overall, the resources and analyses presented here offer new opportunities

  14. Investigation of Kinetic Hydrate Inhibition Using a High Pressure Micro Differential Scanning Calorimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraboina, Nagu; Malmos, Christine; von Solms, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    . These investigations were performed using small samples in four different capillary tubes in the calorimeter cell. When the isothermal method was employed, it was found that Luvicap EG significantly delays the hydrate nucleation time as compared to water. The results obtained from the ramping method demonstrated...... of hydrate growth. Additionally, hydrate formed in the presence of inhibitor decomposed at higher temperatures compared to pure water, indicating that while hydrate formation is initially inhibited; once hydrates form, they are more stable in the presence of inhibitor. Overall, this method proved a viable...

  15. Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amos Nur

    2009-01-08

    We quantify natural methane hydrate reservoirs by generating synthetic seismic traces and comparing them to real seismic data: if the synthetic matches the observed data, then the reservoir properties and conditions used in synthetic modeling might be the same as the actual, in-situ reservoir conditions. This approach is model-based: it uses rock physics equations that link the porosity and mineralogy of the host sediment, pressure, and hydrate saturation, and the resulting elastic-wave velocity and density. One result of such seismic forward modeling is a catalogue of seismic reflections of methane hydrate which can serve as a field guide to hydrate identification from real seismic data. We verify this approach using field data from known hydrate deposits.

  16. Water Dynamics in the Hydration Shells of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The structure and function of biomolecules are strongly influenced by their hydration shells. Structural fluctuations and molecular excitations of hydrating water molecules cover a broad range in space and time, from individual water molecules to larger pools and from femtosecond to microsecond time scales. Recent progress in theory and molecular dynamics simulations as well as in ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy has led to new and detailed insight into fluctuations of water structure, elementary water motions, electric fields at hydrated biointerfaces, and processes of vibrational relaxation and energy dissipation. Here, we review recent advances in both theory and experiment, focusing on hydrated DNA, proteins, and phospholipids, and compare dynamics in the hydration shells to bulk water. PMID:28248491

  17. Hydration of Portoguese cements, measurement and modelling of chemical shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maia, Lino; Geiker, Mette Rica; Figueiras, Joaquim A.

    2008-01-01

    Development of cement hydration was studied by measuring the chemical shrinkage of pastes. Five types of Portuguese Portland cement were used in cement pastes with . Chemical shrinkage was measured by gravimetry and dilatometry. In gravimeters results were recorded automatically during at least...... seven days, dilatometers were manually recorded during at least 56 days. The dispersion model was applied to fit chemical shrinkage results and to estimate the maximum (or ultimate) value for calculation of degree of hydration. Except for a pure Portland cement best fits were obtained by the general...... form of the dispersion model. The development of hydration varied between the investigated cements; based on the measured data the degree of hydration after 24 h hydration at 20 C varied between 40 and 50%. This should be taken into account when comparing properties of concrete made from the different...

  18. Inhibition of Methane Hydrate Formation by Ice-Structuring Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Ramløv, Hans; Thomsen, Kaj

    2010-01-01

    In the oil and gas industry there is ample motivation for moving toward greener kinetic inhibitors of gas hydrates as many of those used today suffer from poor biodegradability. In this work, we have investigated experimentally whether ice-structuring proteins (ISPs) found in fish and insect......, assumed biodegradable, are capable of inhibiting the growth of methane hydrate (a structure I hydrate). The ISPs investigated were type III HPLC12 (originally identified in ocean pout) and ISP type III found in meal worm (Tenebrio molitor). These were compared to polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) a well......-known kinetic hydrate inhibitor. The results revealed that adding ISP in sufficient amounts caused the appearance of an initial nonlinear growth period. At a certain point during the growth process the growth pattern changed to linear which is identical to the growth observed for methane hydrate in the absence...

  19. Regioselective Hydration of an Alkene and Analysis of the Alcohol Product by Remote Access NMR: A Classroom Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Maureen E.; Johnson, Sara L.; Masterson, Douglas S.

    2013-01-01

    A two-part demonstration was conducted in our first-semester organic chemistry course designed to introduce students to the formation of alcohols, regioselective reactions, and analysis of organic products by NMR analysis. This demonstration utilized the oxymercuration-demercuration sequence to prepare an alcohol from an alkene in a Markovnikov…

  20. Irrigation port hydration in phacoemulsification surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki H

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hisaharu Suzuki,1 Yoichiro Masuda,2 Yuki Hamajima,1 Hiroshi Takahashi3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Nippon Medical School Musashikosugi Hospital, Kawasaki City, Kanagawa, 2Department of Ophthalmology, The Jikei University, Katsushika Medical Center, Tokyo, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan Background: In most cases, hydration is performed by water injection into the stromal tissue with a needle. The technique is simple, however it is sometimes troublesome.Purpose: We describe a simple technique for hydrating the corneal stroma in cataract surgery using an irrigation port.Patients and methods: The technique began by pushing the irrigation port against the corneal stroma for a few seconds during phacoemulsification, which generated edema in the corneal incision that subsequently prevented leakage. This procedure is called the hydration using irrigation port (HYUIP technique. A total of 60 eyes were randomized and placed in two groups, 30 eyes underwent surgeries using the HYUIP technique (HYUIP group and 30 eyes underwent surgeries without the HYUIP technique (control. The three points evaluated during each surgery included 1 the occurrence of anterior chamber collapse during the pulling out of the I/A tip after inserting the intraocular lens, 2 the need for conventional hydration, and 3 watertight completion at the end stage of surgery.Results: The anterior chamber collapse and the need for conventional hydration were significantly smaller in the HYUIP group compared to the control group. Regarding the self-sealing completion, no significant difference was observed between the two groups.Conclusion: The HYUIP technique is an effective method for creating self-sealing wound. In addition, this technique helps to prevent anterior chamber collapse. Keywords: cataract surgery, hydration, irrigation and aspiration, phacoemulsification, wound, self-sealing 

  1. Investigation of the hydration and bioactivity of radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine and MTA Angelus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Josette; Sorrentino, François; Damidot, Denis

    2013-05-01

    Novel root-end filling materials are composed of tricalcium silicate (TCS) and radiopacifier as opposed to the traditional mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) which is made up of clinker derived from Portland cement and bismuth oxide. The aim of this research was to characterize and investigate the hydration of a tricalcium silicate-based proprietary brand cement (Biodentine™) and a laboratory manufactured cement made with a mixture of tricalcium silicate and zirconium oxide (TCS-20-Z) and compare their properties to MTA Angelus™. The materials investigated included a cement containing 80% of TCS and 20% zirconium oxide (TCS-20-Z), Biodentine™ and MTA Angelus™. The specific surface area and the particle size distribution of the un-hydrated cements and zirconium oxide were investigated using a gas adsorption method and scanning electron microscopy. Un-hydrated cements and set materials were tested for mineralogy and microstructure, assessment of bioactivity and hydration. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive analysis, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Rietveld refined X-ray diffraction and calorimetry were employed. The radiopacity of the materials was investigated using ISO 6876 methods. The un-hydrated cements were composed of tricalcium silicate and a radiopacifier phase; zirconium oxide for both Biodentine™ and TCS-20-Z whereas bismuth oxide for MTA Angelus™. In addition Biodentine™ contained calcium carbonate particles and MTA Angelus™ exhibited the presence of dicalcium silicate, tricalcium aluminate, calcium, aluminum and silicon oxides. TCS and MTA Angelus™ exhibited similar specific surface area while Biodentine™ had a greater specific surface area. The cements hydrated and produced some hydrates located either as reaction rim around the tricalcium silicate grain or in between the grains at the expense of volume containing the water initially present in the mixture. The rate of reaction of tricalcium

  2. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  3. Multi-detector CT urography: effect of oral hydration and contrast medium volume on renal parenchymal enhancement and urinary tract opacification - a quantitative and qualitative analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szolar, Dieter H.; Tillich, Manfred; Preidler, Klaus W. [Diagnostikum Graz-Suedwest, Graz (Austria)

    2010-09-15

    To assess the effect of oral hydration and contrast-medium volume on renal enhancement and urinary tract opacification in multi-detector CT urography. A total of 192 patients were assigned to different protocols with varying doses of contrast agent with and without oral hydration. The attenuation was measured in the renal parenchyma in the unenhanced, nephrographic and excretory phase, and in the urinary tract in excretory phase imaging, respectively. Opacification of the urinary tract was graded on volume rendered images. Oral hydration did not significantly alter renal parenchymal enhancement in both the nephrographic and the excretory phase (p > 0.001), but significantly decreased mean attenuation of the urinary tract in the excretory phase (p {<=} 0.001), and improved continuous opacification of all ureter segments (p < 0.01). Higher volumes of contrast medium improved renal parenchymal enhancement (p {<=} 0.001) and continuous opacification of the urinary tract (p {<=} 0.01). Oral hydration leads to lower attenuation values in the urinary tract but improves the continuous opacification of the tract. Increase in contrast medium volume leads to higher renal parenchymal enhancement as well as to an increased continuous opacification of the urinary tract. Decrease in contrast medium volume cannot be compensated for by oral hydration in terms of parenchymal enhancement. (orig.)

  4. Multi-detector CT urography: effect of oral hydration and contrast medium volume on renal parenchymal enhancement and urinary tract opacification--a quantitative and qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szolar, Dieter H; Tillich, Manfred; Preidler, Klaus W

    2010-09-01

    To assess the effect of oral hydration and contrast-medium volume on renal enhancement and urinary tract opacification in multi-detector CT urography. A total of 192 patients were assigned to different protocols with varying doses of contrast agent with and without oral hydration. The attenuation was measured in the renal parenchyma in the unenhanced, nephrographic and excretory phase, and in the urinary tract in excretory phase imaging, respectively. Opacification of the urinary tract was graded on volume rendered images. Oral hydration did not significantly alter renal parenchymal enhancement in both the nephrographic and the excretory phase (p > 0.001), but significantly decreased mean attenuation of the urinary tract in the excretory phase (p < or = 0.001), and improved continuous opacification of all ureter segments (p < 0.01). Higher volumes of contrast medium improved renal parenchymal enhancement (p < or = 0.001) and continuous opacification of the urinary tract (p < or = 0.01). Oral hydration leads to lower attenuation values in the urinary tract but improves the continuous opacification of the tract. Increase in contrast medium volume leads to higher renal parenchymal enhancement as well as to an increased continuous opacification of the urinary tract. Decrease in contrast medium volume cannot be compensated for by oral hydration in terms of parenchymal enhancement.

  5. Hydration of Biodentine, Theracal LC, and a prototype tricalcium silicate-based dentin replacement material after pulp capping in entire tooth cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Josette; Laurent, Patrick; About, Imad

    2014-11-01

    The calcium-releasing ability of pulp-capping materials induces pulp tissue regeneration. Tricalcium silicate-based materials produce calcium hydroxide as a by-product of hydration. Assessment of hydration and calcium ion leaching is usually performed on samples that have been aged in physiological solution for a predetermined period of time. The hydration and activity of the materials in vivo may not be similar to those displayed in vitro because of insufficient fluid available in contact with dentin. The aim of this research was the assessment of hydration of Biodentine, Theracal LC, and a prototype radiopacified tricalcium silicate-based material after pulp capping and to compare it with direct hydration in an aqueous solution. The extent of hydration of Biodentine, Theracal LC, and a prototype radiopacified tricalcium silicate-based material with a similar composition to Biodentine but not incorporating the additives was assessed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy of polished specimens after being allowed to hydrate in Hank's balanced salt solution for 14 days. The extent of hydration was compared with material hydration when used as direct pulp capping materials by using a tooth culture model. Material activity was also assessed by x-ray diffraction analysis to investigate the deposition of calcium hydroxide by the materials, and calcium ion leaching in Hank's balanced salt solution was assessed by ion chromatography. Biodentine and the prototype tricalcium silicate cement hydrated and reaction by-products were deposited in the cement matrix both after pulp capping and when incubated in an aqueous solution. Calcium hydroxide was formed, and calcium ions were leached in solution. Theracal LC hydration was incomplete because of the limited moisture diffusion within the material. Thus, no calcium hydroxide was produced, and a lower calcium ion leaching was recorded. Theracal LC had a heterogeneous structure with large unhydrated

  6. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  7. Improved reliability of the urine lactate concentration under controlled hydration after maximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, Stefanos; Kosmidis, Ioannis; Koulidou, Triantafullia; Panagakis, Sotiris; Tsalis, George; Loupos, Dimitris; Mougios, Vassilis

    2017-11-01

    Urine lactate may be a novel biomarker of lactate production capacity but its reliability has been unsatisfactory so far. To compare the reliability of urine lactate between controlled hydration and no hydration after maximal exercise. Athletes performed swimming exercise four times: two followed by consumption of 1 L of water and two followed by no water intake. Blood and urine lactate was measured. The reliability of urine lactate was good and similar to that in blood only after controlled hydration. Blood and urine lactate were correlated under both hydration conditions. Controlled hydration after exercise provides satisfactory reliability of urine lactate.

  8. A prediction method of natural gas hydrate formation in deepwater gas well and its application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Guo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To prevent the deposition of natural gas hydrate in deepwater gas well, the hydrate formation area in wellbore must be predicted. Herein, by comparing four prediction methods of temperature in pipe with field data and comparing five prediction methods of hydrate formation with experiment data, a method based on OLGA & PVTsim for predicting the hydrate formation area in wellbore was proposed. Meanwhile, The hydrate formation under the conditions of steady production, throttling and shut-in was predicted by using this method based on a well data in the South China Sea. The results indicate that the hydrate formation area decreases with the increase of gas production, inhibitor concentrations and the thickness of insulation materials and increases with the increase of thermal conductivity of insulation materials and shutdown time. Throttling effect causes a plunge in temperature and pressure in wellbore, thus leading to an increase of hydrate formation area.

  9. MORPHOLOGY OF METHANE HYDRATE HOST SEDIMENTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JONES,K.W.; FENG,H.; TOMOV,S.; WINTER,W.J.; EATON,M.; MAHAJAN,D.

    2004-12-01

    Results from simulated experiments in several laboratories show that host sediments influence hydrate formation in accord with known heterogeneity of host sediments at sites of gas hydrate occurrence (1). For example, in Mackenzie Delta, NWT Canada (Mallik 2L-38 well), coarser-grained units (pore-filling model) are found whereas in the Gulf of Mexico, the found hydrate samples do not appear to be lithologically controlled. We have initiated a systematic study of sediments, initially focusing on samples from various depths at a specific site, to establish a correlation with hydrate occurrence (or variations thereof) to establish differences in their microstructure, porosity, and other associated properties. The synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) set-up at the X-27A tomography beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory was used as a tool to study sediments from Blake Ridge at three sub bottom depths of 0.2, 50, and 667 meters. Results from the tomographic analysis of the deepest sample (667 m) are presented here to illustrate how tomography can be used to obtain new insights into the structures of methane hydrate host sediments. The investigation shows the internal grain/pore space resolution in the microstructure and a 3-D visualization of the connecting pathways obtained following data segmentation into pore space and grains within the sediment sample. The analysis gives the sample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity, as well. An earlier report on the experimental program has been given by Mahajan et al. (2).

  10. Comparative Analysis of Measles Morbidigf and Mortalityin Calabar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative Analysis of Measles Morbidigf and. Mortalityin Calabar during the Eaqaanded Programme. ' on Immunization and the National Programme on. Immunization Eras. IS Etuk*, EE Ekanem'h", JJ Udo*. Summary. Etuk IS, Ekanem EE, UdoJJ. Comparative Analysis of Measles Morbidity and Mortality in Calabar ...

  11. Taxation and Gender Equity : A Comparative Analysis of Direct and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    10 juin 2010 ... Taxation and Gender Equity : A Comparative Analysis of Direct and Indirect Taxes in Developing and Developed Countries. Couverture du livre Taxation and Gender Equity : A Comparative Analysis of Direct and Indirect Taxes. Directeur(s) : Caren Grown et Imraan Valodia. Maison(s) d'édition : Routledge ...

  12. Reshaping Health Care in Latin America: A Comparative Analysis of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2000-01-01

    Reshaping Health Care in Latin America: A Comparative Analysis of Health Care Reform in Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico. Book cover Reshaping Health Care in Latin America: A Comparative Analysis of Health Care Reform. Editor(s):. Sonia Fleury, Susana Belmartino, and Enis Baris. Publisher(s):. IDRC. January 1, 2000.

  13. Comparison of rescue techniques for failed chloral hydrate sedation for magnetic resonance imaging scans--additional chloral hydrate vs intranasal dexmedetomidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenhua; Wang, Zixin; Song, Xingrong; Fan, Yanting; Tian, Hang; Li, Bilian

    2016-03-01

    Chloral hydrate, a commonly used sedative in children during noninvasive diagnostic procedures, is associated with side effects like prolonged sedation, paradoxical excitement, delirium, and unpleasant taste. Dexmedetomidine, a highly selective α-2 agonist, has better pharmacokinetic properties than chloral hydrate. We conducted this prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial to evaluate efficacy of intranasal dexmedetomidine with that of a second oral dose of chloral hydrate for rescue sedation during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in infants. One hundred and fifty infants (age group: 1-6 months), who were not adequately sedated after initial oral dose of 50 mg · kg(-1) chloral hydrate, were randomly divided into three groups with the following protocol for each group. Group C: second oral dose chloral hydrate 25 mg · kg(-1); Group L and Group H: intranasal dexmedetomidine in a dosage of 1 and 2 mcg · kg(-1), respectively. Status of sedation, induction time, time to wake up, vital signs, oxygen saturation, and recovery characteristics were recorded. Successful rescue sedation in Groups C, L, and H were achieved in 40 (80%), 47 (94%), and 49 (98%) of infants, respectively, on an intention to treat analysis, and the proportion of infants successfully sedated in Group H was more than that of Group L (P ˂ 0.01). There were no significant differences in sedation induction time; however, the time to wake up was significantly shorter in Group L as compared to that in Group C or H (P < 0.01). No significant adverse hemodynamic or hypoxemic effects were observed in the study. Intranasal dexmedetomidine induced satisfactory rescue sedation in 1- to 6-month-old infants during MRI study, and appears to cause sedation in a dose-dependent manner. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS BETWEEN THE FUNDAMENTAL AND TECHNICAL ANALYSIS OF STOCKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Petrusheva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the world of investing and trading, in order to have a definite advantage and constantly create profit, you need to have a strategic approach. Generally speaking, the two main schools of thought and strategies in financial markets are fundamental and technical analysis. Fundamental and technical analysis differ in several aspects, such as the way of functioning and execution, the time horizon used, the tools used and their objective. These differences lead to certain advantages and disadvantages of each of the analyses. Fundamental and technical analysis are also a subject of critical reviews by the academic and scientific community and many of these reviews concern the methods of their application, i.e. the possibility of combining the two analyses and using them complementarily to fully utilize their strengths and advantages.

  15. Dipolar response of hydrated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2012-02-28

    The paper presents an analytical theory and numerical simulations of the dipolar response of hydrated proteins in solution. We calculate the effective dielectric constant representing the average dipole moment induced at the protein by a uniform external field. The dielectric constant shows a remarkable variation among the proteins, changing from 0.5 for ubiquitin to 640 for cytochrome c. The former value implies a negative dipolar susceptibility, that is a dia-electric dipolar response and negative dielectrophoresis. It means that ubiquitin, carrying an average dipole of ≃240 D, is expected to repel from the region of a stronger electric field. This outcome is the result of a negative cross-correlation between the protein and water dipoles, compensating for the positive variance of the intrinsic protein dipole in the overall dipolar susceptibility. In contrast to the neutral ubiquitin, charged proteins studied here show para-electric dipolar response and positive dielectrophoresis. The study suggests that the dipolar response of proteins in solution is strongly affected by the coupling of the protein surface charge to the hydration water. The protein-water dipolar cross-correlations are long-ranged, extending ~2 nm from the protein surface into the bulk. A similar correlation length of about 1 nm is seen for the electrostatic potential produced by the hydration water inside the protein. The analysis of numerical simulations suggests that the polarization of the protein-water interface is highly heterogeneous and does not follow the standard dielectric results for cavities carved in dielectrics. The polarization of the water shell gains in importance, relative to the intrinsic protein dipole, at high frequencies, above the protein Debye peak. The induced interfacial dipole can be either parallel or antiparallel to the protein dipole, depending on the distribution of the protein surface charge. As a result, the high-frequency absorption of the protein solution can

  16. comparative analysis of the growth performance and haemolymph

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Osondu

    4 No.2 2011. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE GROWTH PERFORMANCE AND HAEMOLYMPH .... Statistical Analysis. Data collected from the experiments were analyzed by one way analysis of variance. (ANOVA) and student- Newman kuel's test was used for the ... bigger and grow faster than albino snails. The lack of.

  17. Measuring populism: comparing two methods of content analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooduijn, M.; Pauwels, T.

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of populism - particularly over time and space - has received only scarce attention. In this research note two different ways to measure populism are compared: a classical content analysis and a computer-based content analysis. An analysis of political parties in the United Kingdom,

  18. The effect of hydrate formation on the elastic properties of unconsolidated sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydzy, Marisa B.

    Natural gas hydrates exist in unconsolidated marine or permafrost sediments and can adopt many morphologies. In this study, the effect of hydrate formation on the wave velocities of unconsolidated sediment was investigated in a series of laboratory studies, with particular focus on the extent to which the initial water saturation controls the manner in which hydrate is distributed, and thus the extent to which hydrate formation increases the wave velocity in sands. Ultrasonic p- and s-wave velocities (vp, vs) were measured in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in hydrate-bearing Ottawa Sand F110 during hydrate formation and dissociation. vp and vs were determined as functions of gas hydrate saturation (Sh). Hydrates were formed out of solution using tetrahydrofuran (THF) and through CH 4 injection into partially water-saturated samples. For the latter, samples with low and high initial water saturation (Swi) were tested. The recorded velocities exhibited a noticeable dependence on Swi. At low Swi (~20%) the hydrate stiffened the sediment and increased the ultrasonic velocities dramatically. Comparing measured velocities to those calculated with existing rock physics models links the initial water saturation, which determines the gas-water distribution in the sediment and hence the location of initial hydrate formation, to the evolution of wave velocity during hydrate formation. We concluded that at low Swi, the water is evenly distributed and located at the grain contacts. The resulting hydrate cements the grains, dramatically increasing the wave velocities even at low hydrate saturations. To test the dependence of the initial water distribution on the initial water saturation, micro X-ray CT images were also acquired of partially saturated glass-bead packs without hydrate but with varying amounts of water. At low water saturations, water occurred as bridges between adjacent glass beads or was located at the glass-bead contacts. At high water

  19. Effects of ensembles on methane hydrate nucleation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengcai; Liu, Chan-Juan; Walsh, Matthew R; Guo, Guang-Jun

    2016-06-21

    By performing molecular dynamics simulations to form a hydrate with a methane nano-bubble in liquid water at 250 K and 50 MPa, we report how different ensembles, such as the NPT, NVT, and NVE ensembles, affect the nucleation kinetics of the methane hydrate. The nucleation trajectories are monitored using the face-saturated incomplete cage analysis (FSICA) and the mutually coordinated guest (MCG) order parameter (OP). The nucleation rate and the critical nucleus are obtained using the mean first-passage time (MFPT) method based on the FS cages and the MCG-1 OPs, respectively. The fitting results of MFPT show that hydrate nucleation and growth are coupled together, consistent with the cage adsorption hypothesis which emphasizes that the cage adsorption of methane is a mechanism for both hydrate nucleation and growth. For the three different ensembles, the hydrate nucleation rate is quantitatively ordered as follows: NPT > NVT > NVE, while the sequence of hydrate crystallinity is exactly reversed. However, the largest size of the critical nucleus appears in the NVT ensemble, rather than in the NVE ensemble. These results are helpful for choosing a suitable ensemble when to study hydrate formation via computer simulations, and emphasize the importance of the order degree of the critical nucleus.

  20. Application of the independent molecule model to elucidate the dynamics of structure I methane hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioki, Shuzo

    2007-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy has exhibited the C-H stretch (A1 mode) frequency nu1 of hydrated methanes at 2915 cm(-1) for the 5(12) cage and 2905 cm(-1) for the 5(12)6(2) cage. These values are lower than the frequency of 2916.5 cm(-1) in gaseous methane. In this paper, we theoretically examine the Raman spectra observed in methane hydrate by normal mode analysis using the independent molecule model. By a breakdown of the symmetry, the four frequencies in modes A1, E, T2 and T2 observed in gaseous methane are separated into nine frequencies in the hydrate. It is necessary to consider the anharmonic potential energy within methane and hydrogen bonding between methane hydrogen and water oxygen in order to get a result in qualitative agreement with experiment. The frequency in the 5(12)6(2) cage is shifted downward in comparison to the one in 5(12), and the frequencies in the both cages are also shifted downward compared with the frequencies in gas. Calculations are also reported for the isotopic methane (CD4, 13CH4) hydrates.

  1. Diurnally-Varying Lunar Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, A. R.; Hurley, D.; Retherford, K. D.; Mandt, K.; Greathouse, T. K.; Farrell, W. M.; Vilas, F.

    2016-12-01

    Dayside, non-polar lunar hydration signatures have been observed by a handful of instruments and present insights into the lunar water cycle. In this study, we utilize the unique measurements from the current Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission to study the phenomenon of diurnally-varying dayside lunar hydration. The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) onboard LRO senses a strong far-ultraviolet water absorption edge indicating hydration in small abundances in the permanently shadowed regions as well as on the lunar dayside. We report on diurnal variability in hydration in different terrain types. We investigate the importance of different sources of hydration, including solar wind bombardment and meteoroid bombardment, by observing trends during magnetotail and meteor stream crossings.

  2. Flow assurance intervention, hydrates remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Christopher S. [Oceaneering International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the issues of removing hydrates in sub sea flow lines and associated equipment with an Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) of opportunity and a multi-service-vessel (MSV). The paper is split into three topics: the equipment used with the ROV, assessing the interface points and handling fluids produced from drawing down the pressure. Each section is explained thoroughly and backed up with real world experience. The equipment section details information from actual jobs performed and why the particular components were utilized. The system is generally contained in an ROV mounted skid. Pumps are utilized to draw down the pressure inside the hydrated section of equipment, removing one of the three necessary components for hydrates formation. Once the section is pumped down, several options exist for handling the fluids pumped out of the system: pumping to surface, re-injection into the well, or injection into an operating flow line. This method of hydrates remediation is both economical and timely. Hydrate blockages form in low temperatures and high pressures. Reducing the pressure or increasing the temperature so the conditions lie to the right of the hydrate dissociation curve will slowly decompose the blockage. Depressurization and the use of MEG or methanol will give favorable conditions to remove the hydrate plug. Oceaneering has the capabilities to remove hydrates using the FRS in conjunction with an installation vessel to dispose of the gas and fluid removed from the flow line. Hydrate remediation techniques should be implemented into the initial design to reduce costs later. The cost of stopped production combined with the day rate for equipment needed for hydrate removal outweighs the costs if no technique is utilized. (author)

  3. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  4. Molecular modeling of the dissociation of methane hydrate in contact with a silica surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherzadeh, S Alireza; Englezos, Peter; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A

    2012-03-15

    We use constant energy, constant volume (NVE) molecular dynamics simulations to study the dissociation of the fully occupied structure I methane hydrate in a confined geometry between two hydroxylated silica surfaces between 36 and 41 Å apart, at initial temperatures of 283, 293, and 303 K. Simulations of the two-phase hydrate/water system are performed in the presence of silica, with and without a 3 Å thick buffering water layer between the hydrate phase and silica surfaces. Faster decomposition is observed in the presence of silica, where the hydrate phase is prone to decomposition from four surfaces, as compared to only two sides in the case of the hydrate/water simulations. The existence of the water layer between the hydrate phase and the silica surface stabilizes the hydrate phase relative to the case where the hydrate is in direct contact with silica. Hydrates bound between the silica surfaces dissociate layer-by-layer in a shrinking core manner with a curved decomposition front which extends over a 5-8 Å thickness. Labeling water molecules shows that there is exchange of water molecules between the surrounding liquid and intact cages in the methane hydrate phase. In all cases, decomposition of the methane hydrate phase led to the formation of methane nanobubbles in the liquid water phase. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  5. Gas hydrate saturation from acoustic impedance and resistivity logs in the shenhu area, south china sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Wu, S.; Lee, M.; Guo, Y.; Yang, S.; Liang, J.

    2011-01-01

    During the China's first gas hydrate drilling expedition -1 (GMGS-1), gas hydrate was discovered in layers ranging from 10 to 25 m above the base of gas hydrate stability zone in the Shenhu area, South China Sea. Water chemistry, electrical resistivity logs, and acoustic impedance were used to estimate gas hydrate saturations. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the chloride concentrations range from 0 to 43% of the pore space. The higher gas hydrate saturations were present in the depth from 152 to 177 m at site SH7 and from 190 to 225 m at site SH2, respectively. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from the resistivity using Archie equation have similar trends to those from chloride concentrations. To examine the variability of gas hydrate saturations away from the wells, acoustic impedances calculated from the 3 D seismic data using constrained sparse inversion method were used. Well logs acquired at site SH7 were incorporated into the inversion by establishing a relation between the water-filled porosity, calculated using gas hydrate saturations estimated from the resistivity logs, and the acoustic impedance, calculated from density and velocity logs. Gas hydrate saturations estimated from acoustic impedance of seismic data are ???10-23% of the pore space and are comparable to those estimated from the well logs. The uncertainties in estimated gas hydrate saturations from seismic acoustic impedances were mainly from uncertainties associated with inverted acoustic impedance, the empirical relation between the water-filled porosities and acoustic impedances, and assumed background resistivity. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Monitoring membrane hydration with 2-(dimethylamino)-6-acylnaphtalenes fluorescent probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2015-01-01

    of LAURDAN and PRODAN are exquisitely sensitive to cholesterol effects, allowing interpretations that correlate changes in membrane packing with membrane hydration. Different membrane model systems as well as innate biological membranes have been studied with this family of probes allowing interesting...... comparative studies. This chapter presents a short historical overview about these fluorescent reporters, discusses on different models proposed to explain their sensitivity to membrane hydration, and includes relevant examples from experiments performed in artificial and biological membranes....

  7. A comparative study between release analysis and column flotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge Pineres; Juan Barraza [Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia)

    2007-07-01

    This paper shows the results of a comparative study between release analysis and column flotation of three Colombian coals: Guachinte (South West), Cerrejon (North) and Nech (Midlands). Analysis release was used in order to evaluate the coal potential cleaning in terms of both low ash and high organic recovery of froth. Results from release analysis were compared with those from a column flotation and showed that the froth from Nechi coal had the highest recovery and the lowest ash, followed by Cerrejon and then by Guachinte. Results of release analysis were in agreement with the column flotation. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  9. Shifting Focus: From Hydration for Performance to Hydration for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Erica T

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, literature on hydration biomarkers has evolved considerably - from (de)hydration assessment towards a more global definition of biomarkers of hydration in daily life. This shift in thinking about hydration markers was largely driven by investigating the differences that existed between otherwise healthy individuals whose habitual, ad-libitum drinking habits differ, and by identifying physiological changes in low-volume drinkers who subsequently increase their water intake. Aside from obvious differences in urinary volume and concentration, a growing body of evidence is emerging that links differences in fluid intake with small, but biologically significant, differences in vasopressin (copeptin), glomerular filtration rate, and markers of metabolic dysfunction or disease. Taken together, these pieces of the puzzle begin to form a picture of how much water intake should be considered adequate for health, and represent a shifting focus from hydration for performance, toward hydration for health outcomes. This narrative review outlines the key areas of research in which the global hydration process - including water intake, urinary hydration markers, and vasopressin - has been associated with health outcomes, focusing on kidney and metabolic endpoints. It will also provide a commentary on how various hydration biomarkers may be used in hydration for health assessment. Finally, if adequate water intake can play a role in maintaining health, how might we tell if we are drinking enough? Urine output is easily measured, and can take into account differences in daily physical activity, climate, dietary solute load, and other factors that influence daily water needs. Today, targets have been proposed for urine osmolality, specific gravity, and color that may be used by researchers, clinicians, and individuals as simple indicators of optimal hydration. However, there remain a large number of incomplete or unanswered research questions regarding the

  10. Comparative Analysis of Kernel Methods for Statistical Shape Learning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rathi, Yogesh; Dambreville, Samuel; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2006-01-01

    .... In this work, we perform a comparative analysis of shape learning techniques such as linear PCA, kernel PCA, locally linear embedding and propose a new method, kernelized locally linear embedding...

  11. Comparative analysis of myocardial revascularization methods for ischemic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinkeev M.S.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The review of literature is devoted to the comparative analysis of clinical researches of efficiency and frequency of complications after application of surgical and medicamentous methods of treatment of coronary heart disease.

  12. Functional and comparative analysis of expressed sequences from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Functional and comparative analysis of expressed sequences from Diuraphis noxia infested wheat obtained utilizing the conserved Nucleotide Binding Site. Lynelle Lacock, Chantal van Niekerk, Shilo Loots, Franco du Preez, Anna-Maria Botha ...

  13. A comparative analysis of the characteristics of the wines produced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative analysis of the characteristics of the wines produced from the fruit juices of vitis vinifera (Grapevine), Citrus sinensis sweet orange) and Ananos comosus (pineapple)using pure cultured brewer's yeast.

  14. Bluetooth security attacks comparative analysis, attacks, and countermeasures

    CERN Document Server

    Haataja, Keijo; Pasanen, Sanna; Toivanen, Pekka

    2013-01-01

    This overview of Bluetooth security examines network vulnerabilities and offers a comparative analysis of recent security attacks. It also examines related countermeasures and proposes a novel attack that works against all existing Bluetooth versions.

  15. Analogy of ISSR and RAPD markers for comparative analysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analogy of ISSR and RAPD markers for comparative analysis of genetic diversity among different Jatropha curcas genotypes. S Gupta, M Srivastava, GP Mishra, PK Naik, RS Chauhan, SK Tiwari, M Kumar, R Singh ...

  16. The temperature hydration kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Oroian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the hydration kinetics of lentil seeds (Lens culinaris in water at different temperatures (25, 32.5, 40, 55, 70 and 80 °C for assessing the adequacy of models for describing the absorption phenomena during soaking. The diffusion coefficient values were calculated using Fick’s model for spherical and hemispherical geometries and the values were in the range of 10−6 m2/s. The experimental data were fitted to Peleg, Sigmoidal, Weibull and Exponential models. The models adequacy was determined using regression coefficients (R2, root mean square error (RMSE and reduced chi-square (χ2. The Peleg model is the suitable one for predicting the experimental data. Temperature had a positive and significant effect on the water absorption capacities and absorption was an endothermic process.

  17. Phase Equilibria of H2SO4, HNO3, and HCl Hydrates and the Composition of Polar Stratospheric Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Paul J.; Zhang, Renyi; Molina, Mario J.

    1995-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties and phase equilibria behavior for the hydrates and coexisting pairs of hydrates of common acids which exist in the stratosphere are assembled from new laboratory measurements and standard literature data. The analysis focuses upon solid-vapor and solid-solid-vapor equilibria at temperatures around 200 K and includes new calorimetric and vapor pressure data. Calculated partial pressures versus 1/T slopes for the hydrates and coexisting hydrates agree well with experimental data where available.

  18. A comparative analysis of watershed and edge based segmentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJP

    2015-03-17

    Mar 17, 2015 ... Background: Useful information which is helpful in the diagnosis of various disorders is obtained from the analysis of individual blood cells. Aim: To perform a comparative analysis between edge-based segmentation and watershed segmentation on images of the red blood cells. Method: The images.

  19. Comparative Analysis of Termiteria and Surrounding Soil Properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative Analysis of Termiteria and Surrounding Soil Properties in the University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Nigeria. IS Eneji, R Sha'Ato, SE Ejembi. Abstract. Variations in the properties of termitaria and their surrounding soil properties within the University of Agriculture Makurdi were investigated using routine soil analysis ...

  20. A comparative analysis of watershed and edge based segmentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Useful information which is helpful in the diagnosis of various disorders is obtained from the analysis of individual blood cells. Aim: To perform a comparative analysis between edge-based segmentation and watershed segmentation on images of the red blood cells. Method: The images to be used for the ...

  1. A Comparative Analysis of Fuzzy Inference Engines in Context of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fuzzy inference engine has found successful applications in a wide variety of fields, such as automatic control, data classification, decision analysis, expert engines, time series prediction, robotics, pattern recognition, etc. This paper presents a comparative analysis of three fuzzy inference engines, max-product, max-min ...

  2. The Constant Comparative Analysis Method Outside of Grounded Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Sheila M.

    2013-01-01

    This commentary addresses the gap in the literature regarding discussion of the legitimate use of Constant Comparative Analysis Method (CCA) outside of Grounded Theory. The purpose is to show the strength of using CCA to maintain the emic perspective and how theoretical frameworks can maintain the etic perspective throughout the analysis. My…

  3. Comparative analysis and relationships of six important crop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using informatics tools to compare important species is now feasible as structural genomics continue in importance and establishment of structure-function relationships become a common way of comparative analysis. Currently, many of the technical issues involved in sequencing complete genomes have been solved.

  4. A Comparative Analysis of Charter Schools and Traditional Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jodi Renee Abbott

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this descriptive research study was to compare charter and traditional public schools on the academic knowledge of fifth grade students as measured by Arizona's Instrument to Measure Standards (AIMS) in a suburb of a large southwestern city. This analysis also compared charter and traditional public schools on AYP status. It was…

  5. Customer service on the Czech mobile telecommunication market. Comparative Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hanzlík, Radek

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis is to compare the quality of customer service between the Mobile Network Operators (MNOs) and Mobile Virtual Network Operators (MVNOs) on the Czech mobile telecommunication market. The mystery shopping method is used as the source of data for the comparative analysis.

  6. comparative cost and strength analysis of cement and aggregate

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-07-02

    Jul 2, 2012 ... Abstract. This research presents a comparative cost and strength analysis of cement and aggregate replace- ment materials which is aimed at reducing the cost of concrete production. Tests were performed to compare the strength and cost of seven various cement replacement materials(rice husk ash,.

  7. Comparative Cost and Strength Analysis of Cement and Aggregate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research presents a comparative cost and strength analysis of cement and aggregate replacement materials which is aimed at reducing the cost of concrete production. Tests were performed to compare the strength and cost of seven various cement replacement materials(rice husk ash, groundnut husk ash, palm oil ...

  8. Historical methane hydrate project review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Frye, Matt; Goldberg, Dave; Husebo, Jarle; Koh, Carolyn; Malone, Mitch; Shipp, Craig; Torres, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In 1995, U.S. Geological Survey made the first systematic assessment of the volume of natural gas stored in the hydrate accumulations of the United States. That study, along with numerous other studies, has shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world greatly exceeds the volume of known conventional gas resources. However, gas hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of gas hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various gas hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural gas hydrates, and (5) analyzing the effects of methane hydrate on drilling safety.Methane hydrates are naturally occurring crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid water-­‐lattice holds gas molecules in a cage-­‐like structure. The gas and water becomes a solid under specific temperature and pressure conditions within the Earth, called the hydrate stability zone. Other factors that control the presence of methane hydrate in nature include the source of the gas included within the hydrates, the physical and chemical controls on the migration of gas with a sedimentary basin containing methane hydrates, the availability of the water also included in the hydrate structure, and the presence of a suitable host sediment or “reservoir”. The geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrates have become collectively known as the “methane hydrate petroleum system”, which has become the focus of numerous hydrate research programs.Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated

  9. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF CELEBRITY AND NON-CELEBRITY ADVERTISEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Ammar Asad; Muhammad Naseem Hayat; Shafaqat Mehmood

    2013-01-01

    This study is undertaken to make a comparative analysis of celebrity advertisement and non-celebrity advertisement with respect to attitude toward advertisement, attitude toward brand, purchase intentions, and advertising attributes. For this purpose, a simple random sample of 200 students studying four different disciplines was taken from the Private University in Lahore. For econometric proof, reliability analysis, descriptive analysis, and independent sample T-test was used to interpret th...

  10. [Key technologies in image analysis of comparative genomic hybridization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, J; Ji, L; Wang, M

    2001-12-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization has become a new technique in molecular-cytogenetics, and it has found significant applications in tumor pathology. Image analysis is an important part of comparative genomic hybridization. It analyzes the fluorescent images by many steps and finally determines whether there is any abnormality in the copy number of the test tumor tissue. This paper expatiates on the key steps in the image analysis of comparative genomic hybridization, including background correction, chromosome segmentation, chromosome axis determination, karyotyping and determining ratio profile. The future trend is also discussed.

  11. Effects of hydration on blood rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, George A; Tangney, Christine C; Rosenson, Robert S

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of oral fluid intake on blood rheology of 17 healthy adults following a 12-14 hour overnight fast from food and drink. An oral fluid load of 500 ml was consumed every 30 minutes for 2 hours. Blood viscosity values at shear rates of 1, 10 and 100 s(-1) were reduced (p<0.05 to p<0.01) at 30 and 120 minutes following hydration; however, these differences were not significant after hematocrit correction. With fluid intake, both uncorrected and corrected viscous component of blood viscoelasticity at oscillatory shear rate of 1 s(-1) and at a constant frequency of 2 Hz were reduced (p<0.05 to p<0.001) at all time points as compared to fasting values. The corrected elastic component of blood viscoelasticity increased 90 minutes after hydration (p<0.05). An overnight fast is accompanied by rheological abnormalities that are altered by fluid intake.

  12. Experimental techniques for cement hydration studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Luttge

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cement hydration kinetics is a complex problem of dissolution, nucleation and growth that is still not well understood, particularly in a quantitative way. While cement systems are unique in certain aspects they are also comparable to natural mineral systems. Therefore, geochemistry and particularly the study of mineral dissolution and growth may be able to provide insight and methods that can be utilized in cement hydration research. Here, we review mainly what is not known or what is currently used and applied in a problematic way. Examples are the typical Avrami approach, the application of Transition State Theory (TST to overall reaction kinetics and the problem of reactive surface area. Finally, we suggest an integrated approach that combines vertical scanning interferometry (VSI with other sophisticated analytical techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM and theoretical model calculations based on a stochastic treatment.

  13. Proton affinities of hydrated molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadbeigi, Younes

    2016-09-01

    Proton affinities (PA) of non-hydrated, M, and hydrated forms, M(H2O)1,2,3, of 20 organic molecules including alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones and amines were calculated by the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. For homogeneous families, linear correlations were observed between PAs of the M(H2O)1,2,3 and the PAs of the non-hydrated molecules. Also, the absolute values of the hydration enthalpies of the protonated molecules decreased linearly with the PAs. The correlation functions predicted that for an amine with PA amine with PA > 1100 kJ/mol the PA(M(H2O)) is smaller than the PA.

  14. Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moridis, G.J.; Collett, T.S.; Pooladi-Darvish, M.; Hancock, S.; Santamarina, C.; Boswell, R.; Kneafsey, T.; Rutqvist, J.; Kowalsky, M.; Reagan, M.T.; Sloan, E.D.; Sum, A.K.; Koh, C.

    2010-11-01

    The current paper complements the Moridis et al. (2009) review of the status of the effort toward commercial gas production from hydrates. We aim to describe the concept of the gas hydrate petroleum system, to discuss advances, requirement and suggested practices in gas hydrate (GH) prospecting and GH deposit characterization, and to review the associated technical, economic and environmental challenges and uncertainties, including: the accurate assessment of producible fractions of the GH resource, the development of methodologies for identifying suitable production targets, the sampling of hydrate-bearing sediments and sample analysis, the analysis and interpretation of geophysical surveys of GH reservoirs, well testing methods and interpretation of the results, geomechanical and reservoir/well stability concerns, well design, operation and installation, field operations and extending production beyond sand-dominated GH reservoirs, monitoring production and geomechanical stability, laboratory investigations, fundamental knowledge of hydrate behavior, the economics of commercial gas production from hydrates, and the associated environmental concerns.

  15. Hydration in soccer: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo; Guerra Isabela; Barros Turíbio Leite de

    2003-01-01

    Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. Th...

  16. Low-δD hydration rinds in Yellowstone perlites record rapid syneruptive hydration during glacial and interglacial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, Ilya N.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2016-01-01

    Hydration of silicic volcanic glass forms perlite, a dusky, porous form of altered glass characterized by abundant “onion-skin” fractures. The timing and temperature of perlite formation are enigmatic and could plausibly occur during eruption, during post-eruptive cooling, or much later at ambient temperatures. To learn more about the origin of natural perlite, and to fingerprint the hydration waters, we investigated perlitic glass from several synglacial and interglacial rhyolitic lavas and tuffs from the Yellowstone volcanic system. Perlitic cores are surrounded by a series of conchoidal cracks that separate 30- to 100-µm-thick slivers, likely formed in response to hydration-induced stress. H2O and D/H profiles confirm that most D/H exchange happens together with rapid H2O addition but some smoother D/H variations may suggest separate minor exchange by deuterium atom interdiffusion following hydration. The hydrated rinds (2–3 wt% H2O) transition rapidly (within 30 µm, or by 1 wt% H2O per 10 µm) to unhydrated glass cores. This is consistent with quenched “hydration fronts” where H2O diffusion coefficients are strongly dependent on H2O concentrations. The chemical, δ18O, and δD systematics of bulk glass records last equilibrium between ~110 and 60 °C without chemical exchange but with some δ18O exchange. Similarly, the δ18O of water extracted from glass by rapid heating suggests that water was added to the glass during cooling at hydration at temperatures as low as 60 °C; prolonged exposure to high temperature of 175°–225° during water addition is less likely as the glass would lose alkalies and should alter to clays within days. A compilation of low-temperature hydration diffusion coefficients suggests ~2 orders of magnitude higher rates of diffusion at 60–110 °C temperatures, compared with values expected from extrapolation of high-temperature (>400 °C) experimental data. The thick hydration rinds in perlites, measuring

  17. Comparative analysis of genomic signal processing for microarray data clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istepanian, Robert S H; Sungoor, Ala; Nebel, Jean-Christophe

    2011-12-01

    Genomic signal processing is a new area of research that combines advanced digital signal processing methodologies for enhanced genetic data analysis. It has many promising applications in bioinformatics and next generation of healthcare systems, in particular, in the field of microarray data clustering. In this paper we present a comparative performance analysis of enhanced digital spectral analysis methods for robust clustering of gene expression across multiple microarray data samples. Three digital signal processing methods: linear predictive coding, wavelet decomposition, and fractal dimension are studied to provide a comparative evaluation of the clustering performance of these methods on several microarray datasets. The results of this study show that the fractal approach provides the best clustering accuracy compared to other digital signal processing and well known statistical methods.

  18. Structural, dynamical, and transport properties of the hydrated halides: How do At{sup −} bulk properties compare with those of the other halides, from F{sup −} to I{sup −}?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Réal, Florent, E-mail: florent.real@univ-lille1.fr; Severo Pereira Gomes, André; Guerrero Martínez, Yansel Omar; Vallet, Valérie [Université de Lille, CNRS, UMR 8523–PhLAM–Physique des Lasers Atomes et Molécules, F-59000 Lille (France); Ayed, Tahra; Galland, Nicolas [CEISAM UMR CNRS 6230, Université de Nantes, 2 Rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208 F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Masella, Michel [Laboratoire de Biologie Structurale et Radiobiologie, Service de Bioénergétique, Biologie Structurale et Mécanismes, Institut de Biologie et de Technologies de Saclay, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2016-03-28

    The properties of halides from the lightest, fluoride (F{sup −}), to the heaviest, astatide (At{sup −}), have been studied in water using a polarizable force-field approach based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at the 10 ns scale. The selected force-field explicitly treats the cooperativity within the halide-water hydrogen bond networks. The force-field parameters have been adjusted to ab initio data on anion/water clusters computed at the relativistic Möller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory level of theory. The anion static polarizabilities of the two heaviest halides, I{sup −} and At{sup −}, were computed in the gas phase using large and diffuse atomic basis sets, and taking into account both electron correlation and spin-orbit coupling within a four-component framework. Our MD simulation results show the solvation properties of I{sup −} and At{sup −} in aqueous phase to be very close. For instance, their first hydration shells are structured and encompass 9.2 and 9.1 water molecules at about 3.70 ± 0.05 Å, respectively. These values have to be compared to the F{sup −}, Cl{sup −}, and Br{sup −} ones, i.e., 6.3, 8.4, and 9.0 water molecules at 2.74, 3.38, and 3.55 Å, respectively. Moreover our computations predict the solvation free energy of At{sup −} in liquid water at ambient conditions to be 68 kcal mol{sup −1}, a value also close the I{sup −} one, about 70 kcal mol{sup −1}. In all, our simulation results for I{sup −} are in excellent agreement with the latest neutron- and X-ray diffraction studies. Those for the At{sup −} ion are predictive, as no theoretical or experimental data are available to date.

  19. Hydration status and fluid intake of urban, underprivileged South African male adolescent soccer players during training

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Reno Eron; Kassier, Susanna Maria; Biggs, Chara

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor hydration compromises performance and heightens the risk of heat stress which adolescents are particularly susceptible to as they produce comparatively larger amount of metabolic heat during exercise. This study determined the hydration status and fluid intake of socio-economically disadvantaged, male adolescent soccer players during training. Methods A pilot study was conducted among 79 soccer players (mean age 15.9???0.8?years; mean BMI 20.2???2.1?kg/m2). Hydration status wa...

  20. Isotopic fractionation of guest gas at the formation of methane and ethane hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachikubo, A.; Ozeki, T.; Kosaka, T.; Sakagami, H.; Minami, H.; Nunokawa, Y.; Takahashi, N.; Shoji, H. [Kitami Inst. of Technology, Kitami (Japan); Kida, M. [Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Sapporo (Japan); Krylov, A. [All-Russia Inst. for Geology and Mineral Resources of the Ocean, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    Gas fractionation can occur between light and heavy guest molecules when equilibrium pressures in the hydrates differ. This study investigated the effect of temperature on the isotopic fractionation of gas molecules during the formation of synthetic methane-ethane gas hydrates prepared in a pressurized cell. The experiments were conducted in a temperature ranging between 223.2 and 278.2 K. The study showed that methane and ethane values in the hydrate phase were smaller than those observed in the gas phase, and that heavy molecules were more unstable within the hydrate. The isotopic composition of the residual and hydrate-bonded gases were also measured and compared. Results showed that the hydrate-bound molecules of the hydrates were lower than those observed in the residual gas during the formation process. Isotopic fractionation was used to identify the gas origin of the natural gas hydrates. Isotopic differences between the hydrate-bound and surrounding gases will help researchers determine when the hydrate was formed. However, further studies are needed to determine the effects of pressure, salinity, and formation rate on the process of isotopic fractionation. The study also demonstrated that fractionation was effective at lower temperatures. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Comparison of Short and Continuous Hydration Regimen in Chemotherapy Containing Intermediate- to High-Dose Cisplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Ouchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The efficacy of the short hydration regimen was reported in chemotherapy containing intermediate- to high-dose cisplatin, and the use of outpatient chemotherapy containing cisplatin with short hydration has been widespread in recent years. Methods. We compared patients with gastric cancer, lung cancer, and urothelial cancer who received outpatient chemotherapy containing cisplatin (≥60 mg/m2/cycle with the short hydration regimen since April 2012 (n=13 with those who received hospital chemotherapy with continuous hydration between April 2011 and March 2013 (n=17 in our hospital. Results. Grade 2 or higher acute kidney injury occurred in 2 patients in the continuous hydration group and in no patient in the short hydration group; 1 patient discontinued treatment on account of nephrotoxicity. There was no difference between the 2 groups in maximum creatinine increment and maximum clearance decrement. Relative dose intensity in the short hydration group was higher than that in the continuous hydration group (89.5% versus 80.3%; P<0.01. Conclusions. The short hydration regimen in outpatient chemotherapy containing intermediate- to high-dose cisplatin is as safe as the continuous hydration regimen and increased the efficacy of chemotherapy.

  2. Mechanism of gypsum hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco, G.

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an hypothesis that the mechanism o f gypsum hydration and dehydration is performed through two simultaneous phenomena. In this study we try to clear up this phenomenon using chlorides as accelerators or a mixture of ethanol-methanol as retarders to carry out the gypsum setting. Natural Mexican gypsum samples and a hemihydrate prepared in the laboratory are used. The following analytical techniques are used: MO, DRX, DTA, TG and DTG. In agreement with the obtained results, it can be concluded: that colloid formation depends on the action of accelerators or retarders and the crystals are a consequence of the quantity of hemihydrate formed.

    En el mecanismo de hidratación y deshidratación del yeso existe la hipótesis de que éste se efectúa por dos fenómenos simultáneos. Este estudio intenta esclarecer estos fenómenos, empleando: cloruros como aceleradores o mezcla etanol-metanol como retardadores para efectuar el fraguado del yeso. Se emplean muestras de yeso de origen natural mexicano y hemihydrate preparado en laboratorio; se utilizan técnicas analíticas: MO, DRX, DTA, TG y DTG. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos se puede deducir: que la formación del coloide depende de la acción de los agentes aceleradores o retardadores y que los cristales son consecuencia de la cantidad de hemihidrato formado.

  3. Genome-wide comparative analysis of four Indian Drosophila species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sujata; Khanna, Radhika

    2017-12-01

    Comparative analysis of multiple genomes of closely or distantly related Drosophila species undoubtedly creates excitement among evolutionary biologists in exploring the genomic changes with an ecology and evolutionary perspective. We present herewith the de novo assembled whole genome sequences of four Drosophila species, D. bipectinata, D. takahashii, D. biarmipes and D. nasuta of Indian origin using Next Generation Sequencing technology on an Illumina platform along with their detailed assembly statistics. The comparative genomics analysis, e.g. gene predictions and annotations, functional and orthogroup analysis of coding sequences and genome wide SNP distribution were performed. The whole genome of Zaprionus indianus of Indian origin published earlier by us and the genome sequences of previously sequenced 12 Drosophila species available in the NCBI database were included in the analysis. The present work is a part of our ongoing genomics project of Indian Drosophila species.

  4. Mycobacterial species as case-study of comparative genome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakham, F.; Belayachi, L.; Ussery, David

    2011-01-01

    The genus Mycobacterium represents more than 120 species including important pathogens of human and cause major public health problems and illnesses. Further, with more than 100 genome sequences from this genus, comparative genome analysis can provide new insights for better understanding...... the evolutionary events of these species and improving drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics tools for controlling Mycobacterial diseases. In this present study we aim to outline a comparative genome analysis of fourteen Mycobacterial genomes: M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis K—10, M. bovis AF2122/97, M. bovis BCG str...

  5. Supplementation of Acqua Lete® (Bicarbonate Calcic Mineral Water improves hydration status in athletes after short term anaerobic exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brancaccio Paola

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental studies suggest that mineral waters with high concentrations of calcium and bicarbonate can impact acid–base balance. The purpose of this study was to test the effect on acid–base balance and specific urine gravity, of a bicarbonate calcic mineral water (Acqua Lete® compared to a minimally mineralized water. Methods 88 amateur male athletes underwent two experimental trials with a modified Wingate test: the first was carried out without hydration (Control Test, Test C, n = 88; the second was carried out after one week of controlled hydration (Test with hydration, Test H, n = 88, with 1.5 L/day of a very low mineral content water (Group A, n = 44 or 1.5 L/day of Acqua Lete® (Group B, n = 44. Measure of body temperature, bioimpedance analysis, muscular ultrasound, and urinalysis were taken before (t0, immediately after (t1, 5’ (t2, and 30’ (t3 after exercise. Results Hydration results in a decreased core temperature; muscular ultrasound showed increased muscle thickness after exercise related to content of body water. Regarding urinalysis, in test H, we found in both groups after exercise a significant decrease of specific urine gravity with significantly lower levels in Group B. We also found a significant increase of pH in the same Group B. Conclusions In conclusion all the athletes hydrated with Acqua Lete® showed a positive impact on hydration status after anaerobic exercise with significant decrease of specific urine gravity and a positive effect on pH.

  6. Supplementation of Acqua Lete® (Bicarbonate Calcic Mineral Water) improves hydration status in athletes after short term anaerobic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancaccio, Paola; Limongelli, Francesco Mario; Paolillo, Iride; D'Aponte, Antonio; Donnarumma, Vincenzo; Rastrelli, Luca

    2012-07-26

    Experimental studies suggest that mineral waters with high concentrations of calcium and bicarbonate can impact acid-base balance. The purpose of this study was to test the effect on acid-base balance and specific urine gravity, of a bicarbonate calcic mineral water (Acqua Lete®) compared to a minimally mineralized water. 88 amateur male athletes underwent two experimental trials with a modified Wingate test: the first was carried out without hydration (Control Test, Test C, n = 88); the second was carried out after one week of controlled hydration (Test with hydration, Test H, n = 88), with 1.5 L/day of a very low mineral content water (Group A, n = 44) or 1.5 L/day of Acqua Lete® (Group B, n = 44). Measure of body temperature, bioimpedance analysis, muscular ultrasound, and urinalysis were taken before (t0), immediately after (t1), 5' (t2), and 30' (t3) after exercise. Hydration results in a decreased core temperature; muscular ultrasound showed increased muscle thickness after exercise related to content of body water. Regarding urinalysis, in test H, we found in both groups after exercise a significant decrease of specific urine gravity with significantly lower levels in Group B. We also found a significant increase of pH in the same Group B. In conclusion all the athletes hydrated with Acqua Lete® showed a positive impact on hydration status after anaerobic exercise with significant decrease of specific urine gravity and a positive effect on pH.

  7. Comparative analysis of land cadastral system in Macedonia and Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Stojčeska, Viktorija

    2015-01-01

    In the graduation thesis the topic of cadastral systems in Macedonia and Slovenia is discussed. The historical development, organization and functioning of today's cadastral systems in both countries is presented and compared. The development of cadastre of real property in Macedonia is presented in detail, where the land recording is presented from the title deeds system (tapija) to today's unified cadastre. The thesis comprises a comparative analysis of land administration syste...

  8. Elastic wave speeds and moduli in polycrystalline ice Ih, si methane hydrate, and sll methane-ethane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgerud, M.B.; Waite, W.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Nur, A.

    2009-01-01

    We used ultrasonic pulse transmission to measure compressional, P, and shear, S, wave speeds in laboratory-formed polycrystalline ice Ih, si methane hydrate, and sll methane-ethane hydrate. From the wave speed's linear dependence on temperature and pressure and from the sample's calculated density, we derived expressions for bulk, shear, and compressional wave moduli and Poisson's ratio from -20 to 15??C and 22.4 to 32.8 MPa for ice Ih, -20 to 15??C and 30.5 to 97.7 MPa for si methane hydrate, and -20 to 10??C and 30.5 to 91.6 MPa for sll methane-ethane hydrate. All three materials had comparable P and S wave speeds and decreasing shear wave speeds with increasing applied pressure. Each material also showed evidence of rapid intergranular bonding, with a corresponding increase in wave speed, in response to pauses in sample deformation. There were also key differences. Resistance to uniaxial compaction, indicated by the pressure required to compact initially porous samples, was significantly lower for ice Ih than for either hydrate. The ice Ih shear modulus decreased with increasing pressure, in contrast to the increase measured in both hydrates ?? 2009.

  9. comparative analysis of some existing kinetic models with proposed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IGNATIUS NWIDI

    But based on values of ARE%, first proposed kinetic model accounted for 93.3% while pseudo second-order kinetic model accounted for 6.7% of the results for biosorption of the three heavy metals by the five microbes. Keynotes: Heavy metals, Biosorption, Kinetics Models, Comparative analysis, Average Relative Error. 1.

  10. Comparative analysis of codon usage bias in Crenarchaea and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the pattern of optimal codon usage in Archaea. Comparative analysis was executed to understand the pattern of codon usage bias between the high expression genes (HEG) and the whole genomes in two Archaeal phyla, Crenarchaea and Euryarchaea. The G+C% of the ...

  11. A comparative analysis of returns of various financial asset classes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative analysis of returns of various financial asset classes in South Africa: a triumph of bonds? ... Southern African Business Review ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in ...

  12. Comparative analysis of the Proximate composition and Sensory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative analysis of the Proximate composition and Sensory properties of dokuwa produced in Niger State Metropolis. ... Sensory evaluation of the samples on the basis of colour, texture, aroma, taste and overall acceptability showed that significant difference (p<0.05) existed between the samples. The sample from ...

  13. A Comparative Analysis of Administrative Competencies of Male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Comparative Analysis of Admin. Competencies of Male & Female Principals leadership roles of supervisors as well. Explaining each of these skills,. Sergiovanni and Starrat (1979) argued that technical skills assume ability to use knowledge, methods and techniques to perform specific tasks. The mechanics associated with ...

  14. a comparative analysis of first day neonatal mortality between

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-11

    Nov 11, 2013 ... A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF FIRST DAY NEONATAL MORTALITY BETWEEN ADOLESCENTS AND ADULT. FEMALES GIVING BIRTH ..... Multivariable logistic regression on predictors of neonatal mortality and maternal age5. Number of .... Provision of low cost special care units for LBW neonates to ...

  15. Comparative analysis of acon- Plasmodium falciparum rapid malaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative analysis of acon- Plasmodium falciparum rapid malaria diagnostic test with routine microscopy among school children and pregnant women in a rural community in Enugu State, ... The following parameters were determined: intrinsic validity, predictive values, species diagnostic power and logistic factors.

  16. Comparative Analysis of VLF Signal Variation along Trajectory ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Comparative qualitative analysis of amplitude and phase delay variations was carried out along the trajectory of GQD/22.1 kHz and NAA/24.0 kHz VLF signal traces, propagating from Skelton (UK) and Maine (USA) toward Belgrade, induced by four isolated solar X-ray flare events occurred during the period from September ...

  17. Comparative demand analysis for rice in Edo, delta and Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the comparative demand analysis for rice types in Edo, Delta and Lagos states of Nigeria. A multi-stage sampling procedure, involving four stages, was used to select eight hundred and twelve (812) households. Data collected were analysed using both descriptive and inferential statistics. The results of ...

  18. Comparative Demand Analysis for Rice in Three States of South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dauda Omoba

    2013-01-01

    Jan 1, 2013 ... The study examined the comparative demand analysis for rice types in Edo, Delta and Lagos states of .... variables, such as age, education level, household ..... Variable. Entire sample Mean Lagos. Delta. Edo. Income. Rural. Urban Rural Urban Rural Urban Rural Urban Low Middle High. Expenditure.

  19. Comparative analysis of accident potiential of priority junction with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative analysis of accident potiential of priority junction with different layouts and controls. M Salifu. Abstract. No Abstract. Journal of the Ghana Institution of Engineers Vol. 3 (1) 2005: pp. 42-53. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African ...

  20. Indian Ocean surface winds from NCMRWF analysis as compared to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The quality of the surface wind analysis at the National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (NCMRWF), New Delhi over the tropical Indian Ocean and its improvement in 2001 are examined by comparing it with in situ buoy measurements and satellite derived surface winds from NASA QuikSCAT satellite (QSCT) ...

  1. Comparative and Familial Analysis of Handedness in Great Apes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, William D.

    2006-01-01

    Historically, population-level handedness has been considered a hallmark of human evolution. Whether nonhuman primates exhibit population-level handedness remains a topic of considerable debate. This paper summarizes published data on handedness in great apes. Comparative analysis indicated that chimpanzees and bonobos show population-level right…

  2. A comparative analysis of strategy disclosure reporting trends in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative analysis of strategy disclosure reporting trends in South Africa in 2010. ... Southern African Business Review ... In South Africa, the King II Report on Corporate Governance recommended that organisations should produce a sustainability report some time during the reporting cycle (IOD 2009: 13). The latest ...

  3. Comparative analysis of crayfish marketing in selected markets of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was on comparative analysis of crayfish marketing in some selected markets of Akwa Ibom and Abia states of Nigeria. It specifically looked at market integration, costs and return, marketing margin, marketing efficiency and factors influencing marketing efficiency in both states. Data were collected from 60 ...

  4. A comparative analysis of strategy disclosure reporting trends in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chestt

    A comparative analysis of strategy disclosure reporting trends in South Africa in 2010. 29 the strategy ... M. Ungerer. 30 could result in a competitive advantage for the organisation (Lazarus & McManus. 2006: 925). Table 1: The advantages and disadvantages of transparency in disclosure of strategic information.

  5. Comparative analysis of transformed potato microtubers and its non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rapid progress of transgenic biotechnology has significantly promoted the development and production of genetically modified (GM) crops. The aim of this study was to compare some compositional analysis and genetic variation of transformed potato microtubers (Solanum tuberosum L. Desiree) line (which harbor ...

  6. A comparative analysis of the perception and understanding of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative analysis of the perception and understanding of physical education and school sport among South African children aged 6-15 years. ... PE teachers are qualified in some cases and grossly unqualified in many others. PE programmes in white schools and urban cities offer a wide and balanced variety of ...

  7. Comparative Analysis of the Effects of Organization Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative Analysis of the Effects of Organization Development Interventions on Organizational Leadership and Management Practice: A Case Of Green Earth Program ... A pre- assessment of leadership and management practice at Green Earth was conducted which identified six problem areas or improvement issues.

  8. Comparative Analysis on Chemical Composition of Bentonite Clays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... Abdullahi and Audu. 35. Comparative Analysis on Chemical Composition of Bentonite Clays. Obtained from Ashaka and Tango Deposits in Gombe State, Nigeria. Abdullahi S.L1 and Audu A.A2. 1Kano State Polytechnic, Kano - Nigeria. 2Department of Pure and Industrial Chemistry, Bayero University Kano ...

  9. Comparative Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Of Solar Photovoltaic Power ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many homes in Nigeria are in remote locations where grid electricity supply could not be extended. This paper attempts to present a concise life-cycle-cost comparison of diesel generator power supply system and photovoltaic power system for a remote rural application. In this comparative analysis, conceptual designs ...

  10. comparative analysis of salivary glucose and electrolytes in diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    periodontitis. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SALIVARY GLUCOSE AND ELECTROLYTES IN. DIABETIC INDIVIDUALS WITH PERIODONTITIS. 1. Department of Physiology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan. 2. Department of Medicine, Endocrinology Unit, University College Hospital, Ibadan. T.J. Lasisi1 and A.A. Fasanmade2.

  11. Indian Ocean surface winds from NCMRWF analysis as compared to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The quality of the surface wind analysis at the National Centre for Medium Range Weather Fore- casts (NCMRWF), New Delhi over the tropical Indian Ocean and its improvement in 2001 are examined by comparing it with in situ buoy measurements and satellite derived surface winds from. NASA QuikSCAT satellite (QSCT) ...

  12. A comparative analysis of Numerov and Nystrom methods | Unanam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, two test problems were used to study the behaviour and performance of two numerical methods (Numerov and Nystrom) of solving second order initial value problem (IVP) of ordinary differential equation without the first order term. A test implementation of each of the methods and a comparative analysis of the ...

  13. A comparative analysis of cohesion in academic and newspaper texts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article presents findings on a comparative analysis of cohesion in academic and newspaper texts on road traffic accidents. Cohesive devices are the surface structure features that link different parts of a text and make it flow logically. They are the necessary reins that hold the clauses of a text together. Coherence, on ...

  14. A Comparative Analysis of the Caracteristics of Authors in Four ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative analysis of the characteristics of Nigerian s of articles published in the African Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science (AJLAIS), the Nigerian Libraries (NL), Lagos Librarian (LL) and the Nigerian Library and Information Science Review (NLISR), between 1994 and 2000 was carried out.

  15. A Comparative Analysis of Fuzzy Inference Engines in Context of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. O. E. OSUAGWU

    robotics, pattern recognition, etc. This paper presents a comparative analysis of three fuzzy inference engines, max-product, max-min and root sum in fuzzy controllers using profitability control data. The presented results shows that RSS inference engine gives largest output membership function, while the product inference ...

  16. Comparative economic analysis of yam minisett and ware yam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study on comparative economic analysis of yam minisett and ware yam production was conducted using 150 yam farmers as respondents. A structured questionnaire was used in collecting data from the yam farmers. Statistical tools such as frequency distribution, percentages, means and gross margin were used for ...

  17. A Comparative Analysis of Three Unique Theories of Organizational Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Carol C.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present three classical theories on organizational learning and conduct a comparative analysis that highlights their strengths, similarities, and differences. Two of the theories -- experiential learning theory and adaptive -- generative learning theory -- represent the thinking of the cognitive perspective, while…

  18. Comparative analysis of the chemical composition of three spices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative analysis of the chemical composition of three spices – Allium sativum L. Zingiber officinale Rosc. and Capsicum frutescens L. commonly consumed in Nigeria. ... Phytochemical screening indicated that these spices are also rich in phytonutrients including alkaloid, tannin, carotenoids, saponin and flavonoids.

  19. Comparative analysis of equalization methods for SC-FDMA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dogadaev, Anton Konstantinovich; Kozlov, Alexander; Ukhanova, Ann

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we introduce comparative analysis for different types of equalization schemes, based on the minimum mean square error (MMSE) optimization. The following types of equalizers were compared: linear equalization, decision feedback equalization (DFE) and turbo equalization. Performance...... and complexity of these schemes were tested for Single Carrier Frequency Division Multiple Access (SC-FDMA) system with Single Input Single Output (SISO) antenna configuration. SC-FDMA is a common technique, which is used in the UTRA LTE Uplink, so the results of complexity and performance analysis could...... be applied to find the appropriate equalization algorithm to be used in the Uplink channel of the LTE – the famous standard in 4G telecommunications. Simulation results in the end in this paper show bit error ratio (BER) and modulation error ratio (MER) for compared schemes....

  20. Measuring and modelling of the combined thermodynamic promoting effect of tetrahydrofuran and cyclopentane on carbon dioxide hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Peter Jørgensen; Daraboina, Nagu; Thomsen, Kaj

    2014-01-01

    promoters due to its significant pressure reducing effect in hydrate forming systems such as those related to carbon dioxide capture.The present work shows that hydrate dissociation pressures may be lowered by up to 22% compared to those of the cyclopentane promoted carbon dioxide hydrate system by addition......This work documents both experimental data, and by thermodynamic modelling, the synergistic effect occurring in promoted carbon dioxide hydrate systems at the simultaneous presence of tetrahydrofuran and cyclopentane.Cyclopentane has previously been considered a reference among gas hydrate...

  1. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.

    1999-01-01

    Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations...... and experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6...

  2. A Circuit Model of Real Time Human Body Hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asogwa, Clement Ogugua; Teshome, Assefa K; Collins, Stephen F; Lai, Daniel T H

    2016-06-01

    Changes in human body hydration leading to excess fluid losses or overload affects the body fluid's ability to provide the necessary support for healthy living. We propose a time-dependent circuit model of real-time human body hydration, which models the human body tissue as a signal transmission medium. The circuit model predicts the attenuation of a propagating electrical signal. Hydration rates are modeled by a time constant τ, which characterizes the individual specific metabolic function of the body part measured. We define a surrogate human body anthropometric parameter θ by the muscle-fat ratio and comparing it with the body mass index (BMI), we find theoretically, the rate of hydration varying from 1.73 dB/min, for high θ and low τ to 0.05 dB/min for low θ and high τ. We compare these theoretical values with empirical measurements and show that real-time changes in human body hydration can be observed by measuring signal attenuation. We took empirical measurements using a vector network analyzer and obtained different hydration rates for various BMI, ranging from 0.6 dB/min for 22.7 [Formula: see text] down to 0.04 dB/min for 41.2 [Formula: see text]. We conclude that the galvanic coupling circuit model can predict changes in the volume of the body fluid, which are essential in diagnosing and monitoring treatment of body fluid disorder. Individuals with high BMI would have higher time-dependent biological characteristic, lower metabolic rate, and lower rate of hydration.

  3. Comparative secretome analysis of rat stomach under different nutritional status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia L. Senin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The fact that gastric surgery is at the moment the most effective treatment to fight against obesity highlights the relevance of gastric derived proteins as potential targets to treat this pathology. Taking advantage of a previously established gastric explant model for endocrine studies, the proteomic analysis of gastric secretome was performed. To validate this gastric explant system for proteomic analysis, the identification of ghrelin, a classical gastric derived peptide, was performed by MS. In addition, the differential analysis of gastric secretomes under differential nutritional status (control feeding vs fasting vs re-feeding was performed. The MS identified proteins are showed in the present manuscript. The data supplied in this article is related to the research article entitled “Comparative secretome analysis of rat stomach under different nutritional status” [1].

  4. BLAT-Based Comparative Analysis for Transposable Elements: BLATCAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangbum Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The availability of several whole genome sequences makes comparative analyses possible. In primate genomes, the priority of transposable elements (TEs is significantly increased because they account for ~45% of the primate genomes, they can regulate the gene expression level, and they are associated with genomic fluidity in their host genomes. Here, we developed the BLAST-like alignment tool (BLAT based comparative analysis for transposable elements (BLATCAT program. The BLATCAT program can compare specific regions of six representative primate genome sequences (human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, and rhesus macaque on the basis of BLAT and simultaneously carry out RepeatMasker and/or Censor functions, which are widely used Windows-based web-server functions to detect TEs. All results can be stored as a HTML file for manual inspection of a specific locus. BLATCAT will be very convenient and efficient for comparative analyses of TEs in various primate genomes.

  5. Fungal communities from methane hydrate-bearing deep-sea marine sediments in South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Xintian; Cao, Lixiang; Tan, Hongming; Fang, Shu; Huang, Yali; Zhou, Shining

    2007-12-01

    To elucidate fungal diversity in methane hydrate-bearing deep-sea marine sediments in the South China Sea, internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rRNA genes from five different sediment DNA samples were amplified and phylogenetically analyzed. Total five ITS libraries were constructed and 413 clones selected randomly were grouped into 24 restriction patterns by Amplified Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis (ARDRA). ITS sequences of 44 representative clones were determined and compared with the GenBank database using gapped-BLAST. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the ITS sequences (71-97% similarity) were similar to those of Phoma, Lodderomyces, Malassezia, Cryptococcus, Cylindrocarpon, Hortaea, Pichia, Aspergillus and Candida. The remaining sequences were not associated to any known fungi or fungal sequences in the public database. The results suggested that methane hydrate-bearing deep-sea marine sediments harbor diverse fungi. This is the first report on fungal communities from methane hydrate-bearing deep-sea marine sediments in South China Sea.

  6. Selection of optimal hydrate/solvate forms of a fibrinogen receptor antagonist for solid dosage development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, M L; Jahansouz, H; Kaufman, M J

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this work was to compare the physicochemical properties of four crystalline forms of the fibrinogen receptor antagonist L-738,167 [2(S)-[p-toluenesulfonyl amino]-3-[[[5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4-oxo-5-[2-(piperidin-4-yl)ethyl] -4-H-pyrazolo[1,5-a][1,4] diazepin-2-yl] carbonyl]amino]-propionic acid] to determine the best form for use in the development of oral dosage formulations. Four crystalline forms [form A (trihydrate), form B (pentahydrate), form C, and form D] were compared using x-ray powder diffractometry, thermal analysis, and moisture sorption studies. The trihydrate, form A, was demonstrated to hydrate upon exposure to relative humidity (RH) above 50% at room temperature (25 degrees C) with conversion to the pentahydrate. The pentahydrate, form B, converted to the trihydrate at room temperature when exposed to humidity levels below 25% RH. The crystalline pentahydrate was shown to be stable to dehydration upon storage at 30 degrees C/60% RH and 40 degrees C/75% RH for 3 months. The suspension of form A or form D in water resulted in conversion to form B, the stable hydrated form in an aqueous environment. Form C has a unique crystalline structure that is stable in an aqueous environment and not subject to hydration/dehydration with changes in relative humidity and thus may offer some advantages in pharmaceutical development.

  7. MetaComp: comprehensive analysis software for comparative meta-omics including comparative metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Peng; Yang, Longshu; Guo, Xiao; Wang, Zhe; Guo, Jiangtao; Wang, Xiaoqi; Zhu, Huaiqiu

    2017-10-02

    During the past decade, the development of high throughput nucleic sequencing and mass spectrometry analysis techniques have enabled the characterization of microbial communities through metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics data. To reveal the diversity of microbial communities and interactions between living conditions and microbes, it is necessary to introduce comparative analysis based upon integration of all four types of data mentioned above. Comparative meta-omics, especially comparative metageomics, has been established as a routine process to highlight the significant differences in taxon composition and functional gene abundance among microbiota samples. Meanwhile, biologists are increasingly concerning about the correlations between meta-omics features and environmental factors, which may further decipher the adaptation strategy of a microbial community. We developed a graphical comprehensive analysis software named MetaComp comprising a series of statistical analysis approaches with visualized results for metagenomics and other meta-omics data comparison. This software is capable to read files generated by a variety of upstream programs. After data loading, analyses such as multivariate statistics, hypothesis testing of two-sample, multi-sample as well as two-group sample and a novel function-regression analysis of environmental factors are offered. Here, regression analysis regards meta-omic features as independent variable and environmental factors as dependent variables. Moreover, MetaComp is capable to automatically choose an appropriate two-group sample test based upon the traits of input abundance profiles. We further evaluate the performance of its choice, and exhibit applications for metagenomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics samples. MetaComp, an integrative software capable for applying to all meta-omics data, originally distills the influence of living environment on microbial community by regression analysis

  8. Evaluating the risks of clinical research: direct comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rid, Annette; Abdoler, Emily; Roberson-Nay, Roxann; Pine, Daniel S; Wendler, David

    2014-09-01

    Many guidelines and regulations allow children and adolescents to be enrolled in research without the prospect of clinical benefit when it poses minimal risk. However, few systematic methods exist to determine when research risks are minimal. This situation has led to significant variation in minimal risk judgments, raising concern that some children are not being adequately protected. To address this concern, we describe a new method for implementing the widely endorsed "risks of daily life" standard for minimal risk. This standard defines research risks as minimal when they do not exceed the risks posed by daily life activities or routine examinations. This study employed a conceptual and normative analysis, and use of an illustrative example. Different risks are composed of the same basic elements: Type, likelihood, and magnitude of harm. Hence, one can compare the risks of research and the risks of daily life by comparing the respective basic elements with each other. We use this insight to develop a systematic method, direct comparative analysis, for implementing the "risks of daily life" standard for minimal risk. The method offers a way of evaluating research procedures that pose the same types of risk as daily life activities, such as the risk of experiencing anxiety, stress, or other psychological harm. We thus illustrate how direct comparative analysis can be applied in practice by using it to evaluate whether the anxiety induced by a respiratory CO2 challenge poses minimal or greater than minimal risks in children and adolescents. Direct comparative analysis is a systematic method for applying the "risks of daily life" standard for minimal risk to research procedures that pose the same types of risk as daily life activities. It thereby offers a method to protect children and adolescents in research, while ensuring that important studies are not blocked because of unwarranted concerns about research risks.

  9. Effects of hydration on laser soldering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eric K.; Brown, Dennis T.; Kovach, Ian S.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1997-05-01

    Laser welding with albumin-based tissue solder has been investigated as an alternative to surgical suturing. Many surgical procedures require the soldered tissues to be in a hydrated environment. We have studied the effects of hydration on laser soldered rat dermis and baboon articular cartilage in vitro. The solder is composed of human serum albumin, sodium hyaluronate and indocyanine green. We used a micro-pipette to deposit 2 (mu) l of solder on each tissue specimen. An 808 nm cw laser beam with irradiance of 27 W/cm2 was scanned 4 times over the same solder area at a constant speed of 0.84 mm/sec. After photo-coagulation, each tissue specimen was cut into two halves at the center of the solder, perpendicular to the direction of the scanning laser beam. One half was reserved as control while the other half was soaked in phosphate buffered saline for a designated hydration period. The hydration periods were 1 hr, 1, 2, and 7 days. All tissue specimens were fixed in glutaraldahyde, then prepared for scanning electron microcopy analysis. For most of the specimens, there was non-uniform coagulation across the thickness of the solder. Closer to the laser beam, the upper solder region formed a more dense coagulum. While the region closer to solder-tissue interface, the solder aggregated into small globules. This non-uniform coagulation was likely caused by non-uniform energy distribution during photocoagulation. The protein globules and coagulum seem to be responsible for the solder attachment from the specimen surface. However, we have noted that the solder detached from the cartilage substrate as early as after 1 hr of hydration. On the other hand, the solder attached to the dermis much better than to cartilage. This may be explained by the difference in surface roughness of the two tissue types. The dermal layer of the skin is composed of collagen matrix which may provide a better entrapment of the solder than the smooth surface of articular cartilage.

  10. Comparative analysis of special preparedness young water-slalom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Okun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to identify indicators is specially trained water-slalom aged 10–12 years. Material & Methods: methods of theoretical analysis, synthesis and synthesis of information, pedagogical control tests (tests, methods of mathematical statistics. Results: presented materials research performance technical readiness of 60 young water-slalom groups of initial training. A comparative analysis of the results and regulatory requirements, the proposed curriculum for youth sports schools. Conclusions: the results of the study suggest lagging performance testing young athletes behind the standards of the program requirements, indicating insufficient specially trained water-slaloms.

  11. Comparative Analysis of Resonant Converters for Energy Storage Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuchev Stoyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The following paperwork presents a comparative analysis of multiphase resonant converters for applications in energy storage systems. Models of the examined converters are developed in the software environments of MATLAB and LTspice. Results from the simulation examination of the converters during charging of supercapacitors and rechargeable batteries are presented. These results are compared to results obtained from experimental examination of the converters via a laboratory stand. For the purposes of the experimental examination, a control system is developed on the base of a virtual instrument in LabVIEW. The advantages and disadvantages of the different converters are discussed.

  12. Hydrate Evolution in Response to Ongoing Environmental Shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempel, Alan [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Natural gas hydrates have the potential to become a vital domestic clean-burning energy source. However, past changes in environmental conditions have caused hydrates to become unstable and trigger both massive submarine landslides and the development of crater-like pockmarks, thereby releasing methane into the overlying seawater and atmosphere, where it acts as a powerful greenhouse gas. This project was designed to fill critical gaps in our understanding of domestic hydrate resources and improve forecasts for their response to environmental shifts. Project work can be separated into three interrelated components, each involving the development of predictive mathematical models. The first project component concerns the role of sediment properties on the development and dissociation of concentrated hydrate anomalies. To this end, we developed numerical models to predict equilibrium solubility of methane in twophase equilibrium with hydrate as a function of measureable porous medium characteristics. The second project component concerned the evolution of hydrate distribution in heterogeneous reservoirs. To this end, we developed numerical models to predict the growth and decay of anomalies in representative physical environments. The third project component concerned the stability of hydrate-bearing slopes under changing environmental conditions. To this end, we developed numerical treatments of pore pressure evolution and consolidation, then used "infinite-slope" analysis to approximate the landslide potential in representative physical environments, and developed a "rate-and-state" frictional formulation to assess the stability of finite slip patches that are hypothesized to develop in response to the dissociation of hydrate anomalies. The increased predictive capabilities that result from this work provide a framework for interpreting field observations of hydrate anomalies in terms of the history of environmental forcing that led to their development. Moreover

  13. Mechanical instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, J.; Ning, F.; Trinh, T.T.; Kjelstrup, S.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; He, J.; Skallerud, B.H.; Zhang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Despite observations of massive methane release and geohazards associated with gas hydrate instability in nature, as well as ductile flow accompanying hydrate dissociation in artificial polycrystalline methane hydrates in the laboratory, the destabilising mechanisms of gas hydrates under deformation

  14. Comparison of the physical and geotechnical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments from offshore India and other gas-hydrate-reservoir systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, William J.; Wilcox-Cline, R.W.; Long, P.; Dewri, S.K.; Kumar, P.; Stern, Laura A.; Kerr, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    The sediment characteristics of hydrate-bearing reservoirs profoundly affect the formation, distribution, and morphology of gas hydrate. The presence and type of gas, porewater chemistry, fluid migration, and subbottom temperature may govern the hydrate formation process, but it is the host sediment that commonly dictates final hydrate habit, and whether hydrate may be economically developed.In this paper, the physical properties of hydrate-bearing regions offshore eastern India (Krishna-Godavari and Mahanadi Basins) and the Andaman Islands, determined from Expedition NGHP-01 cores, are compared to each other, well logs, and published results of other hydrate reservoirs. Properties from the hydrate-free Kerala-Konkan basin off the west coast of India are also presented. Coarser-grained reservoirs (permafrost-related and marine) may contain high gas-hydrate-pore saturations, while finer-grained reservoirs may contain low-saturation disseminated or more complex gas-hydrates, including nodules, layers, and high-angle planar and rotational veins. However, even in these fine-grained sediments, gas hydrate preferentially forms in coarser sediment or fractures, when present. The presence of hydrate in conjunction with other geologic processes may be responsible for sediment porosity being nearly uniform for almost 500 m off the Andaman Islands.Properties of individual NGHP-01 wells and regional trends are discussed in detail. However, comparison of marine and permafrost-related Arctic reservoirs provides insight into the inter-relationships and common traits between physical properties and the morphology of gas-hydrate reservoirs regardless of location. Extrapolation of properties from one location to another also enhances our understanding of gas-hydrate reservoir systems. Grain size and porosity effects on permeability are critical, both locally to trap gas and regionally to provide fluid flow to hydrate reservoirs. Index properties corroborate more advanced

  15. Hydrated interfacial ions and electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Charged particles such as hydrated ions and transient hydrated electrons, the simplest anionic reducing agents in water, and the special hydronium and hydroxide ions at water interfaces play an important role in many fields of science, such as atmospheric chemistry, radiation chemistry, and biology, as well as biochemistry. This article focuses on these species near hydrophobic interfaces of water, such as the air or vacuum interface of water or water protein/membrane interfaces. Ions at interfaces as well as solvated electrons have been reviewed frequently during the past decade. Although all species have been known for some time with seemingly familiar features, recently the picture in all cases became increasingly diffuse rather than clearer. The current account gives a critical state-of-the art overview of what is known and what remains to be understood and investigated about hydrated interfacial ions and electrons.

  16. Comparative analysis of tax administration system in Russian regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey Sergeevich Naydenov

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the study on tax administration attractiveness for taxpayers in the Russian Federation. The authors provide an overview of existing approaches to understanding the nature of the tax administration. To solve the problem of estimating the attractiveness of the tax administration in this study, we proposed a methodological approach based on comparative analysis of the rank of territorial systems of tax administration. In the basis of comparative analysis is the calculation of a set of indicators that characterize the tax administration system attractiveness from the standpoint of the taxpayer, with subsequent calculation of integral indexes and rankings of the Russian Federation. The results assessing the attractiveness of the tax administration system in the regions are shown. In this paper, we attempt to assess modern tax administration as one of the key economic institutions, as well as to obtain quantitative data on the status of the tax administration in Russia's regions.

  17. Comparative analysis about dynamic performances of grid synchronization schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Hao; Wang, Xiongfei; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    For a grid-connected Voltage-Source Converter (VSC), dynamics of the grid synchronization plays an important role in affecting the converter performances and stability. Due to its significance, this paper gives a comparative analysis about some basic grid synchronization schemes, through viewpoint...... of dynamic performances, which appeared as the impacts of voltage perturbation on the estimated angle error (Δθ). The analyzed synchronization schemes cover Synchronous-Reference-Frame Phase-Locked Loop (SRF-PLL), Second-Order Generalized Integrator Frequency-Locked Loop (SOGI-FLL)-based scheme......, and Decoupled Double SRF-PLL (DDSRF-PLL), in which their small-signal models, regarding the voltage perturbation, are derived in the stationary-reference frame and compared with the frequency responses diagrams. Based on the analysis, their common features and differences are summarized and finally validated...

  18. Mammalian comparative sequence analysis of the Agrp locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B Kaelin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Agouti-related protein encodes a neuropeptide that stimulates food intake. Agrp expression in the brain is restricted to neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and is elevated by states of negative energy balance. The molecular mechanisms underlying Agrp regulation, however, remain poorly defined. Using a combination of transgenic and comparative sequence analysis, we have previously identified a 760 bp conserved region upstream of Agrp which contains STAT binding elements that participate in Agrp transcriptional regulation. In this study, we attempt to improve the specificity for detecting conserved elements in this region by comparing genomic sequences from 10 mammalian species. Our analysis reveals a symmetrical organization of conserved sequences upstream of Agrp, which cluster into two inverted repeat elements. Conserved sequences within these elements suggest a role for homeodomain proteins in the regulation of Agrp and provide additional targets for functional evaluation.

  19. Strategic planning effectiveness comparative analysis of the Macedonian context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobek Šuklev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Strategic planning is an important element in the organizational success and the key to effectiveness and overall competitiveness of the organizations. Strategic planning practice and effectiveness has been the subject of much academic debate in the Western context, but little empirical research and comparative analysis exists on this subject in emerging and developing countries. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between strategic planning and the organizational effectiveness with the examination of a wider list of strategic planning dimensions and different approaches and measures to assess the strategic planning effectiveness in the case of the Republic of Macedonia, as well as to conduct comparative analysis of the strategic planning effectiveness in different emerging and developing countries. After the initial processing of the total number of received questionnaires, 113 questionnaires proceeded to the next phase of processing, as companies were found to be strategic planners. Two regression models were performed, enclosed with necessary tests, as well as in order to achieve unidimensionality, factor analysis was performed for all stated items for each of the investigated variables. The empirical analysis conducted in Macedonian companies shows that strategic planning can generally contribute to organizational effectiveness. A significant correlation between different strategic planning dimensions and the strategic planning effectiveness was found in the relationship between the formality of strategic planning, the management participation in strategic planning and the employee participation in strategic planning. The comparative analysis conducted in this study with the purpose of comparing the case of Republic of Macedonia with the studies in the other emerging and developing counties, and indicating the probable reasons for potential differences in strategic planning effectiveness in different counties, refers to

  20. Perceptions of Industry Change: Decadal Comparative Analysis of Consumer Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Bowen, Brent D.; Bowen, Erin E.; Headley, Dean E.; Sabin, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Longitudinal comparisons of perceptions are rarely available over rapid industrial change, and few industries have changed to the degree of airline travel in the post-9/11 decade. This study presents comparative analysis of airline consumer perceptions following September 11th 2001 to findings from a Congressperson-initiated survey of 3,500 travelers ending 2011. The National Airline Quality Rating (AQR), released annually each April at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. and viewe...

  1. Comparative analysis of some brushless motors based on catalog data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Kalapish

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Brushless motors (polyphased AC induction, synchronous and brushless DC motors have no alternatives in modern electric drives. They possess highly efficient and very wide range of speeds. The objective of this paper is to represent some relation between the basic parameters and magnitudes of electrical machines. This allows to be made a comparative analysis and a choice of motor concerning each particular case based not only on catalogue data or price for sale.

  2. Comparative analysis oil industry of Russia, OPEC and USA

    OpenAIRE

    Khairytdinov I.; Shalina O.

    2016-01-01

    The article provides an overview of the oil and liquid hydrocarbons markets — the largest producers and consumers countries, the major oil companies. A comparative analysis oil industry of the Russia, OPEC countries, USA is delivered. The authors come to the conclusion that most OPEC countries and Russia occupy leading positions at the expense of large stockpiles of conventional oil, low cost, as well as economies of scale, being the natural recipients of rent. Their extraction profitable...

  3. Initial Implementation of a comparative Data Analysis Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Prosdocimi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative analysis is used throughout biology. When entities under comparison (e.g. proteins, genomes, species are related by descent, evolutionary theory provides a framework that, in principle, allows N-ary comparisons of entities, while controlling for non-independence due to relatedness. Powerful software tools exist for specialized applications of this approach, yet it remains under-utilized in the absence of a unifying informatics infrastructure. A key step in developing such an infrastructure is the definition of a formal ontology. The analysis of use cases and existing formalisms suggests that a significant component of evolutionary analysis involves a core problem of inferring a character history, relying on key concepts: “Operational Taxonomic Units” (OTUs, representing the entities to be compared; “character-state data” representing the observations compared among OTUs; “phylogenetic tree”, representing the historical path of evolution among the entities; and “transitions”, the inferred evolutionary changes in states of characters that account for observations. Using the Web Ontology Language (OWL, we have defined these and other fundamental concepts in a Comparative Data Analysis Ontology (CDAO. CDAO has been evaluated for its ability to represent token data sets and to support simple forms of reasoning. With further development, CDAO will provide a basis for tools (for semantic transformation, data retrieval, validation, integration, etc. that make it easier for software developers and biomedical researchers to apply evolutionary methods of inference to diverse types of data, so as to integrate this powerful framework for reasoning into their research.

  4. Revision urethroplasty success is comparable to primary urethroplasty: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Max A; Kinnaird, Adam S; Rourke, Keith F

    2014-10-01

    To assess the efficacy and complications of revision urethroplasty compared with urethroplasty-naïve controls. A retrospective analysis was performed of 534 urethroplasties performed by a single surgeon from August 2003 to March 2011. Patient age, stricture length, location, etiology, comorbidities, and type of surgery were recorded. Statistical comparison between the revision cohort and urethroplasty-naïve group were made using Fisher, χ(2), and unpaired t tests, with significance at P comparable to results in urethroplasty-naïve patients. Patients undergoing revision urethroplasty are more likely to require tissue transfer and experience higher rates of chordee and urinary tract infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dissociation of methane hydrate granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misyura, S. Y.; Donskoy, I. G.; Morozov, V. S.

    2017-09-01

    The methane hydrate dissociation at negative temperatures and under external pressure of 1 bar is studied experimentally. It is shown that the dissociation rate of the gas hydrate depends on the granule diameter and heat transfer. The dissociation curve has an extremum. The dissociation rate initially increases due to the temperature increase and reaches the maximum value and then sharply falls due to the curvature of the granules. When describing dissociation kinetics of the spherical granules, it is important to take into account the granule size and their composition.

  6. Computational Approach for Gas Hydrate Formation and Corresponding Physical Property Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, D.; Keehm, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid substance composed of water and hydrocarbon (mainly methane). It occurs worldwide in the oceanic and polar sediments where temperature is low enough and pressure is sufficiently high to crystallize the methane into gas hydrate. Gas hydrate has drawn great attention because it can be future energy resource, a global warming factor and a hazard in ocean structures such as oil platforms. However, the formation of gas hydrate and corresponding physical property changes are not well known, since the detailed hydrates formation mechanism at the pore scale are poorly understood. In this paper, we try various phenomenological formation models on pore microstructure of beach sands obtained by the X-ray microtomographic technique, and calculate physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments as functions of gas hydrate saturation. Then we compare the results to lab experiments by KIGAM (Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources) and AIST (Advanced Industrial Science and Technology of Japan), which were obtained from a similar experiment setup, but the permeability trends along hydrate saturation were quite different. As a preliminary result, among the various nucleation and growth models, the KIGAM's results agree well with G-2 model, where the nucleation and growth of hydrate occur at the pore throats; while AIST's results seem to match the G-3 model, which is growth-dominant one. Although more complete conclusion will be possible by more results from ongoing pore-scale modeling, this computational approach show that it can be a robust tool for analyzing the hydrate formation mechanism for a given sediment and estimating quantitative relations between hydrate saturation and physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments.

  7. The elastic wave velocity response of methane gas hydrate formation in vertical gas migration systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Q. T.; Hu, G. W.; Ye, Y. G.; Liu, C. L.; Li, C. F.; Best, A. I.; Wang, J. S.

    2017-06-01

    Knowledge of the elastic wave velocities of hydrate-bearing sediments is important for geophysical exploration and resource evaluation. Methane gas migration processes play an important role in geological hydrate accumulation systems, whether on the seafloor or in terrestrial permafrost regions, and their impact on elastic wave velocities in sediments needs further study. Hence, a high-pressure laboratory apparatus was developed to simulate natural continuous vertical migration of methane gas through sediments. Hydrate saturation (S h) and ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities (V p and V s) were measured synchronously by time domain reflectometry (TDR) and by ultrasonic transmission methods respectively during gas hydrate formation in sediments. The results were compared to previously published laboratory data obtained in a static closed system. This indicated that the velocities of hydrate-bearing sediments in vertical gas migration systems are slightly lower than those in closed systems during hydrate formation. While velocities increase at a constant rate with hydrate saturation in the closed system, P-wave velocities show a fast-slow-fast variation with increasing hydrate saturation in the vertical gas migration system. The observed velocities are well described by an effective-medium velocity model, from which changing hydrate morphology was inferred to cause the fast-slow-fast velocity response in the gas migration system. Hydrate forms firstly at the grain contacts as cement, then grows within the pore space (floating), then finally grows into contact with the pore walls again. We conclude that hydrate morphology is the key factor that influences the elastic wave velocity response of methane gas hydrate formation in vertical gas migration systems.

  8. Experimental Study of Methane Hydrates in Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smirnov Vyacheslav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of gas hydrate formation in porous space of coal has been studied. The experiments conducted have proven the possibility of methane gas hydrate formation in moist coal. It has been demonstrated that the decomposition points of methane gas hydrates in coal are near to the phase equilibrium curve for bulk methane hydrate. Only part of water absorbed by coal can be involved in the methane gas hydrate formation. With the increase in gas pressure increases the amount of gas hydrate formed in natural coal. For formation of hydrates at a positive temperature, the pressure in the system has to be at least 2 MPa. At the same time the speed of formation and decomposition of gas hydrates in coal is big enough.

  9. MUNICIPAL INDICATORS SYSTEM SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Saccol Ferreira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the indicators of sustainable development in the municipalities of Chapeco , Joaçaba , Port Union and Mafra, which developed the urban and territorial expansion of the West and North of the Santa Catarina region during the twentieth century . Thus, the objective of the analysis is to identify the similarities and differences of municipal sustainable development of each municipality , proposing alternative ways to improve these indexes, through the concepts Sachs (1997. The work is guided by a comparative analysis of data considering the indicators in 2012 and 2014 , through a survey of documentary approach . From this analysis , identified and demonstrated the points with disabilities, but at the same time essential to raise the indices of sustainability of municipalities in socio-cultural terms, economic, environmental and political

  10. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF CELEBRITY AND NON-CELEBRITY ADVERTISEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar Asad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is undertaken to make a comparative analysis of celebrity advertisement and non-celebrity advertisement with respect to attitude toward advertisement, attitude toward brand, purchase intentions, and advertising attributes. For this purpose, a simple random sample of 200 students studying four different disciplines was taken from the Private University in Lahore. For econometric proof, reliability analysis, descriptive analysis, and independent sample T-test was used to interpret the results. Our findings show that there is no significant difference between celebrity and non-celebrity advertisement with respect to attitude toward advertisement, attitude toward brand, purchasing intentions, and advertising attributes. The limitations and recommendations of this research are also given.

  11. Comparative analysis of breast cancer detection in mammograms and thermograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosevic, Marina; Jankovic, Dragan; Peulic, Aleksandar

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we present a system based on feature extraction techniques for detecting abnormal patterns in digital mammograms and thermograms. A comparative study of texture-analysis methods is performed for three image groups: mammograms from the Mammographic Image Analysis Society mammographic database; digital mammograms from the local database; and thermography images of the breast. Also, we present a procedure for the automatic separation of the breast region from the mammograms. Computed features based on gray-level co-occurrence matrices are used to evaluate the effectiveness of textural information possessed by mass regions. A total of 20 texture features are extracted from the region of interest. The ability of feature set in differentiating abnormal from normal tissue is investigated using a support vector machine classifier, Naive Bayes classifier and K-Nearest Neighbor classifier. To evaluate the classification performance, five-fold cross-validation method and receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed.

  12. Comparing methods for analysis of biomedical hyperspectral image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Sweat, Brenner; Abbott, Caitlyn; Favreau, Peter F.; Annamdevula, Naga S.; Rich, Thomas C.

    2017-02-01

    Over the past 2 decades, hyperspectral imaging technologies have been adapted to address the need for molecule-specific identification in the biomedical imaging field. Applications have ranged from single-cell microscopy to whole-animal in vivo imaging and from basic research to clinical systems. Enabling this growth has been the availability of faster, more effective hyperspectral filtering technologies and more sensitive detectors. Hence, the potential for growth of biomedical hyperspectral imaging is high, and many hyperspectral imaging options are already commercially available. However, despite the growth in hyperspectral technologies for biomedical imaging, little work has been done to aid users of hyperspectral imaging instruments in selecting appropriate analysis algorithms. Here, we present an approach for comparing the effectiveness of spectral analysis algorithms by combining experimental image data with a theoretical "what if" scenario. This approach allows us to quantify several key outcomes that characterize a hyperspectral imaging study: linearity of sensitivity, positive detection cut-off slope, dynamic range, and false positive events. We present results of using this approach for comparing the effectiveness of several common spectral analysis algorithms for detecting weak fluorescent protein emission in the midst of strong tissue autofluorescence. Results indicate that this approach should be applicable to a very wide range of applications, allowing a quantitative assessment of the effectiveness of the combined biology, hardware, and computational analysis for detecting a specific molecular signature.

  13. Interaction of Simple Ions with Water: Theoretical Models for the Study of Ion Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gancheff, Jorge S.; Kremer, Carlos; Ventura, Oscar N.

    2009-01-01

    A computational experiment aimed to create and systematically analyze models of simple cation hydrates is presented. The changes in the structure (bond distances and angles) and the electronic density distribution of the solvent and the thermodynamic parameters of the hydration process are calculated and compared with the experimental data. The…

  14. Gas hydrate characterization and grain-scale imaging of recovered cores from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Laura A.; Lorenson, T.D.; Pinkston, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Using cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (CSEM), powder X-ray diffraction, and gas chromatography methods, we investigated the physical states, grain characteristics, gas composition, and methane isotopic composition of two gas-hydrate-bearing sections of core recovered from the BPXA–DOE–USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well situated on the Alaska North Slope. The well was continuously cored from 606.5 m to 760.1 m depth, and sections investigated here were retrieved from 619.9 m and 661.0 m depth. X-ray analysis and imaging of the sediment phase in both sections shows it consists of a predominantly fine-grained and well-sorted quartz sand with lesser amounts of feldspar, muscovite, and minor clays. Cryogenic SEM shows the gas-hydrate phase forming primarily as a pore-filling material between the sediment grains at approximately 70–75% saturation, and more sporadically as thin veins typically several tens of microns in diameter. Pore throat diameters vary, but commonly range 20–120 microns. Gas chromatography analyses of the hydrate-forming gas show that it is comprised of mainly methane (>99.9%), indicating that the gas hydrate is structure I. Here we report on the distribution and articulation of the gas-hydrate phase within the cores, the grain morphology of the hydrate, the composition of the sediment host, and the composition of the hydrate-forming gas.

  15. Decomposition of Protein Experimental Compressibility into Intrinsic and Hydration Shell Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadarlat, Voichita M.; Post, Carol Beth

    2006-01-01

    The experimental determination of protein compressibility reflects both the protein intrinsic compressibility and the difference between the compressibility of water in the protein hydration shell and bulk water. We use molecular dynamics simulations to explore the dependence of the isothermal compressibility of the hydration shell surrounding globular proteins on differential contributions from charged, polar, and apolar protein-water interfaces. The compressibility of water in the protein hydration shell is accounted for by a linear combination of contributions from charged, polar, and apolar solvent-accessible surfaces. The results provide a formula for the deconvolution of experimental data into intrinsic and hydration contributions when a protein of known structure is investigated. The physical basis for the model is the variation in water density shown by the surface-specific radial distribution functions of water molecules around globular proteins. The compressibility of water hydrating charged atoms is lower than bulk water compressibility, the compressibility of water hydrating apolar atoms is somewhat larger than bulk water compressibility, and the compressibility of water around polar atoms is about the same as the compressibility of bulk water. We also assess whether hydration water compressibility determined from small compound data can be used to estimate the compressibility of hydration water surrounding proteins. The results, based on an analysis from four dipeptide solutions, indicate that small compound data cannot be used directly to estimate the compressibility of hydration water surrounding proteins. PMID:16997864

  16. Distribution and Characters of Gas Hydrate Offshore of Southwestern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Char-Shine Liu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Bottom simulating reflector (BSR is a key indicator for the presence of gas hydrate beneath the sea floor. Widely distributed BSRs have been observed in the area offshore of southwestern Taiwan where the active accretionary complex meets with the passive China continental margin. In order to better understand the distribution and characters of the gas hydrate in the region, closely spaced (1.86-km line spacing multichannel seismic reflection surveys have been conducted in recent years under the support of the Central Geological Survey, ROC. Over 10000 km of multichannel seismic reflection profiles have been collected that cover an area of about 10000 km2 offshore of southwestern Taiwan. BSRs can be identified along 50% of the seismic profiles that we collected. A newly compiled BSR distribution map suggests that gas hydrates are distributed both in the passive margin of the China continental slope as well as in the submarine Taiwan accretionary wedge, from water depths of 500 to over 3000 m. Gas hydrates are most concentrated underneath anticlinal ridges in the accretionary wedge, and underneath the slope ridges of the passive continental margin that were formed due to sedimentary processes. Active fluid activities are evident from various features observed on seismic reflection and chirp sonar profiles, such as mud volcanoes, gas plumes and gas charged shallow sedimentary layers. Fluid migration model has been established from a set of pseudo 3D seismic reflection data. The predicted locations of high fluid flux correlate well with those interpreted from geochemical analyses that show very high methane concentrations and very shallow sulfate-methane interfaces (SMI. This demonstrates the importance of structural control over gas hydrate emplacement. From the observed gas hydrate distribution and characters, the area offshore of southwestern Taiwan provides an ideal place to study and compare the formation and migration of gas hydrates under

  17. Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunbar, John

    2012-12-31

    Electrical methods offer a geophysical approach for determining the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate in deep marine environments. Methane hydrate is essentially non-conductive. Hence, sediments containing hydrate are more resistive than sediments without hydrates. To date, the controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method has been used in marine hydrates studies. This project evaluated an alternative electrical method, direct current resistivity (DCR), for detecting marine hydrates. DCR involves the injection of direct current between two source electrodes and the simultaneous measurement of the electric potential (voltage) between multiple receiver electrodes. The DCR method provides subsurface information comparable to that produced by the CSEM method, but with less sophisticated instrumentation. Because the receivers are simple electrodes, large numbers can be deployed to achieve higher spatial resolution. In this project a prototype seafloor DCR system was developed and used to conduct a reconnaissance survey at a site of known hydrate occurrence in Mississippi Canyon Block 118. The resulting images of sub-bottom resistivities indicate that high-concentration hydrates at the site occur only in the upper 50 m, where deep-seated faults intersect the seafloor. Overall, there was evidence for much less hydrate at the site than previously thought based on available seismic and CSEM data alone.

  18. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lina

    2017-05-13

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10 was conducted for tricalcium silicate (C3S) to interpret long-term hydration process and investigate the formation, structure and properties of C-S-H. Based on results from XRD, IR, SEM, NMR and so forth, loose and dense clusters of C-S-H with analogous C/S ratio were obtained along with the corresponding chemical formulae proposed as Ca5Si4O13∙6.2H2O. Crystalline structure inside C-S-H was observed by TEM, which was allocated at the foil-like proportion as well as the edge of wrinkles of the product. The long-term hydration process of C3S in dilute suspension could be sketchily described as migration of calcium hydroxide and in-situ growth of C-S-H with equilibrium silicon in aqueous solution relatively constant and calcium varied.

  19. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  20. Gene expression changes in diapause or quiescent potato cyst nematode, Globodera pallida, eggs after hydration or exposure to tomato root diffusate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Emilio Palomares-Rius

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant-parasitic nematodes (PPN need to be adapted to survive in the absence of a suitable host or in hostile environmental conditions. Various forms of developmental arrest including hatching inhibition and dauer stages are used by PPN in order to survive these conditions and spread to other areas. Potato cyst nematodes (PCN (Globodera pallida and G. rostochiensis are frequently in an anhydrobiotic state, with unhatched nematode persisting for extended periods of time inside the cyst in the absence of the host. This paper shows fundamental changes in the response of quiescent and diapaused eggs of G. pallida to hydration and following exposure to tomato root diffusate (RD using microarray gene expression analysis encompassing a broad set of genes. For the quiescent eggs, 547 genes showed differential expression following hydration vs. hydratation and RD (H-RD treatment whereas 708 genes showed differential regulation for the diapaused eggs following these treatments. The comparison between hydrated quiescent and diapaused eggs showed marked differences, with 2,380 genes that were differentially regulated compared with 987 genes following H-RD. Hydrated quiescent and diapaused eggs were markedly different indicating differences in adaptation for long-term survival. Transport activity is highly up-regulated following H-RD and few genes were coincident between both kinds of eggs. With the quiescent eggs, the majority of genes were related to ion transport (mainly sodium, while the diapaused eggs showed a major diversity of transporters (amino acid transport, ion transport, acetylcholine or other molecules.

  1. Controlled source electromagnetic study on the response of cold vent sites and gas hydrate occurrences on the northern Cascadia margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrmann, R.; Schwalenberg, K.; Riedel, M.; Dosso, S. E.; Mir, R. A.; Edwards, R. N.

    2012-12-01

    The northern Cascadia margin offshore Vancouver Island is an accretionary sedimentary prism with abundant fluid seepage including cold vents. Cold vents represent gas-rich fluid conduits that often reach the seafloor, contain gas hydrates and support large chemo-synthetic communities. Fluids rise pervasively through the sediments and locally through fault and fracture networks from as far down as the subducting plate to the seafloor. Transported gases may result locally in high amounts of gas hydrate within the upper few tens of meters below the seafloor. The controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method is sensitive to resistivity contrasts and therefore to free gas and hydrate accumulations. Our data were acquired with the electric dipole-dipole CSEM configuration built at the University of Toronto that is especially designed to detect resistive anomalies close to the seafloor. We utilize 1-D data inversion and model parameter uncertainty analysis, as well as complementary information from seismic, bathymetry and borehole data. Our data were acquired near the prominent vent site Bullseye, as well as close to the shelf at the edge of the gas hydrate stability field. We analyze the 3-D effect of vents on the CSEM response through forward modeling of a variety of vent models and compare the results to our data. We conclude with a geological interpretation for the upper few hundred meters of the sediment section on the middle and upper slope of the northern Cascadia margin.

  2. Comparative analysis as a basic research orientation: Key methodological problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N P Narbut

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To date, the Sociological Laboratory of the Peoples’ Friendship University of Russia has accumulated a vast experience in the field of cross-cultural studies reflected in the publications based on the results of mass surveys conducted in Moscow, Maikop, Beijing, Guangzhou, Prague, Belgrade, and Pristina. However, these publications mainly focus on the comparisons of the empirical data rather than methodological and technical issues, that is why the aim of this article is to identify key problems of the comparative analysis in cross-cultural studies that become evident only if you conduct an empirical research yourself - from the first step of setting the problem and approving it by all the sides (countries involved to the last step of interpreting and comparing the data obtained. The authors are sure that no sociologist would ever doubt the necessity and importance of comparative analysis in the broadest sense of the word, but at the same time very few are ready to discuss its key methodological challenges and prefer to ignore them completely. We summarize problems of the comparative analysis in sociology as follows: (1 applying research techniques to the sample in another country - both in translating and adapting them to different social realities and worldview (in particular, the problematic status of standardization and qualitative approach; (2 choosing “right” respondents to question and relevant cases (cultures to study; (3 designing the research scheme, i.e. justifying the sequence of steps (what should go first - methodology or techniques; (4 accepting the procedures that are correct within one country for cross-cultural work (whether or not that is an appropriate choice.

  3. High-Altitude Hydration System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazynski, Scott E.; Orndoff, Evelyne; Bue, Grant C.; Schaefbauer, Mark E.; Urban, Kase

    2010-01-01

    Three methods are being developed for keeping water from freezing during high-altitude climbs so that mountaineers can remain hydrated. Three strategies have been developed. At the time of this reporting two needed to be tested in the field and one was conceptual. The first method is Passive Thermal Control Using Aerogels. This involves mounting the fluid reservoir of the climber s canteen to an inner layer of clothing for better heat retention. For the field test, bottles were mounted to the inner fleece layer of clothing, and then aerogel insulation was placed on the outside of the bottle, and circumferentially around the drink straw. When climbers need to drink, they can pull up the insulated straw from underneath the down suit, take a sip, and then put it back into the relative warmth of the suit. For the field test, a data logger assessed the temperatures of the water reservoir, as well as near the tip of the drink straw. The second method is Passive Thermal Control with Copper-Shielded Drink Straw and Aerogels, also mounted to inner layers of clothing for better heat retention. Braided wire emanates from the inside of the fleece jacket layer, and continues up and around the drink straw in order to use body heat to keep the system-critical drink straw warm enough to keep water in the liquid state. For the field test, a data logger will be used to compare this with the above concept. The third, and still conceptual, method is Active Thermal Control with Microcontroller. If the above methods do not work, microcontrollers and tape heaters have been identified that could keep the drink straw warm even under extremely cold conditions. Power requirements are not yet determined because the thermal environment inside the down suit relative to the external environment has not been established. A data logger will be used to track both the external and internal temperatures of the suit on a summit day.

  4. 77 FR 40032 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to...

  5. 78 FR 37536 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. The Federal... of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of methane... Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate Research and Development Program. Tentative Agenda: The agenda will...

  6. Comparative Effectiveness of 12 Treatment Strategies for Preventing Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury: A Systematic Review and Bayesian Network Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaole; Xie, Xinfang; Liu, Lijun; Lv, Jicheng; Song, Fujian; Perkovic, Vlado; Zhang, Hong

    2017-01-01

    To simultaneously evaluate the relative efficacy of multiple pharmacologic strategies for preventing contrast-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). Systematic review containing a Bayesian network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Participants undergoing diagnostic and/or interventional procedures with contrast media. Randomized controlled trials comparing the active drug treatments with each other or with hydration alone. Any of the following drugs in combination with hydration: N-acetylcysteine (NAC), theophylline (aminophylline), fenoldopam, iloprost, alprostadil, prostaglandin E1, statins, statins plus NAC, bicarbonate sodium, bicarbonate sodium plus NAC, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), tocopherol (vitamin E), α-lipoic acid, atrial natriuretic peptide, B-type natriuretic peptide, and carperitide. The occurrence of contrast-induced AKI. The trial network included 150 trials with 31,631 participants and 4,182 contrast-induced AKI events assessing 12 different interventions. Compared to hydration, ORs (95% credible intervals) for contrast-induced AKI were 0.31 (0.14-0.60) for high-dose statin plus NAC, 0.37 (0.19-0.64) for high-dose statin alone, 0.37 (0.17-0.72) for prostaglandins, 0.48 (0.26-0.82) for theophylline, 0.62 (0.40-0.88) for bicarbonate sodium plus NAC, 0.67 (0.54-0.81) for NAC alone, 0.64 (0.41-0.95) for vitamins and analogues, 0.70 (0.29-1.37) for natriuretic peptides, 0.69 (0.31-1.37) for fenoldopam, 0.78 (0.59-1.01) for bicarbonate sodium, and 0.98 (0.41-2.07) for low-dose statin. High-dose statin plus NAC or high-dose statin alone were likely to be ranked the best or the second best for preventing contrast-induced AKI. The overall results were not materially changed in metaregressions or subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Patient-level data were unavailable; unable to include some treatment agents; low event rates; imbalanced distribution of participants among treatment strategies. High-dose statins plus hydration with or without NAC might

  7. Nitrogen-assisted Three-phase Equilibrium in Hydrate Systems Composed of Water, Methane, Carbon Dioxide, and Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, K.; Flemings, P. B.; DiCarlo, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Guest molecule exchange is a new and promising methane hydrate production technique in which methane gas is produced by injection of another gas without requiring depressurization or thermal stimulation. The technique is generally associated with injection of carbon dioxide, but injection of nitrogen and carbon dioxide mixtures are the most efficient and economical. However, thermodynamic behavior of injection mixtures is poorly understood, and it is unclear how nitrogen affects the exchange process. Here, we describe thermodynamic stability of hydrate systems that contain water, methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen. We present a series of ternary and quaternary phase diagrams and show the impact nitrogen has on hydrate stability. Our results demonstrate that nitrogen can either stabilize hydrate, de-stabilize hydrate, or produce three-phase equilibrium (gas, water, and hydrate) depending on its relative abundance. At low abundance nitrogen forms hydrate and directly contributes to the exchange process. At high abundance nitrogen de-stabilizes hydrate akin to traditional hydrate inhibitors, such as salt, alcohol, or mono-ethylene glycol. We show how the dual properties of nitrogen lead to three-phase equilibrium and how three-phase equilibrium may explain much of the behavior observed in methane production from nitrogen-rich injections. We apply our analysis to laboratory experiments and the methane hydrate field test on the northern Alaskan slope at Ignik Sikumi. These results can be extended to analyze dynamic evolution of mixed hydrate systems.

  8. Comparative Analysis of Shift Registers in Different Nanometer Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh MEHRA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, power and speed efficient registers have been designed using different nanometer technologies. Serial in Serial out (SISO and Serial in Parallel out (SIPO shift registers are designed using 180 nm and 90 nm technologies. Both the design are analyzed and compared based on power, delay and power-delay-product (PDP. Present portable real time system demands high performance in terms of speed along with low power consumption. The concept of technology scale down has been used to optimize power and delay in booth designs. The schematic of SISO and SIPO has been developed using Cadence Virtuoso software and analysis has been performed using Analog Design Environment. It has been observed from simulation analysis that 90 nm based SISO design shows an improvement of 68.61 % in power and 54.92 % in delay as compared to 180 nm technology. Likewise SIPO design has shown an improvement of 67.75 % in power and 53.32 % in delay as compared to 180 nm technology.

  9. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of streptococcus pseudopneumoniae with viridans group streptococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Hee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, is a novel member of the genus Streptococcus, falling close to related members like S. pneumoniae, S. mitis, and S. oralis. Its recent appearance has shed light on streptococcal infections, which has been unclear till recently. In this study, the transcriptome of S. pseudopneumoniae CCUG 49455T was analyzed using the S. pneumoniae R6 microarray platform and compared with those of S. pneumoniae KCTC 5080T, S. mitis KCTC 3556T, and S. oralis KCTC 13048T strains. Results Comparative transcriptome analysis revealed the extent of genetic relatedness among the species, and implies that S. pseudopneumoniae is the most closely related to S. pneumoniae. A total of 489, 444 and 470 genes were upregulated while 347, 484 and 443 were downregulated relative to S. pneumoniae in S. pseudopneumoniae, S. oralis and S. mitis respectively. Important findings were the up-regulation of TCS (two component systems and transposase which were found to be specific to S. pseudopneumoniae. Conclusions This study provides insight to the current understanding of the genomic content of S. pseudopneumoniae. The comparative transcriptome analysis showed hierarchical clustering of expression data of S. pseudopneumoniae with S. pneumoniae and S. mitis with S. oralis. This proves that transcriptional profiling can facilitate in elucidating the genetic distance between closely related strains.

  10. Canine Mammary Carcinomas: A Comparative Analysis of Altered Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farruk M. Lutful Kabir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer represents the second most frequent neoplasm in humans and sexually intact female dogs after lung and skin cancers, respectively. Many similar features in human and dog cancers including, spontaneous development, clinical presentation, tumor heterogeneity, disease progression and response to conventional therapies have supported development of this comparative model as an alternative to mice. The highly conserved similarities between canine and human genomes are also key to this comparative analysis, especially when compared to the murine genome. Studies with canine mammary tumor (CMT models have shown a strong genetic correlation with their human counterparts, particularly in terms of altered expression profiles of cell cycle regulatory genes, tumor suppressor and oncogenes and also a large group of non-coding RNAs or microRNAs (miRNAs. Because CMTs are considered predictive intermediate models for human breast cancer, similarities in genetic alterations and cancer predisposition between humans and dogs have raised further interest. Many cancer-associated genetic defects critical to mammary tumor development and oncogenic determinants of metastasis have been reported and appear to be similar in both species. Comparative analysis of deregulated gene sets or cancer signaling pathways has shown that a significant proportion of orthologous genes are comparably up- or down-regulated in both human and dog breast tumors. Particularly, a group of cell cycle regulators called cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs acting as potent tumor suppressors are frequently defective in CMTs. Interestingly, comparative analysis of coding sequences has also shown that these genes are highly conserved in mammals in terms of their evolutionary divergence from a common ancestor. Moreover, co-deletion and/or homozygous loss of the INK4A/ARF/INK4B (CDKN2A/B locus, encoding three members of the CKI tumor suppressor gene families (p16/INK4A, p14ARF and p15

  11. Micro-PIXE analyses of frozen-hydrated semi-thick biological sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.D., E-mail: yaodongw@tlabs.ac.za [Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, J., E-mail: mesjasz@tlabs.ac.za [Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Tylko, G., E-mail: grzegorz.tylko@uj.edu.pl [Department of Cell Biology and Imaging, Institute of Zoology, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 9, 30-387 Krakow (Poland); Barnabas, A.D., E-mail: alban@tlabs.ac.za [Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Przybylowicz, W.J., E-mail: Przybylowicz@tlabs.ac.za [Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa)

    2013-07-01

    Cryo-micro-PIXE system and methodology of microanalysis of frozen-hydrated semi-thick biological sections is described. A commercially available cryotransfer system used in electron microscopy has been adapted for this purpose. The analyzed material was frozen by metal–mirror method and sections of 20–50 micron thickness were prepared. Micro-PIXE and simultaneous proton backscattering was performed using 3 MeV proton beam. Monitoring of water vapour composition during the proton bombardment showed good stability of the analyzed material. The results of repetitive analyses of standards prepared from gelatin–glycerol solution with added known concentrations of K, Ni, Cu, Zn were in good agreement with expected, calculated values. Mass losses and changes of elemental composition were monitored. Elemental maps obtained for frozen-hydrated semi-thick section of Ni hyperaccumulator Senecio coronatus showed excellent preservation of leaf morphology and the distribution of elements. Quantitative elemental mapping of frozen-hydrated specimens compared with subsequent analysis of the same areas after freeze-drying revealed similar distribution pattern in both cases. It is clear, however, that freeze-drying induces some distortion of cell morphology and specimen shrinkage.

  12. Hydration modelling of calcium sulphates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korte, A.C.J.; Eligehausen, R.; Gehlen, C.

    2008-01-01

    The CEMHYD3D model has been extended at the University of Twente in last ten years1,2. At present the cement hydration model is extended for the use of gypsum. Although gypsum was present in the model already, the model was not suitable for high contents of gypsum and did not include the transitions

  13. Hydrated-electron population dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pshenichnikov, MS; Baltuska, A; Wiersma, DA; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Baltuška, Andrius

    2004-01-01

    A detailed frequency-resolved pump-probe study of hydrated electron dynamics, performed with 5-fs pulses, is presented. We show that the experimental data can be successfully described with a model in which the excited state lifetime is similar to50 fs in regular water and similar to70 A in heavy

  14. Systemic hydration: relating science to clinical practice in vocal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Naomi A; Thibeault, Susan L

    2014-09-01

    To examine the current state of the science regarding the role of systemic hydration in vocal function and health. Literature review. Literature search spanning multiple disciplines, including speech-language pathology, nutrition and dietetics, medicine, sports and exercise science, physiology, and biomechanics. The relationship between hydration and physical function is an area of common interest among multiple professions. Each discipline provides valuable insight into the connection between performance and water balance, as well as complimentary methods of investigation. Existing voice literature suggests a relationship between hydration and voice production; however, the underlying mechanisms are not yet defined and a treatment effect for systemic hydration remains to be demonstrated. Literature from other disciplines sheds light on methodological shortcomings and, in some cases, offers an alternative explanation for observed phenomena. A growing body of literature in the field of voice science is documenting a relationship between hydration and vocal function; however, greater understanding is required to guide best practice in the maintenance of vocal health and management of voice disorders. Integration of knowledge and technical expertise from multiple disciplines facilitates analysis of existing literature and provides guidance as to future research. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Systemic Hydration: Relating Science to Clinical Practice in Vocal Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Naomi A.; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the current state of the science regarding the role of systemic hydration in vocal function and health. Study Design Literature Review Methods Literature search spanning multiple disciplines, including speech-language pathology, nutrition and dietetics, medicine, sports and exercise science, physiology and biomechanics. Results The relationship between hydration and physical function is an area of common interest amongst multiple professions. Each discipline provides valuable insight into the connection between performance and water balance, as well as complimentary methods of investigation. Existing voice literature suggests a relationship between hydration and voice production, however the underlying mechanisms are not yet defined and a treatment effect for systemic hydration remains to be demonstrated. Literature from other disciplines sheds light on methodological shortcomings and in some cases offers an alternative explanation for observed phenomena. Conclusions A growing body of literature in the field of voice science is documenting a relationship between hydration and vocal function, however greater understanding is required to guide best practice in the maintenance of vocal health and management of voice disorders. Integration of knowledge and technical expertise from multiple disciplines facilitates analysis of existing literature and provides guidance as to future research. PMID:24880674

  16. Integrating Natural Gas Hydrates in the Global Carbon Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Archer; Bruce Buffett

    2011-12-31

    We produced a two-dimensional geological time- and basin-scale model of the sedimentary margin in passive and active settings, for the simulation of the deep sedimentary methane cycle including hydrate formation. Simulation of geochemical data required development of parameterizations for bubble transport in the sediment column, and for the impact of the heterogeneity in the sediment pore fluid flow field, which represent new directions in modeling methane hydrates. The model is somewhat less sensitive to changes in ocean temperature than our previous 1-D model, due to the different methane transport mechanisms in the two codes (pore fluid flow vs. bubble migration). The model is very sensitive to reasonable changes in organic carbon deposition through geologic time, and to details of how the bubbles migrate, in particular how efficiently they are trapped as they rise through undersaturated or oxidizing chemical conditions and the hydrate stability zone. The active margin configuration reproduces the elevated hydrate saturations observed in accretionary wedges such as the Cascadia Margin, but predicts a decrease in the methane inventory per meter of coastline relative to a comparable passive margin case, and a decrease in the hydrate inventory with an increase in the plate subduction rate.

  17. Thermal properties of methane gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, William F.

    2007-01-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline solids in which molecules of a “guest” species occupy and stabilize cages formed by water molecules. Similar to ice in appearance (fig. 1), gas hydrates are stable at high pressures and temperatures above freezing (0°C). Methane is the most common naturally occurring hydrate guest species. Methane hydrates, also called simply “gas hydrates,” are extremely concentrated stores of methane and are found in shallow permafrost and continental margin sediments worldwide. Brought to sea-level conditions, methane hydrate breaks down and releases up to 160 times its own volume in methane gas. The methane stored in gas hydrates is of interest and concern to policy makers as a potential alternative energy resource and as a potent greenhouse gas that could be released from sediments to the atmosphere and ocean during global warming. In continental margin settings, methane release from gas hydrates also is a potential geohazard and could cause submarine landslides that endanger offshore infrastructure. Gas hydrate stability is sensitive to temperature changes. To understand methane release from gas hydrate, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a laboratory investigation of pure methane hydrate thermal properties at conditions relevant to accumulations of naturally occurring methane hydrate. Prior to this work, thermal properties for gas hydrates generally were measured on analog systems such as ice and non-methane hydrates or at temperatures below freezing; these conditions limit direct comparisons to methane hydrates in marine and permafrost sediment. Three thermal properties, defined succinctly by Briaud and Chaouch (1997), are estimated from the experiments described here: - Thermal conductivity, λ: if λ is high, heat travels easily through the material. - Thermal diffusivity, κ: if κ is high, it takes little time for the temperature to rise in the material. - Specific heat, cp: if cp is high, it takes a great deal of heat to

  18. Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterston, Robert H.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Birney, Ewan; Rogers, Jane; Abril, Josep F.; Agarwal, Pankaj; Agarwala, Richa; Ainscough, Rachel; Alexandersson, Marina; An, Peter; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Attwood, John; Baertsch, Robert; Bailey, Jonathon; Barlow, Karen; Beck, Stephan; Berry, Eric; Birren, Bruce; Bloom, Toby; Bork, Peer; Botcherby, Marc; Bray, Nicolas; Brent, Michael R.; Brown, Daniel G.; Brown, Stephen D.; Bult, Carol; Burton, John; Butler, Jonathan; Campbell, Robert D.; Carninci, Piero; Cawley, Simon; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Chinwalla, Asif T.; Church, Deanna M.; Clamp, Michele; Clee, Christopher; Collins, Francis S.; Cook, Lisa L.; Copley, Richard R.; Coulson, Alan; Couronne, Olivier; Cuff, James; Curwen, Val; Cutts, Tim; Daly, Mark; David, Robert; Davies, Joy; Delehaunty, Kimberly D.; Deri, Justin; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Dewey, Colin; Dickens, Nicholas J.; Diekhans, Mark; Dodge, Sheila; Dubchak, Inna; Dunn, Diane M.; Eddy, Sean R.; Elnitski, Laura; Emes, Richard D.; Eswara, Pallavi; Eyras, Eduardo; Felsenfeld, Adam; Fewell, Ginger A.; Flicek, Paul; Foley, Karen; Frankel, Wayne N.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Fulton, Robert S.; Furey, Terrence S.; Gage, Diane; Gibbs, Richard A.; Glusman, Gustavo; Gnerre, Sante; Goldman, Nick; Goodstadt, Leo; Grafham, Darren; Graves, Tina A.; Green, Eric D.; Gregory, Simon; Guigo, Roderic; Guyer, Mark; Hardison, Ross C.; Haussler, David; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Hinrichs, Angela; Hlavina, Wratko; Holzer, Timothy; Hsu, Fan; Hua, Axin; Hubbard, Tim; Hunt, Adrienne; Jackson, Ian; Jaffe, David B.; Johnson, L. Steven; Jones, Matthew; Jones, Thomas A.; Joy, Ann; Kamal, Michael; Karlsson, Elinor K.; Karolchik, Donna; Kasprzyk, Arkadiusz; Kawai, Jun; Keibler, Evan; Kells, Cristyn; Kent, W. James; Kirby, Andrew; Kolbe, Diana L.; Korf, Ian; Kucherlapati, Raju S.; Kulbokas III, Edward J.; Kulp, David; Landers, Tom; Leger, J.P.; Leonard, Steven; Letunic, Ivica; Levine, Rosie; et al.

    2002-12-15

    The sequence of the mouse genome is a key informational tool for understanding the contents of the human genome and a key experimental tool for biomedical research. Here, we report the results of an international collaboration to produce a high-quality draft sequence of the mouse genome. We also present an initial comparative analysis of the mouse and human genomes, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the two sequences. We discuss topics including the analysis of the evolutionary forces shaping the size, structure and sequence of the genomes; the conservation of large-scale synteny across most of the genomes; the much lower extent of sequence orthology covering less than half of the genomes; the proportions of the genomes under selection; the number of protein-coding genes; the expansion of gene families related to reproduction and immunity; the evolution of proteins; and the identification of intraspecies polymorphism.

  19. Comparative analysis of old, recycled and new PV modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroon Ashfaq

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents comparative analysis of old, recycled and new PV modules. It is possible to recycle even very old products by modern standard processes in a value-conserving manner. About 90% of the materials recovered from solar panels can be recycled into useful products. Carbon emission and energy cost are low in manufacturing recycled SPV. Modules can be manufactured with recycled materials and reinstalled in systems as a full quality product with today’s technology good for another 25–30 years. Analysis of all the models of PV module is done with the help of MATLAB. This helps in comparison and proves the effectiveness of the recycled PV module based systems.

  20. Efficacy of escitalopram compared to citalopram: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Stuart; Hansen, Thomas; Kasper, Siegfried

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the clinical relevance of the relative antidepressant efficacy of escitalopram and citalopram by meta-analysis. Studies in major depressive disorder (MDD) with both escitalopram and citalopram treatment arms were identified. Adult patients had to meet DSM-IV criteria for MDD. The primary outcome measure was the treatment difference in Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score at week 8 (or last assessment if escitalopram, n=995; citalopram, n=1014). Escitalopram was significantly more effective than citalopram in overall treatment effect, with an estimated mean treatment difference of 1.7 points at week 8 (or last assessment if escitalopram. In this meta-analysis, the statistically significant superior efficacy of escitalopram compared to citalopram was shown to be clinically relevant.

  1. Establishing a framework for comparative analysis of genome sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansal, A.K.

    1995-06-01

    This paper describes a framework and a high-level language toolkit for comparative analysis of genome sequence alignment The framework integrates the information derived from multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree (hypothetical tree of evolution) to derive new properties about sequences. Multiple sequence alignments are treated as an abstract data type. Abstract operations have been described to manipulate a multiple sequence alignment and to derive mutation related information from a phylogenetic tree by superimposing parsimonious analysis. The framework has been applied on protein alignments to derive constrained columns (in a multiple sequence alignment) that exhibit evolutionary pressure to preserve a common property in a column despite mutation. A Prolog toolkit based on the framework has been implemented and demonstrated on alignments containing 3000 sequences and 3904 columns.

  2. Comparative and functional analysis of cardiovascular-related genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-09-01

    The ability to detect putative cis-regulatory elements in cardiovascular-related genes has been accelerated by the availability of genomic sequence data from numerous vertebrate species and the recent development of comparative genomic tools. This improvement is anticipated to lead to a better understanding of the complex regulatory architecture of cardiovascular (CV) genes and how genetic variants in these non-coding regions can potentially play a role in cardiovascular disease. This manuscript reviews a recently established database dedicated to the comparative sequence analysis of 250 human CV genes of known importance, 37 of which currently contain sequence comparison data for organisms beyond those of human, mouse and rat. These data have provided a glimpse into the variety of possible insights from deep vertebrate sequence comparisons and the identification of putative gene regulatory elements.

  3. Stigma, sex work, and substance use: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Cecilia; McCarthy, Bill; Jansson, Mikael

    2015-03-01

    Stigma is a widely used concept in social science research and an extensive literature claims that stigmatisation contributes to numerous negative health outcomes. However, few studies compare groups that vary in the extent to which they are stigmatised and even fewer studies examine stigma's independent and mediating effects. This article addresses these gaps in a comparative study of perceived stigma and drug use among three low-income feminised service occupations: sex work, food and alcoholic beverage serving, and barbering and hairstyling. An analysis of longitudinal data shows positive associations between sex work, perceived stigma, and socially less acceptable drug use (for example, heroin and cocaine), and that stigma mediates part of the link between sex work and the use of these drugs. Our overall findings suggest that perceived stigma is pronounced among those who work in the sex industry and negatively affects health independently of sex work involvement. © 2015 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  4. Comparative analysis of vitamin status of schoolchildren in recreational period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Podrigalo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available It is a comparative analysis of the characteristics of the vitamin status of schoolchildren during the summer recreation of 90th years of the last century and now. The study involved 167 schoolchildren aged 11-14 years. With the help of questionnaires developed by the authors assessed the severity of symptoms of vitamin deficiency, the prevalence of vitamin supplementation, frequency and volume of consumption of fruits and vegetables. It is confirmed that the saturation is the state of the vitamin in children is the best compared with data from 20 years ago, the state of multi-vitamin deficiency is replaced mono-vitamin deficit. The results, data evaluation and the availability of additional fortification of the diet of fruit and vegetables support the need for measures aimed at improving vitamin status. Using the questionnaire method is most appropriate for monitoring the vitamin status of schoolchildren.

  5. The Comparative Analysis of the Efficiency of Coal Liquefaction Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudyka Viktor I.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Organization of production of synthetic liquid fuels (SLF in Ukraine becomes an especially topical and at the same time complex scientific and applied task, taking into consideration criteria of the techno-ecological and economic rationality. The article presents a methodical approach to the comparative analysis of efficiency of the main methods and technologies for the synthetic liquid fuels production and a carried out testing, the results of which allowed to conclude that the most rational is the technology of indirect coal liquefaction based on coal thermal plasma gasification.

  6. Comparative analysis of measles virus RNA by oligonucleotide fingerprinting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, J.R.; Meulen, V. ter (Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.))

    1982-01-01

    Isolates from two cases of acute measles, one case of acute measles encephalitis and three patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis were compared. This comparison was based upon the electrophoretic analysis of T/sub 1/ oligonucleotides from single-stranded, full-length RNA isolated from cytoplasmic nucleocapsids. Although all viruses have oligonucleotides in common, each isolate generated a unique pattern of oligonucleotides. However, no group of oligonucleotides was observed which would allow differentiation between viruses isolated from acute infections and those isolated from CNS diseases; indicating that probably all measles viruses differ in their nucleotide sequence, regardless of origin.

  7. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF ESTIMATION METHODS OF PHARMACY ORGANIZATION BANKRUPTCY PROBABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Adzhienko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A purpose of this study was to determine the probability of bankruptcy by various methods in order to predict the financial crisis of pharmacy organization. Estimating the probability of pharmacy organization bankruptcy was conducted using W. Beaver’s method adopted in the Russian Federation, with integrated assessment of financial stability use on the basis of scoring analysis. The results obtained by different methods are comparable and show that the risk of bankruptcy of the pharmacy organization is small.

  8. Comparative Analysis of Transport Terminologyusage on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Petrėtienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available he paper deals with the comparative analysis of the usage of transport terminology on the Internet using the popular search engine www.google.lt. It analyses the frequency of correct and incorrect usage of lexis, word-building and pronominal forms. The charts show what mistakes are mostly made and that they are mainly term building mistakes. The usage of new loanwords can be justified because most of them are not considered as serious language mistakes. Although, mistakes of another kind can only be explained as the negligence of the authors of the Internet text.

  9. Comparative analysis of plates obtained with different aerial photogrammetric cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelbl, Otto

    The image quality and metric precision of three aerial cameras, the Zeiss Jena LMK, the Wild Heerbrugg RC10A, and the Zeiss Oberkochen RMK, are compared. The metric precision analysis is based on an aerial triangulation of a photogrammetric block of six bands using seven plates with the scale set at 1:5500. Differences in image quality were successfully analyzed by determination of the modulation transfer function under flight conditions, and the reproduction of singularized points is also considered. Results using Panatomic-X film demonstrate that the quality of the image depends principally on the objective used.

  10. Racial classification in the evolutionary sciences: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billinger, Michael S

    2007-01-01

    Human racial classification has long been a problem for the discipline of anthropology, but much of the criticism of the race concept has focused on its social and political connotations. The central argument of this paper is that race is not a specifically human problem, but one that exists in evolutionary thought in general. This paper looks at various disciplinary approaches to racial or subspecies classification, extending its focus beyond the anthropological race concept by providing a comparative analysis of the use of racial classification in evolutionary biology, genetics, and anthropology.

  11. Peace Negotiations in the Third World: A Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Benítez Manaut

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the negotiations and peace processes in the Third World are analized from a comparative viewpoint in order to focus in on the case of Centroamerica. Reference is made to the special features and common elements of those peace processes in otherregions of the Third World and they are compared to those which have taken place in Centroamerica. It is a retrospective and comparative analysis. For this reason, the author has decided to carry out a brief typology of those conflicts offered by Centroamerica: inNicaragua, El Salvador and Guatemala. Later, the author goes on to analyse the most relevant peace and negotiation processes involving the Third World including one or two from Latin America: the cases of Panama, Afghanistan, Iran-Iraq, Colombia, southern Africa (South Africa, Namibia and Angola and Cambodia. Later, the author goes overthe peace process periods in Centroamerica and the temporary contradictions which are presented by internal conflict, regional conflict and geopolitical conflict. Finally, a comparative methodological exercise is carried out which allows to focus on modes of implementation of the peace processes.

  12. Comparative proteomic analysis of fibrosarcoma and skin fibroblast cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meral, Ogunc; Uysal, Hamdi

    2015-02-01

    Comparative proteomic analysis of normal and cancer cell lines provides for a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of cancer development and is essential for developing more effective strategies for new biomarker or drug target discovery. The purpose of this study is to compare protein expression levels between fibrosarcoma and fibroblast cell lines. In our study, two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) techniques were carried out to compare the protein profile between fibrosarcoma and fibroblast cell lines. We prepared cell lysate samples to analyze intracellular proteins and secretome samples to analyze extracellular proteins in both cell lines. Our results revealed 13 upregulated proteins and 1 downregulated protein of which all of them identified in fibrosarcoma cell line after the comparison with fibroblast cell line cell lysates. When comparing secretome profiles of both cell lines, we found and identified 13 proteins only expressed in fibrosarcoma cell line. These identified proteins have common functions such as cell proliferation, cell differentiation, invasion, metastasis, and apoptosis in cancer. The data obtained from this study indicates that these proteins have importance on understanding the molecular mechanism of fibrosarcoma. These proteins may serve as candidate biomarkers and drug targets for future clinical studies.

  13. Feature-level sentiment analysis by using comparative domain corpora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Changqin; Ren, Fuji

    2016-06-01

    Feature-level sentiment analysis (SA) is able to provide more fine-grained SA on certain opinion targets and has a wider range of applications on E-business. This study proposes an approach based on comparative domain corpora for feature-level SA. The proposed approach makes use of word associations for domain-specific feature extraction. First, we assign a similarity score for each candidate feature to denote its similarity extent to a domain. Then we identify domain features based on their similarity scores on different comparative domain corpora. After that, dependency grammar and a general sentiment lexicon are applied to extract and expand feature-oriented opinion words. Lastly, the semantic orientation of a domain-specific feature is determined based on the feature-oriented opinion lexicons. In evaluation, we compare the proposed method with several state-of-the-art methods (including unsupervised and semi-supervised) using a standard product review test collection. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of using comparative domain corpora.

  14. Phase equilibria of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, HNO{sub 3}, and HCl hydrates and the composition of polar stratospheric clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooldridge, P.J.; Zhang, R.; Molina, M.J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-20

    Thermodynamic properties and phase equilibria behavior for the hydrates and coexisting pairs of hydrates of common acids which exist in the stratosphere are assembled from new laboratory measurements and standard literature data. The analysis focuses upon solid-solid-vapor equilibria at temperatures around 200 K and includes new calorimetric and vapor pressure data. Calculated partial pressures versus 1/T slopes for the hydrates and coexisting hydrates agree well with experimental data where available. 42 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Comparative Numerical Analysis Of Advertising Board Tower Using Adina And Autodesk Robot Structural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Major Maciej

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the subject of comparative stress and displacement analysis for different computer aided design program environments is discussed. For the purposes of analysis ADINA and Autodesk ROBOT program were used. In both programs an advertising board tower was modeled. Static analysis was adopted for the computations. Obtained results allowed showing small differences and limitations between those two environments.

  16. Study on gas hydrate as a new energy resource in the 21th century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Byeong-Jae; Kwak Young-Hoon; Kim, Won-Sik [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (KR)] (and others)

    1999-12-01

    Natural gas hydrate, a special type of clathrate hydrates, is a metastable solid compound which mainly consists of methane and water, and generally called as gas hydrate. It is stable in the specific low-temperature/high-pressure conditions. Gas hydrates play an important role as major reservoir of methane on the earth. On the other hand, the formation and dissociation of gas hydrates could cause the plugging in pipeline, gas kick during production, atmospheric pollution and geohazard. To understand the formation and dissociation of the gas hydrate, the experimental equilibrium conditions of methane hydrate were measured in pure water, 3 wt.% NaCl and MgCl{sub 2} solutions. The equilibrium conditions of propane hydrates were also measured in pure water. The relationship between methane hydrate formation time and overpressure was also analyzed through the laboratory work. The geophysical surveys using air-gun system and multibeam echo sounder were implemented to develop exploration techniques and to evaluate the gas hydrate potential in the East Sea, Korea. General indicators of submarine gas hydrates on seismic data is commonly inferred from the BSR developed parallel to the see floor, amplitude blanking at the upper part of the BSR, and phase reversal and decrease of the interval velocity at BSR. The field data were processed using Geobit 2.9.5 developed by KIGAM to detect the gas hydrate indicators. The accurate velocity analysis was performed by XVA (X-window based Velocity Analysis). Processing results show that the strong reflector occurred parallel to the sea floor were shown at about 1800 ms two way travel time. The interval velocity decrease at this strong reflector and at the reflection phase reversal corresponding to the reflection at the sea floor. Gas hydrate stability field in the study area was determined using the data of measured hydrate equilibrium condition, hydrothermal gradient and geothermal gradient. The depth of BSR detected in the seismic

  17. MEMS-based shear characterization of soft hydrated samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Gadryn C.; Simmons, Chelsey S.; Gao, Yingning; Fried, Andrew T.; Park, Sung-Jin; Chung, Cindy; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2013-08-01

    We have designed, fabricated, calibrated and tested actuators for shear characterization to assess microscale shear properties of soft substrates. Here, we demonstrate characterization of dry silicone and hydrated polyethylene glycol. Microscale tools, including atomic force microscopes and nanoindenters, often have limited functionality in hydrated environments. While electrostatic comb-drive actuators are particularly susceptible to moisture damage, through chemical vapor deposition of hexamethyldisiloxane, we increase the hydrophobicity of our electrostatic devices to a water contact angle 90 ± 3°. With this technique, we determine the effective shear stiffness of both dry and hydrated samples for a range of soft substrates. Using computational and analytical models, we compare our empirically determined effective shear stiffness with existing characterization methods, rheology, and nanoindentation, for samples with shear moduli ranging from 5-320 kPa. This work introduces a new approach for microscale assessment of synthetic materials that can be used on biological materials for basic and applied biomaterials research.

  18. 4-Component seismic survey in the first offshore production test of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, T.; Saeki, T.; Fujii, T.; Aoki, N.; Inamori, T.; Asakawa, E.; Takahashi, H.; Fujii, Y.

    2016-12-01

    JOGMEC conducted a gas production test in the offshore field where methane hydrates exist in the first offshore production test in March 2013. 4-component seismic survey was carried out as geophysical monitoring to assess the dissociation behaviour of methane hydrates by comparing the characteristics of seismic data before and after the gas production test. The data acquisition was performed three times using an ocean bottom cable (OBC), which installed on the sea bottom of 1000m water depth around the gas production well, consists of 36 receiver devices at an interval of 26.5 meters. The first data acquisition was performed in August 2012 before the gas production test. The second and final data acquisitions were performed in April and August 2013 after the gas production test respectively. The shooting operations using air gun source were executed in 2D lines along OBC and in pseudo 3D layout. The OBC was not collected, a connection with a recording boat was disconnected, the terminal of the OBC was waterproofed, and it had been left in the survey area after the first and the second data acquisitions. The terminal of the OBC installing on the sea bottom was fished and the OBC was reconnected into the recording boat before the second and the final data acquisitions. The OBC had been left on the sea bottom for 8 months and 4 months respectively, but the OBC could work normally and provided high quality data. In the result of the analysis of the acquired data, the change in physical properties and the decrease in impedance were seen by the data comparison before and after the gas production test, and the result which suggests dissociation of methane hydrates was obtained. In addition, the increase phenomenon of impedance from the second to the final data acquisition was seen, which suggests a possibility of the regeneration of methane hydrates.

  19. SEM imaging of gas hydrate formation processes and growth textures and comparison to natural hydrates of marine and permafrost origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Laura; Circone, Susan; Kirby, Stephen; Durham, William

    2005-07-01

    Cryogenic scanning electron microscopy provides an excellent means for examining grain morphologies, grain contacts, phase distributions, and pore characteristics within gas-hydratebearing samples of both natural and laboratory origin. Here, we use SEM to observe a variety of laboratory-synthesized sI and sII gas hydrates of known composition and pressure-temperature histories. We show images that convey the diversity of textures observed at various extents of hydrate growth in single-phase gas hydrate systems and hydrate/sediment assemblages, including transient morphologies that are limited primarily to early-to-mid stages of reaction. The resulting textures of fully reacted and/or annealed samples are then followed through increasingly complex laboratory or ocean-floor processes, including compaction, compression, partial dissociation, or partial dissolution. Lastly, we compare the observed features to those developed within natural gashydrate-bearing samples recovered from both marine and permafrost settings. We find that labsynthesized samples can be produced to yield remarkably similar textures, phase distributions, and grain contacts to those found in some hydrate-bearing materials recovered from natural settings. (Author)

  20. Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy for Structure-II Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeya, Kei; Zhang, Caihong; Kawayama, Iwao

    2009-01-01

    For the nondestructive inspection of gas hydrates, terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) was applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate and propane hydrate. The absorption of propane hydrate monotonically increases with frequency, similar to the case of ice, while THF hydrate has a charact......For the nondestructive inspection of gas hydrates, terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) was applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate and propane hydrate. The absorption of propane hydrate monotonically increases with frequency, similar to the case of ice, while THF hydrate has...

  1. Comparative Analysis of Results of Online and Offline Customer Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovović Milorad

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The logic that customer satisfaction is the starting point of marketing and business activities is based on the assumption that customer satisfaction leads to customer loyalty, keeping in mind all of the positive effects that customer loyalty has on business success of an organization. Because of this, marketing and management theory and practice dedicate particular attention to the concepts of customer satisfaction and loyalty. In this paper we will use the surveys of customers of banking services not only to show the levels of their satisfaction and loyalty, but also to make a comparative analysis of data obtained through online and offline research. This approach was made possible because the research was carried out on a sample which was divided in two groups. All of the participants answered the questions from a unique questionnaire, however, one group took the survey via the Internet (online while data from the other group of participants was collected in the field by using printed questionnaires (offline. The findings of the comparative analysis of online and offline survey results are presented in the final part of the paper.

  2. A Comparative Analysis of Polish and Czech International New Ventures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Danik

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to compare the characteristics of Polish and Czech companies which follow the Born Global internationalization model. More concretely, the analysis aims to discover the differences or similarities in terms of the internationalization paths of Polish and Czech SMEs in the characteristics of their managers in terms of the so-called “international vision” and in their innovativeness level. The introductory part of article provides a description of this internationalization model and the International New Ventures traits (INV and summarizes the recent studies on this topic conducted in Poland and Czech Republic. In the empirical part, the International New Ventures from the two countries are compared. The Polish sample includes 105 companies which were surveyed with use of computer assisted telephone interviews in autumn 2014. For the Czech Republic, the sample consists of 54 small and medium-sized companies, which were surveyed using the computer assisted web interviews from November 2013 till January 2014. The surveyed companies in both countries fulfilled the definition of Born Globals. Descriptive statistics, cross-tabulation analysis and non-parametric tests are applied to accomplish the goals of the paper.

  3. Comparative proteomic analysis of ductal and lobular invasive breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, N C S; Gomig, T H B; Milioli, H H; Cordeiro, F; Costa, G G; Urban, C A; Lima, R S; Cavalli, I J; Ribeiro, E M S F

    2016-04-04

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the first among women. Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) are the two major histological subtypes, and the clinical and molecular differences between them justify the search for new markers to distinguish them. As proteomic analysis allows for a powerful and analytical approach to identify potential biomarkers, we performed a comparative analysis of IDC and ILC samples by using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Twenty-three spots were identified corresponding to 10 proteins differentially expressed between the two subtypes. ACTB, ACTG, TPM3, TBA1A, TBA1B, VIME, TPIS, PDIA3, PDIA6, and VTDB were upregulated in ductal carcinoma compared to in lobular carcinoma samples. Overall, these 10 proteins have a key role in oncogenesis. Their specific functions and relevance in cancer initiation and progression are further discussed in this study. The identified peptides represent promising biomarkers for the differentiation of ductal and lobular breast cancer subtypes, and for future interventions based on tailored therapy.

  4. Thermal buckling comparative analysis using Different FE (Finite Element) tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banasiak, Waldemar; Labouriau, Pedro [INTECSEA do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Burnett, Christopher [INTECSEA UK, Surrey (United Kingdom); Falepin, Hendrik [Fugro Engineers SA/NV, Brussels (Belgium)

    2009-12-19

    High operational temperature and pressure in offshore pipelines may lead to unexpected lateral movements, sometimes call lateral buckling, which can have serious consequences for the integrity of the pipeline. The phenomenon of lateral buckling in offshore pipelines needs to be analysed in the design phase using FEM. The analysis should take into account many parameters, including operational temperature and pressure, fluid characteristic, seabed profile, soil parameters, coatings of the pipe, free spans etc. The buckling initiation force is sensitive to small changes of any initial geometric out-of-straightness, thus the modeling of the as-laid state of the pipeline is an important part of the design process. Recently some dedicated finite elements programs have been created making modeling of the offshore environment more convenient that has been the case with the use of general purpose finite element software. The present paper aims to compare thermal buckling analysis of sub sea pipeline performed using different finite elements tools, i.e. general purpose programs (ANSYS, ABAQUS) and dedicated software (SAGE Profile 3D) for a single pipeline resting on an the seabed. The analyses considered the pipeline resting on a flat seabed with a small levels of out-of straightness initiating the lateral buckling. The results show the quite good agreement of results of buckling in elastic range and in the conclusions next comparative analyses with sensitivity cases are recommended. (author)

  5. Elevated gas hydrate saturation within silt and silty clay sediments in the Shenhu area, South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiujuan; Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Wu, Shiguo; Yang, Shengxiong; Guo, Yiqun

    2011-01-01

    Gas hydrate saturations were estimated using five different methods in silt and silty clay foraminiferous sediments from drill hole SH2 in the South China Sea. Gas hydrate saturations derived from observed pore water chloride values in core samples range from 10 to 45% of the pore space at 190–221 m below seafloor (mbsf). Gas hydrate saturations estimated from resistivity (Rt) using wireline logging results are similar and range from 10 to 40.5% in the pore space. Gas hydrate saturations were also estimated by P wave velocity obtained during wireline logging by using a simplified three-phase equation (STPE) and effective medium theory (EMT) models. Gas hydrate saturations obtained from the STPE velocity model (41.0% maximum) are slightly higher than those calculated with the EMT velocity model (38.5% maximum). Methane analysis from a 69 cm long depressurized core from the hydrate-bearing sediment zone indicates that gas hydrate saturation is about 27.08% of the pore space at 197.5 mbsf. Results from the five methods show similar values and nearly identical trends in gas hydrate saturations above the base of the gas hydrate stability zone at depths of 190 to 221 mbsf. Gas hydrate occurs within units of clayey slit and silt containing abundant calcareous nannofossils and foraminifer, which increase the porosities of the fine-grained sediments and provide space for enhanced gas hydrate formation. In addition, gas chimneys, faults, and fractures identified from three-dimensional (3-D) and high-resolution two-dimensional (2-D) seismic data provide pathways for fluids migrating into the gas hydrate stability zone which transport methane for the formation of gas hydrate. Sedimentation and local canyon migration may contribute to higher gas hydrate saturations near the base of the stability zone.

  6. Seismic reflections associated with submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassen, K.

    1995-12-31

    Gas hydrates are often suggested as a future energy resource. This doctoral thesis improves the understanding of the concentration and distribution of natural submarine gas hydrates. The presence of these hydrates are commonly inferred from strong bottom simulating reflection (BSR). To investigate the nature of BSR, this work uses seismic studies of hydrate-related BSRs at two different locations, one where gas hydrates are accepted to exist and interpreted to be very extensive (in the Beaufort Sea), the other with good velocity data and downhole logs available (offshore Oregon). To ascertain the presence of free gas under the BSR, prestack offset data must supplement near-vertical incidence seismic data. A tentative model for physical properties of sediments partially saturated with gas hydrate and free gas is presented. This model, together with drilling information and seismic data containing the BSR beneath the Oregon margin and the Beaufort Sea, made it possible to better understand when to apply the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) method to constrain BSR gas hydrate and gas models. Distribution of natural gas hydrates offshore Norway and Svalbard is discussed and interpreted as reflections from the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, overlying sediments containing free gas. Gas hydrates inferred to exist at the Norwegian-Svalbard continental margin correlate well with Cenozoic depocenters, and the associated gas is assumed to be mainly biogenic. Parts of that margin have a high potential for natural gas hydrates of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. 235 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. The Comparative Analysis of Aversive and Ordinary Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, C. Marion, Jr.

    There is a vast amount of literature concerning the psychological and physiological effects of ordinary noise on the individual. However, few publications have addressed the analysis of aversive noise. This research analyzes three noises which produce the familiar goose flesh or chilling effect responsivity. These aversive sounds which are made by chalk squeaking on the chalkboard, fingernails on the chalkboard and rubbing styrofoam against a smooth surface are digitally compared to ordinary noise to show how these aversive sounds differ from sounds which are only annoying. This work, which uses Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis is a combination with cross correlation analysis and other innovative methods to produce comparative data on noises, illustrates subtle differences between ordinary and aversive noise which may be useful for future work in acoustics or experimental psychology. The literature review shows disagreement among the numerous works on the effects of ordinary noise on human subjects. One explanation for this difference is the failure to adequately measure and define the dynamic nature of the noise used. The existing literature also establishes that a mixture of tones plus random noise is more annoying (but not aversive) than either the random noise or the tones alone. This investigation shows that one property of aversive noises is the combination of randomness plus tones which vary rapidly with time. This paper utilizes a new digital technique which improves the FFT analyzer resolution by a factor of 25. The resulting +/-2 Hz accuracy facilitated the presentation of frequency variation as a function of time data. Other computer generated graphical data includes the percent harmonic deviation as a function of time, the rate of change of fundamental frequency, and the rate of change in harmonic deviation. From these dynamic data, average values are calculated which show the aversive noise to be consistently greater in mean frequency deviation

  8. Handbook of gas hydrate properties and occurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuustraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.

    1983-12-01

    This handbook provides data on the resource potential of naturally occurring hydrates, the properties that are needed to evaluate their recovery, and their production potential. The first two chapters give data on the naturally occurring hydrate potential by reviewing published resource estimates and the known and inferred occurrences. The third and fourth chapters review the physical and thermodynamic properties of hydrates, respectively. The thermodynamic properties of hydrates that are discussed include dissociation energies and a simplified method to calculate them; phase diagrams for simple and multi-component gases; the thermal conductivity; and the kinetics of hydrate dissociation. The final chapter evaluates the net energy balance of recovering hydrates and shows that a substantial positive energy balance can theoretically be achieved. The Appendices of the Handbook summarize physical and thermodynamic properties of gases, liquids and solids that can be used in designing and evaluating recovery processes of hydrates. 158 references, 67 figures, 47 tables.

  9. In silico comparative genomic analysis of GABAA receptor transcriptional regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Christopher J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subtypes of the GABAA receptor subunit exhibit diverse temporal and spatial expression patterns. In silico comparative analysis was used to predict transcriptional regulatory features in individual mammalian GABAA receptor subunit genes, and to identify potential transcriptional regulatory components involved in the coordinate regulation of the GABAA receptor gene clusters. Results Previously unreported putative promoters were identified for the β2, γ1, γ3, ε, θ and π subunit genes. Putative core elements and proximal transcriptional factors were identified within these predicted promoters, and within the experimentally determined promoters of other subunit genes. Conserved intergenic regions of sequence in the mammalian GABAA receptor gene cluster comprising the α1, β2, γ2 and α6 subunits were identified as potential long range transcriptional regulatory components involved in the coordinate regulation of these genes. A region of predicted DNase I hypersensitive sites within the cluster may contain transcriptional regulatory features coordinating gene expression. A novel model is proposed for the coordinate control of the gene cluster and parallel expression of the α1 and β2 subunits, based upon the selective action of putative Scaffold/Matrix Attachment Regions (S/MARs. Conclusion The putative regulatory features identified by genomic analysis of GABAA receptor genes were substantiated by cross-species comparative analysis and now require experimental verification. The proposed model for the coordinate regulation of genes in the cluster accounts for the head-to-head orientation and parallel expression of the α1 and β2 subunit genes, and for the disruption of transcription caused by insertion of a neomycin gene in the close vicinity of the α6 gene, which is proximal to a putative critical S/MAR.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Vertebrate Diurnal/Circadian Transcriptomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Boyle

    Full Text Available From photosynthetic bacteria to mammals, the circadian clock evolved to track diurnal rhythms and enable organisms to anticipate daily recurring changes such as temperature and light. It orchestrates a broad spectrum of physiology such as the sleep/wake and eating/fasting cycles. While we have made tremendous advances in our understanding of the molecular details of the circadian clock mechanism and how it is synchronized with the environment, we still have rudimentary knowledge regarding its connection to help regulate diurnal physiology. One potential reason is the sheer size of the output network. Diurnal/circadian transcriptomic studies are reporting that around 10% of the expressed genome is rhythmically controlled. Zebrafish is an important model system for the study of the core circadian mechanism in vertebrate. As Zebrafish share more than 70% of its genes with human, it could also be an additional model in addition to rodent for exploring the diurnal/circadian output with potential for translational relevance. Here we performed comparative diurnal/circadian transcriptome analysis with established mouse liver and other tissue datasets. First, by combining liver tissue sampling in a 48h time series, transcription profiling using oligonucleotide arrays and bioinformatics analysis, we profiled rhythmic transcripts and identified 2609 rhythmic genes. The comparative analysis revealed interesting features of the output network regarding number of rhythmic genes, proportion of tissue specific genes and the extent of transcription factor family expression. Undoubtedly, the Zebrafish model system will help identify new vertebrate outputs and their regulators and provides leads for further characterization of the diurnal cis-regulatory network.

  11. Continuing Medical Education in six European countries: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garattini, Livio; Gritti, Sara; De Compadri, Paola; Casadei, Gianluigi

    2010-03-01

    We examined Continuing Medical Education (CME) systems in a sample of six EU countries: Austria, Belgium, France, Italy, Norway, and the UK. The aim of this comparative study was to assess the main country-specific institutional settings applied by governments. A common scheme of analysis was applied to investigate the following variables: (i) CME institutional framework; (ii) benefits and/or penalties to participants; (iii) types of CME activities and system of credits; (iv) accreditation of CME providers and events; (v) CME funding and sponsorship. The analysis involved reviewing the literature on CME policy and interviewing a selected panel of local experts in each country (at least one public manager, one representative of medical associations and one pharmaceutical manager). CME is formally compulsory in Austria, France, Italy and the UK, although no sanctions are enforced against non-compliant physicians in practice. The only two countries that offer financial incentives to enhance CME participation are Belgium and Norway, although limited to specific categories of physicians. Formal accreditation of CME providers is required in Austria, France and Italy, while in the other three countries accreditation is focused on activities. Private sponsorship is allowed in all countries but Norway, although within certain limits. This comparative exercise provides an overview of the CME policies adopted by six EU countries to regulate both demand and supply. The substantial variability in the organization and accreditation of schemes indicates that much could be done to improve effectiveness. Although further analysis is needed to assess the results of these policies in practice, lessons drawn from this study may help clarify the weaknesses and strengths of single domestic policies in the perspective of pan-European CME harmonization.

  12. Function of magnesium aluminate hydrate and magnesium nitrate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MgO was added both as spinel (MgAl2O4) forming precursor i.e. magnesium aluminate hydrate, and magnesium nitrate. Sintering investigations were conducted in the temperature range 1500–1600°C with 2 h soaking. Structural study of sintered pellets was carried out by extensive XRD analysis. Scanning electron mode ...

  13. Decision on performing interim analysis for comparative clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyongsun Pak

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In randomized-controlled trials, interim analyses are often planned for possible early trial termination to claim superiority or futility of a new therapy. While unblinding is necessary to conduct the formal interim analysis in blinded studies, blinded data also have information about the potential treatment difference between the groups. We developed a blinded data monitoring tool that enables investigators to predict whether they observe such an unblinded interim analysis results that supports early termination of the trial. Investigators may skip some of the planned interim analyses if an early termination is unlikely. We specifically focused on blinded, randomized-controlled studies to compare binary endpoints of a new treatment with a control. Assuming one interim analysis is planned for early termination for superiority or futility, we conducted extensive simulation studies to assess the impact of the implementation of our tool on the size, power, expected number of interim analyses, and bias in the treatment effect. The numerical study showed the proposed monitoring tool does not affect size or power, but dramatically reduces the expected number of interim analyses when the effect of the treatment difference is small. The tool serves as a useful reference when interpreting the summary of the blinded data throughout the course of the trial, without losing integrity of the study. This tool could potentially save the study resources and budget by avoiding unnecessary interim analyses.

  14. Comparative Analysis for Robust Penalized Spline Smoothing Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Smoothing noisy data is commonly encountered in engineering domain, and currently robust penalized regression spline models are perceived to be the most promising methods for coping with this issue, due to their flexibilities in capturing the nonlinear trends in the data and effectively alleviating the disturbance from the outliers. Against such a background, this paper conducts a thoroughly comparative analysis of two popular robust smoothing techniques, the M-type estimator and S-estimation for penalized regression splines, both of which are reelaborated starting from their origins, with their derivation process reformulated and the corresponding algorithms reorganized under a unified framework. Performances of these two estimators are thoroughly evaluated from the aspects of fitting accuracy, robustness, and execution time upon the MATLAB platform. Elaborately comparative experiments demonstrate that robust penalized spline smoothing methods possess the capability of resistance to the noise effect compared with the nonrobust penalized LS spline regression method. Furthermore, the M-estimator exerts stable performance only for the observations with moderate perturbation error, whereas the S-estimator behaves fairly well even for heavily contaminated observations, but consuming more execution time. These findings can be served as guidance to the selection of appropriate approach for smoothing the noisy data.

  15. Comparative analysis of prophages in Streptococcus mutans genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tiwei; Fan, Xiangyu; Long, Quanxin; Deng, Wanyan; Song, Jinlin

    2017-01-01

    Prophages have been considered genetic units that have an intimate association with novel phenotypic properties of bacterial hosts, such as pathogenicity and genomic variation. Little is known about the genetic information of prophages in the genome of Streptococcus mutans, a major pathogen of human dental caries. In this study, we identified 35 prophage-like elements in S. mutans genomes and performed a comparative genomic analysis. Comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses of prophage sequences revealed that the prophages could be classified into three main large clusters: Cluster A, Cluster B, and Cluster C. The S. mutans prophages in each cluster were compared. The genomic sequences of phismuN66-1, phismuNLML9-1, and phismu24-1 all shared similarities with the previously reported S. mutans phages M102, M102AD, and ϕAPCM01. The genomes were organized into seven major gene clusters according to the putative functions of the predicted open reading frames: packaging and structural modules, integrase, host lysis modules, DNA replication/recombination modules, transcriptional regulatory modules, other protein modules, and hypothetical protein modules. Moreover, an integrase gene was only identified in phismuNLML9-1 prophages. PMID:29158986

  16. Hydrate Phase Assemblages in Calcium Sulfoaluminate - Metakaolin - Limestone Blends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Malene Thostrup; Lothenbach, Barbara; Winnefeld, Frank

    2017-01-01

    as 27Al and 29Si NMR and compared with predictions from thermodynamic modelling. The results show almost full degrees of reaction for ye’elimite in all blends and that the degrees of reaction for belite and MK have an important impact on the hydrate phases and their quantities formed in the ternary...... systems....

  17. Hydration and Fluid Replacement Knowledge, Attitudes, Barriers, and Behaviors of NCAA Division 1 American Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Lawrence W; Kumley, Roberta F; Bellar, David M; Pike, Kim L; Pierson, Eric E; Weidner, Thomas; Pearson, David; Friesen, Carol A

    2016-11-01

    Judge, LW, Kumley, RF, Bellar, DM, Pike, KL, Pierson, EE, Weidner, T, Pearson, D, and Friesen, CA. Hydration and fluid replacement knowledge, attitudes, barriers, and behaviors of NCAA Division 1 American football players. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 2972-2978, 2016-Hydration is an important part of athletic performance, and understanding athletes' hydration knowledge, attitudes, barriers, and behaviors is critical for sport practitioners. The aim of this study was to assess National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division 1 (D1) American football players, with regard to hydration and fluid intake before, during, and after exercise, and to apply this assessment to their overall hydration practice. The sample consisted of 100 student-athletes from 2 different NCAA D1 universities, who participated in voluntary summer football conditioning. Participants completed a survey to identify the fluid and hydration knowledge, attitudes and behaviors, demographic data, primary football position, previous nutrition education, and barriers to adequate fluid consumption. The average Hydration Knowledge Score (HKS) for the participants in the present study was 11.8 ± 1.9 (69.4% correct), with scores ranging from 42 to 100% correct. Four key misunderstandings regarding hydration, specifically related to intervals of hydration habits among the study subjects, were revealed. Only 24% of the players reported drinking enough fluids before, during, immediately after, and 2 hours after practice. Generalized linear model analysis predicted the outcome variable HKS (χ = 28.001, p = 0.045), with nutrition education (Wald χ = 8.250, p = 0.041) and position on the football team (χ = 9.361, p = 0.025) being significant predictors. "Backs" (e.g., quarterbacks, running backs, and defensive backs) demonstrated significantly higher hydration knowledge than "Linemen" (p = 0.014). Findings indicated that if changes are not made to increase hydration awareness levels among football teams

  18. Hydration shell parameters of aqueous alcohols: THz excess absorption and packing density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matvejev, V; Zizi, M; Stiens, J

    2012-12-06

    Solvation in water requires minimizing the perturbations in its hydrogen bonded network. Hence solutes distort water molecular motions in a surrounding domain, forming a molecule-specific hydration shell. The properties of those hydration shells impact the structure and function of the solubilized molecules, both at the single molecule and at higher order levels. The size of the hydration shell and the picoseconds time-scale water dynamics retardation are revealed by terahertz (THz) absorption coefficient measurements. Room-temperature absorption coefficient at f = 0.28 [THz] is measured as a function of alcohol concentration in aqueous methanol, ethanol, 1,2-propanol, and 1-butanol solutions. Highly diluted alcohol measurements and enhanced overall measurement accuracy are achieved with a THz absorption measurement technique of nL-volume liquids in a capillary tube. In the absorption analysis, bulk and interfacial molecular domains of water and alcohol are considered. THz ideal and excess absorption coefficients are defined in accordance with thermodynamics mixing formulations. The parameter extraction method is developed based on a THz excess absorption model and hydrated solute molecule packing density representation. First, the hydration shell size is deduced from the hydrated solute packing densities at two specific THz excess absorption nonlinearity points: at infinite alcohol dilution (IAD) and at the THz excess absorption extremum (EAE). Consequently, interfacial water and alcohol molecular domain absorptions are deduced from the THz excess absorption model. The hydration shell sizes obtained at the THz excess absorption extremum are in excellent agreement with other reports. The hydration shells of methanol, ethanol, 1- and 2-propanol consist of 13.97, 22.94, 22.99, and 31.10 water molecules, respectively. The hydration shell water absorption is on average 0.774 ± 0.028 times the bulk water absorption. The hydration shell parameters might shed light on

  19. Gas migration in the Terrebonne Basin gas hydrate system, Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, A.; Hillman, J. I. T.; Sawyer, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Terrebonne Basin is a salt bounded mini-basin in the northeast section of the Walker Ridge protraction area in the Gulf of Mexico (water depth ~2 km), where the Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg 2 identified gas hydrate via logging-while-drilling in 2009. The Terrebonne Basin is infilled by gently dipping mud-rich sedimentary sequences with several sand units. Gas hydrate was detected in two significant reservoir sands 10s of meters in thickness, a number of thin 1 to 3 meter-thick sands, and in thick, 10-100 meter intervals of marine muds with gas hydrate in near-vertical fractures. In this research, we combine 3D seismic mapping with wavelet and travel time analysis to interpret gas migration mechanisms in each hydrate-bearing sand. Our analyses suggest that the Orange sand, a main reservoir unit, is sourced from below the gas hydrate stability zone and, the 2.5 meter-thick Red sand (also called 'Unit A'), is sourced locally. Our primary evidence is from seismic amplitudes across the two sands that show distinctly different patterns. The Orange sand has distinct high amplitudes within the gas hydrate stability zone and negative amplitudes suggesting free gas below the gas hydrate stability zone. The Red sand, in contrast, has no free gas source below the stability zone and the hydrate distribution as described by high amplitudes suggests that hydrate distribution is spotty. This may imply that gas generation is occurring sporadically in the surrounding marine mud units; this matches with a model of the Red sand that suggests it is sourced locally. These preliminary observations require further refinement but they indicate that fundamentally different migration mechanisms are occurring within a single hydrate system.

  20. Gender- and hydration- associated differences in the physiological response to spinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Jiménez, Arnulfo; Hernández-Torres, Rosa Patricia; Wall-Medrano, Abraham; Torres-Durán, Patricia Victoria; Juárez-Oropeza, Marco Antonio; Viloria, María; Villalobos-Molina, Rafael

    2014-03-01

    There is scarce and inconsistent information about gender-related differences in the hydration of sports persons, as well as about the effects of hydration on performance, especially during indoor sports. To determine the physiological differences between genders during in indoor physical exercise, with and without hydration. 21 spinning sportspeople (12 men and 9 women) participated in three controlled, randomly assigned and non-sequential hydration protocols, including no fluid intake and hydration with plain water or a sports drink (volume adjusted to each individual every 15 min), during 90 min of spinning exercise. The response variables included body mass, body temperature, heart rate and blood pressure. During exercise without hydration, men and women lost ~2% of body mass, and showed higher body temperature (~0.2°C), blood pressure (~4 mmHg) and heart rate (~7 beats/min) compared to exercises with hydration. Body temperature and blood pressure were higher for men than for women during exercise without hydration, differences not observed during exercise with hydration. Between 42-99% of variance in body temperature, blood pressure and heart rate could be explained by the physical characteristics of subjects and the work done. During exercise with hydration (either with water or sport drink), the physiological response was similar for both genders. Exercise without hydration produced physical stress, which could be prevented with either of the fluids (plain water was sufficient). Gender differences in the physiological response to spinning (body temperature, mean blood pressure and heart rate) can be explained in part by the distinct physical characteristics of each individual. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  1. Well log characterization of natural gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2011-01-01

    In the last 25 years we have seen significant advancements in the use of downhole well logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrate in nature: From an early start of using wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gas hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments to today where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. The most established and well known use of downhole log data in gas hydrate research is the use of electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data (both compressional- and shear-wave data) to make estimates of gas hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. New downhole logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation resistivity log measurements have provided the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly inter-bedded and fracture dominated gas hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing have also allowed for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids (i.e., free-water along with clay and capillary bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms controlling the formation and occurrence of gas hydrate in nature along with data on gas hydrate reservoir properties (i.e., permeabilities) needed to accurately predict gas production rates for various gas hydrate

  2. Improvement of gas hydrate preservation by increasing compression pressure to simple hydrates of methane, ethane, and propane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Masato; Jin, Yusuke; Watanabe, Mizuho; Murayama, Tetsuro; Nagao, Jiro

    2017-09-01

    In this report, we describe the dissociation behavior of gas hydrate grains pressed at 1 and 6 MPa. Certain simple gas hydrates in powder form show anomalous preservation phenomenon under their thermodynamic unstable condition. Investigation of simple hydrates of methane, ethane, and propane reveals that high pressure applied to the gas hydrate particles enhances their preservation effects. Application of high pressure increases the dissociation temperature of methane hydrate and has a restrictive effect against the dissociation of ethane and propane hydrate grains. These improvements of gas hydrate preservation by increasing pressure to the initial gas hydrate particles imply that appropriate pressure applied to gas hydrate particles enhances gas hydrate preservation effects.

  3. Comparative Genomics and Transcriptomic Analysis of Mycobacterium Kansasii

    KAUST Repository

    Alzahid, Yara

    2014-04-01

    The group of Mycobacteria is one of the most intensively studied bacterial taxa, as they cause the two historical and worldwide known diseases: leprosy and tuberculosis. Mycobacteria not identified as tuberculosis or leprosy complex, have been referred to by ‘environmental mycobacteria’ or ‘Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). Mycobacterium kansasii (M. kansasii) is one of the most frequent NTM pathogens, as it causes pulmonary disease in immuno-competent patients and pulmonary, and disseminated disease in patients with various immuno-deficiencies. There have been five documented subtypes of this bacterium, by different molecular typing methods, showing that type I causes tuberculosis-like disease in healthy individuals, and type II in immune-compromised individuals. The remaining types are said to be environmental, thereby, not causing any diseases. The aim of this project was to conduct a comparative genomic study of M. kansasii types I-V and investigating the gene expression level of those types. From various comparative genomics analysis, provided genomics evidence on why M. kansasii type I is considered pathogenic, by focusing on three key elements that are involved in virulence of Mycobacteria: ESX secretion system, Phospholipase c (plcb) and Mammalian cell entry (Mce) operons. The results showed the lack of the espA operon in types II-V, which renders the ESX- 1 operon dysfunctional, as espA is one of the key factors that control this secretion system. However, gene expression analysis showed this operon to be deleted in types II, III and IV. Furthermore, plcB was found to be truncated in types III and IV. Analysis of Mce operons (1-4) show that mce-1 operon is duplicated, mce-2 is absent and mce-3 and mce-4 is present in one copy in M. kansasii types I-V. Gene expression profiles of type I-IV, showed that the secreted proteins of ESX-1 were slightly upregulated in types II-IV when compared to type I and the secreted forms of ESX-5 were highly down

  4. Explaining the judicial independence of international courts: a comparative analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beach, Derek

    What factors allow some international courts (ICs) to rule against the express preferences of powerful member states, whereas others routinely defer to governments? While judicial independence is not the only factor explaining the strength of a given international institution, it is a necessary...... condition. The paper first develops three sets of competing explanatory variables that potentially can explain variations in the judicial independence of ICs. The causal effects of these explanatory variables upon variance in judicial independence are investigated in a comparative analysis of the ACJ, ECJ......, ECtHR and IACHR. It is found that the threat of governmental noncompliance and the strength of the constituency possessed by an IC have the most explanatory power, although there is still a significant residual that can only be explained by looking at factors relating to judicial choices and agency....

  5. Comparative analysis of customer satisfaction in postal and banking services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratković Milijanka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is a comparative analysis of customer satisfaction towards postal and banking services in Serbia. In addition, this paper should provide guidance on how managements of the Post Office and the Bank should behave on the market. The survey was conducted throughout the whole Serbian territory. The subject of the research is to measure the perception of postal and banking services, in order to assess the quality of services and the impact of expectations on the level of perceived quality. Testing and final conclusions about the level of quality of postal and banking services was carried out on the basis of the existing literature and modified SERVQUAL model.

  6. Perret & Piacentini. A Comparative Analysis of Two Parallel Architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ramón Alonso Pereira

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available It is very common to understand the home of the masters of architecture as a manifesto of their respective architectures. Nevertheless, those houses are usually identified with single-family models, relegating collective examples. Only the apartment-atelier that Le Corbusier elevated in Porte Molitor (1930-33 is saved from this oblivion. However, there are at the same time two other examples of house-studio by two masters of the moment: Perret and Piacentini. Both are parallel in their vital dynamics and in their programs: The Roman house-studio of Piacentini in Lungotevere Tor di Nona (1929-31 and the Parisian building of Raynouard (1929-33, where Perret established his home and his agence (office. The coincidence of theme and the parallelism of place facilitate the comparative analysis in a common historical time, with their debates between tradition and vanguard.

  7. Comparative analysis of DG and solar PV water pumping system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharani, Kusum; Dahiya, Ratna

    2016-03-01

    Looking at present day electricity scenario, there is a major electricity crisis in rural areas. The farmers are still dependant on the monsoon rains for their irrigation needs and livestock maintenance. Some of the agrarian population has opted to use Diesel Generators for pumping water in their fields. But taking into consideration the economics and environmental conditions, the above choice is not suitable for longer run. An effort to shift from non-renewable sources such as diesel to renewable energy source such as solar has been highlighted. An approximate comparative analysis showing the life cycle costs of a PV pumping system with Diesel Generator powered water pumping is done using MATLAB/STMULTNK.

  8. Phylogeny and comparative genome analysis of a Basidiomycete fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert W.; Salamov, Asaf; Grigoriev, Igor; Hibbett, David

    2011-03-14

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota, make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important from the perspectives of forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes the mushrooms, wood rots, plant pathogenic rusts and smuts, and some human pathogens. To better understand these important fungi, we have undertaken a comparative genomic analysis of the Basidiomycetes with available sequenced genomes. We report a phylogeny that sheds light on previously unclear evolutionary relationships among the Basidiomycetes. We also define a `core proteome? based on protein families conserved in all Basidiomycetes. We identify key expansions and contractions in protein families that may be responsible for the degradation of plant biomass such as cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Finally, we speculate as to the genomic changes that drove such expansions and contractions.

  9. Comparative Analysis on Nuclear Fuel Sustainability Aspect of FBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permana, Sidik; Irwanto, Dwi; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Saito, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Recycle program of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will have some challanges in term of fuel cycle capability and its facilities as well as nuclear non-proliferation concern of special nuclear materials. A different analysis approach as a comparative study have been analyzed based on breeding ratio and heavy metal inventory ratio concepts in fast breeder reactor (FBR) type. Breeding ratio and heavy metal inventory obtain higher than unity which shows breeding gain or surplus inventory of heavy metals are obtained. Breeding ratio indicates the fuel conversion capability from conversion process of fertile materials into fissile material such as fertile materials of U-238, Pu-238, Pu-240 and fissile materials of Pu-239 and Pu-241. Inventory ratio approaches are appropriate to estimate some selected actinide as a mass inventory production such as plutonium inventory ratio which estimate the surplus mass inventory from the ratio of produced plutonium at the net of operation to the initial inventory ratio.

  10. A comparative analysis between fuzzy topsis and simplified fuzzy topsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sharifah Aniza Sayed; Mohamad, Daud

    2017-08-01

    Fuzzy Multiple Criteria Decision Making plays an important role in solving problems in decision making under fuzzy environment. Among the popular methods used is the fuzzy TOPSIS (Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution) where the solution is based on the shortest distance from its positive ideal solution and the farthest distance from its negative ideal solution. The fuzzy TOPSIS method was first introduced by Chen (2000). At present, there are several variants of fuzzy TOPSIS methods and each of them claimed to have its own advantages. In this paper, a comparative analysis is made between the classical fuzzy TOPSIS method proposed by Chen in 2000 and the simplified fuzzy TOPSIS proposed by Sodhi in 2012. The purpose of this study is to show the similarities and the differences between these two methods and also elaborate on their strengths and limitations as well. A comparison is also made by providing numerical examples of both methods.

  11. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF DISPUTE RESOLUTION DYNAMICS IN ASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Voronin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available China’s rise to prominence in the international community following the end of the Cold War, the growth in economic power and population numbers project that China will become the leading world power within several decades, regardless of the course its government takes. The article aimes to contribute to answering the question whether this rise will be peaceful through a comparative analysis of resolved and unresolved territorial disputes between China and groups of neighbouring states between 1986 and 2013. While previous studies have focused rather exclusively on Chinese behaviour, this text will examine both sides of the dispute and the behavior of the parties in light of regional dynamics. 

  12. Comparative Analysis of Human Gut Microbiota by Barcoded Pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Anders F.; Lindberg, Mathilda; Jakobsson, Hedvig; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Nyrén, Pål; Engstrand, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Humans host complex microbial communities believed to contribute to health maintenance and, when in imbalance, to the development of diseases. Determining the microbial composition in patients and healthy controls may thus provide novel therapeutic targets. For this purpose, high-throughput, cost-effective methods for microbiota characterization are needed. We have employed 454-pyrosequencing of a hyper-variable region of the 16S rRNA gene in combination with sample-specific barcode sequences which enables parallel in-depth analysis of hundreds of samples with limited sample processing. In silico modeling demonstrated that the method correctly describes microbial communities down to phylotypes below the genus level. Here we applied the technique to analyze microbial communities in throat, stomach and fecal samples. Our results demonstrate the applicability of barcoded pyrosequencing as a high-throughput method for comparative microbial ecology. PMID:18665274

  13. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF JET VORTEX TYPE SUPERCHAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rogovyi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of mathematical modeling there was carried out a comparative analysis of characteristics of jet vortex type superchargers. Dependences of the energy performance of vortex ejector on the geometry parameters and the largest values in terms of efficiency as well as the coefficient of ejection are analyzed. There were built combined characteristics of vortex chamber pumps and vortex ejectors. Vortex chamber pump has advantage pressure in an exit channel over the vortex ejector, consequently there is a more effective power transmission from a working medium, besides the withdrawal of pumping medium in a tangential channel allows to avoid energy losses owing to rotation of a stream in an exit channel.

  14. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF VAT EVOLUTION IN THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHAELA ANDREEA STROE

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study a comparative analysis of VAT in different states of the world. I made some observation on this theme because I believe that VAT is very important in carrying out transactions and the increase or decrease of this tax has a major impact upon national economies and also on the quality of life in developing countries. The papers has to pourpose to make a comparison between the American and European system of taxation with its advantages and disadvantages and, in the end to render an economic model and its statistics components. VAT is a value added tax which appeared about 50 years, initially with two purposes: one to replace certain indirect taxes, and another to reduce the budget deficit according to the faith of that time. The first country that has adopted this model was France, calling it today as value-added tax.

  15. Demographic changes in towns of Central Serbia: Comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović Marko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to intensive urbanization, Central Serbia's urban population reached almost 60% in the total population. Despite the fact that the urban residents share in Serbia is still bellow the level of urbanization in developed countries, in which the percentage of urban residents exudes 70% (in majority of cases even more than 80%, it is an impression that demographic "resources" of rural areas have bean rather exhausted and that all demographic revitalization potential of Central Serbia is concentrated in towns. This paper treats the demographic changes which encompassed the towns of Central Serbia since 1981 census onwards, with special emphasis on the population migrations as well as on the natural growth, i.e. age - gender structure formation featuring the towns of Central Serbia. The changes will be analyzed trough a comparative analysis at the level of small, medium sized towns and big cities, while Belgrade will be represent as a special category.

  16. A Nonlinear Elastic Model for Triaxial Compressive Properties of Artificial Methane-Hydrate-Bearing Sediment Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Yamaguchi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A constitutive model for marine sediments containing natural gas hydrate is essential for the simulation of the geomechanical response to gas extraction from a gas-hydrate reservoir. In this study, the triaxial compressive properties of artificial methane-hydrate-bearing sediment samples reported in an earlier work were analyzed to examine the applicability of a nonlinear elastic constitutive model based on the Duncan-Chang model. The presented model considered the dependences of the mechanical properties on methane hydrate saturation and effective confining pressure. Some parameters were decided depending on the type of sand forming a specimen. The behaviors of lateral strain versus axial strain were also formulated as a function of effective confining pressure. The constitutive model presented in this study will provide a basis for an elastic analysis of the geomechanical behaviors of the gas-hydrate reservoir in the future study, although it is currently available to a limited extent.

  17. Comparative expression pathway analysis of human and canine mammary tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marconato Laura

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous tumors in dog have been demonstrated to share many features with their human counterparts, including relevant molecular targets, histological appearance, genetics, biological behavior and response to conventional treatments. Mammary tumors in dog therefore provide an attractive alternative to more classical mouse models, such as transgenics or xenografts, where the tumour is artificially induced. To assess the extent to which dog tumors represent clinically significant human phenotypes, we performed the first genome-wide comparative analysis of transcriptional changes occurring in mammary tumors of the two species, with particular focus on the molecular pathways involved. Results We analyzed human and dog gene expression data derived from both tumor and normal mammary samples. By analyzing the expression levels of about ten thousand dog/human orthologous genes we observed a significant overlap of genes deregulated in the mammary tumor samples, as compared to their normal counterparts. Pathway analysis of gene expression data revealed a great degree of similarity in the perturbation of many cancer-related pathways, including the 'PI3K/AKT', 'KRAS', 'PTEN', 'WNT-beta catenin' and 'MAPK cascade'. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional relationships between different gene signatures observed in human breast cancer are largely maintained in the canine model, suggesting a close interspecies similarity in the network of cancer signalling circuitries. Conclusion Our data confirm and further strengthen the value of the canine mammary cancer model and open up new perspectives for the evaluation of novel cancer therapeutics and the development of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers to be used in clinical studies.

  18. Bisphenol A alters gut microbiome: Comparative metagenomics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Keng-Po; Chung, Yan-Tung; Li, Rong; Wan, Hin-Ting; Wong, Chris Kong-Chu

    2016-11-01

    Mounting evidence has shown that an alteration of the gut microbiota is associated with diet, and plays an important role in animal health and metabolic diseases. However, little is known about the influence of environmental contaminants on the gut microbial community. Bisphenol A (BPA), which is widely used for manufacturing plastic products, has recently been classified as an environmental obesogen. Although many studies have demonstrated the metabolic-disrupting effects of BPA on liver and pancreatic functions, the possible effects of this synthetic compound on the metabolic diversity of the intestinal microbiota is unknown. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis on caecum samples of CD-1 mice, the present study aimed to test the hypothesis that dietary BPA intake may influence the gut microbiota composition and functions, an important attributing factor to development of the metabolic syndrome. A high-fat diet (HFD) and high-sucrose diet (HSD) were included as the positive controls for comparing the changes in the intestinal microbial profiles. Our results demonstrated a significant reduction of species diversity in the gut microbiota of BPA-fed mice. Alpha and beta diversity analyses showed that dietary BPA intake led to a similar gut microbial community structure as that induced by HFD and HSD in mice. In addition, comparative analysis of the microbial communities revealed that both BPA and a HFD favored the growth of Proteobacteria, a microbial marker of dysbiosis. Consistently, growth induction of the family Helicobacteraceae and reduction of the Firmicutes and Clostridia populations were observed in the mice fed BPA or a HFD. Collectively, our study highlighted that the effects of dietary BPA intake on the shift of microbial community structure were similar to those of a HFD and HSD, and revealed microbial markers for the development of diseases associated with an unstable microbiota. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A comparative analysis of readmission rates after outpatient cosmetic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioton, Lauren M; Alghoul, Mohammed S; Kim, John Y S

    2014-02-01

    Despite the increasing scrutiny of surgical procedures, outpatient cosmetic surgery has an established record of safety and efficacy. A key measure in assessing surgical outcomes is the examination of readmission rates. However, there is a paucity of data on unplanned readmission following cosmetic surgery procedures. The authors studied readmission rates for outpatient cosmetic surgery and compared the data with readmission rates for other surgical procedures. The 2011 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) data set was queried for all outpatient procedures. Readmission rates were calculated for the 5 surgical specialties with the greatest number of outpatient procedures and for the overall outpatient cosmetic surgery population. Subgroup analysis was performed on the 5 most common cosmetic surgery procedures. Multivariate regression models were used to determine predictors of readmission for cosmetic surgery patients. The 2879 isolated outpatient cosmetic surgery cases had an associated 0.90% unplanned readmission rate. The 5 specialties with the highest number of outpatient surgical procedures were general, orthopedic, gynecologic, urologic, and otolaryngologic surgery; their unplanned readmission rates ranged from 1.21% to 3.73%. The 5 most common outpatient cosmetic surgery procedures and their associated readmission rates were as follows: reduction mammaplasty, 1.30%; mastopexy, 0.31%; liposuction, 1.13%; abdominoplasty, 1.78%; and breast augmentation, 1.20%. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that operating time (in hours) was an independent predictor of readmission (odds ratio, 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.81; P=.010). Rates of unplanned readmission with outpatient cosmetic surgery are low and compare favorably to those of other outpatient surgeries.

  20. Comparative analysis of linear motor geometries for Stirling coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    R, Rajesh V.; Kuzhiveli, Biju T.

    2017-12-01

    Compared to rotary motor driven Stirling coolers, linear motor coolers are characterized by small volume and long life, making them more suitable for space and military applications. The motor design and operational characteristics have a direct effect on the operation of the cooler. In this perspective, ample scope exists in understanding the behavioural description of linear motor systems. In the present work, the authors compare and analyze different moving magnet linear motor geometries to finalize the most favourable one for Stirling coolers. The required axial force in the linear motors is generated by the interaction of magnetic fields of a current carrying coil and that of a permanent magnet. The compact size, commercial availability of permanent magnets and low weight requirement of the system are quite a few constraints for the design. The finite element analysis performed using Maxwell software serves as the basic tool to analyze the magnet movement, flux distribution in the air gap and the magnetic saturation levels on the core. A number of material combinations are investigated for core before finalizing the design. The effect of varying the core geometry on the flux produced in the air gap is also analyzed. The electromagnetic analysis of the motor indicates that the permanent magnet height ought to be taken in such a way that it is under the influence of electromagnetic field of current carrying coil as well as the outer core in the balanced position. This is necessary so that sufficient amount of thrust force is developed by efficient utilisation of the air gap flux density. Also, the outer core ends need to be designed to facilitate enough room for the magnet movement under the operating conditions.

  1. Rheological properties of methane hydrate slurries formed from AOT + water + oil microemulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Eric B; Koh, Carolyn A; Liberatore, Matthew W

    2013-09-03

    The in situ formation and flow properties of methane hydrates formed from water-in-oil microemulsions composed of water, dodecane, and aerosol OT surfactant (AOT) were studied using a unique high pressure rheometer. AOT microemulsions have high stability (order of months), well-characterized composition, and yield reproducible results compared to hydrate studies in water-in-crude oil emulsions. Viscosity increases on the order of minutes upon hydrate formation, and then decreases on the order of hours. If significant unconverted water remained after the initial formation event, then viscosity increases for a time as methane slowly dissolves and converts additional water to hydrate. In addition to transient formation measurements, yield stresses and flow curves are measured for a set of experimental conditions. Hydrate slurry viscosity and yield stress increase with increasing water volume fraction, increasing initial pressure, decreasing temperature, and decreasing formation shear rate.

  2. Four Critical Needs to Change the Hydrate Energy Paradigm from Assessment to Production: The 2007 Report to Congress by the U.S. Federal methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahajan,D.; Sloan, D.; Brewer, P.; Dutta, N.; Johnson, A.; Jones, E.; Juenger, K.; Kastner, M.; Masutani, S.; Swenson, R.; Whelan, J.; Wilson, s.; Woolsey, R.

    2009-03-11

    This work summarizes a two-year study by the U.S. Federal Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee recommending the future needs for federally-supported hydrate research. The Report was submitted to the US Congress on August 14, 2007 and includes four recommendations regarding (a) permafrost hydrate production testing, (b) marine hydrate viability assessment (c) climate effect of hydrates, and (d) international cooperation. A secure supply of natural gas is a vital goal of the U.S. national energy policy because natural gas is the cleanest and most widely used of all fossil fuels. The inherent cleanliness of natural gas, with the lowest CO2 emission per unit of heat energy of any fossil fuel, means substituting gas for coal and fuel oil will reduce emissions that can exacerbate the greenhouse effect. Both a fuel and a feedstock, a secure and reasonably priced supply of natural gas is important to industry, electric power generators, large and small commercial enterprises, and homeowners. Because each volume of solid gas hydrate contains as much as 164 standard volumes of methane, hydrates can be viewed as a concentrated form of natural gas equivalent to compressed gas but less concentrated than liquefied natural gas (LNG). Natural hydrate accumulations worldwide are estimated to contain 700,000 TCF of natural gas, of which 200,000 TCF are located within the United States. Compared with the current national annual consumption of 22 TCF, this estimate of in-place gas in enormous. Clearly, if only a fraction of the hydrated methane is recoverable, hydrates could constitute a substantial component of the future energy portfolio of the Nation (Figure 1). However, recovery poses a major technical and commercial challenge. Such numbers have sparked interest in natural gas hydrates as a potential, long-term source of energy, as well as concerns about any potential impact the release of methane from hydrates might have on the environment. Energy-hungry countries such as India and

  3. The hydration structure of DNA and proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-03-01

    Water-soluble proteins are surrounded by water molecules, and the water molecules mediate the biological processes: i.e. the protein folding, the enzymatic reaction, the molecular recognition via hydrogen bonds, electrostatic interactions and van der Waals interactions. It is essential to know the structural information such as orientation and dynamical behavior of water molecules including hydrogen atoms in order to characterize these interactions. The neutron analysis can determine the positions of the hydrogen atoms at the medium resolution in the protein crystallography (d{sub min}{approx}2.0 A). Recently we have constructed the high-resolution neutron diffractometer (BIX) dedicated for the biological macromolecules. By using this diffractometer, the high resolution (1.5 or 1.6A) neutron structure analyses of sperm whale myoglobin, a wild-type rubredoxin from Pyrococcus furiosus, and the rubredoxin mutant have been successfully carried out and their hydration structure including hydrogen atoms have been observed. Hydrogen atoms in the water molecule can be clearly identified in two boomerang-shaped water molecules and the forming of the hydrogen bonds between the two water molecules can be recognized well. It has been concluded that hydration structure observed by the high resolution neutron protein crystallography provides where a water molecule locates, and how it binds to the neighbor atoms, and how it behaves. (M.Suetake)

  4. Microbial community structure in methane hydrate-bearing sediments of freshwater Lake Baikal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadnikov, Vitaly V; Mardanov, Andrey V; Beletsky, Alexey V; Shubenkova, Olga V; Pogodaeva, Tatiana V; Zemskaya, Tamara I; Ravin, Nikolai V; Skryabin, Konstantin G

    2012-02-01

    Gas hydrates in marine sediments have been known for many years but recently hydrates were found in the sediments of Lake Baikal, the largest freshwater basin in the world. Marine gas hydrates are associated with complex microbial communities involved in methanogenesis, methane oxidation, sulfate reduction and other biotransformations. However, the contribution of microorganisms to the formation of gas hydrates remains poorly understood. We examined the microbial communities in the hydrate-bearing sediments and water column of Lake Baikal using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Aerobic methanotrophic bacteria dominated the water sample collected at the lake floor in the hydrate-bearing site. The shallow sediments were dominated by Archaea. Methanogens of the orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales were abundant, whereas representatives of archaeal lineages known to perform anaerobic oxidation of methane, as well as sulfate-reducing bacteria, were not found. Affiliation of archaea to methanogenic rather than methane-oxidizing lineages was supported by analysis of the sequences of the methyl coenzyme M reductase gene. The deeper sediments located at 85-90 cm depth close to the hydrate were dominated by Bacteria, mostly assigned to Chloroflexi, candidate division JS1 and Caldiserica. Overall, our results are consistent with the biological origin of methane hydrates in Lake Baikal. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Water Dynamics in Protein Hydration Shells: The Molecular Origins of the Dynamical Perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Protein hydration shell dynamics play an important role in biochemical processes including protein folding, enzyme function, and molecular recognition. We present here a comparison of the reorientation dynamics of individual water molecules within the hydration shell of a series of globular proteins: acetylcholinesterase, subtilisin Carlsberg, lysozyme, and ubiquitin. Molecular dynamics simulations and analytical models are used to access site-resolved information on hydration shell dynamics and to elucidate the molecular origins of the dynamical perturbation of hydration shell water relative to bulk water. We show that all four proteins have very similar hydration shell dynamics, despite their wide range of sizes and functions, and differing secondary structures. We demonstrate that this arises from the similar local surface topology and surface chemical composition of the four proteins, and that such local factors alone are sufficient to rationalize the hydration shell dynamics. We propose that these conclusions can be generalized to a wide range of globular proteins. We also show that protein conformational fluctuations induce a dynamical heterogeneity within the hydration layer. We finally address the effect of confinement on hydration shell dynamics via a site-resolved analysis and connect our results to experiments via the calculation of two-dimensional infrared spectra. PMID:24479585

  6. Water dynamics in protein hydration shells: the molecular origins of the dynamical perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Aoife C; Laage, Damien

    2014-07-17

    Protein hydration shell dynamics play an important role in biochemical processes including protein folding, enzyme function, and molecular recognition. We present here a comparison of the reorientation dynamics of individual water molecules within the hydration shell of a series of globular proteins: acetylcholinesterase, subtilisin Carlsberg, lysozyme, and ubiquitin. Molecular dynamics simulations and analytical models are used to access site-resolved information on hydration shell dynamics and to elucidate the molecular origins of the dynamical perturbation of hydration shell water relative to bulk water. We show that all four proteins have very similar hydration shell dynamics, despite their wide range of sizes and functions, and differing secondary structures. We demonstrate that this arises from the similar local surface topology and surface chemical composition of the four proteins, and that such local factors alone are sufficient to rationalize the hydration shell dynamics. We propose that these conclusions can be generalized to a wide range of globular proteins. We also show that protein conformational fluctuations induce a dynamical heterogeneity within the hydration layer. We finally address the effect of confinement on hydration shell dynamics via a site-resolved analysis and connect our results to experiments via the calculation of two-dimensional infrared spectra.

  7. Comparative analysis on flexibility requirements of typical Cryogenic Transfer lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadon, Mohit; Kumar, Uday; Choukekar, Ketan; Shah, Nitin; Sarkar, Biswanath

    2017-04-01

    The cryogenic systems and their applications; primarily in large Fusion devices, utilize multiple cryogen transfer lines of various sizes and complexities to transfer cryogenic fluids from plant to the various user/ applications. These transfer lines are composed of various critical sections i.e. tee section, elbows, flexible components etc. The mechanical sustainability (under failure circumstances) of these transfer lines are primary requirement for safe operation of the system and applications. The transfer lines need to be designed for multiple design constraints conditions like line layout, support locations and space restrictions. The transfer lines are subjected to single load and multiple load combinations, such as operational loads, seismic loads, leak in insulation vacuum loads etc. [1]. The analytical calculations and flexibility analysis using professional software are performed for the typical transfer lines without any flexible component, the results were analysed for functional and mechanical load conditions. The failure modes were identified along the critical sections. The same transfer line was then refurbished with the flexible components and analysed for failure modes. The flexible components provide additional flexibility to the transfer line system and make it safe. The results obtained from the analytical calculations were compared with those obtained from the flexibility analysis software calculations. The optimization of the flexible component’s size and selection was performed and components were selected to meet the design requirements as per code.

  8. Comparative analysis of quantitative efficiency evaluation methods for transportation networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuxin; Qin, Jin; Hong, Jian

    2017-01-01

    An effective evaluation of transportation network efficiency could offer guidance for the optimal control of urban traffic. Based on the introduction and related mathematical analysis of three quantitative evaluation methods for transportation network efficiency, this paper compares the information measured by them, including network structure, traffic demand, travel choice behavior and other factors which affect network efficiency. Accordingly, the applicability of various evaluation methods is discussed. Through analyzing different transportation network examples it is obtained that Q-H method could reflect the influence of network structure, traffic demand and user route choice behavior on transportation network efficiency well. In addition, the transportation network efficiency measured by this method and Braess's Paradox can be explained with each other, which indicates a better evaluation of the real operation condition of transportation network. Through the analysis of the network efficiency calculated by Q-H method, it can also be drawn that a specific appropriate demand is existed to a given transportation network. Meanwhile, under the fixed demand, both the critical network structure that guarantees the stability and the basic operation of the network and a specific network structure contributing to the largest value of the transportation network efficiency can be identified.

  9. Comparative analysis of Klafki and Heimann's didactic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojović Žana P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative analysis of Klafki's didactic thinking which is based on an analysis of different kinds of theories on the nature of education and Heimann's didactic which is based on the theory of teaching and learning shows that both are dealing with teaching in its entirety. Both authors emphasize the role of contents, methods, procedures and resources for material and formal education and both use anthropological and social reality as their starting point. According to Klafki, resources, procedures, and methods are in form of dependency where it is important to know what and why should something be learnt, whereas Heimann sees the same elements in the form of interdependency. Each of the didactic conceptions, from their point of view, define the position of goals and tasks in education as well as how to achieve them. Determination and formulation of objectives is a complex, responsible, and very difficult task, and a goal must be clearly defined, because it emanates the guidelines for the preparation of didactic methodology educational programs and their planning. The selection of content in didactic methodology scenarios of education and learning, are only possible if the knowledge, skills and abilities that are necessary for a student to develop are explicitly indicated. The question of educational goals is the main problem of didactics for only a clearly defined objective implicates the selection of appropriate methods and means for its achievement, and it should be a permanent task of the current didactic conception now and in the future.

  10. A comparative analysis of Chikungunya and Zika transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Riou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent global dissemination of Chikungunya and Zika has fostered public health concern worldwide. To better understand the drivers of transmission of these two arboviral diseases, we propose a joint analysis of Chikungunya and Zika epidemics in the same territories, taking into account the common epidemiological features of the epidemics: transmitted by the same vector, in the same environments, and observed by the same surveillance systems. We analyse eighteen outbreaks in French Polynesia and the French West Indies using a hierarchical time-dependent SIR model accounting for the effect of virus, location and weather on transmission, and based on a disease specific serial interval. We show that Chikungunya and Zika have similar transmission potential in the same territories (transmissibility ratio between Zika and Chikungunya of 1.04 [95% credible interval: 0.97; 1.13], but that detection and reporting rates were different (around 19% for Zika and 40% for Chikungunya. Temperature variations between 22 °C and 29 °C did not alter transmission, but increased precipitation showed a dual effect, first reducing transmission after a two-week delay, then increasing it around five weeks later. The present study provides valuable information for risk assessment and introduces a modelling framework for the comparative analysis of arboviral infections that can be extended to other viruses and territories.

  11. Comparative multiplex dosage analysis in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calì, F; Chiavetta, V; Ragalmuto, A; Vinci, M; Ruggeri, G; Schinocca, P; Romano, V

    2013-04-12

    We developed a new application of comparative multiplex dosage analysis (CMDA) for evaluation of the ataxin 2 gene. Expansions of the triplet CAG can cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), a neurodegenerative disease with an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance. Molecular diagnosis of SCA2 is routinely based on the use of conventional PCR to detect the CAG expansion. However, PCR does not amplify an allele with an expansion of many triplets (>80), which is typically found in infantile and juvenile forms of SCA2, thus leading to false negatives. We propose the analysis of the ATXN2 gene by CMDA to complement existing methods currently used for the detection of large expansions of the CAG repeat. Using CMDA, the presence of any longer mutated allele in a heterozygous patient or fetus would be inferred due to dosage variation of the very frequent normal allele #22. CMDA can be completed in 1 day, at very low cost, and would be a useful tool for prenatal diagnosis and for diagnosis of presymptomatic forms of early-onset SCA2.

  12. Comparative analysis of methods for genome-wide nucleosome cartography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintales, Luis; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Nucleosomes contribute to compacting the genome into the nucleus and regulate the physical access of regulatory proteins to DNA either directly or through the epigenetic modifications of the histone tails. Precise mapping of nucleosome positioning across the genome is, therefore, essential to understanding the genome regulation. In recent years, several experimental protocols have been developed for this purpose that include the enzymatic digestion, chemical cleavage or immunoprecipitation of chromatin followed by next-generation sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments. Here, we compare the performance and resolution of these methods from the initial biochemical steps through the alignment of the millions of short-sequence reads to a reference genome to the final computational analysis to generate genome-wide maps of nucleosome occupancy. Because of the lack of a unified protocol to process data sets obtained through the different approaches, we have developed a new computational tool (NUCwave), which facilitates their analysis, comparison and assessment and will enable researchers to choose the most suitable method for any particular purpose. NUCwave is freely available at http://nucleosome.usal.es/nucwave along with a step-by-step protocol for its use. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. A comparative analysis of national food recall systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Liuzzo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Food recall and withdrawal is a fundamental tool for risk management and different countries stated the mandatory application of a system for food; the present work is an analysis of different systems applied in different countries. The main objective of analysed systems is the consumer’s health protection through an audit system and the application of system to rapidly recall/withdraw food on the part of producers. The comparative analysis of different national systems [i.e. European Union (EU, Australia, Canada, US and China] shows differences both of the terminological and legal aspects; the words recall and withdrawal have different meaning in EU legislation than in other counties’ legislations; from a legal point of view, two main recall/withdrawal systems could be identified: a mandatory one (EU and China and a voluntary one (USA, Canada and Australia; all the investigated systems have a co-operative approach between authority and food business operator, but different functions on their respective roles could be identified.

  14. Models for Gas Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Inferred from Hydraulic Permeability and Elastic Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung W.

    2008-01-01

    Elastic velocities and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments strongly depend on how gas hydrate accumulates in pore spaces and various gas hydrate accumulation models are proposed to predict physical property changes due to gas hydrate concentrations. Elastic velocities and permeability predicted from a cementation model differ noticeably from those from a pore-filling model. A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log provides in-situ water-filled porosity and hydraulic permeability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments. To test the two competing models, the NMR log along with conventional logs such as velocity and resistivity logs acquired at the Mallik 5L-38 well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada, were analyzed. When the clay content is less than about 12 percent, the NMR porosity is 'accurate' and the gas hydrate concentrations from the NMR log are comparable to those estimated from an electrical resistivity log. The variation of elastic velocities and relative permeability with respect to the gas hydrate concentration indicates that the dominant effect of gas hydrate in the pore space is the pore-filling characteristic.

  15. Juvenile spondylolysis: a comparative analysis of CT, SPECT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, R.S.D. [Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Grainger, A.J. [Leeds General Infirmary, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Hide, I.G. [Freeman Hospital, Department of Radiology, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Papastefanou, S. [James Cook University Hospital, Department Radiology, Middlesbrough (United Kingdom); Greenough, C.G. [James Cook University Hospital, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Middlesbrough (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-01

    To evaluate whether MRI correlates with CT and SPECT imaging for the diagnosis of juvenile spondylolysis, and to determine whether MRI can be used as an exclusive image modality. Juveniles and young adults with a history of extension low back pain were evaluated by MRI, CT and SPECT imaging. All images were reviewed blindly. Correlative analyses included CT vs MRI for morphological grading and SPECT vs MRI for functional grading. Finally, an overall grading system compared MRI vs CT and SPECT combined. Statistical analysis was performed using the kappa statistic. Seventy-two patients (mean age 16 years) were recruited. Forty pars defects were identified in 22 patients (31%), of which 25 were chronic non-union, five acute complete defects and ten acute incomplete fractures. Kappa scores demonstrated a high level of agreement for all comparative analyses. MRI vs SPECT (kappa: 0.794), MRI vs CT (kappa: 0.829) and MRI vs CT/SPECT (kappa: 0.786). The main causes of discrepancy were between MRI and SPECT for the diagnosis of stress reaction in the absence of overt fracture, and distinguishing incomplete fractures from intact pars or complete defects. MRI can be used as an effective and reliable first-line image modality for diagnosis of juvenile spondylolysis. However, localised CT is recommended as a supplementary examination in selected cases as a baseline for assessment of healing and for evaluation of indeterminate cases. (orig.)

  16. A Comparative Analysis of MOOC (Massive Open Online Course Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria CONACHE

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The MOOC platforms have known a considerable development in recent years due to the enlargement of online space and the shifting between traditional to virtual activities. These plat-forms made it possible for people almost everywhere to take online academic courses offered by top universities via open access to web and with unlimited participation. Thus, it came naturally to us to address the question what makes them so successful? The purpose of this paper is to report comparatively MOOC platforms in terms of features, based on the user’s implication and demands. First, we chose four relevant lifelong learning platforms and then we structured three main categories for the platforms' qualification, depending on which we built our theory regarding the comparison between them. Our analysis consists of three sets of criteria: business model, course design and popularity among online users. Starting from this perspective, we built a range of representative factors for which we highlighted the major aspects for each plat-form in our comparative research

  17. N-terminal protein processing: A comparative proteogenomic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonissone, Stefano; Gupta, Nitin; Romine, Margaret F.; Bradshaw, Ralph A.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2013-01-01

    N-Terminal Methionine Excision (NME) is a universally conserved mechanism with the same specificity across all life forms that removes the first Methionine in proteins when the second residue is Gly, Ala, Ser, Cys, Thr, Pro, or Val. In spite of its necessity for proper cell functioning, the functional role of NME remains unclear. In 1988, Arfin and Bradshaw connected NME with the N-end protein degradation rule and postulated that the role of NME is to expose the stabilizing residues with the goal to resist protein degradation. While this explanation (that treats 7 stabilizing residues in the same manner) has become the de facto dogma of NME, comparative proteogenomics analysis of NME tells a different story. We suggest that the primary role of NME is to expose only two (rather than seven) amino acids Ala and Ser for post-translational modifications (e.g., acetylation) rather than to regulate protein degradation. We argue that, contrary to the existing view, NME is not crucially important for proteins with 5 other stabilizing residue at the 2nd positions that are merely bystanders (their function is not affected by NME) that become exposed to NME because their sizes are comparable or smaller than the size of Ala and Ser.

  18. Comparative analysis of the mammalian WNT4 promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Geoffrey

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background WNT4 is a critical signalling molecule in embryogenesis and homeostasis, but the elements that control its transcriptional regulation are largely unknown. This study uses comparative cross species sequence and functional analyses between humans and a marsupial (the tammar wallaby,Macropus eugenii to refine the mammalian Wnt4 promoter. Results We have defined a highly conserved 89 bp minimal promoter region in human WNT4 by comparative analysis with the tammar wallaby. There are many conserved transcription factor binding sites in the proximal promoter region, including SP1, MyoD, NFκB and AP2, as well as highly conserved CpG islands within the human, mouse and marsupial promoters, suggesting that DNA methylation may play an important role in WNT4 transcriptional regulation. Conclusion Using a marsupial model, we have been able to provide new information on the transcriptional regulators in the promoter of this essential mammalian developmental gene, WNT4. These transcription factor binding sites and CpG islands are highly conserved in two disparate mammals, and are likely key controlling elements in the regulation of this essential developmental gene.

  19. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF DIFFERENT LIDAR SYSTEM CALIBRATION TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Miller

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available With light detection and ranging (LiDAR now being a crucial tool for engineering products and on the fly spatial analysis, it is necessary for the user community to have standardized calibration methods. The three methods in this study were developed and proven by the Digital Photogrammetry Research Group (DPRG for airborne LiDAR systems and are as follows; Simplified, Quasi-Rigorous, and Rigorous. In lieu of using expensive control surfaces for calibration, these methods compare overlapping LiDAR strips to estimate the systematic errors. These systematic errors are quantified by these methods and include the lever arm biases, boresight biases, range bias and scan angle scale bias. These three methods comprehensively represent all of the possible flight configurations and data availability and this paper will test the limits of the method with the most assumptions, the simplified calibration, by using data that violates the assumptions it’s math model is based on and compares the results to the quasi-rigorous and rigorous techniques. The overarching goal is to provide a LiDAR system calibration that does not require raw measurements which can be carried out with minimal control and flight lines to reduce costs. This testing is unique because the terrain used for calibration does not contain gable roofs, all other LiDAR system calibration testing and development has been done with terrain containing features with high geometric integrity such as gable roofs.

  20. A Comparative Analysis of Chinese and Shona Vowels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Mushangwe

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a comparative analysis between Chinese and Shona vowel system. The research is biased towards helping Chinese language learners whose mother tongue is Shona however it is expected to benefit other researchers interested in comparative researches. The main focus of this research is on the major differences that exist between these two languages, with an aim to predict and combat the possible pronunciation errors that may result from native language transfer. The research findings show that Chinese language’s vowel system is more complex than the Shona vowel system. It is therefore assumed that though Chinese language learners whose mother tongue is Shona language may find it challenging to acquire the Chinese vowel system, however if students are advised in advanced the differences between the Chinese and Shona vowels represented by same letters in the writing systems of these two languages, students are likely to have less pronunciation errors in Chinese since they will not borrow the Shona pronunciation strategies.

  1. THE COMPARATIVE COST-EFFICACY ANALYSIS OF VARIOUS ANTIHYPERTENSIVE THERAPIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Malchikova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To perform the comparative cost-efficacy analysis of various antihypertensive therapies in hypertensives patients.Material and methods. 140 hypertensive patients with history of ineffective antihypertensive therapy were randomized in to 4 groups, 35 patients in each one. Patients of Group A received indapamide retard plus perindopril; group B - indapamide retard plus amlodipine; group C - amlodipine plus lisinopril; group D - amlodipine plus bisoprolol. The Russian version of general questionnaire MOS-SF-36 was applied for quality of a life estimated. Endothelium function was evaluated with B-mode ultrasonography (Acuson 128 ХР/10. Albuminuria level was detected by immunoturbometric method (Integra-700, Roche.Results. The drug combination B had the least cost. The drug combination C was the most effective. The drug combination C was the most economically rational. The drug combination A was the least economically rational for BP reduction. However the drug combination A was comparable with drug combination C in effects on quality of life and on endothelium function, and it was the most economically rational for albuminuria reduction.Conclusion. Indapamide retard plus perindopril combination is the most economically rational in patients with target-organ lesions (nephropathy. Lisinopril plus amlodipine combination is economically rational in patients without target-organ lesions. 

  2. THE COMPARATIVE COST-EFFICACY ANALYSIS OF VARIOUS ANTIHYPERTENSIVE THERAPIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Malchikova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To perform the comparative cost-efficacy analysis of various antihypertensive therapies in hypertensives patients.Material and methods. 140 hypertensive patients with history of ineffective antihypertensive therapy were randomized in to 4 groups, 35 patients in each one. Patients of Group A received indapamide retard plus perindopril; group B - indapamide retard plus amlodipine; group C - amlodipine plus lisinopril; group D - amlodipine plus bisoprolol. The Russian version of general questionnaire MOS-SF-36 was applied for quality of a life estimated. Endothelium function was evaluated with B-mode ultrasonography (Acuson 128 ХР/10. Albuminuria level was detected by immunoturbometric method (Integra-700, Roche.Results. The drug combination B had the least cost. The drug combination C was the most effective. The drug combination C was the most economically rational. The drug combination A was the least economically rational for BP reduction. However the drug combination A was comparable with drug combination C in effects on quality of life and on endothelium function, and it was the most economically rational for albuminuria reduction.Conclusion. Indapamide retard plus perindopril combination is the most economically rational in patients with target-organ lesions (nephropathy. Lisinopril plus amlodipine combination is economically rational in patients without target-organ lesions. 

  3. EMERGING ECONOMIES: COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF MIST AND IBSA COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca Oguz Gok

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Post Second World War liberal economic order and its institutions have been challenged with the rapidly growing powerful economies of some Asian and Latin American countries in the last decade. Yet, there is ambiguity in international political economy field with regard to conceptualizing and categorizing these emerging economies. This study mainly aims to ravel out this obstacle by offering a new quantitative benchmarking framework. In other words, this study proposes a new evaluation criteria set for assessing emerging economies with combining testable domestic and systematic factors. Accordingly, this study presents the cross-country comparison by using quantitative benchmarking analysis between IBSA -India, Brazil and South Africa- and MIST -Mexico, Indonesia, South Korea and Turkey- countries over the period 2008- 2012. We compare these countries based on the criteria of economic growth, human development index, foreign direct investment, and official development assistance. This study also aims to evaluate the group performance of these newly emerging economies- namely the rise of IBSA and MIST countries-in a comparative perspective. In conclusion, the performance of these countries -from both group-of-country and individual-country perspectives- are discussed in light of the results

  4. Transcriptomics and comparative analysis of three antarctic notothenioid fishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Chul Shin

    Full Text Available For the past 10 to 13 million years, Antarctic notothenioid fish have undergone extraordinary periods of evolution and have adapted to a cold and highly oxygenated Antarctic marine environment. While these species are considered an attractive model with which to study physiology and evolutionary adaptation, they are poorly characterized at the molecular level, and sequence information is lacking. The transcriptomes of the Antarctic fishes Notothenia coriiceps, Chaenocephalus aceratus, and Pleuragramma antarcticum were obtained by 454 FLX Titanium sequencing of a normalized cDNA library. More than 1,900,000 reads were assembled in a total of 71,539 contigs. Overall, 40% of the contigs were annotated based on similarity to known protein or nucleotide sequences, and more than 50% of the predicted transcripts were validated as full-length or putative full-length cDNAs. These three Antarctic fishes shared 663 genes expressed in the brain and 1,557 genes expressed in the liver. In addition, these cold-adapted fish expressed more Ub-conjugated proteins compared to temperate fish; Ub-conjugated proteins are involved in maintaining proteins in their native state in the cold and thermally stable Antarctic environments. Our transcriptome analysis of Antarctic notothenioid fish provides an archive for future studies in molecular mechanisms of fundamental genetic questions, and can be used in evolution studies comparing other fish.

  5. Textbooks in transitional countries: Towards a methodology for comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miha Kovač

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In its first part, the paper analyses the ambiguous nature of the book as a medium: its physical production and its distribution to the end user takes place on a market basis; on the other hand, its content is predominantly consumed in a sector that was at least in the continental Europe traditionally considered as public and non-profit making. This ambiguous nature of the book and with it the impact of the market on the organization of knowledge in book format remains a dark spot in contemporary book research. On the other hand, textbooks are considered as ephemera both in contemporary education and book studies. Therefore, research on textbooks publishing models could be considered as a blind-spot of contemporary social studies. As a consequence, in the majority of European countries, textbook publishing and the organization of the textbook market are considered as self-evident. Throughout a comparative analysis of textbook publishing models in small transitional and developed countries, the paper points out that this self-evident organization of the textbook market is always culturally determined. In its final part, the paper compares different models of textbook publishing and outlines the scenarios for the development of the Slovene textbook market.

  6. Dipolar response of hydrated proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents an analytical theory and numerical simulations of the dipolar response of hydrated proteins. The effective dielectric constant of the solvated protein, representing the average dipole moment induced at the protein by a uniform external field, shows a remarkable variation among the proteins studied by numerical simulations. It changes from 0.5 for ubiquitin to 640 for cytochrome c. The former value implies a negative dipolar susceptibility of ubiquitin, that is a dia-electri...

  7. Comparability of mixed IC₅₀ data - a statistical analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomo Kalliokoski

    Full Text Available The biochemical half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 is the most commonly used metric for on-target activity in lead optimization. It is used to guide lead optimization, build large-scale chemogenomics analysis, off-target activity and toxicity models based on public data. However, the use of public biochemical IC50 data is problematic, because they are assay specific and comparable only under certain conditions. For large scale analysis it is not feasible to check each data entry manually and it is very tempting to mix all available IC50 values from public database even if assay information is not reported. As previously reported for Ki database analysis, we first analyzed the types of errors, the redundancy and the variability that can be found in ChEMBL IC50 database. For assessing the variability of IC50 data independently measured in two different labs at least ten IC50 data for identical protein-ligand systems against the same target were searched in ChEMBL. As a not sufficient number of cases of this type are available, the variability of IC50 data was assessed by comparing all pairs of independent IC50 measurements on identical protein-ligand systems. The standard deviation of IC50 data is only 25% larger than the standard deviation of Ki data, suggesting that mixing IC50 data from different assays, even not knowing assay conditions details, only adds a moderate amount of noise to the overall data. The standard deviation of public ChEMBL IC50 data, as expected, resulted greater than the standard deviation of in-house intra-laboratory/inter-day IC50 data. Augmenting mixed public IC50 data by public Ki data does not deteriorate the quality of the mixed IC50 data, if the Ki is corrected by an offset. For a broad dataset such as ChEMBL database a Ki- IC50 conversion factor of 2 was found to be the most reasonable.

  8. IMPORTANCE OF HYDRATION IN SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Vasić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Importance of hydration is detrmined by importance of functions of water in the human organism: i.e. regulation of body temperature, transport, excretion of waste materials through urine, digestion of food which is facilititated by saliva and gastric juices, maintenance of flexibility of organs and tissues About 60 % body mass of an adult person (males: 61 %, females: 54 % is made up of water. Water content of a newly born baby reaches 77 %, and it is up to 50 % in adults. It is very important for sportsmen to provide adequate hydration during and after the time of bodily activities. A symptom of water shortage is thirst. However, thirst is a late response of an organism and it occurs when dehydration has already taken place. Minimum in take of fluids in humans should range between one-and-half to two liters. It has been known for a long time that there is no success in sport without proper hydration in a sportsman.

  9. Gas hydrates: Technology status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    In 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) assumed the responsibility for expanding the knowledge base and for developing methods to recover gas from hydrates. These are ice-like mixtures of gas and water where gas molecules are trapped within a framework of water molecules. This research is part of the Unconventional Gas Recovery (UGR) program, a multidisciplinary effort that focuses on developing the technology to produce natural gas from resources that have been classified as unconventional because of their unique geologies and production mechanisms. Current work on gas hydrates emphasizes geological studies; characterization of the resource; and generic research, including modeling of reservoir conditions, production concepts, and predictive strategies for stimulated wells. Complementing this work is research on in situ detection of hydrates and field tests to verify extraction methods. Thus, current research will provide a comprehensive technology base from which estimates of reserve potential can be made, and from which industry can develop recovery strategies. 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boswell, R.D.; Shelander, D.; Lee, M.; Latham, T.; Collett, T.; Guerin, G.; Moridis, G.; Reagan, M.; Goldberg, D.

    2009-07-15

    A unique set of high-quality downhole shallow subsurface well log data combined with industry standard 3D seismic data from the Alaminos Canyon area has enabled the first detailed description of a concentrated gas hydrate accumulation within sand in the Gulf of Mexico. The gas hydrate occurs within very fine grained, immature volcaniclastic sands of the Oligocene Frio sand. Analysis of well data acquired from the Alaminos Canyon Block 818 No.1 ('Tigershark') well shows a total gas hydrate occurrence 13 m thick, with inferred gas hydrate saturation as high as 80% of sediment pore space. Average porosity in the reservoir is estimated from log data at approximately 42%. Permeability in the absence of gas hydrates, as revealed from the analysis of core samples retrieved from the well, ranges from 600 to 1500 millidarcies. The 3-D seismic data reveals a strong reflector consistent with significant increase in acoustic velocities that correlates with the top of the gas-hydrate-bearing sand. This reflector extends across an area of approximately 0.8 km{sup 2} and delineates the minimal probable extent of the gas hydrate accumulation. The base of the inferred gas-hydrate zone also correlates well with a very strong seismic reflector that indicates transition into units of significantly reduced acoustic velocity. Seismic inversion analyses indicate uniformly high gas-hydrate saturations throughout the region where the Frio sand exists within the gas hydrate stability zone. Numerical modeling of the potential production of natural gas from the interpreted accumulation indicates serious challenges for depressurization-based production in settings with strong potential pressure support from extensive underlying aquifers.

  11. The influence of raw material, added emulsifying salt and spray drying on cheese powder structure and hydration properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felix da Silva, Denise; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Hougaard, Anni Bygvrå

    2017-01-01

    The present work has evaluated how raw material, addition of emulsifying salts (ES) and drying technology affect particle characteristics, structure, and hydration of cheese powders. In this context the spray drying technology induced the strongest effect on morphology and swelling of cheese powder...... particles showed enhanced swelling but unchanged hydration properties compared with non-aggregated powder. Rheological measurements indicated the presence of a stable and elastic network after hydration....

  12. The disagreement between BSRS and the base of methane hydrate stability zones, in Shenhu area, north of South China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; He, L.; Wang, J. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. of Geology and Geophysics

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrate is an ice-like solid material that forms when natural gas is in contact with liquid water or ice under high pressure and low temperature. Gas hydrates occur in oceanic sediments and permafrost regions around the world. Release of methane hydrate into the atmosphere can cause environmental problems and pose a geological hazard. Methane hydrates can also be a potential energy resource. In the South China Sea, successful drilling and recovery of methane hydrate samples have proved that methane hydrate deposits are in existence in the northern South China Sea. The methane hydrate stability zone (HSZ), where the methane hydrate can form or exist stably in the sediments is mainly controlled by the temperature and the pressure conditions. When the temperature and pressure conditions are known, the depth of the base of the methane hydrate stability zone can be obtained. This paper presented a study that compared the bottom simulating reflector (BSR) depth and base of methane hydrate stability zone (BHSZ) in the Shenhu area, north of South China Sea. The paper defined BSRs and BHSZs and provided a comparison between the two. The paper also presented the results and discussion of results including origin of errors. It was concluded that there were greater differences between them than in other places world wide. These differences demonstrated regular spatial distribution and relationship with sedimentation rates and basement topography. The possible reason for the differences in regular spatial distribution was related to the geological setting. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Comparative analysis of Trichuris muris surface using conventional, low vacuum, environmental and field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Torres, Eduardo José; de Souza, Wanderley; Miranda, Kildare

    2013-09-23

    The whipworm of the genus Trichuris Roederer, 1791, is a nematode of worldwide distribution and comprises species that parasitize humans and other mammals. Infections caused by Trichuris spp. in mammals can lead to various intestinal diseases of human and veterinary interest. The morphology of Trichuris spp. and other helminths has been mostly studied using conventional scanning electron microscopy of chemically fixed, dried and metal-coated specimens, although this kind of preparation has been shown to introduce a variety of artifacts such as sample shrinking, loss of secreted products and/or hiding of small structures due to sample coating. Low vacuum (LVSEM) and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) have been applied to a variety of insulator samples, also used in the visualization of hydrated and/or live specimens in their native state. In the present work, we used LVSEM and ESEM to analyze the surface of T. muris and analyze its interaction with the host tissue using freshly fixed or unfixed hydrated samples. Analysis of hydrated samples showed a set of new features on the surface of the parasite and the host tissue, including the presence of the secretory products of the bacillary glands on the surface of the parasite, and the presence of mucous material and eggs on the intestinal surface. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) was also applied to reveal the detailed structure of the glandular chambers in fixed, dried and metal coated samples. Taken together, the results show that analysis of hydrated samples may provide new insights in the structural organization of the surface of helminth parasites and its interaction with the infected tissue, suggesting that the application of alternative SEM techniques may open new perspectives for analysis in taxonomy, morphology and host-parasite interaction fields. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Determination of methane concentrations in water in equilibrium with sI methane hydrate in the absence of a vapor phase by in situ Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    Most submarine gas hydrates are located within the two-phase equilibrium region of hydrate and interstitial water with pressures (P) ranging from 8 to 60 MPa and temperatures (T) from 275 to 293 K. However, current measurements of solubilities of methane in equilibrium with hydrate in the absence of a vapor phase are limited below 20 MPa and 283.15 K, and the differences among these data are up to 30%. When these data were extrapolated to other P-T conditions, it leads to large and poorly known uncertainties. In this study, in situ Raman spectroscopy was used to measure methane concentrations in pure water in equilibrium with sI (structure one) methane hydrate, in the absence of a vapor phase, at temperatures from 276.6 to 294.6 (??0.3) K and pressures at 10, 20, 30 and 40 (??0.4%) MPa. The relationship among concentration of methane in water in equilibrium with hydrate, in mole fraction [X(CH4)], the temperature in K, and pressure in MPa was derived as: X(CH4) = exp [11.0464 + 0.023267 P - (4886.0 + 8.0158 P)/T]. Both the standard enthalpy and entropy of hydrate dissolution at the studied T-P conditions increase slightly with increasing pressure, ranging from 41.29 to 43.29 kJ/mol and from 0.1272 to 0.1330 kJ/K ?? mol, respectively. When compared with traditional sampling and analytical methods, the advantages of our method include: (1) the use of in situ Raman signals for methane concentration measurements eliminates possible uncertainty caused by sampling and ex situ analysis, (2) it is simple and efficient, and (3) high-pressure data can be obtained safely. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Early Aggressive Hydration Hastens Clinical Improvement in Mild Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxbaum, James L; Quezada, Michael; Da, Ben; Jani, Niraj; Lane, Christianne; Mwengela, Didi; Kelly, Thomas; Jhun, Paul; Dhanireddy, Kiran; Laine, Loren

    2017-05-01

    Early aggressive intravenous hydration is recommended for acute pancreatitis treatment although randomized trials have not documented benefit. We performed a randomized trial of aggressive vs. standard hydration in the initial management of mild acute pancreatitis. Sixty patients with acute pancreatitis without systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) or organ failure were randomized within 4 h of diagnosis to aggressive (20 ml/kg bolus followed by 3 ml/kg/h) vs. standard (10 ml/kg bolus followed by 1.5 mg/kg/h) hydration with Lactated Ringer's solution. Patients were assessed at 12-h intervals. At each interval, in both groups, if hematocrit, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), or creatinine was increased, a bolus of 20 ml/kg followed by 3 ml/kg/h was given; if labs were decreased and epigastric pain was decreased (measured on 0-10 visual analog scale), hydration was then given at 1.5 ml/kg/h and clear liquid diet was started. The primary endpoint, clinical improvement within 36 h, was defined as the combination of decreased hematocrit, BUN, and creatinine; improved pain; and tolerance of oral diet. The mean age of the patients was 45 years and only 14 (23%) had comorbidities. A higher proportion of patients treated with aggressive vs. standard hydration showed clinical improvement at 36 h: 70 vs. 42% (P=0.03). The rate of clinical improvement was greater with aggressive vs. standard hydration by Cox regression analysis: adjusted hazard ratio=2.32, 95% confidence interval 1.21-4.45. Persistent SIRS occurred less commonly with aggressive hydration (7.4 vs. 21.1%; adjusted odds ratio (OR)=0.12, 0.02-0.94) as did hemoconcentration (11.1 vs. 36.4%, adjusted OR=0.08, 0.01-0.49). No patients developed signs of volume overload. Early aggressive intravenous hydration with Lactated Ringer's solution hastens clinical improvement in patients with mild acute pancreatitis.

  16. Whole genome comparative analysis of four Georgian grape cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabidze, V; Pipia, I; Gogniashvili, M; Kunelauri, N; Ujmajuridze, L; Pirtskhalava, M; Vishnepolsky, B; Hernandez, A G; Fields, C J; Beridze, Tengiz

    2017-12-01<