WorldWideScience

Sample records for hydrated surface vanadium

  1. Effect of Sulfuric and Triflic Acids on the Hydration of Vanadium Cations: An ab Initio Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehr, Fatemeh; Paddison, Stephen J

    2015-06-01

    Vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) may be a promising solution for large-scale energy storage applications, but the crossover of any of the redox active species V(2+), V(3+), VO(2+), and VO2(+) through the ion exchange membrane will result in self-discharge of the battery. Hence, a molecular level understanding of the states of vanadium cations in the highly acidic environment of a VRFB is needed. We examine the effects of sulfuric and triflic (CF3SO3H) acids on the hydration of vanadium species as they mimic the electrolyte and functional group of perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) membranes. Hybrid density functional theory in conjunction with a continuum solvation model was utilized to obtain the local structures of the hydrated vanadium cations in proximity to H2SO4, CF3SO3H, and their conjugate anions. The results indicate that none of these species covalently bond to the vanadium cations. The hydration structure of V(3+) is more distorted than that of V(2+) in an acidic medium. The oxo-group of VO2(+) is protonated by either acid, in contrast to VO(2+) which is not protonated. The atomic partial charge of the four oxidation states of vanadium varies from +1.7 to +2.0. These results provide the local solvation structures of vanadium cations in the VRFBs environment that are directly related to the electrolytes stability and diffusion of vanadium ions into the membrane.

  2. Vanadium Trineodecanoate Promoter for Fiberglass-Polyester Soil Surfacings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    surfaces for soils consists of a polyester resin, cumene hydroperoxide catalyst and a promoter solution containing a vanadium salt and N,N-dimethyl-p-tolui...4 Synthesis of Vanadium Trineodecanoate .. .... ......... 4 Reactions Using Various Reagents. ..... ........... 4 Analysis of Vanadium...polymer system consists of a polyester resin, a peroxide cata- lyst ( cumene hydroperoxide) and a two-part, premixed, promoter solution. The promoter

  3. Synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of a new vanadium fluoride hydrate V{sub 2}F{sub 6} . 4H{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakhal, Suliman; Weber, Dominik; Irran, Elisabeth; Lerch, Martin [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Chemie; Schwarz, Bjoern; Ehrenberg, Helmut [Karlsruhe Institute for Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst for Applied Materials

    2013-09-01

    A new vanadium fluoride hydrate V{sub 2}F{sub 6} . 4H{sub 2}O was prepared by reacting vanadium metal with hexafluorosilicic acid solution. The crystal structure of the green compound was determined by X-ray diffraction. The identified structure of the CuMF{sub 6} . 4H{sub 2}O-type (M = Ti, Zr) has not been found amongst vanadium fluoride hydrates to date. In addition, thermal decomposition behaviour and magnetic properties of V{sub 2}F{sub 6} . 4H{sub 2}O were studied. (orig.)

  4. Hydration effects on the molecular structure of silica-supported vanadium oxide catalysts: A combined IR, Raman, UV–vis and EXAFS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, D.E.; Visser, T.; Soulimani, F.; Koningsberger, D.C.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of hydration on the molecular structure of silica-supported vanadium oxide catalysts with loadings of 1–16 wt.% V has been systematically investigated by infrared, Raman, UV–vis and EXAFS spectroscopy. IR and Raman spectra recorded during hydration revealed the formation of V–OH groups, c

  5. A coordination chemistry study of hydrated and solvated cationic vanadium ions in oxidation states +III, +IV, and +V in solution and solid state

    OpenAIRE

    Krakowiak, Joanna; Lundberg, Daniel; Persson, Ingmar

    2012-01-01

    The coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III), oxovanadium(IV), and dioxovanadium(V) ions in the oxygen donor solvents water, dimethylsulfoxide (dmso) and N,N′-dimethylpropyleneurea (dmpu) has been studied in solution by EXAFS and large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and in solid state by single crystal X-ray diffraction and EXAFS. The hydrated vanadium(III) ion has a regular octahedral configuration with a mean V-O bond distance of 1.99 Å. In the hydrated and dimethylsulfo...

  6. Roll-to-Roll Processing of Inverted Polymer Solar Cells using Hydrated Vanadium(VOxide as a PEDOT:PSS Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik C. Krebs

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of hydrated vanadium(Voxide as a replacement of the commonly employed hole transporting material PEDOT:PSS was explored in this work. Polymer solar cells were prepared by spin coating on glass. Polymer solar cells and modules comprising 16 serially connected cells were prepared using full roll-to-roll (R2R processing of all layers. The devices were prepared on flexible polyethyleneterphthalate (PET and had the structure PET/ITO/ZnO/P3HT:PCBM/V2O5·(H2On/Ag. The ITO and silver electrodes were processed and patterned by use of screen printing. The zinc oxide, P3HT:PCBM and vanadium(Voxide layers were processed by slot-die coating. The hydrated vanadium(Voxide layer was slot-die coated using an isopropanol solution of vanadyl-triisopropoxide (VTIP. Coating experiments were carried out to establish the critical thickness of the hydrated vanadium(Voxide layer by varying the concentration of the VTIP precursor over two orders of magnitude. Hydrated vanadium(Voxide layers were characterized by profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and grazing incidence wide angle X-ray scattering. The power conversion efficiency (PCE for completed modules was up to 0.18%, in contrast to single cells where efficiencies of 0.4% were achieved. Stability tests under indoor and outdoor conditions were accomplished over three weeks on a solar tracker.

  7. Roll-to-Roll Processing of Inverted Polymer Solar Cells using Hydrated Vanadium(V)Oxide as a PEDOT:PSS Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Nieves Espinosa; Dam, Henrik Friis; Tanenbaum, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The use of hydrated vanadium(V)oxide as a replacement of the commonly employed hole transporting material PEDOT:PSS was explored in this work. Polymer solar cells were prepared by spin coating on glass. Polymer solar cells and modules comprising 16 serially connected cells were prepared using full...

  8. Spectroscopic determination of optimal hydration time of zircon surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez R, E. [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Garcia R, G. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Division de Estudios del Posgrado, Av. Tecnologico s/n, Ex-Rancho La Virgen, 52140 Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Garcia G, N., E-mail: eduardo.ordonez@inin.gob.m [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Av. Colon y Av. Tollocan, 50180 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    When a mineral surface is immersed in an aqueous solution, it develops and electric charge produced by the amphoteric dissociation of hydroxyl groups created by the hydration of the solid surface. This is one influential surface property. The complete hydration process takes a time which is specific for each mineral species. The knowledge of the aqueous solution contact time for complete surface hydration is mandatory for further surface phenomena studies. This study deals with the optimal hydration time of the raw zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) surface comparing the classical potentiometric titrations with a fluorescence spectroscopy technique. The latter is easy and rea liable as it demands only one sample batch to determine the optimal time to ensure a total hydration of the zircon surface. The analytical results of neutron activation analysis showed the presence of trace quantities of Dy{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3} in the bulk of zircon. The Dy{sup 3+} is structured in the zircon crystalline lattice and undergoes the same chemical reactions as zircon. Furthermore, the Dy{sup 3+} has a good fluorescent response whose intensity is enhanced by hydration molecules. The results show that, according to the potentiometric analysis, the hydration process for each batch (at least 8 sample batches) takes around 2 h, while the spectrometric method indicates only 5 minutes from only one batch. Both methods showed that the zircon surface have a 16 h optimal hydration time. (Author)

  9. A coordination chemistry study of hydrated and solvated cationic vanadium ions in oxidation states +III, +IV, and +V in solution and solid state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowiak, Joanna; Lundberg, Daniel; Persson, Ingmar

    2012-09-17

    The coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III), oxovanadium(IV), and dioxovanadium(V) ions in the oxygen-donor solvents water, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and N,N'-dimethylpropyleneurea (DMPU) has been studied in solution by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and large-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and in the solid state by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and EXAFS. The hydrated vanadium(III) ion has a regular octahedral configuration with a mean V-O bond distance of 1.99 Å. In the hydrated and DMSO-solvated oxovanadium(IV) ions, vanadium binds strongly to an oxo group at ca. 1.6 Å. The solvent molecule trans to the oxo group is very weakly bound, at ca. 2.2 Å, while the remaining four solvent molecules, with a mean V-O bond distance of 2.0 Å, form a plane slightly below the vanadium atom; the mean O═V-O(perp) bond angle is ca. 98°. In the DMPU-solvated oxovanadium(IV) ion, the space-demanding properties of the DMPU molecule leave no solvent molecule in the trans position to the oxo group, which reduces the coordination number to 5. The O═V-O bond angle is consequently much larger, 107°, and the mean V═O and V-O bond distances decrease to 1.58 and 1.97 Å, respectively. The hydrated and DMSO-solvated dioxovanadium(V) ions display a very distorted octahedral configuration with the oxo groups in the cis position with a mean V═O bond distance of 1.6 Å and a O═V═O bond angle of ca. 105°. The solvent molecules trans to the oxo groups are weakly bound, at ca. 2.2 Å, while the remaining two have bond distances of 2.02 Å. The experimental studies of the coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III,IV,V) ions are complemented by summarizing previously reported crystal structures to yield a comprehensive description of the coordination chemistry of vanadium with oxygen-donor ligands.

  10. Tuning surface porosity on vanadium surface by low energy He+ ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, J. K.; Novakowski, T. J.; Hassanein, A.

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, we report on tuning the surface porosity on vanadium surfaces using high-flux, low-energy He+ ion irradiation as function of sample temperature. Polished, mirror-finished vanadium samples were irradiated with 100 eV He+ ions at a constant ion-flux of 7.2 × 1020 ions m-2 s-1 for 1 h duration at constant sample temperatures in the wide range of 823-1173 K. Our results show that the surface porosity of V2O5 (naturally oxidized vanadium porous structure, after taking out from UHV) is strongly correlated to the sample temperature and is highly tunable. In fact, the surface porosity significantly increases with reducing sample temperature and reaches up to ∼87%. Optical reflectivity on these highly porous V2O5 surfaces show ∼0% optical reflectivity at 670 nm wavelength, which is very similar to that of "black metal". Combined with the naturally high melting point of V2O5, this very low optical reflectivity suggests potential application in solar power concentration technology. Additionally, this top-down approach guarantees relatively good contact between the different crystallites and avoids electrical conductivity limitations (if required). Since V2O5 is naturally a potential photocatalytic material, the resulting sub-micron-sized cube-shaped porous structures could be used in solar water splitting for hydrogen production in energy applications.

  11. Tuning surface porosity on vanadium surface by low energy He{sup +} ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, J.K., E-mail: jtripat@purdue.edu; Novakowski, T.J.; Hassanein, A.

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Surface nanostructuring on vanadium surface using novel He{sup +} ion irradiation process. • Tuning surface-porosity using high-flux, low-energy He{sup +} ion irradiation at constant elevated sample temperature (823–173 K). • Presented top-down approach guarantees good contact between different crystallites. • Sequential significant enhancement in surface-pore edge size (and corresponding reduction in surface-pore density) with increasing sample temperature. - Abstract: In the present study, we report on tuning the surface porosity on vanadium surfaces using high-flux, low-energy He{sup +} ion irradiation as function of sample temperature. Polished, mirror-finished vanadium samples were irradiated with 100 eV He{sup +} ions at a constant ion-flux of 7.2 × 10{sup 20} ions m{sup −2} s{sup −1} for 1 h duration at constant sample temperatures in the wide range of 823–1173 K. Our results show that the surface porosity of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (naturally oxidized vanadium porous structure, after taking out from UHV) is strongly correlated to the sample temperature and is highly tunable. In fact, the surface porosity significantly increases with reducing sample temperature and reaches up to ∼87%. Optical reflectivity on these highly porous V{sub 2}O{sub 5} surfaces show ∼0% optical reflectivity at 670 nm wavelength, which is very similar to that of “black metal”. Combined with the naturally high melting point of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, this very low optical reflectivity suggests potential application in solar power concentration technology. Additionally, this top-down approach guarantees relatively good contact between the different crystallites and avoids electrical conductivity limitations (if required). Since V{sub 2}O{sub 5} is naturally a potential photocatalytic material, the resulting sub-micron-sized cube-shaped porous structures could be used in solar water splitting for hydrogen production in energy applications.

  12. Hydration dynamics near a model protein surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-09-01

    The evolution of water dynamics from dilute to very high concentration solutions of a prototypical hydrophobic amino acid with its polar backbone, N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA), is studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation for both the completely deuterated and completely hydrogenated leucine monomer. We observe several unexpected features in the dynamics of these biological solutions under ambient conditions. The NALMA dynamics shows evidence of de Gennes narrowing, an indication of coherent long timescale structural relaxation dynamics. The translational water dynamics are analyzed in a first approximation with a jump diffusion model. At the highest solute concentrations, the hydration water dynamics is significantly suppressed and characterized by a long residential time and a slow diffusion coefficient. The analysis of the more dilute concentration solutions takes into account the results of the 2.0M solution as a model of the first hydration shell. Subtracting the first hydration layer based on the 2.0M spectra, the translational diffusion dynamics is still suppressed, although the rotational relaxation time and residential time are converged to bulk-water values. Molecular dynamics analysis shows spatially heterogeneous dynamics at high concentration that becomes homogeneous at more dilute concentrations. We discuss the hydration dynamics results of this model protein system in the context of glassy systems, protein function, and protein-protein interfaces.

  13. Silica surfaces lubrication by hydrated cations adsorption from electrolyte solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donose, Bogdan C; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Higashitani, Ko

    2005-03-01

    Adsorption of hydrated cations on hydrophilic surfaces has been related to a variety of phenomena associated with the short-range interaction forces and mechanisms of the adhesive contact between the surfaces. Here we have investigated the effect of the adsorption of cations on the lateral interaction. Using lateral force microscopy (LFM), we have measured the friction force between a silica particle and silica wafer in pure water and in electrolyte solutions of LiCl, NaCl, and CsCl salts. A significant lubrication effect was demonstrated for solutions of high electrolyte concentrations. It was found that the adsorbed layers of smaller and more hydrated cations have a higher lubrication capacity than the layers of larger and less hydrated cations. Additionally, we have demonstrated a characteristic dependence of the friction force on the sliding velocity of surfaces. A mechanism for the observed phenomena based on the microstructures of the adsorbed layers is proposed.

  14. Surface oxidation of vanadium dioxide films prepared by radio frequency magnetron Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xue-Jin; Liang Chun-Jun; Guan Kang-Ping; Li De-Hua; Nie Yu-Xin; Zhu Shi-Oiu; Huang Feng; Zhang Wei-Wei; Cheng Zheng-Wei

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports that the thermochromic vanadium dioxide films were deposited on various transparent substrates by radio frequency magnetron sputtering,and then aged under circumstance for years.Samples were characterized with several different techniques such as x-ray diffraction,x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy,and Raman,when they were fresh from sputter chamber and aged after years,respectively,in order to determine their structure and composition.It finds that a small amount of sodium occurred on the surface of vanadium dioxide films,which was probably due to sodium ion diffusion from soda-lime glass when sputtering was performed at high substrate temperature.It also finds that aging for years significantly affected the noustoichiometry of vanadium dioxide films,thus inducing much change in Raman modes.

  15. Effect of vanadium admixing on the surface structure of TiO2(110) under non-oxidizing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xin; Primorac, Elena; Kuhlenbeck, Helmut; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-11-01

    Single crystalline Ti + V mixed oxide layers have been prepared by doping vanadium into TiO2(110) thin films on TiO2(110) single crystal substrates with a Ti + Ta mixed oxide interlayer between the film and the substrate. The interlayer prevents the diffusion of vanadium into the substrate and also the diffusion of Ti3 + between substrate and overlayer. Mixing vanadium into the TiO2 lattice increases the reducibility of the host oxide as concluded from an appreciable degree of reduction produced by comparatively mild annealing. A high density of bridging oxygen vacancies was identified at the surface of films with a low vanadium content (2%) while a (1 × 2) reconstruction as also known for massively reduced TiO2(110) was observed for layers with 8% of vanadium. Studies of methanol adsorption indicate that the vanadium atoms are mostly located below the surface since there is no indication of a vanadium-methanol interaction. We provide evidence that the reducibility of the vanadium ions in the thin film is higher than that of the titanium ions and we suggest that this is the origin of the increased reducibility of the mixed oxide.

  16. On the validity of the electron transfer model in photon emission from ion bombarded vanadium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait El Fqih, M.; El Boujlaidi, A.; Jourdani, R.; Kaddouri, A. [Equipe de Spectroscopie and Imagerie Atomiques des Materiaux, Universite Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco); Ait El Fqih, M. [Faculte Polydisciplinaire, Universite Chouaib Doukkali, B.P. 2390 El Jadida (Morocco)

    2011-06-15

    The spectral structure of the radiation (250-500 nm) emitted during sputtering of clean and oxygen-covered polycrystalline vanadium and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} by 5 keV Kr{sup +} ions is presented. The optical spectra obtained by bombarding the vanadium target consist of series of sharp lines, which are attributed to neutral and ionic excited V. The same lines are observed in the spectra of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and vanadium when oxygen is present. The absolute intensities of VI and VII lines are measured under similar conditions for all spectra. The difference in photon yield from the clean and oxide vanadium targets is discussed in terms of the electron-transfer processes between the excited sputtered and electronic levels of the two types of surfaces. We have examined the existing models of ionisation, excitation, neutralisation and de-excitation of atomic particles in the vicinity of solid surfaces. Continuum radiation was also observed and interpreted as a result of the emission of excited molecules of the metal-oxide. (authors)

  17. On the validity of the electron transfer model in photon emission from ion bombarded vanadium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Fqih, M. Ait; El Boujlaïdi, A.; Jourdani, R.; Kaddouri, A.

    2011-06-01

    The spectral structure of the radiation (250-500 nm) emitted during sputtering of clean and oxygen-covered polycrystalline vanadium and V2O5 by 5 keV Kr+ ions is presented. The optical spectra obtained by bombarding the vanadium target consist of series of sharp lines, which are attributed to neutral and ionic excited V. The same lines are observed in the spectra of V2O5 and vanadium when oxygen is present. The absolute intensities of VI and VII lines are measured under similar conditions for all spectra. The difference in photon yield from the clean and oxide vanadium targets is discussed in terms of the electron-transfer processes between the excited sputtered and electronic levels of the two types of surfaces. We have examined the existing models of ionisation, excitation, neutralisation and de-excitation of atomic particles in the vicinity of solid surfaces. Continuum radiation was also observed and interpreted as a result of the emission of excited molecules of the metal-oxide.

  18. The specific surface area of methane hydrate formed in different conditions and manners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The specific surface area of methane hydrates, formed both in the presence and absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and processed in different manners (stirring, compacting, holding the hydrates at the formation conditions for different periods of time, cooling the hydrates for different periods of time before depressurizing them), was measured under atmospheric pressure and temperatures below ice point. It was found that the specific surface area of hydrate increased with the decreasing temperature. The methane hydrate in the presence of SDS was shown to be of bigger specific surface areas than pure methane hydrates. The experimental results further demonstrated that the manners of forming and processing hydrates affected the specific surface area of hydrate samples. Stirring or compacting made the hydrate become finer and led to a bigger specific surface area.

  19. Imaging metal-like monoclinic phase stabilized by surface coordination effect in vanadium dioxide nanobeam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zejun; Wu, Jiajing; Hu, Zhenpeng; Lin, Yue; Chen, Qi; Guo, Yuqiao; Liu, Yuhua; Zhao, Yingcheng; Peng, Jing; Chu, Wangsheng; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2017-06-01

    In correlated systems, intermediate states usually appear transiently across phase transitions even at the femtosecond scale. It therefore remains an open question how to determine these intermediate states--a critical issue for understanding the origin of their correlated behaviour. Here we report a surface coordination route to successfully stabilize and directly image an intermediate state in the metal-insulator transition of vanadium dioxide. As a prototype metal-insulator transition material, we capture an unusual metal-like monoclinic phase at room temperature that has long been predicted. Coordinate bonding of L-ascorbic acid molecules with vanadium dioxide nanobeams induces charge-carrier density reorganization and stabilizes metallic monoclinic vanadium dioxide, unravelling orbital-selective Mott correlation for gap opening of the vanadium dioxide metal-insulator transition. Our study contributes to completing phase-evolution pathways in the metal-insulator transition process, and we anticipate that coordination chemistry may be a powerful tool for engineering properties of low-dimensional correlated solids.

  20. Termination and hydration of forsteritic olivine (0 1 0) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hongping; Park, Changyong; Ahn, Gun; Hong, Seungbum; Keane, Denis T.; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Shen, Guoyin

    2014-11-01

    Termination and hydration of the forsteritic (Fo90Fa10) olivine (0 1 0) surface have been investigated with high-resolution specular X-ray reflectivity and Atomic Force Microscopy. The surface was prepared by polishing a naturally grown {0 1 0} face, from which we found the polished surface in acidic (pH 3.5) alumina suspension exhibits regular steps while the basic (pH 9.5) silica polished surface is irregularly roughened, indicating there are two distinguishable mechanochemical processes for the surface dissolution. The quantitative interpretation of the regular steps from the alumina-polished surface suggests that the observed step heights correspond to multiples of crystallographic unit cell. Only this atomically terraced surface is investigated with the high-resolution X-ray reflectivity (HRXR) to determine the surface termination and hydration. The basic silica paste polished surface turned out too rough to measure with X-ray reflectivity. HRXR reveals that the alumina polished olivine (0 1 0) surface in pure water is terminated at a plane including half-occupied metal ion sites (M1), an oxygen vacancy site, and a silicate tetrahedral unit with one of its apices pointing outward with respect to the surface. An ideal termination with the oxygen vacancy would fulfill the stoichiometry of the formula unit; however, in the observation, the vacancy site is filled by an adsorbed water species and about a quarter of the remaining metal ions are further depleted. The terminating plane generates two distinct atomic layers in the laterally averaged electron density profile, on which two highly ordered adsorbed water layers are formed. The first layer formation is likely through the direct interaction with the M1 plane and the second layer is likely through the hydrogen bonding interaction with the first water layer. With this multilayered adsorbed water structure, the surface metal ion is partially hydrated by the vacancy-filling water species and adsorbed water

  1. Hydration-controlled bacterial motility and dispersal on surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Wang, G.; Gulez, Gamze

    2010-01-01

    hydrated habitats, where water dynamics result in fragmented aquatic habitats connected by micrometric films, is debated. Here, we quantify the spatial dynamics of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and its nonflagellated isogenic mutant as affected by the hydration status of a rough porous surface using......Flagellar motility, a mode of active motion shared by many prokaryotic species, is recognized as a key mechanism enabling population dispersal and resource acquisition in microbial communities living in marine, freshwater, and other liquid-replete habitats. By contrast, its role in variably...... an experimental system that mimics aquatic habitats found in unsaturated soils. The flagellar motility of the model soil bacterium decreased sharply within a small range of water potential (0 to −2 kPa) and nearly ceased in liquid films of effective thickness smaller than 1.5 μm. However, bacteria could rapidly...

  2. Surface Roughness and Porosity of Hydrated Cement Pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ficker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available . Seventy-eight graphs were plotted to describe and analyze the dependences of the height and roughness irregularities on the water-to-cement ratio and on the porosity of the cement hydrates. The results showed unambiguously that the water-to-cement ratio or equivalently the porosity of the specimens has a decisive influence on the irregularities of the fracture surfaces of this material. The experimental results indicated the possibility that the porosity or the value of the water-to-cement ratio might be inferred from the height irregularities of the fracture surfaces. It was hypothesized that there may be a similarly strong correlation between porosity and surface irregularity, on the one hand, and some other highly porous solids, on the other, and thus the same possibility to infer porosity from the surfaces of their fracture remnants.

  3. Molecular modeling of the dissociation of methane hydrate in contact with a silica surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherzadeh, S Alireza; Englezos, Peter; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A

    2012-03-15

    We use constant energy, constant volume (NVE) molecular dynamics simulations to study the dissociation of the fully occupied structure I methane hydrate in a confined geometry between two hydroxylated silica surfaces between 36 and 41 Å apart, at initial temperatures of 283, 293, and 303 K. Simulations of the two-phase hydrate/water system are performed in the presence of silica, with and without a 3 Å thick buffering water layer between the hydrate phase and silica surfaces. Faster decomposition is observed in the presence of silica, where the hydrate phase is prone to decomposition from four surfaces, as compared to only two sides in the case of the hydrate/water simulations. The existence of the water layer between the hydrate phase and the silica surface stabilizes the hydrate phase relative to the case where the hydrate is in direct contact with silica. Hydrates bound between the silica surfaces dissociate layer-by-layer in a shrinking core manner with a curved decomposition front which extends over a 5-8 Å thickness. Labeling water molecules shows that there is exchange of water molecules between the surrounding liquid and intact cages in the methane hydrate phase. In all cases, decomposition of the methane hydrate phase led to the formation of methane nanobubbles in the liquid water phase.

  4. Defining reactive sites on hydrated mineral surfaces: Rhombohedral carbonate minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas-Jiménez, Adrián; Mucci, Alfonso; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Schott, Jacques

    2009-08-01

    Despite the success of surface complexation models (SCMs) to interpret the adsorptive properties of mineral surfaces, their construct is sometimes incompatible with fundamental chemical and/or physical constraints, and thus, casts doubts on the physical-chemical significance of the derived model parameters. In this paper, we address the definition of primary surface sites (i.e., adsorption units) at hydrated carbonate mineral surfaces and discuss its implications to the formulation and calibration of surface equilibria for these minerals. Given the abundance of experimental and theoretical information on the structural properties of the hydrated (10.4) cleavage calcite surface, this mineral was chosen for a detailed theoretical analysis of critical issues relevant to the definition of primary surface sites. Accordingly, a single, generic charge-neutral surface site ( tbnd CaCO 3·H 2O 0) is defined for this mineral whereupon mass-action expressions describing adsorption equilibria were formulated. The one-site scheme, analogous to previously postulated descriptions of metal oxide surfaces, allows for a simple, yet realistic, molecular representation of surface reactions and provides a generalized reference state suitable for the calculation of sorption equilibria for rhombohedral carbonate minerals via Law of Mass Action (LMA) and Gibbs Energy Minimization (GEM) approaches. The one-site scheme is extended to other rhombohedral carbonate minerals and tested against published experimental data for magnesite and dolomite in aqueous solutions. A simplified SCM based on this scheme can successfully reproduce surface charge, reasonably simulate the electrokinetic behavior of these minerals, and predict surface speciation agreeing with available spectroscopic data. According to this model, a truly amphoteric behavior is displayed by these surfaces across the pH scale but at circum-neutral pH (5.8-8.2) and relatively high ΣCO 2 (⩾1 mM), proton/bicarbonate co

  5. Adhesion force interactions between cyclopentane hydrate and physically and chemically modified surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Zachary M; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2014-12-07

    Interfacial interactions between liquid-solid and solid-solid phases/surfaces are of fundamental importance to the formation of hydrate deposits in oil and gas pipelines. This work establishes the effect of five categories of physical and chemical modification to steel on clathrate hydrate adhesive force: oleamide, graphite, citric acid ester, nonanedithiol, and Rain-X anti-wetting agent. Hydrate adhesive forces were measured using a micromechanical force apparatus, under both dry and water-wet surface conditions. The results show that the graphite coating reduced hydrate-steel adhesion force by 79%, due to an increase in the water wetting angle from 42 ± 8° to 154 ± 7°. Two chemical surface coatings (nonanedithiol and the citric acid ester) induced rapid hydrate growth in the hydrate particles; nonanedithiol increased hydrate adhesive force by 49% from the baseline, while the citric acid ester coating reduced hydrate adhesion force by 98%. This result suggests that crystal growth may enable a strong adhesive pathway between hydrate and other crystalline structures, however this effect may be negated in cases where water-hydrocarbon interfacial tension is minimised. When a liquid water droplet was placed on the modified steel surfaces, the graphite and citric acid ester became less effective at reducing adhesive force. In pipelines containing a free water phase wetting the steel surface, chemical or physical surface modifications alone may be insufficient to eliminate hydrate deposition risk. In further tests, the citric acid ester reduced hydrate cohesive forces by 50%, suggesting mild activity as a hybrid anti-agglomerant suppressing both hydrate deposition and particle agglomeration. These results demonstrate a new capability to develop polyfunctional surfactants, which simultaneously limit the capability for hydrate particles to aggregate and deposit on the pipeline wall.

  6. [Vanadium: threat and hope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, J; Antonowicz-Juchniewicz, J; Andrzejak, R

    2001-01-01

    Vanadium is an element classified in the group of heavy metals, very common in the natural environment and widely used in industry. It is mainly used in the production of nonferrous alloys, most resistant carbon steel, as well as in chemical, glass, paint and varnish, ceramic, and photographic industries. In the atmosphere, two second of vanadium originates from anthropogenic sources, sea-born aerosols and volcanic eruptions. Municipal waste is the major source of vanadium in surface water. It is one of the components of live organisms and participates in many biochemical processes essential for their proper functioning, but in higher concentrations it may induce acute or chronic intoxication that damage biological structures and disorder biochemical systems. The mechanism of vanadium toxic effect has not as yet been elucidated, however, it is already known that this mechanism is rooted among others in vanadium properties able to hinder a number of enzymatic systems. For vanadium the most "critical" systems are respiratory, urinary and hemopoietic. Vanadium salts may also be genotoxic and harmful at different phases of reproduction and development. Numerous studies of a possible use of vanadium in treatment of certain diseases, e.g., diabetes, have been carried out. Some findings on a potential antineoplastic or contraceptive effect of vanadium compounds have recently been reported. To sum up, there are numerous hazards associated with the wide industrial use of vanadium, nevertheless, the number of findings highlighting its nutritive and therapeutic properties is growing.

  7. Facile embedding of single vanadium atoms at the anatase TiO2(101) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koust, Stig; Arnarson, Logi; Moses, Poul G; Li, Zheshen; Beinik, Igor; Lauritsen, Jeppe V; Wendt, Stefan

    2017-04-05

    To understand the structure-reactivity relationships for mixed-metal oxide catalysts, well-defined systems are required. Mixtures of vanadia and titania (TiO2) are of particular interest for application in heterogeneous catalysis, with TiO2 often acting as the support. By utilizing high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy, we studied the interaction of vanadium (V) with the anatase TiO2(101) surface in the sub-monolayer regime. At 80 K, metallic V nucleates into homogeneously distributed clusters onto the terraces with no preference for nucleation at the step edges. However, embedding of single V atoms into TiO2 occurs following annealing at room temperature. In conjunction with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data and density functional theory calculations, we propose that monomeric V atoms occupy positions of regular surface Ti sites, i.e., Ti atoms are substituted by V atoms.

  8. Self-organized homo-epitaxial growth of (001) vanadium assisted by oxygen surface reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrieu, S.; Turban, P.; Kierren, B.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper the effect of oxygen on the vanadium homoepitaxial growth process is analyzed by using Auger spectroscopy, electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy. As the oxygen induced 1 × 5 surface structure got a lattice spacing 6% different from the pure V lattice, relaxation is observed by electron diffraction during the growth. The average in-plane lattice spacing is thus shown to be proportional to the oxygen surface concentration. The surface lattice relaxation is observed to exponentially vary with the number of deposited atomic planes. A kinetic model is proposed and allows us to explain these observations. Furthermore, it helps us to distinguish two regimes depending on growth temperature. At high temperature, the oxygen surface concentration during growth is due to oxygen upward diffusion from the underneath V layer. For lower temperature however, this upward diffusion is not efficient and another source of oxygen contamination is evidenced. When the oxygen surface concentration is sufficient, a spectacular self-organization is observed at the surface by surface microscopy. Ribbons shape islands are observed and are tentatively explained as a consequence of oxygen surface concentration and stress induced by the surface reconstruction.

  9. Dynamics of hydration water and coupled protein sidechains around a polymerase protein surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yangzhong; Yang, Yi; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2017-09-01

    Water-protein coupled interactions are essential to the protein structural stability, flexibility and dynamic functions. The ultimate effects of the hydration dynamics on the protein fluctuations remain substantially unexplored. Here, we investigated the dynamics of both hydration water and protein sidechains at 13 different sites around the polymerase β protein surface using a tryptophan scan with femtosecond spectroscopy. Three types of hydration-water relaxations and two types of protein sidechain motions were determined, reflecting a highly dynamic water-protein interactions fluctuating on the picosecond time scales. The hydration-water dynamics dominate the coupled interactions with higher flexibility.

  10. Hydration Repulsion between Carbohydrate Surfaces Mediated by Temperature and Specific Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsieh; Cox, Jason R.; Ow, Hooisweng; Shi, Rena; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2016-06-01

    Stabilizing colloids or nanoparticles in solution involves a fine balance between surface charges, steric repulsion of coating molecules, and hydration forces against van der Waals attractions. At high temperature and electrolyte concentrations, the colloidal stability of suspensions usually decreases rapidly. Here, we report a new experimental and simulation discovery that the polysaccharide (dextran) coated nanoparticles show ion-specific colloidal stability at high temperature, where we observed enhanced colloidal stability of nanoparticles in CaCl2 solution but rapid nanoparticle-nanoparticle aggregation in MgCl2 solution. The microscopic mechanism was unveiled in atomistic simulations. The presence of surface bound Ca2+ ions increases the carbohydrate hydration and induces strongly polarized repulsive water structures beyond at least three hydration shells which is farther-reaching than previously assumed. We believe leveraging the binding of strongly hydrated ions to macromolecular surfaces represents a new paradigm in achieving absolute hydration and colloidal stability for a variety of materials, particularly under extreme conditions.

  11. Arsenic, Fluoride and Vanadium in surface water (Chasicó Lake, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria laura ePuntoriero

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chasicó Lake is the main water body in the southwest of the Chaco-Pampean plain. It shows some differences from the typical Pampean shallow lakes, such as high salinity and high arsenic and fluoride levels. The aim of this paper is to analyze the trace elements [arsenic (As, fluoride (F- and vanadium (V] present in Chasicó Lake. Surface and groundwater were sampled in dry and wet periods, during 2010 and 2011. Fluoride was determined with a selective electrode. As and V were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES. Significant correlation in surface water was only found for As and F- (r=0.978, p<0.01. The As, F- and V concentration values were higher and more widely dispersed in surface water than in groundwater, as a consequence of evaporation. The fact that these elements do not correlate in surface water may also indicates that groundwater would not be the main source of origin of As, F- and V in surface water. The origin of these trace elements is from volcanic glass from Pampean loess. As, F- and V concentration were higher than in national and international guideline levels for the protection of aquatic biota. Hence, this issue is relevant since the silverside (Odontesthes bonariensis is the most important commercial species in Chasicó Lake. This fish is both consumed locally and exported to other South-American countries through commercial and sport fishing.

  12. A highly permeable and enhanced surface area carbon-cloth electrode for vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X. L.; Zhao, T. S.; Zeng, Y. K.; An, L.; Wei, L.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a high-performance porous electrode, made of KOH-activated carbon-cloth, is developed for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). The macro-scale porous structure in the carbon cloth formed by weaving the carbon fibers in an ordered manner offers a low tortuosity (∼1.1) and a broad pore distribution from 5 μm to 100 μm, rendering the electrode a high hydraulic permeability and high effective ionic conductivity, which are beneficial for the electrolyte flow and ion transport through the porous electrode. The use of KOH activation method to create nano-scale pores on the carbon-fiber surfaces leads to a significant increase in the surface area for redox reactions from 2.39 m2 g-1 to 15.4 m2 g-1. The battery assembled with the present electrode delivers an energy efficiency of 80.1% and an electrolyte utilization of 74.6% at a current density of 400 mA cm-2, as opposed to an electrolyte utilization of 61.1% achieved by using a conventional carbon-paper electrode. Such a high performance is mainly attributed to the combination of the excellent mass/ion transport properties and the high surface area rendered by the present electrode. It is suggested that the KOH-activated carbon-cloth electrode is a promising candidate in redox flow batteries.

  13. Surface and Bulk Electronic Structure and Chemisorption Properties of Titanium and Vanadium Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kevin Eugene

    The unusual electronic properties of Ti _2O_3 and V _2O_3, in particular the metal-insulator transitions which they undergo, have produced widespread interest in the physics of these materials, while the use of titanium and vanadium oxides as catalysts and catalyst supports makes a detailed understanding of their surface properties of great importance. The electronic structure and gas adsorption properties of single crystal titanium and vanadium oxides have been studied here using ultraviolet and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation, Auger electron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction. Spatially anisotropic resonant photoemission from 3d states in Ti_2O_3 and V_2O_3 was observed and shown to originate from localised molecular orbitals. This contrasts with an energy analysis of the photoemission data which revealed dispersing, delocalised d-bands in both oxides. A large resonance was observed in the O 2p emission at the cation 3p to 3d absorption edge in Ti_2O _3 which is inconsistent with hybridisation, indicating the possible existence of inter-atomic resonances. The first detailed photoemission observation of metal-insulator transitions in Cr-doped V_2O _3 is reported; large changes in the density of states at the Fermi level are seen at these transitions. The surface electronic structure of single crystal TiO_2, Ti_2O _3 and V_2O _3 was found to be indistinguishable from that of the bulk. The interaction of SO_2 with these oxides was extensively studied since sulfur is a notorious catalyst poison. SO_2 reacts vigorously with the titanium oxides, dissociating in the presence of Ti^{3+} cations to form TiO_2 and TiS _2; in their absence no reaction occurs. Surprisingly, SO_2 reacts very weakly with V _2O_3, adsorbing in both dissociated and molecular form. Additionally, only a weak reaction of H_2S and TiO _2 was found. The electronic structure of these oxides is shown to be extremely complex, displaying both localised and

  14. The dynamics of the surface layer of lipid membranes doped by vanadium complex: computer modeling and EPR studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olchawa Ryszard

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Penetration of the liposome membranes doped with vanadium complex formed in the liquid-crystalline phase from egg yolk lecithin (EYL by the TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl spin probes has been investigated. The penetration process was followed by 360 hours at 24°C, using the electron spin resonance (EPR method. The spectroscopic parameter of the partition (F of this probe indicated that a maximum rigidity of the membrane was at 3% concentration of the vanadium complex. Computer simulations showed that the increase in the rigidity of the membrane corresponds to the closure of gaps in the surface layer of the membrane, and indicates the essential role of the membrane surface in transport processes.

  15. Improved performance of organic light-emitting diode with vanadium pentoxide layer on the FTO surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, D.; Sarma, R.

    2017-06-01

    Vanadium pentoxide layer deposited on the fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) anode by vacuum deposition has been investigated in organic light-emitting diode (OLED). With 12 nm optimal thickness of V2O5, the luminance efficiency is increased by 1.66 times compared to the single FTO-based OLED. The improvement of current efficiency implies that there is a better charge injection and better controlling of hole current. To investigate the performance of OLED by the buffer layer, V2O5 films of different thicknesses were deposited on the FTO anode and their J- V and L- V characteristics were studied. Further analysis was carried out by measuring sheet resistance, optical transmittance and surface morphology with the FE-SEM images. This result indicates that the V2O5 (12 nm) buffer layer is a good choice for increasing the efficiency of FTO-based OLED devices within the tunnelling region. Here the maximum value of current efficiency is found to be 2.83 cd / A.

  16. Improved performance of organic light-emitting diode with vanadium pentoxide layer on the FTO surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D SAIKIA; R SARMA

    2017-06-01

    Vanadium pentoxide layer deposited on the fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) anode by vacuum deposition has been investigated in organic light-emitting diode (OLED).With 12nm optimal thickness of $V_{2}O_{5}$, the luminance efficiency is increased by 1.66 times compared to the single FTO-based OLED. The improvement of current efficiency implies that there is a better charge injection and better controlling of hole current. To investigate the performance of OLED by the buffer layer, $V_{2}O_{5}$ films of different thicknesses were deposited on the FTO anode and their $J–V$ and $L–V$ characteristics were studied. Further analysis was carried out by measuring sheet resistance, optical transmittance and surface morphology with the FE-SEM images. This result indicates that the $V_{2}O_{5}$ (12 nm) buffer layer is a good choice for increasing the efficiency of FTO-based OLED devices within the tunnelling region. Here the maximum value of current efficiency is found to be 2.83 cd/A.

  17. Tunable Oxygen Functional Groups as Electrocatalysts on Graphite Felt Surfaces for All-Vanadium Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevez, Luis; Reed, David; Nie, Zimin; Schwarz, Ashleigh M; Nandasiri, Manjula I; Kizewski, James P; Wang, Wei; Thomsen, Edwin; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Sprenkle, Vincent; Li, Bin

    2016-06-22

    A dual oxidative approach using O2 plasma followed by treatment with H2 O2 to impart oxygen functional groups onto the surface of a graphite felt electrode. When used as electrodes for an all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) system, the energy efficiency of the cell is enhanced by 8.2 % at a current density of 150 mA cm(-2) compared with one oxidized by thermal treatment in air. More importantly, by varying the oxidative techniques, the amount and type of oxygen groups was tailored and their effects were elucidated. It was found that O-C=O groups improve the cells performance whereas the C-O and C=O groups degrade it. The reason for the increased performance was found to be a reduction in the cell overpotential after functionalization of the graphite felt electrode. This work reveals a route for functionalizing carbon electrodes to improve the performance of VRB cells. This approach can lower the cost of VRB cells and pave the way for more commercially viable stationary energy storage systems that can be used for intermittent renewable energy storage.

  18. Theoretical Investigation on the Adsorption of Ag+ and Hydrated Ag+ Cations on Clean Si(111)Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG Yong-Li; LI Meng-Hua; WANG Zhi-Guo; LIU Yong-Jun

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,the adsorption of Ag+ and hydrated Ag+ cations on clean Si(111)surface were investigated by using cluster(Gaussian 03)and periodic(DMol3)ab initio calculations.Si(111)surface was described with cluster models(Si14H17 and Si22H21)and a four-silicon layer slab with periodic boundary conditions.The effect of basis set superposition error(BSSE)was taken into account by applying the counterpoise correction.The calculated results indicated that the binding energies between hydrated Ag+ cations and clean Si(111)surface are large,suggesting a strong interaction between hydrated Ag+ cations and the semiconductor surface.With the increase of number,water molecules form hydrogen bond network with one another and only one water molecule binds directly to the Ag+ cation.The Ag+ cation in aqueous solution will safely attach to the clean Si(111)surface.

  19. From hydration repulsion to dry adhesion between asymmetric hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanduč, Matej; Netz, Roland R

    2015-10-01

    Using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at constant water chemical potential in combination with basic theoretical arguments, we study hydration-induced interactions between two overall charge-neutral yet polar planar surfaces with different wetting properties. Whether the water film between the two surfaces becomes unstable below a threshold separation and cavitation gives rise to long-range attraction, depends on the sum of the two individual surface contact angles. Consequently, cavitation-induced attraction also occurs for a mildly hydrophilic surface interacting with a very hydrophobic surface. If both surfaces are very hydrophilic, hydration repulsion dominates at small separations and direct attractive force contribution can-if strong enough-give rise to wet adhesion in this case. In between the regimes of cavitation-induced attraction and hydration repulsion we find a narrow range of contact angle combinations where the surfaces adhere at contact in the absence of cavitation. This dry adhesion regime is driven by direct surface-surface interactions. We derive simple laws for the cavitation transition as well as for the transition between hydration repulsion and dry adhesion, which favorably compare with simulation results in a generic adhesion state diagram as a function of the two surface contact angles.

  20. Surface characteristics of nanocrystalline apatites: effect of mg surface enrichment on morphology, surface hydration species, and cationic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertinetti, Luca; Drouet, Christophe; Combes, Christele; Rey, Christian; Tampieri, Anna; Coluccia, Salvatore; Martra, Gianmario

    2009-05-19

    The incorporation of foreign ions, such as Mg2+, exhibiting a biological activity for bone regeneration is presently considered as a promising route for increasing the bioactivity of bone-engineering scaffolds. In this work, the morphology, structure, and surface hydration of biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites were investigated before and after surface exchange with such Mg2+ ions, by combining chemical alterations (ion exchange, H2O-D2O exchanges) and physical examinations (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM)). HRTEM data suggested that the Mg2+/Ca2+ exchange process did not affect the morphology and surface topology of the apatite nanocrystals significantly, while a new phase, likely a hydrated calcium and/or magnesium phosphate, was formed in small amount for high Mg concentrations. Near-infrared (NIR) and medium-infrared (MIR) spectroscopies indicated that the samples enriched with Mg2+ were found to retain more water at their surface than the Mg-free sample, both at the level of H2O coordinated to cations and adsorbed in the form of multilayers. Additionally, the H-bonding network in defective subsurface layers was also noticeably modified, indicating that the Mg2+/Ca2+ exchange involved was not limited to the surface. This work is intended to widen the present knowledge on Mg-enriched calcium phosphate-based bioactive materials intended for bone repair applications.

  1. Multi-scale cell/surface interaction on modified titanium aluminum vanadium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianbo

    This dissertation presents a series of experimental studies of the effects of multi-scale cell/surface interactions on modified Ti-6Al-4V surfaces. These include laser-grooved surfaces; porous structures and RGD-coated laser-grooved surfaces. A nano-second DPSS UV lasers with a Gaussian pulse energy profile was used to introduce the desired micro-groove geometries onto Ti-6Al-4V surfaces. This was done without inducing micro-cracks or significant changes in surface chemistry within the heat affected zones. The desired 8-12 mum groove depths and widths were achieved by the control of pulse frequency, scan speed, and the lens focal length that controls spot size. The interactions between human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells and laser-grooved Ti-6Al-4V surfaces were investigated after 48 hours of cell culture. The cell behavior, including cell spreading, alignment and adhesion, was elucidated using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), immuno-fluorescence staining and enzymatic detachment. Contact guidance was shown to increase as grooved spacing decreased. For the range of micro-groove geometries studied, micro-grooves with groove spacings of 20 mum provided the best combination of cell orientation and adhesion. Short-term adhesion experiments (15 mins to 1 day) also revealed that there is a positive correlation between cell orientation and cell adhesion. Contact guidance on the micro-grooved surfaces is shown to be enhanced by nano- and micro-scale asperities that provide sites for the attachment of lamellopodia during cell locomotion and spreading. Contact guidance is also promoted by the geometrical confinement provided by laser grooves. An experimental study of initial cell spreading and ingrowth into Ti-6Al-4V porous structures was also carried out on porous structures with different pore sizes and geometries. A combination of SEM, the tetrazolium salt (MTT) colorimetric assay and enzymatic detachment were used to study cell spreading and adhesion. The extent of cell

  2. Simultaneous recovery of vanadium and nickel from power plant fly-ash: Optimization of parameters using response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazari, E.; Rashchi, F., E-mail: rashchi@ut.ac.ir; Saba, M.; Mirazimi, S.M.J.

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Leaching of vanadium and nickel from fly ash (14.43% V and 5.19% Ni) in sulfuric acid was performed. • Optimization of leaching parameters was carried out using a response surface methodology. • Using optimum conditions, 94.28% V and 81.01% Ni “actual recovery” was obtained. - Abstract: Simultaneous recovery of vanadium (V) and nickel (Ni), which are classified as two of the most hazardous metal species from power plant heavy fuel fly-ash, was studied using a hydrometallurgical process consisting of acid leaching using sulfuric acid. Leaching parameters were investigated and optimized in order to maximize the recovery of both vanadium and nickel. The independent leaching parameters investigated were liquid to solid ratio (S/L) (5–12.5 wt.%), temperature (45–80 °C), sulfuric acid concentration (5–25 v/v%) and leaching time (1–5 h). Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize the process parameters. The most effective parameter on the recovery of both elements was found to be temperature and the least effective was time for V and acid concentration for Ni. Based on the results, optimum condition for metals recovery (actual recovery of ca.94% for V and 81% for Ni) was determined to be solid to liquid ratio of 9.15 wt.%, temperature of 80 °C, sulfuric acid concentration of 19.47 v/v% and leaching time of 2 h. The maximum V and Ni predicted recovery of 91.34% and 80.26% was achieved.

  3. Oil and gas pipelines with hydrophobic surfaces better equipped to deal with gas hydrate flow assurance issues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perfeldt, Christine Malmos; Sharifi, Hassan; von Solms, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    concerns. Here we show the effect of a hydrophobically coated surface on hydrate formation in the presence of an antifreeze protein type I (AFP I) and a biodegradable synthetic polymer (LuvicapBio) in a high pressure crystallizer setup. The hydrophobic surface increased the hydrate induction time...

  4. The inhibition of methane hydrate formation by water alignment underneath surface adsorption of surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ngoc N.; Nguyen, Anh V.; Dang, Liem X.

    2017-06-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been widely shown to strongly promote the formation of methane hydrate. Here we show that SDS displays an extraordinary inhibition effect on methane hydrate formation when the surfactant is used in sub-millimolar concentration (around 0.3 mM). We have also employed Sum Frequency Generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) to elucidate the molecular mechanism of this inhibition. The SFG and MDS results revealed a strong alignment of water molecules underneath surface adsorption of SDS in its sub-millimolar solution. Interestingly, both the alignment of water and the inhibition effect (in 0.3 mM SDS solution) went vanishing when an oppositely-charged surfactant (tetra-n-butylammonium bromide, TBAB) was suitably added to produce a mixed solution of 0.3 mM SDS and 3.6 mM TBAB. Combining structural and kinetic results, we pointed out that the alignment of water underneath surface adsorption of dodecyl sulfate (DS-) anions gave rise to the unexpected inhibition of methane hydration formation in sub-millimolar solution of SDS. The adoption of TBAB mitigated the SDS-induced electrostatic field at the solution’s surface and, therefore, weakened the alignment of interfacial water which, in turn, erased the inhibition effect. We discussed this finding using the concept of activation energy of the interfacial formation of gas hydrate. The main finding of this work is to reveal the interplay of interfacial water in governing gas hydrate formation which sheds light on a universal molecular-scale understanding of the influence of surfactants on gas hydrate formation. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  5. Weakly Hydrated Surfaces and the Binding Interactions of Small Biological Solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, J. W.; Tavagnacco, L.; Ehrlich, L.; Chen, M.; Schnupf, U.; Himmel, M. E.; Saboungi, M. L.; Cesaro, A.

    2012-04-01

    Extended planar hydrophobic surfaces, such as are found in the side chains of the amino acids histidine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, exhibit an affinity for the weakly hydrated faces of glucopyranose. In addition, molecular species such as these, including indole, caffeine, and imidazole, exhibit a weak tendency to pair together by hydrophobic stacking in aqueous solution. These interactions can be partially understood in terms of recent models for the hydration of extended hydrophobic faces and should provide insight into the architecture of sugar-binding sites in proteins.

  6. Simultaneous recovery of vanadium and nickel from power plant fly-ash: optimization of parameters using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, E; Rashchi, F; Saba, M; Mirazimi, S M J

    2014-12-01

    Simultaneous recovery of vanadium (V) and nickel (Ni), which are classified as two of the most hazardous metal species from power plant heavy fuel fly-ash, was studied using a hydrometallurgical process consisting of acid leaching using sulfuric acid. Leaching parameters were investigated and optimized in order to maximize the recovery of both vanadium and nickel. The independent leaching parameters investigated were liquid to solid ratio (S/L) (5-12.5 wt.%), temperature (45-80 °C), sulfuric acid concentration (5-25 v/v%) and leaching time (1-5h). Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize the process parameters. The most effective parameter on the recovery of both elements was found to be temperature and the least effective was time for V and acid concentration for Ni. Based on the results, optimum condition for metals recovery (actual recovery of ca.94% for V and 81% for Ni) was determined to be solid to liquid ratio of 9.15 wt.%, temperature of 80 °C, sulfuric acid concentration of 19.47 v/v% and leaching time of 2h. The maximum V and Ni predicted recovery of 91.34% and 80.26% was achieved.

  7. Ultrafast Hydration Dynamics Probed by Tryptophan at Protein Surface and Protein-DNA Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yangzhong

    As we all live in a special water planet Earth, the significance of water to life has been universally recognized. The reason why water is so important to life has intrigued many researchers. This dissertation will focus on the ultrafast dynamics of protein surface water and protein-DNA interfacial water which have direct importance to the protein structure and function. Using tryptophan as an intrinsic fluorescence probe, combined with site-directed mutagenesis and ultrafast fluorescence up-conversion spectroscopy, we can achieve single residue spatial resolution and femtosecond temporal resolution. We can also precisely determine the local hydration water dynamics by monitoring the Stokes shift of tryptophan one at a time. Previously, the protein surface hydration has been extensively studied by our group. In this thesis, we will provide more details on the methods we are using to extract the hydration dynamics, and also validate our methods from both experimental and theoretical perspectives. To further interrogate the interfacial water hydration dynamics relative to the protein surface hydration, we studied two DNA polymerases: DNA Polymerase IV (Dpo4) and DNA Polymerase Beta (Pol beta). Both proteins show typical surface hydration pattern with three distinct time components including: (i) the ultrafast sub-picosecond component reflects the bulk type water motion; (ii) a few picoseconds component shows the inner water relaxation mainly corresponding to the local libration and reorientation; (iii) the tens to hundred picoseconds component represents the water-protein coupled motion involving the whole water network reorganization. Dpo4, a loosely DNA binding protein, exhibits very flexible interfacial water which resembles its surface water yet with a significantly reduced ultrafast component. Such dynamic interfacial water not only maintains interfacial flexibility, but also contributes to the low fidelity of the protein. In contrast to the Dpo4, pol beta

  8. Combined ATR-FTIR and DFT Study of Cyclohexanone Adsorption on Hydrated TiO2 Anatase Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almeida, Ana Rita; Calatayud, Monica; Tielens, Frederik; Moulijn, Jacob A.; Mul, Guido

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption of cyclohexanone on different planes ((100), (101), and (001)) of anatase TiO2, with variable level of hydration, was evaluated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Surface hydration was found to affect the cyclohexanone adsorption enthalpy and the calculated infrared abso

  9. Epithermal Neutron Evidence for a Diurnal Surface Hydration Process in the Moon's High Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClanahan, T. P.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Parsons, A.; Starr, R. D.; Evans, L. G.; Sanin, A.; Litvak, M.; Livengood, T.

    2015-01-01

    We report evidence from epithermal neutron flux observations that show that the Moon's high latitude surfaces are being actively hydrated, dehydrated and rehydrated in a diurnal cycle. The near-surface hydration is indicated by an enhanced suppression of the lunar epithermal neutron leakage flux on the dayside of the dawn terminator on poleward-facing slopes (PFS). At 0600 to 0800 local-time, hydrogen concentrations within the upper 1 meter of PFS are observed to be maximized relative to equivalent equator-facing slopes (EFS). During the lunar day surface hydrogen concentrations diminish towards dusk and then rebuild overnight. Surface hydration is determined by differential comparison of the averaged EFS to PFS epithermal neutron count rates above +/- 75 deg latitude. At dawn the contrast bias towards PFS is consistent with at least 15 to 25 parts-per-million (ppm) hydrogen that dissipates by dusk. We review several lines of evidence derived from temperature and epithermal neutron data by a correlated analysis of observations from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) that were mapped as a function of lunar local-time, Lunar Observing Laser Altimeter (LOLA) topography and Diviner (DLRE) surface temperature.

  10. Band energy control of molybdenum oxide by surface hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, Keith T., E-mail: k.t.butler@bath.ac.uk; Walsh, Aron [Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Crespo-Otero, Rachel [School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Buckeridge, John; Scanlon, David O. [University College London, Kathleen Lonsdale Materials Chemistry, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Bovill, Edward; Lidzey, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-07

    The application of oxide buffer layers for improved carrier extraction is ubiquitous in organic electronics. However, the performance is highly susceptible to processing conditions. Notably, the interface stability and electronic structure is extremely sensitive to the uptake of ambient water. In this study we use density functional theory calculations to asses the effects of adsorbed water on the electronic structure of MoO{sub x}, in the context of polymer-fullerene solar cells based on PCDTBT. We obtain excellent agreement with experimental values of the ionization potential for pristine MoO{sub 3} (010). We find that IP and EA values can vary by as much as 2.5 eV depending on the oxidation state of the surface and that adsorbed water can either increase or decrease the IP and EA depending on the concentration of surface water.

  11. Sialic acid-to-urea ratio as a measure of airway surface hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esther, Charles R; Hill, David B; Button, Brian; Shi, Shuai; Jania, Corey; Duncan, Elizabeth A; Doerschuk, Claire M; Chen, Gang; Ranganathan, Sarath; Stick, Stephen M; Boucher, Richard C

    2017-03-01

    Although airway mucus dehydration is key to pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) and other airways diseases, measuring mucus hydration is challenging. We explored a robust method to estimate mucus hydration using sialic acid as a marker for mucin content. Terminal sialic acid residues from mucins were cleaved by acid hydrolysis from airway samples, and concentrations of sialic acid, urea, and other biomarkers were analyzed by mass spectrometry. In mucins purified from human airway epithelial (HAE), sialic acid concentrations after acid hydrolysis correlated with mucin concentrations (r(2) = 0.92). Sialic acid-to-urea ratios measured from filters applied to the apical surface of cultured HAE correlated to percent solids and were elevated in samples from CF HAEs relative to controls (2.2 ± 1.1 vs. 0.93 ± 1.8, P gold standard measure of mucus hydration. The method proved robust and has potential to serve as flexible techniques to assess mucin hydration, particularly in samples like BALF in which established methods such as percent solids cannot be utilized.

  12. A Trimeric Surfactant: Surface Micelles, Hydration-Lubrication, and Formation of a Stable, Charged Hydrophobic Monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, Nir; Wu, Chunxian; Wang, Yilin; Klein, Jacob

    2016-11-15

    The surface structure of the trimeric surfactant tri(dodecyldimethylammonioacetoxy)diethyltriamine trichloride (DTAD) on mica and the interactions between two such DTAD-coated surfaces were determined using atomic force microscopy and a surface force balance. In an aqueous solution of 3 mM, 5 times the critical aggregation concentration (CAC), the surfaces are coated with wormlike micelles or hemimicelles and larger (∼80 nm) bilayer vesicles. Repulsive normal interactions between the surfaces indicate a net surface charge and a solution concentration of ions close to that expected from the CAC. Moreover, this surface coating is strongly lubricating up to some tens of atmospheres, attributed to the hydration-lubrication mechanism acting at the exposed, highly hydrated surfactant headgroups. Upon replacement of the DTAD solution with surfactant-free water, the surface structures have changed on the DTAD monolayers, which then jump into adhesive contact on approach, both in water and following addition of 0.1 M NaNO3. This trimeric surfactant monolayer, which is highly hydrophobic, is found to be positively charged, which is evident from the attraction between the DTAD monolayer and negatively charged bare mica across water. These monolayers are stable over days even under a salt solution. The stability is attributed to the several stabilization pathways available to DTAD on the mica surface.

  13. Physicochemical properties of vanadium impregnated Al-PILCs: Effect of vanadium source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balci, Suna, E-mail: sunabalci@gazi.edu.tr; Tecimer, Aylin

    2015-03-01

    resulted in less structural deformation in the final solid. Loading of the vanadyl sulfate hydrate (VOSO{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O) resulted in a higher V/Si ratio in the solid since both settling and ion exchange mechanism occured. The vanadium was usually bonded in the +5 oxide form, and the particles were settled between these layers and onto the outer surface of the clay particles. The existence of V–O structural bonds and Bronsted and Lewis acid sites were observed in the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results. Up to 300 °C dehydration with high mass loss was observed, followed by the decreases in mass loss, and finally, at around 900 °C, hydroxylation reactions were observed in the TGA/DTA analyses.

  14. Surface cracking of tungsten-vanadium alloys under transient heat loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kameel Arshad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate high heat load performance of tungsten-vanadium (W-V alloys as a potential candidate for plasma facing materials of fusion devices, the target materials with three different V concentrations (1, 5 and 10 wt% are exposed to thermal shock loading. The alloys are fabricated by cold isostatic pressing and subsequently sintered in a vacuum furnace. Thereafter, they are exposed to different high heat flux densities ranging from 340 to 675 MW/m2 for single shot of 5 ms duration in an intense electron beam test facility. The alloys with lowest V concentration (1 wt% are highly damaged in form of seriously cracking. The ones with intermediate V content (5 wt% has shown comparatively better performance than both highest and lowest V contents alloys. The results indicate that improved mechanical properties and reduced thermal conductivity due to V addition comprehensively affect the cracking behavior of W-V alloy under transient thermal shock.

  15. High surface area bio-waste based carbon as a superior electrode for vanadium redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharjan, Makhan; Bhattarai, Arjun; Ulaganathan, Mani; Wai, Nyunt; Oo, Moe Ohnmar; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Lim, Tuti Mariana

    2017-09-01

    Activated carbon (AC) with high surface area (1901 m2 g-1) is synthesized from low cost bio-waste orange (Citrus sinensis) peel for vanadium redox flow battery (VRB). The composition, structure and electrochemical properties of orange peel derived AC (OP-AC) are characterized by elemental analyzer, field emission-scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. CV results show that OP-AC coated bipolar plate demonstrates improved electro-catalytic activity in both positive and negative side redox couples than the pristine bipolar plate electrode and this is ascribed to the high surface area of OP-AC which provides effective electrode area and better contact between the porous electrode and bipolar plate. Consequently, the performance of VRB in a static cell shows higher energy efficiency for OP-AC electrode than the pristine electrode at all current densities tested. The results suggest the OP-AC to be a promising electrode for VRB applications and can be incorporated into making conducting plastics electrode to lower the VRB cell stack weight and cost.

  16. Exploring a novel approach to fabricate vanadium carbide encapsulated into carbon nanotube (VC@C) with large specific surface area

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yifu Zhang; Juecheng Zhang; Meijuan Fan; Yan’an Long; Yalan Zhong; Xinghai Liu; Chi Huang

    2013-06-01

    A novel approach to the fabrication of vanadium carbide encapsulated into carbon nanotube (VC@C) core-shell structured composite by thermal treatment with the precursor V3O7.H2O@C was developed for the first time. The as-obtained VC@C were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Raman spectrum, energydispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX), elemental analysis (EA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT)–(IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET). The results showed that VC@C with core-shell structures could be successfully synthesized at 1000 °C for 2 h. The specific surface area, average pore size and measured pore volume of VC@C were 135.46 m2/g, 4.443 nm and 0.180 cm3/g, respectively indicating that the as-obtained VC@C composite could be used as a mesoporous material. Furthermore, thermal behaviour of the as-obtained VC@C composite in air was investigated by thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyser (TG/DTA). The experimental result revealed that the carbon coated on the surface of VC has high activity with O2 in air atmosphere.

  17. Microbial Diversity in Hydrate-bearing and -free Seafloor Surface Sediments in the Shenhu Area, South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, X.

    2015-12-01

    In 2007, the China's first gas hydrate drilling expedition GMGS-1 in the Shenhu area on the northern continental slope of the South China Sea was performed (Zhang et al., 2007). Six holes (namely Sites SH1B, SH2B, SH3B, SH5B, SH5C and SH7B) were drilled, and gas hydrate samples were recovered at three sites: Sites SH2B, SH3B and SH7B. In order to investigate microbial diversity and community features in correlation to gas hydrate-bearing sediments, a study on microbial diversity in the surface sediments at hydrate-bearing sites (SH3B and SH7B) and -free sites (SH1B, SH5B, SH5C) was carried out by using 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis. The phylogenetic results indicated difference in microbial communities between hydrate-bearing and -free sediments. At the gas hydrate-bearing sites, bacterial communities were dominated by Deltaproteobacteria (30.5%), and archaeal communities were dominated by Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group (33.8%); In contrast, Planctomycetes was the major group (43.9%) in bacterial communities, while Marine Benthic Group-D (MBG-D) (32.4%) took up the largest proportion in the archaeal communities. Moreover, the microbial communities have characteristics different from those in other hydrate-related sediments around the world, indicating that the presence of hydrates could affect the microbial distribution and community composition. In addition, the microbial community composition in the studied sediments has its own uniqueness, which may be resulted by co-effect of geochemical characteristics and presence/absence of gas hydrates.

  18. Communication: Contrasting effects of glycerol and DMSO on lipid membrane surface hydration dynamics and forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Alex M.; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Han, Songi

    2016-07-01

    Glycerol and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) are commonly used cryoprotectants in cellular systems, but due to the challenges of measuring the properties of surface-bound solvent, fundamental questions remain regarding the concentration, interactions, and conformation of these solutes at lipid membrane surfaces. We measured the surface water diffusivity at gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer surfaces in aqueous solutions containing ≤7.5 mol. % of DMSO or glycerol using Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization. We found that glycerol similarly affects the diffusivity of water near the bilayer surface and that in the bulk solution (within 20%), while DMSO substantially increases the diffusivity of surface water relative to bulk water. We compare these measurements of water dynamics with those of equilibrium forces between DPPC bilayers in the same solvent mixtures. DMSO greatly decreases the range and magnitude of the repulsive forces between the bilayers, whereas glycerol increases it. We propose that the differences in hydrogen bonding capability of the two solutes leads DMSO to dehydrate the lipid head groups, while glycerol affects surface hydration only as much as it affects the bulk water properties. The results suggest that the mechanism of the two most common cryoprotectants must be fundamentally different: in the case of DMSO by decoupling the solvent from the lipid surface, and in the case of glycerol by altering the hydrogen bond structure and intermolecular cohesion of the global solvent, as manifested by increased solvent viscosity.

  19. Hydrated salt minerals on Europa's Surface from the Galileo near-infrared mapping spectrometer (NIMS) investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, T.B.; Hansen, G.B.; Matson, D.L.; Johnson, T.V.; Crowley, J.K.; Fanale, F.P.; Carlson, R.W.; Smythe, W.D.; Martin, P.D.; Hibbitts, C.A.; Granahan, J.C.; Ocampo, A.

    1999-01-01

    We reported evidence of heavily hydrated salt minerals present over large areas of Europa's surface from analysis of reflectance spectra returned by the Galileo mission near infrared mapping spectrometer (NIMS) [McCord et al., 1997a, b, 1998a, b]. Here we elaborate on this earlier evidence, present spatial distributions of these minerals, examine alternate water-ice interpretations, expand on our hydrated-salts interpretation, consider salt mineral stability on Europa, and discuss the implications. Extensive well-defined areas on Europa show distinct, asymmetric water-related absorption bands in the 1 to 2.5-??m region. Radiative transfer modeling of water ice involving different particle sizes and layers at Europa temperatures does not reproduce the distinctive Europa water bands. However, ice near its melting temperature, such as in terrestrial environments, does have some characteristics of the Europa spectrum. Alternatively, some classes of heavily hydrated minerals do exhibit such water bands. Among plausible materials, heavily hydrated salt minerals, such as magnesium and sodium sulfates, sodium carbonate and their mixtures, are preferred. All Europa spectral features are present in some salt minerals and a very good match to the Europa spectrum can be achieved by mixing several salt spectra. However, no single or mix of salt mineral spectra from the limited library available has so far been found to perfectly match the Europa spectrum in every detail. The material is concentrated at the lineaments and in chaotic terrain, which are technically disrupted areas on the trailing side. Since the spectrum of the material on Europa is nearly the same everywhere so-far studied, the salt or salt-mixture composition may be nearly uniform. This suggests similar sources and processes over at least a near-hemispheric scale. This would suggest that an extensive subsurface ocean containing dissolved salts is the source, and several possible mechanisms for deposit

  20. Conformation and hydration of surface grafted and free polyethylene oxide chains in solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Udaya; Wang, Zilu; Dormidontova, Elena

    Due to the wide application of polyethylene oxide (PEO), ranging from biomedicine to fuel cells, it is one of the most studied polymers in the scientific world. In order to elucidate detailed molecular-level insights on the impact of surface grafting on PEO conformation, we performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of PEO chains in solution and grafted to a flat gold surface in different solvents. We examined the hydration as well as conformation of the free chain compared to the grafted polymer in pure water and mixed solvents. We find that grafted chains are stiffer and have a stronger tendency to form helical structures in isobutyric acid or mixture of isobutyric acid and water solution than the free chains in corresponding solutions. For grafted chains exposed to pure water the random coil conformation is retained at low grafting density, but becomes stretched and more dehydrated as the grafting density or temperature increases. This research is supported by NSF (DMR-1410928).

  1. Surface modification of magnesium hydroxide sulfate hydrate whiskers using a silane coupling agent by dry process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Donghai; Nai, Xueying; Lan, Shengjie; Bian, Shaoju; Liu, Xin; Li, Wu

    2016-12-01

    In order to improve the compatibility of magnesium hydroxide sulfate hydrate (MHSH) whiskers with polymers, the surface of MHSH whiskers was modified using vinyltriethoxysilane (VTES) by dry process. The possible mechanism of the surface modification and the interfacial interactions between MHSH whiskers and VTES, as well as the effect of surface modification, were studied. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analyses showed that the agglomerations were effectively separated and a thin layer was formed on the surface of the whiskers after modification. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses showed that the VTES molecules were bound to the surface of MHSH whiskers after modification. Chemical bonds (Sisbnd Osbnd Mg) were formed by the reaction between Sisbnd OC2H5 or Sisbnd OH and the hydroxyl group of MHSH whiskers. The effect of surface modification was evaluated by sedimentation tests, contact angle measurements and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that the surface of MHSH whiskers was transformed from hydrophilic to hydrophobic, and the dispersibility and the compatibility of MHSH whiskers were significantly improved in the organic phase. Additionally, the thermal stability of the VTES-modified MHSH whiskers was improved significantly.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation for surface melting and self-preservation effect of methane hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The surface melting process of structure sI methane hydrate is simulated at T = 240, 260, 280, and 300 K using NVT molecular dynamics method. The simulation results show that a quasi-liquid layer will be formed during the melting process. The density distribution, translation, orientation, and dynamic properties of water molecules in the quasi-liquid layer are calculated as a function of the distance normal to the interface, which indicates the performance of quasi-liquid layer exhibits a continuous change from crystal-like to liquid-like. The quasi-liquid layer plays as a resistance of mass transfer restraining the diffusion of water and methane molecules during the melting process. The resistance of quasi-liquid layer will restrain methane molecules diffuse from hydrate phase to gas phase and slow the melting process, which can be considered as a possible mechanism of self-preservation effect. The performance of quasi-liquid layer is more crystal-like when the temperature is lower than the melt- ing-point of water, which will exhibit an obvious self-preservation. The self-preservation will weaken while the temperature is higher than the melting-point of water because of the liquid-like performance of the quasi-liquid layer.

  3. Using extremely halophilic bacteria to understand the role of surface charge and surface hydration in protein evolution, folding, and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Wouter; Deole, Ratnakar; Osu Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Halophilic Archaea accumulate molar concentrations of KCl in their cytoplasm as an osmoprotectant, and have evolved highly acidic proteomes that only function at high salinity. We examine osmoprotection in the photosynthetic Proteobacteria Halorhodospira halophila. We find that H. halophila has an acidic proteome and accumulates molar concentrations of KCl when grown in high salt media. Upon growth of H. halophila in low salt media, its cytoplasmic K + content matches that of Escherichia coli, revealing an acidic proteome that can function in the absence of high cytoplasmic salt concentrations. These findings necessitate a reassessment of two central aspects of theories for understanding extreme halophiles. We conclude that proteome acidity is not driven by stabilizing interactions between K + ions and acidic side chains, but by the need for maintaining sufficient solvation and hydration of the protein surface at high salinity through strongly hydrated carboxylates. We propose that obligate protein halophilicity is a non-adaptive property resulting from genetic drift in which constructive neutral evolution progressively incorporates weakly stabilizing K + binding sites on an increasingly acidic protein surface.

  4. Small cluster models of the surface electronic structure and bonding properties of titanium carbide, vanadium carbide, and titanium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didziulis, Stephen V; Butcher, Kristine D; Perry, Scott S

    2003-12-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on stoichiometric, high-symmetry clusters have been performed to model the (100) and (111) surface electronic structure and bonding properties of titanium carbide (TiC), vanadium carbide (VC), and titanium nitride (TiN). The interactions of ideal surface sites on these clusters with three adsorbates, carbon monoxide, ammonia, and the oxygen atom, have been pursued theoretically to compare with experimental studies. New experimental results using valence band photoemission of the interaction of O(2) with TiC and VC are presented, and comparisons to previously published experimental studies of CO and NH(3) chemistry are provided. In general, we find that the electronic structure of the bare clusters is entirely consistent with published valence band photoemission work and with straightforward molecular orbital theory. Specifically, V(9)C(9) and Ti(9)N(9) clusters used to model the nonpolar (100) surface possess nine electrons in virtually pure metal 3d orbitals, while Ti(9)C(9) has no occupation of similar orbitals. The covalent mixing of the valence bonding levels for both VC and TiC is very high, containing virtually 50% carbon and 50% metal character. As expected, the predicted mixing for the Ti(9)N(9) cluster is somewhat less. The Ti(8)C(8) and Ti(13)C(13) clusters used to model the TiC(111) surface accurately predict the presence of Ti 3d-based surface states in the region of the highest occupied levels. The bonding of the adsorbate species depends critically on the unique electronic structure features present in the three different materials. CO bonds more strongly with the V(9)C(9) and Ti(9)N(9) clusters than with Ti(9)C(9) as the added metal electron density enables an important pi-back-bonding interaction, as has been observed experimentally. NH(3) bonding with Ti(9)N(9) is predicted to be somewhat enhanced relative to VC and TiC due to greater Coulombic interactions on the nitride. Finally, the interaction with

  5. Inter- and intra-individual differences in skin hydration and surface lipids measured with mid-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezerskaia, A.; Pereira, S. F.; Urbach, H. P.; Varghese, B.

    2016-03-01

    Skin health is characterized by heterogeneous system of water and lipids in upper layers providing protection from external environment and preventing loss of vital components of the body. Skin hydration (moisture) and sebum (skin surface lipids) are considered to be important factors in skin health; a right balance between these components is an indication of healthy skin and plays a central role in protecting and preserving skin integrity. In this manuscript we present inter- and intra-individual variation in skin hydration and surface lipids measured with a home-built experimental prototype based on infrared spectroscopy. Results show good agreement with measurements performed by commercially available instruments Corneometer and Sebumeter used for skin hydration and sebum measurements respectively.

  6. Vanadium and molybdenum oxide thin films on Au(111). Growth and surface characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimond, Sebastien

    2009-06-04

    The growth and the surface structure of well-ordered V{sub 2}O{sub 3}, V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and MoO{sub 3} thin films have been investigated in this work. These films are seen as model systems for the study of elementary reaction steps occurring on vanadia and molybdena-based selective oxidation catalysts. It is shown that well-ordered V{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) thin films can be prepared on Au(111). The films are terminated by vanadyl groups which are not part of the V{sub 2}O{sub 3} bulk structure. Electron irradiation specifically removes the oxygen atoms of the vanadyl groups, resulting in a V-terminated surface. The fraction of removed vanadyl groups is controlled by the electron dose. Such surfaces constitute interesting models to probe the relative role of both the vanadyl groups and the undercoordinated V ions at the surface of vanadia catalysts. The growth of well-ordered V{sub 2}O{sub 5}(001) and MoO{sub 3}(010) thin films containing few point defects is reported here for the first time. These films were grown on Au(111) by oxidation under 50 mbar O{sub 2} in a dedicated high pressure cell. Contrary to some of the results found in the literature, the films are not easily reduced by annealing in UHV. This evidences the contribution of radiation and surface contamination in some of the reported thermal reduction experiments. The growth of ultrathin V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and MoO{sub 3} layers on Au(111) results in formation of interface-specific monolayer structures. These layers are coincidence lattices and they do not correspond to any known oxide bulk structure. They are assumed to be stabilized by electronic interaction with Au(111). Their formation illustrates the polymorphic character and the ease of coordination units rearrangement which are characteristic of both oxides. The formation of a second layer apparently precedes the growth of bulk-like crystallites for both oxides. This observation is at odds with a common assumption that crystals nucleate as soon as a

  7. Hydration behavior at the ice-binding surface of the Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midya, Uday Sankar; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2014-05-08

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out at two different temperatures (300 and 220 K) to study the conformational rigidity of the hyperactive Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein (TmAFP) in aqueous medium and the structural arrangements of water molecules hydrating its surface. It is found that irrespective of the temperature the ice-binding surface (IBS) of the protein is relatively more rigid than its nonice-binding surface (NIBS). The presence of a set of regularly arranged internally bound water molecules is found to play an important role in maintaining the flat rigid nature of the IBS. Importantly, the calculations reveal that the strategically located hydroxyl oxygens of the threonine (Thr) residues in the IBS influence the arrangements of five sets of ordered waters around it on two parallel planes that closely resemble the basal plane of ice. As a result, these waters can register well with the ice basal plane, thereby allowing the IBS to preferentially bind at the ice interface and inhibit its growth. This provides a possible molecular reason behind the ice-binding activity of TmAFP at the basal plane of ice.

  8. Hydration and hydrogen bond network of water around hydrophobic surface investigated by terahertz spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraga, K; Suzuki, T; Kondo, N; Ogawa, Y

    2014-12-21

    Water conformation around hydrophobic side chains of four amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-aminobutyric acid, and L-norvaline) was investigated via changes in complex dielectric constant in the terahertz (THz) region. Each of these amino acids has the same hydrophilic backbone, with successive additions of hydrophobic straight methylene groups (-CH2-) to the side chain. Changes in the degree of hydration (number of dynamically retarded water molecules relative to bulk water) and the structural conformation of the water hydrogen bond (HB) network related to the number of methylene groups were quantitatively measured. Since dielectric responses in the THz region represent water relaxations and water HB vibrations at a sub-picosecond and picosecond timescale, these measurements characterized the water relaxations and HB vibrations perturbed by the methylene apolar groups. We found each successive straight -CH2- group on the side chain restrained approximately two hydrophobic hydration water molecules. Additionally, the number of non-hydrogen-bonded (NHB) water molecules increased slightly around these hydrophobic side chains. The latter result seems to contradict the iceberg model proposed by Frank and Evans, where water molecules are said to be more ordered around apolar surfaces. Furthermore, we compared the water-hydrophilic interactions of the hydrophilic amino acid backbone with those with the water-hydrophobic interactions around the side chains. As the hydrophobicity of the side chain increased, the ordering of the surrounding water HB network was altered from that surrounding the hydrophilic amino acid backbone, thereby diminishing the fraction of NHB water and ordering the surrounding tetrahedral water HB network.

  9. Adsorption behavior of some metal ions on hydrated amorphous titanium dioxide surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panit Sherdshoopongse

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide was prepared from titanium tetrachloride and diluted ammonia solution at low temperature. The product obtained was characterized by XRD, EDXRF, TGA, DSC, and FT-IR techniques. It was found that the product was in the form of hydrated amorphous titanium dioxide, TiO2·1.6H2O (ha- TiO2. Ha-TiO2 exhibits high BET surface area at 449 m2/g. Adsorptions of metal ions onto the ha-TiO2 surface were investigated in the batch equilibrium experiments, using Mn(II, Fe(III, Cu(II, and Pb(II solutions. The concentrations of metal ions were determined by atomic absorption spectrometer. The adsorption isotherms of all metal ions were studied at pH 7. The adsorption of Mn(II, Cu(II, and Pb(II ions on ha-TiO2 conformed to the Langmuir isotherm while that of Fe(III fit equally well to both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms.

  10. Cooperation in carbon source degradation shapes spatial self-organization of microbial consortia on hydrated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecon, Robin; Or, Dani

    2017-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that natural microbial communities exhibit a high level of spatial organization at the micrometric scale that facilitate ecological interactions and support biogeochemical cycles. Microbial patterns are difficult to study definitively in natural environments due to complex biodiversity, observability and variable physicochemical factors. Here, we examine how trophic dependencies give rise to self-organized spatial patterns of a well-defined bacterial consortium grown on hydrated surfaces. The model consortium consisted of two Pseudomonas putida mutant strains that can fully degrade the aromatic hydrocarbon toluene. We demonstrated that obligate cooperation in toluene degradation (cooperative mutualism) favored convergence of 1:1 partner ratio and strong intermixing at the microscale (10–100 μm). In contrast, competition for benzoate, a compound degraded independently by both strains, led to distinct segregation patterns. Emergence of a persistent spatial pattern has been predicted for surface attached microbial activity in liquid films that mediate diffusive exchanges while permitting limited cell movement (colony expansion). This study of a simple microbial consortium offers mechanistic glimpses into the rules governing the assembly and functioning of complex sessile communities, and points to general principles of spatial organization with potential applications for natural and engineered microbial systems. PMID:28262696

  11. Modeling of stability of gas hydrates under permafrost in an environment of surface climatic change – terrestrial case, Beaufort-Mackenzie basin, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Majorowicz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of the onset of permafrost formation and succeeding gas hydrate formation in the changing surface temperature environment has been done for the Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin (BMB. Numerical 1-D modeling is constrained by deep heat flow from deep well bottom hole temperatures, deep conductivity, present permafrost thickness and thickness of Type I gas hydrates. Latent heat effects were applied to the model for the entire ice bearing permafrost and Type I hydrate intervals. Modeling for a set of surface temperature forcing during the glacial-interglacial history including the last 14 Myr was performed. Two scenarios of gas formation were considered; case 1: formation of gas hydrate from gas entrapped under deep geological seals and case 2: formation of gas hydrate from gas in a free pore space simultaneously with permafrost formation. In case 1, gas hydrates could have formed at a depth of about 0.9 km only some 1 Myr ago. In case 2, the first gas hydrate formed in the depth range of 290–300 m shortly after 6 Myr ago when the GST dropped from −4.5 °C to −5.5. °C. The gas hydrate layer started to expand both downward and upward subsequently. These models show that the gas hydrate zone, while thinning persists under the thick body of BMB permafrost through the current interglacial warming periods.

  12. Adsorption of sodium ions and hydrated sodium ions on a hydrophobic graphite surface via cation-π interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Guo-Sheng; Wang Zhi-Gang; Zhao Ji-Jun; Hu Jun; Fang Hai-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Using density functional theory computation, we show that sodium ions and hydrated sodium ions can be strongly adsorbed onto a hydrophobic graphite surface via cation-π interactions. The key to this cation-π interaction is the coupling of the delocalized π states of graphite and the empty orbitals of sodium ions. This finding implies that the property of the graphite surface is extremely dependent on the existence of the ions on the surface, suggesting that the hydrophobic property of the graphite surface may be affected by the existence of the sodium ions.

  13. Hydrate film growth on the surface of a gas bubble suspended in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, B Z; Dandekar, A; Sun, C Y; Luo, H; Ma, Q L; Pang, W X; Chen, G J

    2007-11-01

    The lateral film growth rate of CH4, C2H4, CO2, CH4 + C2H4, and CH4 + C3H8 hydrates in pure water were measured at four fixed temperatures of 273.4, 275.4, 277.4, and 279.4 K by means of suspending a single gas bubble in water. The results showed that the lateral growth rates of mixed-gas CH4 + C2H4 hydrate films were slower than that of pure gas (CH4 or C2H4) for the same driving force and that of mixed-gas CH4 + C3H8 hydrate film growth was the slowest. The dependence of the thickness of hydrate film on the driving force was investigated, and it was demonstrated that the thickness of hydrate film was inversely proportional to the driving force. It was found that the convective heat transfer control model reported in the literature could be used to formulate the lateral film growth rate v(f) with the driving force DeltaT perfectly for all systems after introduction of the assumption that the thickness of hydrate films is inversely proportional to the driving force DeltaT; i.e., v(f) = psiDeltaT(5/2) is correct and independent of the composition of gas and the type of hydrate. The thicknesses of different gas hydrate films were estimated, and it is demonstrated that the thicknesses of mixed-gas hydrate films were thicker than those of pure gases, which was qualitatively consistent with the experimental result.

  14. Application of Response Surface Methodology in Development of Sirolimus Liposomes Prepared by Thin Film Hydration Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Ghanbarzadeh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present investigation was aimed to optimize the formulating process of sirolimus liposomes by thin film hydration method. Methods: In this study, a 32 factorial design method was used to investigate the influence of two independent variables in the preparation of sirolimus liposomes. The dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC /Cholesterol (Chol and dioleoyl phosphoethanolamine(DOPE /DPPC molar ratios were selected as the independent variables. Particle size (PS and Encapsulation Efficiency (EE % were selected as the dependent variables. To separate the un-encapsulated drug, dialysis method was used. Drug analysis was performed with a validated RP-HPLC method. Results: Using response surface methodology and based on the coefficient values obtained for independent variables in the regression equations, it was clear that the DPPC/Chol molar ratio was the major contributing variable in particle size and EE %. The use of a statistical approach allowed us to see individual and/or interaction effects of influencing parameters in order to obtain liposomes with desired properties and to determine the optimum experimental conditions that lead to the enhancement of characteristics. In the prediction of PS and EE % values, the average percent errors are found to be as 3.59 and 4.09%. This value is sufficiently low to confirm the high predictive power of model. Conclusion: Experimental results show that the observed responses were in close agreement with the predicted values and this demonstrates the reliability of the optimization procedure in prediction of PS and EE % in sirolimus liposomes preparation.

  15. Conceptual Tenets of the Theory of Hydration of Heterogeneous Surface with Polar Order of Disperse Ground Layers of Sedimentary Genesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara G. Makeeva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article, basing on the established regularity defines the basic tenets of the theory of hydration of heterogeneous surface with polar order of disperse ground layers of sedimentary genesis. It offers classification and formula for the associated water density, valid corrections for the associated water density, calculates the water film thickness in disperse ground, develops the reliable physicochemical model of the disperse ground, determines the range of applicability of the existing laboratory and field methods.

  16. Variation of Skin Surface pH, Sebum Content and Stratum Corneum Hydration with Age and Gender in a Large Chinese Population

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Man, M.Q; Xin, S.J; Song, S.P; Cho, S.Y; Zhang, X.J; Tu, C.X; Feingold, K.R; Elias, P.M

    2009-01-01

    .... The results to date of studies on skin surface pH, stratum corneum (SC) hydration and sebum content in both genders and at various ages have been inconclusive, which was in part due to small sample size...

  17. Étude des minéraux hydratés à la surface de Mars par les imageurs hyperspectraux OMEGA/MEx et CRISM/MRO

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, John

    2011-01-01

    The planet Mars has experienced an era during which water was stable in its liquid state. In addition to morphological evidence for aqueous activity, the chemical interaction of water with the basaltic crust has led to the formation of hydrated clays and salts both on the surface and at depth. These hydrated minerals were first detected on the surface of Mars in 2004 with the OMEGA near infrared imaging spectrometer, onboard European probe Mars Express. Their study allows us to piece together...

  18. On the lipid head group hydration of floating surface monolayers bound to self-assembled molecular protein layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lösche, M.; Erdelen, C.; Rump, E.

    1994-01-01

    with molecular resolution. Emphasis here is placed on the hydration of the lipid head groups in the bound state. For three functionalized lipids with spacers of different lengths between the biotin and their chains it was observed that the head groups were dehydrated in monolayers of the pure lipids, which were...... kept at low surface pressure before protein adsorption. The introduction of dipole moments at the interface by the admixture of phospholipids or the application of lateral pressure on the lipid monolayer before protein adsorption were found to impose an extension of the spacer moieties. The biotin...... groups were thus presented further away from the interface, and a hydration layer between the protein and the functionalized interface was observed in the self-assembled supramolecular structures....

  19. Diffusion and reaction pathways of water near fully hydrated TiO2 surfaces from ab initio molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Lorenzo; Brandt, Erik G.; Lyubartsev, Alexander P.

    2017-07-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are reported for water-embedded TiO2 surfaces to determine the diffusive and reactive behavior at full hydration. A three-domain model is developed for six surfaces [rutile (110), (100), and (001), and anatase (101), (100), and (001)] which describes waters as "hard" (irreversibly bound to the surface), "soft" (with reduced mobility but orientation freedom near the surface), or "bulk." The model explains previous experimental data and provides a detailed picture of water diffusion near TiO2 surfaces. Water reactivity is analyzed with a graph-theoretic approach that reveals a number of reaction pathways on TiO2 which occur at full hydration, in addition to direct water splitting. Hydronium (H3O+) is identified to be a key intermediate state, which facilitates water dissociation by proton hopping between intact and dissociated waters near the surfaces. These discoveries significantly improve the understanding of nanoscale water dynamics and reactivity at TiO2 interfaces under ambient conditions.

  20. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-14

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  1. The effect of vanadium-carbon monolayer on the adsorption of tungsten and carbon atoms on tungsten-carbide (0001 surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moitra A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a first-principles calculations to study the effect of a vanadium-carbon (VC monolayer on the adsorption process of tungsten (W and carbon (C atoms onto tungsten-carbide (WC (0001 surface. The essential configuration for the study is a supercell of hexagonal WC with a (0001 surface. When adding the VC monolayer, we employed the lowest energy configuration by examining various configurations. The total energy of the system is computed as a function of the W or C adatoms’ height from the surface. The adsorption of a W and C adatom on a clean WC (0001 surface is compared with that of a W and C adatom on a WC (0001 surface with VC monolayer. The calculations show that the adsorption energy increased for both W and C adatoms in presence of the VC monolayer. Our results provide a fundamental understanding that can explain the experimentally observed phenomena of inhibited grain growth during sintering of WC or WC-Co powders in presence of VC.

  2. Membrane dipole potentials, hydration forces, and the ordering of water at membrane surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawrisch, K; Ruston, D; Zimmerberg, J; Parsegian, V A; Rand, R P; Fuller, N

    1992-01-01

    We have compared hydration forces, electrical dipole potentials, and structural parameters of dispersions of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dihexadecylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) to evaluate the influence of fatty acid carbonyl groups on phospholipid bilayers. NMR and x-ray investigations performed over a wide range of water concentrations in the samples show, that in the liquid crystalline lamellar phase, the presence of carbonyl groups is not essential for lipid structure and hydration. Within experimental error, the two lipids have identical repulsive hydration forces between their bilayers. The higher transport rate of the negatively charged tetraphenylboron over the positively charged tetraphenylarsonium indicates that the dipole potential is positive inside the membranes of both lipids. However, the lack of fatty acid carbonyl groups in the ether lipid DHPC decreased the potential by (118 +/- 15) mV. By considering the sign of the potential and the orientation of carbonyl groups and headgroups, we conclude that the first layer of water molecules at the lipid water interface makes a major contribution to the dipole potential. PMID:1600081

  3. Exploring the role of water in molecular recognition: predicting protein ligandability using a combinatorial search of surface hydration sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, Sinisa; Brennan, Paul E.; Huggins, David J.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between any two biological molecules must compete with their interaction with water molecules. This makes water the most important molecule in medicine, as it controls the interactions of every therapeutic with its target. A small molecule binding to a protein is able to recognize a unique binding site on a protein by displacing bound water molecules from specific hydration sites. Quantifying the interactions of these water molecules allows us to estimate the potential of the protein to bind a small molecule. This is referred to as ligandability. In the study, we describe a method to predict ligandability by performing a search of all possible combinations of hydration sites on protein surfaces. We predict ligandability as the summed binding free energy for each of the constituent hydration sites, computed using inhomogeneous fluid solvation theory. We compared the predicted ligandability with the maximum observed binding affinity for 20 proteins in the human bromodomain family. Based on this comparison, it was determined that effective inhibitors have been developed for the majority of bromodomains, in the range from 10 to 100 nM. However, we predict that more potent inhibitors can be developed for the bromodomains BPTF and BRD7 with relative ease, but that further efforts to develop inhibitors for ATAD2 will be extremely challenging. We have also made predictions for the 14 bromodomains with no reported small molecule K d values by isothermal titration calorimetry. The calculations predict that PBRM1(1) will be a challenging target, while others such as TAF1L(2), PBRM1(4) and TAF1(2), should be highly ligandable. As an outcome of this work, we assembled a database of experimental maximal K d that can serve as a community resource assisting medicinal chemistry efforts focused on BRDs. Effective prediction of ligandability would be a very useful tool in the drug discovery process.

  4. Surface properties and graphitization of polyacrylonitrile based fiber electrodes affecting the negative half-cell reaction in vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, J.; Bruns, M.; Dixon, D.; Nefedov, A.; Wöll, Ch.; Scheiba, F.; Ehrenberg, H.; Roth, C.; Melke, J.

    2016-07-01

    Carbon felt electrodes for vanadium redox flow batteries are obtained by the graphitization of polyacrylonitrile based felts at different temperatures. Subsequently, the surface of the felts is modified via thermal oxidation at various temperatures. A single-cell experiment shows that the voltage efficiency is increased by this treatment. Electrode potentials measured with reference electrode setup show that this voltage efficiency increase is caused mainly by a reduction of the overpotential of the negative half-cell reaction. Consequently, this reaction is investigated further by cyclic voltammetry and the electrode activity is correlated with structural and surface chemical properties of the carbon fibers. By Raman, X-ray photoelectron and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy the role of edge sites and oxygen containing functional groups (OCFs) for the electrochemical activity are elucidated. A significant activity increase is observed in correlation with these two characteristics. The amount of OCFs is correlated with structural defects (e.g. edge sites) of the carbon fibers and therefore decreases with an increasing graphitization degree. Thus, for the same thermal oxidation temperature carbon fibers graphitized at a lower temperature show higher activities than those graphitized at a higher temperature.

  5. Role of Mechanical Stress in Regulating Airway Surface Hydration and Mucus Clearance Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Brian; Boucher, Richard C.

    2008-01-01

    Effective clearance of mucus is a critical innate airway defense mechanism, and under appropriate conditions, can be stimulated to enhance clearance of inhaled pathogens. It has become increasingly clear that extracellular nucleotides (ATP and UTP) and nucleosides (adenosine) are important regulators of mucus clearance in the airways as a result of their ability to stimulate fluid secretion, mucus hydration, and cilia beat frequency (CBF). One ubiquitous mechanism to stimulate ATP release is through external mechanical stress. This article addresses the role of physiologically-relevant mechanical forces in the lung and their effects on regulating mucociliary clearance (MCC). The effects of mechanical forces on the stimulating ATP release, fluid secretion, CBF, and MCC are discussed. Also discussed is evidence suggesting that airway hydration and stimulation of MCC by stress-mediated ATP release may play a role in several therapeutic strategies directed at improving mucus clearance in patients with obstructive lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). PMID:18585484

  6. Formation of porous gas hydrates

    CERN Document Server

    Salamatin, Andrey N

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates grown at gas-ice interfaces are examined by electron microscopy and found to have a submicron porous texture. Permeability of the intervening hydrate layers provides the connection between the two counterparts (gas and water molecules) of the clathration reaction and makes further hydrate formation possible. The study is focused on phenomenological description of principal stages and rate-limiting processes that control the kinetics of the porous gas hydrate crystal growth from ice powders. Although the detailed physical mechanisms involved in the porous hydrate formation still are not fully understood, the initial stage of hydrate film spreading over the ice surface should be distinguished from the subsequent stage which is presumably limited by the clathration reaction at the ice-hydrate interface and develops after the ice grain coating is finished. The model reveals a time dependence of the reaction degree essentially different from that when the rate-limiting step of the hydrate formation at...

  7. The metal-insulator transition in vanadium dioxide: A view at bulk and surface contributions for thin films and the effect of annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, W.; West, K. G.; Lu, J. W.; Pei, Y.; Wolf, S. A.; Reinke, P.; Sun, Y.

    2009-06-01

    Vanadium dioxide is investigated as potential oxide barrier in spin switches, and in order to incorporate VO2 layers in complex multilayer devices, it is necessary to understand the relation between bulk and surface/interface properties. Highly oriented VO2 thin films were grown on (0001) sapphire single crystal substrates with reactive bias target ion beam deposition. In the analysis of the VO2 films, bulk-sensitive methods [x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transport measurements] and surface sensitive techniques [photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy] were employed. The samples were subjected to heating cycles with annealing temperatures of up to 425 and 525K. Prior to annealing the VO2 films exhibit the transition from the monoclinic to the tetragonal phase with the concurrent change in conductivity by more than a factor of 103 and their phase purity is confirmed by XRD. Annealing to 425K and thus cycling across the metal-insulator transition (MIT) temperature has no impact on the bulk properties of the VO2 film but the surface undergoes irreversible electronic changes. The observation of the valence band with PES during the annealing illustrates that the surface adopts a partially metallic character, which is retained after cooling. Annealing to a higher temperature (525K ) triggers a modification of the bulk, which is evidenced by a considerable reduction in the MIT characteristics, and a degradation in crystallite morphology. The local measurement of the conductivity with scanning tunneling spectroscopy shows the transition of the surface from predominantly semiconducting surface prior to annealing to a surface with an overwhelming contribution from metallic sections afterward. The spatial distribution of metallic regions cannot be linked in a unique manner to the crystallite size or location within the crystallites. The onset of oxygen depletion at the surface is held responsible for this behavior. The onset of bulk

  8. The nature of Mars's surface hydration: converging views from satellite (MEX), surface (MSL) and meteorite (NWA 7034 / 7533 and co) observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, P.; Pommerol, A.; Zanda, B.; Remusat, L.; Lorand, J. P.; Gopel, C. H.; Hewins, R.; Pont, S.; Lewin, E.; Quirico, E.; Schmitt, B.; Montes-Hernandez, G.; Garenne, A.; Bonal, L.; Proux, O.; Hazemann, J. L.; Chevrier, V.; Martín-Torres, J.; Zorzano, M. P.; Gasnault, O.; Maurice, S.; Wiens, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Early infrared observations of the Martian surface have revealed the presence of a deep absorption between 2.6 and 3.5 µm usually referred to as the 3-µm band. Two non-exclusive explanations have been formulated to account for this 3-µm band. The first possibility is that it relates to the presence of some amount of adsorbed atmospheric water, water that would be exchangeable and could play a role in present day Mars water cycle. The alternative is that this absorption is due to an -OH or H2O bearing mineral component within the Martian dust, which would imply that water is involved at some stage of the dust production mechanism. Several lines of evidences seem to converge toward the second hypothesis. First, after 10 years of mapping of the martian surface with OMEGA (MEX), the lack of variation of the 3-µm feature with surface relative humidity suggests that the surface hydration does not exchange with the atmosphere. This is in agreement with laboratory adsorption experiments under Mars conditions. 
More recently the Mars Science Laboratory with unprecedented payload has provided some crucial constraints on the nature of surface hydration. The ChemCam instrument onboard MSL has detected hydrogen in dust and soil, and revealed the lack of variation of H concentration with surface humidity, including nighttime measurements. Also, evolved gas analysis by SAM of Gale crater soils shows that water is released at relatively high-temperature and suggest that -OH or H2O bearing phases are trapped in the amorphous component of soils. 
Finally, the exceptional "black beauty" meteorite might also provide clues to the nature of Mars's surface hydration. This Martian breccia shows elevated amount of water with respect to any other Martian meteorite. By studying the spectral properties of NWA 7533, we were able to show the presence of a 3-µm band and a small red-slope; this Martian breccia seems to contain a fine-oxidized-H-bearing component, possibly similar to that

  9. Hydration and Thermal Expansion in Anatase Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, He; Li, Qiang; Ren, Yang; Fan, Longlong; Chen, Jun; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2016-08-01

    A tunable thermal expansion is reported in nanosized anatase by taking advantage of surface hydration. The coefficient of thermal expansion of 4 nm TiO2 along a-axis is negative with a hydrated surface and is positive without a hydrated surface. High-energy synchrotron X-ray pair distribution function analysis combined with ab initio calculations on the specific hydrated surface are carried out to reveal the local structure distortion that is responsible for the unusual negative thermal expansion.

  10. Hydration and Thermal Expansion in Anatase Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, He [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Li, Qiang [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Ren, Yang [Argonne National Laboratory, X-Ray Science Division, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Fan, Longlong [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Chen, Jun [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Deng, Jinxia [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Xing, Xianran [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China

    2016-06-06

    A tunable thermal expansion is reported in nanosized anatase by taking advantage of surface hydration. The coefficient of thermal expansion of 4 nm TiO2 along a-axis is negative with a hydrated surface and is positive without a hydrated surface. High-energy synchrotron X-ray pair distribution function analysis combined with ab initio calculations on the specific hydrated surface are carried out to reveal the local structure distortion that is responsible for the unusual negative thermal expansion.

  11. The amphoteric effect on friction between the bovine cartilage/cartilage surfaces under slightly sheared hydration lubrication mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Zenon; Gadomski, Adam; Sojka, Michal; Urbaniak, Wieslaw; Bełdowski, Piotr

    2016-10-01

    The amphoteric effect on the friction between the bovine cartilage/cartilage contacts has been found to be highly sensitive to the pH of an aqueous solution. The cartilage surface was characterized using a combination of the pH, wettability, as well as the interfacial energy and friction coefficient testing methods to support lamellar-repulsive mechanism of hydration lubrication. It has been confirmed experimentally that phospholipidic multi-bilayers are essentially described as lamellar frictionless lubricants protecting the surface of the joints against wear. At the hydrophilicity limit, the low friction would then be due to (a) lamellar slippage of bilayers and (b) a short-range (nanometer-scale) repulsion between the interfaces of negatively charged (PO4(-)) cartilage surfaces, and in addition, contribution of the extracellular matrix (ECM) collagen fibers, hyaluronate, proteoglycans aggregates (PGs), glycoprotein termed lubricin and finally, lamellar PLs phases. In this paper we demonstrate experimentally that the pH sensitivity of cartilage to friction provides a novel concept in joint lubrication on charged surfaces.

  12. A vanadium-based conversion coating as chromate replacement for electrogalvanized steel substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou Zhongli [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li Ning, E-mail: lininghit@yeah.net [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li Deyu; Liu Haiping; Mu Songlin [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2011-01-12

    Research highlights: > We develop a new environmentally friendly coating, vanadium conversion coating, for the corrosion protection of eletcrogalvanized steel. > According to the results, the V-treated EG plate shows the best corrosion protection property compared with the untreated and Cr-treated EG plates. And the vanadium coating mainly consists of vanadium and oxygen, which mainly exist as V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, VO{sub 2}, and its hydrates. - Abstract: The vanadium conversion coating as chromate replacement was prepared on electrogalvanized steel (EG) plates previously treated in a solution mainly composed of vanadate. Corrosion behavior of these EG plates in contact with 3.5% NaCl solution was investigated using potentio-dynamic measurement and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement. The morphology and composition of the vanadium conversion coating were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in conjunction with argon-ion sputtering. According to the results, the V-treated EG plate shows the best corrosion protection property compared with the untreated and Cr-treated EG plates. The vanadium-rich coating is composed of the closely packed particles. The coating mainly consists of vanadium and oxygen, which mainly exist as V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, VO{sub 2}, and its hydrates such as V{sub 2}O{sub 5}.nH{sub 2}O, VO(OH){sub 2}.

  13. Formation of vanadium carbide precipitations at the surface of alloys: Thermodynamics and kinetics aspects; Bildung von Vanadiumcarbid-Ausscheidungen auf Legierungsoberflaechen: Thermodynamische und kinetische Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, A.; Uebing, C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The paper describes the formation of vanadium carbides on the surface layers of Fe-3%V-C(100) alloys. The phase diagram calculated for this alloyed material using the ThermoCalc program package reveals a co-existence of ferritic matrix and V{sub 3}C{sub 2} at temperatures of T{<=}650 C. This carbide is instable at elevated temperatures, leading to co-existence of ferrite and the cubic VC{sub 1-x}. Experimental analyses revealed the formation of a 2D VC compound in the top layers of the surface of Fe-3%V-C(100) alloys, induced by equilibrium segregation. The paper explains the usefulness of thermodynamic and kinetic calculations for interpretation of precipitation phenomena in steels. Mathematically derived and experimental results of analyses for the case of non-equilibrium segregation showed excellent agreement in the determination of carbide thickness (nanometer scale) and time dependence of segregation under fast cooling conditions. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde die Bildung von Vanadiumcarbiden auf Fe-3%V-C(100)-Legierungsoberflaechen beschrieben. Das anhand des ThermoCalc-Programmpakets fuer diese Legierungszusammensetzung berechnete Phasendiagramm zeigt bei niedrigen Temperaturen T{<=}650 C die Koexistenz von ferritischer Matrix und V{sub 3}C{sub 2}. Bei hoeheren Temperaturen ist dieses Carbid instabil und es liegt Koexistenz von Ferrit und dem kubischen VC{sub 1-x} vor. Die experimentellen Untersuchungen zeigen die Ausbildung einer zweidimensionalen VC-Oberflaechenverbindung auf Fe-3%V-C(100)-Legierungsoberflaechen durch Gleichgewichtssegregation. Diese Arbeit zeigt, dass thermodynamische und kinetische Rechnungen bei der Deutung von Ausscheidungsphaenomenen in Staehlen sinnvoll eingesetzt werden koennen. Bei der Nichtgleichgewichtssegregation wurde bezueglich Carbiddicke (im Nanometerbereich) und Zeitabhaengigkeit der Ausscheidung bei schneller Abkuehlung eine hervorragende Uebereinstimmung zwischen Simulation und Experiment gefunden

  14. Communication: Contrasting effects of glycerol and DMSO on lipid membrane surface hydration dynamics and forces

    OpenAIRE

    Schrader, Alex M.; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Han, Songi

    2016-01-01

    Glycerol and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) are commonly used cryoprotectants in cellular systems, but due to the challenges of measuring the properties of surface-bound solvent, fundamental questions remain regarding the concentration, interactions, and conformation of these solutes at lipid membrane surfaces. We measured the surface water diffusivity at gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer surfaces in aqueous solutions containing ≤7.5 mol. % of DMSO or glycerol using Overhause...

  15. From hydration repulsion to dry adhesion between asymmetric hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kanduč, Matej; Netz, Roland R.

    2015-01-01

    Besides van der Waals and electrostatic interactions, surfaces in water experience solvation forces arising from the interfacial water structure that become dominant at small surface separations. Using a combination of atomistic simulations and theoretical arguments, we construct a universal adhesion state diagram for two neutral surfaces with different water affinities. We find an intermediate regime of affinity combinations where the surfaces adhere to each other without an intervening wate...

  16. Nuclear reactor fuel element with vanadium getter on cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carl E.; Carroll, Kenneth G.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel element is described which has an outer cladding, a central core of fissionable or mixed fissionable and fertile fuel material and a layer of vanadium as an oxygen getter on the inner surface of the cladding. The vanadium reacts with oxygen released by the fissionable material during irradiation of the core to prevent the oxygen from reacting with and corroding the cladding. Also described is a method for coating the inner surface of small diameter tubes of cladding with a layer of vanadium.

  17. The simulation of gas production from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by the combination of ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Yang; Yu-Hu Bai; Qing-Ping Li

    2012-01-01

    A new method is proposed to produce gas from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by combining the ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization which can efficiently utilize the synthetic effects of thermal,salt and depressurization on gas hydrate dissociation.The method has the advantage of high efficiency,low cost and enhanced safety.Based on the proposed conceptual method,the physical and mathematical models are established,in which the effects of the flow of multiphase fluid,the kinetic process of hydrate dissociation,the endothermic process of hydrate dissociation,ice-water phase equilibrium,salt inhibition,dispersion,convection and conduction on the hydrate dissociation and gas and water production are considered.The gas and water rates,formation pressure for the combination method are compared with that of the single depressurization,which is referred to the method in which only depressurization is used.The results show that the combination method can remedy the deficiency of individual producing methods.It has the advantage of longer stable period of high gas rate than the single depressurization.It can also reduce the geologic hazard caused by the formation deformation due to the maintaining of the formation pressure by injected ocean warm water.

  18. Tunable oxygen functional groups as electro-catalysts on graphite felt surfaces for all vanadium flow batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estevez, Luis; Reed, David M.; Nie, Zimin; Schwarz, Ashleigh M.; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Kizewski, James P.; Wang, Wei; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Jiguang; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Li, Bin

    2016-06-22

    We decorated the surfaces of graphite felts with some oxygen-containing functional groups, such as C-OH, O=C and HO-C=O. And the mole ratios and amounts of these functional groups were effectively adjusted on the graphite surface by a particular method. The catalytic effects of amounts and mole ratio of different kinds of functional groups on VRB electrode performances were investigated in detail.

  19. In Situ Confocal Raman Microscopy of Hydrated Early Stages of Bacterial Biofilm Formation on Various Surfaces in a Flow Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Palmer, Truis; Lin, Sicheng; Oguejiofor, Ikenna; Leng, Tianyang; Pustam, Amanda; Yang, Jin; Graham, Lori L; Wyeth, Russell C; Bishop, Cory D; DeMont, M Edwin; Pink, David

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial biofilms are precursors to biofouling by other microorganisms. Understanding their initiation may allow us to design better ways to inhibit them, and thus to inhibit subsequent biofouling. In this study, the ability of confocal Raman microscopy to follow the initiation of biofouling by a marine bacterium, Pseudoalteromonas sp. NCIMB 2021 (NCIMB 2021), in a flow cell, using optical and confocal Raman microscopy, was investigated. The base of the flow cell comprised a cover glass. The cell was inoculated and the bacteria attached to, and grew on, the cover glass. Bright field images and Raman spectra were collected directly from the hydrated biofilms over several days. Although macroscopically the laser had no effect on the biofilm, within the first 24 h cells migrated away from the position of the laser beam. In the absence of flow, a buildup of extracellular substances occurred at the base of the biofilm. When different coatings were applied to cover glasses before they were assembled into the flow cells, the growth rate, structure, and composition of the resulting biofilm was affected. In particular, the ratio of Resonance Raman peaks from cytochrome c (CC) in the extracellular polymeric substances, to the Raman phenylalanine (Phe) peak from protein in the bacteria, depended on both the nature of the surface and the age of the biofilm. The ratios were highest for 24 h colonies on a hydrophobic surface. Absorption of a surfactant with an ethyleneoxy chain into the hydrophobic coating created a surface similar to that given with a simple PEG coating, where bacteria grew in colonies away from the surface rather than along the surface, and CC:Phe ratios were initially low but increased at least fivefold in the first 48 h.

  20. Hydration in Lipid Monolayers: Correlation of Water Activity and Surface Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disalvo, E Anibal; Hollmann, Axel; Martini, M Florencia

    2015-01-01

    In order to give a physical meaning to each region of the membrane we define the interphase as the region in a lipid membrane corresponding to the polar head groups imbibed in water with net different properties than the hydrocarbon region and the water phase. The interphase region is analyzed under the scope of thermodynamics of surface and solutions based on the definition of Defay-Prigogine of an interphase and the derivation that it has in the understanding of membrane processeses in the context of biological response. In the view of this approach, the complete monolayer is considered as the lipid layer one molecule thick plus the bidimensional solution of the polar head groups inherent to it (the interphase region). Surface water activity appears as a common factor for the interaction of several aqueous soluble and surface active proteins with lipid membranes of different composition. Protein perturbation can be measured by changes in the surface pressure of lipid monolayers at different initial water surface activities. As predicted by solution chemistry, the increase of surface pressure is independent of the particle nature that dissolves. Therefore, membranes give a similar response in terms of the determined surface states given by water activity independent of the protein or peptide.

  1. Hydrated goethite (alpha-FeOOH) (100) interface structure: Ordered water and surface functional groups.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghose, S.K.; Waychunas, G.A.; Trainor, T.P.; Eng, P.J.

    2009-12-15

    Goethite({alpha}-FeOOH), an abundant and highly reactive iron oxyhydroxide mineral, has been the subject of numerous stud-ies of environmental interface reactivity. However, such studies have been hampered by the lack of experimental constraints on aqueous interface structure, and especially of the surface water molecular arrangements. Structural information of this type is crucial because reactivity is dictated by the nature of the surface functional groups and the structure or distribution of water and electrolyte at the solid-solution interface. In this study we have investigated the goethite(100) surface using surface diffraction techniques, and have determined the relaxed surface structure, the surface functional groups, and the three dimensional nature of two distinct sorbed water layers. The crystal truncation rod (CTR) results show that the interface structure consists of a double hydroxyl, double water terminated interface with significant atom relaxations. Further, the double hydroxyl terminated surface dominates with an 89% contribution having a chiral subdomain structure on the(100) cleavage faces. The proposed interface stoichiometry is ((H{sub 2}O)-(H{sub 2}O)-OH{sub 2}-OH-Fe-O-O-Fe-R) with two types of terminal hydroxyls; a bidentate (B-type) hydroxo group and a monodentate (A-type) aquo group. Using the bond-valence approach the protonation states of the terminal hydroxyls are predicted to be OH type (bidentate hydroxyl with oxygen coupled to two Fe{sup 3+} ions) and OH{sub 2} type (monodentate hydroxyl with oxygen tied to only one Fe{sup 3+}). A double layer three dimensional ordered water structure at the interface was determined from refinement of fits to the experimental data. Application of bond-valence constraints to the terminal hydroxyls with appropriate rotation of the water dipole moments allowed a plausible dipole orientation model as predicted. The structural results are discussed in terms of protonation and H-bonding at the interface

  2. Pathway and Surface Mechanism Studies of 1,3-butadiene Selective Oxidation Over Vanadium-Molybdenum-Oxygen Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, William David [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The partial oxidation of 1,3-butadiene has been investigated over VMoO catalysts synthesized by sol-gel techniques. Surface areas were 9-14 m2/g, and compositions were within the solid solution regime, i.e. below 15.0 mol % MoO3/(MoO3 + V2O5). Laser Raman Spectroscopy and XRD data indicated that solid solutions were formed, and pre- and post-reaction XPS data indicated that catalyst surfaces contained some V+4 and were further reduced in 1,3-butadiene oxidation. A reaction pathway for 1,3-butadiene partial oxidation to maleic anhydride was shown to involve intermediates such as 3,4-epoxy-1-butene, crotonaldehyde, furan, and 2-butene-1,4-dial. The addition of water to the reaction stream substantially increased catalyst activity and improved selectivity to crotonaldehyde and furan at specific reaction temperatures. At higher water addition concentrations, furan selectivity increased from 12% to over 25%. The catalytic effects of water addition were related to competitive adsorption with various V2O5-based surface sites, including the vanadyl V=O, corner sharing V-O-V and edge sharing V-O oxygen. Higher levels of water addition were proposed to impose acidic character by dissociative adsorption. In addition, a novel combinatorial synthesis technique for VMoO was used to investigate the phase transitions of V2O5, solid solutions of Mo in V2O5, V9Mo6O40, and other reduced VMoO compounds, characterized by laser Raman spectroscopy. The natural composition gradient imposed by the sputter deposition apparatus was used to create VMoO arrays containing 225 samples ranging from 7.0-42 mol% MoO3/(V2O5 + MoO3), determined by EDS analysis.

  3. Albumin-mediated deposition of bone-like apatite onto nano-sized surfaces: Effect of surface reactivity and interfacial hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Elia, Noelia L; Gravina, Noel; Ruso, Juan M; Marco-Brown, Jose L; Sieben, Juan M; Messina, Paula V

    2017-05-15

    The bioactivity of an implant is displayed on its ability to induce heterogeneous nucleation of biogenic apatite onto its surface upon immersion in body fluids; forming, through this layer, a stable bond with the host tissue. The present article evaluates the bioactivity of different nanostructured substrates based on synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA) and titania (TiO2) nanoparticles, where we extend the debate regarding the selective roles played by the presence of albumin on the biogenic apatite coating evolution. The substrates bone-bonding potential was evaluated by keeping the materials in contact with Simulated Body Fluid, while the influence of the presence of Bovine Serum Albumin in bioactivity was analyzed by a spectrophotometric technique. Our results show that materials' surface reactivity and their interfacial hydration are responsible for the bonding-site alteration and surface charge density distribution, which in turn, regulate the protein adsorption process. As a matter of fact, variations on the protein adsorbed density have a directly proportional impact on calcium binding sites, which should be responsible for the initiation of the mineralization process, disturbing the deposition of the interfacial calcium phosphate (Ca-P) mineralized coating. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Variation in Surface Ionization Potentials of Pristine and Hydrated BiVO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Otero, Rachel; Walsh, Aron

    2015-06-18

    Bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) is a promising material for photoelectrochemical water splitting and photocatalytic degradation of organic moieties. We evaluate the ionization potentials of the (010) surface termination of BiVO4 using first-principles simulations. The electron removal energy of the pristine termination (7.2 eV) validates recent experimental reports. The effect of water absorption on the ionization potentials is considered using static models as well as structures obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. Owing to the large molecular dipole of H2O, adsorption stabilizes the valence band edge (downward band bending), thereby increasing the ionization potentials. These results provide new understanding to the role of polar layers on complex oxide semiconductors, with importance for the design of efficient photoelectrodes for water splitting.

  5. Release of Vanadium from soils by conventional leaching procedures and extractions.

    OpenAIRE

    Cappuyns, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    1. Introduction Despite the fact that vanadium (V) is among the 20 most abundant elements in the earth's crust5, with average concentrations between 50 and 150 µg g-1, this element receives relatively few attention in the scientific literature on soil and sediment geochemistry. However, the last few years, the attention for this potentially harmful element is growing. Some countries adopted threshold values for vanadium in soils, sediments, ground- or surface water, but in general vanadium...

  6. Nanostructured Electrocatalysts for All-Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Minjoon; Ryu, Jaechan; Cho, Jaephil

    2015-10-01

    Vanadium redox reactions have been considered as a key factor affecting the energy efficiency of the all-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). This redox reaction determines the reaction kinetics of whole cells. However, poor kinetic reversibility and catalytic activity towards the V(2+)/V(3+) and VO(2+)/VO2(+) redox couples on the commonly used carbon substrate limit broader applications of VRFBs. Consequently, modified carbon substrates have been extensively investigated to improve vanadium redox reactions. In this Focus Review, recent progress on metal- and carbon-based nanomaterials as an electrocatalyst for VRFBs is discussed in detail, without the intention to provide a comprehensive review on the whole components of the system. Instead, the focus is mainly placed on the redox chemistry of vanadium ions at a surface of various metals, different dimensional carbons, nitrogen-doped carbon nanostructures, and metal-carbon composites.

  7. Vanadium distribution following decavanadate administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, S S; Martins, H; Aureliano, M

    2006-01-01

    An acute exposure of two vanadate solutions-metavanadate and decavanadate-containing different vanadate oligomers, induces different patterns of subcellular vanadium distribution in blood plasma, red blood cells (RBC), and cardiac muscle subcellular fractions of the fish Sparus aurata (gilthead seabream). The highest amount of vanadium was found in blood plasma 1 h after (5 mM) intravenous vanadate administration (295 +/- 64 and 383 +/- 104 microg V/g dry tissue, for metavanadate and decavanadate solutions, respectively), being 80-fold higher than in RBC. After 12 h of administration, the amount of vanadium in plasma, as well as in cardiac cytosol, decreased about 50%, for both vanadate solutions. During the period between 1 and 12 h, the ratio of vanadium in plasma/vanadium in RBC increased from 27 to 128 for metavanadate, whereas it remains constant (77) for decavanadate. Both vanadium solutions were primarily accumulated in the mitochondrial fraction (138 +/- 0 and 195 +/- 34 ng V/g dry tissue for metavanadate and decavanadate solutions, respectively, after 12 h exposure), rather than in cytosol. The amount of vanadium in cardiac mitochondria was twofold higher than in cytosol, earlier for metavanadate (6 h) than for decavanadate (12 h). It is concluded that, in fish cardiac muscle, the vanadium distribution is dependent on the administration of decameric vanadate, with vanadium being mainly distributed in plasma, before being accumulated into the mitochondrial fraction.

  8. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    and the role it plays in the global climate and the future of fuels. Russia, Japan, Nigeria, Peru, Chile, Pakistan, Indonesia, Korea, etc are various countries who are perusing the gas hydrates studies as a future resource for fuel. Indian Initiative..., 1993, Free gas at the base of the gas hydrate zone in the vicinity of the Chile Triple junction: Geology, v. 21, pp. 905-908. Borowski, W.S., C.K. Paull, and U. William, III, 1999, Global and local variations of interstitial sulfate gradients...

  9. The effect of hydrate saturation on water retention curves in hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabadi, Nariman; Zheng, Xianglei; Jang, Jaewon

    2016-05-01

    The experimental measurement of water retention curve in hydrate-bearing sediments is critically important to understand the behavior of hydrate dissociation and gas production. In this study, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is selected as hydrate former. The pore habit of THF hydrates is investigated by visual observation in a transparent micromodel. It is confirmed that THF hydrates are not wetting phase on the quartz surface of the micromodel and occupy either an entire pore or part of pore space resulting in change in pore size distribution. And the measurement of water retention curves in THF hydrate-bearing sediments with hydrate saturation ranging from Sh = 0 to Sh = 0.7 is conducted for excess water condition. The experimental results show that the gas entry pressure and the capillary pressure increase with increasing hydrate saturation. Based on the experimental results, fitting parameters for van Genuchten equation are suggested for different hydrate saturation conditions.

  10. Correlating steric hydration forces with water dynamics through surface force and diffusion NMR measurements in a lipid–DMSO–H2O system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Alex M.; Donaldson, Stephen H.; Song, Jinsuk; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Dong Woog; Han, Songi; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2015-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a common solvent and biological additive possessing well-known utility in cellular cryoprotection and lipid membrane permeabilization, but the governing mechanisms at membrane interfaces remain poorly understood. Many studies have focused on DMSO–lipid interactions and the subsequent effects on membrane-phase behavior, but explanations often rely on qualitative notions of DMSO-induced dehydration of lipid head groups. In this work, surface forces measurements between gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membranes in DMSO–water mixtures quantify the hydration- and solvation-length scales with angstrom resolution as a function of DMSO concentration from 0 mol% to 20 mol%. DMSO causes a drastic decrease in the range of the steric hydration repulsion, leading to an increase in adhesion at a much-reduced intermembrane distance. Pulsed field gradient NMR of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) head group analogs, dimethyl phosphate and tetramethylammonium ions, shows that the ion hydrodynamic radius decreases with increasing DMSO concentration up to 10 mol% DMSO. The complementary measurements indicate that, at concentrations below 10 mol%, the primary effect of DMSO is to decrease the solvated volume of the PC head group and that, from 10 mol% to 20 mol%, DMSO acts to gradually collapse head groups down onto the surface and suppress their thermal motion. This work shows a connection between surface forces, head group conformation and dynamics, and surface water diffusion, with important implications for soft matter and colloidal systems. PMID:26261313

  11. Mesoporous vanadium nitride as a high performance catalyst support for formic acid electrooxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minghui; Cui, Zhiming; DiSalvo, Francis J

    2012-11-04

    Mesoporous vanadium nitride (VN) with high surface area and good electrical conductivity was prepared by a solid-solid phase separation method from a Zn containing vanadium oxide, Zn(3)V(2)O(8). The VN supported Pd catalyst exhibited significant catalytic activity for formic acid oxidation.

  12. Structures and Properties of As(OH)3 Adsorption Complexes on Hydrated Mackinawite (FeS) Surfaces: A DFT-D2 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzade, Nelson Y; Roldan, Alberto; de Leeuw, Nora H

    2017-03-21

    Reactive mineral-water interfaces exert control on the bioavailability of contaminant arsenic species in natural aqueous systems. However, the ability to accurately predict As surface complexation is limited by the lack of molecular-level understanding of As-water-mineral interactions. In the present study, we report the structures and properties of the adsorption complexes of arsenous acid (As(OH)3) on hydrated mackinawite (FeS) surfaces, obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The fundamental aspects of the adsorption, including the registries of the adsorption complexes, adsorption energies, and structural parameters are presented. The FeS surfaces are shown to be stabilized by hydration, as is perhaps to be expected because the adsorbed water molecules stabilize the low-coordinated surface atoms. As(OH)3 adsorbs weakly at the water-FeS(001) interface through a network of hydrogen-bonded interactions with water molecules on the surface, with the lowest-energy structure calculated to be an As-up outer-sphere complex. Compared to the water-FeS(001) interface, stronger adsorption was calculated for As(OH)3 on the water-FeS(011) and water-FeS(111) interfaces, characterized by strong hybridization between the S-p and O-p states of As(OH)3 and the surface Fe-d states. The As(OH)3 molecule displayed a variety of chemisorption geometries on the water-FeS(011) and water-FeS(111) interfaces, where the most stable configuration at the water-FeS(011) interface is a bidentate Fe-AsO-Fe complex, but on the water-FeS(111) interface, a monodentate Fe-O-Fe complex was found. Detailed information regarding the adsorption mechanisms has been obtained via projected density of states (PDOS) and electron density difference iso-surface analyses and vibrational frequency assignments of the adsorbed As(OH)3 molecule.

  13. Flow assurance intervention, hydrates remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Christopher S. [Oceaneering International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the issues of removing hydrates in sub sea flow lines and associated equipment with an Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) of opportunity and a multi-service-vessel (MSV). The paper is split into three topics: the equipment used with the ROV, assessing the interface points and handling fluids produced from drawing down the pressure. Each section is explained thoroughly and backed up with real world experience. The equipment section details information from actual jobs performed and why the particular components were utilized. The system is generally contained in an ROV mounted skid. Pumps are utilized to draw down the pressure inside the hydrated section of equipment, removing one of the three necessary components for hydrates formation. Once the section is pumped down, several options exist for handling the fluids pumped out of the system: pumping to surface, re-injection into the well, or injection into an operating flow line. This method of hydrates remediation is both economical and timely. Hydrate blockages form in low temperatures and high pressures. Reducing the pressure or increasing the temperature so the conditions lie to the right of the hydrate dissociation curve will slowly decompose the blockage. Depressurization and the use of MEG or methanol will give favorable conditions to remove the hydrate plug. Oceaneering has the capabilities to remove hydrates using the FRS in conjunction with an installation vessel to dispose of the gas and fluid removed from the flow line. Hydrate remediation techniques should be implemented into the initial design to reduce costs later. The cost of stopped production combined with the day rate for equipment needed for hydrate removal outweighs the costs if no technique is utilized. (author)

  14. Plasma assisted synthesis of vanadium pentoxide nanoplates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Megha; Sharma, Rabindar Kumar; Kumar, Prabhat, E-mail: prabhat89k@gmail.com; Reddy, G. B. [Thin film laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2015-08-28

    In this work, we report the growth of α-V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (orthorhombic) nanoplates on glass substrate using plasma assisted sublimation process (PASP) and Nickel as catalyst. 100 nm thick film of Ni is deposited over glass substrate by thermal evaporation process. Vanadium oxide nanoplates have been deposited treating vanadium metal foil under high vacuum conditions with oxygen plasma. Vanadium foil is kept at fixed temperature growth of nanoplates of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} to take place. Samples grown have been studied using XPS, XRD and HRTEM to confirm the growth of α-phase of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, which revealed pure single crystal of α- V{sub 2}O{sub 5} in orthorhombic crystallographic plane. Surface morphological studies using SEM and TEM show nanostructured thin film in form of plates. Uniform, vertically aligned randomly oriented nanoplates of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} have been deposited.

  15. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  16. Evidence of mud volcanism rooted in gas hydrate-rich cryosphere linking surface and subsurface for the search for life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toffoli, Barbara; Pozzobon, Riccardo; Mazzarini, Francesco; Massironi, Matteo; Cremonese, Gabriele

    2017-04-01

    We mapped around 6000 mounds in three different portions of the Martian surface on an average area of about 90.000 Km2 for each region. The study areas are located in Hellas basin, Utopia basin and a portion of the Northern Plains lying north of Arabia Terra, between Acidalia and Utopia Planitia. The aim of the study was to understand the nature of the observed features, particularly if they could be interpreted as mud volcanoes or not, and improve our knowledge about the Martian mound fields origin. The analysis of Context Camera (onboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter) images showed circular, elliptical and coalescent mounds with central and/or distal pits and flow features such as concentric annular lobes around the source pits and apron-like extensions. We produced DTMs and then high-to-diameter morphometric analysis on two groups of mounds located in Utopia and Hellas basins to enhance the geomorphological observations. We inferred, by means of cluster and fractal analyses, the thickness of the medium cracked by connected fractures and, consequently, the depths of reservoirs that fed the mounds. We found that the fields, which are seated at different latitudes, has been fed, at least partially, by reservoirs located at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone according to Clifford et al., 2010. This evidence produces a meaningful relationship between the clathrates distribution underneath the Martian surface and the occurrence of mound fields on the surface leading to the assumption that the involvement of water, ostensibly as a result of gas hydrate dissociation, plays a key role in the subsurface processes that potentially worked as triggers. These outcomes corroborate the hypothesis that the mapped mounds are actually mud volcanoes and make these structures outstanding targets for astrobiology and habitability studies. In fact, mud volcanoes, extruding material from depths that are still not affordable by our present-day instrumentations, could have sampled

  17. Investigation of the Electrolyte Effects on Formation of Vanadium Carbide via Plasma Electrolytic Saturation Method (pes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanian, Babak; Khoie, Seyed Mohammad Mousavi; Rasouli, Mahmood; Doodran, Ramona Javadi

    2016-02-01

    One of the most important hardening methods of tool steel is the use of carbide coatings. During this process, vanadium atoms diffuse the specimen’s surface at high temperature and reacts with the available carbon in steel and create vanadium carbide with high hardness. During the plasma electrolytic saturation (PES) process, the vanadium element diffuses with the help of plasma and increases up to around 950∘ as a result of the temperature, providing conditions for the creation of vanadium carbide. The best combination of electrolyte is 4g vanadium oxide and 50mL hydrochloric acid and different concern of sodium hydroxide. The results indicate that the formed coating is about 30μm. As the conductivity increases, the condition for diffusion is provided; however, with increase in the temperature, the diffusion decreases. The coating formation is observed in the current at 9-11 A and hardness of this coating is about 1400vickers.

  18. Obsidian Hydration: A New Paleothermometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Riciputi, Lee R [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Fayek, Mostafa [ORNL; Elam, J. Michael [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2006-01-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  19. Obsidian hydration: A new paleothermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Riciputi, Lee R.; Cole, David R.; Fayek, Mostafa; Elam, J. Michael

    2006-07-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  20. Speciation of vanadium in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Połedniok, Justyna; Buhl, Franciszek

    2003-01-02

    A method for speciation of vanadium in soil is presented in this work. The sequential extraction analysis procedure of Tessier et al. for heavy metals was used for the vanadium separation. The method consists of sequential leaching of the soil samples to separate five fractions of metals: (1) exchangeable, (2) bound to carbonates, (3) bound to Fe-Mn oxides, (4) bound to organic matter and (5) residual. The leaching solutions of Tessier were used for the vanadium extraction, only for the residual fraction the HClO(4) was replaced with H(2)SO(4). The optimum conditions for leaching of vanadium from soil (weight of sample, concentration and volume of extractants, time of extraction) were chosen for each fraction. A sensitive, spectrophotometric method based on the ternary complex V(IV) with Chrome Azurol S and benzyldodecyldimethylammonium bromide (epsilon=7.1x10(4) l mol(-1) cm(-1)) was applied for the vanadium determination after separation of V(V) by solvent extraction using mesityl oxide and reduction of V(V) using ascorbic acid. This method was applied for vanadium speciation in soil from two different regions of Poland: Upper Silesia (industrial region) and Podlasie (agricultural region). The content of vanadium in the fractions of Upper Silesia soil was respectively (in 10(-3)%): I, 3.39; III, 4.53; IV, 10.70; V, 8.70 and it was the highest in the organic fraction, indicating input by anthropogenic activities. The content of vanadium in Podlasie soil was clearly lower and it was (in 10(-3)%): I, 2.07; III, 0.92; IV, 0.69; V, 1.23. The concentration of vanadium in fraction 2 of both soils was less than detection limit of applied method. The total content of vanadium in the five soil fractions was in good correlation with the total content of this element in both soils found after HF-H(2)SO(4) digestion. Analysis using the ICP-AES method gave comparable results.

  1. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn

    2009-11-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  2. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, D.D.; Martin, A.I.; Yun, T.S.; Francisca, F.M.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Investigation on the pure and fluorine doped vanadium oxide thin films deposited by spray pyrolysis method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margoni, Mudaliar Mahesh; Mathuri, S. [Crystal Growth and Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, SRM University, Kattankulathur, – 603203 Kancheepuram Dt., Tamil Nadu (India); Ramamurthi, K., E-mail: krmurthin@yahoo.co.in [Crystal Growth and Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, SRM University, Kattankulathur, – 603203 Kancheepuram Dt., Tamil Nadu (India); Babu, R. Ramesh [Crystal Growth and Thin Film Laboratory, School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli – 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Sethuraman, K. [School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai – 625021, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-05-01

    Vanadium oxide and fluorine doped vanadium oxide thin films were deposited on the micro-slide glass substrates at 400 °C by spray pyrolysis technique. Vanadium oxide films were deposited using 0.1 M ammonium meta vanadate aqua solution. Precursor solution used to deposit fluorine doped vanadium oxide films was prepared adding separately 5 wt.%, 10 wt.%, 15 wt.% and 20 wt.% of ammonium fluoride with the 0.1 M ammonium meta vanadate aqua solution. X-ray diffraction results showed that the films are in mixed phases of β-V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and V{sub 3}O{sub 7}. Surface morphology and band gap of these films were modified due to different levels of fluorine doping. The average visible transmittance (500–800 nm) of vanadium oxide films is decreased due to low level concentration of fluorine doping. - Highlights: • Addition of a few ml HCl yielded clear precursor aqua solution. • F doped vanadium oxide films were deposited for less concentration of fluorine. • Low level fluorine doping modified the surface morphology of the thin films. • Direct band gap of vanadium oxide film is slightly increased by fluorine doping.

  4. Clathrate hydrates in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Keith C; Brewer, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    Scientific knowledge of natural clathrate hydrates has grown enormously over the past decade, with spectacular new findings of large exposures of complex hydrates on the sea floor, the development of new tools for examining the solid phase in situ, significant progress in modeling natural hydrate systems, and the discovery of exotic hydrates associated with sea floor venting of liquid CO2. Major unresolved questions remain about the role of hydrates in response to climate change today, and correlations between the hydrate reservoir of Earth and the stable isotopic evidence of massive hydrate dissociation in the geologic past. The examination of hydrates as a possible energy resource is proceeding apace for the subpermafrost accumulations in the Arctic, but serious questions remain about the viability of marine hydrates as an economic resource. New and energetic explorations by nations such as India and China are quickly uncovering large hydrate findings on their continental shelves.

  5. Separation of Impurity Vanadium from TiCl4 by Means of Adsorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The possibility and extent of the separation of impurity vanadium in titanium tetrachloride by means of adsorption with molecular sieves were studied. As ascertained by the experimental results, the adsorption of VOCl3 onto molecular sieve internal surface was controlled by the intraparticle diffusion of the molecules. Although all of the three kinds of molecular sieves used are competent for removing vanadium from titanium tetrachloride, type 4 A behaves more effectively than the others under the same conditions. After adsorption for nine stages, the concentration of vanadium in the product becomes as less as that of industrial standard level.

  6. In silico approach to investigating the adsorption mechanisms of short chain perfluorinated sulfonic acids and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid on hydrated hematite surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hongru; Lin, Yuan; Sun, Yuzhen; Cao, Huiming; Fu, Jianjie; Gao, Ke; Zhang, Aiqian

    2017-05-01

    Short chain perfluorinated sulfonic acids (PFSAs) that were introduced as alternatives for perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) have been widely produced and used. However, few studies have investigated the environmental process of short chain PFSAs, and the related adsorption mechanisms still need to be uncovered. The water-oxide interface is one of the major environmental interfaces that plays an important role in affecting the adsorption behaviour and transport potential of the environmental pollutant. In this study, we performed molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemistry calculations to investigate the adsorption mechanisms of five PFSAs and their adsorption on hydrated hematite surface as well. Different to the vertical configuration reported for PFOS on titanium oxide, all PFSAs share the same adsorption configuration as the long carbon chains parallel to the surface. The formation of hydrogen bonds between F and inter-surface H helps to stabilize the unique configuration. As a result, the sorption capacity increases with increasing C-F chain length. Moreover, both calculated adsorption energy and partial density of states (PDOS) analysis demonstrate a PFSAs adsorption mechanism in between physical and chemical adsorption because the hydrogen bonds formed by the overlap of F (p) orbital and H (s) orbital are weak intermolecular interactions while the physical adsorption are mainly ascribed to the electrostatic interactions. This massive calculation provides a new insight into the pollutant adsorption behaviour, and in particular, may help to evaluate the environmental influence of pollutants. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Correlation between molten vanadium salts and the structural degradation of HK-type steel superheater tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho Nunes, Frederico; de Almeida, Luiz Henrique; Ribeiro, André Freitas

    2006-12-01

    HK steels are among the most used heat-resistant cast stainless steels, being corrosion-resistant and showing good mechanical properties at high service temperatures. These steels are widely used in reformer furnaces and as superheater tubes. During service, combustion gases leaving the burners come in contact with these tubes, resulting in corrosive attack and a large weight loss occurs due to the presence of vanadium, which forms low melting point salts, removing the protective oxide layer. In this work the external surface of a tube with dramatic wall thickness reduction was analyzed using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The identification of the phases was achieved by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analyses. The results showed oxides arising from the external surface. In this oxidized region vanadium compounds inside chromium carbide particles were also observed, due to inward vanadium diffusion during corrosion attack. A chemical reaction was proposed to explain the presence of vanadium in the metal microstructure.

  8. Theoretical study of the interaction between vanadium oxide and HY-Zeolite elucidating loss activity of the catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irineo Pedro Zaragoza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the interaction between vanadium oxide and the HY-zeolite using molecular dynamics interaction was carried out for two systems: i when vanadium oxide penetrates a zeolite ring at its center, and ii when vanadium oxide impacts the zeolite surface model. The dynamical effects are used to investigate the reduced activity and eventual degradation of the catalyst for the vanadium oxide presence. In the first case, we observe the breaking of an OH-bond that belongs to the acid site. This is related to an initial loss activity stage of the catalyst. In the second case, vanadium oxide is weakly adsorbed onto the zeolite surface velocity depending. Density functional theory, with nonlocal exchange and correlation functional and the basis set of double numerical accuracy, is used to analyze the electronic structure. It was used in combination with Born-Oppenheimer dynamics to perform calculations.

  9. The Oxidation Behavior of Vanadium Alloys in Air at Elevated Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENJiming; XUYing; XUZengyu

    2001-01-01

    Vanadium alloy is one of the most important candidate structural materials for a fusion reactor. Its main advantages over other candidates are its low activity feature and feasible properties at high temperature. However, vanadium is easily oxidized at high temperature to form a non-protective surface film of V2O5. Oxygen concentration would thus get high and the properties get worse in not only the loss of the ductility but also the enhanced hydrogen embrittlement by the oxidation.

  10. Dissolution kinetics and thermodynamic analysis of vanadium trioxide during pressure oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The dissolution kinetics of vanadium trioxide in sulphuric acid-oxygen medium was examined. It was determined that the concentration of sulphuric acid and stirring speed above 800 r min 1 did not significantly affect vanadium extraction. The dissolution rate increased with increasing temperature and oxygen partial pressure, but decreased with increasing particle size. The dissolution kinetics was controlled by the chemical reaction at the surface with the estimated activation energy of 43.46 kJ·mol-1. The l...

  11. Chemical separation of vanadium oxides in the gaseous phase. Chemische Gasphasenabscheidung von Vanadiumoxiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wormer, O.G.

    1993-01-01

    The report discusses the possibility of producing vanadium oxide films on ceramics by the CVD process. It was found that the reaction of VOCl[sub 3] with oxygen resulted in well-adhesive layers on the fibrous matrix although the specific surface was hardly higher than in the case of uncoated ceramic fibres. The technique promises good results in producing novel catalytic converters on the basis of oxidic ceramics coated with vanadium oxides. (orig.)

  12. Characterization of vanadium flow battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindner, H.; Ekman, C.; Gehrke, O.; Isleifsson, F.

    2010-10-15

    This report summarizes the work done at Risoe DTU testing a vanadium flow battery as part of the project 'Characterisation of Vanadium Batteries' (ForskEl project 6555) with the partners PA Energy A/S and OI Electric A/S under the Danish PSO energy research program. A 15kW/120kWh vanadium battery has been installed as part of the distributed energy systems experimental facility, SYSLAB, at Risoe DTU. A test programme has been carried out to get hands-on experience with the technology, to characterize the battery from a power system point of view and to assess it with respect to integration of wind energy in the Danish power system. The battery has been in operation for 18 months. During time of operation the battery has not shown signs of degradation of performance. It has a round-trip efficiency at full load of approximately 60% (depending on temperature and SOC). The sources of the losses are power conversion in cell stacks/electrolyte, power converter, and auxiliary power consumption from pumps and controller. The response time for the battery is limited at 20kW/s by the ramp rate of the power converter. The battery can thus provide power and frequency support for the power system. Vanadium battery is a potential technology for storage based services to the power system provided investment and O and M cost are low enough and long term operation is documented. (Author)

  13. Swelling and tensile properties of neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1990-07-01

    Vanadium-base alloys are candidates for use as structural material in magnetic fusion reactors. In comparison to other candidate structural materials (e.g., Type 316 stainless and HT-9 ferritic steels), vanadium-base alloys such as V-15Cr-5Ti and V-20Ti have intrinsically lower long-term neutron activation, neutron irradiation after-heat, biological hazard potential, and neutron-induced helium and hydrogen transmutation rates. Moreover, vanadium-base alloys can withstand a higher surface-heat, flux than steels because of their lower thermal stress factor. In addition to having these favorable neutronic and physical properties, a candidate alloy for use as structural material in a fusion reactor must have dimensional stability, i.e., swelling resistance, and resistance to embrittlement during the reactor lifetime at a level of structural strength commensurate with the reactor operating temperature and structural loads. In this paper, we present experimental results on the swelling and tensile properties of several vanadium-base alloys after irradiation at 420, 520, and 600{degree}C to neutron fluences ranging from 0.3 to 1.9 {times} 10{sup 27} neutrons/m{sup 2} (17 to 114 atom displacements per atom (dpa)).

  14. Compound Natural Gas Hydrate: A Natural System for Separation of Hydrate-Forming Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, M. D.; Osegovic, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Natural processes that separate materials from a mixture may exert a major influence on the development of the atmospheres and surfaces of planets, moons, and other planetary bodies. Natural distillation and gravity separation, amongst others, are well known means of differentiating materials through liquid-gas partitioning. One of the least known attributes of clathrate (gas) hydrates is their potential effect on the evolution of planetary system oceans and atmospheres. Gas hydrates separate gases from mixtures of gases by concentrating preferred hydrate-forming materials (HFM) guests within the water-molecule cage structure of crystalline hydrate. Different HFMs have very different fields of stability. When multiple hydrate formers are present, a preference series based on their selective uptake exists. Compound hydrate, which is formed from two or more species of HFM, extract preferred HFM from a mixture in very different proportions to their relative percentages of the original mixture. These compound hydrates can have different formation and dissociation conditions depending on the evolution of the environment. That is, the phase boundary of the compound hydrate that is required for dissociation lies along a lower pressure - higher temperature course. Compound hydrates respond to variations in temperature, pressure, and HFM composition. On Earth, the primary naturally occurring hydrate of interest to global climate modeling is methane hydrate. Oceanic hydrate on Earth is the largest store of carbon in the biosphere that is immediately reactive to environmental change, and is capable of releasing large amounts of methane into the atmosphere over a short geological time span. Hydrate formation is essentially metastable and is very sensitive to environmental change and to gas flux. Where natural variations in temperature and pressure varies so that hydrate will form and dissociate in some cyclical manner, such as in oceans where sea level is capable of rising and

  15. Investigations into surfactant/gas hydrate relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Rudy; Zhang, Guochang; Dearman, Jennifer; Woods, Charles [Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Gas hydrates have unique physical properties portending useful industrial applications of gas storage, gas separation, or water desalination. When gas hydrates were found in the early 1990s to occur naturally and abundantly in seafloors, three other primary interests and concerns emerged: potential new energy source, climate threat from their greenhouse gases, and seafloor instabilities. This paper presents research showing how anionic synthetic surfactants helped develop an industrial gas hydrate storage process for natural gas and how naturally-occurring in-situ anionic biosurfactants influence the formation and placement of gas hydrates in ocean sediments. The catalytic effects, mechanisms, and surface specificities imparted by synthetic surfactants in the gas storage process and imparted by biosurfactants in porous media are discussed. The Bacillus subtilis bacterium that is indigenous to gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico was cultured in the laboratory. Its biosurfactant was separated and found to catalyze gas hydrates in porous media. The experiments indicate that seafloor-biosurfactants can be produced rapidly in-situ to achieve threshold concentrations whereby hydrates are promoted. The biosurfactants accumulate and promote hydrate formation on specific mineral surfaces such as sodium montmorillonite. (author)

  16. Polyethylene oxide hydration in grafted layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Wang, Zilu

    Hydration of water soluble polymers is one of the key-factors defining their conformation and properties, similar to biopolymers. Polyethylene oxide (PEO) is one of the most important biomedical-applications polymers and is known for its reverse temperature solubility due to hydrogen bonding with water. As in many practical applications PEO chains are grafted to surfaces, e.g. of nanoparticles or planar surfaces, it is important to understand PEO hydration in such grafted layers. Using atomistic molecular dynamic simulations we investigate the details of molecular conformation and hydration of PEO end-grafted to gold surfaces. We analyze polymer and water density distribution as a function of distance from the surface for different grafting densities. Based on a detailed analysis of hydrogen bonding between polymer and water in grafted PEO layers, we will discuss the extent of PEO hydration and its implication for polymer conformation, mobility and layer properties. This research is supported by NSF (DMR-1410928).

  17. Gas hydrate of Lake Baikal: Discovery and varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlystov, Oleg; De Batist, Marc; Shoji, Hitoshi; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Nishio, Shinya; Naudts, Lieven; Poort, Jeffrey; Khabuev, Andrey; Belousov, Oleg; Manakov, Andrey; Kalmychkov, Gennаdy

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of recent gas-hydrate studies in Lake Baikal, the only fresh-water lake in the world containing gas hydrates in its sedimentary infill. We provide a historical overview of the different investigations and discoveries and highlight some recent breakthroughs in our understanding of the Baikal hydrate system. So far, 21 sites of gas hydrate occurrence have been discovered. Gas hydrates are of structures I and II, which are of thermogenic, microbial, and mixed origin. At the 15 sites, gas hydrates were found in mud volcanoes, and the rest six - near gas discharges. Additionally, depending on type of discharge and gas hydrate structure, they were visually different. Investigations using MIR submersibles allowed finding of gas hydrates at the bottom surface of Lake Baikal at the three sites.

  18. Directed synthesis of bio-inorganic vanadium oxide composites using genetically modified filamentous phage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Michael; Baik, Seungyun [Environmental Safety Group, Korea Institute of Science and Technology Europe (KIST-Europe) Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Campus E 7 1, Saarbruecken (Germany); Jeon, Hojeong; Kim, Yuchan [Center for Biomaterials, Biomedical Research Institute Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jungtae [Environmental Safety Group, Korea Institute of Science and Technology Europe (KIST-Europe) Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Campus E 7 1, Saarbruecken (Germany); Kim, Young Jun, E-mail: youngjunkim@kist-europe.de [Environmental Safety Group, Korea Institute of Science and Technology Europe (KIST-Europe) Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Campus E 7 1, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Phage is an excellent seeding for bio-templates for environmentally benign vanadium oxide nanocomposite synthesis. • The synthesized bio-inorganic vanadium oxide showed photodegradation activities. • The fabricated wt phage/vanadium oxide composite exhibited bundle-like structure. • The fabricated RSTB-phage/vanadium oxide composite exhibited a ball with a fiber-like nanostructure. • The virus/vanadium oxide composite could be applied in photocatalysts, sensors and nanoelectronic applications. - Abstract: The growth of crystalline vanadium oxide using a filamentous bacteriophage template was investigated using sequential incubation in a V{sub 2}O{sub 5} precursor. Using the genetic modification of the bacteriophage, we displayed two cysteines that constrained the RSTB-1 peptide on the major coat protein P8, resulting in vanadium oxide crystallization. The phage-driven vanadium oxide crystals with different topologies, microstructures, photodegradation and vanadium oxide composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), quartz microbalance and dissipation (QCM-D) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Non-specific electrostatic attraction between a wild-type phage (wt-phage) and vanadium cations in the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} precursor caused phage agglomeration and fiber formation along the length of the viral scaffold. As a result, the addition of recombinant phage (re-phage) in V{sub 2}O{sub 5} precursors formed heterogeneous structures, which led to efficient condensation of vanadium oxide crystal formation in lines, shown by QCM-D analysis. Furthermore, re-phage/V{sub x}O{sub x} composites showed significantly enhanced photodegradation activities compared with the synthesized wt-phage-V{sub 2}O{sub 5} composite under illumination. This study demonstrates that peptide-mediated vanadium oxide mineralization is governed by a complicated interplay of peptide sequence, local structure

  19. Hydrophobic thickness, lipid surface area and polar region hydration in monounsaturated diacylphosphatidylcholine bilayers: SANS study of effects of cholesterol and beta-sitosterol in unilamellar vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallová, J; Uhríková, D; Kucerka, N; Teixeira, J; Balgavý, P

    2008-11-01

    The influence of a mammalian sterol cholesterol and a plant sterol beta-sitosterol on the structural parameters and hydration of bilayers in unilamellar vesicles made of monounsaturated diacylphosphatidylcholines (diCn:1PC, n=14-22 is the even number of acyl chain carbons) was studied at 30 degrees C using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Recently published advanced model of lipid bilayer as a three-strip structure was used with a triangular shape of polar head group probability distribution (Kucerka et al., Models to analyze small-angle neutron scattering from unilamellar lipid vesicles, Physical Review E 69 (2004) Art. No. 051903). It was found that 33 mol% of both sterols increased the thickness of diCn:1PC bilayers with n=18-22 similarly. beta-sitosterol increased the thickness of diC14:1PC and diC16:1PC bilayers a little more than cholesterol. Both sterols increased the surface area per unit cell by cca 12 A(2) and the number of water molecules located in the head group region by cca 4 molecules, irrespective to the acyl chain length of diCn:1PC. The structural difference in the side chain between cholesterol and beta-sitosterol plays a negligible role in influencing the structural parameters of bilayers studied.

  20. A Noachian source region for the "Black Beauty" meteorite, and a source lithology for Mars surface hydrated dust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, P.; Pommerol, A.; Zanda, B.; Remusat, L.; Lorand, J. P.; Göpel, C.; Hewins, R.; Pont, S.; Lewin, E.; Quirico, E.; Schmitt, B.; Montes-Hernandez, G.; Garenne, A.; Bonal, L.; Proux, O.; Hazemann, J. L.; Chevrier, V. F.

    2015-10-01

    The Martian surface is covered by a fine-layer of oxidized dust responsible for its red color in the visible spectral range (Bibring et al., 2006; Morris et al., 2006). In the near infrared, the strongest spectral feature is located between 2.6 and 3.6 μm and is ubiquitously observed on the planet (Jouglet et al., 2007; Milliken et al., 2007). Although this absorption has been studied for many decades, its exact attribution and its geological and climatic implications remain debated. We present new lines of evidence from laboratory experiments, orbital and landed missions data, and characterization of the unique Martian meteorite NWA 7533, all converging toward the prominent role of hydroxylated ferric minerals. Martian breccias (so-called "Black Beauty" meteorite NWA7034 and its paired stones NWA7533 and NWA 7455) are unique pieces of the Martian surface that display abundant evidence of aqueous alteration that occurred on their parent planet (Agee et al., 2013). These dark stones are also unique in the fact that they arose from a near surface level in the Noachian southern hemisphere (Humayun et al., 2013). We used IR spectroscopy, Fe-XANES and petrography to identify the mineral hosts of hydrogen in NWA 7533 and compare them with observations of the Martian surface and results of laboratory experiments. The spectrum of NWA 7533 does not show mafic mineral absorptions, making its definite identification difficult through NIR remote sensing mapping. However, its spectra are virtually consistent with a large fraction of the Martian highlands. Abundant NWA 7034/7533 (and paired samples) lithologies might abound on Mars and might play a role in the dust production mechanism.

  1. Biochemical and medical importance of vanadium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbecki, Jan; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Gutowska, Izabela; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2012-01-01

    Vanadium belongs to the group of transition metals and is present in the air and soil contaminants in large urban agglomerations due to combustion of fossil fuels. It forms numerous inorganic compounds (vanadyl sulfate, sodium metavanadate, sodium orthovanadate, vanadium pentoxide) as well as complexes with organic compounds (BMOV, BEOV, METVAN). Depending on the research model, vanadium compounds exhibit antitumor or carcinogenic properties. Vanadium compounds generate ROS as a result of Fenton's reaction or of the reaction with atmospheric oxygen. They inactivate the Cdc25B(2) phosphatase and lead to degradation of Cdc25C, which induces G(2)/M phase arrest. In cells, vanadium compounds activate numerous signaling pathways and transcription factors, including PI3K-PKB/Akt-mTOR, NF-κB, MEK1/2-ERK, that cause cell survival or increased expression and release of VEGF. Vanadium compounds inhibit p53-dependent apoptosis and promote entry into the S phase of cells containing functional p53 protein. In addition, vanadium compounds, in particular organic derivatives, have insulin-mimetic and antidiabetic properties. Vanadium compounds lower blood glucose levels in animals and in clinical trials. They also inhibit the activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B. By activating the PI3K-PKB/Akt pathway, vanadium compaunds increase the cellular uptake of glucose by the GLUT4 transporter. The PKB/Akt pathway is also used to inactivate glycogen synthase kinase-3. The impact of vanadium compounds on inflammatory reactions has not been fully studied. Vanadium pentoxide causes expression of COX-2 and the release of proinflammatory cytokines in a human lung fibroblast model. Other vanadium compounds activate NF-κB in macrophages by activating IKKβ.

  2. Mineral resource of the month: vanadium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Vanadium, the name of which comes from Vanadis, a goddess in Scandinavian mythology, is one of the most important ferrous metals. Vanadium has many uses, but the metal’s metallurgical applications, such as an alloying element in iron and steel, account for more than 85 percent of U.S. consumption. The dominant nonmetallurgical use of the metal is as a catalyst for the production of maleic anhydride and sulfuric acid, ceramics, vanadium chemicals and electronics.

  3. Formation rate of natural gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, Marit

    2002-07-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 deg C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted to hydrate. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by gas injection rate and pressure. The effect of stirring rate is less significant and subcooling has no observable effect on the formation rate. Hydrate crystal concentration and gas composition do not influence the hydrate formation rate. Observations of produced hydrate crystals indicate that the crystals are elongated, about 5 micron in diameter and 10 micron long. Analysis of the results shows that the rate of hydrate formation is dominated by gas-liquid mass transfer. A mass transfer model, the bubble-to-crystal model, was developed for the hydrate formation rate in a continuous stirred tank reactor, given in terms of concentration driving force and an overall mass transfer coefficient. The driving force is the difference between the gas concentration at the gas-liquid interface and at the hydrate crystal surface. These concentrations correspond to the solubility of gas in water at experimental temperature and pressure and the solubility of gas at hydrate equilibrium temperature and experimental pressure, respectively. The overall mass transfer coefficient is expressed in terms of superficial gas velocity and impeller power consumption, parameters commonly used in study of stirred tank reactors. Experiments and modeling show that the stirred tank reactor has a considerable potential for increased production capacity. However, at higher hydrate production rates the

  4. Thermal and chemical modification of titanium-aluminum-vanadium implant materials: effects on surface properties, glycoprotein adsorption, and MG63 cell attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, D E; Rapuano, B E; Deo, N; Stranick, M; Somasundaran, P; Boskey, A L

    2004-07-01

    The microstructure, chemical composition and wettability of thermally and chemically modified Ti-6Al-4V alloy disks were characterized and correlated with the degree of radiolabeled fibronectin-alloy surface adsorption and subsequent adhesion of osteoblast-like cells. Heating either in pure oxygen or atmosphere (atm) resulted in an enrichment of Al and V within the surface oxide. Heating (oxygen/atm) and peroxide treatment both followed by butanol treatment resulted in a reduction in content of V, but not in Al. Heating (oxygen/atm) or peroxide treatment resulted in a thicker oxide layer and a more hydrophilic surface when compared with passivated controls. Post-treatment with butanol, however, resulted in less hydrophilic surfaces than heating or peroxide treatment alone. The greatest increases in the adsorption of radiolabeled fibronectin following treatment were observed with peroxide/butanol-treated samples followed by peroxide/butanol and heat/butanol, although binding was only increased by 20-40% compared to untreated controls. These experiments with radiolabeled fibronectin indicate that enhanced adsorption of the glycoprotein was more highly correlated with changes in chemical composition, reflected in a reduction in V content and decrease in the V/Al ratio, than with changes in wettability. Despite promoting only a modest elevation in fibronectin adsorption, the treatment of disks with heat or heat/butanol induced a several-fold increase in the attachment of MG63 cells promoted by a nonadhesive concentration of fibronectin that was used to coat the pretreated disks compared to uncoated disks. Therefore, results obtained with these modifications of surface properties indicate that an increase in the absolute content of Al and/or V (heat), and/or in the Al/V ratio (with little change in hydrophilicity; heat+butanol) is correlated with an increase in the fibronectin-promoted adhesion of an osteoblast-like cell line. It would also appear that the thermal

  5. Vanadium irradiation at ATR - neutronics aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-04-01

    Calculations were performed to estimate damage and transmutation rates in vanadium irradiated in the ATR (Advanced Test Reactor) located in Idaho. The main focuses of the study are to evaluate the transmutation of vanadium to chromium and to explore ways to design the irradiation experiment to avoid excessive transmutation. It was found that the A-hole of ATR produces damage rate of {approximately} 0.2%/dpa of vanadium to chromium. A thermal neutron filter can be incorporated into the design to reduce the vanadium-to-chromium transmutation rate to low levels. A filter 1-2 mm thick of gadolinium or hafnium can be used.

  6. Anaerobic oxidation of methane above gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, NE Pacific Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treude, T.; Boetius, A.; Knittel, K.;

    2003-01-01

    At Hydrate Ridge (HR), Cascadia convergent margin, surface sediments contain massive gas hydrates formed from methane that ascends together with fluids along faults from deeper reservoirs. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), mediated by a microbial consortium of archaea and sulfate-reducing...... bacteria, generates high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide in the surface sediments. The production of sulfide supports chemosynthetic communities that gain energy from sulfide oxidation. Depending on fluid flow, the surface communities are dominated either by the filamentous sulfur bacteria Beggiatoa...

  7. 油酸表面修饰的Ce2O3纳米微粒的制备和钝钒研究%PREPARATION AND VANADIUM PASSIVATION EFFECT OF SURFACE MODIFIED Ce2O3 NANOPARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王国良

    2001-01-01

    以硝酸铈为原料,在水-乙醇混合溶剂中制备出油酸修饰的Ce2O3纳米微粒,并用FT-IR、TEM对其进行了表征。结果表明:油酸修饰Ce2O3纳米微粒在四氢呋喃、石油醚、氯仿、苯和甲苯等有机溶剂中具有良好的分散性,说明油酸修饰的Ce2O3纳米微粒表面存在疏水有机基团,修饰剂油酸与Ce2O3纳米核之间存在着化学键合作用。用Ce2O3纳米微粒浸渍钒中毒催化裂化催化剂进行实验,结果表明,可使其比表面积、孔体积和微反活性得到不同程度的恢复。%Olelic acid surface modified Ce2O3 nanoparticles were prepared in the water-alcohol solvent.Such Ce2O3 nanoparticles were analyzed by means of various characterization approaches,including TEM and FT-IR.It was found that the olelic acid modified Ce2O3 nanoparticles can be well dispersed in such organic solvents as tetrahydrofuran,petroleum ether,trichloromethane,benzene and toluene.The dispersancy test showed that some hydrophobic groups exist at the surface of olelic acid modified Ce2O3 nanoparticles and olelic acid chemically bonds Ce2O3 nanonuclear with each other.By impregnation of Ce2O3 nanoparticles on vanadium contaminated FCC catalyst,the specific surface area,pore volume and microactivity of the catalyst can be restored partially.

  8. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a

  9. Characterization of Vanadium Flow Battery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindner, Henrik W.; Krog Ekman, Claus; Gehrke, Oliver;

    of wind energy in the Danish power system. The battery has been in operation for 18 months. During time of operation the battery has not shown signs of degradation of performance. It has a round-trip efficiency at full load of approximately 60% (depending on temperature and SOC). The sources of the losses......This report summarizes the work done at Risø-DTU testing a vanadium flow battery as part of the project “Characterisation of Vanadium Batteries” (ForskEl project 6555) with the partners PA Energy A/S and OI Electric A/S under the Danish PSO energy research program. A 15kW/120kWh vanadium battery...... has been installed as part of the distributed energy systems experimental facility, SYSLAB, at Risø DTU. A test programme has been carried out to get hands-on experience with the technology, to characterize the battery from a power system point of view and to assess it with respect to integration...

  10. Characterization of Vanadium Flow Battery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindner, Henrik W.; Krog Ekman, Claus; Gehrke, Oliver

    This report summarizes the work done at Risø-DTU testing a vanadium flow battery as part of the project “Characterisation of Vanadium Batteries” (ForskEl project 6555) with the partners PA Energy A/S and OI Electric A/S under the Danish PSO energy research program. A 15kW/120kWh vanadium battery...... has been installed as part of the distributed energy systems experimental facility, SYSLAB, at Risø DTU. A test programme has been carried out to get hands-on experience with the technology, to characterize the battery from a power system point of view and to assess it with respect to integration...... of wind energy in the Danish power system. The battery has been in operation for 18 months. During time of operation the battery has not shown signs of degradation of performance. It has a round-trip efficiency at full load of approximately 60% (depending on temperature and SOC). The sources of the losses...

  11. Incorporation of Vanadium Oxide in Silica Nanofiber Mats via Electrospinning and Sol-Gel Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne E. Panels

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Submicron scale vanadia/silica hybrid nanofiber mats have been produced by electrospinning silica sol-gel precursor containing vanadium oxytriisopropoxide (VOTIP, followed by calcinations at high temperature. The properties of the resulting inorganic hybrid nanofiber mats are compared to those of electrospun pure silica nanofibers. SEM images show fibers are submicron in diameter and their morphology is maintained after calcination. Physisorption experiments reveal that silica nanofiber mats have a high specific surface area of 63 m2/g. FT-IR spectra exhibit Si—O vibrations and indicate the presence of V2O5 in the fibers. XPS studies reveal that the ratio of Si to O is close to 0.5 on the surface of fibers and the amount of vanadium on the surface of fibers increases with calcination. XRD diffraction patterns show that silica nanofibers are amorphous and orthorhombic V2O5 crystals have formed after calcination. EFTEM images demonstrate the growth of crystals on the surface of fibers containing vanadium after calcination. SEM images of fibers with high-vanadium content (50 mol% V: Si show that vanadia crystals are mostly aligned along the fiber axis. XPS shows an increase in vanadium contents at the surface, and XRD patterns exhibit an increase in the degree of crystallinity. A coaxial electrospinning scheme has successfully been employed to selectively place V2O5 in the skin layer.

  12. Preparation and characterization of vanadium(Ⅳ) oxide supported on SBA-15 and its catalytic performance in benzene hydroxylation to phenol using molecular oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing Chen; Wenguang Zhao; Feng Wang; Jie Xu

    2012-01-01

    Preparation of dispersed transition metal oxides catalyst with low oxidation state still remains a challenging task in heterogeneous catalysis.In this study,vanadium oxides supported on zeolite SBA-15 have been prepared under hydrothermal condition using V2O5 and oxalic acid as sources of vanadium and reductant,respectively.The structures of samples,especially the oxidation state of vanadium,and the surface distribution of vanadium oxide species,have been thoroughly characterized using various techniques,including N2-physisorption,X-ray diffraction (XRD),transmission electron microscopy (TEM),X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),UV-visible spectra (UV-Vis) and UV-visible-near infrared spectra (UV-Vis-NIR).It is found that the majority of supported vanadium was in the form of vanadium(Ⅳ) oxide species with the low valence of vanadium.By adjusting hydrothermal treatment time,the surface distribution of vanadium(Ⅳ) oxide species can be tuned from vanadium(Ⅳ) oxide cluster to crystallites.These materials have been tested in the hydroxylation of benzene to phenol in liquid-phase with molecular oxygen in the absence of reductant.The catalyst exhibits high selectivity for phenol (61%) at benzene conversion of 4.6%,which is a relatively good result in comparison with other studies employing molecular oxygen as the oxidant.

  13. Proton percolation on hydrated lysozyme powders

    OpenAIRE

    Careri, G; Giansanti, A; Rupley, John A.

    1986-01-01

    The framework of percolation theory is used to analyze the hydration dependence of the capacitance measured for protein samples of pH 3-10, at frequencies from 10 kHz to 4 MHz. For all samples there is a critical value of the hydration at which the capacitance sharply increases with increase in hydration level. The threshold hc = 0.15 g of water per g of protein is independent of pH below pH 9 and shows no solvent deuterium isotope effect. The fractional coverage of the surface at hc is in cl...

  14. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the

  15. Phonon triggered rhombohedral lattice distortion in vanadium at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonangeli, Daniele; Farber, Daniel L.; Bosak, Alexei; Aracne, Chantel M.; Ruddle, David G.; Krisch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the simple body-centered-cubic crystal structure, the elements of group V, vanadium, niobium and tantalum, show strong interactions between the electronic properties and lattice dynamics. Further, these interactions can be tuned by external parameters, such as pressure and temperature. We used inelastic x-ray scattering to probe the phonon dispersion of single-crystalline vanadium as a function of pressure to 45 GPa. Our measurements show an anomalous high-pressure behavior of the transverse acoustic mode along the (100) direction and a softening of the elastic modulus C44 that triggers a rhombohedral lattice distortion occurring between 34 and 39 GPa. Our results provide the missing experimental confirmation of the theoretically predicted shear instability arising from the progressive intra-band nesting of the Fermi surface with increasing pressure, a scenario common to all transition metals of group V. PMID:27539662

  16. High power density self-cooled lithium-vanadium blanket.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohar, Y.; Majumdar, S.; Smith, D.

    1999-07-01

    A self-cooled lithium-vanadium blanket concept capable of operating with 2 MW/m{sup 2} surface heat flux and 10 MW/m{sup 2} neutron wall loading has been developed. The blanket has liquid lithium as the tritium breeder and the coolant to alleviate issues of coolant breeder compatibility and reactivity. Vanadium alloy (V-4Cr-4Ti) is used as the structural material because it can accommodate high heat loads. Also, it has good mechanical properties at high temperatures, high neutron fluence capability, low degradation under neutron irradiation, good compatibility with the blanket materials, low decay heat, low waste disposal rating, and adequate strength to accommodate the electromagnetic loads during plasma disruption events. Self-healing electrical insulator (CaO) is utilized to reduce the MHD pressure drop. A poloidal coolant flow with high velocity at the first wall is used to reduce the peak temperature of the vanadium structure and to accommodate high surface heat flux. The blanket has a simple blanket configuration and low coolant pressure to reduce the fabrication cost, to improve the blanket reliability, and to increase confidence in the blanket performance. Spectral shifter, moderator, and reflector are utilized to improve the blanket shielding capability and energy multiplication, and to reduce the radial blanket thickness. Natural lithium is used to avoid extra cost related to the lithium enrichment process.

  17. High power density self-cooled lithium-vanadium blanket.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohar, Y.; Majumdar, S.; Smith, D.

    1999-07-01

    A self-cooled lithium-vanadium blanket concept capable of operating with 2 MW/m{sup 2} surface heat flux and 10 MW/m{sup 2} neutron wall loading has been developed. The blanket has liquid lithium as the tritium breeder and the coolant to alleviate issues of coolant breeder compatibility and reactivity. Vanadium alloy (V-4Cr-4Ti) is used as the structural material because it can accommodate high heat loads. Also, it has good mechanical properties at high temperatures, high neutron fluence capability, low degradation under neutron irradiation, good compatibility with the blanket materials, low decay heat, low waste disposal rating, and adequate strength to accommodate the electromagnetic loads during plasma disruption events. Self-healing electrical insulator (CaO) is utilized to reduce the MHD pressure drop. A poloidal coolant flow with high velocity at the first wall is used to reduce the peak temperature of the vanadium structure and to accommodate high surface heat flux. The blanket has a simple blanket configuration and low coolant pressure to reduce the fabrication cost, to improve the blanket reliability, and to increase confidence in the blanket performance. Spectral shifter, moderator, and reflector are utilized to improve the blanket shielding capability and energy multiplication, and to reduce the radial blanket thickness. Natural lithium is used to avoid extra cost related to the lithium enrichment process.

  18. Perspectives for vanadium in health issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Vanadium is omnipresent in trace amounts in the environment, in food and also in the human body, where it might serve as a regulator for phosphate-dependent proteins. Potential vanadium-based formulations--inorganic and coordination compounds with organic ligands--commonly underlie speciation in the body, that is, they are converted to vanadate(V), oxidovanadium(IV) and to complexes with the body's own ligand systems. Vanadium compounds have been shown to be potentially effective against diabetes Type 2, malign tumors including cancer, endemic tropical diseases (such as trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis and amoebiasis), bacterial infections (tuberculosis and pneumonia) and HIV infections. Furthermore, vanadium drugs can be operative in cardio- and neuro-protection. So far, vanadium compounds have not yet been approved as pharmaceuticals for clinical use.

  19. Towards a green hydrate inhibitor: imaging antifreeze proteins on clathrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimond Gordienko

    Full Text Available The formation of hydrate plugs in oil and gas pipelines is a serious industrial problem and recently there has been an increased interest in the use of alternative hydrate inhibitors as substitutes for thermodynamic inhibitors like methanol. We show here that antifreeze proteins (AFPs possess the ability to modify structure II (sII tetrahydrofuran (THF hydrate crystal morphologies by adhering to the hydrate surface and inhibiting growth in a similar fashion to the kinetic inhibitor poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP. The effects of AFPs on the formation and growth rate of high-pressure sII gas mix hydrate demonstrated that AFPs are superior hydrate inhibitors compared to PVP. These results indicate that AFPs may be suitable for the study of new inhibitor systems and represent an important step towards the development of biologically-based hydrate inhibitors.

  20. Chemistry and biochemistry of vanadium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisch, H U; Bielig, H J

    1980-01-01

    The transition metal vanadium is considered to be essential for plants and animals. In order to understand its physiological function, some important chemical properties of V are reviewed, e.g. its redox activity and the tendency of V3+, VO2+, and VO3- ions to form chelates with numerous ligands. A survey of the occurrence and distribution of kV in geochemistry and in living organisms is followed by a consideration of the V influence on several metabolic events such as microbial nitrogen metabolism, chlorophyll biosynthesis, and activation or inhibition of regulatory enzymes.

  1. Removal of vanadium(III and molybdenum(V from wastewater using Posidonia oceanica (Tracheophyta biomass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Pennesi

    Full Text Available The use of dried and re-hydrated biomass of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica was investigated as an alternative and -low-cost biomaterial for removal of vanadium(III and molybdenum(V from wastewaters. Initial characterisation of this biomaterial identified carboxylic groups on the cuticle as potentially responsible for cation sorption, and confirmed the toxic-metal bioaccumulation. The combined effects on biosorption performance of equilibrium pH and metal concentrations were investigated in an ideal single-metal system and in more real-life multicomponent systems. There were either with one metal (vanadium or molybdenum and sodium nitrate, as representative of high ionic strength systems, or with the two metals (vanadium and molybdenum. For the single-metal solutions, the optimum was at pH 3, where a significant proportion of vanadium was removed (ca. 70% while there was ca. 40% adsorption of molybdenum. The data obtained from the more real-life multicomponent systems showed that biosorption of one metal was improved both by the presence of the other metal and by high ionic strength, suggesting a synergistic effect on biosorption rather than competition. There data ware used for the development of a simple multi-metal equilibrium model based on the non-competitive Langmuir approach, which was successfully fitted to experimental data and represents a useful support tool for the prediction of biosorption performance in such real-life systems. Overall, the results suggest that biomass of P. oceanica can be used as an efficient biosorbent for removal of vanadium(III and molybdenum(V from aqueous solutions. This process thus offers an eco-compatible solution for the reuse of the waste material of leaves that accumulate on the beach due to both human activities and to storms at sea.

  2. Adsorption of Vanadium (V) from SCR Catalyst Leaching Solution and Application in Methyl Orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Xuelong; Ma, Wei; Meng, Fanqing; Wang, Ren; Fuping, Tian; Wei, Linsen

    2016-12-01

      In this study, we explored an effective and low-cost catalyst and its adsorption capacity and catalytic capacity for Methyl Orange Fenton oxidation degradation were investigated. The catalyst was directly prepared by reuse of magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) after saturated adsorption of vanadium (V) from waste SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) catalyst. The obtained catalyst was characterized by FTIR, XPS and the results showed that vanadium (V) adsorption process of Fe3O4 nanoparticles was non-redox reaction. The effects of pH, adsorption kinetics and equilibrium isotherms of adsorption were assessed. Adsorption of vanadium (V) ions by Fe3O4 nanoparticles could be well described by the Sips isotherm model which controlled by the mixed surface reaction and diffusion (MSRDC) adsorption kinetic model. The results show that vanadium (V) was mainly adsorbed on external surface of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The separation-recovering tungsten (VI) and vanadium (V) from waste SCR catalyst alkaline solution through pH adjustment was also investigated in this study. The results obtained from the experiments indicated that tungsten (VI) was selectively adsorbed from vanadium (V)/tungsten (VI) mixed solution in certain acidic condition by Fe3O4 nanoparticle to realize their recovery. Tungsten (V) with some impurity can be obtained by releasing from adsorbent, which can be confirmed by ICP-AES. The Methyl Orange degradation catalytic performance illustrated that the catalyst could improve Fenton reaction effectively at pH = 3.0 compare to Fe3O4 nanoparticles alone. Therefore, Fe3O4 nanoparticle adsorbed vanadium (V) has a potential to be employed as a heterogeneous Fenton-like catalyst in the present contribution, and its catalytic activity was mainly evaluated in terms of the decoloration efficiency of Methyl Orange.

  3. Absorption of hydrogen in vanadium, enhanced by ion bombardment; Ionenbeschussunterstuetzte Absorption des Wasserstoffs in Vanadium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulus, H.; Lammers, M. [Inst. fuer Technologie- und Wissenstransfer, Soest (Germany); Mueller, K.H. [Inst. fuer Technologie- und Wissenstransfer, Soest (Germany)]|[Paderborn Univ. (Gesamthochschule), Soest (Germany). Fachbereich 16 - Elektrische Energietechnik; Kiss, G.; Kemeny, Z. [Technical Univ. Budapest (Hungary)

    1998-12-31

    Prior to hydrogen implantation into vanadium, the vanadium specimen usually is exposed to an activation process and is then heated at 1 atm hydrogen to temperatures between 500 and 600 C, subsequently cooled down in several steps. Within this temperature range, hydrogen solubility increases with declining temperature. A decisive factor determining hydrogen absorption is the fact that at temperatures above 250 C, oxygen desorbs from the material surface and thus no longer inhibits hydrogen absorption. Therefore a different approach was chosen for the experiments reported: Hydrogen absorption under UHV conditions at room temperature. After the usual activation process, the vanadium surface was cleaned by 5 keV Ar{sup +} ion bombardment. Thus oxygen absorption at the specimen surface (and new reactions with oxygen from the remaining gas) could be avoided, or removed. By means of thermal desorption mass spectrometry (TDMS), hydrogen absorption as a function of argon ion dose was analysed. TDMS measurements performed for specimens treated by ion bombardment prior to H{sup 2} exposure showed two H{sup 2} desorption peaks, in contrast to the profiles measured with specimens not exposed to ion bombardment. It is assumed that the ion bombardment disturbs the crystal structure so that further sites for hydrogen absorption are produced. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Bei der Beladung von Vandium mit Wasserstoff wird ueblicherweise die Probe nach einer Aktivierungsprozedur bei 1 atm Wasserstoff auf Temperaturen im Bereich von 500 bis 600 C hochgeheizt und danach schrittweise abgekuehlt. In diesem Temperaturbereich nimmt die Wasserstoffloeslichkeit mit abnehmender Temperatur zu. Entscheidend fuer die Beladung ist aber auch die Tatsache, dass bei Temperaturen groesser 250 C Sauerstoff von der Oberflaeche desorbiert und dadurch die Absorption von Wasserstoff nicht mehr blockieren kann. Im Rahmen der hier beschriebenen Untersuchungen sollte die Wasserstoffbeladung unter UHV-Bedingungen bei

  4. Kinetics of hydrate formation using gas bubble suspended in water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马昌峰; 陈光进; 郭天民

    2002-01-01

    An innovative experimental technique, which was devised to study the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate of hydrate formation at the surface of a gas bubble suspended in a stagnant water phase, was adapted in this work. Under such conditions, the hydrate-growth process is free from dynamic mass transfer factors. The rate of hydrate formation of methane and carbon dioxide has been systematically studied. The measured hydrate-growth data were correlated by using the molar Gibbs free energy as driving force. In the course of the experiments, some interesting surface phenomena were observed.

  5. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release as much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  6. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  7. Formulating formation mechanism of natural gas hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palodkar, Avinash V; Jana, Amiya K

    2017-07-25

    A large amount of energy, perhaps twice the total amount of all other hydrocarbon reserves combined, is trapped within gas hydrate deposits. Despite emerging as a potential energy source for the world over the next several hundred years and one of the key factors in causing future climate change, gas hydrate is poorly known in terms of its formation mechanism. To address this issue, a mathematical formulation is proposed in the form of a model to represent the physical insight into the process of hydrate growth that occurs on the surface and in the irregular nanometer-sized pores of the distributed porous particles. To evaluate the versatility of this rigorous model, the experimental data is used for methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) hydrates grown in different porous media with a wide range of considerations.

  8. Vanadium Electrolyte Studies for the Vanadium Redox Battery-A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria; Cao, Liuyue; Kazacos, Michael; Kausar, Nadeem; Mousa, Asem

    2016-07-01

    The electrolyte is one of the most important components of the vanadium redox flow battery and its properties will affect cell performance and behavior in addition to the overall battery cost. Vanadium exists in several oxidation states with significantly different half-cell potentials that can produce practical cell voltages. It is thus possible to use the same element in both half-cells and thereby eliminate problems of cross-contamination inherent in all other flow battery chemistries. Electrolyte properties vary with supporting electrolyte composition, state-of-charge, and temperature and this will impact on the characteristics, behavior, and performance of the vanadium battery in practical applications. This Review provides a broad overview of the physical properties and characteristics of the vanadium battery electrolyte under different conditions, together with a description of some of the processing methods that have been developed to produce vanadium electrolytes for vanadium redox flow battery applications.

  9. Hydration Assessment of Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS · Although there is no scientific consensus for 1 ) howbest to assess the hydration status of athletes, 2)what criteria to use as acceptable outcome measurements, or 3) the best time to apply practical assessment methods, there are methods that can be used toprovide athletes with useful feedback about their hydration status

  10. Comparative analysis of growth characteristics of hydrate formation on the surface of suspended water droplet and bubble%悬垂水滴与悬浮气泡表面气体水合物形成特性对比

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆引哲; 刘道平; 杨亮

    2015-01-01

    Based on a set of high-pressure visual experiment device used for the natural gas hydrates crystallization and growth on the surface of suspended water droplet and suspended bubble,the influence of factors such as pressure,temperature,water quality on the crystallization and growth are analyzed and discussed respectively.Comparative analysis of the experimental phenomena about the characteristics of hydrate formation on the surface of suspended water droplet and bubble was discussed.Temperature and pressure are the important factors of hydrate crystallization and growth.The decrease of temperature or the increase of pressure will also improve the growth of hydrate.This paper also provides experimental support for the development of spray and bubbling method to improve the hydrate formation.%基于悬垂水滴和悬浮气泡表面形成气体水合物的可视化耐高压实验装置,分析探讨了反应压力、温度、水质等因素对水滴和气泡表面气体水合物成核和生长规律的影响。对已有的关于研究单个静止悬垂水滴和悬浮气泡表面气体水合物生长特性的实验现象及结果进行了对比分析,得出结论:温度和压力是影响表面水合物结晶与生长的重要因素;温度的降低或压力的升高均使水合反应速度加快。研究为发展喷雾法和鼓泡法这两种强化制备水合物的方式提供了有效的实验支撑。

  11. Photochemical transformation of vanadium(5) acetylacetonate complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchmij, S.Ya.; Turchaninov, A.M.; Kryukov, A.I. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Fizicheskoj Khimii)

    1980-08-01

    Photochemical transformations of mixed vanadium (5) complex formed as a result of interaction between ethylorthovanadate and acetylacetone which includes in the first coordination sphere vanadyl oxygen, two enolate-ions and enthoxygroup are studied spectrophotometrically and using ESR method. During irradiation of ethanol solutions of the complex a successive reduction of central atom with formation of acetyl-acetonate complexes of vanadium (4) and (3) takes place. At that the solvent is oxidated. In CCl/sub 4/ solution under the effect of UV irradiation ethoxygroup is replaced by chlorine ion with the formation of new mixed vanadium (5) complex, sensible to visible and UV radiation.

  12. Obsidian hydration profiles measured by sputter-induced optical emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsong, I S; Houser, C A; Yusef, N A; Messier, R F; White, W B; Michels, J W

    1978-07-28

    The variation of concentrations of hydrogen, sodium, potassium, lithium, calcium, magnesium, silicon, and aluminum as a function of depth in the hydration layer of obsidian artifacts has been determined by sputter-induced optical emission. The surface hydration is accompanied by dealkalization, and there is a buildup of alkaline earths, calcium and magnesium in the outermost layers. These results have clarified the phenomena underlying the obsidian hydration dating technique.

  13. Characteristics researches of natural gas hydrate growth on the suspended bubble surface%悬浮气泡表面天然气水合物形成的特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶鹏; 刘道平; 张健

    2013-01-01

    基于悬浮气泡表面生成气体水合物的高压可视化实验装置,分析探讨了系统压力、温度、水质因素对天然气水合物的成核和生长规律的影响。研究结果表明,随着反应温度的降低和反应压力的增大,诱导时间和生长时间呈现出缩减的趋势,气泡表面水合物逐渐由粗糙变得光滑;蒸馏水形成的水合物比较规则、密实,而纯净水形成的水合物略显凌乱、松散;相同实验条件下,蒸馏水生成水合物的诱导时间和生长时间较短。%Based on a set of high-pressure visual experiment device built for the investigation of the natural gas hydrates crystallization and grow th on the suspended gas bubble surface ,the in-fluence factors such as pressure ,temperature ,water quality were analyzed and discussed .The results showed that the higher pressure or the lower temperature resulted in the less induction time and growth time ,which led to surface changing from rough to smooth .The surface of hy-drate film in distilled water is smoother and tidier than that in pure water .Under the same exper-imental conditions ,the hydrate film in distilled water grew faster than that in pure water .

  14. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years.

  15. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Thomas Williams; Bjorn Paulsson; Alexander Goertz

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a drilling hazard by the oil and gas industry for years. Drilling engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous problems, including drilling kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates as a potential energy source agree that the resource potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained from physical samples taken from actual hydrate-bearing rocks. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The project team drilled and continuously cored the Hot Ice No. 1 well on Anadarko-leased acreage beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and used for determining physical characteristics of hydrates and surrounding rock. After the well was logged, a 3D vertical seismic profile (VSP) was recorded to calibrate the shallow geologic section with seismic data and to investigate techniques to better resolve lateral subsurface variations of potential hydrate-bearing strata. Paulsson Geophysical Services, Inc. deployed their 80 level 3C clamped borehole seismic receiver array in the wellbore to record samples every 25 ft. Seismic vibrators were successively positioned at 1185 different surface positions in a circular pattern around the wellbore. This technique generated a 3D image of the subsurface. Correlations were

  16. Vanadium and the cardiovascular functions1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lise Coderre; Ashok K Srivastava

    2004-01-01

      Inorganic and organic compounds of vanadium have been shown to exhibit a large range of insulinomimetic effects in the cardiovascular system, including stimulation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT-4...

  17. Effect of Gemini-type surfactant on methane hydrate formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, K.E.; Park, J.M.; Kim, C.U.; Chae, H.J.; Jeong, S.Y. [Korea Research Inst. of Chemical Technology, Jang-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Natural gas hydrates are formed from water and natural gas molecules at particular temperatures and pressures that become ice-like inclusion compounds. Gas hydrates offer several benefits such as energy resource potential and high storage capacity of natural gas in the form of hydrates. However, the application of natural gas hydrates has been deterred by its low formation rate and low conversion ratio of water into hydrate resulting in low actual storage capacity. This paper presented an experimental study to determine the effect of adding a novel Gemini-type surfactant on methane hydrate formation. The experimental study was described with reference to the properties of prepared diols and properties of prepared disulfonates. Gemini surfactant is the family of surfactant molecules possessing more than one hydrophobic tail and hydrophilic head group. They generally have better surface-active properties than conventional surfactants of equal chain length. The paper presented the results of the study in terms of the reactions of diols with propane sultone; storage capacity of hydrate formed with and without surfactant; and methane hydrate formation with and without disulfonate. It was concluded that the methane hydrate formation was accelerated by the addition of novel anionic Gemini-type surfactants and that hydrate formation was influenced by the surfactant concentration and alkyl chain length. For a given concentration, the surfactant with the highest chain length demonstrated the highest formation rate and storage capacity. 5 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  18. Thermodynamic and experimental study of corrosion behavior of vanadium-based alloy in liquid sodium-potassium coolant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasin, V. P.; Lyublinski, I. E.; Soyustova, S. I.

    2016-11-01

    A preliminary assessment of oxygen effect on vanadium solubility in Na-K melt eutectic composition has been carried out using mathematical framework of the subregular solution model and equations of coordination-cluster model. The effect of oxygen on the solubility of vanadium in the Na-K alloy can be considered as the result of short-range ordering in liquid metal solution. The negative deviations from the ideality for dilute oxygen solutions in Na-K solvent is one reason that explains the quantitative differences between Na and Na-K coolants, when we need to estimate the threshold oxygen concentration for the formation of ternary oxide NaVO2 on the surface of the solid vanadium in liquid sodium and in Na-K alloy. Isothermal capsule experiments qualitatively confirmed the results of calculations of vanadium solubility in Na0.32K0.68 alloy.

  19. Influence of vanadium oxidation states on the performance of V-Mg-Al mixed-oxide catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schacht, L. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Av. IPN s/n, Edificio 9, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Navarrete, J.; Schacht, P.; Ramirez, M. A., E-mail: pschacha@imp.m [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, 07730 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    V-Mg-Al mixed-oxide catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation of propane were prepared by thermal decomposition of Mg-Al-layered double hydroxides with vanadium interlayer doping. The obtained catalysts were tested for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane, obtaining good results in catalytic activity (conversion 16.55 % and selectivity 99.97 %) Results indicated that catalytic performance of these materials depends on how vanadium is integrated in the layered structure, which is determined by the Mg/Al ratio. Vanadium interlayer doping modifies the oxidation state of vanadium and consequently catalytic properties. Surface properties were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic and diffuse reflectance, UV-visible spectroscopy, and temperature programmed reduction. The analyses provided information about the oxidation state, before and after the reaction. From these results, it is suggested that selectivity to propylene and catalytic activity depend mainly of vanadium oxidation state. (Author)

  20. Pore capillary pressure and saturation of methane hydrate bearing sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Shicai; LIU Changling; YE Yuguang; LIU Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the relationship between the pore capillary pressure and hydrate saturation in sedi-ments, a new method was proposed. First, the phase equilibria of methane hydrate in fine-grained silica sands were measured. As to the equilibrium data, the pore capillary pressure and saturation of methane hydrate were calculated. The results showed that the phase equilibria of methane hydrates in fine-grained silica sands changed due to the depressed activity of pore water caused by the surface group and negatively charged characteristic of silica particles as well as the capillary pressure in small pores together. The capil-lary pressure increased with the increase of methane hydrate saturation due to the decrease of the available pore space. However, the capillary-saturation relationship could not yet be described quantitatively because of the stochastic habit of hydrate growth.

  1. Vanadium recovery from clay vanadium mineral using an acid leaching method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Haoran; FENG Yali; LIANG Jianglong; LUO Xiaobing; DU Zhuwei

    2008-01-01

    A technique including direct acid leaching,vanadium precipitation with alkaline,sodium hydroxide releaching,impurity removing by adjusting pH value,precipitation vanadium with ammonium chloride,and vanadium pentoxide by roasting steps was proposed according to the characteristic of Xichuan clay vanadium mineral.The factors influencing leaching vanadium such as temperature and the concentration of sulfuric acid were investigated and optimized.The experimental results indicate that the extract ratios of V2O5 can reach 94% and 92% at a sodium chlorate ratio of 3% and a manganese dioxide ratio of 3%,respectively.A completely chemical precipitation method was adopted to decontaminate and enrich the vanadium in the acid leaching solution.The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern and the purity analysis of vanadium pentoxide indicate that the purity of final vanadium pentoxide can reach 99% and meet the standard specifications.The total recovery can reach about 75%.The technique has the characteristics of simplicity,less investlnent,and more environment safety as compared with the traditional salt roasting method.

  2. Investigation of the electrospun carbon web as the catalyst layer for vanadium redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guanjie; Fan, Xinzhuang; Liu, Jianguo; Yan, Chuanwei

    2014-12-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) carbon nonwoven web consisting of 100-200 nm ultrafine fibers has been developed by electrospinning and subsequent carbonization process at 1000 °C for different times. The surface morphology, composition, structure, and electrical conductivity of the electrospun carbon webs (ECWs) as well as their electrochemical properties toward vanadium redox couples have been characterized. With the increasing of carbonization time, the electrochemical reversibility of the vanadium redox couples on the ECW is enhanced greatly. As the carbonization time increases up to 120 min, the hydrogen evolution is facilitated while the reversibility is promoted a little bit further. The excellent performance of ECW may be attributed to the conversion of fibers carbon structure and improvement of electrical conductivity. Due to the good electrochemical activity and freestanding 3-dimensional structure, the ECW carbonized for 90 min is used as catalyst layer in vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) and enhances the cell performance.

  3. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  4. Wet hydrate dissolution plant

    OpenAIRE

    Stanković Mirjana S.; Kovačević Branimir T.; Pezo Lato L.

    2003-01-01

    The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant with capacity of 50,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE), Italy, in 1997, for increasing detergent zeolite production from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate ...

  5. Structure, hydrolysis and diffusion of aqueous vanadium ions from Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Zhen; Alexandrov, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    A molecular level understanding of the properties of electroactive vanadium species in aqueous solution is crucial for enhancing the performance of vanadium redox flow batteries (RFB). Here, we employ Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations based on density functional theory to investigate the hydration structures, first hydrolysis reaction and diffusion of aqueous V$^{2+}$, V$^{3+}$, VO$^{2+}$, and VO$_2^+$ ions at 300 K. The results indicate that the first hydration shell of both V$^{2+}$ and V$^{3+}$ contains six water molecules, while VO$^{2+}$ is coordinated to five and VO$_2^+$ to three water ligands. The first acidity constants (p$K_\\mathrm{a}$) estimated using metadynamics simulations are 2.47, 3.06 and 5.38 for aqueous V$^{3+}$, VO$_2^+$ and VO$^{2+}$, respectively, while V$^{2+}$ is predicted to be a fairly weak acid in aqueous solution with a p$K_\\mathrm{a}$ value of 6.22. We also show that the presence of chloride ions in the first coordination sphere of the aqueous VO$_2^+$ ion has a...

  6. Structure, hydrolysis, and diffusion of aqueous vanadium ions from Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhen; Klyukin, Konstantin; Alexandrov, Vitaly

    2016-09-01

    A molecular level understanding of the properties of electroactive vanadium species in aqueous solution is crucial for enhancing the performance of vanadium redox flow batteries. Here, we employ Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations based on density functional theory to investigate the hydration structures, first hydrolysis reaction, and diffusion of aqueous V2+, V3+, VO2+, and VO 2+ ions at 300 K. The results indicate that the first hydration shell of both V2+ and V3+ contains six water molecules, while VO2+ is coordinated to five and VO 2+ to three water ligands. The first acidity constants (pKa) estimated using metadynamics simulations are 2.47, 3.06, and 5.38 for aqueous V3+, VO 2+ , and VO2+, respectively, while V2+ is predicted to be a fairly weak acid in aqueous solution with a pKa value of 6.22. We also show that the presence of chloride ions in the first coordination sphere of the aqueous VO 2+ ion has a significant impact on water hydrolysis leading to a much higher pKa value of 4.8. This should result in a lower propensity of aqueous VO 2+ for oxide precipitation reaction in agreement with experimental observations for chloride-based electrolyte solutions. The computed diffusion coefficients of vanadium species in water at room temperature are found to increase as V 3 + < VO 2 + < V O 2 + < V 2 + and thus correlate with the simulated hydrolysis constants, namely, the higher the pKa value, the greater the diffusion coefficient.

  7. Iron diminishes the in vitro biological effect of vanadium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanistic pathways underlying inflammatory injury following exposures to vanadium-containing compounds are not defined. We tested the postulate that the in vitro biological effect of vanadium results from its impact on iron homeostasis. Human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells ex...

  8. Study of propane partial oxidation on vanadium-containing catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komashko, G.A.; Khalamejda, S.V.; Zazhigalov, V.A. [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev (Ukraine). Inst. Fizicheskoj Khimii

    1998-12-31

    The present results indicate that maximum selectivity to acrylic acid can be reached over V-P-Zr-O catalysts. When the hydrocarbon concentration is 5.1 vol.% the selectivity is about 30% at quite high paraffin conversion. Conclusively, some explanations to the observed facts can be given. The V-P-O catalyst promotion with lanthanum by means of mechanochemical treatment is distinguished by the additive uniform spreading all over the matrix surface. Such twophase system is highly active in propane conversion (lanthanum oxide) and further oxidation of the desired products. The similar properties are attributed to V-P-Bi-La-O catalyst. Bismuth, tellurium and zirconium additives having clearly defined acidic properties provoke the surface acidity strengthening and make easier desorption of the acidic product (acrylic acid) from the surface lowering its further oxidation. Additionally, since bismuth and zirconium are able to form phosphates and, according to, to create space limitations for the paraffin molecule movement out of the active group boundaries, this can be one more support in favour of the selectivity increase. With this point of view very interesting results were obtained. It has been shown that the more limited the size of the vanadium unit, the higher the selectivity is. Monoclinic phase AV{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 10} which consists in clusters of four vanadium atoms is sensibly more reactive than the orthorhombic phase consists in V{sub {infinity}} infinite chains. (orig.)

  9. Hydration behaviour of polyhydroxylated fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Zavala, J G [Departamento de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnologicas, Centro Universitario de Los Lagos, Universidad de Guadalajara, Enrique Diaz de Leon S/N, 47460 Jalisco (Mexico); Barajas-Barraza, R E [Departamento de Matematicas y Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Occidente, Periferico Sur, Manuel Gomez MorIn No 8585, 45604 Jalisco (Mexico); Padilla-Osuna, I; Guirado-Lopez, R A, E-mail: jgrz@culagos.udg.mx, E-mail: ebarajas@iteso.mx, E-mail: ismael@ifisica.uaslp.mx, E-mail: guirado@ifisica.uaslp.mx [Instituto de Fisica ' Manuel Sandoval Vallarta' , Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, 78000 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2011-10-28

    We have performed semi-empirical as well as density functional theory calculations in order to analyse the hydration properties of both bare C{sub 60} and highly hydroxylated C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} fullerenes. In all of our calculations, a total of 42 and 98 water molecules are always surrounding our here-considered carbon nanostructures. We found different wetting properties as a function of the chemical composition and structure of the OH-molecular over-layer covering the fullerene surface. In the case of bare C{sub 60}, water adsorption reveals that the H{sub 2}O species are not uniformly arranged around the carbon network but rather forms water droplets of different sizes, clearly revealing the hydrophobic nature of the C{sub 60} structure. In contrast, in the polyhydroxylated C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} fullerenes, the degree of wetting is strongly influenced by the precise location of the hydroxyl groups. We found that different adsorbed configurations for the OH-molecular coating can lead to the formation of partially hydrated or completely covered C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} compounds, a result that could be used to synthesize fullerene materials with different degrees of wettability. By comparing the relative stability of our hydroxylated structures in both bare and hydrated conditions we obtain that the energy ordering of the C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} isomers can change in the presence of water. The radial distribution function of our hydrated fullerenes reveals that water near these kinds of surfaces is densely packed. In fact, by counting the number of H{sub 2}O molecules which are adsorbed, by means of hydrogen bonds, to the surface of our more stable C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} isomer, we found that it varies in the range of 5-10, in good agreement with experiments. Finally, by comparing the calculated optical absorption spectra of various C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} structures in the presence and absence of water molecules, we note that only slight variations in the position and

  10. Investigation of local environments in Nafion-SiO(2) composite membranes used in vanadium redox flow batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, M; Schwenzer, Birgit; Kim, Soowhan; Yang, Zhenguo; Thevuthasan, S; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L; Hu, Jianzhi

    2012-04-01

    Proton conducting polymer composite membranes are of technological interest in many energy devices such as fuel cells and redox flow batteries. In particular, polymer composite membranes, such as SiO(2) incorporated Nafion membranes, are recently reported as highly promising for the use in redox flow batteries. However, there is conflicting reports regarding the performance of this type of Nafion-SiO(2) composite membrane in the redox flow cell. This paper presents results of the analysis of the Nafion-SiO(2) composite membrane used in a vanadium redox flow battery by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The XPS study reveals the chemical identity and environment of vanadium cations accumulated at the surface. On the other hand, the (19)F and (29)Si NMR measurement explores the nature of the interaction between the silica particles, Nafion side chains and diffused vanadium cations. The (29)Si NMR shows that the silica particles interact via hydrogen bonds with the sulfonic groups of Nafion and the diffused vanadium cations. Based on these spectroscopic studies, the chemical environment of the silica particles inside the Nafion membrane and their interaction with diffusing vanadium cations during flow cell operations are discussed. This study discusses the origin of performance degradation of the Nafion-SiO(2) composite membrane materials in vanadium redox flow batteries.

  11. Memory Deficit Recovery after Chronic Vanadium Exposure in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwabusayo Folarin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vanadium is a transitional metal with an ability to generate reactive oxygen species in the biological system. This work was designed to assess memory deficits in mice chronically exposed to vanadium. A total of 132 male BALB/c mice (4 weeks old were used for the experiment and were divided into three major groups of vanadium treated, matched controls, and animals exposed to vanadium for three months and thereafter vanadium was withdrawn. Animals were tested using Morris water maze and forelimb grip test at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of age. The results showed that animals across the groups showed no difference in learning but had significant loss in memory abilities after 3 months of vanadium exposure and this trend continued in all vanadium-exposed groups relative to the controls. Animals exposed to vanadium for three months recovered significantly only 9 months after vanadium withdrawal. There was no significant difference in latency to fall in the forelimb grip test between vanadium-exposed groups and the controls in all age groups. In conclusion, we have shown that chronic administration of vanadium in mice leads to memory deficit which is reversible but only after a long period of vanadium withdrawal.

  12. Mechanical properties of sand, silt, and clay containing tetrahydrofuran hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, T.S.; Santamarina, C.J.; Ruppel, C.

    2007-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to large strains has relevance for the stability of the seafloor and submarine slopes, drilling and coring operations, and the analysis of certain small-strain properties of these sediments (for example, seismic velocities). This study reports on the results of comprehensive axial compression triaxial tests conducted at up to 1 MPa confining pressure on sand, crushed silt, precipitated silt, and clay specimens with closely controlled concentrations of synthetic hydrate. The results show that the stress-strain behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments is a complex function of particle size, confining pressure, and hydrate concentration. The mechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments at low hydrate concentration (probably 50% of pore space), the behavior becomes more independent of stress because the hydrates control both stiffness and strength and possibly the dilative tendency of sediments by effectively increasing interparticle coordination, cementing particles together, and filling the pore space. The cementation contribution to the shear strength of hydrate-bearing sediments decreases with increasing specific surface of soil minerals. The lower the effective confining stress, the greater the impact of hydrate formation on normalized strength.

  13. Nature of active vanadium nanospecies in MCM-41 type catalysts for olefins oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanquía, Corina M., E-mail: cchanquia@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Atómico Bariloche, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (CAB-CNEA). Av. Bustillo 9500, R8402AGP, San Carlos de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET). Avenida Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cánepa, Analía L. [Centro de Investigación y Tecnología Química (CITeQ), Universidad Tecnológica Nacional, Facultad Regional Córdoba (UTN-FRC), Maestro López esq. Cruz Roja Argentina, Ciudad Universitaria, 5016, Córdoba Capital (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET). Avenida Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Winkler, Elin L. [Centro Atómico Bariloche, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (CAB-CNEA). Av. Bustillo 9500, R8402AGP, San Carlos de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET). Avenida Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2016-06-01

    A multi-technique physicochemical investigation including UV–Vis-DRS, Raman spectroscopy, XPS, ESR and FTIRS with pyridine adsorption was performed to analyze the nature of different vanadium nanospecies present on MCM-41 type catalysts. By employing a direct hydrothermal synthesis, vanadium species were incorporated into siliceous structure mainly as tetrahedrally coordinated isolated V{sup δ+} ions, which would be located inside the wall and on the wall surface of the mesoporous channels. The coexistence of both vanadium oxidation states V{sup 4+} and V{sup 5+} was also revealed. Acidity measurements permitted to infer about the majority presence of Lewis acid sites, which increase with vanadium content. The catalytic performance of these materials was evaluated in the reaction of α-pinene oxidation with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The highest intrinsic activity of the sample with lower V loading was attributed to the high dispersion and efficiency of the isolated V{sup δ+} species that actuate as active sites. A mixture of reaction products arising from competitive processes of epoxidation and allylic oxidation was found. - Highlights: • Nature of vanadium nanospecies in mesoporous silicates was investigated. • From hydrothermal sol–gel synthesis, isolated V{sup δ+} sites were mainly generated. • The coexistence of both vanadium oxidation states V{sup 4+} and V{sup 5+} was revealed. • The catalytic performance was evaluated in α-pinene oxidation with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • The high catalytic activity is attributed to high dispersion of isolated V{sup δ+} ions.

  14. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  15. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom

  16. Characterization of un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate™ and MTA Angelus™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J; Sorrentino, F; Damidot, D

    2015-04-01

    BioAggregate™ is a novel material introduced for use as a root-end filling material. It is tricalcium silicate-based, free of aluminium and uses tantalum oxide as radiopacifier. BioAggregate contains additives to enhance the material performance. The purpose of this research was to characterize the un-hydrated and hydrated forms of BioAggregate using a combination of techniques, verify whether the additives if present affect the properties of the set material and compare these properties to those of MTA Angelus™. Un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate and MTA Angelus were assessed. Un-hydrated cement was tested for chemical composition, specific surface area, mineralogy and kinetics of hydration. The set material was investigated for mineralogy, microstructure and bioactivity. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopic analysis, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and isothermal calorimetry were employed. The specific surface area was investigated using a gas adsorption method with nitrogen as the probe. BioAggregate was composed of tricalcium silicate, tantalum oxide, calcium phosphate and silicon dioxide and was free of aluminium. On hydration, the tricalcium silicate produced calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide. The former was deposited around the cement grains, while the latter reacted with the silicon dioxide to form additional calcium silicate hydrate. This resulted in reduction of calcium hydroxide in the aged cement. MTA Angelus reacted in a similar fashion; however, since it contained no additives, the calcium hydroxide was still present in the aged cement. Bioactivity was demonstrated by deposition of hydroxyapatite. BioAggregate exhibited a high specific surface area. Nevertheless, the reactivity determined by isothermal calorimetry appeared to be slow compared to MTA Angelus. The tantalum oxide as opposed to bismuth oxide was inert, and tantalum was not leached in solution. BioAggregate exhibited

  17. Vanadium bioavailability in soils amended with blast furnace slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Maja A., E-mail: maja.larsson@slu.se [Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7014, 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Baken, Stijn, E-mail: stijn.baken@ees.kuleuven.be [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Leuven University, Kasteelpark Arenberg 20 bus 2459, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Smolders, Erik, E-mail: erik.smolders@ees.kuleuven.be [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Leuven University, Kasteelpark Arenberg 20 bus 2459, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Cubadda, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.cubadda@iss.it [Department of Food Safety and Veterinary Public Health, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, Rome 00161 (Italy); Gustafsson, Jon Petter, E-mail: jon-petter.gustafsson@slu.se [Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7014, 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Division of Land and Water Resources Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Brinellvägen 28, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-10-15

    Blast furnace (BF) slags are commonly applied as soil amendments and in road fill material. In Sweden they are also naturally high in vanadium. The aim of this study was to assess the vanadium bioavailability in BF slags when applied to soil. Two soils were amended with up to 29% BF slag (containing 800 mg V kg{sup −1}) and equilibrated outdoors for 10 months before conducting a barley shoot growth assay. Additional soil samples were spiked with dissolved vanadate(V) for which assays were conducted two weeks (freshly spiked) and 10 months (aged) after spiking. The BF slag vanadium was dominated by vanadium(III) as shown by V K-edge XANES spectroscopy. In contrast, results obtained by HPLC-ICP-MS showed that vanadium(V), the most toxic vanadium species, was predominant in the soil solution. Barley shoot growth was not affected by the BF slag additions. This was likely due to limited dissolution of vanadium from the BF slag, preventing an increase of dissolved vanadium above toxic thresholds. The difference in vanadium bioavailability among treatments was explained by the vanadium concentration in the soil solution. It was concluded that the vanadium in BF slag is sparingly available. These findings should be of importance in environmental risk assessment.

  18. Vanadium bioavailability in soils amended with blast furnace slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Maja A; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik; Cubadda, Francesco; Gustafsson, Jon Petter

    2015-10-15

    Blast furnace (BF) slags are commonly applied as soil amendments and in road fill material. In Sweden they are also naturally high in vanadium. The aim of this study was to assess the vanadium bioavailability in BF slags when applied to soil. Two soils were amended with up to 29% BF slag (containing 800 mg V kg(-1)) and equilibrated outdoors for 10 months before conducting a barley shoot growth assay. Additional soil samples were spiked with dissolved vanadate(V) for which assays were conducted two weeks (freshly spiked) and 10 months (aged) after spiking. The BF slag vanadium was dominated by vanadium(III) as shown by V K-edge XANES spectroscopy. In contrast, results obtained by HPLC-ICP-MS showed that vanadium(V), the most toxic vanadium species, was predominant in the soil solution. Barley shoot growth was not affected by the BF slag additions. This was likely due to limited dissolution of vanadium from the BF slag, preventing an increase of dissolved vanadium above toxic thresholds. The difference in vanadium bioavailability among treatments was explained by the vanadium concentration in the soil solution. It was concluded that the vanadium in BF slag is sparingly available. These findings should be of importance in environmental risk assessment.

  19. Vanadium recycling in the United States in 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2011-01-01

    As one of a series of reports that describe the recycling of metal commodities in the United States, this report discusses the flow of vanadium in the U.S. economy in 2004. This report includes a description of vanadium supply and demand in the United States and illustrates the extent of vanadium recycling and recycling trends. In 2004, apparent vanadium consumption, by end use, in the United States was 3,820 metric tons (t) in steelmaking and 232 t in manufacturing, of which 17 t was for the production of superalloys and 215 t was for the production of other alloys, cast iron, catalysts, and chemicals. Vanadium use in steel is almost entirely dissipative because recovery of vanadium from steel scrap is chemically impeded under the oxidizing conditions in steelmaking furnaces. The greatest amount of vanadium recycling is in the superalloy, other-alloy, and catalyst sectors of the vanadium market. Vanadium-bearing catalysts are associated with hydrocarbon recovery and refining in the oil industry. In 2004, 2,850 t of vanadium contained in alloy scrap and spent catalysts was recycled, which amounted to about 44 percent of U.S. domestic production. About 94 percent of vanadium use in the United States was dissipative (3,820 t in steel/4,050 t in steel+fabricated products).

  20. Atomic layer deposition of VO2 films with Tetrakis-dimethyl-amino vanadium (IV) as vanadium precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xinrui; Cao, Yunzhen; Yan, Lu; Li, Ying; Song, Lixin

    2017-02-01

    VO2 thin films have been grown on Si(100) (VO2/Si) and fused silica substrates (VO2/SiO2) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tetrakis-dimethyl-amino vanadium (IV) (TDMAV) as a novel vanadium precursor and water as reactant gas. The quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurement was performed to study the ALD process of VO2 thin film deposition, and a constant growth rate of about 0.95 Å/cycle was obtained at the temperature range of 150-200 °C. XRD measurement was performed to study the influence of deposition temperature and post-annealing condition on the crystallization of VO2 films, which indicated that the films deposited between 150 and 200 °C showed well crystallinity after annealing at 475 °C for 100 min in Ar atmosphere. XPS measurement verified that the vanadium oxidation state was 4+ for both as-deposited film and post-annealed VO2/Si film. AFM was applied to study the surface morphology of VO2/Si films, which showed a dense polycrystalline film with roughness of about 1 nm. The resistance of VO2/Si films deposited between 150 °C and 200 °C as a function of temperature showed similar semiconductor-to-metal transition (SMT) characters with the transition temperature for heating branch (Tc,h) of about 72 °C, a hysteresis width of about 10 °C and the resistance change of two orders of magnitude. The increase of Tc,h compared with the bulk VO2 (68 °C) may be attributed to the tensile stress along the c-axis in the film. Transmittance measurement of VO2/SiO2 films showed typical thermochromic property with a NIR switching efficiency of above 50% at 2 μm across the transition.

  1. Aqueous vanadium ion dynamics relevant to bioinorganic chemistry: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustin, Kenneth

    2015-06-01

    Aqueous solutions of the four highest vanadium oxidation states exhibit four diverse colors, which only hint at the diverse reactions that these ions can undergo. Cationic vanadium ions form complexes with ligands; anionic vanadium ions form complexes with ligands and self-react to form isopolyanions. All vanadium species undergo oxidation-reduction reactions. With a few exceptions, elucidation of the dynamics of these reactions awaited the development of fast reaction techniques before the kinetics of elementary ligation, condensation, reduction, and oxidation of the aqueous vanadium ions could be investigated. As the biological roles played by endogenous and therapeutic vanadium expand, it is appropriate to bring the results of the diverse kinetics studies under one umbrella. To achieve this goal this review presents a systematic examination of elementary aqueous vanadium ion dynamics.

  2. The Pore Structure and Hydration Performance of Sulphoaluminate MDF Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Cong-yun; YUAN Run-zhang; LONG Shi-zong

    2004-01-01

    The hydration and pore structure of sulphoaluminate MDF cement were studied by X-ray diffractometer ( XRD ), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimeter ( MIP ) etc. The ex-perimental results indicate that hydration products of the materials are entringites ( Aft ), aluminium hydroxide andCSH (Ⅰ) gel etc. Due to its very low water-cement ratio, hydration function is only confined to the surfaces of ce-ment grains, and there is a lot of sulphoaluminate cement in the hardenite which is unhydrated yet. Hydration re-action was rapidly carried under the condition of the heat-pressing. Therefore cement hydrates Aft, CSH (Ⅰ) andaluminium hydroxide gel fill in pores. The expansibility of Aft makes the porosity of MDF cement lower ( less than1 percent ) and the size of pore smaller (80 percent pore was less than 250A), and enhances its strength.

  3. Volatile inventories in clathrate hydrates formed in the primordial nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Mousis, O; Picaud, S; Cordier, D

    2010-01-01

    Examination of ambient thermodynamic conditions suggest that clathrate hydrates could exist in the martian permafrost, on the surface and in the interior of Titan, as well as in other icy satellites. Clathrate hydrates probably formed in a significant fraction of planetesimals in the solar system. Thus, these crystalline solids may have been accreted in comets, in the forming giant planets and in their surrounding satellite systems. In this work, we use a statistical thermodynamic model to investigate the composition of clathrate hydrates that may have formed in the primordial nebula. In our approach, we consider the formation sequence of the different ices occurring during the cooling of the nebula, a reasonable idealization of the process by which volatiles are trapped in planetesimals. We then determine the fractional occupancies of guests in each clathrate hydrate formed at given temperature. The major ingredient of our model is the description of the guest-clathrate hydrate interaction by a spherically a...

  4. [Hydration in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maristany, Cleofé Pérez-Portabella; Segurola Gurruchaga, Hegoi

    2011-01-01

    Water is an essential foundation for life, having both a regulatory and structural function. The former results from active and passive participation in all metabolic reactions, and its role in conserving and maintaining body temperature. Structurally speaking it is the major contributer to tissue mass, accounting for 60% of the basis of blood plasma, intracellular and intersticial fluid. Water is also part of the primary structures of life such as genetic material or proteins. Therefore, it is necessary that the nurse makes an early assessment of patients water needs to detect if there are signs of electrolyte imbalance. Dehydration can be a very serious problem, especially in children and the elderly. Dehydrations treatment with oral rehydration solution decreases the risk of developing hydration disorders, but even so, it is recommended to follow preventive measures to reduce the incidence and severity of dehydration. The key to having a proper hydration is prevention. Artificial nutrition encompasses the need for precise calculation of water needs in enteral nutrition as parenteral, so the nurse should be part of this process and use the tools for calculating the patient's requirements. All this helps to ensure an optimal nutritional status in patients at risk. Ethical dilemmas are becoming increasingly common in clinical practice. On the subject of artificial nutrition and hydration, there isn't yet any unanimous agreement regarding hydration as a basic care. It is necessary to take decisions in consensus with the health team, always thinking of the best interests of the patient.

  5. Magang‘s 20 t Top Blowing BOF Used for Extracting Vanadium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Because that vanadium sells well recently in market and the Maagng's iron ore ontains higher vanadium,Magang decied to use its 20 t top blowing BOF to extract vanadium in steel-makin.Production result showed that the extracted vanadium slag reached the expected target of V2O3 compsoition.The recovery rate of vanadium is up to 80%

  6. Electrochemical properties of dip-coated vanadium pentaoxide thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S INGOLE; B J LOKHANDE

    2016-10-01

    Vanadium oxide (V$_2$O$_5$) thin films have been deposited on to the stainless-steel substrates by simple dip-coating technique using vanadium pentaoxide as an initial ingredient. Deposited samples were annealed at773 K for 3 h in air. X-ray diffraction analysis of the sample shows crystalline with orthorhombic crystal structure. Scanning electron microscopy study depicts the homogeneous and dense surface morphology. Optical study provesthe direct bandgap transition with energy $\\sim$2.25 eV. Electrochemical performance of the deposited electrode was studied in 1 M NaNO$_3$ electrolyte using cyclic voltammetery, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and galvanostatic charge–discharge tests. Prepared V$_2$O$_5$ electrode shows 207.50 F g$^{−1}$ specific capacitance at the scan rate 5 mV s$^{−1}$, specific energy, specific power and efficiency are 41.33 Whkg$^{−1}$, 21 kW kg$^{−1}$ and 96.72%, respectively. The internal resistance observed from impedance spectroscopy is $\\sim$8.77 ohm. Electrode exhibits excellent chemicalstability up to 1000 cycles.

  7. Geochemistry of vanadium (V) in Chinese coals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Liu, Guijian; Qu, Qinyuan; Qi, Cuicui; Sun, Ruoyu; Liu, Houqi

    2016-10-11

    Vanadium in coals may have potential environmental and economic impacts. However, comprehensive knowledge of the geochemistry of V in coals is lacking. In this study, abundances, distribution and modes of occurrence of V are reviewed by compiling >2900 reported Chinese coal samples. With coal reserves in individual provinces as the weighting factors, V in Chinese coals is estimated to have an average abundance of 35.81 μg/g. Large variation of V concentration is observed in Chinese coals of different regions, coal-forming periods, and maturation ranks. According to the concentration coefficient of V in coals from individual provinces, three regions are divided across Chinese coal deposits. Vanadium in Chinese coals is probably influenced by sediment source and sedimentary environment, supplemented by late-stage hydrothermal fluids. Specifically, hydrothermal fluids have relatively more significant effect on the enrichment of V in local coal seams. Vanadium in coals is commonly associated with aluminosilicate minerals and organic matter, and the modes of V occurrence in coal depend on coal-forming environment and coal rank. The Chinese V emission inventory during coal combustion is estimated to be 4906 mt in 2014, accounting for 50.55 % of global emission. Vanadium emissions by electric power plants are the largest contributor.

  8. Posttranslational modification of a vanadium nitrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiniger, Erin K; Harwood, Caroline S

    2015-08-01

    In microbes that fix nitrogen, nitrogenase catalyzes the conversion of N2 to ammonia in an ATP-demanding reaction. To help conserve energy some bacteria inhibit nitrogenase activity upon exposure to ammonium. The purple nonsulfur phototrophic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain CGA009 can synthesize three functional nitrogenase isoenzymes: a molybdenum nitrogenase, a vanadium nitrogenase, and an iron nitrogenase. Previous studies showed that in some alphaproteobacteria, including R. palustris, molybdenum nitrogenase activity is inhibited by ADP-ribosylation when cells are exposed to ammonium. Some iron nitrogenases are also posttranslationally modified. However, the posttranslational modification of vanadium nitrogenase has not been reported. Here, we investigated the regulation of the alternative nitrogenases of R. palustris and determined that both its vanadium nitrogenase and its iron nitrogenase activities were inhibited and posttranslationally modified when cells are exposed to ammonium. Vanadium nitrogenase is not found in all strains of R. palustris, suggesting that it may have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Also, phylogenetic analyses of the three nitrogenases suggest that VnfH, the target of ADP-ribosylation, may be the product of a gene duplication of nifH, the molybdenum nitrogenase homolog.

  9. Vanadium in marine mussels and algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperling, K.R.; Bahr, B. [Alfred-Wegener-Institut fuer Polar- und Meeresforschung, Bremerhaven (Germany); Ott, J. [Fachhochschule Hamburg (Germany). Fachbereich Naturwissenschaftliche Technik, Studiengang Biotechnologie

    2000-01-01

    A method is presented which is sensitive enough for the determination of vanadium (V) in marine organisms such as mussels and algae. It was sufficiently checked by a reference material and it was applied to V determination in blue mussels and brown algae from the German Bight. (orig.)

  10. Geometric constraints on phase coexistence in vanadium dioxide single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGahan, Christina; Gamage, Sampath; Liang, Jiran; Cross, Brendan; Marvel, Robert E.; Haglund, Richard F.; Abate, Yohannes

    2017-02-01

    The appearance of stripe phases is a characteristic signature of strongly correlated quantum materials, and its origin in phase-changing materials has only recently been recognized as the result of the delicate balance between atomic and mesoscopic materials properties. A vanadium dioxide (VO2) single crystal is one such strongly correlated material with stripe phases. Infrared nano-imaging on low-aspect-ratio, single-crystal VO2 microbeams decorated with resonant plasmonic nanoantennas reveals a novel herringbone pattern of coexisting metallic and insulating domains intercepted and altered by ferroelastic domains, unlike previous reports on high-aspect-ratio VO2 crystals where the coexisting metal/insulator domains appear as alternating stripe phases perpendicular to the growth axis. The metallic domains nucleate below the crystal surface and grow towards the surface with increasing temperature as suggested by the near-field plasmonic response of the gold nanorod antennas.

  11. Geometric constraints on phase coexistence in vanadium dioxide single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGahan, Christina; Gamage, Sampath; Liang, Jiran; Cross, Brendan; Marvel, Robert E; Haglund, Richard F; Abate, Yohannes

    2017-02-24

    The appearance of stripe phases is a characteristic signature of strongly correlated quantum materials, and its origin in phase-changing materials has only recently been recognized as the result of the delicate balance between atomic and mesoscopic materials properties. A vanadium dioxide (VO2) single crystal is one such strongly correlated material with stripe phases. Infrared nano-imaging on low-aspect-ratio, single-crystal VO2 microbeams decorated with resonant plasmonic nanoantennas reveals a novel herringbone pattern of coexisting metallic and insulating domains intercepted and altered by ferroelastic domains, unlike previous reports on high-aspect-ratio VO2 crystals where the coexisting metal/insulator domains appear as alternating stripe phases perpendicular to the growth axis. The metallic domains nucleate below the crystal surface and grow towards the surface with increasing temperature as suggested by the near-field plasmonic response of the gold nanorod antennas.

  12. Partial Oxidation of n-Butane over a Sol-Gel Prepared Vanadium Phosphorous Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Salazar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vanadium phosphorous oxide (VPO is traditionally manufactured from solid vanadium oxides by synthesizing VOHPO4∙0.5H2O (the precursor followed by in situ activation to produce (VO2P2O7 (the active phase. This paper discusses an alternative synthesis method based on sol-gel techniques. Vanadium (V triisopropoxide oxide was reacted with ortho-phosphoric acid in an aprotic solvent. The products were dried at high pressure in an autoclave with a controlled excess of solvent. This procedure produced a gel of VOPO4 with interlayer entrapped molecules. The surface area of the obtained materials was between 50 and 120 m2/g. Alcohol produced by the alkoxide hydrolysis reduced the vanadium during the drying step, thus VOPO4 was converted to the precursor. This procedure yielded non-agglomerated platelets, which were dehydrated and evaluated in a butane-air mixture. Catalysts were significantly more selective than the traditionally prepared materials with similar intrinsic activity. It is suggested that the small crystallite size obtained increased their selectivity towards maleic anhydride.

  13. Microwave-treated graphite felt as the positive electrode for all-vanadium redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoxin; Xu, Hongfeng; Xu, Pengcheng; Shen, Yang; Lu, Lu; Shi, Jicheng; Fu, Jie; Zhao, Hong

    2014-10-01

    An environmental, economic, and highly effective method based on microwave treatment was firstly used to improve the electrochemical activity of graphite felt as the positive electrode in all vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB). The graphite felt was treated by microwave and characterized by Fourier transform infrared and scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical performance of the prepared electrode was evaluated with cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Results show that graphite felt treated by microwave for 15 min at 400 °C exhibits excellent electro-catalytic activity and reactive velocity to vanadium redox couples. The coulombic, voltage, and energy efficiency of the VRFB with as-prepared electrodes at 50 mA cm-2 are 96.9%, 75.5%, and 73.2%, respectively; these values are much higher than those of cell-assembled conventionally and thermally treated graphite felt electrodes. The microwave-treated graphite felt will carry more hydrophilic groups, such as -OH, on its defects, and rough degree of the surface which should be advantageous in facilitating the redox reaction of vanadium ions, leading to the efficient operation of a vanadium redox flow battery. Moreover, microwave treatment can be easily scaled up to treat graphite felt for VRFB in large quantities.

  14. Portland cement hydration in the presence of admixtures: black gram pulse and superplasticizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka Nand Dwivedi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Effect of admixtures such as black gram pulse (BGP and sulfonated naphthalene based superplasticizer (SP on the hydration of Portland cement has been studied. The hydration characteristics of OPC in the presence of BGP and SP were studied with the help of non evaporable water content determinations, calorimetric method, Mössbauer spectroscopic and atomic force microscopic techniques. Results have shown that both BGP and SP get adsorbed at the surface of cement and its hydration products. The hydration of Portland cement is retarded in the presence of both the admixtures and nanosize hydration products are formed.

  15. Natural Gas Evolution in a Gas Hydrate Melt: Effect of Thermodynamic Hydrate Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujith, K S; Ramachandran, C N

    2017-01-12

    Natural gas extraction from gas hydrate sediments by injection of hydrate inhibitors involves the decomposition of hydrates. The evolution of dissolved gas from the hydrate melt is an important step in the extraction process. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, we study the evolution of dissolved methane from its hydrate melt in the presence of two thermodynamic hydrate inhibitors, NaCl and CH3OH. An increase in the concentration of hydrate inhibitors is found to promote the nucleation of methane nanobubbles in the hydrate melt. Whereas NaCl promotes bubble formation by enhancing the hydrophobic interaction between aqueous CH4 molecules, CH3OH molecules assist bubble formation by stabilizing CH4 bubble nuclei formed in the solution. The CH3OH molecules accumulate around the nuclei leading to a decrease in the surface tension at their interface with water. The nanobubbles formed are found to be highly dynamic with frequent exchange of CH4 molecules between the bubble and the surrounding liquid. A quantitative analysis of the dynamic behavior of the bubble is performed by introducing a unit step function whose value depends on the location of CH4 molecules with respect to the bubble. It is observed that an increase in the concentration of thermodynamic hydrate inhibitors reduces the exchange process, making the bubble less dynamic. It is also found that for a given concentration of the inhibitor, larger bubbles are less dynamic compared to smaller ones. The dependence of the dynamic nature of nanobubbles on bubble size and inhibitor concentration is correlated with the solubility of CH4 and the Laplace pressure within the bubble. The effect of CO2 on the formation of nanobubble in the CH4-CO2 mixed gas hydrate melt in the presence of inhibitors is also examined. The simulations show that the presence of CO2 molecules significantly reduces the induction time for methane nanobubble nucleation. The role of CO2 in the early nucleation of bubble is explained

  16. Studies in transition metal chemistry ; VI. Soluble Ziegler-type catalysts based on vanadium, part II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liefde Meijer, H.J. de; Hurk, J.W.G. van den; Kerk, G.J.M. van der

    1966-01-01

    Spectrophotometric measurements in the visible region on soluble catalyst systems prepared from (i) vanadium tetrachloride, aluminium bromide and tetraphenyltin and (ii) vanadium tetrachloride or vanadium oxytrichloride and ethylaluminium dihalides are reported. The formation of hydrocarbonsoluble i

  17. Modeling Hydrates and the Gas Hydrate Markup Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Wang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates, as an important potential fuels, flow assurance hazards, and possible factors initiating the submarine geo-hazard and global climate change, have attracted the interest of scientists all over the world. After two centuries of hydrate research, a great amount of scientific data on gas hydrates has been accumulated. Therefore the means to manage, share, and exchange these data have become an urgent task. At present, metadata (Markup Language is recognized as one of the most efficient ways to facilitate data management, storage, integration, exchange, discovery and retrieval. Therefore the CODATA Gas Hydrate Data Task Group proposed and specified Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML as an extensible conceptual metadata model to characterize the features of data on gas hydrate. This article introduces the details of modeling portion of GHML.

  18. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  19. A study on gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byoung Jae; Jung, Tae Jin; Sunwoo, Don [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Sufficient documents were reviewed to understand solid components of water and gaseous hydrocarbon known as gas hydrates, which represent an important potential energy resource of the future. The review provides us with valuable information on crystal structures, kinetics, origin and distribution of gas hydrates. In addition, the review increased our knowledge of exploration and development methods of gas hydrates. Large amounts of methane, the principal component of natural gas, in the form of solid gas hydrate are found mainly offshore in outer continental margin sediment and, to a lesser extent, in polar regions commonly associated with permafrost. Natural gas hydrates are stable in some environments where the hydrostatic pressure exerted by overlying water column is sufficient for hydrate formation and stability. The required high pressures generally restrict gas hydrate to sediments beneath water of approximately 400 m. Higher sediment temperatures at greater subbottom depths destabilize gas hydrates. Based on the pressure- temperature condition, the outer continental margin of East Sea where water depth is deep enough to form gas hydrate is considered to have high potential of gas hydrate accumulations. (author). 56 refs., tabs., figs.

  20. Speciation of vanadium in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L.) and soils in response to different levels of vanadium in soils and cabbage growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Liyan; Yang, Jinyan; Alewell, Christine; Huang, Jen-How

    2014-09-01

    This study highlights the accumulation and speciation of vanadium in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L.) in relation to the speciation of soil vanadium with pot experiments at 122-622mgVkg(-1) by spiking NH4VO3. Cabbage planting decreased the bioavailable and residual vanadium based on sequential extraction, leading to enrichment of oxalate-extractable vanadium in soils. The biomass production increased with increasing concentrations of soil vanadium from 122 to 372mgVkg(-1), probably due to the increasing nitrogen availability and low vanadium availability in our soils with a consequent low vanadium toxicity. Although the concentrations of root vanadium (14.4-24.9mgVkg(-1)) related positively with soil vanadium, the bio-dilution alleviated the increase of leaf vanadium (2.1-2.7mgVkg(-1)). The predominance of vanadium(IV) in leaves (∼60-80% of total vanadium) indicates bio-reduction of vanadium in Chinese cabbage, since the mobile vanadium in oxic soils was usually pentavalent. Approximately 15-20% of the leaf vanadium was associated with recalcitrant leaf tissues. The majority of leaf vanadium was water and ethanol extractable, which is considered mobile and may cause more toxic effects on Chinese cabbage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Vanadium in foods and in human body fluids and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, A R; Kosta, L

    1978-07-01

    Using neutron activation analysis, vanadium was analysed in a range of foods, human body fluids and tissues. On the basis of these results and those of other workers, it was concluded that daily dietary intake amounts to some tens of micrograms. Analysis of body fluids (including milk, blood and excreta) and organs and tissues provided an estimate for the total body pool of vanadium in man of about 100 microgram. Vanadium was not detectable in blood and urine at the level of 0.3 ng/g, while low levels were found in muscle, fat, bone, teeth and other tissues. The relationship between dietary intake to pulmonary absorption is discussed in relation to the occurrence of vanadium in man-made air particulates. The very low levels found in milks and eggs suggest minimal vanadium requirements in growth. The findings are discussed in the light of previous results and also in relation to the possible essentiality of vanadium.

  2. Chloride supporting electrolytes for all-vanadium redox flow batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soowhan; Vijayakumar, M; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jianlu; Chen, Baowei; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Feng; Hu, Jianzhi; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-10-28

    This paper examines vanadium chloride solutions as electrolytes for an all-vanadium redox flow battery. The chloride solutions were capable of dissolving more than 2.3 M vanadium at varied valence states and remained stable at 0-50 °C. The improved stability appeared due to the formation of a vanadium dinuclear [V(2)O(3)·4H(2)O](4+) or a dinuclear-chloro complex [V(2)O(3)Cl·3H(2)O](3+) in the solutions over a wide temperature range. The all-vanadium redox flow batteries with the chloride electrolytes demonstrated excellent reversibility and fairly high efficiencies. Only negligible, if any, gas evolution was observed. The improved energy capacity and good performance, along with the ease in heat management, would lead to substantial reduction in capital cost and life-cycle cost, making the vanadium chloride redox flow battery a promising candidate for stationary applications.

  3. Structural and catalytic properties of a novel vanadium containing solid core mesoporous silica shell catalysts for gas phase oxidation reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Venkatathri; Vijayamohanan K Pillai; A Rajini; M Nooka Raju; I A K Reddy

    2013-01-01

    A novel vanadium containing solid core mesoporous silica shell catalyst was synthesized with different Si/V ratios by sol-gel method under neutral conditions. The synthesized materials were characterized by various techniques and gas phase diphenyl methane oxidation reaction. The mesoporosity combined with microporosity are formed by incorporation of octadecyltrichloro silane and triethylamine in the catalyst and it was found out from E-DAX and BET—surface area analysis. The material was found to be nanocrystalline. Vanadium is present as V4+ species in as-synthesized samples and convert to V5+ on calcination. Most of the vanadium is present in tetrahedral or square pyramidal environment. Incorporation of vanadium in silica framework was confirmed by 29Si MAS NMR analysis. Among the various vanadium containing solid core mesoporous silica shell catalysts, the Si/V =100 ratio exhibited maximum efficiency towards diphenyl methane to benzophenone gas phase reaction. The optimum condition required for maximum conversion and selectivity was found out from the catalytic studies.

  4. Advances in understanding hydration of Portland cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scrivener, Karen L., E-mail: Karen.scrivener@epfl.ch [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 (Switzerland); Juilland, Patrick [Sika Technology AG, Zürich (Switzerland); Monteiro, Paulo J.M. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California at Berkeley (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Progress in understanding hydration is summarized. Evidence supports the geochemistry dissolution theory as an explanation for the induction period, in preference to the inhibiting layer theory. The growth of C–S–H is the principal factor controlling the main heat evolution peak. Electron microscopy indicates that C–S–H “needles” grow from the surface of grains. At the peak, the surface is covered, but deceleration cannot be attributed to diffusion control. The shoulder peak comes from renewed reaction of C{sub 3}A after depletion of sulfate in solution, but release of sulfate absorbed on C–S–H means that ettringite continues to form. After several days space becomes the major factor controlling hydration. The use of new analytical technique is improving our knowledge of the action of superplasticizers and leading to the design of molecules for different applications. Atomistic modeling is becoming a topic of increasing interest. Recent publications in this area are reviewed.

  5. Chemical Composition Study of Vanadium Pentoxide Xerogels Doped by Bovine Albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereika, R.; Kaciulis, S.; Mezzi, A.; Brucale, M.

    2016-06-01

    Metal-bioorganic compounds of vanadium pentoxide and bovine serum albumin (BSA) (Fraction V) were obtained by using sol-gel method. Series of the samples (BSA)xV2O5ṡnH2O, where x=0, 0.01 and 0.001, were originally produced by the synthesis of vanadium pentoxide xerogels and subsequent blending with water-dissolved BSA in appropriate molar ratios. It was evident that the gelation process does not occur for x>0.01. For the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies, the thin layers of these materials were prepared by drying the gel onto the glass and mica substrates. The surface morphology of the samples was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. It follows from the analysis of experimental XPS spectra of (BSA)xV2O5ṡnH2O that the nitrogen ions in pure albumin and in (BSA)0.01V2O5ṡnH2O are present in imine, amine and protonated amine groups. The additional protonated amine arises when the concentration of albumin in (BSA)xV2O5ṡnH2O is low (x=0.001). Increasing the amount of albumin results in decrease of the number of oxygen ions bonded to vanadium. At the same time (with increase of albumin), the component of oxygen bounded to carbon and nitrogen is increasing. In the samples with greater amount of albumin, the reduction of vanadium ions occurs. This means that the trivalent and tetravalent vanadium ions are present together with pentavalent ones.

  6. Drilling Gas Hydrates on hydrate Ridge, Oregon continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehu, A. M.; Bohrmann, G.; Leg 204 Science Party

    2002-12-01

    During Leg 204, we cored and logged 9 sites on the Oregon continental margin to determine the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates in an accretionary ridge and adjacent slope basin, investigate the mechanisms that transport methane and other gases into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and obtain constraints on physical properties of hydrates in situ. A 3D seismic survey conducted in 2000 provided images of potential subsurface fluid conduits and indicated the position of the GHSZ throughout the survey region. After coring the first site, we acquired Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) data at all but one site to provide an overview of downhole physical properties. The LWD data confirmed the general position of key seismic stratigraphic horizons and yielded an initial estimate of hydrate concentration through the proxy of in situ electrical resistivity. These records proved to be of great value in planning subsequent coring. The second new hydrate proxy to be tested was infrared thermal imaging of cores on the catwalk as rapidly as possible after retrieval. The thermal images were used to identify hydrate samples and to estimate the distribution and texture of hydrate within the cores. Geochemical analyses of interstitial waters and of headspace and void gases provide additional information on the distribution and concentration of hydrate within the stability zone, the origin and pathway of fluids into and through the GHSZ, and the rates at which gas hydrate is forming. Bio- and lithostratigraphic description of cores, measurement of physical properties, and in situ pressure core sampling and thermal measurements complement the data set, providing ground-truth tests of inferred physical and sedimentological properties. Among the most interesting preliminary results are: 1) that gas hydrates are distributed through a broad depth range within the GHSZ and that different physical and chemical proxies for hydrate distribution and concentration give generally

  7. Effect of Reactivity of Quick Lime on the Properties of Hydrated Lime Sorbent for SO2 Removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.G.Shin; H.Kim; Y.N.Kim; H.S.Lee

    2009-01-01

    The hydration of quick lime and the sulfation of hydrated lime were carried out for verification of relationship between the reactivity of quick lime and the properties of hydrated lime as a sorbent.The effect of reactivity of quick lime was investigated with the change of calcination temperature and time.Results obtained showed that the temperature rise during the hydration of quick limes varied from 31 to 69℃ with the variation of calcination temperature and time.The specific surface area and the sulfation ability of hydrated lime prepared by hydration of quick lime showed a proportional relationship with the reactivity of quick lime.The hydrated lime which was prepared by hydration of quick lime calcined at 1100℃ had the highest reactivity and showed 41.53 m2/g of the specific surface area, 0.16 cm3/g of the pore volume and 87% of the removal efficiency for SO2 removal.

  8. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  9. Methane storage in dry water gas hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weixing; Bray, Christopher L; Adams, Dave J; Cooper, Andrew I

    2008-09-03

    Dry water stores 175 v(STP)/v methane at 2.7 MPa and 273.2 K in a hydrate form which is close to the Department of Energy volumetric target for methane storage. Dry water is a silica-stabilized free-flowing powder (95% wt water), and fast methane uptakes were observed (90% saturation uptake in 160 min with no mixing) as a result of the relatively large surface-to-volume ratio of this material.

  10. Influence of bulk fibre properties of PAN-based carbon felts on their performance in vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiss, Rüdiger

    2015-03-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon felts with different fibre properties were studied in terms of their suitability as porous flow-through electrode materials in all vanadium redox flow batteries. The crystallinity and their bulk hetero element content (in particular nitrogen) of the carbon fibres was shown to produce a significant effect on the electrocatalytical properties of the electrodes towards vanadium species. Similar effects were seen on the capacity losses associated with concomitant hydrogen evolution. Adjustments of fibre properties offer the potential of manufacturing improved electrode materials, potentially without additional steps such as surface activation or decoration with catalytically active species.

  11. Vanadium bioavailability and toxicity to soil microorganisms and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Maja A; Baken, Stijn; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Hadialhejazi, Golshid; Smolders, Erik

    2013-10-01

    Vanadium, V, is a redox-sensitive metal that in solution, under aerobic conditions, prevails as the oxyanion vanadate(V). There is little known regarding vanadium toxicity to soil biota, and the present study was set up to determine the toxicity of added vanadate to soil organisms and to investigate the relationship between toxicity and vanadium sorption in soils. Five soils with contrasting properties were spiked with 7 different doses (3.2-3200 mg V kg(-1)) of dissolved vanadate, and toxicity was measured with 2 microbial and 3 plant assays. The median effective concentration (EC50) thresholds of the microbial assays ranged from 28 mg added V kg(-1) to 690 mg added V kg(-1), and the EC50s in the plant assays ranged from 18 mg added V kg(-1) to 510 mg added V kg(-1). The lower thresholds were in the concentration range of the background vanadium in the untreated control soils (15-58 mg V kg(-1)). The vanadium toxicity to plants decreased with a stronger soil vanadium sorption strength. The EC50 values for plants expressed on a soil solution basis ranged from 0.8 mg V L(-1) to 15 mg V L(-1) and were less variable among soils than corresponding values based on total vanadium in soil. It is concluded that sorption decreases the toxicity of added vanadate and that soil solution vanadium is a more robust measure to determine critical vanadium concentrations across soils. © 2013 SETAC.

  12. Vanadium-spinel composites for structural applications in hostile environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, R.B.; Wetteland, C.J.; Shen, T.D. [and others

    1997-05-01

    Vanadium-spinel composites are promising materials for structural applications in radiation environments. Powders of two Vanadium-spinel composites, 20/80 vol. %, were prepared by (a) ball milling mixtures of vanadium and spinel powders (alloy VSLP) and (b) through a self-sustained reaction synthesis of vanadium, MgO, and Al powders (alloy VSHP). These powders were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing. Most of the V and spinel domains in the the compacts are sub-micron in size. The compacts have K{sub c} toughness values of 3.9, about three times the toughness obtained by hipping mixtures of commercial powders.

  13. Structure, properties, and MEMS and microelectronic applications of vanadium oxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Robert B Darling; Shiho Iwanaga

    2009-08-01

    Vanadium oxides have for many decades attracted much attention for their rich and unique physical properties which pose intriguing questions as to their fundamental origins as well as offering numerous potential applications for microelectronics, sensors, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). This paper reviews the unique structure and properties of the two most common vanadium oxides which have entered into microfabricated devices, VO2 and V25, and some of the past and future device applications which can be realized using these materials. Two emerging new materials, sodium vanadium bronzes and vanadium oxide nanotubes are also discussed for their potential use in new microelectronic devices.

  14. Analysis of Erbium and Vanadium Diffusion in Porous Silicon Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina G. Mynbaeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental data on diffusion of erbium and vanadium in porous and nonporous silicon carbide at 1700 and 2200°C have been used for modelling diffusion in porous SiC. It is shown that the consideration of pore structure modification under annealing via vacancy redistribution allows for satisfactory description of dopant diffusion. As expected, important contribution to the diffusion in the porous medium is found to be made by the walls of the pores: in SiC, the vacancy surface diffusion coefficient on the walls appears to exceed that in the bulk of the material by an order of magnitude. When thermal treatment transforms pore channels into closed voids, pathways for accelerated diffusion cease to exist and diffusion rates in porous and nonporous SiC become similar.

  15. Formation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments 1. Conceptual model of gas hydrate growth conditioned by host sediment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clennell, M.B.; Hovland, M.; Booth, J.S.; Henry, P.; Winters, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    The stability of submarine gas hydrates is largely dictated by pressure and temperature, gas composition, and pore water salinity. However, the physical properties and surface chemistry of deep marine sediments may also affect the thermodynamic state, growth kinetics, spatial distributions, and growth forms of clathrates. Our conceptual model presumes that gas hydrate behaves in a way analogous to ice in a freezing soil. Hydrate growth is inhibited within fine-grained sediments by a combination of reduced pore water activity in the vicinity of hydrophilic mineral surfaces, and the excess internal energy of small crystals confined in pores. The excess energy can be thought of as a "capillary pressure" in the hydrate crystal, related to the pore size distribution and the state of stress in the sediment framework. The base of gas hydrate stability in a sequence of fine sediments is predicted by our model to occur at a lower temperature (nearer to the seabed) than would be calculated from bulk thermodynamic equilibrium. Capillary effects or a build up of salt in the system can expand the phase boundary between hydrate and free gas into a divariant field extending over a finite depth range dictated by total methane content and pore-size distribution. Hysteresis between the temperatures of crystallization and dissociation of the clathrate is also predicted. Growth forms commonly observed in hydrate samples recovered from marine sediments (nodules, and lenses in muds; cements in sands) can largely be explained by capillary effects, but kinetics of nucleation and growth are also important. The formation of concentrated gas hydrates in a partially closed system with respect to material transport, or where gas can flush through the system, may lead to water depletion in the host sediment. This "freeze-drying" may be detectable through physical changes to the sediment (low water content and overconsolidation) and/or chemical anomalies in the pore waters and metastable

  16. Microadditions of boron and vanadium in ADI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rzychoń T.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the second part of the study, describing the role of vanadium and boron microadditions in the process of structure formation in heavy-walled castings made from ADI, the results of own investigations were presented. Within this study two series of melts of the ductile iron were made, introducing microadditions of the above mentioned elements to both unalloyed ductile iron and the ductile iron containing high levels of nickel and copper (the composition typical of ADI. Melts were conducted with iron-nickel-magnesium master alloy. Thermal analysis of the solidification process of the cast keel blocks was conducted, the heat treatment of the alloys was carried out, and then the effect of the introduced additions of boron and vanadium on the hardenability of the investigated cast iron was examined and evaluated.

  17. Irradiation creep of vanadium-base alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Billone, M.C.; Strain, R.V.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Matsui, H. [Tohoku Univ. (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    A study of irradiation creep in vanadium-base alloys is underway with experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in the United States. Test specimens are thin-wall sealed tubes with internal pressure loading. The results from the initial ATR irradiation at low temperature (200--300 C) to a neutron damage level of 4.7 dpa show creep rates ranging from {approx}0 to 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}/dpa/MPa for a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy. These rates were generally lower than reported from a previous experiment in BR-10. Because both the attained neutron damage levels and the creep strains were low in the present study, however, these creep rates should be regarded as only preliminary. Substantially more testing is required before a data base on irradiation creep of vanadium alloys can be developed and used with confidence.

  18. EFFECT OF ANNEALING ON THE PROPERTIES OF VANADIUM PENTOXIDE FILMS PREPARED BY SOL–GEL METHOD

    OpenAIRE

    YAQIANG LIU; XUELIAN DU; XUEQIN LIU

    2014-01-01

    The vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) films were obtained by using sol–gel procedure and then were annealed at different temperature in air. The effect of different annealing temperatures on the composition, the microstructure, the surface morphology and the optical properties of the films were characterized by methods such as by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and spectral transmittance. The results revealed that the film annealed at 150°C has amorphous structure ...

  19. EFFECT OF ANNEALING ON THE PROPERTIES OF VANADIUM PENTOXIDE FILMS PREPARED BY SOL–GEL METHOD

    OpenAIRE

    YAQIANG LIU; XUELIAN DU; XUEQIN LIU

    2014-01-01

    The vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) films were obtained by using sol–gel procedure and then were annealed at different temperature in air. The effect of different annealing temperatures on the composition, the microstructure, the surface morphology and the optical properties of the films were characterized by methods such as by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and spectral transmittance. The results revealed that the film annealed at 150°C has amorphous structure ...

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Vanadium Molybdenum Oxynitrides Nanoparticles in the Channels of MCM-41

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Cunman; XU Zheng; LIU Qian

    2005-01-01

    Vanaadium molybdenum oxynitrides nanoparticles were synthesized successfully in the channels of MCM-41 after surface modification, vacuum co-impregnation ami nitridation technology. The products were investigated by nitrogen sorption measurement, X-ray powder diffraction ( XRD ), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) and CNH element analysis. The investigation results show that superfine nanoparticles of vanadium molybdenum oxynitrides exist in the channels of MCM-41.

  1. Structure of vanadium oxide on supports as measure by the benzaldehyde-ammonia titration method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niwa, M.; Matsuoka, Y.; Murakami, Y.

    1987-08-13

    In order to clarify the structure of vanadium oxide on supports, the benzaldehyde-ammonia titration (BAT) method was applied to various supported vanadium oxide catalysts. Prior to the measurements, an infrared study of the adsorbed benzoate ion on TiO/sub 2/, ZrO/sub 2/, and CeO/sub 2/ was carried out to justify the BAT method to measure surface cus sites. The exposed surface area of the supports Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, TiO/sub 2/, and ZrO/sub 2/ with different crystal phases was then measured, and the surface area of vanadium oxide supported was calculated by the difference between BET and exposed surfaced areas. On the other hand, the surface area of vanadium oxide on SiO/sub 2/ was measured after reduction on 773 K, because benzaldehyde was adsorbed on the reduced V/sub 2/O/sub 3/ but not on SiO/sub 2/. Based on these measurements, the relationship between percent coverage on support and surface V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ concentration was obtained. The structure of supported V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ thus determined depended on the kind of support, but not significantly on the crystal phase. Except in small concentration on Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and SiO/sub 2/, vanadium oxide formed a multilayer. The support surface at Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/(..gamma..) was covered most effectively, and the average thickness of V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ in 100% of the coverage was 3 layers. To the contrary, the SiO/sub 2/ surface was not covered effectively, and the average thickness attained up to 50 layers. Furthermore, ZrO/sub 2/ and TiO/sub 2/ showed intermediate behavior between these supports. It is shown that the coverage efficiency and thickness of the formed metal oxides are correlated with the electronegativity of the cations of supports.

  2. Determination of hydration film thickness using atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Changsheng; SONG Shaoxian; GU Qingbao

    2005-01-01

    Dispersion of a solid particle in water may lead to the formation of hydration film on the particle surface, which can strongly increase the repulsive force between the particles and thus strongly affect the stability of dispersions. The hydration film thickness, which varies with the variation of property of suspension particles, is one of the most important parameters of hydration film, and is also one of the most difficult parameters that can be measured accurately. In this paper, a method, based on force-distance curve of atomic force microscopy, for determining the hydration film thickness of particles is developed. The method utilizes the difference of cantilever deflection before, between and after penetrating the hydration films between tip and sample, which reflect the difference of slope on the force-distance curve. 3 samples, mica, glass and stainless steel, were used for hydration thickness determination, and the results show that the hydration film thickness between silicon tip and mica, glass and stainless steel are 30.0(2.0, 29.0(1.0 and 32.5(2.5 nm, respectively.

  3. Mechanical and electromagnetic properties of northern Gulf of Mexico sediments with and without THF hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.Y.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2008-01-01

    Using an oedometer cell instrumented to measure the evolution of electromagnetic properties, small strain stiffness, and temperature, we conducted consolidation tests on sediments recovered during drilling in the northern Gulf of Mexico at the Atwater Valley and Keathley Canyon sites as part of the 2005 Chevron Joint Industry Project on Methane Hydrates. The tested specimens include both unremolded specimens (as recovered from the original core liner) and remolded sediments both without gas hydrate and with pore fluid exchanged to attain 100% synthetic (tetrahydrofuran) hydrate saturation at any stage of loading. Test results demonstrate the extent to which the electromagnetic and mechanical properties of hydrate-bearing marine sediments are governed by the vertical effective stress, stress history, porosity, hydrate saturation, fabric, ionic concentration of the pore fluid, and temperature. We also show how permittivity and electrical conductivity data can be used to estimate the evolution of hydrate volume fraction during formation. The gradual evolution of geophysical properties during hydrate formation probably reflects the slow increase in ionic concentration in the pore fluid due to ion exclusion in closed systems and the gradual decrease in average pore size in which the hydrate forms. During hydrate formation, the increase in S-wave velocity is delayed with respect to the decrease in permittivity, consistent with hydrate formation on mineral surfaces and subsequent crystal growth toward the pore space. No significant decementation/debonding occurred in 100% THF hydrate-saturated sediments during unloading, hence the probability of sampling hydrate-bearing sediments without disturbing the original sediment fabric is greatest for samples in which the gas hydrate is primarily responsible for maintaining the sediment fabric and for which the time between core retrieval and restoration of in situ effective stress in the laboratory is minimized. In evaluating the

  4. Progress of all vanadium redox flow batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Aresearch team headed by Prof.ZHANG Huamin from the CAS Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics has made important progress in the research and development of a LED screen demo system powered by vanadium redox flow batteries (VRB).The system has operated continuously for over one year without any malfunction.So far,the total running time is up to 11,000 hours.

  5. Characterization of vanadium flow battery. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindner, H.; Ekman, C.; Gehrke, O.; Isleifsson, F.

    2011-02-15

    This report summarizes the work done at Risoe-DTU testing a vanadium flow battery as part of the project ''Characterisation of Vanadium Batteries'' (ForskEl project 6555) with the partners PA Energy A/S and OI Electric A/S under the Danish PSO energy research program. A 15kW/120kWh vanadium battery has been installed as part of the distributed energy systems experimental facility, SYSLAB, at Risoe DTU. A test programme has been carried out to get hands-on experience with the technology, to characterize the battery from a power system point of view and to assess it with respect to integration of wind energy in the Danish power system. The battery has been in operation for 18 months. During time of operation the battery has not shown signs of degradation of performance. It has a round-trip efficiency at full load of approximately 60% (depending on temperature and SOC). The sources of the losses are power conversion in cell stacks/electrolyte, power converter, and auxiliary power consumption from pumps and controller. The efficiency was not influenced by the cycling of the battery. The response time for the battery is limited at 20kW/s by the ramp rate of the power converter. The battery can thus provide power and frequency support for the power system. The battery was operated together with a 11kW stall-regulated Gaia wind turbine to smooth the output of the wind turbine and during the tests the battery proved capable of firming the output of the wind turbine. Vanadium battery is a potential technology for storage based services to the power system provided investment and O and M cost are low enough and long term operation is documented. (Author)

  6. MORPHOLOGY OF METHANE HYDRATE HOST SEDIMENTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JONES,K.W.; FENG,H.; TOMOV,S.; WINTER,W.J.; EATON,M.; MAHAJAN,D.

    2004-12-01

    Results from simulated experiments in several laboratories show that host sediments influence hydrate formation in accord with known heterogeneity of host sediments at sites of gas hydrate occurrence (1). For example, in Mackenzie Delta, NWT Canada (Mallik 2L-38 well), coarser-grained units (pore-filling model) are found whereas in the Gulf of Mexico, the found hydrate samples do not appear to be lithologically controlled. We have initiated a systematic study of sediments, initially focusing on samples from various depths at a specific site, to establish a correlation with hydrate occurrence (or variations thereof) to establish differences in their microstructure, porosity, and other associated properties. The synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) set-up at the X-27A tomography beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory was used as a tool to study sediments from Blake Ridge at three sub bottom depths of 0.2, 50, and 667 meters. Results from the tomographic analysis of the deepest sample (667 m) are presented here to illustrate how tomography can be used to obtain new insights into the structures of methane hydrate host sediments. The investigation shows the internal grain/pore space resolution in the microstructure and a 3-D visualization of the connecting pathways obtained following data segmentation into pore space and grains within the sediment sample. The analysis gives the sample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity, as well. An earlier report on the experimental program has been given by Mahajan et al. (2).

  7. Controls on gas hydrate stability in methane depleted sediments: Laboratory and field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, L.; Chanton, J.; Martens, C. S.

    2009-12-01

    Gas hydrate deposits are the Earth’s largest reservoir of the powerful greenhouse gas methane and thus a key future energy resource. However, hydrate stability in sedimentary environments featuring highly variable methane concentrations needs to be understood to allow resource estimation and recovery. Hydrates are at chemical equilibrium and therefore stable where high pressures, low temperatures, and moderate salinities coexist with methane-saturated pore waters. When all of these conditions are not met, hydrates should dissociate or dissolve, releasing methane to the overlying water and possibly the atmosphere. In addition, other natural factors may control the kinetics of their degradation complicating models for hydrate stability and occurrence. Our measurements indicate that the pore-waters surrounding some shallow buried hydrates are not methane-saturated suggesting that dissolution should occur relatively rapidly. Yet, these hydrate deposits are known to persist relatively unchanged for years. We hypothesize that, once formed, hydrate deposits may be stabilized by natural factors inhibiting dissolution, including oil or microbial biofilm coatings. While most studies have focused on pressure and temperature changes where hydrates occur, relatively few have included measurements of in situ methane concentration gradients because of the difficulties inherent to making such measurements. Here we present recent measurements of methane concentration and stable carbon isotope gradients immediately adjacent to undisturbed hydrate surfaces obtained through deployments of novel seafloor instruments. Our results suggest that the hydrates studied are relatively stable when exposed to overlying and pore-waters that are undersaturated with methane. Concurrent laboratory measurements of methane concentration gradients next to artificial hydrate surfaces were utilized to test our protective coating hypothesis. After a stable dissolution rate for hydrate samples was

  8. Vanadium proton exchange membrane water electrolyser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Jens; Roznyatovskaya, Nataliya; Pinkwart, Karsten; Tübke, Jens

    2017-05-01

    In order to reverse the reactions of vanadium oxygen fuel cells and to regenerate vanadium redox flow battery electrolytes that have been oxidised by atmospheric oxygen, a vanadium proton exchange membrane water electrolyser was set up and investigated. Using an existing cell with a commercial and iridium-based catalyst coated membrane, it was possible to fully reduce V3.5+ and V3+ solutions to V2+ with the formation of oxygen and with coulomb efficiencies of over 96%. The cell achieved a maximum current density of 75 mA/cm2 during this process and was limited by the proximity of the V(III) reduction to the hydrogen evolution reaction. Due to the specific reaction mechanisms of V(IV) and V(III) ions, V(III) solutions were reduced with an energy efficiency of 61%, making this process nearly twice as energy efficient as the reduction of V(IV) to V(III). Polarisation curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to further investigate the losses of half-cell reactions and to find ways of further increasing efficiency and performance levels.

  9. Reduction of vanadium(V) with Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredberg, Katarina; Karlsson, Hans T; Holst, Olle

    2004-03-01

    Biotechnological leaching has been proposed as a suitable method for extraction of vanadium from spent catalysts and oil ash. In the biological leaching process, the vanadium(V) can be reduced to vanadium(IV), which is a less toxic and more soluble form of the vanadium. The present investigation showed that Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans efficiently reduced vanadium(V) in the form of vanadium pentaoxide, to vanadyl(IV) ions, and tolerated high concentrations of vanadium(IV) and vanadium(V). A. ferrooxidans was compared with Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, which has previously been utilized for vanadium leaching and reduction. Vanadium pentaoxide and sodium vanadate were used as model compounds. The results of this study indicate possibilities to develop an economical and technically feasible process for biotechnological vanadium recovery.

  10. Oxygen segregation and its impact on the absorption of hydrogen in vanadium; Einfluss der Sauerstoffsegregation auf die Absorption von Wasserstoff in Vanadium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulus, H.; Lammers, M. [Inst. fuer Technologie- und Wissenstransfer, Soest (Germany); Mueller, K.H. [Inst. fuer Technologie- und Wissenstransfer, Soest (Germany)]|[Paderborn Univ. (Gesamthochschule), Soest (Germany). Fachbereich 16 - Elektrische Energietechnik; Kiss, G.; Kemeny, Z. [Technical Univ. Budapest (Hungary)

    1998-12-31

    The impact of the dissolved oxygen on the hydrogen absorption in vanadium was analysed with an UHV apparatus. The vanadium specimen with an oxygen content of 230 ppm was treated by a variety of heat treatments. The depth distributions of the induced concentrations of segregated oxygen in the specimen were analysed by SIMS. It was found that the amount of segregated oxygen increases with rising final temperature and tempering period. In a further experiment, the specimen was exposed after each segregation process to a H{sub 2}-pressure of 2.2 x 10{sup -4} Pa for a period of 1800 sec. The hydrogen amounts absorbed in the specimen were determined by thermal desorption mass spectrometry (TDMS). It was found that segregation of oxygen close to the surface of the specimen likewise hampers the absorption of hydrogen. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Der Einfluss des im Volumen geloesten Sauerstoffs auf die Wasserstoff-Absorption in Vanadium wurde in einer UHV-Apparatur untersucht. Zunaechst wurde die V-Probe mit einem Sauerstoffgehalt von 230 ppm unterschiedlichen thermischen Behandlungen ausgesetzt. Die sich einstellenden Konzentrationstiefenverteilungen des an der Oberflaeche segregierten Sauerstoffs wurden anschliessend mit SIMS untersucht. Dabei nimmt die Menge des segregierten Sauerstoffs mit der Hoehe der Endtemperatur sowie der Temperzeit zu. In einem weiteren Experiment wurde die Probe nach jeder Segregationsprozedur fuer eine Zeit von 1800 sec einem H{sub 2}-Druck von 2.2 x 10{sup -4} Pa ausgesetzt. Die Mengen des dabei aufgenommenen Wasserstoffs wurden mit Hilfe der thermischen Desorptions-Massenspektrometrie TDMS bestimmt. Dabei zeigt sich, dass auch die Segregation von Sauerstoff im oberflaechennahen Bereich die Wasserstoffaufnahme in Vanadium behindert. (orig.)

  11. X-Ray Absorption Studies of Vanadium-Containing Metal Oxide Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohn, Keith, L.

    2006-01-09

    Metal oxide nanocrystals offer significant potential for use as catalysts or catalyst supports due to their high surface areas and unique chemical properties that result from the high number of exposed corners and edges. However, little is known about the catalytic activity of these materials, especially as oxidation catalysts. This research focused on the preparation, characterization and use of vanadium-containing nanocrystals as selective oxidation catalysts. Three vanadium-containing nanocrystals were prepared using a modified sol-gel procedure: V/MgO, V/SiO2, and vanadium phosphate (VPO). These represent active oxidation catalysts for a number of industrially relevant reactions. The catalysts were characterized by x-ray diffraction and Raman, UV-VIS, infrared and x-ray absorption spectroscopies with the goal of determining the primary structural and chemical differences between nanocrystals and microcrystals. The catalytic activity of these catalysts was also studied in oxidative dehydrogenation of butane and methanol oxidation to formaldehyde. V/MgO nanocrystals were investigated for activity in oxidative dehydrogenation of butane and compared to conventional V/MgO catalysts. Characterization of V/MgO catalysts using Raman spectroscopy and x-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that both types of catalysts contained magnesium orthovanadate at vanadium loadings below 15 weight%, but above that loading, magnesium pyrovanadate may have been present. In general, MgO nanocrystals had roughly half the crystal size and double the surface area of the conventional MgO. In oxidative dehydrogenation of butane, nanocrystalline V/MgO gave higher selectivity to butene than conventional V/MgO at the same conversion. This difference was attributed to differences in vanadium domain size resulting from the higher surface areas of the nanocrystalline support, since characterization suggested that similar vanadium phases were present on both types of catalysts. Experiments in

  12. Scanning electron microscopy investigations of laboratory-grown gas clathrate hydrates formed from melting ice, and comparison to natural hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Circone, S.; Durham, W.B.

    2004-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate grain texture and pore structure development within various compositions of pure sI and sII gas hydrates synthesized in the laboratory, as well as in natural samples retrieved from marine (Gulf of Mexico) and permafrost (NW Canada) settings. Several samples of methane hydrate were also quenched after various extents of partial reaction for assessment of mid-synthesis textural progression. All laboratory-synthesized hydrates were grown under relatively high-temperature and high-pressure conditions from rounded ice grains with geometrically simple pore shapes, yet all resulting samples displayed extensive recrystallization with complex pore geometry. Growth fronts of mesoporous methane hydrate advancing into dense ice reactant were prevalent in those samples quenched after limited reaction below and at the ice point. As temperatures transgress the ice point, grain surfaces continue to develop a discrete "rind" of hydrate, typically 5 to 30 ??m thick. The cores then commonly melt, with rind microfracturing allowing migration of the melt to adjacent grain boundaries where it also forms hydrate. As the reaction continues under progressively warmer conditions, the hydrate product anneals to form dense and relatively pore-free regions of hydrate grains, in which grain size is typically several tens of micrometers. The prevalence of hollow, spheroidal shells of hydrate, coupled with extensive redistribution of reactant and product phases throughout reaction, implies that a diffusion-controlled shrinking-core model is an inappropriate description of sustained hydrate growth from melting ice. Completion of reaction at peak synthesis conditions then produces exceptional faceting and euhedral crystal growth along exposed pore walls. Further recrystallization or regrowth can then accompany even short-term exposure of synthetic hydrates to natural ocean-floor conditions, such that the final textures may closely mimic

  13. Vanadium pentoxide nanoparticles mimic vanadium haloperoxidases and thwart biofilm formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Natalio, F.; Andre, R.; Hartog, A.F.; Stoll, B.; Jochum, K.P.; Wever, R.; Tremel, W.

    2012-01-01

    Marine biofouling—the colonization of small marine microorganisms on surfaces that are directly exposed to seawater, such as ships' hulls—is an expensive problem that is currently without an environmentally compatible solution1. Biofouling leads to increased hydrodynamic drag, which, in turn, causes

  14. Structure, activity and kinetics of supported molybdenum oxide and mixed molybdenum-vanadium oxide catalysts prepared by flame spray pyrolysis for propane OHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høj, Martin; Kessler, Thomas; Beato, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy and evaluated as catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of propane. The results show that samples with high specific surface areas between 122 and 182 m2/g were obtained, resulting in apparent MoOx and VOx surface densities from 0.7 to 7.7 nm -2 and 1.5 to 1.9 nm-2......, respectively. Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy and XRD confirmed the high dispersion of molybdenum and vanadia species on γ-Al2O3 as the main crystalline phase. Only at the highest loading of 15 wt% Mo, with theoretically more than monolayer coverage, some crystalline molybdenum oxide was observed....... For the mixed molybdenum-vanadium oxide catalysts the surface species were separate molybdenum oxide and vanadium oxide monomers at low loadings of molybdenum, but with increasing molybdenum loading interactions between surface molybdenum and vanadium oxide species were observed with Raman spectroscopy...

  15. One-step preparation and photocatalytic performance of vanadium doped TiO{sub 2} coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilić, R., E-mail: rastko.vasilic@ff.bg.ac.rs [University of Belgrade, Faculty of Physics, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Stojadinović, S. [University of Belgrade, Faculty of Physics, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Radić, N. [University of Belgrade, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, Department of Catalysis and Chemical Engineering, Njegoševa 12, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Stefanov, P. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Block 11, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Dohčević-Mitrović, Z. [University of Belgrade, Institute of Physics, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Grbić, B. [University of Belgrade, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, Department of Catalysis and Chemical Engineering, Njegoševa 12, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we have investigated one-step preparation of vanadium doped TiO{sub 2} coatings formed by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) of titanium in electrolyte containing 10 g/L Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}·12H{sub 2}O + 0.5 g/L NH{sub 4}VO{sub 3}. The morphology, phase structure, and elemental composition of the formed coatings were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Ultraviolet–visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV–Vis DRS) was employed to evaluate the band gap energy of obtained coatings. Vanadium doped TiO{sub 2} coatings are partly crystallized and mainly composed of anatase phase TiO{sub 2}, with up to about 2 wt% of vanadium present in the surface layer of the oxide. The valence band photoelectron spectra and UV–Vis DRS showed that vanadium doped TiO{sub 2} coatings exhibit notable red shift with respect to the pure TiO{sub 2} coatings. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated by monitoring the degradation of methyl orange under simulated sunlight conditions. Photocatalytic activity of vanadium doped TiO{sub 2} coatings increases with PEO time. Prolonged PEO times result in higher roughness of obtained coatings, thus increasing surface area available for methyl orange degradation. Vanadium doped TiO{sub 2} coatings obtained after 180 s of PEO time exhibit the best photocatalytic activity and about 67% of methyl orange is degraded after 12 h of irradiation under simulated sunlight. - Highlights: • One-step preparation of V-doped TiO{sub 2} coatings in 10 g/L Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}·12H{sub 2}O + 0.5 g/L NH{sub 4}VO{sub 3}. • Properties of obtained coatings strongly depend on microdischarge characteristics. • Band gap of V-doped TiO{sub 2} coatings is shifted towards red side of the spectrum. • V-doped TiO{sub 2} coatings have better photocatalytic activity than pure TiO{sub 2}. • After 12 h of simulated sunlight irradiation, 67% of

  16. Observation of ice sheet formation on methane and ethane gas hydrates using a scanning confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, J.; Shimomura, N.; Ebinuma, T.; Narita, H. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Toyohira, Sapporo (Japan). Methane Hydrate Research Lab.

    2008-07-01

    Interest in gas hydrates has increased in recent years due to the discovery of large deposits under the ocean floor and in permafrost regions. Natural gas hydrates, including methane, is expected to become a new energy source and a medium for energy storage and transportation. Gas hydrates consist of an open network of water molecules that are hydrogen-bonded in a similar manner to ice. Gas molecules are interstitially engaged under high pressures and low temperatures. Although the dissociation temperature of methane hydrate under atmospheric pressure is about 193 K, studies have shown that methane hydrate can be stored at atmospheric pressure and 267 K for 2 years. Because of this phenomenon, known as self-preservation, transportation and storage of methane hydrate can occur at temperature conditions milder than those for liquefied methane gas at atmospheric pressure. This study examined the surface changes of methane and ethane hydrates during dissociation using an optical microscope and confocal scanning microscope (CSM). This paper reported on the results when the atmospheric gas pressure was decreased. Ice sheets formed on the surfaces of methane and ethane gas hydrates due to depressurizing dissociation of methane and ethane hydrates when the methane and ethane gas pressures were decreased at designated temperatures. The dissociation of methane gas hydrate below below 237 K resulted in the generation of small ice particles on the hydrate surface. A transparent ice sheet formed on the hydrate surface above 242 K. The thickness of the ice sheet on the methane hydrate surface showed the maximum of ca. 30 {mu}m at 253 K. In the case of ethane hydrates, ice particles and ice sheets formed below 262 and 267 respectively. Since the ice particles and ice sheets were formed by water molecules generated during the gas hydrate dissociation, the mechanism of ice sheet formation depends on the dissociation rate of hydrate, ice particle sintering rate, and water molecule

  17. Hydration and physical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Bob

    2007-10-01

    There is a rich scientific literature regarding hydration status and physical function that began in the late 1800s, although the relationship was likely apparent centuries before that. A decrease in body water from normal levels (often referred to as dehydration or hypohydration) provokes changes in cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, metabolic, and central nervous function that become increasingly greater as dehydration worsens. Similarly, performance impairment often reported with modest dehydration (e.g., -2% body mass) is also exacerbated by greater fluid loss. Dehydration during physical activity in the heat provokes greater performance decrements than similar activity in cooler conditions, a difference thought to be due, at least in part, to greater cardiovascular and thermoregulatory strain associated with heat exposure. There is little doubt that performance during prolonged, continuous exercise in the heat is impaired by levels of dehydration >or= -2% body mass, and there is some evidence that lower levels of dehydration can also impair performance even during relatively short-duration, intermittent exercise. Although additional research is needed to more fully understand low-level dehydration's effects on physical performance, one can generalize that when performance is at stake, it is better to be well-hydrated than dehydrated. This generalization holds true in the occupational, military, and sports settings.

  18. Nonequilibrium adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations of methane clathrate hydrate decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, J. A.

    2010-04-01

    Nonequilibrium, constant energy, constant volume (NVE) molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the decomposition of methane clathrate hydrate in contact with water. Under adiabatic conditions, the rate of methane clathrate decomposition is affected by heat and mass transfer arising from the breakup of the clathrate hydrate framework and release of the methane gas at the solid-liquid interface and diffusion of methane through water. We observe that temperature gradients are established between the clathrate and solution phases as a result of the endothermic clathrate decomposition process and this factor must be considered when modeling the decomposition process. Additionally we observe that clathrate decomposition does not occur gradually with breakup of individual cages, but rather in a concerted fashion with rows of structure I cages parallel to the interface decomposing simultaneously. Due to the concerted breakup of layers of the hydrate, large amounts of methane gas are released near the surface which can form bubbles that will greatly affect the rate of mass transfer near the surface of the clathrate phase. The effects of these phenomena on the rate of methane hydrate decomposition are determined and implications on hydrate dissociation in natural methane hydrate reservoirs are discussed.

  19. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  20. Some thermodynamical aspects of protein hydration water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallamace, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.mallamace@unime.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Corsaro, Carmelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Mallamace, Domenico [Dipartimento SASTAS, Università di Messina, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Sebastiano [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Cirino [CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Stanley, H. Eugene [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Chen, Sow-Hsin [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    We study by means of nuclear magnetic resonance the self-diffusion of protein hydration water at different hydration levels across a large temperature range that includes the deeply supercooled regime. Starting with a single hydration shell (h = 0.3), we consider different hydrations up to h = 0.65. Our experimental evidence indicates that two phenomena play a significant role in the dynamics of protein hydration water: (i) the measured fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover temperature is unaffected by the hydration level and (ii) the first hydration shell remains liquid at all hydrations, even at the lowest temperature.

  1. A statistical mechanical description of biomolecular hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    We present an efficient and accurate theoretical description of the structural hydration of biological macromolecules. The hydration of molecules of almost arbitrary size (tRNA, antibody-antigen complexes, photosynthetic reaction centre) can be studied in solution and in the crystal environment. The biomolecular structure obtained from x-ray crystallography, NMR, or modeling is required as input information. The structural arrangement of water molecules near a biomolecular surface is represented by the local water density analogous to the corresponding electron density in an x-ray diffraction experiment. The water-density distribution is approximated in terms of two- and three-particle correlation functions of solute atoms with water using a potentials-of-mean-force expansion.

  2. Experimental techniques for cement hydration studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Luttge

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cement hydration kinetics is a complex problem of dissolution, nucleation and growth that is still not well understood, particularly in a quantitative way. While cement systems are unique in certain aspects they are also comparable to natural mineral systems. Therefore, geochemistry and particularly the study of mineral dissolution and growth may be able to provide insight and methods that can be utilized in cement hydration research. Here, we review mainly what is not known or what is currently used and applied in a problematic way. Examples are the typical Avrami approach, the application of Transition State Theory (TST to overall reaction kinetics and the problem of reactive surface area. Finally, we suggest an integrated approach that combines vertical scanning interferometry (VSI with other sophisticated analytical techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM and theoretical model calculations based on a stochastic treatment.

  3. Propane hydrate nucleation: Experimental investigation and correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    In this work the nucleation kinetics of propane gas hydrate has been investigated experimentally using a stirred batch reactor. The experiments have been performed isothermally recording the pressure as a function of time. Experiments were conducted at different stirring rates, but in the same......) to the aqueous phase was found to reduce the gas dissolution rate slightly. However the induction times were prolonged quite substantially upon addition of PVP.The induction time data were correlated using a newly developed induction time model based on crystallization theory also capable of taking into account...... the presence of additives. In most cases reasonable agreement between the data and the model could be obtained. The results revealed that especially the effective surface energy between propane hydrate and water is likely to change when the stirring rate varies from very high to low. The prolongation...

  4. Detection and Appraisal of Gas Hydrates: Indian Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sain, K.

    2009-04-01

    Gas hydrates, found in shallow sediments of permafrost and outer continental margins, are crystalline form of methane and water. The carbon within global gas hydrates is estimated two times the carbon contained in world-wide fossil fuels. It is also predicted that 15% recovery of gas hydrates can meet the global energy requirement for the next 200 years. Several parameters like bathymetry, seafloor temperature, sediment thickness, rate of sedimentation and total organic carbon content indicate very good prospect of gas hydrates in the vast offshore regions of India. Methane stored in the form of gas hydrates within the Indian exclusive economic zone is estimated to be few hundred times the country's conventional gas reserve. India produces less than one-third of her oil requirement and gas hydrates provide great hopes as a viable source of energy in the 21st century. Thus identification and quantitative assessment of gas hydrates are very important. By scrutiny and reanalysis of available surface seismic data, signatures of gas hydrates have been found out in the Kerala-Konkan and Saurashtra basins in the western margin, and Krishna-Godavari, Mahanadi and Andaman regions in the eastern margin of India by mapping the bottom simulating reflector or BSR based on its characteristic features. In fact, the coring and drilling in 2006 by the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program have established the ground truth in the eastern margin. It has become all the more important now to identify further prospective regions with or without BSR; demarcate the lateral/areal extent of gas hydrate-bearing sediments and evaluate their resource potential in both margins of India. We have developed various approaches based on seismic traveltime tomography; waveform inversion; amplitude versus offset (AVO) modeling; AVO attributes; seismic attributes and rock physics modeling for the detection, delineation and quantification of gas-hydrates. The blanking, reflection strength, instantaneous

  5. Fragility–structure–conductivity relations in vanadium tellurite glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Yue, Yuanzheng; Rodrigues, Ana Candida Martins

    the ability to intercalate lithium-ions, it is a candidate as cathode material. Here, we investigate the correlation between liquid fragility, structure and electronic conductivity in a series of vanadium-tellurite glasses with varying vanadium concentration. We measure dynamic and thermodynamic fragility...

  6. Vanadium-pumped titanium x-ray laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, J.

    1991-02-13

    A resonantly photo-pumped x-ray laser is formed of a vanadium and titanium foil combination that is driven by two beams of intense line focused optical laser radiation. Ground state neon-like titanium ions are resonantly photo-pumped by line emission from fluorine-like vanadium ions.

  7. Study of the structure of passivated vanadium-titanium alloys and their semiconductor properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, T; Vonau, W; John, P

    2002-10-01

    The possibility of investigating the photocurrent behavior and structure of electrochemically prepared passive films on metallic titanium and on binary vanadium-titanium alloys has been demonstrated. The semiconductor properties were characterized by measuring the dependence of the photocurrent on the wavelength of the incident light and on the electrode potential. The results showed the oxide layers to be n-type semiconductors with a bandgap between 2.6 and 3.3 eV and a flatband potential of approximately -300 to +400 mV (relative to the SCE). The results were interpreted in terms of the corrosion characteristics of the materials. XPS measurements on pure vanadium and some alloys are presented. Several properties were used to characterize the passive surface of these materials. The V(2)O(5) and TiO(2) content decreases with increasing depth.

  8. Oxidative dehydration of glycerol to acrylic acid over vanadium-impregnated zeolite beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pestana, Carolina F.M.; Guerra, Antonio C.O.; Turci, Cassia C. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Ferreira, Glaucio B. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Mota, Claudio J.A., E-mail: cmota@iq.ufrj.br [INCT Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    The oxidative dehydration of glycerol to acrylic acid was studied over vanadium-impregnated zeolite Beta. Catalysts were prepared by wet impregnation of ammonium metavanadate over ammonium-exchanged zeolite Beta, followed by air calcination at 823 K. Impregnation reduced the specific surface area, but did not significantly affected the acidity (Bronsted and Lewis) of the zeolites. The catalytic evaluation was carried out in a fixed bed flow reactor using air as the carrier and injecting glycerol by means of a syringe pump. Acrolein was the main product, with acetaldehyde and hydroxy-acetone (acetol) being also formed. Acrylic acid was formed with approximately 25% selectivity at 548 K over the impregnated zeolites. The result can be explained by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) measurements, which indicated a good dispersion of the vanadium inside the pores. (author)

  9. Portland cement hydration in the presence of admixtures: black gram pulse and superplasticizer

    OpenAIRE

    Viveka Nand Dwivedi; Shiva Saran Das; Nakshatra Bahadur Singh; Sarita Rai; Namdev Shriram Gajbhiye

    2008-01-01

    Effect of admixtures such as black gram pulse (BGP) and sulfonated naphthalene based superplasticizer (SP) on the hydration of Portland cement has been studied. The hydration characteristics of OPC in the presence of BGP and SP were studied with the help of non evaporable water content determinations, calorimetric method, Mössbauer spectroscopic and atomic force microscopic techniques. Results have shown that both BGP and SP get adsorbed at the surface of cement and its hydration products. Th...

  10. Hydrophobic hydration from small to large lengthscales: Understanding and manipulating the crossover

    OpenAIRE

    Rajamani, Sowmianarayanan; Truskett, Thomas M.; Garde, Shekhar

    2005-01-01

    Small and large hydrophobic solutes exhibit remarkably different hydration thermodynamics. Small solutes are accommodated in water with minor perturbations to water structure, and their hydration is captured accurately by theories that describe density fluctuations in pure water. In contrast, hydration of large solutes is accompanied by dewetting of their surfaces and requires a macroscopic thermodynamic description. A unified theoretical description of these lengthscale dependencies was pres...

  11. Theoretical study of the influence of cation vacancies on the catalytic properties of vanadium antimonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messina, S. [Laboratorio de Procesos Cataliticos, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, FIUBA, Pabellon de Industrias, Ciudad Universitaria, (1428) Capital Federal (Argentina); Juan, A. [Departamento de Fisica, UNS, Av. Alem 1253, (8000) Bahia Blanca (Argentina)], E-mail: cajuan@uns.edu.ar; Larrondo, S.; Irigoyen, B.; Amadeo, N. [Laboratorio de Procesos Cataliticos, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, FIUBA, Pabellon de Industrias, Ciudad Universitaria, (1428) Capital Federal (Argentina)

    2008-07-15

    We have theoretically studied the influence of antimony and vanadium cation vacancies in the electronic structure and reactivity of vanadium antimonate, using molecular orbital methods. From the analysis of the electronic properties of the VSbO{sub 4} crystal structure, we can infer that both antimony and vanadium vacancies increase the oxidation state of closer V cations. This would indicate that, in the rutile-type VSbO{sub 4} phase the Sb and V cations defects stabilize the V in a higher oxidation state (V{sup 4+}). Calculations of the adsorption energy for different toluene adsorption geometries on the VSbO{sub 4}(1 1 0) surface have also been performed. The oxidation state of Sb, V and O atoms and the overlap population of metal-oxygen bonds have been evaluated. Our results indicate that the cation defects influence in the toluene adsorption reactions is slight. We have computed different alternatives for the reoxidation of the VSbO{sub 4}(1 1 0) surface active sites which were reduced during the oxygenated products formation. These calculations indicate that the V cations in higher oxidation state (V{sup 4+}) are the species, which preferentially incorporate lattice oxygen to the reduced Sb cations. Thus, the cation defects would stabilize the V{sup 4+} species in the VSbO{sub 4} structure, determining its ability to provide lattice oxygen as a reactant.

  12. Oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde on supported vanadium oxide catalysts compared to gas phase molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döbler, Jens; Pritzsche, Marc; Sauer, Joachim

    2005-08-10

    The oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde on silica supported vanadium oxide is studied by density functional theory. For isolated vanadium oxide species silsesquioxane-type models are adopted. The first step is dissociative adsorption of methanol yielding CH3O(O=)V(O-)2 surface complexes. This makes the O=V(OCH3)3 molecule a suited model system. The rate-limiting oxidation step involves hydrogen transfer from the methoxy group to the vanadyl oxygen atom. The transition state is biradicaloid and needs to be treated by the broken-symmetry approach. The activation energies for O=V(OCH3)3 and the silsesquioxane surface model are 147 and 154 kJ/mol. In addition, the (O=V(OCH3)3)(2) dimer (a model for polymeric vanadium oxide species) and the O=V(OCH3)3(*+) radical cation are studied. For the latter the barrier is only 80 kJ/mol, indicating a strong effect of the charge on the energy profile of the reaction and questioning the significance of gas-phase cluster studies for understanding the activity of supported oxide catalysts.

  13. Anion-conductive membranes with ultralow vanadium permeability and excellent performance in vanadium flow batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Zhensheng; Zhang, Huamin; Zhang, Hongzhang; Xu, Wanxing; Wei, Wenping; Na, Hui; Li, Xianfeng

    2013-02-01

    Anion exchange membranes prepared from quaternized poly(tetramethyl diphenyl ether sulfone) (QAPES) were first investigated in the context of vanadium flow battery (VFB) applications. The membranes showed an impressive suppression effect on vanadium ions. The recorded vanadium permeability was 0.02×10(-7)-0.09×10(-7) cm(2) min(-1), which was two orders of magnitude lower than that of Nafion 115. The self-discharge duration of a VFB single cell with a QAPES membrane is four times longer than that of Nafion 115. The morphological difference in hydrophilic domains between QAPES and Nafion was confirmed by TEM. After soaking the membranes in VO(2)(+) solution, adsorbed vanadium ions can barely be found in QAPES, whereas the hydrophilic domains of Nafion were stained. In the ex situ chemical stability test, QAPES showed a high tolerance to VO(2)(+) and remained intact after immersion in VO(2)(+) solution for over 250 h. The performance of a VFB single cell assembled with QAPES membranes is equal to or even better than that of Nafion 115 and remains stable in a long-term cycle test. These results indicate that QAPES membranes can be an ideal option in the fabrication of high-performance VFBs with low electric capacity loss.

  14. Recent progress on gas tungsten arc welding of vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J.F.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Goodwin, G.M.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This is a progress report on a continuing research project to acquire a fundamental understanding of the metallurgical processes in the welding of vanadium alloys. It also has the goal of developing techniques for welding structural vanadium alloys. The alloy V-4Cr-4Ti is used as a representative alloy of the group; it is also the prime candidate vanadium alloy for the U.S. Fusion Program at the present time. However, other alloys of this class were used in the research as necessary. The present work focuses on recent findings of hydrogen embrittlement found in vanadium alloy welds. It was concluded that the atmosphere in the inert gas glove box was insufficient for welding 6mm thick vanadium alloy plates.

  15. Chemistry related to the procurement of vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, H.M.; Chung H.M.; Tsai, H.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Evaluation of trace element concentrations in vanadium alloys is important to characterize the low-activation characteristics and possible effects of trace elements on the properties. Detailed chemical analysis of several vanadium and vanadium alloy heats procured for the Argonne vanadium alloy development program were analyzed by Johnson-Matthey (UK) as part of a joint activity to evaluate trace element effects on the performance characteristics. These heats were produced by normal production practices for high grade vanadium. The analyses include approximately 60 elements analyzed in most cases by glow-discharge mass spectrometry. Values for molybdenum and niobium, which are critical for low-activation alloys, ranged from 0.4 to 60 wppm for the nine heats.

  16. Solvent extraction of vanadium from sulfuric acid solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mingyu; ZHANG Guiqing; WANG Xuewen; ZHANG Jialiang

    2009-01-01

    The behaviour of vanadium(V) extracted from sulfuric acid solution was investigated using Cyanex 923 as an cxtractant. The effects of the concentration of Cyanex 923 and the pH of the solution were studied. The extraction of vanadium(V) increases with the increase of Cyanex 923 concentration and shaking time. Cyanex 923 can extract vanadium(V) fi'om sulfuric acid solution at low pH conditions, and the best pH conditions for exuaction of vanadium(V) are at pH 1.0-2.0. The species extracted into the organic phase is VO2HSO4 with one molecule of Cyanex 923. Equilibrium studies were used to assess the extraction efficiency of vanadium(V) recovery from the sulfuric acid solution.

  17. Metabolic problems in northeastern Thailand: possible role of vanadium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitprija, V; Tungsanga, K; Tosukhowong, P; Leelhaphunt, N; Kruerklai, D; Sriboonlue, P; Saew, O

    1993-01-01

    Common metabolic problems in northeastern Thailand include renal stone disease, distal renal tubular acidosis, hypokalemic periodic paralysis, sudden unexplained nocturnal death and malnutrition-related diabetes mellitus. There is evidence of decreased activity of Na,K-ATPase and H,K-ATPase. A preliminary study was made of the vanadium concentration in the soil and water in northeastern Thailand. The urinary and tissue vanadium concentrations were also determined in the northeastern villagers. The soil was found to have high vanadium content. The vanadium content was also high in the urine, kidneys and lungs of the villagers. It is postulated that these metabolic problems are attributed to the inhibition of Na,K-ATPase and H,K-ATPase activity by vanadium.

  18. 40 CFR 440.30 - Applicability; description of the uranium, radium and vanadium ores subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for the extraction of uranium, radium and vanadium. Only vanadium byproduct production from uranium... uranium, radium and vanadium ores subcategory. 440.30 Section 440.30 Protection of Environment... SOURCE CATEGORY Uranium, Radium and Vanadium Ores Subcategory § 440.30 Applicability; description of...

  19. Path-integral molecular dynamics simulations of hydrated hydrogen chloride cluster HCl(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} on a semiempirical potential energy surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayanagi, Toshiyuki, E-mail: tako@mail.saitama-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama City, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Takahashi, Kenta; Kakizaki, Akira [Department of Chemistry, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama City, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Shiga, Motoyuki [Center for Computational Science and E-systems, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Higashi-Ueno 6-9-3, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-0015 (Japan); Tachikawa, Masanori [Quantum Chemistry Division, International Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Yokohama-City University, Seto 22-2, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan)

    2009-04-22

    Path-integral molecular dynamics simulations for the HCl(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} cluster have been performed on the ground-state potential energy surface directly obtained on-the-fly from semiempirical PM3-MAIS molecular orbital calculations. It is found that the HCl(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} cluster has structural rearrangement above the temperature of 300 K showing a liquid-like behavior. Quantum mechanical fluctuation of hydrogen nuclei plays a significant role in structural arrangement processes in this cluster.

  20. Path-integral molecular dynamics simulations of hydrated hydrogen chloride cluster HCl(H 2O) 4 on a semiempirical potential energy surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Kenta; Kakizaki, Akira; Shiga, Motoyuki; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2009-04-01

    Path-integral molecular dynamics simulations for the HCl(H 2O) 4 cluster have been performed on the ground-state potential energy surface directly obtained on-the-fly from semiempirical PM3-MAIS molecular orbital calculations. It is found that the HCl(H 2O) 4 cluster has structural rearrangement above the temperature of 300 K showing a liquid-like behavior. Quantum mechanical fluctuation of hydrogen nuclei plays a significant role in structural arrangement processes in this cluster.

  1. Investigation on Gas Storage in Methane Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigao Sun; Rongsheng Ma; Shuanshi Fan; Kaihua Guo; Ruzhu Wang

    2004-01-01

    The effect of additives (anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), nonionic surfactant alkyl polysaccharide glycoside (APG), and liquid hydrocarbon cyclopentane (CP)) on hydrate induction time and formation rate, and storage capacity was studied in this work. Micelle surfactant solutions were found to reduce hydrate induction time, increase methane hydrate formation rate and improve methane storage capacity in hydrates. In the presence of surfactant, hydrate could form quickly in a quiescent system and the energy costs of hydrate formation were reduced. The critical micelle concentrations of SDS and APG water solutions were found to be 300× 10-6 and 500× 10-6 for methane hydrate formation system respectively. The effect of anionic surfactant (SDS) on methane storage in hydrates is more pronounced compared to a nonionic surfactant (APG). CP also reduced hydrate induction time and improved hydrate formation rate, but could not improve methane storage in hydrates.

  2. Conceptual chemistry approach towards the support effect in supported vanadium oxides : Valence bond calculations on the ionicity of vanadium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fievez, Tim; De Proft, Frank; Geerlings, Paul; Weckhuysen, Bert M.; Havenith, Remco W. A.

    2011-01-01

    The concept of bond ionicity, obtained via a valence bond analysis, is invoked in the interpretation of the catalytic activity of supported vanadium oxides, in analogy with previous work conducted within the framework of conceptual DFT. For a set of model clusters representing the vanadium oxide sup

  3. Temperature dependence of protein hydration hydrodynamics by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, E Y; Krishnan, V V

    2007-07-18

    The dynamics of water molecules near the protein surface are different from those of bulk water and influence the structure and dynamics of the protein itself. To elucidate the temperature dependence hydration dynamics of water molecules, we present results from the molecular dynamic simulation of the water molecules surrounding two proteins (Carboxypeptidase inhibitor and Ovomucoid) at seven different temperatures (T=273 to 303 K, in increments of 5 K). Translational diffusion coefficients of the surface water and bulk water molecules were estimated from 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Temperature dependence of the estimated bulk water diffusion closely reflects the experimental values, while hydration water diffusion is retarded significantly due to the protein. Protein surface induced scaling of translational dynamics of the hydration waters is uniform over the temperature range studied, suggesting the importance protein-water interactions.

  4. Five ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces for hydrated NaCl and NaF. I. Two-body interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimin; Bowman, Joel M; Kamarchik, Eugene

    2016-03-21

    We report full-dimensional, ab initio-based potentials and dipole moment surfaces for NaCl, NaF, Na(+)H2O, F(-)H2O, and Cl(-)H2O. The NaCl and NaF potentials are diabatic ones that dissociate to ions. These are obtained using spline fits to CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV5Z energies. In addition, non-linear least square fits using the Born-Mayer-Huggins potential are presented, providing accurate parameters based strictly on the current ab initio energies. The long-range behavior of the NaCl and NaF potentials is shown to go, as expected, accurately to the point-charge Coulomb interaction. The three ion-H2O potentials are permutationally invariant fits to roughly 20,000 coupled cluster CCSD(T) energies (awCVTZ basis for Na(+) and aVTZ basis for Cl(-) and F(-)), over a large range of distances and H2O intramolecular configurations. These potentials are switched accurately in the long range to the analytical ion-dipole interactions, to improve computational efficiency. Dipole moment surfaces are fits to MP2 data; for the ion-ion cases, these are well described in the intermediate- and long-range by the simple point-charge expression. The performance of these new fits is examined by direct comparison to additional ab initio energies and dipole moments along various cuts. Equilibrium structures, harmonic frequencies, and electronic dissociation energies are also reported and compared to direct ab initio results. These indicate the high fidelity of the new PESs.

  5. Thermolysis of Half-Sandwich Vanadium(V) Imido Complexes to Generate Vanadium(III) Imido Species via a Vanadium(IV) Intermediate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batinas, Aurora A.; Dam, Jeroen; Meetsma, Auke; Hessen, Bart; Bouwkamp, Marco W.

    2010-01-01

    Thermolysis of half-sandwich vanadium imido complexes Cp(RN)V(i-Pr(2)N)Me (R = p-Tol, 1a; R = t-Bu, 1b) results in a mixture of products, including vanadium(IV) dimers [CpVMe](2)(mu-RN)(2), i-Pr(2)NH, i-PrNCMe(2), CH(4), and one or more paramagnetic species. In the presence of dmpe (dmpe =

  6. Manipulation of Terahertz Radiation Using Vanadium Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-Ye Wen

    2014-01-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is a phase transition material which undergoes a reversible metal-insulator transition (MIT) when triggered by thermal, photo, electrical, and even stress. The huge conduction change of VO2 renders it a promising material for terahertz (THz) manipulation. In this paper, some interesting works concerning the growth and characteristics of the VO2 film are selectively reviewed. A switching of THz radiation by photo-driven VO2 film is demonstrated. Experiments indicate an ultrafast optical switching to THz transmission within 8 picoseconds, and a switching ratio reaches to over 80%during a wide frequency range from 0.3 THz to 2.5 THz.

  7. Deformation of vanadium and niobium during hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geld, P.V.; Kats, M.IA.; Spivak, L.V.

    1986-01-01

    The deformation behavior of polycrystalline vanadium and niobium during hydrogenation is investigated experimentally using a torsional pendulum to load 0.5-mm-diameter, 80-mm-long wire specimens. It is found that under conditions of isothermal hydrogenation, the macrodeformation of the V and Nb specimens is determined by the contributions of the following two components: deformation due to changes in the shear modulus of the system metal-hydrogen and deformation due to the oriented growth of the hydride phase in an applied stress field. 9 references.

  8. Lithium insertion in sputtered vanadium oxide film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, K.; Zachau-Christiansen, B.; Skaarup, S.V.

    1992-01-01

    were oxygen deficient compared to V2O5. Films prepared in pure argon were reduced to V(4) or lower. The vanadium oxide films were tested in solid-state lithium cells. Films sputtered in oxygen showed electrochemical properties similar to crystalline V2O5. The main differences are a decreased capacity...... above 3.0 V, showing that V is partially reduced, and a broadening of the capacity peaks, showing that the crystallinity of these films is rather low. The film sputtered in argon behaved differently, discharging at a very low potential, 1.9 V versus Li, in the first cycle. In subsequent cycles...

  9. Hydrates fighting tools; Des outils de lutte contre les hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2003-04-01

    Shell Exploration and Production company (SEPCo) is the operator of the 'Popeye' deep offshore field in the Gulf of Mexico. Thanks to the introduction of a low dosing hydrates inhibitor (LDHI) elaborated by Shell Global Solutions, the company has added a 7.5 Gpc extra volume of gas to its recoverable reserves. This new technology avoids the plugging of pipes by hydrates formation. (J.S.)

  10. A Proposed Unified Theory of Hydrated Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivkin, Andrew S.

    2016-10-01

    The last decade has seen tremendous growth in the study of hydrated and hydroxylated minerals (hereafter simply called "hydrated minerals") on asteroids. Several workers have used absorptions in the 3-µm region and a correlated absorption near 0.7 µm to determine not only the presence or absence of these minerals but gain insight into the compositions of asteroid surfaces. Spectra of hundreds of asteroids have been measured and published or presented at meetings, and we are in a position to use these newer datasets to globally assess the patterns and relationships we see, as previously done by Jones et al. (1990) and Takir et al. (2012). There are several points to be addressed by any such assessment. Several different band shapes are seen in the 3-µm region, only one of which is seen in the hydrated meteorites in our collections. However, each of the main 3-µm band shapes is represented among parent bodies of collisional families. There seems to be little correlation in general between asteroid spectral class and 3-µm band shape, save for the Ch meteorites which are overwhelmingly likely to share the same band shape as the CM meteorites. Ceres has an unusual but not unique band shape, which has thus far only been found on the largest asteroids. I will present an outline scenario for the formation and evolution of hydrated asteroids, where aqueous alteration serves to lithify some objects while other objects remain unlithified and still others differentiate and suffer collisional modification. While some details will no doubt be altered to account for better or new information, this scenario is offered as a starting point for discussion.

  11. Non-Isothermal, Multi-phase, Multi-component Flows through Deformable Methane Hydrate Reservoirs

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Shubhangi; Wohlmuth, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    We present a hydro-geomechanical model for subsurface methane hydrate systems. Our model considers kinetic hydrate phase change and non-isothermal, multi-phase, multi-component flow in elastically deforming soils. The model accounts for the effects of hydrate phase change and pore pressure changes on the mechanical properties of the soil, and also for the effect of soil deformation on the fluid-solid interaction properties relevant to reaction and transport processes (e.g., permeability, capillary pressure, reaction surface area). We discuss a 'cause-effect' based decoupling strategy for the model and present our numerical discretization and solution scheme. We then identify the important model components and couplings which are most vital for a hydro-geomechanical hydrate simulator, namely, 1) dissociation kinetics, 2) hydrate phase change coupled with non-isothermal two phase two component flow, 3) two phase flow coupled with linear elasticity (poroelasticity coupling), and finally 4) hydrate phase change c...

  12. Monitoring hydrate formation and dissociation in sandstone and bulk with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, B A; Moradi-Araghi, A; Stevens, J C

    2003-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be a very effective tool for monitoring the formation and dissociation of hydrates because of the large intensity contrast between the images of the liquid components and the solid hydrate. Tetrahydrofuran/water hydrate was used because the two liquid components are miscible and form hydrate at ambient pressure. These properties made this feasibility study proceed much faster than using methane/water, which requires high pressure to form the hydrate. The formation and dissociation was monitored first in a THF/water-saturated Berea sandstone plug and second in the bulk. In both cases it appeared that nucleation was needed to begin the formation process, i.e., the presence of surfaces in the sandstone and shaking of the bulk solution. Dissociation appeared to be dominated by the rate of thermal energy transfer. The dissociation temperature of hydrate formed in the sandstone plug was not significantly different from the dissociation temperature in bulk.

  13. A new electrocatalyst and its application method for vanadium redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guanjie; Jing, Minghua; Fan, Xinzhuang; Liu, Jianguo; Yan, Chuanwei

    2015-08-01

    The edge plane in carbon structure has good electrocatalytic activity toward vanadium redox reaction. To apply it in vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) practically, the graphite nanopowders (GNPs) containing amounts of edge planes are used as electrocatalyst and embedded in the electrospun carbon nanofibers (ECNFs) by different mass ratios to make composite electrodes. The morphology and electrochemical activity of the GNPs and the composite electrodes containing them are characterized. Compared with the pristine ECNFs, the composite electrodes show much higher electrochemical activity. With the increase of GNPs content in composite electrodes, the electrochemical reversibility of the vanadium redox couples also increases. It proves the addition of GNPs can surely improve the electrochemical activity of ECNFs. Among the composite electrodes, the ECNFs containing 30 nm GNP by mass ratio of 1:50 show the best electrochemical activity, largest active surface area and excellent stability. Due to the high performance of GNP/ECNFs composite electrode and its relatively low cost preparation process, the GNPs are expected to be used as electrocatalyst in VRFB on a large scale to improve the cell performance.

  14. Multiplier, moderator, and reflector materials for lithium-vanadium fusion blankets.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohar, Y.; Smith, D. L.

    1999-10-07

    The self-cooled lithium-vanadium fusion blanket concept has several attractive operational and environmental features. In this concept, liquid lithium works as the tritium breeder and coolant to alleviate issues of coolant breeder compatibility and reactivity. Vanadium alloy (V-4Cr-4Ti) is used as the structural material because of its superior performance relative to other alloys for this application. However, this concept has poor attenuation characteristics and energy multiplication for the DT neutrons. An advanced self-cooled lithium-vanadium fusion blanket concept has been developed to eliminate these drawbacks while maintaining all the attractive features of the conventional concept. An electrical insulator coating for the coolant channels, spectral shifter (multiplier, and moderator) and reflector were utilized in the blanket design to enhance the blanket performance. In addition, the blanket was designed to have the capability to operate at high loading conditions of 2 MW/m{sup 2} surface heat flux and 10 MW/m{sup 2} neutron wall loading. This paper assesses the spectral shifter and the reflector materials and it defines the technological requirements of this advanced blanket concept.

  15. Formation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments. Gas hydrate growth and stability conditioned by host sediment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clennell, M.B.; Henry, P.; Hovland, M.; Booth, J.S.; Winters, W.J.; Thomas, M.

    2000-01-01

    The stability conditions of submarine gas hydrates (methane clathrates) are largely dictated by pressure, temperature, gas composition, and pore water salinity. However, the physical properties and surface chemistry of the host sediments also affect the thermodynamic state, growth kinetics, spatial distributions, and growth forms of clathrates. Our model presumes that gas hydrate behaves in a way analogous to ice in the pores of a freezing soil, where capillary forces influence the energy balance. Hydrate growth is inhibited within fine-grained sediments because of the excess internal phase pressure of small crystals with high surface curvature that coexist with liquid water in small pores. Therefore, the base of gas hydrate stability in a sequence of fine sediments is predicted by our model to occur at a lower temperature, and so nearer to the seabed than would be calculated from bulk thermodynamic equilibrium. The growth forms commonly observed in hydrate samples recovered from marine sediments (nodules, sheets, and lenses in muds; cements in sand and ash layers) can be explained by a requirement to minimize the excess of mechanical and surface energy in the system.

  16. Gas hydrate fast nucleation from melting ice and quiescent growth along vertical heat transfer tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE; Yingming; GUO; Kaihua; LIANG; Deqing; FAN; Shuanshi

    2005-01-01

    During the observation of HCFC141b gas hydrate growth processes outside a vertical heat transfer tube, two exciting phenomena were found: fast nucleation of gas hydrate from melting ice, and the spontaneous permeation of water into the guest phases along the surface of heat transfer tube to form gas hydrate continuously. These two phenomena were explained with Zhou & Sloan's hypothesis and the theory of surface free energy respectively, and a novel method of gas hydrate formation was presented--gas hydrate fast nucleation from melting ice and quiescent growth along heat transfer tube. There is no mechanic stirring in this method, the formed gas hydrates are compact, the ratio of unreacted interstitial water is little, which overcome the drawback of high energy cost and high ratio of unreacted interstitial water among the formed gas hydrates in the system with mechanic stirring. This finding will benefit the gas hydrate application technologies such as natural gas storage technology or cool storage technology with gas hydrate.

  17. Platinum–Vanadium Oxide Nanotube Hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández EduardoPadrón

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present contribution reports on the features of platinum-based systems supported on vanadium oxide nanotubes. The synthesis of nanotubes was carried out using a commercial vanadium pentoxide via hydrothermal route. The nanostructured hybrid materials were prepared by wet impregnation using two different platinum precursors. The formation of platinum nanoparticles was evaluated by applying distinct reduction procedures. All nanostructured samples were essentially analysed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. After reduction, transmission electron microscopy also made it possible to estimate particle size distribution and mean diameter calculations. It could be seen that all reduction procedures did not affect the nanostructure of the supports and that the formation of metallic nanoparticles is quite efficient with an indistinct distribution along the nanotubes. Nevertheless, the reduction procedure determined the diameter, dispersion and shape of the metallic particles. It could be concluded that the use of H2PtCl6 is more suitable and that the use of hydrogen as reducing agent leads to a nanomaterial with unagglomerated round-shaped metallic particles with mean size of 6–7 nm.

  18. Facile synthesis of vanadium oxide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kysar, Jesse; Sekhar, Praveen Kumar

    2016-10-01

    A simple growth process is reported for the synthesis of vanadium (II) oxide nanowires with an average width of 65 nm and up to 5 μm in length for growth at 1000 °C for 3 h. The vanadium (II) oxide nanowires were grown on a gold-coated silicon substrate at ambient pressure using a single heat zone furnace with Ar as the carrier gas. Gold was utilized as a catalyst for the growth of the nanowires. The growth temperature and heating time were varied to observe the nanowire morphology. An increase in nanowire width was observed with an increase in the heating temperature. A ninefold increase in the number density of the nanowires was observed when the heating time was changed from 30 min to 3 h. This is the first time a simple growth process for producing VO nanowires at ambient pressure has been demonstrated. Such a scheme enables wider use of VO nanowires in critical applications such as energy storage, gas sensors, and optical devices.

  19. Evaluation of Heat Induced Methane Release from Methane Hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, J.; Elwood-Madden, M.; Phelps, T. J.; Rawn, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    Clathrates, or gas hydrates, structurally are guest gas molecules populating a cavity in a cage of water molecules. Gas hydrates naturally occur on Earth under low temperature and moderate pressure environments including continental shelf, deep ocean, and permafrost sediments. Large quantities of methane are trapped in hydrates, providing significant near-surface reserves of carbon and energy. Thermodynamics predicts that hydrate deposits may be destabilized by reducing the pressure in the system or raising the temperature. However, the rate of methane release due to varying environmental conditions remains relatively unconstrained and complicated by natural feedback effects of clathrate dissociation. In this study, hydrate dissociation in sediment due to localized increases in temperature was monitored and observed at the mesoscale (>20L) in a laboratory environment. Experiments were conducted in the Seafloor Process Simulator (SPS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to simulate heat induced dissociation. The SPS, containing a column of Ottawa sand saturated with water containing 25mg/L Sno-Max to aid nucleation, was pressurized and cooled well into the hydrate stability field. A fiber optic distributed sensing system (DSS) was embedded at four depths in the sediment column. This allowed the temperature strain value (a proxy for temperature) of the system to be measured with high spatial resolution to monitor the clathrate formation/dissociation processes. A heat exchanger embedded in the sediment was heated using hot recirculated ethylene glycol and the temperature drop across the exchanger was measured. These experiments indicate a significant and sustained amount of heat is required to release methane gas from hydrate-bearing sediments. Heat was consumed by hydrate dissociated in a growing sphere around the heat exchanger until steady state was reached. At steady state all heat energy entering the system was consumed in maintaining the temperature profile

  20. Ferromagnetism in vanadium-doped Bi2Se3 topological insulator films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liguo; Zhao, Dapeng; Zang, Yunyi; Yuan, Yonghao; Jiang, Gaoyuan; Liao, Menghan; Zhang, Ding; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qikun

    2017-07-01

    With molecular beam epitaxy, we grew uniformly vanadium-doped Bi2Se3 films which exhibit ferromagnetism with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. A systematic study on the magneto-transport properties of the films revealed the crucial role of topological surface states in ferromagnetic coupling. The enhanced ferromagnetism with reduced carrier density can support quantum anomalous Hall phase in the films, though the anomalous Hall resistance is far from quantization due to high carrier density. The topological surface states of films exhibit a gap of ˜180 meV which is unlikely to be magnetically induced but may significantly influence the quantum anomalous Hall effect in the system.

  1. Vanadium-base alloys for fusion reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.; Loomis, B.A.; Diercks, D.R.

    1984-10-01

    Vanadium-base alloys offer potentially significant advantages over other candidate alloys as a structural material for fusion reactor first wall/blanket applications. Although the data base is more limited than that for the other leading candidate structural materials, viz., austenitic and ferritic steels, vanadium-base alloys exhibit several properties that make them particularly attractive for the fusion reactor environment. This paper presents a review of the structural material requirements, a summary of the materials data base for selected vanadium-base alloys, and a comparison of projected performance characteristics compared to other candidate alloys. Also, critical research and development (R and D) needs are defined.

  2. Storing natural gas as frozen hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudmundsson, J.S.; Khokhar, A.A. (Univ. of Trondheim (Norway)); Parlaktuna, M. (Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey))

    1994-02-01

    The formation of natural gas hydrates is a well-known problem in the petroleum and natural gas industries. Hydrates are solid materials that form when liquid water and natural gas are brought in contact under pressure. Hydrate formation need not be a problem. On the contrary, it can be an advantage. The volume of hydrates is much less than that of natural gas. At standard conditions, hydrates occupy 150 to 170 times less volume than the corresponding gas. Typically, natural gas hydrates contain 15% gas and 85% water by mass. It follows that hydrates can be used for large-scale storage of natural gas. Benesh proposed using hydrates to improve the load factor of natural gas supply systems. The author suggested that hydrates could be produced by bringing liquid water into contact with natural gas at the appropriate temperature and high pressure. The hydrate then would be stored at a temperature and pressure where it was stable. When gas was needed for the supply system, the hydrate would be melted at low pressure. The stability of a natural gas hydrate during storage at atmospheric pressure and below-freezing temperatures was studied in the laboratory. The gas hydrate was produced in a stirred vessel at 2- to 6-MPa pressure and temperatures from 0 to 20 C. The hydrate was refrigerated and stored in deep freezers at [minus]5, [minus]10, and [minus]18 C for up to 10 days. The natural gas hydrate remained stable when kept frozen at atmospheric pressure.

  3. Strong and coverage-independent promotion of catalytic activity of a noble metal by subsurface vanadium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichl, Wolfgang; Hayek, Konrad

    2003-07-01

    While common bimetallic surfaces have a variable composition, the stable subsurface alloys of V/Rh and V/Pd are characterised by a purely noble metal-terminated surface and the second metal positioned in near-surface layers. The uniform composition of the topmost surface layer excludes conventional ensemble effects in catalysis, and the activity of the surface can be controlled by the metal loading and by the temperature of annealing. For example, the activity of a polycrystalline Rh surface in CO hydrogenation is significantly increased by promotion with subsurface vanadium. The modification of the subsurface layer with a different metal must be considered a promising approach to improve the catalytic properties of a metal surface.

  4. Airway Hydration and COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arunava; Boucher, R.C.; Tarran, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the prevalent causes of worldwide mortality and encompasses two major clinical phenotypes, i.e., chronic bronchitis (CB) and emphysema. The most common cause of COPD is chronic tobacco inhalation. Research focused on the chronic bronchitic phenotype of COPD has identified several pathological processes that drive disease initiation and progression. For example, the lung’s mucociliary clearance (MCC) system performs the critical task of clearing inhaled pathogens and toxic materials from the lung. MCC efficiency is dependent on: (i) the ability of apical plasma membrane ion channels such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) to maintain airway hydration; (ii) ciliary beating; and, (iii) appropriate rates of mucin secretion. Each of these components is impaired in CB and likely contributes to the mucus stasis/accumulation seen in CB patients. This review highlights the cellular components responsible for maintaining MCC and how this process is disrupted following tobacco exposure and with CB. We shall also discuss existing therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic bronchitis and how components of the MCC can be used as biomarkers for the evaluation of tobacco or tobacco-like-product exposure. PMID:26068443

  5. Mechanism of gypsum hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco, G.

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an hypothesis that the mechanism o f gypsum hydration and dehydration is performed through two simultaneous phenomena. In this study we try to clear up this phenomenon using chlorides as accelerators or a mixture of ethanol-methanol as retarders to carry out the gypsum setting. Natural Mexican gypsum samples and a hemihydrate prepared in the laboratory are used. The following analytical techniques are used: MO, DRX, DTA, TG and DTG. In agreement with the obtained results, it can be concluded: that colloid formation depends on the action of accelerators or retarders and the crystals are a consequence of the quantity of hemihydrate formed.

    En el mecanismo de hidratación y deshidratación del yeso existe la hipótesis de que éste se efectúa por dos fenómenos simultáneos. Este estudio intenta esclarecer estos fenómenos, empleando: cloruros como aceleradores o mezcla etanol-metanol como retardadores para efectuar el fraguado del yeso. Se emplean muestras de yeso de origen natural mexicano y hemihydrate preparado en laboratorio; se utilizan técnicas analíticas: MO, DRX, DTA, TG y DTG. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos se puede deducir: que la formación del coloide depende de la acción de los agentes aceleradores o retardadores y que los cristales son consecuencia de la cantidad de hemihidrato formado.

  6. Stability of rhombohedral phases in vanadium at high-pressure and high-temperature: first-principles investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi X.; Wu, Q.; Chen, Xiang R.; Geng, Hua Y.

    2016-09-01

    The pressure-induced transition of vanadium from BCC to rhombohedral structures is unique and intriguing among transition metals. In this work, the stability of these phases is revisited by using density functional theory. At finite temperatures, a novel transition of rhombohedral phases back to BCC phase induced by thermal electrons is discovered. This reentrant transition is found not driven by phonons, instead it is the electronic entropy that stabilizes the latter phase, which is totally out of expectation. Parallel to this transition, we find a peculiar and strong increase of the shear modulus C44 with increasing temperature. It is counter-intuitive in the sense that it suggests an unusual harding mechanism of vanadium by temperature. With these stability analyses, the high-pressure and finite-temperature phase diagram of vanadium is proposed. Furthermore, the dependence of the stability of RH phases on the Fermi energy and chemical environment is investigated. The results demonstrate that the position of the Fermi level has a significant impact on the phase stability, and follows the band-filling argument. Besides the Fermi surface nesting, we find that the localization/delocalization of the d orbitals also contributes to the instability of rhombohedral distortions in vanadium.

  7. Hofmeister effects: interplay of hydration, nonelectrostatic potentials, and ion size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Drew F; Boström, Mathias; Lo Nostro, Pierandrea; Ninham, Barry W

    2011-07-21

    The classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory of colloids, and corresponding theories of electrolytes, are unable to explain ion specific forces between colloidal particles quantitatively. The same is true generally, for surfactant aggregates, lipids, proteins, for zeta and membrane potentials and in adsorption phenomena. Even with fitting parameters the theory is not predictive. The classical theories of interactions begin with continuum solvent electrostatic (double layer) forces. Extensions to include surface hydration are taken care of with concepts like inner and outer Helmholtz planes, and "dressed" ion sizes. The opposing quantum mechanical attractive forces (variously termed van der Waals, Hamaker, Lifshitz, dispersion, nonelectrostatic forces) are treated separately from electrostatic forces. The ansatz that separates electrostatic and quantum forces can be shown to be thermodynamically inconsistent. Hofmeister or specific ion effects usually show up above ≈10(-2) molar salt. Parameters to accommodate these in terms of hydration and ion size had to be invoked, specific to each case. Ionic dispersion forces, between ions and solvent, for ion-ion and ion-surface interactions are not explicit in classical theories that use "effective" potentials. It can be shown that the missing ionic quantum fluctuation forces have a large role to play in specific ion effects, and in hydration. In a consistent predictive theory they have to be included at the same level as the nonlinear electrostatic forces that form the skeletal framework of standard theory. This poses a challenge. The challenges go further than academic theory and have implications for the interpretation and meaning of concepts like pH, buffers and membrane potentials, and for their experimental interpretation. In this article we overview recent quantitative developments in our evolving understanding of the theoretical origins of specific ion, or Hofmeister effects. These are demonstrated

  8. Parametric study of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sand, silt, and clay sediments: 2. Small-strain mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. Y.; Francisca, F. M.; Santamarina, J. C.; Ruppel, C.

    2010-11-01

    The small-strain mechanical properties (e.g., seismic velocities) of hydrate-bearing sediments measured under laboratory conditions provide reference values for calibration of logging and seismic exploration results acquired in hydrate-bearing formations. Instrumented cells were designed for measuring the compressional (P) and shear (S) velocities of sand, silts, and clay with and without hydrate and subject to vertical effective stresses of 0.01 to 2 MPa. Tetrahydrofuran (THF), which is fully miscible in water, was used as the hydrate former to permit close control over the hydrate saturation Shyd and to produce hydrate from dissolved phase, as methane hydrate forms in most natural marine settings. The results demonstrate that laboratory hydrate formation technique controls the pattern of P and S velocity changes with increasing Shyd and that the small-strain properties of hydrate-bearing sediments are governed by effective stress, σ'v and sediment specific surface. The S velocity increases with hydrate saturation owing to an increase in skeletal shear stiffness, particularly when hydrate saturation exceeds Shyd≈ 0.4. At very high hydrate saturations, the small strain shear stiffness is determined by the presence of hydrates and becomes insensitive to changes in effective stress. The P velocity increases with hydrate saturation due to the increases in both the shear modulus of the skeleton and the bulk modulus of pore-filling phases during fluid-to-hydrate conversion. Small-strain Poisson's ratio varies from 0.5 in soft sediments lacking hydrates to 0.25 in stiff sediments (i.e., subject to high vertical effective stress or having high Shyd). At Shyd ≥ 0.5, hydrate hinders expansion and the loss of sediment stiffness during reduction of vertical effective stress, meaning that hydrate-rich natural sediments obtained through pressure coring should retain their in situ fabric for some time after core retrieval if the cores are maintained within the hydrate

  9. Gas-Phase Partial Oxidation of Lignin to Carboxylic Acids over Vanadium Pyrophosphate and Aluminum-Vanadium-Molybdenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Samira; Boffito, Daria C; Patience, Gregory S

    2015-10-26

    Lignin is a complex polymer that is a potential feedstock for aromatic compounds and carboxylic acids by cleaving the β-O-4 and 5-5' linkages. In this work, a syringe pump atomizes an alkaline solution of lignin into a catalytic fluidized bed operating above 600 K. The vanadium heterogeneous catalysts convert all the lignin into carboxylic acids (up to 25 % selectivity), coke, carbon oxides, and hydrogen. Aluminum-vanadium-molybdenum mostly produced lactic acid (together with formic acid, acrylic acid, and maleic anhydride), whereas the vanadium pyrophosphate catalyst produced more maleic anhydride.

  10. Rheological properties of hydrate suspensions in asphaltenic crude oils; Proprietes rheologiques de suspensions d'hydrate dans des bruts asphalteniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques de Toledo Camargo, R.

    2001-03-01

    The development of offshore oil exploitation under increasing water depths has forced oil companies to increase their understanding of gas hydrate formation and transportation in multiphase flow lines in which a liquid hydrocarbon phase is present. This work deals with the flow behaviour of hydrate suspensions in which a liquid hydrocarbon is the continuous phase. Three different liquid hydrocarbons are used: an asphaltenic crude oil, a condensate completely free of asphaltenes and a mixture between the asphaltenic oil and heptane. The rheological characterisation of hydrate suspensions is the main tool employed. Two original experimental devices are used: a PVT cell adapted to operate as a Couette type rheometer and a semi-industrial flow loop. Hydrate suspensions using the asphaltenic oil showed shear-thinning behaviour and thixotropy. This behaviour is typically found in flocculated systems, in which the particles attract each other forming flocs of aggregated particles at low shear rates. The suspensions using the condensate showed Newtonian behaviour. Their relative viscosities were high, which suggests that an aggregation process between hydrate particles takes. place during hydrate formation. Finally, hydrate suspensions using the mixture asphaltenic oil-heptane showed shear-thinning behaviour, thixotropy and high relative viscosity. From these results it can be inferred that, after the achievement of the hydrate formation process, the attractive forces between hydrate particles are weak. making unlikely pipeline obstruction by an aggregation process. Nevertheless, during the hydrate formation, these attractive forces can be sufficiently high. It seems that the hydrate surface wettability is an important parameter in this phenomena. (author)

  11. Monte Carlo simulations of a protein molecule with and without hydration energy calculated by the hydration-shell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wako, H

    1989-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of a small protein, crambin, were carried out with and without hydration energy. The methodology presented here is characterized, as compared with the other similar simulations of proteins in solution, by two points: (1) protein conformations are treated in fixed geometry so that dihedral angles are independent variables rather than cartesian coordinates of atoms; and (2) instead of treating water molecules explicitly in the calculation, hydration energy is incorporated in the conformational energy function in the form of sigma giAi, where Ai is the accessible surface area of an atomic group i in a given conformation, and gi is the free energy of hydration per unit surface area of the atomic group (i.e., hydration-shell model). Reality of this model was tested by carrying out Monte Carlo simulations for the two kinds of starting conformations, native and unfolded ones, and in the two kinds of systems, in vacuo and solution. In the simulations starting from the native conformation, the differences between the mean properties in vacuo and solution simulations are not very large, but their fluctuations around the mean conformation during the simulation are relatively smaller in solution than in vacuo. On the other hand, in the simulations starting from the unfolded conformation, the molecule fluctuates much more largely in solution than in vacuo, and the effects of taking into account the hydration energy are pronounced very much. The results suggest that the method presented in this paper is useful for the simulations of proteins in solution.

  12. Tetrahydrofuran hydrate decomposition characteristics in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongchen; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Shenglong; Zhao, Jiafei; Yang, Mingjun

    2016-12-01

    Many tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate properties are similar to those of gas hydrates. In the present work THF hydrate dissociation in four types of porous media is studied. THF solution was cooled to 275.15 K with formation of the hydrate under ambient pressure, and then it dissociated under ambient conditions. THF hydrate dissociation experiments in each porous medium were conducted three times. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to obtain images. Decomposition time, THF hydrate saturation and MRI mean intensity (MI) were measured and analyzed. The experimental results showed that the hydrate decomposition time in BZ-4 and BZ-3 was similar and longer than that in BZ-02. In each dissociation process, the hydrate decomposition time of the second and third cycles was shorter than that of the first cycle in BZ-4, BZ-3, and BZ-02. The relationship between THF hydrate saturation and time is almost linear.

  13. Thermal annealing effects on vanadium pentoxide xerogel films

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    G. N. Barbosa; C. F.O. Graeff; H. P. Oliveira

    2005-01-01

    The effect of water molecules on the conductivity and electrochemical properties of vanadium pentoxide xerogel was studied in connection with changes of morphology upon thermal annealing at different temperatures...

  14. Process development for economical processing of various vanadium bearing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retelsdorf, H. J.; Rothmann, H.; Fichte, R.

    1982-06-01

    Three different vanadium bearing products were tested. It was proven feasible to recover a ferroalloy containing 73.5% of the vanadium contained in the leaching residues from blast furnace slags by reduction in an electric arc furnace. The composition of the obtained ferroalloy was 67% Fe, 2% V, 7% Cr, and 5.5% C. The vanadium recovery contained 0.5 to 6% in the fly ash, resulting from the combustion of fuel. Different fly ashes were tested by oxidation through roasting and subsequent basic leaching, or by reduction roasting with subsequent acid leaching, or bysoda roasting and leaching. The third source of vanadium tested was the waste salt, originating in alumina production, and containing about 4% V, 5% P, and 0.5% As. It was possible to produce a ferroalloy containing V2O5 and a secondary sodium phosphate, which could be applied in the phosphate processing industry.

  15. Vanadium removal from LD converter slag using bacteria and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirazimi, S M J; Abbasalipour, Z; Rashchi, F

    2015-04-15

    Removal of vanadium from Linz-Donawits (LD) converter slag was investigated by means of three different species of microbial systems: Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans (autotrophic bacteria), Pseudomonas putida (heterotrophic bacteria) and Aspergillus niger (fungi). The bioleaching process was carried out in both one-step and two-step process and the leaching efficiencies in both cases were compared. Formation of inorganic and organic acids during the leaching process caused mobilization of vanadium. In order to reduce toxic effects of the metal species on the above mentioned microorganisms, a prolonged adaptation process was performed. Both bacteria, A. thiooxidans and P. putida were able to remove more than 90% of vanadium at slag concentrations of 1-5 g L(-1) after 15 days. Also, the maximum achievable vanadium removal in the fungal system was approximately 92% at a slag concentration of 1 g L(-1) after 22 days.

  16. Spectrofluorometric determination of vanadium based on the formation of a ternary complex between vanadium, peroxides, and 2-alpha-pyridylthioquinaldinamide. Application to the determination of hydrogen peroxide and peroxy acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paleologos, E K; Giokas, D L; Tzouwara-Karayanni, S M; Karayannis, M I

    2002-01-01

    A selective and sensitive method for the determination of the total amount of vanadium in nutritional and biological substrates is proposed. The method is based on the reaction of vanadium with 2-alpha-pyridylthioquinaldinamide (PTQA) in the presence of H2O2. The product of this reaction emits constant fluorescence, in a sulfuric acid environment, at 490 nm, with the exciting radiation set at 340 nm. Various parameters such as acidity, flow rate, solvents, and temperature were studied. The presence of a surface-active agent was also considered in order to increase sensitivity. At the optimal conditions, a calibration curve was constructed, revealing a linear range of 2-100 microg L(-1) and a detection limit as low as 0.5 microg L(-1) while the RSD ranged in the area of 0.1-1.8%, depending on vanadium concentration. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of a wide variety of food samples, which are known to contribute to the dietary required amount of vanadium and to relevant biological matrixes. Reversing the conditions of the above reaction, the effect of the peroxy group on the vanadium-PTQA system was examined. The formation of a vanadyl complex was revealed which was suitable for the determination of hydrogen peroxide and peroxy acids. Linear calibration curves in the range of 0.2-50 microM for H2O2 and 0.1-2 microM for a respective peroxy acid were obtained, yielding detection limits of 0.05 and 0.03 microM, respectively.

  17. Extraction of vanadium from athabasca tar sands fly ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Bueno, C. O.; Spink, D. R.; Rempel, G. L.

    1981-06-01

    The production of refinery grade oil from the Alberta tar sands deposits as currently practiced by Suncor (formally Great Canadian Oil Sands Ltd.—GCOS) generates a substantial amount of petroleum coke fly ash which contains appreciable amounts of valuable metals such as vanadium, nickel and titanium. Although the recovery of vanadium from petroleum ash is a well established commercial practice, it is shown in the present work that such processes are not suitable for recovery of vanadium from the GCOS fly ash. The fact that the GCOS fly ash behaves so differently when compared to other petroleum fly ash is attributed to its high silicon and aluminum contents which tie up the metal values in a silica-alumina matrix. Results of experiments carried out in this investigation indicate that such matrices can be broken down by application of a sodium chloride/water roast of the carbon-free fly ash. Based on results from a series of preliminary studies, a detailed investigation was undertaken in order to define optimum conditions for a vanadium extraction process. The process developed involves a high temperature (875 to 950 °C) roasting of the fly ash in the presence of sodium chloride and water vapor carried out in a rotary screw kiln, followed by dilute sodium hydroxide atmosphereic leaching (98 °C) to solublize about 85 pet of the vanadium originally present in the fly ash. It was found that the salt roasting operation, besides enhancing vanadium recovery, also inhibits silicon dissolution during the subsequent leaching step. The salt roasting treatment is found to improve vanadium recovery significantly when the fly ash is fully oxidized. This is easily achieved by burning off the carbon present in the “as received” fly ash under excess air. The basic leaching used in the new process selectively dissolves vanadium from the roasted ash, leaving nickel and titanium untouched.

  18. Development and testing of mechanically stable Vanadium redox flow battery

    OpenAIRE

    Molchanov, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    This thesis work is concerned with electrochemical energy storage and conversion technology based on vanadium chemistry. This thesis is continuation of a work done at Arcada in summer 2015 and is expected to become a foundation for future research in the flow battery area. The major objective of this study was to build a prototype of vanadium flow battery that is robust enough to be analyzed and compared against flow batteries of other research groups. The work is broken down into four smalle...

  19. Low vanadium ion permeabilities of sulfonated poly(phthalazinone ether ketone)s provide high efficiency and stability for vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liyun; Zhang, Shouhai; Chen, Yuning; Jian, Xigao

    2017-07-01

    A series of novel sulfonated poly(phthalazinone ether ketone)s containing pendant phenyl moieties (SPPEK-Ps) are synthesized and thoroughly characterized. The chemical structures of the polymers are confirmed by 1H NMR and FTIR analysis. The physicochemical properties and single cell performance of SPPEK-P membranes are systematically evaluated, revealing that the membranes are thermally, chemically and mechanically stable. The area resistances of SPPEK-P-90 and SPPEK-P-100 are 0.75 Ω cm2 and 0.34 Ω cm2, respectively. SPPEK-P membranes are impermeable to the bulky hydrated VO2+ ion and exhibited low V3+ ion permeability (SPPEK-P-90, 2.53 × 10-5 cm min-1) (Nafion 115 membrane: 9.0 × 10-4 cm min-1). Tests of SPPEK-P-90 in vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) demonstrate a comparable columbic efficiency (CE) and energy efficiency (EE) to that of Nafion 115, where the CE is 98% and the EE is 83% at 60 mA cm-2. Moreover, the SPPEK-P-90 membrane exhibits stable performance in cell over 100 charge-discharge cycles (∼450 h).

  20. The analysis of magnesium oxide hydration in three-phase reaction system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Xiaojia; Guo, Lin; Chen, Chen; Liu, Quan; Li, Tie; Zhu, Yimin, E-mail: ntp@dlmu.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    In order to investigate the magnesium oxide hydration process in gas–liquid–solid (three-phase) reaction system, magnesium hydroxide was prepared by magnesium oxide hydration in liquid–solid (two-phase) and three-phase reaction systems. A semi-empirical model and the classical shrinking core model were used to fit the experimental data. The fitting result shows that both models describe well the hydration process of three-phase system, while only the semi-empirical model right for the hydration process of two-phase system. The characterization of the hydration product using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) was performed. The XRD and SEM show hydration process in the two-phase system follows common dissolution/precipitation mechanism. While in the three-phase system, the hydration process undergo MgO dissolution, Mg(OH){sub 2} precipitation, Mg(OH){sub 2} peeling off from MgO particle and leaving behind fresh MgO surface. - Graphical abstract: There was existence of a peeling-off process in the gas–liquid–solid (three-phase) MgO hydration system. - Highlights: • Magnesium oxide hydration in gas–liquid–solid system was investigated. • The experimental data in three-phase system could be fitted well by two models. • The morphology analysis suggested that there was existence of a peel-off process.

  1. Esterase catalysis of substrate vapour: enzyme activity occurs at very low hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Penelope A; Daniel, Roy M; Monk, Colin; Dunn, Rachel V

    2004-10-01

    It has been generally accepted that enzyme activity requires a minimal hydration of about 0.2 g H2O g(-1) protein. This fits well with evidence that hydration above this level is associated with the onset of intramolecular motions. The influence of enzyme hydration on the hydrolysis of substrate by Candida rugosa Lipase B and pig liver esterase was investigated. Each enzyme was studied as a powder at various hydration levels, using vapour phase ethyl butyrate as substrate. This procedure allows the separation of those effects that are due to hydration from those arising from diffusional constraints. We found hydrolytic activity in both enzymes at all hydration levels above zero (between 0.054-0.47 and 0.029-0.60 g H2O g(-1) protein, respectively) that were investigated. The lowest hydration level investigated, hydrolysis of ethyl butyrate requires water as a second substrate, the absence of activity at zero hydration does not rule out the possibility of enzyme activity in the absence of water. These results suggest that the properties conferred on proteins by water, at least above 10% surface coverage (in this case corresponding to a hydration level of 0.03 g H2O g(-1) protein), are not a requirement for enzyme catalysis.

  2. Temperature dependence of lysozyme hydration and the role of elastic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Jing; Kleinhammes, Alfred; Tang, Pei; Xu, Yan; Wu, Yue

    2011-03-01

    Water plays a critical role in protein dynamics and functions. However, the most basic property of hydration—the water sorption isotherm—remains inadequately understood. Surface adsorption is the commonly adopted picture of hydration. Since it does not account for changes in the conformational entropy of proteins, it is difficult to explain why protein dynamics and activity change upon hydration. The solution picture of hydration provides an alternative approach to describe the thermodynamics of hydration. Here, the flexibility of proteins could influence the hydration level through the change of elastic energy upon hydration. Using nuclear magnetic resonance to measure the isotherms of lysozyme in situ between 18 and 2 °C, the present work provides evidence that the part of water uptake associated with the onset of protein function is significantly reduced below 8 °C. Quantitative analysis shows that such reduction is directly related to the reduction of protein flexibility and enhanced cost in elastic energy upon hydration at lower temperature. The elastic property derived from the water isotherm agrees with direct mechanical measurements, providing independent support for the solution model. This result also implies that water adsorption at charged and polar groups occurring at low vapor pressure, which is known for softening the protein, is crucial for the later stage of water uptake, leading to the activation of protein dynamics. The present work sheds light on the mutual influence of protein flexibility and hydration, providing the basis for understanding the role of hydration on protein dynamics.

  3. Obsidian hydration profile measurements using a nuclear reaction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R.R.; Leich, D.A.; Tombrello, T.A.; Ericson, J.E.; Friedman, I.

    1974-01-01

    AMBIENT water diffuses into the exposed surfaces of obsidian, forming a hydration layer which increases in thickness with time to a maximum depth of 20-40 ??m (ref. 1), this layer being the basic foundation of obsidian dating2,3. ?? 1974 Nature Publishing Group.

  4. Chemo-physical modeling of cement mortar hydration: Role of aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jena, E-mail: jeong@profs.estp.fr [Université Paris-Est, Institut de Recherche en Constructibilité, ESTP, 28 Avenue Président Wilson, 94234 Cachan (France); Ramézani, Hamidréza, E-mail: hamidreza.ramezani@univ-orleans.fr [CRMD, CNRS FRE 3520-Research Center on Divided Materials, École Polytechnique de l’Université d’Orléans, 8 rue Léonrad de Vinci, 45072 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Leklou, Nordine, E-mail: nordine.leklou@univ-nantes.fr [LUNAM Université, Université de Nantes-IUT Saint-Nazaire, GeM, CNRS UMR 6183, Research Institute in Civil Engineering and Mechanics, 58 rue Michel Ange BP 420 44606 Saint Nazaire Cedex (France); Mounanga, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.mounanga@univ-nantes.fr [LUNAM Université, Université de Nantes-IUT Saint-Nazaire, GeM, CNRS UMR 6183, Research Institute in Civil Engineering and Mechanics, 58 rue Michel Ange BP 420 44606 Saint Nazaire Cedex (France)

    2013-07-20

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: After mixing of the cement with water, most of the anhydride products sustain the hydration process and this leads to the hydrate products, e.g. CSH, Ca(OH){sub 2}, Afm and Aft. The mentioned hydration process is a highly complex phenomenon involving the chemically based thermo-activation inside the cement mortars during the early age hydration process. The chemo-thermal hydration reactions drasticaly increase at the early age of hydration after the mixing action and then it becomes less important and turns to be nearly asymptotic. The progress of the hydration phenomenon drives the material properties change during the very early age of cement hydration. Regarding the mortar and concrete, such hydration process would not be homogeneous through the cement matrix due to the aggregates presence. These inclusions will affect the temperature distribution as well as degree of hydration. In the current contribution, the chemical and thermal hydration have been firstly investigated by means of SEM observations using replica method and secondly by the 3D-FEM numerical experiments including two different case studies using glass beads as aggregates. The numerical experiments match fairly good the experimental measurements obtained using a pseudo-adiabatic testing setup for the case studies herein. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images observation demonstrates the gap spaces around the glass beads next to the external surfaces. These gaps can be essentially seen for the multi-glass beads case study. The role of the temperature and degree of hydration gradients are clearly obtained using the numerical samples. Some fresh routes and outlooks have been afterwards discussed.

  5. Role of vanadium in Bi-2223 ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D R Mishra; S V Sharma; R G Sharma

    2000-02-01

    The effect of substitution of vanadium in Bi1.6Pb0.4Sr2Ca2Cu3O ceramic at Bi and Cu sites has been investigated for the resistivity, a.c. susceptibility, XRD and a.c. magnetization studies. Enhancement in for the smaller concentrations of V at either of the two sites was observed which followed an expected lattice distortion and decrease in for higher V concentrations. V plays a role of substituting element more than just a sintering agent as reflected in the more rapid decrease in at Cu-site and further in the magnetization values that are higher compared to the values at the Bisite. It indicates higher magnetization scattering at the Cu site. The results were explained keeping in mind the liquid phase mechanism behind the formation of the 2223 phase and the possibility of magnetic scattering.

  6. Electrochemical properties of vanadium pentoxide xerogel films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong; HU Xin-guo; LIU Yu-wen; CHENG Yu-shan

    2005-01-01

    Vanadium pentoxide xerogel(VXG) films were prepared by rapid quenching, then coin type 2016 size lithium rechargeable batteries were assembled and tested with the VXG film electrodes and lithium anodes. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy(EIS) analysis result reveals the expected response for intercalation, except that there is almost no Warburg (diffusion) component. Analyses results of cyclic voltammetry(CV), constant discharge(CD) and discharge-charge(DC) indicate that the sample achieves a high initial discharge specific capacity of approximate 400 mA·h/g and a corresponding efficiency of 97 % in the voltage diapason of 1.5-4.0 V with a draining current of 60 mA/g. Its preservation ratio of capacity still keeps as high as 85 % even after 100 cycles. The good electrochemical performance indicates that VXG film material is a promising cathode for lithium rechargeable batteries.

  7. Economics of vanadium redox flow battery membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minke, Christine; Turek, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    The membrane is a key component of the vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) in terms of electrochemical performance as well as costs. The standard material Nafion® is cost intensive and therefore several alternative materials are in the focus of research. In this paper a substantial analytical approach is presented in order to quantify bottom price limits for different types of membranes. An in-depth analysis of material and production cost allows statements concerning cost potentials of different ion exchange membranes (IEM) and nano filtration membranes (NFM). The final result reveals that expected costs of IEM and NFM at high production volumes differ by one order of magnitude. Moreover, an analysis of the current market situation is made to provide a framework for economic considerations at present.

  8. Liquid anion-exchange separation of vanadium from malonate media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, R.R.; Khopkar, S.M. (Indian Inst. of Technology, Dept. of Chemistry, Bombay (India))

    1992-06-01

    Vanadium (IV) and (V) can be quantitatively extracted with 0.2 mol/l Amberlite LA-2 in xylene at pH 3.0 from 0.02 mol/l malonic acid, stripped with 0.5 mol/l hydrochloric acid, and determined spectrophotometrically. Five other liquid anion exchangers (Amberlite LA-1, Primene JM-T, Aliquat 336S, TOA and TIOA) were examined as possible extractants. The extraction of vanadium(IV) was found to be quantitative only with Amberlite LA-2, while that of vanadium(V) was quantitative with Amberlite LA-1 and LA-2, Primene JM-T and Aliquat 336S. Eight common solvents were tested as diluents; of these hexane, cyclohexane, benzene, and xylene were found to be satisfactory. Vanadium was separated from elements that do not form anionic complexes with malonic acid by selective extraction, from those that form weak complexes by washing the organic extract with water, and from metals that form strong malonato complexes by selective stripping with hydrochloric, nitric, or sulphuric acid. The method has been applied to the determination of vanadium in steel, coal fly ash and fuel oil. The precision of measurement is within {+-}5% and the detection limit of the method for vanadium is 0.5 mg/kg. (orig.).

  9. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.;

    1999-01-01

    Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations...... and experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6...

  10. Progress of Gas Hydrate Studies in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊栓狮; 汪集旸

    2006-01-01

    A brief overview is given on the gas hydrate-related research activities carried out by Chinese researchers in the past 15 years. The content involves: (1) Historical review. Introducing the gas hydrate research history in China; (2) Gas hydrate research groups in China. There are nearly 20 groups engaged in gas hydrate research now; (3) Present studies.Including fundamental studies, status of the exploration of natural gas hydrate resources in the South China Sea region, and development of hydrate-based new techniques; (4) Future development.

  11. Hydration of fly ash cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etsuo Sakai; Shigeyoshi Miyahara; Shigenari Ohsawa; Seung-Heun Lee; Masaki Daimon [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Graduate School of Science and Engineering

    2005-06-01

    It is necessary to establish the material design system for the utilization of large amounts of fly ash as blended cement instead of disposing of it as a waste. Cement blended with fly ash is also required as a countermeasure to reduce the amount of CO{sub 2} generation. In this study, the influences of the glass content and the basicity of glass phase on the hydration of fly ash cement were clarified and hydration over a long curing time was characterized. Two kinds of fly ash with different glass content, one with 38.2% and another with 76.6%, were used. The hydration ratio of fly ash was increased by increasing the glass content in fly ash in the specimens cured for 270 days. When the glass content of fly ash is low, the basicity of glass phase tends to decrease. Reactivity of fly ash is controlled by the basicity of the glass phase in fly ash during a period from 28 to 270 days. However, at an age of 360 days, the reaction ratios of fly ash show almost identical values with different glass contents. Fly ash also affected the hydration of cement clinker minerals in fly ash cement. While the hydration of alite was accelerated, that of belite was retarded at a late stage.

  12. Results on the electrochromic and photocatalytic properties of vanadium doped tungsten oxide thin films prepared by reactive dc magnetron sputtering technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu Karuppasamy, K.; Subrahmanyam, A.

    2008-02-01

    In this investigation, vanadium doped tungsten oxide (V : WO3) thin films are prepared at room temperature by reactive dc magnetron sputtering employing a tungsten-vanadium 'inlay' target. In comparison with pure sputtered tungsten oxide thin films, 11% vanadium doping is observed to decrease the optical band gap, enhance the colour neutral property, decrease the coloration efficiency (from 121 to 13 cm2 C-1), increase the surface work function (4.68-4.83 eV) and significantly enhance the photocatalytic efficiency in WO3 thin films. These observations suggest that (i) vanadium creates defect levels that are responsible for optical band gap reduction, (ii) multivalent vanadium bonding with terminal oxygen in the WO3 lattice gives rise to localized covalent bonds and thus results in an increase in the work function, and (iii) a suitable work function of V : WO3 with ITO results in an enhancement of the photocatalytic activity. These results on electrochromic and photocatalytic properties of V : WO3 thin films show good promise in the low maintenance window application.

  13. Results on the electrochromic and photocatalytic properties of vanadium doped tungsten oxide thin films prepared by reactive dc magnetron sputtering technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karuppasamy, K Muthu; Subrahmanyam, A [Semiconductor Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2008-02-07

    In this investigation, vanadium doped tungsten oxide (V : WO{sub 3}) thin films are prepared at room temperature by reactive dc magnetron sputtering employing a tungsten-vanadium 'inlay' target. In comparison with pure sputtered tungsten oxide thin films, 11% vanadium doping is observed to decrease the optical band gap, enhance the colour neutral property, decrease the coloration efficiency (from 121 to 13 cm{sup 2} C{sup -1}), increase the surface work function (4.68-4.83 eV) and significantly enhance the photocatalytic efficiency in WO{sub 3} thin films. These observations suggest that (i) vanadium creates defect levels that are responsible for optical band gap reduction, (ii) multivalent vanadium bonding with terminal oxygen in the WO{sub 3} lattice gives rise to localized covalent bonds and thus results in an increase in the work function, and (iii) a suitable work function of V : WO{sub 3} with ITO results in an enhancement of the photocatalytic activity. These results on electrochromic and photocatalytic properties of V : WO{sub 3} thin films show good promise in the low maintenance window application.

  14. Compositional characteristics and hydration behavior of mineral trioxide aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hsi Wang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA was one of most popular biomaterials for endodontic treatment in the past decade. Its superb biocompatibility, sealing ability and surface for tissue adhesion all make MTA a potential candidate for many dental applications, such as apexification, perforation repair, repair of root resorption, and as a root-end filling material. There are many review articles regarding the physical, chemical and biological properties of MTA. However, there are few reviews discussing the relationship between the composition and hydration behavior of MTA. The aim of this article was to provide a systematic review regarding the compositional characteristics and hydration behavior of MTA.

  15. NATURAL GAS HYDRATES STORAGE PROJECT PHASE II. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ECONOMIC STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.E. Rogers

    1999-09-27

    DOE Contract DE-AC26-97FT33203 studied feasibility of utilizing the natural-gas storage property of gas hydrates, so abundantly demonstrated in nature, as an economical industrial process to allow expanded use of the clean-burning fuel in power plants. The laboratory work achieved breakthroughs: (1) Gas hydrates were found to form orders of magnitude faster in an unstirred system with surfactant-water micellar solutions. (2) Hydrate particles were found to self-pack by adsorption on cold metal surfaces from the micellar solutions. (3) Interstitial micellar-water of the packed particles were found to continue forming hydrates. (4) Aluminum surfaces were found to most actively collect the hydrate particles. These laboratory developments were the bases of a conceptual design for a large-scale process where simplification enhances economy. In the design, hydrates form, store, and decompose in the same tank in which gas is pressurized to 550 psi above unstirred micellar solution, chilled by a brine circulating through a bank of aluminum tubing in the tank employing gas-fired refrigeration. Hydrates form on aluminum plates suspended in the chilled micellar solution. A low-grade heat source, such as 110 F water of a power plant, circulates through the tubing bank to release stored gas. The design allows a formation/storage/decomposition cycle in a 24-hour period of 2,254,000 scf of natural gas; the capability of multiple cycles is an advantage of the process. The development costs and the user costs of storing natural gas in a scaled hydrate process were estimated to be competitive with conventional storage means if multiple cycles of hydrate storage were used. If more than 54 cycles/year were used, hydrate development costs per Mscf would be better than development costs of depleted reservoir storage; above 125 cycles/year, hydrate user costs would be lower than user costs of depleted reservoir storage.

  16. Optothermal transient emission radiometry for studying the changes in epidermal hydration induced during ripening of tomato fruit mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.; Bicanic, D.; Imhof, R.; Xiao, P.; Harbinson, J.

    2004-10-01

    Optothermal transient emission radiometry (OTTER) was used to determine the mean surface hydration and the hydration profile of three mutants (beefsteak, slicing and salad) of harvested tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) that were kept under ambient conditions for as long as 51 days. Maximal sensitivity of OTTER to water in the samples was achieved by using 2.94 μm and 13.1 μm as excitation and emission wavelengths, respectively. The surface hydration increases rapidly and reaches a constant level during the remaining period. The hydrolysis of pectic substances that occur in tomatoes while ripening might be a possible cause for the observed change in hydration.

  17. Comparison of stromal hydration techniques for clear corneal cataract incisions: conventional hydration versus anterior stromal pocket hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifflin, Mark D; Kinard, Krista; Neuffer, Marcus C

    2012-06-01

    Anterior stromal pocket hydration was compared with conventional hydration for preventing wound leak after 2.8 mm uniplanar clear corneal incisions (CCIs) in patients having routine cataract surgery. Conventional hydration involves hydration of the lateral walls of the main incision with visible whitening of the stroma. The anterior stromal pocket hydration technique involves creation of an additional supraincisional stromal pocket overlying the main incision, which is then hydrated instead of the main incision. Sixty-six eyes of 48 patients were included in the data analysis with 33 assigned to each study group. The anterior stromal pocket hydration technique was significantly better than conventional hydration in preventing wound leak due to direct pressure on the posterior lip of the incision. Copyright © 2012 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotube/Graphite Felts as Advanced Electrode Materials for Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuangyin; Zhao, Xinsheng; Cochell, Thomas; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2012-08-16

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes have been grown, for the first time, on graphite felt (N-CNT/GF) by a chemical vapor deposition approach and examined as an advanced electrode for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). The unique porous structure and nitrogen doping of N-CNT/GF with increased surface area enhances the battery performance significantly. The enriched porous structure of N-CNTs on graphite felt could potentially facilitate the diffusion of electrolyte, while the N-doping could significantly contribute to the enhanced electrode performance. Specifically, the N-doping (i) modifies the electronic properties of CNT and thereby alters the chemisorption characteristics of the vanadium ions, (ii) generates defect sites that are electrochemically more active, (iii) increases the oxygen species on CNT surface, which is a key factor influencing the VRFB performance, and (iv) makes the N-CNT electrochemically more accessible than the CNT.

  19. State of hydration and electrical conductance of ichthyotic skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta A

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Dry skin of twelve subjects suffering from ichthyosis vulgaris and the efficacy of a moisturiser-Cotaryl were quantitatively assessed by measuring the skin surface hydration and high frequency (3.5 MHz electrical conductance of skin. The state of hydration and conductance of ichthyotic skin were 86.9 + 24.6 and 11.0 + 5.7 micro-mho respectively, being much less-compared to 132. 0 + 5.3 and 72.5 + 54.0 micro-mho ofnormal subjects. The moisturiser increased the state of hydration and also the electrical conductance of the stratum corneuni to near-normal values and maintained them as long as the application continued. However, both the hydration and the conductance fell sharply within a week of withrawal of the moisturiser. A moisturiser was thus undoubtedly efficacious in ichthyotic skin, but the effect was only temporary. The state of hydration was found, at all stages, to bear a strong positive correlation (r = 0.69 to 0.80 with the skin conductance.

  20. Modeling the influence of limestone addition on cement hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Ragab Mohamed

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the influence of using Portland limestone cement “PLC” on cement hydration by characterization of its microstructure development. The European Standard EN 197-1:2011 and Egyptian specification ESS 4756-1/2009 permit the cement to contain up to 20% ground limestone. The computational tools assist in better understanding the influence of limestone additions on cement hydration and microstructure development to facilitate the acceptance of these more economical and ecological materials. μic model has been developed to enable the modeling of microstructural evolution of cementitious materials. In this research μic model is used to simulate both the influence of limestone as fine filler, providing additional surfaces for the nucleation and growth of hydration products. Limestone powder also reacts relatively slow with hydrating cement to form monocarboaluminate (AFmc phase, similar to the mono-sulfoaluminate (AFm phase formed in ordinary Portland cement. The model results reveal that limestone cement has accelerated cement hydration rate, previous experimental results and computer model “cemhyd3d” are used to validate this model.

  1. Gas hydrates forming and decomposition conditions analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Павленко

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of gas hydrates has been defined; their brief description has been given; factors that affect the formation and decomposition of the hydrates have been reported; their distribution, structure and thermodynamic conditions determining the gas hydrates formation disposition in gas pipelines have been considered. Advantages and disadvantages of the known methods for removing gas hydrate plugs in the pipeline have been analyzed, the necessity of their further studies has been proved. In addition to the negative impact on the process of gas extraction, the hydrates properties make it possible to outline the following possible fields of their industrial use: obtaining ultrahigh pressures in confined spaces at the hydrate decomposition; separating hydrocarbon mixtures by successive transfer of individual components through the hydrate given the mode; obtaining cold due to heat absorption at the hydrate decomposition; elimination of the open gas fountain by means of hydrate plugs in the bore hole of the gushing gasser; seawater desalination, based on the hydrate ability to only bind water molecules into the solid state; wastewater purification; gas storage in the hydrate state; dispersion of high temperature fog and clouds by means of hydrates; water-hydrates emulsion injection into the productive strata to raise the oil recovery factor; obtaining cold in the gas processing to cool the gas, etc.

  2. Water dynamics in protein hydration shells: the molecular origins of the dynamical perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Aoife C; Laage, Damien

    2014-07-17

    Protein hydration shell dynamics play an important role in biochemical processes including protein folding, enzyme function, and molecular recognition. We present here a comparison of the reorientation dynamics of individual water molecules within the hydration shell of a series of globular proteins: acetylcholinesterase, subtilisin Carlsberg, lysozyme, and ubiquitin. Molecular dynamics simulations and analytical models are used to access site-resolved information on hydration shell dynamics and to elucidate the molecular origins of the dynamical perturbation of hydration shell water relative to bulk water. We show that all four proteins have very similar hydration shell dynamics, despite their wide range of sizes and functions, and differing secondary structures. We demonstrate that this arises from the similar local surface topology and surface chemical composition of the four proteins, and that such local factors alone are sufficient to rationalize the hydration shell dynamics. We propose that these conclusions can be generalized to a wide range of globular proteins. We also show that protein conformational fluctuations induce a dynamical heterogeneity within the hydration layer. We finally address the effect of confinement on hydration shell dynamics via a site-resolved analysis and connect our results to experiments via the calculation of two-dimensional infrared spectra.

  3. Investigations on transfer of water and vanadium ions across Nafion membrane in an operating vanadium redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chenxi; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Huamin; Han, Xi; Luo, Qingtao

    Diffusion coefficients of the vanadium ions across Nafion 115 (Dupont) in a vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) are measured and found to be in the order of V 2+ > VO 2+ > VO 2 + > V 3+. It is found that both in self-discharge process and charge-discharge cycles, the concentration difference of vanadium ions between the positive electrolyte (+ve) and negative electrolyte (-ve) is the main reason causing the transfer of vanadium ions across the membrane. In self-discharge process, the transfer of water includes the transfer of vanadium ions with the bound water and the corresponding transfer of protons with the dragged water to balance the charges, and the transfer of water driven by osmosis. In this case, about 75% of the net transfer of water is caused by osmosis. In charge-discharge cycles, except those as mentioned in the case of self-discharge, the transfer of protons with the dragged water across the membrane during the electrode reaction for the formation of internal electric circuit plays the key role in the water transfer. But in the long-term cycles of charge-discharge, the net transfer of water towards +ve is caused by the transfer of vanadium ions with the bound water and the transfer of water driven by osmosis.

  4. Vaporization Studies from Slag Surfaces Using a Thin Film Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetharaman, Seshadri; Shyrokykh, Tetiana; Schröder, Christina; Scheller, Piotr R.

    2013-08-01

    The investigations of vanadium vaporization from CaO-SiO2-FeO-V2O5 thin film slags were conducted using the single hot thermocouple technique (SHTT) with air as the oxidizing atmosphere. The slag samples were analyzed after the experiments by SEM/EDX. The vanadium content was found to decrease as a function of time. The loss of vanadium from the slag film after 30 minutes of oxidation was approximately 18 pct and after 50 minutes, it was nearly 56 pct. The possible mechanism of vanadium loss would be the surface oxidation of vanadium oxide in the slag, VO x to V5+, followed by surface evaporation of V2O5, which has a high vapor pressure at the experimental temperature.

  5. Animated molecular dynamics simulations of hydrated caesium-smectite interlayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sposito Garrison

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Computer animation of center of mass coordinates obtained from 800 ps molecular dynamics simulations of Cs-smectite hydrates (1/3 and 2/3 water monolayers provided information concerning the structure and dynamics of the interlayer region that could not be obtained through traditional simulation analysis methods. Cs+ formed inner sphere complexes with the mineral surface, and could be seen to jump from one attracting location near a layer charge site to the next, while water molecules were observed to migrate from the hydration shell of one ion to that of another. Neighboring ions maintained a partial hydration shell by sharing water molecules, such that a single water molecule hydrated two ions simultaneously for hundreds of picoseconds. Cs-montmorillonite hydrates featured the largest extent of this sharing interaction, because interlayer ions were able to inhabit positions near surface cavities as well as at their edges, close to oxygen triads. The greater positional freedom of Cs+ within the montmorillonite interlayer, a result of structural hydroxyl orientation and low tetrahedral charge, promoted the optimization of distances between cations and water molecules required for water sharing. Preference of Cs+ for locations near oxygen triads was observed within interlayer beidellite and hectorite. Water molecules also could be seen to interact directly with the mineral surface, entering its surface cavities to approach attracting charge sites and structural hydroxyls. With increasing water content, water molecules exhibited increased frequency and duration of both cavity habitation and water sharing interactions. Competition between Cs+ and water molecules for surface sites was evident. These important cooperative and competitive features of interlayer molecular behavior were uniquely revealed by animation of an otherwise highly complex simulation output.

  6. Assessment of the microstructure and torsional fatigue performance of an induction hardened vanadium microalloyed medium-carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothleutner, Lee M.

    -martensitic transformation products in the induction-hardened case. In the total case region, vanadium reduced the total case depth by inhibiting austenite formation at low austenitizing temperatures; however, the non-martensitic constituents in the case microstructure and the reduced total case depth of the vanadium microalloyed steel did not translate directly to a degradation of torsional fatigue properties. In general, vanadium microalloying was not found to affect torsional fatigue performance significantly with one exception. In the 25 pct effective case depth condition, the 10V45 steel had a ~75 pct increase in fatigue life at all shear stress amplitudes when compared to the 1045 steel. The improved fatigue performance is likely a result of the significantly higher case hardness this condition exhibited compared to all other conditions. The direct influence of vanadium on the improved fatigue life of the 25 pct effective case depth condition is confounded with the slightly higher carbon content of the 10V45 steel. In addition, the 10V45 conditions showed a consistently higher case hardness than the in 1045 conditions. The increased hardness of the 10V45 steel did not increase the compressive residual stresses at the surface. Induction hardening parameters were more closely related to changes in residual stress than vanadium microalloying additions. Torsional fatigue data from the current study as well as from literature were used to develop an empirical multiple linear regression model that accounts for case depth as well as carbon content when predicting torsional fatigue life of induction hardened medium-carbon steels.

  7. Hydrogen spillover on DV (555-777) graphene – vanadium cluster system: First principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, E. Mathan, E-mail: ranjit.t@res.srmuniv.ac.in, E-mail: mathanranjitha@gmail.com; Thapa, Ranjit, E-mail: ranjit.t@res.srmuniv.ac.in, E-mail: mathanranjitha@gmail.com [SRM Research Institute, SRM University, Kattankulathur, Tamil Nadu - 603203 (India); P, Sabarikirishwaran [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, SRM University, Kattankulathur, Tamil Nadu - 603203 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Using dispersion corrected density functional theory (DFT+D), the interaction of Vanadium adatom and cluster with divacancy (555-777) defective graphene sheet has been studied elaborately. We explore the prospect of hydrogen storage on V{sub 4} cluster adsorbed divacancy graphene system. It has been observed that V{sub 4} cluster (acting as a catalyst) can dissociate the H{sub 2} molecule into H atoms with very low barrier energy. We introduce the spillover of the atomic hydrogen throughout the surface via external mediator gallane (GaH{sub 3}) to form a hydrogenated system.

  8. Mathematical modeling taking into account of intrinsic kinetic properties of cylinder-type vanadium catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈振兴; 李洪桂; 王零森

    2004-01-01

    The method to calculate internal surface effective factor of cylinder-type vanadium catalyst Ls-9 was given. Based on hypothesis of subjunctive one dimension diffusion and combined shape adjustment factor with threestep catalytic mechanism model, the macroscopic kinetic model equation about SO2 oxidation on Ls-9 was deduced.With fixed-bed integral reactor and under the conditions of temperature 350 - 410 ℃, space velocity 1 800 - 5 000h-1, SO2 inlet content 7 %- 12%, the macroscopic kinetic data were detected. Through model parameter estimation,the macroscopic kinetic model equation was obtained.

  9. The effect of hydration on the risk of friction blister formation on the heel of the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, Suzanne; Lam, Sharon; Nester, Christopher; Hashmi, Farina

    2014-05-01

    Friction blister research has focused on prevention and treatment approaches rather than exploring the pathophysiology of the friction blister. Increased skin hydration has been purported to be a key risk factor in friction blister development. This study aimed to test the effect of increased skin surface hydration on the risk of friction blister creation. The skin on one foot was hydrated by soaking the foot in water. Intermittent loading was carried out until an observable change of 3°C was evident using infrared thermography. The contra lateral foot acted as a control. Skin hydration and elasticity was measured using electrical capacitance and negative pressure respectively. The rate of temperature change of the hydrated group was significantly greater than that of the non-hydrated foot group (P = 0.001) and showed a strong positive correlation (r = 0.520) with skin surface hydration. Weak negative correlations were seen between skin elasticity and rate of temperature change in response to load application (r = -0.166) and skin surface hydration and elasticity at baseline (r = -0.195). In controlled experimental conditions increased skin surface hydration increases the rate of temperature change of the skin in response to load application and consequently increases the risk of blister creation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Hydrated mineral stratigraphy of Ius Chasma, Valles Marineris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, L.H.; Mustard, J.F.; Swayze, G.; Milliken, R.E.; Bishop, J.L.; Murchie, S.L.; Lichtenberg, K.

    2010-01-01

    New high-resolution spectral and morphologic imaging of deposits on walls and floor of Ius Chasma extend previous geomorphic mapping, and permit a new interpretation of aqueous processes that occurred during the development of Valles Marineris. We identify hydrated mineralogy based on visible-near infrared (VNIR) absorptions. We map the extents of these units with CRISM spectral data as well as morphologies in CTX and HiRISE imagery. Three cross-sections across Ius Chasma illustrate the interpreted mineral stratigraphy. Multiple episodes formed and transported hydrated minerals within Ius Chasma. Polyhydrated sulfate and kieserite are found within a closed basin at the lowest elevations in the chasma. They may have been precipitates in a closed basin or diagenetically altered after deposition. Fluvial or aeolian processes then deposited layered Fe/Mg smectite and hydrated silicate on the chasma floor, postdating the sulfates. The smectite apparently was weathered out of Noachian-age wallrock and transported to the depositional sites. The overlying hydrated silicate is interpreted to be an acid-leached phyllosilicate transformed from the underlying smectite unit, or a smectite/jarosite mixture. The finely layered smectite and massive hydrated silicate units have an erosional unconformity between them, that marks a change in surface water chemistry. Landslides transported large blocks of wallrock, some altered to contain Fe/Mg smectite, to the chasma floor. After the last episode of normal faulting and subsequent landslides, opal was transported short distances into the chasma from a few m-thick light-toned layer near the top of the wallrock, by sapping channels in Louros Valles. Alternatively, the material was transported into the chasma and then altered to opal. The superposition of different types of hydrated minerals and the different fluvial morphologies of the units containing them indicate sequential, distinct aqueous environments, characterized by alkaline

  11. Effect of V Dopant on Physicochemical Properties of Vanadium-Doped Anatase Synthesized via Simple Reflux Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Sutrisno

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous pure TiO2 (M-TiO2 and mesoporous-vanadium-doped TiO2 (M-V-doped TiO2 were successfully synthesized via a facile and simple reflux technique. The purpose of this research was to study the effect of vanadium dopant on the physicochemical properties of all materials obtained. Characterization of the prepared materials was carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS and N2-adsorption-desorption analysis. The presence of Ti and O elements in M-TiO2 and of Ti, V and O elements in M-V doped TiO2 could be detected by SEM-EDS, while the patterns of X-ray diffraction of all the prepared samples had a well-crystalline surface of anatase type. All mesoporous vanadium-doped TiO2 (M-V-doped TiO2 materials performed in a highly transparent mode in the visible region at 554 nm (Eg = 2.24 eV and 588 nm (Eg = 2.12 eV for 3.3 and 4.9 wt% V doped TiO2, respectively. The Rietveld refinement method was applied to extract the structural parameters of the M-TiO2 and M-V-doped TiO2 using the Fullprof program in the WinPlotr package. The prepared materials were refined in the crystal system and space group of anatase (tetragonal, I41/amd (141. The vanadium ion was successfully doped into TiO2. The isotherm type of M-TiO2 and 2.3 wt% V doped TiO2 were of type IV, with a profile of type H2 hysteresis loops, while the 3.3 and 4.9 wt% vanadium-doped TiO2 reflected isotherm type III. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET results showed a significant reduction in surface area due to increased concentrations of vanadium. The highest values of BET-specific surface area, pore volume and average pore size of M-TiO2 were 46 m2/g, 18.45 nm and 0.2572 cm3/g respectively.

  12. Energy and Angular Spectra of Albedo Protons and Neutrons Emitted from Hydrated Layers of Lunar Regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, L. W.; Zaman, F.; Schwadron, N. A.; Wilson, J. K.; Spence, H. E.; Case, A. W.; Kasper, J. C.; Mazur, J. E.; Looper, M. D.

    2016-11-01

    Energy and angular yields of albedo protons and neutrons emitted from the lunar surface as a function of hydration layer thickness in the lunar regolith using the MCNP computer code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory are presented.

  13. Hydration of highly charged ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Thomas S; Weiss, Alexander K H; Randolf, Bernhard R; Rode, Bernd M

    2011-08-01

    Based on a series of ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) simulations, the broad spectrum of structural and dynamical properties of hydrates of trivalent and tetravalent ions is presented, ranging from extreme inertness to immediate hydrolysis. Main group and transition metal ions representative for different parts of the periodic system are treated, as are 2 threefold negatively charged anions. The results show that simple predictions of the properties of the hydrates appear impossible and that an accurate quantum mechanical simulation in cooperation with sophisticated experimental investigations seems the only way to obtain conclusive results.

  14. Is Obsidian Hydration Dating Affected by Relative Humidity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I.; Trembour, F.W.; Smith, G.I.; Smith, F.L.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments carried out under temperatures and relative humidities that approximate ambient conditions show that the rate of hydration of obsidian is a function of the relative humidity, as well as of previously established variables of temperature and obsidian chemical composition. Measurements of the relative humidity of soil at 25 sites and at depths of between 0.01 and 2 m below ground show that in most soil environments, at depths below about 0.25 m, the relative humidity is constant at 100%. We have found that the thickness of the hydrated layer developed on obsidian outcrops exposed to the sun and to relative humidities of 30-90% is similar to that formed on other portions of the outcrop that were shielded from the sun and exposed to a relative humidity of approximately 100%. Surface samples of obsidian exposed to solar heating should hydrate more rapidly than samples buried in the ground. However, the effect of the lower mean relative humidity experiences by surface samples tends to compensate for the elevated temperature, which may explain why obsidian hydration ages of surface samples usually approximate those derived from buried samples.

  15. Computer simulation of alkali metal cation-montmorillonite hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Fang-Ru Chou [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States); Skipper, N.T. [Univ. College, London (United Kingdom); Sposito, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Molecular structure in the interlayers of Li-, Na-, or K-Wyoming montmorillonite with one, two, or three adsorbed water layers was investigated for the first time by concurrent Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, based on the Matsouka-Clementi-Yoshimine, (MCY) model of water-water interactions. Calculated layer spacings, as well as interlayer-species self-diffusion coefficients, were in good agreement with available experimental data. Inner-sphere surface complexes of the cations with tetrahedral charge sites were observed for all hydrates, whereas outer-sphere surface complexes of the cations with octahedral charge sites, found also in the one-layer hydrate, tended to dissociate from the clay mineral basal planes into a diffuse layer in the two- and three-layer hydrates. Differences in the interlayer water structure among the hydrates mainly reflected cation solvation, although some water molecules were entrapped within cavities in the montmorillonite surface. All of the interlayer cation and water species exchanged on the time scale (0.2 ns) of the MD simulations. Comparisons with results obtained using, instead of the MCY model, the TIP4P model for water-water, cation-water, and cation-clay interactions indicated that layer spacings and interlayer species mobilities tend to be under-predicted by the TIP4P model.

  16. Dynamic morphology of gas hydrate on a methane bubble in water: Observations and new insights for hydrate film models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warzinski, Robert P.; Lynn, Ronald; Haljasmaa, Igor; Leifer, Ira; Shaffer, Frank; Anderson, Brian J.; Levine, Jonathan S.

    2014-10-01

    Predicting the fate of subsea hydrocarbon gases escaping into seawater is complicated by potential formation of hydrate on rising bubbles that can enhance their survival in the water column, allowing gas to reach shallower depths and the atmosphere. The precise nature and influence of hydrate coatings on bubble hydrodynamics and dissolution is largely unknown. Here we present high-definition, experimental observations of complex surficial mechanisms governing methane bubble hydrate formation and dissociation during transit of a simulated oceanic water column that reveal a temporal progression of deep-sea controlling mechanisms. Synergistic feedbacks between bubble hydrodynamics, hydrate morphology, and coverage characteristics were discovered. Morphological changes on the bubble surface appear analogous to macroscale, sea ice processes, presenting new mechanistic insights. An inverse linear relationship between hydrate coverage and bubble dissolution rate is indicated. Understanding and incorporating these phenomena into bubble and bubble plume models will be necessary to accurately predict global greenhouse gas budgets for warming ocean scenarios and hydrocarbon transport from anthropogenic or natural deep-sea eruptions.

  17. Great Market Potential of Hydrazine Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Yuying

    2007-01-01

    @@ Stable consumption growth worldwide Hydrazine hydrate is an organic chemical raw material with extensive applications. The world's capacity to produce hydrazine hydrate has reached more than 200 thousand t/atoday (based on 100% hydrazine content).

  18. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  19. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lina

    2017-05-13

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10 was conducted for tricalcium silicate (C3S) to interpret long-term hydration process and investigate the formation, structure and properties of C-S-H. Based on results from XRD, IR, SEM, NMR and so forth, loose and dense clusters of C-S-H with analogous C/S ratio were obtained along with the corresponding chemical formulae proposed as Ca5Si4O13∙6.2H2O. Crystalline structure inside C-S-H was observed by TEM, which was allocated at the foil-like proportion as well as the edge of wrinkles of the product. The long-term hydration process of C3S in dilute suspension could be sketchily described as migration of calcium hydroxide and in-situ growth of C-S-H with equilibrium silicon in aqueous solution relatively constant and calcium varied.

  20. Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Ostrovskii

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper develops the Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-hypothesis, according to which living-matter simplest elements (LMSEs, which are N-bases, riboses, nucleosides, nucleotides, DNA- and RNA-like molecules, amino-acids, and proto-cells repeatedly originated on the basis of thermodynamically controlled, natural, and inevitable processes governed by universal physical and chemical laws from CH4, niters, and phosphates under the Earth's surface or seabed within the crystal cavities of the honeycomb methane-hydrate structure at low temperatures; the chemical processes passed slowly through all successive chemical steps in the direction that is determined by a gradual decrease in the Gibbs free energy of reacting systems. The hypothesis formulation method is based on the thermodynamic directedness of natural movement and consists ofan attempt to mentally backtrack on the progression of nature and thus reveal principal milestones alongits route. The changes in Gibbs free energy are estimated for different steps of the living-matter origination process; special attention is paid to the processes of proto-cell formation. Just the occurrence of the gas-hydrate periodic honeycomb matrix filled with LMSEs almost completely in its final state accounts for size limitation in the DNA functional groups and the nonrandom location of N-bases in the DNA chains. The slowness of the low-temperature chemical transformations and their “thermodynamic front” guide the gross process of living matter origination and its successive steps. It is shown that the hypothesis is thermodynamically justified and testable and that many observed natural phenomena count in its favor.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-30

    properties of key hydrated cement constituent calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) at the molecular, nanometer scale level. Due to complexity, still unknown...public release; distribution is unlimited. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate- Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure The views... Cement Molecular Structure Report Title Multi-scale modeling of complex material systems requires starting from fundamental building blocks to

  2. The porous membrane with tunable performance for vanadium flow battery: The effect of charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuyue; Yuan, Zhizhang; Lu, Wenjing; Li, Xianfeng; Zhang, Huamin

    2017-02-01

    Porous membranes with different charge on the surface and internal pore walls are prepared via the solvent-responsive layer-by-layer (SR-LBL) method. The effect of charge on the transport properties of different ions through the membranes is investigated in detail. The charge property of prepared membranes is tuned by assembling different charged polyelectrolytes (PEs) on the pore walls and the surface of the porous membranes. The results show that in a vanadium flow battery (VFB), the PE layers assembled on the surfaces (including pore walls) are capable to construct excellent ion transport channels to increase proton conductivity and to tune the ion selectivity via Donnan exclusion effect. Compared with the porous membrane with negative charges (7 bilayers), a VFB single cell assembled with a positively charged membrane (7.5 bilayers) yields a higher coulombic efficiency (98%). The water and ion transfer behavior exhibits a similar tendency. In the negative half-cell, the amount of V3+ gradually increases as cycles proceed and the amount of V2+ stays at a low and stable level. In the positive half-cell, the amount of VO2+ decreases; while VO2+ is accumulated. The imbalance of vanadium ions at both sides induces the discharge capacity fade.

  3. Electrochemical behavior of diverse vanadium ions at modified graphite felt electrode in sulphuric solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-gang; HUANG Ke-long; LIU Su-qin; CHEN Li-quan

    2007-01-01

    PAN-based graphite feIt (PGF)treated in 98% sulphuric acid for 5 h and then kept at 450 ℃ for 2 h was evaluated for their electrochemical performance as electrodes of vanadium redox battery(VRB). Structure and characteristic of treated PAN-based graphite felt(TPGF) were determined by means of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy,Scanning Electron Microscopy, Brunauer-Einlrlett-Teller surface area analysis and VRB test system.The results show that the acid and heat synergistic effect increase the number of-COOH functional groups on the PGF surface. and the PGF is eroded by sulphuric acid oxidation.resulting in the surface area increases from 0.31 m2/g to 0.45 m2/g.The V(Ⅱ)/V(Ⅲ)redox reaction is electrochemically reversible on the TPGF electrode, while the V(Ⅳ)/V(Ⅴ)couple is a quasi reversible process.The diflusion coeffcients of the oxidation for V(Ⅳ)/V(Ⅴ)obtained from the scope of peak current Ip vs scan rate v1/2 is 4.4x10-5cm2/s. The improvement of electrochemical activity for the electrode is mainly ascribed to the increase of the number of-C00H groups on the TPGF,which behaves as active sites catalyzing the vanadium species reactions and accelerating electron transfer reaction and oxygen transfer.

  4. Nanorod niobium oxide as powerful catalysts for an all vanadium redox flow battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Gu, Meng; Nie, Zimin; Wei, Xiaoliang; Wang, Chongmin; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    A powerful low-cost electrocatalyst, nanorod Nb2O5, is synthesized using the hydrothermal method with monoclinic phases and simultaneously deposited on the surface of a graphite felt (GF) electrode in an all vanadium flow battery (VRB). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) study confirmed that Nb2O5 has catalytic effects toward redox couples of V(II)/V(III) at the negative side and V(IV)/V(V) at the positive side to facilitate the electrochemical kinetics of the vanadium redox reactions. Because of poor conductivity of Nb2O5, the performance of the Nb2O5 loaded electrodes is strongly dependent on the nanosize and uniform distribution of catalysts on GF surfaces. Accordingly, an optimal amount of W-doped Nb2O5 nanorods with minimum agglomeration and improved distribution on GF surfaces are established by adding water-soluble compounds containing tungsten (W) into the precursor solutions. The corresponding energy efficiency is enhanced by ∼10.7% at high current density (150 mA·cm(-2)) as compared with one without catalysts. Flow battery cyclic performance also demonstrates the excellent stability of the as prepared Nb2O5 catalyst enhanced electrode. These results suggest that Nb2O5-based nanorods, replacing expensive noble metals, uniformly decorating GFs holds great promise as high-performance electrodes for VRB applications.

  5. Combined Studies of ODP log Data and Seismic Reflection Data at Southern Hydrate Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenberg, C. A.; Petersen, J.; Klaeschen, D.

    2003-12-01

    In August 2002 Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 204 (Hydrate Ridge) provided essential borehole data to complement recent seismic studies at Hydrate Ridge to correlate amplitude analysis investigations and to constrain previous results. Seismic data was acquired during cruise SO-150 in September 2000 on the German RV SONNE, aiming at qualitative and quantitative estimates of free gas and gas hydrates within the sediments across Hydrate Ridge. Hydrate Ridge is part of the accretionary complex and is characterized by the presence of extensive gas hydrates, causing a prominent Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR) in marine seismic records. Several seismic in- and crosslines were shot across the ridge to map the spatial distribution of the BSR. Wide angle reflection data of narrowly spaced Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) allow frequency dependent amplitude variations with offset (AVO) investigations. Seismic reflection data, recorded simultaneously with a single channel surface and deep tow streamer completed the data set. The usage of different sources during acquisition provided additional information of the frequency response of the BSR signature. This data set was used to study the complex seismic behaviour of such gas hydrate environments in detail. The borehole data, collected during ODP Leg 204, now improve recent seismic investigations and support previous results. Within the COLIBRI project log information (Vp, Vs and density) was used for forward modeling to combine seismic investigations with new borehole data. The P wave velocity model of a traveltime inversion and AVO analysis of the seismic OBS sections suggest rather low quantities of gas hydrate or at least the lack of massive hydrate zones. Shear wave phases, identified in the seismic OBS sections, refer to slow S wave velocities in the upper sediment layers above the BSR, which support a model with small amounts of hydrate or patchy hydrate zones within the upper sediments.

  6. Impact of Residual Water on CH4-CO2 Exchange rate in Hydrate bearing Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersland, G.; Birkedal, K.; Graue, A.

    2012-12-01

    It is previously shown that sequestration of CO2 in natural gas hydrate reservoirs may offer stable long term deposition of a greenhouse gas while benefiting from methane production, without adding heat to the process. In this work CH4 hydrate formation and CO2 reformation in sandstone has been quantified in a series of experiments using Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The overall objective was to provide an improved basic understanding of processes involved in formation and production of methane from methane hydrates within porous media, and to provide data for numerical modeling and scaling. CH4 hydrate has been formed repeatedly in Bentheim sandstone rocks to study hydrate growth patterns for various brine salinities and saturations to prepare for subsequent lab-scale methane production tests through carbon dioxide replacement at various residual water saturations. Surface area for CO2 exposure and the role of permeability and diffusion on the CH4-CO2 exchange rate will also be discussed.

  7. Terahertz sensing of corneal hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul S; Tewari, Priyamvada; Bourges, Jean Louis; Hubschman, Jean Pierre; Bennett, David B; Taylor, Zachary D; Lee, H; Brown, Elliott R; Grundfest, Warren S; Culjat, Martin O

    2010-01-01

    An indicator of ocular health is the hydrodyanmics of the cornea. Many corneal disorders deteriorate sight as they upset the normal hydrodynamics of the cornea. The mechanisms include the loss of endothelial pump function of corneal dystophies, swelling and immune response of corneal graft rejection, and inflammation and edema, which accompany trauma, burn, and irritation events. Due to high sensitivity to changes of water content in materials, a reflective terahertz (300 GHz and 3 THz) imaging system could be an ideal tool to measure the hydration level of the cornea. This paper presents the application of THz technology to visualize the hydration content across ex vivo porcine corneas. The corneas, with a thickness variation from 470 - 940 µm, were successfully imaged using a reflective pulsed THz imaging system, with a maximum SNR of 50 dB. To our knowledge, no prior studies have reported on the use of THz in measuring hydration in corneal tissues or other ocular tissues. These preliminary findings indicate that THz can be used to accurately sense hydration levels in the cornea using a pulsed, reflective THz imaging system.

  8. Physical properties of gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliner, J.T.R.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Gas hydrates are naturally occurring, solid crystalline compounds (clathrates) that encapsulate gas molecules inside the lattices of hydrogen bonded water molecules within a specific temperature-pressure stability zone. Estimates of the total quantity of available methane gas in natural occurring hydrates are based on twice the energy content of known conventional fossil fuels reservoirs. Accurate and reliable in-situ quantification techniques are essential in determining the economic viability of this potential energy yield, which is dependent upon several factors such as sensitivity of the temperature-pressure stability zone, sediment type, porosity, permeability, concentration/abundance of free gas, spatial distribution in pore spaces, specific cage occupancy, and the influence of inhibitors. Various techniques like acoustic P and S waves, time domain reflectometry, and electrical resistance have been used to analyze the quantity and spatial distribution of the gas hydrate samples. These techniques were reviewed and the results obtained in the course of gas hydrate research were presented. 34 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Hydration kinetics of transgenic soybeans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Francielle Fracasso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic and experimental analyses of the hydration process of transgenic soybeans (BRS 225 RR are provided. The importance of the hydration process consists of the grain texture modifications which favor grinding and extraction of soybeans. The soaking isotherms were obtained for four different temperatures. Results showed that temperature affected transgenic soybeans´ hydration rate and time. Moisture content d.b. of the soybeans increased from 0.12 ± 0.01 kg kg-1 to 1.45 ± 0.19 kg kg-1 during 270 min. of process. Two models were used to fit the kinetic curves: an empirical model developed by Peleg (1988 and a phenomenological one, proposed by Omoto et al. (2009. The two models adequately represented the hydration kinetics. Peleg model was applied to the experimental data and the corresponding parameters were obtained and correlated to temperature. The model by Omoto et al. (2009 showed a better statistical fitting. Although Ks was affected by temperature (Ks = 0.38079 exp (-2289.3 T-1, the equilibrium concentration remained practically unchanged.

  10. Impedance spectroscopy and sensors under ethanol vapors application of sprayed vanadium-doped ZnO compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mhamdi, A., E-mail: mhaammar@gmail.com [Unité de physique des dispositifs à semi-conducteurs, Tunis EL MANAR University, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Labidi, A. [Unite de Recherche de Physique des Semiconducteurs et Capteurs, IPEST, BP 51, La Marsa 2070, Tunis (Tunisia); Souissi, B. [Unité de physique des dispositifs à semi-conducteurs, Tunis EL MANAR University, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Kahlaoui, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux, Faculté des Sciences de Bizerte, Université de Carthage, Zarzouna 7021 (Tunisia); Yumak, A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Marmara University, 34722 Göztepe, Istanbul (Turkey); Boubaker, K.; Amlouk, A.; Amlouk, M. [Unité de physique des dispositifs à semi-conducteurs, Tunis EL MANAR University, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2015-08-05

    Highlights: • Proposing an original explanation to the behavior of vanadium-doped zinc oxide structures. • Presenting an original combination of several referred and established characterization means. • Outlining average particle size changes effects along the surface of the compounds. - Abstract: Thin films of vanadium-doped zinc oxide with different vanadium-doping levels (0, 1, 2 and 3 at%) were deposited on glass substrates by employing an inexpensive, simplified spray technique using at relatively low substrate temperature (460 °C). The effect of V doping on the structural, morphological and optical properties of the films was investigated by Mhamdi et al. (2013). The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the films were well crystallized in würtzite phase with the crystallites preferentially oriented toward (0 0 2) direction parallel c-axis. As also that the average particle size along the surface of the films decreases with increasing of concentration of vanadium. In this work we study the AC and DC conductivity and gas sensor application on ZnO:V thin films. The dielectric properties of ZnO:V thin films were studied by means of complex impedance spectroscopy and frequency dependence of conductivity measured from the impedance data at a range of frequency intervals between 10 Hz and 13 MHz with a temperature between 355 and 445 °C. The frequency dependence of the dielectric constant ε′, dielectric loss ε″, loss tangent (tan δ) and AC electrical conductivity (σ{sub AC}) of the layers was subsequently investigated. In literature, we have shown in previous papers that structural and surface morphology of ZnO thin films, prepared by spray, plays an important role in the gas detection mechanism. In this article, we have studied the response evolution of ZnO:V sensors ethanol versus time and working temperature, relative doping and the concentration of the ethanol vapor.

  11. Facile one-pot fabrication and high photocatalytic performance of vanadium doped TiO2-based nanosheets for visible-light-driven degradation of RhB or Cr(VI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dingze; Zhao, Bin; Fang, Pengfei; Zhai, Shengbin; Li, Delong; Chen, Zhiqiang; Wu, Wenhui; Chai, Wuqiong; Wu, Yichu; Qi, Ning

    2015-12-01

    Vanadium doped TiO2-based nanosheets (V-TNSs) with different V/Ti ratios were prepared by a facile one-pot hydrothermal method using vanadium nitrate and P25 as the vanadium precursor and titanium precursor, respectively. The results indicated that as-synthesized photocatalysts exhibited sheet-like structure with large specific surface area (270-340 cm2/g) and small thickness (4-5 nm). XPS results revealed that vanadium exists in the form of V4+ and V5+, and the binding energies of Tisbnd O bonds have been changed with the concentration of vanadium. Vanadium doping resulted in considerable enhancement of visible light absorption, red-shift, and the band-gap of photocatalysts reduced from 3.18 eV to 2.91 eV. The density functional theory (DFT) calculations for band structure and total energy also provided a good explanation and further confirmation for the experimental results. It has been found that the photo-activity increased gradually with the concentration of vanadium, and then decreased after attaining a maximum with an optimal content of vanadium at 1.0 at.% for RhB or Cr(VI). The reaction rate Kapp of 1.0%-V-TNSs are 9.27-fold and 3.26-fold as compared to undoped TNSs under UV-vis and visible light irradiation, respectively. The cyclic tests that performed six times demonstrated high stability and reusability of the photocatalysts. A possible alternate mechanism for the enhancement of the photocatalytic activity under visible-light irradiation was also proposed.

  12. Structural and silver/vanadium ratio effects on silver vanadium phosphorous oxide solution formation kinetics: impact on battery electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, David C; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Marschilok, Amy C; Takeuchi, Esther S

    2015-01-21

    The detailed understanding of non-faradaic parasitic reactions which diminish battery calendar life is essential to the development of effective batteries for use in long life applications. The dissolution of cathode materials including manganese, cobalt and vanadium oxides in battery systems has been identified as a battery failure mechanism, yet detailed dissolution studies including kinetic analysis are absent from the literature. The results presented here provide a framework for the quantitative and kinetic analyses of the dissolution of cathode materials which will aid the broader community in more fully understanding this battery failure mechanism. In this study, the dissolution of silver vanadium oxide, representing the primary battery powering implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), is compared with the dissolution of silver vanadium phosphorous oxide (Ag(w)VxPyOz) materials which were targeted as alternatives to minimize solubility. This study contains the first kinetic analyses of silver and vanadium solution formation from Ag0.48VOPO4·1.9H2O and Ag2VP2O8, in a non-aqueous battery electrolyte. The kinetic results are compared with those of Ag2VO2PO4 and Ag2V4O11 to probe the relationships among crystal structure, stoichiometry, and solubility. For vanadium, significant dissolution was observed for Ag2V4O11 as well as for the phosphate oxide Ag0.49VOPO4·1.9H2O, which may involve structural water or the existence of multiple vanadium oxidation states. Notably, the materials from the SVPO family with the lowest vanadium solubility are Ag2VO2PO4 and Ag2VP2O8. The low concentrations and solution rates coupled with their electrochemical performance make these materials interesting alternatives to Ag2V4O11 for the ICD application.

  13. Chemistry, spectroscopy and the role of supported vanadium oxides in heterogeneous catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Keller, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    Supported vanadium oxide catalysts are active in a wide range of applications. In this review, an overview is given of the current knowledge available about vanadium oxide-based catalysts. The review starts with the importance of vanadium in heterogeneous catalysis, a discussion of the molecular str

  14. 40 CFR 440.80 - Applicability; description of the vanadium ore subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... vanadium ore subcategory. 440.80 Section 440.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Vanadium Ore Subcategory (Mined Alone and Not as a Byproduct) § 440.80 Applicability; description of the vanadium...

  15. Physical activity, hydration and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascensión Marcos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of mankind, man has sought ways to promote and preserve health as well as to prevent disease. Hydration, physical activity and exercise are key factors for enhancing human health. However, either a little dose of them or an excess can be harmful for health maintenance at any age. Water is an essential nutrient for human body and a major key to survival has been to prevent dehydration. However, there is still a general controversy regarding the necessary amount to drink water or other beverages to properly get an adequate level of hydration. In addition, up to now the tools used to measure hydration are controversial. To this end, there are several important groups of variables to take into account such as water balance, hydration biomarkers and total body water. A combination of methods will be the most preferred tool to find out any risk or situation of dehydration at any age range. On the other hand, physical activity and exercise are being demonstrated to promote health, avoiding or reducing health problems, vascular and inflammatory diseases and helping weight management. Therefore, physical activity is also being used as a pill within a therapy to promote health and reduce risk diseases, but as in the case of drugs, dose, intensity, frequency, duration and precautions have to be evaluated and taken into account in order to get the maximum effectiveness and success of a treatment. On the other hand, sedentariness is the opposite concept to physical activity that has been recently recognized as an important factor of lifestyle involved in the obesogenic environment and consequently in the risk of the non-communicable diseases. In view of the literature consulted and taking into account the expertise of the authors, in this review a Decalogue of global recommendations is included to achieve an adequate hydration and physical activity status to avoid overweight/obesity consequences.

  16. A Sea Floor Methane Hydrate Displacement Experiment Using N2 Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, P. G.; Peltzer, E. T.; Walz, P. M.; Zhang, X.; Hester, K.

    2009-12-01

    The production of free methane gas from solid methane hydrate accumulations presents a considerable challenge. The presently preferred procedure is pressure reduction whereby the relief of pressure to a condition outside the hydrate phase boundary creates a gas phase. The reaction is endothermic and thus a problematic water ice phase can form if the extraction of gas is too rapid, limiting the applicability of this procedure. Additionally, the removal of the formation water in contact with the hydrate phase is required before meaningful pressure reduction can be attained -- and this can take time. An alternate approach that has been suggested is the injection of liquid CO2 into the formation, thereby displacing the formation water. Formation of a solid CO2 hydrate is thermodynamically favored under these conditions. Competition between CH4 and CO2 for the hydrate host water molecules can occur displacing CH4 from the solid to the gas phase with formation of a solid CO2 hydrate. We have investigated another alternate approach with displacement of the surrounding bulk water phase by N2 gas, resulting in rapid release of CH4 gas and complete loss of the solid hydrate phase. Our experiment was carried out at the Southern Summit of Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon, at 780m depth. There we harvested hydrate fragments from surficial sediments using the robotic arm of the ROV Doc Ricketts. Specimens of the hydrate were collected about 1m above the sediment surface in an inverted funnel with a mesh covered neck as they floated upwards. The accumulated hydrate was transferred to an inverted glass cylinder, and N2 gas was carefully injected into this container. Displacement of the water phase occurred and when the floating hydrate material approached the lower rim the gas injection was stopped and the cylinder placed upon a flat metal plate effectively sealing the system. We returned to this site after 7 days to measure progress, and observed complete loss of the hydrate phase

  17. Vanadium promotes hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickl, Heidi; Theron, Annette J; Grimmer, Heidi; Oommen, Joyce; Ramafi, Grace J; Steel, Helen C; Visser, Susanna S; Anderson, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of vanadium in the +2, +3, +4, and +5 valence states on superoxide generation, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils in vitro, using lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (LECL), autoiodination, and electron spin resonance with 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrroline N-oxide as the spin trap, respectively. At concentrations of up to 25 microM, vanadium, in the four different valence states used, did not affect the LECL responses of neutrophils activated with either the chemoattractant, N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine (1 microM), or the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 12-acetate (25 ng/ml). However, exposure to vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4, but not the +5, valence states was accompanied by significant augmentation of hydroxyl radical formation by activated neutrophils and attenuation of MPO-mediated iodination. With respect to hydroxyl radical formation, similar effects were observed using cell-free systems containing either hydrogen peroxide (100 microM) or xanthine/xanthine oxidase together with vanadium (+2, +3, +4), while the activity of purified MPO was inhibited by the metal in these valence states. These results demonstrate that vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4 valence states interacts prooxidatively with human neutrophils, competing effectively with MPO for hydrogen peroxide to promote formation of the highly toxic hydroxyl radical.

  18. Can Vanadium Be Substituted into LiFePO4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omenya F.; Nam K.; Chernova N.A.; Upreti S.; Zavalij P.Y.; Nam K.-W.; Yang X.-Q.; Whittingham M.S.

    2011-11-08

    Vanadium is shown to substitute for iron in the olivine LiFePO{sub 4} up to at least 10 mol %, when the synthesis is carried out at 550 C. In the solid solution LiFe{sub 1-3y/2}V{sub y}PO{sub 4}, the a and b lattice parameters and cell volume decrease with increasing vanadium content, while the c lattice parameter increases slightly. However, when the synthesis is performed at 650 C, a NASICON phase, Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}, is also formed, showing that solid solution is a function of the synthesis temperature. X-ray absorption near-edge structure indicates vanadium is in the 3+ oxidation state and in an octahedral environment. Magnetic studies reveal a shift of the antiferromagnetic ordering transition toward lower temperatures with increasing vanadium substitution, confirming solid solution formation. The addition of vanadium enhances the electrochemical performance of the materials especially at high current densities.

  19. Geochemical controls of vanadium accumulation in fossil fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, G.N.; Wanty, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    High vanadium contents in petroleum and other fossil fuels have been attributed to organic-matter type, organisms, volcanic emanations, diffusion of sea water, and epigenetic enrichment. However, these factors are inadequate to account for the high abundance of vanadium in some fossil fuels and the paucity in others. By examining vanadium deposits in sedimentary rocks with sparse organic matter, constraints are placed on processes controlling vanadium accumulation in organic-rich sediments. Vanadium, as vanadate (V(V)), entered some depositional basins in oxidizing waters from dry, subaerial environments. Upon contact with organic matter in anoxic waters, V(V) is reduced to vanadyl (V(IV)), which can be removed from the water column by adsorption. H2S reduces V(IV) to V(III), which hydrolyzes and precipitates. The lack of V(III) in petroleum suggests that reduction of V(IV) to V(III) is inhibited by organic complexes. In the absence of strong complexing agents, V(III) forms and is incorporated in clay minerals.

  20. Geochemical controls on vanadium accumulation in fossil fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, G.N.; Wanty, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    High vanadium contents in petroleum and other fossil fuels have been attributed to organic-matter type, organisms, volcanic emanations, diffusion of sea water, and epigenetic enrichment. However, these factors are inadequate to account for the high abundance of vanadium in some fossil fuels and the paucity in others. By examining vanadium deposits in sedimentary rocks with sparse organic matter, constraints are placed on processes controlling vanadium accumulation in organic-rich sediments. Vanadium, as vanadate (V(V)), entered some depositional basins in oxidizing waters from dry, subaerial environments. Upon contact with organic matter in anoxic waters, V(V) is reduced to vanadyl (V(IV)), which can be removed from the water column by adsorption. H2S reduces V(IV) to V(III), which hydrolyzes and precipitates. The lack of V(III) in petroleum suggests that reduction of V(IV) to V(III) is inhibited by organic complexes. In the absence of strong complexing agents, V(III) forms and is incorporated in clay minerals.

  1. Phase equilibria and thermodynamic modeling of ethane and propane hydrates in porous silica gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yongwon; Lee, Seungmin; Cha, Inuk; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Huen

    2009-04-23

    In the present study, we examined the active role of porous silica gels when used as natural gas storage and transportation media. We adopted the dispersed water in silica gel pores to substantially enhance active surface for contacting and encaging gas molecules. We measured the three-phase hydrate (H)-water-rich liquid (L(W))-vapor (V) equilibria of C(2)H(6) and C(3)H(8) hydrates in 6.0, 15.0, 30.0, and 100.0 nm silica gel pores to investigate the effect of geometrical constraints on gas hydrate phase equilibria. At specified temperatures, the hydrate stability region is shifted to a higher pressure region depending on pore size when compared with those of bulk hydrates. Through application of the Gibbs-Thomson relationship to the experimental data, we determined the values for the C(2)H(6) hydrate-water and C(3)H(8) hydrate-water interfacial tensions to be 39 +/- 2 and 45 +/- 1 mJ/m(2), respectively. By using these values, the calculation values were in good agreement with the experimental ones. The overall results given in this study could also be quite useful in various fields, such as exploitation of natural gas hydrate in marine sediments and sequestration of carbon dioxide into the deep ocean.

  2. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermannová, Lada, E-mail: lada.biedermannova@ibt.cas.cz; Schneider, Bohdan [Institute of Biotechnology CAS, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-27

    The hydration of protein crystal structures was studied at the level of individual amino acids. The dependence of the number of water molecules and their preferred spatial localization on various parameters, such as solvent accessibility, secondary structure and side-chain conformation, was determined. Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon–donor hydrogen bonds, OH–π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations.

  3. The strength and rheology of methane clathrate hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.; Zhang, W.

    2003-01-01

    Methane clathrate hydrate (structure I) is found to be very strong, based on laboratory triaxial deformation experiments we have carried out on samples of synthetic, high-purity, polycrystalline material. Samples were deformed in compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress, ??), at conditions of confining pressure P = 50 and 100 MPa, strain rate 4.5 ?? 10-8 ??? ?? ??? 4.3 ?? 10-4 s-1, temperature 260 ??? T ??? 287 K, and internal methane pressure 10 ??? PCH4 ??? 15 MPa. At steady state, typically reached in a few percent strain, methane hydrate exhibited strength that was far higher than expected on the basis of published work. In terms of the standard high-temperature creep law, ?? = A??ne-(E*+PV*)/RT the rheology is described by the constants A = 108.55 MPa-n s-1, n = 2.2, E* = 90,000 J mol-1, and V* = 19 cm3 mol-1. For comparison at temperatures just below the ice point, methane hydrate at a given strain rate is over 20 times stronger than ice, and the contrast increases at lower temperatures. The possible occurrence of syntectonic dissociation of methane hydrate to methane plus free water in these experiments suggests that the high strength measured here may be only a lower bound. On Earth, high strength in hydrate-bearing formations implies higher energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure. In the outer solar system, if Titan has a 100-km-thick near-surface layer of high-strength, low-thermal conductivity methane hydrate as has been suggested, its interior is likely to be considerably warmer than previously expected.

  4. 钒钛磁铁矿提钒尾渣浸取钒%Leaching vanadium from extracted vanadium residue of vanadium titanomagnetite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓志敢; 魏昶; 李兴彬; 徐红胜; 李旻廷; 李存兄; 樊刚

    2012-01-01

    Vanadium was leached by composed leaching reagent of sulphuric acid, hydrofluoric acid and sodium hypochlorite from extracted vanadium residues of vanadium titanomagnetite. The process parameters, which impact on the vanadium leaching percent, such as reagent concentration, ratio of liquid to solid, temperature, leaching time, mineral granularity, were investigated. The results show that the vanadium leaching rate increases with the increase of reagent concentration, ratio of liquid to solid, temperature, leaching time and decreases with diminishment of the mineral granularity when the mineral granularity is less than 0.20 mm. The effect of sodium hypochlorite is smaller. When the extracted vanadium residues is leached with granular size of 0.15-0.25 mm, sulphuric acid concentration of 135 g/L, hydrofluoric acid concentration of 30 g/L, sodium hypochlorite dosage of 1.5%, ratio of liquid to solid of 6:1, stirring velocity of 500 r/min at 90 'C for 6 h, the leaching rate of vanadium is above 85%.%采用硫酸-氢氟酸-次氯酸钠组合浸出体系浸取钒钛磁铁矿提钒尾渣中的钒,研究浸出过程中试剂浓度、浸出液固比、浸出温度、浸出时间、物料粒度对钒浸出率的影响.结果表明:钒的浸出率随试剂浓度、液固比、温度和时间的升高而增大;当矿物粒度小于0.20 mm时,钒浸出率有随矿物粒度变小而减小的趋势.在物料粒度0.15~0.25 mm、初始硫酸浓度150 g/L、初始氢氟酸浓度30 g/L、次氯酸钠加入量为矿量1.5%、矿浆液固比6:1、浸出温度90℃、浸出时间6h、搅拌速度500 r/min的条件下,钒的浸出率可达85%以上.

  5. Membrane development for vanadium redox flow batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenzer, Birgit; Zhang, Jianlu; Kim, Soowhan; Li, Liyu; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-10-17

    Large-scale energy storage has become the main bottleneck for increasing the percentage of renewable energy in our electricity grids. Redox flow batteries are considered to be among the best options for electricity storage in the megawatt range and large demonstration systems have already been installed. Although the full technological potential of these systems has not been reached yet, currently the main problem hindering more widespread commercialization is the high cost of redox flow batteries. Nafion, as the preferred membrane material, is responsible for about 11% of the overall cost of a 1 MW/8 MWh system. Therefore, in recent years two main membrane related research threads have emerged: 1) chemical and physical modification of Nafion membranes to optimize their properties with regard to vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) application; and 2) replacement of the Nafion membranes with different, less expensive materials. This review summarizes the underlying basic scientific issues associated with membrane use in VRFBs and presents an overview of membrane-related research approaches aimed at improving the efficiency of VRFBs and making the technology cost-competitive. Promising research strategies and materials are identified and suggestions are provided on how materials issues could be overcome.

  6. Self-Interstitial Transport in Vanadium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zepeda-Ruiz, L A; Rottler, J; Wirth, B D; Car, R; Srolovitz, D J

    2005-01-13

    We study the diffusion of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and SIA clusters in vanadium via molecular dynamics simulations with an improved Finnis-Sinclair potential (fit to first-principles results for SIA structure and energetics). The present results demonstrate that single SIAs exist in a <111>-dumbbell configuration and migrate easily along <111> directions. Changes of direction through rotations into other <111> directions are infrequent at low temperatures, but become prominent at higher temperatures, thereby changing the migration path from predominantly one-dimensional to almost isotropically three-dimensional. SIA clusters (i.e., clusters of <111>-dumbbells) can be described as perfect prismatic dislocation loops with Burgers vector and habit planes of 1/2<111>{l_brace}220{r_brace} that migrate only along their glide cylinder. SIA clusters also migrate along <111>-directions, but do not rotate. Both single SIAs and their clusters exhibit a highly non-Arrhenius diffusivity, which originates from a combination of a temperature dependent correlation factor and the presence of very low migration barriers. At low temperature, the diffusion is approximately Arrhenius, while above room temperature, the diffusivity is a linear function of temperature. A simple model is proposed to describe these diffusion regimes and the transition between them.

  7. Three-dimensional Nitrogen-Doped Reduced Graphene Oxide/Carbon Nanotube Composite Catalysts for Vanadium Flow Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Shaofang [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, WA, 99164 USA.; Zhu, Chengzhou [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, WA, 99164 USA.; Song, Junhua [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, WA, 99164 USA.; Engelhard, Mark H. [Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA.; Du, Dan [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, WA, 99164 USA.; Lin, Yuehe [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, WA, 99164 USA.; Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA.

    2017-02-22

    The development of vanadium redox flow battery is limited by the sluggish kinetics of the reaction, especially the cathodic VO2+/VO2+ redox couples. Therefore, it is vital to develop new electrocatalyst with enhanced activity to improve the battery performance. Herein, we first synthesized the hydrogel precursor by a facile hydrothermal method. After the following carbonization, nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotube composite was obtained. By virtue of the large surface area and good conductivey, which are ensured by the unique hybrid structure, as well as the proper nitrogen doping, the as-prepared composite presents enhanced catalytic performance toward the VO2+/VO2+ redox reaction. We also demonstrated the composite with carbon nanotube loading of 2 mg/mL exhibits the highest activity and remarkable stability in aqueous solution due to the strong synergy between reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes, indicating that this composite might show promising applications in vanadium redox flow battery.

  8. Experiments of Suppressing Froth in Vanadium LeachingSolution%沉钒液泡沫的消除

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金超; 管英富; 曾志勇

    2000-01-01

    针对酸性铵盐沉钒工艺沉淀酸性铵盐过程中沉钒液内涌起泡沫影响正常操作等问题,考察了钒渣碱比、浸出液pH值、表面张力和沉钒上层液等影响因素,并提出了相应的改进措施.%During the process of acidic precipitation of ammonium polyvanadate,serious frothing in the vanadium-leaching solution causes trouble to thenormal operation. To maintain smooth operation, the reason of severefrothing was identified to be the excess of soda used in vanadiumcontaining slag roasting. On this basis, technical measures of carefulcontrol of slag-to-alkali ratio, acidity and surface tension of leachingsolution were proposed to suppress frothing and the normal operation ofprecipitating vanadium salt was realized successfully.

  9. Hydration of swelling clays: multi-scale sequence of hydration and determination of macroscopic energies from microscopic properties; Hydratation des argiles gonflantes: sequence d'hydratation multi-echelle determination des energies macroscopiques a partir des proprietes microscopiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salles, F

    2006-10-15

    smectites: it is responsible for the structure of porosity in a dry state and of the evolution of the pore sizes as a function of the RH and it modifies the hydration sequence by its mobility inside the interlayer space. The distinction between various types of water in the smectite structure is also achieved by thermo-poro-metry at different RH: water bound to the cations and surfaces, water structured by porosity and free water. This distinction is important to understand the behaviour of smectite and in particular the diffusion properties in clayey materials. The importance of the cation nature is also highlighted by the energetic model. Electrostatic calculations using the PACHA formalism (Electronegativities Equalization method) show that, for the small cations, the hydration energy of the layers is predominant. To obtain these results, we determine the surface enthalpies for the dry state, which show a coherent evolution as a function of the cation partial charge with the increase of pore sizes and thus with particle sizes. Then, using a theoretical model, we calculated swelling energies, surface hydration energies and cation hydration energies. The behaviour of mixed purified clay displays a behaviour closer to that of a calcic clay for the experiments carried out, in contradiction with the fact that the Na cation is the most abundant. This observation implies results on the clay properties, different from that expected for hydration properties, swelling and interlayer cation mobility within the framework of the radioactive waste. (author)

  10. Seismic reflections associated with submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassen, K.

    1995-12-31

    Gas hydrates are often suggested as a future energy resource. This doctoral thesis improves the understanding of the concentration and distribution of natural submarine gas hydrates. The presence of these hydrates are commonly inferred from strong bottom simulating reflection (BSR). To investigate the nature of BSR, this work uses seismic studies of hydrate-related BSRs at two different locations, one where gas hydrates are accepted to exist and interpreted to be very extensive (in the Beaufort Sea), the other with good velocity data and downhole logs available (offshore Oregon). To ascertain the presence of free gas under the BSR, prestack offset data must supplement near-vertical incidence seismic data. A tentative model for physical properties of sediments partially saturated with gas hydrate and free gas is presented. This model, together with drilling information and seismic data containing the BSR beneath the Oregon margin and the Beaufort Sea, made it possible to better understand when to apply the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) method to constrain BSR gas hydrate and gas models. Distribution of natural gas hydrates offshore Norway and Svalbard is discussed and interpreted as reflections from the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, overlying sediments containing free gas. Gas hydrates inferred to exist at the Norwegian-Svalbard continental margin correlate well with Cenozoic depocenters, and the associated gas is assumed to be mainly biogenic. Parts of that margin have a high potential for natural gas hydrates of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. 235 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Handbook of gas hydrate properties and occurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuustraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.

    1983-12-01

    This handbook provides data on the resource potential of naturally occurring hydrates, the properties that are needed to evaluate their recovery, and their production potential. The first two chapters give data on the naturally occurring hydrate potential by reviewing published resource estimates and the known and inferred occurrences. The third and fourth chapters review the physical and thermodynamic properties of hydrates, respectively. The thermodynamic properties of hydrates that are discussed include dissociation energies and a simplified method to calculate them; phase diagrams for simple and multi-component gases; the thermal conductivity; and the kinetics of hydrate dissociation. The final chapter evaluates the net energy balance of recovering hydrates and shows that a substantial positive energy balance can theoretically be achieved. The Appendices of the Handbook summarize physical and thermodynamic properties of gases, liquids and solids that can be used in designing and evaluating recovery processes of hydrates. 158 references, 67 figures, 47 tables.

  12. Separation of water through gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boch Andersen, Torben; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goa...... volumes and the needs for high pressure. The process could be interesting for concentration of heat sensitive, high value products......Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goal...... of the project was to formulate an alternative separation concept, which can replace the traditional water evaporation process in the sugar production. Work with the separation concept showed that gas hydrates can be used for water separation. The process is not suitable for sugar production because of large...

  13. Vanadium-Binding Ability of Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase from the Vanadium-Rich Fan Worm, Pseudopotamilla occelata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Nobuo; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Kamino, Kei; Ueki, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    Polychaete fan worms and ascidians accumulate high levels of vanadium ions. Several vanadiumbinding proteins, known as vanabins, have been found in ascidians. However, no vanadium-binding factors have been isolated from the fan worm. In the present study, we sought to identify vanadiumbinding proteins in the branchial crown of the fan worm using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. A nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDK) homolog was isolated and determined to be a vanadium-binding protein. Kinase activity of the NDK homologue, PoNDK, was suppressed by the addition of V(IV), but was unaffected by V(V). The effect of V(IV) on PoNDK precedes its activation by Mg(II). This is the first report to describe the relationship between NDK and V(IV). PoNDK is located in the epidermis of the branchial crown, and its distribution is very similar to that of vanadium. These results suggest that PoNDK is associated with vanadium accumulation and metabolism in P. occelata.

  14. Synthesis of Vanadium-Vanadium Carbide in-situ nanocomposites by high energy ball milling and spark plasma sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Vinoadh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, Vanadium-Vanadium Carbide (V-V2C in-situ nanocomposites were synthesized by mechanically milling vanadium powders with 0.5 wt.% stearic acid. Milled powders were consolidated using spark plasma sintering at 1150, 1250 and 1350°C for 10 min. Phase and morphology of the milled powders were studied using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis of 10 h milled powder shows the evolution of amorphous phase. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy studies on milled powder shows the presence of carbon, which could be due to the decomposition of stearic acid during milling. Degree of crystallinity of milled powder was confirmed using the selective area electron diffraction pattern. X-ray diffraction analysis of sintered samples indicate sharp peaks from vanadium and vanadium carbide (V2C, endorsing amorphous to nanocrystalline transformation. Micro-hardness value of sintered samples increases with increasing sintering temperature.

  15. Simultaneous microbial reduction of vanadium (V) and chromium (VI) by Shewanella loihica PV-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangyu; Zhang, Baogang; Li, Shuang; Yang, Meng; Yin, Changcheng

    2017-03-01

    Toxic vanadium (V) and chromium (VI) often co-exist in wastewater from vanadium ore smelting and their reductions by bacterial strain Shewanella loihica PV-4 is realized simultaneously. After 27-d operation, 71.3% of V(V) and 91.2% of Cr(VI) were removed respectively, with citrate as organic carbon source. Enhancement of Cr(VI) bioreduction was observed with the suppressed V(V) reduction. V(IV) and Cr(III), the main reduction products, precipitated inside the organisms and attached on cell surfaces. Both membrane components containing cytochrome c and cytoplasmic fractions containing soluble proteins as well as NADH may contribute to these microbial reductions. Most Cr(VI) were reduced extracellularly and V(V) tended to be reduced through intracellular process, as revealed by mapping the microbial surface and a line scan across the cell, performed by scanning transmission electron microscopy. This study provides an efficient alternative for controlling combined pollution caused by these two metals based on microbial technology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Well log characterization of natural gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2011-01-01

    In the last 25 years we have seen significant advancements in the use of downhole well logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrate in nature: From an early start of using wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gas hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments to today where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. The most established and well known use of downhole log data in gas hydrate research is the use of electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data (both compressional- and shear-wave data) to make estimates of gas hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. New downhole logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation resistivity log measurements have provided the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly inter-bedded and fracture dominated gas hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing have also allowed for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids (i.e., free-water along with clay and capillary bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms controlling the formation and occurrence of gas hydrate in nature along with data on gas hydrate reservoir properties (i.e., permeabilities) needed to accurately predict gas production rates for various gas hydrate

  17. Sulfate Hydration States in Interpretation of Martian Mineral Assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Bish, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    Remote spectral data and surface-measured chemical associations with S indicate widespread distribution of Mg-, Ca-, and Fe-sulfate salts on Mars. These salts are identified at least in part as hydrates, but spectral data and the low temperatures and low pH2O of Mars suggest that hydration states vary with origin, latitude, and exposure history. An understanding of stability limits and dehydration/rehydration rates is vital to understanding occurrences that may be interpreted variously as lacustrine, alteration via groundwater or discharge with evaporation, surface weathering, thermal brine systems, eolian recycling, or others. Different sulfates on Mars have varied susceptibility to desiccation at relatively warm, low-RH conditions or to hydration at cold, high-RH conditions. This variability provides a potent tool for interpreting exposure history. Among Ca-sulfates, gypsum and insoluble anhydrite should be stable and remain, respectively, fully hydrated or water-free at most latitudes and through diurnal and seasonal cycles, but bassanite is more sensitive to transient hydration. Mg-sulfates may have various values of n in the formula MgSO4.nH2O, and rehydration of desiccated forms often produces metastable phases. At low pH2O, unlike Ca- sulfates, amorphous forms appear with low values of n dependent, in part, on temperature. Kieserite resists dehydration but may hydrate in conditions where ice is stable at the surface. Fe-sulfates have more complex dehydration and rehydration properties. Jarosite is very resilient because of the lack of H2O molecules and presence of OH. Other Fe-sulfates are not so durable, e.g., coquimbite (Fe2 (SO4)3.9H2O) has independent H2O and dehydration on heating to 30 °C produces an amorphous product that does not rehydrate. Copiapite is similarly susceptible to dehydration. Modest heating of many H2O-bearing ferric sulfates can be destructive, and degradation can produce both cemented solids and viscous liquids. Sulfate salt

  18. Novel hybrid materials based on the vanadium oxide nanobelts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabrodina, G. S.; Makarov, S. G.; Kremlev, K. V.; Yunin, P. A.; Gusev, S. A.; Kaverin, B. S.; Kaverina, L. B.; Ketkov, S. Yu.

    2016-04-01

    Novel hybrid materials based on zinc phthalocyanine and nanostructured vanadium oxides have attracted extensive attention for the development of academic research and innovative industrial applications such as flexible electronics, optical sensors and heterogeneous catalysts. Vanadium oxides nanobelts were synthesized via a hydrothermal treatment V2O5·nH2O gel with surfactants (TBAB, CTAB) used as structure-directing agents, where CTAB - cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, TBAB - tetrabutylammonium bromide. Hybrid materials were prepared decoration of (CTA)0.33V2O5 flexible nanobelts with cationic zinc phthalocyanine by the ion-exchange route. Investigations of the thermal stability, morphologies and structures of the (CTA)0.33V2O5, (TBA)0.16V2O5 nanobelts and zinc phthalocyanine exchange product were carried out. The hybrid materials based on the nanostructured vanadium oxide and zinc phthalocyanine were tested as photocatalysts for oxidation of citronellol and 2-mercaptoethanol by dioxygen.

  19. Insulating phases of vanadium dioxide are Mott-Hubbard insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, T. J.; Hendriks, C.; Walter, E. J.; Yoon, Joonseok; Ju, Honglyoul; Smith, R.; Carr, G. L.; Krakauer, H.; Qazilbash, M. M.

    2017-02-01

    We present comprehensive broadband optical spectroscopy data on two insulating phases of vanadium dioxide (V O2 ): monoclinic M2 and triclinic. The main result of our work is that the energy gap and the electronic structure are essentially unaltered by the first-order structural phase transition between the M2 and triclinic phases. Moreover, the optical interband features in the M2 and triclinic phases are remarkably similar to those observed in the well-studied monoclinic M1 insulating phase of V O2 . As the energy gap is insensitive to the different lattice structures of the three insulating phases, we rule out vanadium-vanadium pairing (the Peierls component) as the dominant contributor to the opening of the gap. Rather, the energy gap arises primarily from intra-atomic Coulomb correlations.

  20. The determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump-Wiesner, Hans J.; Feltz, H.R.; Purdy, W.C.

    1971-01-01

    A standard addition method is described for the determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy with a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. Sample pH is adjusted to 1.0 with concentrated hydrochloric acid and the vanadium is directly extracted with 5% cupferron in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). The ketone layer is then aspirated into the flame and the recorded absorption values are plotted as a function of the concentration of the added metal. As little as 2.5 ??g l-1 of vanadium can be detected under the conditions of the procedure. Tungsten and tin interfere when present in excess of 5 and 10 ??g ml-1, respectively. The concentrations of the two interfering ions normally found in brines are well below interference levels. ?? 1971.

  1. [Increase of nonspecific bronchial reactivity after occupational exposure to vanadium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistelli, R; Pupp, N; Forastiere, F; Agabiti, N; Corbo, G M; Tidei, F; Perucci, C A

    1991-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the level of bronchial responsiveness among workers recently exposed to vanadium pentoxide during periodical removal of ashes and clinker from the boilers of an oil-fired power station. A total of 11 male workers were examined 40-60 hours after the last exposure; male subjects, comparable as to age and smoking habits and not exposed to vanadium, were randomly chosen among the employees of the same power station as a control group. None of the subjects in the two groups had symptoms of bronchial inflammation or significant airways obstruction. However, bronchial responsiveness, investigated using a methacholine challenge test, was significantly higher in the exposed group. It is suggested that exposure to vanadium increases bronchial responsiveness even without clinical appearance of bronchial symptoms. The role of such increased level of airways responsiveness as a risk factor for chronic obstructive lung disease is speculated.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of thermal stability of nanocrystalline vanadium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI; Mingzhi; XIAO; Shifang; YUAN; Xiaojian; HU; Wangyu

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure and thermal stability of nanocrystalline vanadium with an average grain size ranging from 2.86 to 7.50 nm are calculated by means of the analytic embedded-atom method and molecular dynamics. The grain boundary and nanocrystalline grain atoms are differentiated by the common neighbor analysis method. The results indicate that the fraction of grain boundary increases with the grain size decreasing, and the mean energy of atoms is higher than that of coarse crystals. The thermal-stable temperatures of nanocrystalline vanadium are determined from the evolution of atomic energy, fraction of grain boundary and radial distribution function. It is shown that the stable temperature decreases obviously with the grain size decreasing. In addition the reasons which cause the grain growth of nanocrystalline vanadium are discussed.

  3. Silver vanadium oxide cathode material and method of preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, A.M.

    1993-06-22

    A method for making an electrochemical cell having the steps of admixing silver vanadium oxide with a conductive material and a binder and forming the admixture into a cathode, combining the cathode with a lithium metal anode; and combining an electrolyte with the anode and cathode, the method is described consisting of preparing the silver vanadium oxide by a chemical addition reaction consisting of admixing AgVO[sub 3] and V[sub 2]O[sub 5] in a 2:1 mole ratio heating the admixed AgVO[sub 3] and V[sub 3]O[sub 5] at a reaction temperature in the range of 300 C to 700 C for 5 to 24 hours. An electrochemical cell having a lithium metal anode, cathode and an electrolyte having a metal salt in a nonaqueous solvent comprising: the cathode including a crystalline silver vanadium oxide prepared by a chemical addition reaction.

  4. Vanadium-modified molecular sieves: preparation, characterization and catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira-Neto, Angela A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Fundamental]. E-mail: gpmmm@iqm.unicamp.br; Marchese, Leonardo [Universita del Piemonte Orientale A. Avogadro, Alessandria (Italy); Pastore, Heloise O. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Inorganica

    2009-07-01

    Vanadium-containing molecular sieves are redox catalysts and are good candidates as substitutes for oxide-supported V{sub 2}O{sub 5} in a number of reactions. These materials have the advantage of presenting better dispersion of vanadium species, as well as shape-selective properties and controllable acidities. They may be prepared by one-pot synthesis or by post-synthesis methods and a number of techniques such as diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectroscopy, {sup 51}V nuclear magnetic resonance and electron paramagnetic resonance, to name but a few, have been used to characterize these materials. In this review, methods of preparation of vanadium-modified molecular sieves, their characterization and applications in catalysis are discussed. (author)

  5. Structure and properties of bimetallic titanium and vanadium oxide clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Benjamin; Sierka, Marek; Döbler, Jens; Sauer, Joachim

    2014-05-14

    By employing a genetic algorithm together with density functional theory (B3LYP), we investigate the most stable minimum structures of several bimetallic titanium and vanadium oxide clusters that contain four metal atoms. The following compositions are studied: VnTin-4O10(-) (n = 1-4), (TiO2)VOn(-) (n = 1-4), and (TiO2)VOn(+) (n = 1-3). Apart from (TiO2)3VO(-), vanadium oxo groups are always part of the most stable minimum structures when vanadium is present. Anti-ferromagnetic coupling lowers the energy substantially if spin centers are located at neighbored metal atoms rather than at distant oxygen radical sites. Vanadium-rich or oxygen-poor compositions prefer symmetric adamantane-like cage structures, some of which have already been proposed in a previous study. In contrast, vanadium-poor and oxygen-rich compositions show versatile structural motifs that cannot be intuitively derived from the symmetric cage motif. Particularly, for Ti4O10(-) there are several non-symmetric and distorted cages that have an up to 68 kJ mol(-1) lower energy than the symmetric adamantane-like cage structure. Nevertheless, for the adamantane-like cage the simulated infra-red spectrum (within the harmonic approximation) agrees best with the experimental vibrational spectrum. The oxidative power of the (TiO2)3VO3(-) and (TiO2)3VO2(+) clusters as measured by the energy of removing 1/2 O2 (297 and 227 kJ mol(-1), respectively) is less than that of the pure vanadium oxide clusters (V2O5)VO3(-) and (V2O5)VO2(+) (283 and 165 kJ mol(-1), respectively).

  6. Effect of Annealing on the Properties of Vanadium Pentoxide Films Prepared by Sol-Gel Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaqiang; Du, Xuelian; Liu, Xueqin

    2014-03-01

    The vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) films were obtained by using sol-gel procedure and then were annealed at different temperature in air. The effect of different annealing temperatures on the composition, the microstructure, the surface morphology and the optical properties of the films were characterized by methods such as by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and spectral transmittance. The results revealed that the film annealed at 150°C has amorphous structure and dense with a smooth surface and the films annealed at 300°C and 450°C have a polycrystalline V2O5 structure with preferred growth orientation along (001) planes, the c-axis and perpendicular to the silicon substrate surface. From the spectral transmittance we determined the absorption edge using the Tauc plot. The results indicated that optical bandgap of V2O5 thin films decreased with annealing temperature.

  7. Characteristics of graphite felt electrode electrochemically oxidized for vanadium redox battery application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-gang; HUANG Ke-long; LIU Su-qin; TAN Ning; CHEN Li-quan

    2007-01-01

    The graphite felt was oxidized at a positive electrode potential in sulfuric acid solution. The electrochemical performance of the treated graphite felt served as electrode for vanadium redox battery was investigated with FT-IR, SEM, XPS, BET, cyclic voltammetry and testing VRB system, respectively. The results show that the molar ratio of O to C increases from 0.085 to 0.15 due to the increase of -COOH functional groups during electrochemical oxidation treatment, and the GF surface is eroded by electrochemical oxidation, resulting in the surface area increase from 0.33 m2/g to 0.49 m2/g. The VRB with modified GF electrode exhibits excellent performance under a current density of 30 mA/cm2. The average current efficiency reaches 94% and average voltage efficiency reaches 85%. The improvement of electrochemical activity for the electrode is ascribed to the increase of the number of -COOH group and the special surface of GF.

  8. Adsorption of hydrated hydroxide and hydronium ions on Ag(1 1 1). A quantum mechanical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrito, E. M.; Paredes-Olivera, P.

    2003-03-01

    In this paper we have studied comparatively the adsorption of hydroxide and hydronium ions, extending our previous study on hydronium adsorption [J. Phys. Chem. B. 105 (2001) 7227] and emphasizing the adsorption of hydroxide. The calculations were performed on the 111 surface of silver using ab initio quantum mechanical methods (Hartree-Fock+Moller-Plesset second order perturbation theory). The adsorption was investigated for the bare and the hydrated ions (up to three water molecules). Binding energies, equilibrium structures and charge transfer processes were investigated. While the successive hydration of hydronium detaches the ion from the surface, the hydrated hydroxide anion remains specifically adsorbed. Charge transfer processes between the adsorbates and the surface were studied using electron density difference plots and effective charges obtained from Mulliken populations and from surface-dipole moment curves. The energetics of the surface reactions leading to the formation of the hydrated hydronium and hydroxide ions from the bare adsorbed ions and water molecules was also investigated. Both reactions are exothermic mainly due to the formation of strong hydrogen bonds. The effect of an external homogeneous electric field perpendicular to the surface on different adsorbate properties was investigated for the bare and hydrated hydroxide ion in order to model the environment of the electrical double layer. The electric field affects the orientation of the water molecules on the surface and the hydroxide surface distance.

  9. Spectroscopy of vanadium (III) doped gallium lanthanum sulphide chalcogenide glass

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, M; Rutt, H; Hewak, D

    2014-01-01

    Vanadium doped gallium lanthanum sulphide glass (V:GLS) displays three absorption bands at 580, 730 and 1155 nm identified by photoluminescence excitation measurements. Broad photoluminescence, with a full width half maximum (FWHM) of 500 nm, is observed peaking at 1500 nm when exciting at 514, 808 and 1064 nm. The fluorescence lifetime and quantum efficiency at 300 K were measured to be 33.4 us and 4 % respectively. From the available spectroscopic data we propose the vanadium ions valence to be 3+ and be in tetrahedral coordination The results indicate potential for development of a laser or optical amplifier based on V:GLS.

  10. Research and development on vanadium alloys for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Matsui, H.; Abe, K. [Tohoku Univ. (Japan); Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Osch, E. van [NERF, Petten (Netherlands); Kazakov, V.A. [RIAR, Dimitrovgrad (Russian Federation)

    1998-03-01

    The current status of research and development on unirradiated and irradiated V-Cr-Ti alloys intended for fusion reactor structural applications is reviewed, with particular emphasis on the flow and fracture behavior of neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys. Recent progress on fabrication, joining, oxidation behavior, and the development of insulator coatings is also summarized. Fabrication of large (>500 kg) heats of V-4Cr-4Ti with properties similar to previous small laboratory heats has now been demonstrated. Impressive advances in the joining of thick sections of vanadium alloys using GTA and electron beam welds have been achieved in the past two years, although further improvements are still needed.

  11. A significantly improved membrane for vanadium redox flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chuankun; Liu, Jianguo; Yan, Chuanwei

    A novel sandwich-type sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK)/tungstophosphoric acid (TPA)/polypropylene (PP) composite membrane for a vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) has been developed with improved properties: the permeability of vanadium ions is greatly reduced and the performance of the VRB cell is greatly increased. The membrane is based on a traditional SPEEK membrane embedded with TPA but PP is used to enhance the membrane for the first time. Although its voltage efficiency (VE) is a little lower than that of a Nafion 212 membrane, it is expected to have good prospects for VRB systems because of its low cost and good performance.

  12. EFFECT OF VANADIUM ON THE DEACTIVATION OF FCC CATALYSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roncolatto R.E

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This work provides concrete evidence that vanadium causes the destruction of the zeolite in the FCC catalysts by a mechanism of acid attack or solid-solid transformation, as well as additional dealumination of the zeolite framework in the presence of steam and at high temperature. While these effects resulted in the reduction in crystallinity (zeolite Y content, specific area and unit cell size of the Y zeolite as the amount of vanadium in the catalysts increased, the reduction in activity was the most pronounced. The differences in these behaviors were interpreted and the model can be used for better catalyst formulation or screening.

  13. Optimal Location of Vanadium in Muscovite and Its Geometrical and Electronic Properties by DFT Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiushi Zheng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Vanadium-bearing muscovite is the most valuable component of stone coal, which is a unique source of vanadium manufacture in China. Numbers of experimental studies have been carried out to destroy the carrier muscovite’s structure for efficient extraction of vanadium. Hence, the vanadium location is necessary for exploring the essence of vanadium extraction. Although most infer that vanadium may substitute for trivalent aluminium (Al as the isomorphism in muscovite for the similar atomic radius, there is not enough experimental evidence and theoretical supports to accurately locate the vanadium site in muscovite. In this study, the muscovite model and optimal location of vanadium were calculated by density functional theory (DFT. We find that the vanadium prefers to substitute for the hexa-coordinated aluminum of muscovite for less deformation and lower substitution energy. Furthermore, the local geometry and relative electronic properties were calculated in detail. The basal theoretical research of muscovite contained with vanadium are reported for the first time. It will make a further influence on the technology development of vanadium extraction from stone coal.

  14. Synthesis of hydrated lutetium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Liu [South China Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Guangdong (China); Rong-jun Ma [Changsha Research Institute of Minig and Metallurgy, Hunan (China)

    1997-09-01

    Crystalline lutetium carbonate was synthesized for the corresponding chloride using ammonium bicarbonate as precipitant. The chemical analyses suggest that the synthesized lutetium carbonate is a hydrated basic carbonate or oxycarbonate. The X-ray powder diffraction data are presented. The IR data for the compound show the presence of two different carbonate groups. There is no stable intermediate carbonate in the process of thermal decomposition of the lutetium carbonate. (au) 15 refs.

  15. Gas hydrate saturation and distribution in the Kumano Forearc Basin of the Nankai Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jihui; Tsuji, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Toshifumi

    2017-02-01

    The Kumano Forearc Basin is located to the south-east of the Kii Peninsula, Japan, overlying the accretionary prism in the Nankai Trough. The presence of gas hydrate in submarine sediments of the forearc basin has resulted in the widespread occurrence of bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) on seismic profiles, and has caused distinct anomalies in logging data in the region. We estimated the in situ gas hydrate saturation from logging data by using three methods: effective rock physics models, Archie's equation, and empirical relationships between acoustic impedance (AI) and water-filled porosity. The results derived from rock physics models demonstrate that gas hydrates are attached to the grain surfaces of the rock matrix and are not floating in pore space. By applying the empirical relationships to the AI distribution derived from model-based AI inversion of the three-dimensional (3D) seismic data, we mapped the spatial distribution of hydrate saturation within the Kumano Basin and characterised locally concentrated gas hydrates. Based on the results, we propose two different mechanisms of free gas supply to explain the process of gas hydrate formation in the basin: (1) migration along inclined strata that dip landwards, and (2) migration through the faults or cracks generated by intensive tectonic movements of the accretionary prism. The dipping strata with relatively low AI in the forearc basin could indicate the presence of hydrate formation due to gas migration along the dipping strata. However, high hydrate concentration is observed at fault zones with high pore pressures, thus the second mechanism likely plays an important role in the genesis of gas hydrates in the Kumano Basin. Therefore, the tectonic activities in the accretionary wedge significantly influence the hydrate saturation and distribution in the Kumano Forearc Basin.

  16. THE INFLUENCE OF NIOBIUM ON THE ACIDITY AND STRUCTURE OF GAMMA-ALUMINA-SUPPORTED VANADIUM OXIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N.B. Sathler

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-alumina-supported niobium oxide was used as a support for vanadium oxides. The influence of the addition of niobium oxide was studied by looking for changes in the structure and acid-base character of superficial species. Vanadium oxide was deposited using the continuous adsorption method; niobium oxide was impregnated using the incipient wetness method. The catalysts were characterized by XPS, UV-visible and IR spectroscopy. Catalytic tests were performed using propane oxidation reaction at 400oC. For coverage below the monolayer, both vanadium and niobium oxides were observed in slightly condensed superficial species. The presence of vanadium oxide on the support was found to increase the Lewis acidity and create some Bronsted acidity. Higher catalytic activity and selectivity for propene were associated with vanadium oxides. The presence of niobium did not contribute to the modification of the chemical properties of superficial vanadium but did decrease the adsorption of vanadium on the alumina.

  17. Micro- and nano-scale optoelectronic devices using vanadium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joushaghani, Arash

    Miniaturization has the potential to reduce the size, cost, and power requirements of active optical devices. However, implementing (sub)wavelength-scale electro-optic switches with high efficiency, low insertion loss, and high extinction ratios remains challenging due to their small active volumes. Here, we use the insulator-metal phase transition of vanadium dioxide (VO2), which exhibits a large and reversible change in the refractive index across the phase transition to demonstrate compact, broadband, and efficient switches and photodetectors with record-setting characteristics. We begin by analyzing the electrical and optical properties of VO2 thin films across the phase transition and discuss the fabrication processes that yield micron- and nano-scale VO2 devices. We then demonstrate a surface plasmon thermo-optic switch, which achieves an extinction ratio of 10 dB in a 5 um long device, a record for plasmonic devices. The switch operates over a 100 nm optical bandwidth, and exhibits a thermally limited switching time of 40 mus. We investigate the current and voltage induced switching of VO2 in nano-gap junctions and show optical switching times as short as 20 ns. The two terminal VO2 junctions are incorporated in a silicon photonics platform to yield silicon-VO2 hybrid waveguide devices with a record extinction ratio of 12 dB in a 1 mum long device. In photodetector mode, the devices exhibit a nonlinear responsivity greater than 12 A/W for optical powers less than 1 muW. This device is the smallest electrically controlled and integrated switch and photodetector capable of achieving extinction ratios > 10 dB/mum. We finally investigate the ultra-fast thermal heating in gold nano-apertures and demonstrate that electron heating can change the gold lattice temperature by 300 K in tens of picoseconds. These nano-apertures can be hybridized with VO2 to demonstrate high extinction and ultrafast optical switches.

  18. Vanadium Oxide in the Spectra of Mira Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelaz, M. W.; Luttermoser, D. G.; Piontek, R. A.

    1999-05-01

    Over the last three years, we have made spectroscopic measurements of twenty Mira variable stars, as a function of phase, probing their stellar atmospheres and underlying pulsation mechanisms. Measurement of variations in TiO and VO with phase can be used to help determine whether these molecular species are produced in an extended region above the layers where Balmer line emission occurs or below this shocked region. Piontek & Luttermoser (1999 IAPPPC, submitted), produce synthetic spectra for three Mira variables, R Leo, V CVn, and R CVn as a function of phase. Comparison of their synthetic spectra to our observed spectra yield the fundamental astrophysical parameters of effective temperatures and surface gravities. Spectra are synthesized with LTE stellar stmospheres code ATLAS, using the 6.6--million Indiana University atomic and molecular line dataset. Piontek & Luttermoser point out that the IU dataset does not include vanadium oxide (VO). Thus, there is a noticeable difference between the synthetic spectra and observed near-IR spectra corresponding to the B-X bands of VO (Mahanti 1935, Proc. Phys. Soc., 47, 43; Keenan & Schroeder 1952,L. W., ApJ, 115, 82). In order to incorporate the VO bands in the synthetic spectra, we need to establish tables of wavenumbers, lowest energy levels, and oscillator strengths. Producing the tables is non-trivial. Laboratory measurements of wavenumbers are used in the Just-Overlapping Line Approximation (JOLA; Tsuji 1966, PASJ, 18, 127) to calculate oscillator strengths. The JOLA technique and preliminary results will be presented. MWC greatly appreciates support from the National Science Foundation grant AST-9500756. RAP acknowledges the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy 1998 Summer REU program supported by the National Science Foundation and thanks DGL for being his mentor.

  19. Oxidation of vanadium metal in oxygen plasma and their characterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabindar Kumar Sharma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this report, the role of oxygen plasma on oxidation of vanadium (V metal and the volatilization of its oxides has been studied as a function of source (V metal strip temperature (Tss and oxygen partial pressure (PO2. The presence of O2-plasma not only enhances the oxidation rate but also ficilitates in transport of oxide molecules from metal to substrate, as confirmed by the simultanous deposition of oxide film onto substrate. Both the oxidized metal strips and oxide films deposited on substrates are characterized separately. The structural and vibrational results evidence the presence of two different oxide phases (i.e. orthorhombic V2O5 and monocilinic V O2 in oxide layers formed on V metal strips, whereas the oxide films deposited on substrates exhibit only orthorhombic phase (i.e. V2O5. The decrease in peak intensities recorded from heated V metal strips on increasing Tss points out the increment in the rate of oxide volatilization, which also confirms by the oxide layer thickness measurements. The SEM results show the noticeable surface changes on V-strips as the function of Tss and PO2 and their optimum values are recorded to be 500   ˚ C and 7.5 × 10−2 Torr, respectively to deposit maximum thick oxide film on substrate. The formation of microcracks on oxidized V-strips, those responsible to countinue oxidation is also confirmed by SEM results. The compositional study of oxide layers formed on V-strips, corroborates their pureness and further assures about the existence of mixed oxide phases. The effect of oxygen partial pressure on oxidation of V-metal has also been discussed in the present report. All the results are well in agreement to each other.

  20. Crystallite size distributions of marine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klapp, S.A.; Bohrmann, G.; Abegg, F. [Bremen Univ., Bremen (Germany). Research Center of Ocean Margins; Hemes, S.; Klein, H.; Kuhs, W.F. [Gottingen Univ., Gottingen (Germany). Dept. of Crystallography

    2008-07-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to determine the crystallite size distributions of natural gas hydrate samples retrieved from the Gulf of Mexico, the Black Sea, and a hydrate ridge located near offshore Oregon. Synchrotron radiation technology was used to provide the high photon fluxes and high penetration depths needed to accurately analyze the bulk sediment samples. A new beam collimation diffraction technique was used to measure gas hydrate crystallite sizes. The analyses showed that gas hydrate crystals were globular in shape. Mean crystallite sizes ranged from 200 to 400 {mu}m for hydrate samples taken from the sea floor. Larger grain sizes in the hydrate ridge samples suggested differences in hydrate formation ages or processes. A comparison with laboratory-produced methane hydrate samples showed half a lognormal curve with a mean value of 40{mu}m. Results of the study showed that a cautious approach must be adopted when transposing crystallite-size sensitive physical data from laboratory-made gas hydrates to natural settings. It was concluded that crystallite size information may also be used to resolve the formation ages of gas hydrates when formation processes and conditions are constrained. 48 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  1. IMPORTANCE OF HYDRATION IN SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Vasić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Importance of hydration is detrmined by importance of functions of water in the human organism: i.e. regulation of body temperature, transport, excretion of waste materials through urine, digestion of food which is facilititated by saliva and gastric juices, maintenance of flexibility of organs and tissues About 60 % body mass of an adult person (males: 61 %, females: 54 % is made up of water. Water content of a newly born baby reaches 77 %, and it is up to 50 % in adults. It is very important for sportsmen to provide adequate hydration during and after the time of bodily activities. A symptom of water shortage is thirst. However, thirst is a late response of an organism and it occurs when dehydration has already taken place. Minimum in take of fluids in humans should range between one-and-half to two liters. It has been known for a long time that there is no success in sport without proper hydration in a sportsman.

  2. Characterization for Fusion Candidate Vanadium Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. Muroga; T. Nagasaka; J. M. Chen; Z. Y. Xu; Q. Y. Huang; y. C. Wu

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent achievements in the characterization of candidate vanadium alloys obtained for fusion in the framework of the Japan-China Core University Program.National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) has a program of fabricating high-purity V-4Cr4Ti alloys. The resulting products (NIFS-HEAT-1,2), were characterized by various research groups in the world including Chinese partners. South Western Institute of Physics (SWIP) fabricated a new V-4Cr-4Ti alloy (SWIP-Heat), and carried out a comparative evaluation of hydrogen embrittlement of NIFS-HEATs and SWIP-Heat. The tensile test of hydrogen-doped alloys showed that the NIFS-HEAT maintained the ductility to relatively high hydrogen levels.The comparison of the data with those of previous studies suggested that the reduced oxygen level in the NIFS-HEATs should be responsible for the increased resistance to hydrogen embrittlement.Based on the chemical analysis data of NIFS-HEATs and SWIP-Heats, neutron-induced activation was analyzed in Institute of Plasma Physics (IPP-CAS) as a function of cooling time after the use in the fusion first wall. The results showed that the low level of Co dominates the activity up to 50 years followed by a domination of Nb or Nb and Al in the respective alloys. It was suggested that reduction of Co and Nb, both of which are thought to have been introduced via cross-contamination into the alloys from the molds used should be crucial for reducing further the activation.

  3. Evaluation of Hydrated Lime Filler in Asphalt Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abbas Hasan Al-Jumaily

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mineral filler is one of important materials and affecting on properties and quality of asphalt mixtures .There are different types of mineral filler depended on cost and quality , the matter encourages us to achieve this study to evaluate hydrated lime filler effects on properties of asphalt mixes related with strength and durability. Conventional asphaltic concrete mixtures with Portland cement and soft sandstone fillers and mixtures modified with hydrated lime were evaluated for their fundamental engineering properties as defined by Marshall properties , index of retained strength , indirect tensile strength , permanent deformation characteristics , and fatigue resistance .A typical dense graded mixture employed in construction of surface course pavement in Iraq in accordance with SCRB specifications was used .The materials used in this study included mineral aggregate materials (coarse and fine sizes were originally obtained from Najaf Sea quarries and two grades of asphalt cements produced from Daurah refinery which are D47 and D66 . The physical properties , stiffness modulus and chemical composition are evaluated for the recovered asphalt cement from prepared asphalt mixes containing various filler types .The paper results indicated that the addition of hydrated lime as mineral filler improved the permanent deformation characteristics and fatigue life and the use of hydrated lime will decrease the moisture susceptibility of the asphalt mixtures.

  4. Vanadium: a review of its potential role in the fight against diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badmaev, V; Prakash, S; Majeed, M

    1999-06-01

    The potential role of vanadium in human health is described as a building material of bones and teeth. However, another very interesting and promising application for vanadium in human health emerges from recent studies that evaluated the role of vanadium in the management of diabetes. Vanadium is present in a variety of foods that we commonly eat. Skim milk, lobster, vegetable oils, many vegetables, grains and cereals are rich source of vanadium (>1 ppm). Fruits, meats, fish, butter, cheese, and beverages are relatively poor sources of vanadium. The daily dietary intake in humans has been estimated to vary from 10 microg to 2 mg of elemental vanadium, depending on the environmental sources of this mineral in the air, water, and food of the particular region tested. In animals, vanadium has been shown essential (1-10 microg vanadium per gram of diet). There is only circumstantial evidence that vanadium is essential for humans. However, in doses ranging from 0.083 mmol/d to 0.42 mmol/d, vanadium has shown therapeutic potential in clinical studies with patients of both insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) type. Although vanadium has a significant biological potential, it has a poor therapeutic index, and attempts have been made to reduce the dose of vanadium required for therapeutic effectiveness. Organic forms of vanadium, as opposed to the inorganic sulfate salt of vanadium, are recognized as safer, more absorbable, and able to deliver a therapeutic effect up to 50% greater than the inorganic forms. The goal is to provide vanadium with better gastrointestinal absorption, and in a form that is best able to produce the desired biological effects. As a result, numerous organic complexes of vanadium have been developed including bis(maltolato)oxovanadium (BMOV), bis(cysteinamide N-octyl)oxovanadium known as Naglivan, bis(pyrrolidine-N-carbodithioato)oxovanadium, vanadyl-cysteine methyl ester, and bis

  5. Mechanism of SO2 Promotion for NO Reduction With NH3 over Activaed Carbon—Supported Vanadium Oxide Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhenpingZhu; ZhenyuLiu; HongxianNiu; ShoujunLiu; TiandouHu; TaoLiu

    2001-01-01

    SO2 shows a significant promoting effect on the activity of V2O5/AC catlayst for No reduction with ammonia at low temperatrures (180-250℃).In the present study,the mechanism of the SO2 promotion was studied.It was found that the promoting effect of SO2 on the catalytic activity is due to the formation of a sulfate species on the catalyst surace.The sulfate species is linked to carbon surfaces other the vanadium or mineral surfaces.There is a synergetic role between carbon and V2O5 for the formation of surface sulfate species.A possilbe mechanism is proposed.SO2 is adsorbed and oxidized by oxygen to SO3 on the vanadium surface, and the formed SO3 shifts to the carbon surface and converts into sulfate species.The formed sulfate species acts as a new acid site,improves significantly the NH3 adsorption,and hence promotes the activity of the catalyst.During the reaction in the presence of SO2 at low temperatures,the sulfate species stays on the catalyst surface,while the ammonium ions react with NO continuously to avoid the formation and deposition of excess ammonium sulfate salts on the catalyst surface.

  6. Study of Formation Mechanisms of Gas Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    Gas hydrates, which had been found in subsurface geological environments of deep-sea sediments and permafrost regions, are solid crystalline compounds of gas molecules and water. The estimated energy resources of hydrates are at least twice of that of the conventional fossil fuel in the world. Gas hydrates have a great opportunity to become a dominating future energy. In the past years, many laboratory experiments had been conducted to study chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of gas hydrates in order to investigate the formation and dissociation mechanisms of hydrates. However, it is difficult to observe the formation and dissociation of hydrates in a porous media from a physical experiment directly. The purpose of this study was to model the dynamic formation mechanisms of gas hydrate in porous media by reservoir simulation. Two models were designed for this study: 1) a closed-system static model with separated gas and water zones; this model was a hydrate equilibrium model to investigate the behavior of the formation of hydrates near the initial gas-water contact; and 2) an open-system dynamic model with a continuous bottom-up gas flow; this model simulated the behavior of gas migration and studied the formation of hydrates from flowed gas and static formation water in porous media. A phase behavior module was developed in this study for reservoir simulator to model the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) behavior of hydrates. The thermodynamic equilibriums and chemical reactions were coupled with the phase behavior module to have functions modelling the formation and dissociation of hydrates from/to water and gas. The simulation models used in this study were validated from the code-comparison project proposed by the NETL. According to the modelling results of the closed-system static model, we found that predominated location for the formation of hydrates was below the gas-water contact (or at the top of water zone). The maximum hydrate saturation

  7. Temperature dependences of the Hall and magnetoresistance coefficients of vanadium and tantalum single crystals: Anisotropy of electron-phonon scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkenshtein, N.V.; Veprev, A.G.; Startsev, V.E.; Cherepanov, A.N.; Cherepanov, V.I.

    1985-07-01

    The Hall coefficient R/sub H/(T), transverse magnetoresistance rho/sub c/(T), and the temperature-dependent component rho/sub c/(T) of the impurity electrical resistance are measured as functions of temperature T = 4.2--300 K for vanadium and tantalum single crystals with rho/sub 273.2//rho/sub 4.2/ = 1350 and 500, respectively. The curves R/sub H/(T) have minima at T0 = 33 and 24 K for vanadium and tantalum, respectively, which indicates that the electron-phonon scattering is anisotropic. The anisotropy is caused by ''intersheet'' electron-phonon processes in which the charge carriers are scattered between the open hole surface GAMMAH3h and the closed hole ellipsoids N3h. The curves r/sub H/(T) and rho/sub c/(T) have maxima for T close to T0. The observed extrema have a common physical origin and can be explained by the Kagan-Zhernov-Flerov theory, which postulates that the nonequilibrium part of the electron distribution function is anisotropic. The observed dependence R/sub H/(T) for T>T0 agrees with calculations of R/sub H/(T) for vanadium based on realistic models for the electron and phonon spectra, including the anisotropy for the electron-phonon interaction matrix element.

  8. Gas hydrate decomposition recorded by authigenic barite at pockmark sites of the northern Congo Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasten, Sabine; Nöthen, Kerstin; Hensen, Christian; Spieß, Volkhard; Blumenberg, Martin; Schneider, Ralph R.

    2012-12-01

    The geochemical cycling of barium was investigated in sediments of pockmarks of the northern Congo Fan, characterized by surface and subsurface gas hydrates, chemosynthetic fauna, and authigenic carbonates. Two gravity cores retrieved from the so-called Hydrate Hole and Worm Hole pockmarks were examined using high-resolution pore-water and solid-phase analyses. The results indicate that, although gas hydrates in the study area are stable with respect to pressure and temperature, they are and have been subject to dissolution due to methane-undersaturated pore waters. The process significantly driving dissolution is the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) above the shallowest hydrate-bearing sediment layer. It is suggested that episodic seep events temporarily increase the upward flux of methane, and induce hydrate formation close to the sediment surface. AOM establishes at a sediment depth where the upward flux of methane from the uppermost hydrate layer counterbalances the downward flux of seawater sulfate. After seepage ceases, AOM continues to consume methane at the sulfate/methane transition (SMT) above the hydrates, thereby driving the progressive dissolution of the hydrates "from above". As a result the SMT migrates downward, leaving behind enrichments of authigenic barite and carbonates that typically precipitate at this biogeochemical reaction front. Calculation of the time needed to produce the observed solid-phase barium enrichments above the present-day depths of the SMT served to track the net downward migration of the SMT and to estimate the total time of hydrate dissolution in the recovered sediments. Methane fluxes were higher, and the SMT was located closer to the sediment surface in the past at both sites. Active seepage and hydrate formation are inferred to have occurred only a few thousands of years ago at the Hydrate Hole site. By contrast, AOM-driven hydrate dissolution as a consequence of an overall net decrease in upward methane flux seems to

  9. Parametric study of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sand, silt, and clay sediments: 1. Electromagnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.Y.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2010-01-01

    The marked decrease in bulk electrical conductivity of sediments in the presence of gas hydrates has been used to interpret borehole electrical resistivity logs and, to a lesser extent, the results of controlled source electromagnetic surveys to constrain the spatial distribution and predicted concentration of gas hydrate in natural settings. Until now, an exhaustive laboratory data set that could be used to assess the impact of gas hydrate on the electromagnetic properties of different soils (sand, silt, and clay) at different effective stress and with different saturations of hydrate has been lacking. The laboratory results reported here are obtained using a standard geotechnical cell and the hydrate-formed tetrahydrofuran (THF), a liquid that is fully miscible in water and able to produce closely controlled saturations of hydrate from dissolved phase. Both permittivity and electrical conductivity are good indicators of the volume fraction of free water in the sediment, which is in turn dependent on hydrate saturation. Permittivity in the microwave frequency range is particularly predictive of free water content since it is barely affected by ionic concentration, pore structure, and surface conduction. Electrical conductivity (or resistivity) is less reliable for constraining water content or hydrate saturation: In addition to fluid-filled porosity, other factors, such as the ionic concentration of the pore fluid and possibly other conduction effects (e.g., surface conduction in high specific surface soils having low conductivity pore fluid), also influence electrical conductivity.

  10. SEISMIC STUDIES OF MARINE GAS HYDRATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Haibin

    2003-01-01

    We give a brief introduction of developments of seismic methods in the studies of marine gas hydrates. Then we give an example of seismic data processing for BSRs in western Nankai accretionary prism, a typical gas hydrate distribution region. Seismic data processing is proved to be important to obtain better images of BSRs distribution. Studies of velocity structure of hydrated sediments are useful for better understanding the distribution of gas hydrates. Using full waveform inversion, we successfully derived high-resolution velocity model of a double BSR in eastern Nankai Trough area. Recent survey and research show that gas hydrates occur in the marine sediments of the South China Sea and East China Sea.But we would like to say seismic researches on gas hydrate in China are very preliminary.

  11. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  12. Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy for Structure-II Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeya, Kei; Zhang, Caihong; Kawayama, Iwao

    2009-01-01

    For the nondestructive inspection of gas hydrates, terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) was applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate and propane hydrate. The absorption of propane hydrate monotonically increases with frequency, similar to the case of ice, while THF hydrate has a charact...

  13. Water-activated graphite felt as a high-performance electrode for vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabtamu, Daniel Manaye; Chen, Jian-Yu; Chang, Yu-Chung; Wang, Chen-Hao

    2017-02-01

    A simple, green, novel, time-efficient, and potentially cost-effective water activation method was employed to enhance the electrochemical activity of graphite felt (GF) electrodes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). The GF electrode prepared with a water vapor injection time of 5 min at 700 °C exhibits the highest electrochemical activity for the VO2+/VO2+ couple among all the tested electrodes. This is attributed to the small, controlled amount of water vapor that was introduced producing high contents of oxygen-containing functional groups, such as sbnd OH groups, on the surface of the GF fibers, which are known to be electrochemically active sites for vanadium redox reactions. Charge-discharge tests further confirm that only 5 min of GF water activation is required to improve the efficiency of the VRFB cell. The average coulombic efficiency, voltage efficiency, and energy efficiency are 95.06%, 87.42%, and 83.10%, respectively, at a current density of 50 mA cm-2. These voltage and energy efficiencies are determined to be considerably higher than those of VRFB cells assembled using heat-treated GF electrodes without water activation and pristine GF electrodes.

  14. Molecular dynamics study on β -phase vanadium monohydride with machine learning potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Kazutoshi; Ohno, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    The formalism to construct the machine learning potentials (MLPs) is presented. We introduce the spilling factor for the simultaneous error estimation and the recursive bisection method for the reduction of the computational cost. The formalism is applied for the β -phase vanadium monohydride. The first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) are used to prepare the sample data set from which the MLP for the vanadium monohydride (VH) system is constructed. In the molecular dynamics simulation with the MLP, the time-averaged structure of β -VH is predicted correctly to be the body-centered tetragonal structure with the octahedral (O ) site occupation of H. The average lattice constants are in good agreement with the experimental data which are not able to be reproduced by the static DFT calculation. The O -site occupation of H observed in the average structure is, however, a saddle point on the potential-energy surface, and the actual hydrogen occupation is found to be the 4 T configuration.

  15. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...... prehydration may occur. In the report both theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during water vapour exposure is nucleation controlled....

  16. Singlet oxygenation in microemulsion catalysed by vanadium chloroperoxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renirie, R.; Pierlot, C.; Wever, R.; Aubry, J.-M.

    2009-01-01

    Non-ionic microemulsions compatible with the enzyme vanadium chloroperoxidase were designed to perform singlet oxygenation of apolar substrates. The media were based on mono- and polydisperse ethoxylated fatty alcohols (CiEj). octane and aqueous buffer. "Fish" diagrams were determined to identify

  17. Vanadium based materials as electrode materials for high performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Li, Bing; Guo, Wei; Pang, Huan; Xue, Huaiguo

    2016-10-01

    As a kind of supercapacitors, pseudocapacitors have attracted wide attention in recent years. The capacitance of the electrochemical capacitors based on pseudocapacitance arises mainly from redox reactions between electrolytes and active materials. These materials usually have several oxidation states for oxidation and reduction. Many research teams have focused on the development of an alternative material for electrochemical capacitors. Many transition metal oxides have been shown to be suitable as electrode materials of electrochemical capacitors. Among them, vanadium based materials are being developed for this purpose. Vanadium based materials are known as one of the best active materials for high power/energy density electrochemical capacitors due to its outstanding specific capacitance and long cycle life, high conductivity and good electrochemical reversibility. There are different kinds of synthetic methods such as sol-gel hydrothermal/solvothermal method, template method, electrospinning method, atomic layer deposition, and electrodeposition method that have been successfully applied to prepare vanadium based electrode materials. In our review, we give an overall summary and evaluation of the recent progress in the research of vanadium based materials for electrochemical capacitors that include synthesis methods, the electrochemical performances of the electrode materials and the devices.

  18. Novel hybrid materials based on the vanadium oxide nanobelts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabrodina, G.S., E-mail: kudgs@mail.ru [G.A. Razuvaev Institute of Organometallic Chemistry of Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Makarov, S.G.; Kremlev, K.V. [G.A. Razuvaev Institute of Organometallic Chemistry of Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Yunin, P.A.; Gusev, S.A. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod 603087 (Russian Federation); Kaverin, B.S.; Kaverina, L.B. [G.A. Razuvaev Institute of Organometallic Chemistry of Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Ketkov, S.Yu. [G.A. Razuvaev Institute of Organometallic Chemistry of Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Flat and curved vanadium oxide nanobelts have been synthesized. • Hybrid material was prepared via decoration of flexible nanobelts with zinc phthalocyanine. • Investigations of the thermal stability, morphologies and structures were carried out. - Abstract: Novel hybrid materials based on zinc phthalocyanine and nanostructured vanadium oxides have attracted extensive attention for the development of academic research and innovative industrial applications such as flexible electronics, optical sensors and heterogeneous catalysts. Vanadium oxides nanobelts were synthesized via a hydrothermal treatment V{sub 2}O{sub 5}·nH{sub 2}O gel with surfactants (TBAB, CTAB) used as structure-directing agents, where CTAB – cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, TBAB – tetrabutylammonium bromide. Hybrid materials were prepared decoration of (CTA){sub 0.33}V{sub 2}O{sub 5} flexible nanobelts with cationic zinc phthalocyanine by the ion-exchange route. Investigations of the thermal stability, morphologies and structures of the (CTA){sub 0.33}V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, (TBA){sub 0.16}V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanobelts and zinc phthalocyanine exchange product were carried out. The hybrid materials based on the nanostructured vanadium oxide and zinc phthalocyanine were tested as photocatalysts for oxidation of citronellol and 2-mercaptoethanol by dioxygen.

  19. Vanadium Effect on a Medium Carbon Forging Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Garcia-Mateo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present work the influence of vanadium on the hardenability and the bainitic transformation of a medium carbon steel is analyzed. While V in solid solution enhances the former, it hardly affects bainitic transformation. The results also reveal an unexpected result, an increase of the prior austenite grain size as the V content increases.

  20. A high-performance dual-scale porous electrode for vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X. L.; Zeng, Y. K.; Zhu, X. B.; Wei, L.; Zhao, T. S.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present a simple and cost-effective method to form a dual-scale porous electrode by KOH activation of the fibers of carbon papers. The large pores (∼10 μm), formed between carbon fibers, serve as the macroscopic pathways for high electrolyte flow rates, while the small pores (∼5 nm), formed on carbon fiber surfaces, act as active sites for rapid electrochemical reactions. It is shown that the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area of the carbon paper is increased by a factor of 16 while maintaining the same hydraulic permeability as that of the original carbon paper electrode. We then apply the dual-scale electrode to a vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) and demonstrate an energy efficiency ranging from 82% to 88% at current densities of 200-400 mA cm-2, which is record breaking as the highest performance of VRFB in the open literature.

  1. Production of large-scale, freestanding vanadium pentoxide nanobelt porous structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yong Ju; Kim, Byung Hoon; Hong, Won G.; Kim, Chang Hee; Kim, Yark Yeon; Jeong, Eun-Ju; Jang, Won Ick; Yu, Han Young

    2012-02-01

    Large-scale, freestanding, porous structures of vanadium pentoxide nanobelts (VPNs) were successfully prepared using the template-free freeze-drying method. The porous and multi-layered VPN macrostructures are composed of randomly oriented long nanobelts (over 100 μm) and their side length can be controlled up to a few tens of centimetres. Also, the bulk density and surface area of these macrostructures are 3-5 mg cm-3 and 40-80 m2 g-1, respectively, which are similar to those of the excellent adsorbents. In addition, the removal efficiency measurements of ammonia molecules revealed that the VPN porous structures can adsorb the ammonia molecules with the combinations of van der Waals forces and strong chemical bonding by functional groups on the VPN surface.

  2. High performance electrodes in vanadium redox flow batteries through oxygen-enriched thermal activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezeshki, Alan M.; Clement, Jason T.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2015-10-01

    The roundtrip electrochemical energy efficiency is improved from 63% to 76% at a current density of 200 mA cm-2 in an all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) by utilizing modified carbon paper electrodes in the high-performance no-gap design. Heat treatment of the carbon paper electrodes in a 42% oxygen/58% nitrogen atmosphere increases the electrochemically wetted surface area from 0.24 to 51.22 m2 g-1, resulting in a 100-140 mV decrease in activation overpotential at operationally relevant current densities. An enriched oxygen environment decreases the amount of treatment time required to achieve high surface area. The increased efficiency and greater depth of discharge doubles the total usable energy stored in a fixed amount of electrolyte during operation at 200 mA cm-2.

  3. Hydrogen evolution at the negative electrode of the all-vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Che-Nan; Delnick, Frank M.; Baggetto, Loïc; Veith, Gabriel M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.

    2014-02-01

    This work demonstrates a quantitative method to determine the hydrogen evolution rate occurring at the negative carbon electrode of the all vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB). Two carbon papers examined by buoyancy measurements yield distinct hydrogen formation rates (0.170 and 0.005 μmol min-1 g-1). The carbon papers have been characterized using electron microscopy, nitrogen gas adsorption, capacitance measurement by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We find that the specific electrochemical surface area (ECSA) of the carbon material has a strong influence on the hydrogen generation rate. This is discussed in light of the use of high surface area material to obtain high reaction rates in the VRFB.

  4. Prediction of Refrigerant Gas Hydrates Formation Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deqing Liang; Ruzhu Wang; Kaihua Guo; Shuanshi Fan

    2001-01-01

    A fugacity model was developed for prediction of mixed refrigerant gas hydrates formation conditions based on the molecule congregation and solution theories. In this model, g as hydrates were regarded as non-ideal solid solution composed of water groups and guest molecules, and the expressions of fugacity of guest molecules in hydrate phase was proposed accordingly. It has been shown that the developed model can indicate successfully the effect of guest-guest molecule interaction. The results showed that the model can describe better the characteristics of phase equilibrium of mixed refrigerant gas hydrates and predictions are in good agreement with experimental data.

  5. Desalination utilizing clathrate hydrates (LDRD final report).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Greathouse, Jeffery A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Majzoub, Eric H. (University of Missouri, Columbia, MO)

    2008-01-01

    Advances are reported in several aspects of clathrate hydrate desalination fundamentals necessary to develop an economical means to produce municipal quantities of potable water from seawater or brackish feedstock. These aspects include the following, (1) advances in defining the most promising systems design based on new types of hydrate guest molecules, (2) selection of optimal multi-phase reactors and separation arrangements, and, (3) applicability of an inert heat exchange fluid to moderate hydrate growth, control the morphology of the solid hydrate material formed, and facilitate separation of hydrate solids from concentrated brine. The rate of R141b hydrate formation was determined and found to depend only on the degree of supercooling. The rate of R141b hydrate formation in the presence of a heat exchange fluid depended on the degree of supercooling according to the same rate equation as pure R141b with secondary dependence on salinity. Experiments demonstrated that a perfluorocarbon heat exchange fluid assisted separation of R141b hydrates from brine. Preliminary experiments using the guest species, difluoromethane, showed that hydrate formation rates were substantial at temperatures up to at least 12 C and demonstrated partial separation of water from brine. We present a detailed molecular picture of the structure and dynamics of R141b guest molecules within water cages, obtained from ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and Raman spectroscopy. Density functional theory calculations were used to provide an energetic and molecular orbital description of R141b stability in both large and small cages in a structure II hydrate. Additionally, the hydrate of an isomer, 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, does not form at ambient conditions because of extensive overlap of electron density between guest and host. Classical molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory trials support the results for the isomer hydrate. Molecular dynamics simulations

  6. Evaluation of influence of proteoglycans on hydration of articular cartilage with the use of ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-yi YANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To monitor the changes in hydration behaviour of articular cartilage induced by degradation of proteoglycans, and to explore the effect of proteoglycans on hydration behaviour of articular cartilage by using high-frequency ultrasound. Methods Twelve porcine patellae with smooth cartilage surface were prepared and equally divided into two groups: normal group without any enzyme treatment, and trypsin group they were treated with 0.25% trypsin for 8h to digest proteoglycan in the cartilage. The hydration behaviour of the cartilage tissue was scanned by high-frequency ultrasound system with a central frequency of 25MHz. Parameters including cartilage hydration strain and cartilage thickness were measured. The histopathological changes in the articular cartilage were observed under a light microscope. Results It took approximately 20min to reach equilibrium during the hydration process in the normal cartilages, while proteoglycan-degraded cartilage took only about 5min to achieve equilibrium. The equilibrium strain of normal cartilage was 3.5%±0.5%. The degradation of proteoglycans induced a significant decrease in equilibrium strain (1.8%±0.2%, P0.05. Conclusion Proteoglycans play an important role in hydration behaviour of articular cartilage. The degradation of proteoglycans could induce degeneration of cartilage structure and decrease in hydration behaviour after dehydration. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.03.03

  7. The analysis of magnesium oxide hydration in three-phase reaction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaojia; Guo, Lin; Chen, Chen; Liu, Quan; Li, Tie; Zhu, Yimin

    2014-05-01

    In order to investigate the magnesium oxide hydration process in gas-liquid-solid (three-phase) reaction system, magnesium hydroxide was prepared by magnesium oxide hydration in liquid-solid (two-phase) and three-phase reaction systems. A semi-empirical model and the classical shrinking core model were used to fit the experimental data. The fitting result shows that both models describe well the hydration process of three-phase system, while only the semi-empirical model right for the hydration process of two-phase system. The characterization of the hydration product using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) was performed. The XRD and SEM show hydration process in the two-phase system follows common dissolution/precipitation mechanism. While in the three-phase system, the hydration process undergo MgO dissolution, Mg(OH)2 precipitation, Mg(OH)2 peeling off from MgO particle and leaving behind fresh MgO surface.

  8. Hydration Forces Between Lipid Bilayers: A Theoretical Overview and a Look on Methods Exploring Dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Helge

    2015-01-01

    Although, many biological systems fulfil their functions under the condition of excess hydration, the behaviour of bound water as well as the processes accompanying dehydration are nevertheless important to investigate. Dehydration can be a result of applied mechanical pressure, lowered humidity or cryogenic conditions. The effort required to dehydrate a lipid membrane at relatively low degree of hydration can be described by a disjoining pressure which is called hydration pressure or hydration force. This force is short-ranging (a few nm) and is usually considered to be independent of other surface forces, such as ionic or undulation forces. Different theories were developed to explain hydration forces that are usually not consistent with each other and which are also partially in conflict with experimental or numerical data.Over the last decades it has been more and more realised that one experimental method alone is not capable of providing much new insight into the world of such hydration forces. Therefore, research requires the comparison of results obtained from the different methods. This chapter thus deals with an overview on the theory of hydration forces, ranging from polarisation theory to protrusion forces, and presents a selection of experimental techniques appropriate for their characterisation, such as X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and even calorimetry.

  9. Experimental study of enhanced gas recovery from gas hydrate bearing sediments by inhibitor and steam injection methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, T.; Ohtake, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Yamamoto, Y.; Haneda, H. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan). Methane Hydrate Research Laboratory; Komai, T. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technoloyg, Tsukuba (Japan). Inst. for Geo-Resource and Environment; Higuchi, S. [Nihon Axis Co. Ltd., Mito (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Inhibitor and steam injection methods for recovering methane hydrate-bearing sediments were investigated. New apparatus designs were used to inject steam into artificial methane hydrate-bearing sediments. Aqueous methanol was injected into a silica-based hydrate-bearing sediment in order to examine the dissociation behaviour of the methane hydrates. Experiments were conducted to examine the effects of steam injection using pure water; an aqueous methyl alcohol (MeOh) solution at 10 wt per cent; and an aqueous sodium chloride (NaC1) solution at 3 wt per cent. Temperatures for the injected fluids were set at 40 degrees C. Total gas production behaviour was divided into 3 stages: (1) the replacement of the remaining gas with the injected solution in the pore space; (2) gas production by hydrate dissociation; and (3) steady state and gas release. Results showed that cumulative gas production using the inhibitor solutions of MeOH and NaC1 proceeded more rapidly than the pure water samples. Downstream temperatures were not maintained at initial temperatures but decreased following the initiation of hydrate dissociation. Temperature changes were attributed to the coupling effect of the dissociation temperature and changes in inhibitor concentrations at the methane hydrate's surface. The use of inhibitors resulted in higher levels of cumulative gas production and more rapid hydrate dissociation rates. It was concluded that depressurization and steam injection induced hydrate dissociation from both upstream and downstream to the center of the sediment sample. 18 refs., 9 figs.

  10. New Model Describing Distribution of Adsorbed Superplasticizer on the Surface of Hydrating Cement Grain%水化水泥颗粒表面超塑化剂吸附层分布模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Johann Plank; Panagiotis Chatziagorastou; Christian Hirsch

    2007-01-01

    制备了钙矾石(AFt)、单硫型硫铝酸钙(AFm)和钾长石类单矿物,并研究了三聚氰胺磺酸盐甲醛缩聚物(PMS)、β-萘磺酸盐甲醛缩合物(BNS)及聚羧酸盐(PC)等几种化学成分不同的超塑化剂在其早期水化颗粒表面上的吸附行为.研究发现,zeta电位是决定水泥颗粒表面对超塑化剂吸附量的关键因素.以溶液沉淀析出法人工合成的AFt具有较高的正zeta电位,能吸附大量带负电荷的超塑化剂,AFm仅带少量正电荷,其吸附超塑化剂相对较少,钾长石、氢氧钙石和石膏的zeta电位几乎为零或负值,因而基本不吸附超塑化剂.根据实验结果,笔者认为水化水泥颗粒用马赛克结构表示为最佳,而超塑化剂主要吸附在AFt表面上.%The adsorption behaviour of chemically different superplasticizers, such as melamine formaldehyde sulphite polycondensate(PMS), β-naphthalene sulfonate formaldehyde polycondensate(BNS) and polycarboxylate(PC), on early hydrating cement phases was studied. For this purpose, pure ettringite(AFt), monosulfate (AFm) and syngenite were prepared. The adsorbed amount and zeta potential of early hydration products were measured. It is found that zeta potential is the key factor determining the amount of superplasticizer absorbed. Synthetic ettringite precipitated from solution shows a highly positive zeta potential, hence it adsorbs great amount of negatively charged superplasticizer. Monosulfate has only a slightly positive zeta potential and adsorbs smaller amounts of superplasticizer. For syngenite, portlandite and gypsum, the zeta potential is around zero or negative. These phases do not adsorb superplasticizers.Consquently, a hydrating cement grain is best represented by a mosaic structure, with superplasticizer molecules mainly adsorbed on ettringite spots.

  11. Sprayed vanadium pentoxide thin films: Influence of substrate temperature and role of HNO3 on the structural, optical, morphological and electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margoni, Mudaliar Mahesh; Mathuri, S.; Ramamurthi, K.; Babu, R. Ramesh; Sethuraman, K.

    2017-10-01

    Spray pyrolysis technique was employed to deposit vanadium pentoxide thin films at different substrate temperature of 300 °C, 325 °C, 350 °C, 375 °C and 400 °C from nitric acid added ammonium meta vanadate aqua precursor solution. X-ray diffraction analysis of the deposited films showed the formation of orthorhombic vanadium pentoxide phase with growth along (101) plane. Average crystallite size showed variation from 21 to 42 nm as a function of substrate temperature. The film deposited at 400 °C acquired average visible transmittance of ∼77% in the 500-800 nm range. Direct optical band gap of the vanadium pentoxide thin film was slightly increased from 1.98 to 2.05 eV. Field emission scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope studies showed that the size and shape of the flakes formed on the surface of the film deposited from the nitric acid added ammonium meta vanadate precursor solution were effectively modified with increase in substrate temperature. The carrier concentration and conductivity of the film deposited at 375 °C respectively is 2.138 × 1013 cm-3 and 1.0 × 10-5 Ω-1 cm-1 which are relatively high when compared to other films. Photoluminescence spectra of the vanadium pentoxide films deposited at 375 °C and 400 °C showed intense emission peaks at 475 nm and 552 nm.

  12. Waters of Hydration of Cupric Hydrates: A Comparison between Heating and Absorbance Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2011-01-01

    The empirical formulas of four cupric hydrates are determined by measuring the absorbance in aqueous solution. The Beer-Lambert Law is verified by constructing a calibration curve of absorbance versus known Cu[superscript 2+](aq) concentration. A solution of the unknown hydrate is prepared by using 0.2-0.3 g of hydrate, and water is added such…

  13. Effect of vanadium on insulin sensitivity and appetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Yuen, V G; McNeill, J H

    2001-06-01

    Vanadium, a potent nonselective inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases, has been shown to mimic many of the metabolic actions of insulin both in vivo and in vitro. The mechanism(s) of the effect of vanadium on the decrease in appetite and body weight in Zucker fa/fa rats, an insulin-resistant model, is still unclear. Because insulin may inhibit hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY), which is known to be related to appetite, and increase leptin secretion in adipose tissue, we studied the possibility that the changes in appetite produced by vanadium may be linked to altered NPY levels in the hypothalamus. We also examined effects of vanadium on leptin. Zucker lean and fatty rats were chronically treated with bis(maltolato)oxovanadium(IV) (BMOV), an organic vanadium compound, in the drinking water. Plasma and adipose tissue leptin levels were measured by radioimmunoassay and immunoblotting, respectively. Hypothalamic NPY mRNA and peptide levels were measured using in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry, respectively. BMOV treatment significantly reduced food intake, body fat, body weight, plasma insulin levels, and glucose levels in fatty Zucker rats. Fifteen minutes after insulin injection (5 U/kg, intravenous [IV]), circulating leptin levels (+100%) and adipose leptin levels (+60%) were elevated in BMOV-treated fatty rats, although these effects were not observed in untreated fatty rats. NPY mRNA levels in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) (-29%), NPY peptide levels in ARC (-31%), as well as in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) (-37%) were decreased with BMOV treatment in these fatty rats. These data indicate that BMOV may increase insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue and decrease appetite and body fat by decreasing NPY levels in the hypothalamus. BMOV-induced reduction in appetite and weight gain along with normalized insulin levels in models of obesity, suggest its possible use as a therapeutic agent in obesity.

  14. Crossing points in the electronic band structure of vanadium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshav N. Shrivastava

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The electronic band structures of several models of vanadium oxide are calculated. In the models 1-3, every vanadium atom is connected to 4 oxygen atoms and every oxygen atom is connected to 4 vanadium atoms. In model 1, a=b=c 2.3574 Å; in model 2, a= 4.7148 Å, b= 2.3574 Å and c= 2.3574 Å; and in model 3, a= 4.7148 Å, b= 2.3574 Å and c= 4.7148 Å. In the models 4-6, every vanadium atom is connected to 4 oxygen atoms and every oxygen atom is connected to 2 vanadium atoms. In model 4, a=b= 4.551 Å and c= 2.851 Å; in model 5, a=b=c= 3.468 Å; and in model 6, a=b=c= 3.171 Å. We have searched for a crossing point in the band structure of all the models. In model 1 there is a point at which five bands appear to meet but the gap is 7.3 meV. In model 2 there is a crossing point between G and F points and there is a point between F and Q with the gap ≈ 3.6608 meV. In model 3, the gap is very small, ~ 10-5 eV. In model 4, the gap is 5.25 meV. In model 5, the gap between Z and G points is 2.035 meV, and in model 6 the gap at Z point is 4.3175 meV. The crossing point in model 2 looks like one line is bent so that the supersymmetry is broken. When pseudopotentials are replaced by a full band calculation, the crossing point changes into a gap of 2.72 x 10-4 eV.

  15. The structure of the hydrated electron in bulk and at interfaces: Does the hydrated electron occupy a cavity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Jennifer Ryan

    experimental temperature dependence in the optical absorption spectrum and show the wrong trends in the resonance Raman spectrum. We also explore the differences between non-cavity and cavity models by quantifying the electron-water overlap, referring to the non-cavity model as an 'inverse plum pudding,' where the water molecules are embedded within the electron density. Finally, we examine hydrated electrons in the presence of an air/water interface. Experiments indicate that most likely electrons do not reside at the surface, and if they do, they have structural and dynamical properties reminiscent of the bulk. Our calculated Potentials of Mean Force indicate that both cavity and non-cavity electrons prefer to be solvated by the bulk, but that the cavity electron has a local free energy minimum near the surface. These calculated interfacial cavity electrons behave very differently than cavity electrons in the bulk, in direct contrast to experimental evidence. From the work presented in this thesis, it is clear that the non-cavity electron is the most appropriate one-electron model we have for the structure of the hydrated electron.

  16. Bioavailability, tissue distribution and hypoglycaemic effect of vanadium in magnesium-deficient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Cristina; Torres, Miguel; Bermúdez-Peña, María C; Aranda, Pilar; Montes-Bayón, María; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo; Llopis, Juan

    2011-12-01

    Vanadium is an element whose role as a micronutrient and hypoglycaemic drug has yet to be fully clarified. The present study was undertaken to investigate the bioavailability and tissue distribution of vanadium and its interactions with magnesium in healthy and in magnesium-deficient rats, in order to determine its role as a micronutrient and antidiabetic agent. Four groups were used: control (456.4 mg magnesium and 0.06 mg vanadium/kg food); control treated with 1mg vanadium/day; magnesium-deficient (164.4 mg magnesium/kg food and 0.06 mg vanadium/kg food); and magnesium-deficient treated with 1 mg vanadium/day. The vanadium was supplied in the drinking water as bis(maltolato)oxovanadium (IV). The experiment had a duration of five weeks. We measured vanadium and magnesium in excreta, serum, skeletal muscle, kidney, liver, adipose tissue and femur. Fasting glucose, insulin and total antioxidant status (TAS) in serum were studied. The vanadium treatment applied to the control rats reduced the absorption, retention, serum level and femur content of magnesium. Magnesium deficiency increased the retention and serum level of vanadium, the content of vanadium in the kidney, liver and femur (organs where magnesium had been depleted), serum glycaemia and insulin, and reduced TAS. V treatment given to magnesium-deficient rats corrected magnesium content in muscle, kidney and liver and levels of serum glucose, insulin and TAS. In conclusion, our results show interactions between magnesium and vanadium in the digestive and renal systems. Treatment with vanadium to magnesium-deficient rats corrected many of the alterations that had been generated by the magnesium deficiency.

  17. Hydration in soccer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. The rates that carbohydrate and water are absorbed by the organism are limited by the rates of gastric emptying and intestinal absorption. The composition of drinks offered to the players should be influenced by the relative importance of the need of supplying carbohydrates or water; it should be remembered that the depletion of carbohydrate can result in fatigue and decrease of performance, but it is not usually a life-threatening condition. The addition of carbohydrate in these drinks increases the concentrations of blood glucose, increases the use of external fuel through the increase of the glucose oxidation in the muscles and it spares muscle glycogen. So, the ingestion of carbohydrate before and during the exercise can delay the emergence of fatigue and increase the players' performance. Several tactics can be used to avoid dehydration, like hyperhydration before exercise and player's acclimatization. The ideal situation to restore the player's fluid losses is between the sessions of exercises. Since soccer is a sport with quite peculiar characteristics related to hydration, the players should be concerned and educated about the importance of fluid ingestion before, during and after the exercise.

  18. The presence of vanadium in groundwater of southeastern extreme the pampean region Argentina Relationship with other chemical elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Carmen E; Paoloni, Juan D; Sequeira, Mario E; Arosteguy, Pedro

    2007-08-15

    Changes in the quality of groundwater resources are related to the presence and concentration of contaminants, especially trace elements such as arsenic, boron, fluoride and vanadium. Vanadium is a rare element naturally abundant, generally found in combination with other elements. Vanadium pentoxide is known to have aneugenic effects. Thus, a study was carried out to assess the presence of vanadium in the groundwater of the southeastern pampean region of Argentina, which constitutes the main water supply for the local population. Statistical and correlational analyses were applied to identify possible interrelationships between vanadium and another chemical elements. Vanadium was found in all groundwater samples. The minimum and maximum vanadium concentrations found were 0.05 mg/l and 2.47 mg/l, respectively. Vanadium is significantly correlated with other trace elements such as arsenic, fluoride and boron. The interrelationship between vanadium and the presence of volcanic glass in sediments is not significant as expected.

  19. Protein dynamics: hydration and cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Heremans

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-pressure behavior of proteins seems to be unique among the biological macromolecules. Thermodynamic as well as kinetic data show the typical elliptical stability diagram. This may be extended by assuming that the unfolded state gives rise to volume and enthalpy-driven liquid-liquid transitions. A molecular interpretation follows from the temperature and the pressure dependence of the hydration and cavities. We suggest that positron annihilation spectroscopy can provide additional quantitative evidence for the contributions of cavities to the dynamics of proteins. Only mature amyloid fibrils that form from unfolded proteins are very resistant to pressure treatment.

  20. A stochastic exposure assessment model to estimate vanadium intake by beef cattle used as sentinels for the South African vanadium mining industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gummow, B.; Kirsten, W.F.A.; Gummow, R.J.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an environmental exposure assessment model for estimating chronic intake of vanadium (a transition metal) by cattle farmed extensively in areas contaminated by vanadium pollutants. The exposure model differs from most other models in several ways: (1) it does not rely heavily

  1. 熔融钒渣直接提钒新工艺%New Process of Vanadium Extraction from Molten Vanadium Slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋文臣; 李宏; 李昆; 郑权

    2013-01-01

    现行钒渣焙烧工艺中的钒渣高温物理热被浪费,对“熔融钒渣直接氧化钠化提钒”新工艺的可行性进行分析,并进行实验室模拟试验.结果表明,新工艺条件下,试验过程中熔融钒渣流动性良好,焙烧后钒渣水浸率为50%~80%,焙烧后钒渣中的钒主要以偏钒酸钠的形式存在.新工艺是合理可行的,具有工业生产价值.%A new process of extracting vanadium from molten vanadium slag by direct oxidation and sodium salt roasting method was introduced,with the aim to address heat waste of vanadium slag existing in vanadium extraction process through vanadium slag roasting.The feasibility of the new process was analyzed,and the simulation test was carried out in laboratory.The results show that under the new process condition,molten vanadium slag can be kept with good fluidity.Water leaching rate of vanadium is 50 % ~80 %.Vanadium in roasted slag exists in form of sodium metavanadate.To conclude,the new process is feasible and can meet industrial production requirement.

  2. The role of phosphate additive in stabilization of sulphuric-acid-based vanadium(V) electrolyte for all-vanadium redox-flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roznyatovskaya, Nataliya V.; Roznyatovsky, Vitaly A.; Höhne, Carl-Christoph; Fühl, Matthias; Gerber, Tobias; Küttinger, Michael; Noack, Jens; Fischer, Peter; Pinkwart, Karsten; Tübke, Jens

    2017-09-01

    Catholyte in all-vanadium redox-flow battery (VRFB) which consists of vanadium salts dissolved in sulphuric acid is known to be stabilized by phosphoric acid to slow down the thermal aging at temperatures higher than 40 °C. To reveal the role of phosphoric acid, the thermally-induced aggregation is investigated using variable-temperature 51V, 31P, 17O, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The results indicate that the thermal stabilization of vanadium(V) electrolyte is attained by the involvement of monomeric and dimeric vanadium(V) species in the reaction with phosphoric acid which is concurrent to the formation of neutral hydroxo-aqua vanadium(V) precipitation precursor. The dimers are stabilized by counter ions due to association reaction or if such stabilization is not possible, precipitation of vanadium pentoxide is favored. The evolution of particles size distributions at 50 °C in electrolyte samples containing 1.6 M vanadium and 4.0 M total sulphate and the pathways of precipitate formation are discussed. The optimal total phosphate concentration is found to be of 0.15 M. However, the induction time is assumed to be dependent not only on the total phosphate concentrations, but also on the ratio of total vanadium(V) to sulphate concentrations.

  3. A stochastic exposure assessment model to estimate vanadium intake by beef cattle used as sentinels for the South African vanadium mining industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gummow, B.; Kirsten, W.F.A.; Gummow, R.J.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an environmental exposure assessment model for estimating chronic intake of vanadium (a transition metal) by cattle farmed extensively in areas contaminated by vanadium pollutants. The exposure model differs from most other models in several ways: (1) it does not rely heavily on

  4. A new strategy for integrating abundant oxygen functional groups into carbon felt electrode for vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Jae; Lee, Seung-Wook; Yim, Taeeun; Kim, Jae-Geun; Choi, Jang Wook; Kim, Jung Ho; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Young-Jun

    2014-11-01

    The effects of surface treatment combining corona discharge and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the electrochemical performance of carbon felt electrodes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) have been thoroughly investigated. A high concentration of oxygen functional groups has been successfully introduced onto the surface of the carbon felt electrodes by a specially designed surface treatment, which is mainly responsible for improving the energy efficiency of VRFBs. In addition, the wettability of the carbon felt electrodes also can be significantly improved. The energy efficiency of the VRFB cell employing the surface modified carbon felt electrodes is improved by 7% at high current density (148 mA cm-2). Such improvement is attributed to the faster charge transfer and better wettability allowed by surface-active oxygen functional groups. Moreover, this method is much more competitive than other surface treatments in terms of processing time, production costs, and electrochemical performance.

  5. Soil Diversity and Hydration as Observed by ChemCam at Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meslin, P.-Y.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; Schröder, S.; Cousin, A.; Berger, G.; Clegg, S. M.; Lasue, J.; Maurice, S.; Sautter, V.; Le Mouélic, S.; Wiens, R. C.; Fabre, C.; Goetz, W.; Bish, D.; Mangold, N.; Ehlmann, B.; Lanza, N.; Harri, A.-M.; Anderson, R.; Rampe, E.; McConnochie, T. H.; Pinet, P.; Blaney, D.; Léveillé, R.; Archer, D.; Barraclough, B.; Bender, S.; Blake, D.; Blank, J. G.; Bridges, N.; Clark, B. C.; DeFlores, L.; Delapp, D.; Dromart, G.; Dyar, M. D.; Fisk, M.; Gondet, B.; Grotzinger, J.; Herkenhoff, K.; Johnson, J.; Lacour, J.-L.; Langevin, Y.; Leshin, L.; Lewin, E.; Madsen, M. B.; Melikechi, N.; Mezzacappa, A.; Mischna, M. A.; Moores, J. E.; Newsom, H.; Ollila, A.; Perez, R.; Renno, N.; Sirven, J.-B.; Tokar, R.; de la Torre, M.; d'Uston, L.; Vaniman, D.; Yingst, A.; Kemppinen, Osku; Minitti, Michelle; Cremers, David; Bell, James F.; Edgar, Lauren; Farmer, Jack; Godber, Austin; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Wellington, Danika; McEwan, Ian; Newman, Claire; Richardson, Mark; Charpentier, Antoine; Peret, Laurent; King, Penelope; Weigle, Gerald; Schmidt, Mariek; Li, Shuai; Milliken, Ralph; Robertson, Kevin; Sun, Vivian; Baker, Michael; Edwards, Christopher; Farley, Kenneth; Griffes, Jennifer; Miller, Hayden; Newcombe, Megan; Pilorget, Cedric; Rice, Melissa; Siebach, Kirsten; Stack, Katie; Stolper, Edward; Brunet, Claude; Hipkin, Victoria; Marchand, Geneviève; Sánchez, Pablo Sobrón; Favot, Laurent; Cody, George; Steele, Andrew; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Lees, David; Nefian, Ara; Martin, Mildred; Gailhanou, Marc; Westall, Frances; Israël, Guy; Agard, Christophe; Baroukh, Julien; Donny, Christophe; Gaboriaud, Alain; Guillemot, Philippe; Lafaille, Vivian; Lorigny, Eric; Paillet, Alexis; Pérez, René; Saccoccio, Muriel; Yana, Charles; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Rodríguez, Javier Caride; Blázquez, Isaías Carrasco; Gómez, Felipe Gómez; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Hettrich, Sebastian; Malvitte, Alain Lepinette; Jiménez, Mercedes Marín; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Martín-Soler, Javier; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Jurado, Antonio Molina; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Caro, Guillermo Muñoz; López, Sara Navarro; Peinado-González, Verónica; Pla-García, Jorge; Manfredi, José Antonio Rodriguez; Romeral-Planelló, Julio José; Fuentes, Sara Alejandra Sans; Martinez, Eduardo Sebastian; Redondo, Josefina Torres; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Mier, María-Paz Zorzano; Chipera, Steve; Mauchien, Patrick; Manning, Heidi; Fairén, Alberto; Hayes, Alexander; Joseph, Jonathan; Squyres, Steven; Sullivan, Robert; Thomas, Peter; Dupont, Audrey; Lundberg, Angela; DeMarines, Julia; Grinspoon, David; Reitz, Günther; Prats, Benito; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Genzer, Maria; Haukka, Harri; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kauhanen, Janne; Kemppinen, Osku; Paton, Mark; Polkko, Jouni; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero; Wray, James; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Poitrasson, Franck; Patel, Kiran; Gorevan, Stephen; Indyk, Stephen; Paulsen, Gale; Gupta, Sanjeev; Schieber, Juergen; Geffroy, Claude; Baratoux, David; Cros, Alain; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Pallier, Etienne; Parot, Yann; Toplis, Mike; Brunner, Will; Heydari, Ezat; Achilles, Cherie; Oehler, Dorothy; Sutter, Brad; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Israël, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Robert, François; Nachon, Marion; Buch, Arnaud; Stalport, Fabien; Coll, Patrice; François, Pascaline; Raulin, François; Teinturier, Samuel; Cameron, James; Dingler, Robert; Jackson, Ryan Steele; Johnstone, Stephen; Little, Cynthia; Nelson, Tony; Williams, Richard B.; Jones, Andrea; Kirkland, Laurel; Treiman, Allan; Baker, Burt; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Davis, Scott; Duston, Brian; Edgett, Kenneth; Fay, Donald; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Herrera, Paul; Jensen, Elsa; Kennedy, Megan R.; Krezoski, Gillian; Krysak, Daniel; Lipkaman, Leslie; Malin, Michael; McCartney, Elaina; McNair, Sean; Nixon, Brian; Posiolova, Liliya; Ravine, Michael; Salamon, Andrew; Saper, Lee; Stoiber, Kevin; Supulver, Kimberley; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; Zimdar, Robert; French, Katherine Louise; Iagnemma, Karl; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Goesmann, Fred; Hviid, Stubbe; Johnson, Micah; Lefavor, Matthew; Lyness, Eric; Breves, Elly; Fassett, Caleb; Bristow, Thomas; DesMarais, David; Edwards, Laurence; Haberle, Robert; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Kahre, Melinda; Keely, Leslie; McKay, Christopher; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William; Choi, David; Conrad, Pamela; Dworkin, Jason P.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Floyd, Melissa; Freissinet, Caroline; Garvin, James; Glavin, Daniel; Harpold, Daniel; Jones, Andrea; Mahaffy, Paul; Martin, David K.; McAdam, Amy; Pavlov, Alexander; Raaen, Eric; Smith, Michael D.; Stern, Jennifer; Tan, Florence; Trainer, Melissa; Meyer, Michael; Posner, Arik; Voytek, Mary; Anderson, Robert C.; Aubrey, Andrew; Beegle, Luther W.; Behar, Alberto; Brinza, David; Calef, Fred; Christensen, Lance; Crisp, Joy A.; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Flesch, Gregory; Hurowitz, Joel; Jun, Insoo; Keymeulen, Didier; Maki, Justin; Morookian, John Michael; Parker, Timothy; Pavri, Betina; Schoppers, Marcel; Sengstacken, Aaron; Simmonds, John J.; Spanovich, Nicole; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Webster, Christopher R.; Yen, Albert; Cucinotta, Francis; Jones, John H.; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard V.; Niles, Paul; Nolan, Thomas; Radziemski, Leon; Berman, Daniel; Dobrea, Eldar Noe; Williams, Rebecca M. E.; Lewis, Kevin; Cleghorn, Timothy; Huntress, Wesley; Manhès, Gérard; Hudgins, Judy; Olson, Timothy; Stewart, Noel; Sarrazin, Philippe; Grant, John; Vicenzi, Edward; Wilson, Sharon A.; Bullock, Mark; Ehresmann, Bent; Hamilton, Victoria; Hassler, Donald; Peterson, Joseph; Rafkin, Scot; Zeitlin, Cary; Fedosov, Fedor; Golovin, Dmitry; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kozyrev, Alexander; Litvak, Maxim; Malakhov, Alexey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Mokrousov, Maxim; Nikiforov, Sergey; Prokhorov, Vasily; Sanin, Anton; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Varenikov, Alexey; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Wolff, Michael; McLennan, Scott; Botta, Oliver; Drake, Darrell; Bean, Keri; Lemmon, Mark; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Lee, Ella Mae; Sucharski, Robert; Hernández, Miguel Ángel de Pablo; Ávalos, Juan José Blanco; Ramos, Miguel; Kim, Myung-Hee; Malespin, Charles; Plante, Ianik; Muller, Jan-Peter; Navarro-González, Rafael; Ewing, Ryan; Boynton, William; Downs, Robert; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Harshman, Karl; Morrison, Shaunna; Dietrich, William; Kortmann, Onno; Palucis, Marisa; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Williams, Amy; Lugmair, Günter; Wilson, Michael A.; Rubin, David; Jakosky, Bruce; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Frydenvang, Jens; Jensen, Jaqueline Kløvgaard; Kinch, Kjartan; Koefoed, Asmus; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Boyd, Nick; Campbell, John L.; Gellert, Ralf; Perrett, Glynis; Pradler, Irina; VanBommel, Scott; Jacob, Samantha; Owen, Tobias; Rowland, Scott; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Savijärvi, Hannu; Boehm, Eckart; Böttcher, Stephan; Burmeister, Sönke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; García, César Martín; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Bridges, John C.; Benna, Mehdi; Franz, Heather; Bower, Hannah; Brunner, Anna; Blau, Hannah; Boucher, Thomas; Carmosino, Marco; Atreya, Sushil; Elliott, Harvey; Halleaux, Douglas; Rennó, Nilton; Wong, Michael; Pepin, Robert; Elliott, Beverley; Spray, John; Thompson, Lucy; Gordon, Suzanne; Williams, Joshua; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Bentz, Jennifer; Nealson, Kenneth; Popa, Radu; Kah, Linda C.; Moersch, Jeffrey; Tate, Christopher; Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary; Hallet, Bernard; Sletten, Ronald; Francis, Raymond; McCullough, Emily; Cloutis, Ed; ten Kate, Inge Loes; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Arvidson, Raymond; Fraeman, Abigail; Scholes, Daniel; Slavney, Susan; Stein, Thomas; Ward, Jennifer; Berger, Jeffrey

    2013-09-01

    The ChemCam instrument, which provides insight into martian soil chemistry at the submillimeter scale, identified two principal soil types along the Curiosity rover traverse: a fine-grained mafic type and a locally derived, coarse-grained felsic type. The mafic soil component is representative of widespread martian soils and is similar in composition to the martian dust. It possesses a ubiquitous hydrogen signature in ChemCam spectra, corresponding to the hydration of the amorphous phases found in the soil by the CheMin instrument. This hydration likely accounts for an important fraction of the global hydration of the surface seen by previous orbital measurements. ChemCam analyses did not reveal any significant exchange of water vapor between the regolith and the atmosphere. These observations provide constraints on the nature of the amorphous phases and their hydration.

  6. Soil diversity and hydration as observed by ChemCam at Gale crater, Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meslin, P-Y; Gasnault, O; Forni, O; Schröder, S; Cousin, A; Berger, G; Clegg, S M; Lasue, J; Maurice, S; Sautter, V; Le Mouélic, S; Wiens, R C; Fabre, C; Goetz, W; Bish, D; Mangold, N; Ehlmann, B; Lanza, N; Harri, A-M; Anderson, R; Rampe, E; McConnochie, T H; Pinet, P; Blaney, D; Léveillé, R; Archer, D; Barraclough, B; Bender, S; Blake, D; Blank, J G; Bridges, N; Clark, B C; DeFlores, L; Delapp, D; Dromart, G; Dyar, M D; Fisk, M; Gondet, B; Grotzinger, J; Herkenhoff, K; Johnson, J; Lacour, J-L; Langevin, Y; Leshin, L; Lewin, E; Madsen, M B; Melikechi, N; Mezzacappa, A; Mischna, M A; Moores, J E; Newsom, H; Ollila, A; Perez, R; Renno, N; Sirven, J-B; Tokar, R; de la Torre, M; d'Uston, L; Vaniman, D; Yingst, A

    2013-09-27

    The ChemCam instrument, which provides insight into martian soil chemistry at the submillimeter scale, identified two principal soil types along the Curiosity rover traverse: a fine-grained mafic type and a locally derived, coarse-grained felsic type. The mafic soil component is representative of widespread martian soils and is similar in composition to the martian dust. It possesses a ubiquitous hydrogen signature in ChemCam spectra, corresponding to the hydration of the amorphous phases found in the soil by the CheMin instrument. This hydration likely accounts for an important fraction of the global hydration of the surface seen by previous orbital measurements. ChemCam analyses did not reveal any significant exchange of water vapor between the regolith and the atmosphere. These observations provide constraints on the nature of the amorphous phases and their hydration.

  7. Dynamics of a photoexcited hydrated electron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pshenichnikov, M.S.; Baltuška, A.; Wiersma, D.A.; Kärtner, F.X.

    2004-01-01

    Combining photon-echo and frequency-resolved pump-probe techniques with extremely short laser pulses that consist of only few optical cycles, we investigate the dynamics of the equilibrated hydrated electron. The pure dephasing time of the hydrated electron deduced from the photon-echo measurements

  8. Gas hydrate inhibition of drilling fluid additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaolan, L.; Baojiang, S.; Shaoran, R. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Dongying (China). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates that form during offshore well drilling can have adverse impacts on well operational safety. The hydrates typically form in the risers and the annulus between the casing and the drillstring, and can stop the circulation of drilling fluids. In this study, experiments were conducted to measure the effect of drilling fluid additives on hydrate inhibition. Polyalcohols, well-stability control agents, lubricating agents, and polymeric materials were investigated in a stirred tank reactor at temperatures ranging from -10 degree C to 60 degrees C. Pressure, temperature, and torque were used to detect onset points of hydrate formation and dissociation. The inhibitive effect of the additives on hydrate formation was quantified. Phase boundary shifts were measured in terms of temperature difference or sub-cooling gained when chemicals were added to pure water. Results showed that the multiple hydroxyl groups in polyalcohol chemicals significantly inhibited hydrate formation. Polymeric and polyacrylamide materials had only a small impact on hydrate formation, while sulfonated methyl tannins were found to increase hydrate formation. 6 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  9. Hydration shells exchange charge with their protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abitan, Haim; Lindgård, Per-Anker; Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert;

    2010-01-01

    Investigation of the interaction between a protein and its hydration shells is an experimental and theoretical challenge. Here, we used ultrasonic pressure waves in aqueous solutions of a protein to explore the conformational states of the protein and its interaction with its hydration shells. In...

  10. A new geotechnical gas hydrates research laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Gas hydrates encapsulate natural gas molecules in a very compact form, as ice-like compounds composed of water molecules. Permafrost environments and offshore areas contain vast quantities of gas hydrates within soil and rock. This paper describes the role played by gas hydrates in submarine slope instability, their potential as a sustainable energy source, and their effects on global climate change. A new state-of-the-art laboratory located at the University of Calgary, which was developed to study the geomechanical behaviour of gas hydrate-sediment mixtures, was also presented. A specialized high pressure low temperature triaxial apparatus capable of performing a suite of tests on gas hydrate-sediment mixtures is housed in this laboratory. Extensive renovations were required in order to enable the use of methane gas to simulate natural hydrate formation conditions. The laboratory is specifically designed to examine the properties and behaviour of reconstituted gas hydrate-sediment mixtures and natural gas hydrate core samples. 26 refs., 9 figs.

  11. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  12. Extraction and spectrophotometric determination of vanadium(V) with 8-hydroxyquinoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurmaiah, N; Satyanarayana, D; Rao, V P

    1967-04-01

    The extraction and spectrophotometric determination of vanadium (V) with oxine is investigated at higher acidities than described previously. Under these conditions, n-butanol and other alcohols are found to exert a synergic effect on the extraction of vanadium into benzene. In the presence of alcohol only a 6-fold ligand excess is needed for quantitative extraction in a single operation, the acidity of the aqueous medium being 0.05M with respect to sulphuric or phosphoric acid. The interference of iron(III) in the spectrophotometric determination of vanadium is suppressed by the addition of pyrophosphate. Beer's law is obeyed up to 14.0 mug of vanadium/ml and the sensitivity is 0.008 mug of vanadium/cm(2) at 390 mmu. The composition of the extracted species is found to be vanadium:oxine:n-butanol = 1:2:2.

  13. Methane-propane hydrate crystal growth in the presence of nanosized materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M.S.; Ryu, Y.B.; Kim, Y.S.; Lee, J.D. [Korea Inst. of Industrial Technology, Busan (Korea, Republic of). Busan Research Center; Park, Y.H. [Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    The impact of nano-sized titanium dioxide, silver, and silica (TiO{sub 2}-Ag-SiO{sub 2}) sols on the gas hydrate formation morphology within an enclosed cell partially filled with liquid water was investigated. The nano-sized particles were synthesized suing a modified sol-gel method with a reduction agent added to eliminate the need for auxiliary dispersants or surfactants. Structure 2 (s2) hydrates were synthesized using a gas mixture of 90.1 per cent methane and propane as guest molecules. Small amounts of the nano-sized sols were added to the liquid water. The aim of the study was to determine methods of ensuring the stability of methane hydrates in storage facilities and during transport using gas to solids technology (GTS). Nucleation, hydrate crystal growth, and the migration of the gas hydrate were studied in relation to the stationary interface between the liquid water and the gas. Results of the study showed that the hydrate's growth phase started with the formation of a film at the upper surface of the liquid water pool. Crystals then grew in a downward manner from the hydrate film. Video images of the crystals showed that the downward crystals grown in the presence of the nano-sized particles occurred at a faster rate and with finer arm spacing. It was concluded that the addition of the nano-particles provided a larger specific surface area and larger nucleation sides so that more gas was absorbed into the water. The TiO{sub 2}-Ag-SiO{sub 2} sols acted as a promoter for methane-propane hydrate formation. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  14. The influence of pipeline wettability and crude oil composition on deposition of gas hydrates during petroleum production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspenes, Guro

    2009-07-01

    At specific temperature and pressure conditions, hydrates can sometimes plug production pipelines. It has been shown that some oils contain natural inhibiting compounds (NICs) that prevent hydrate plug formation even though the pressure and temperature are within the hydrate formation conditions. Thus, the hydrate plugging tendency is influenced by the crude oil composition. The mechanisms by which deposition of hydrates occur in a petroleum production system are also likely to be related to pipeline surface properties, e.g. pipeline material, surface free energy and roughness. The ultimate aim of this work is to develop an understanding of the deposition of hydrates on the pipeline wall. Most of the work in this thesis deals with contact angle measurements that determine the wettability of various solids. Different materials and oil compositions have been tested including both model oil systems and crude oil systems. Micromechanical force experiments have been used to determine the adhesion force between hydrates and solids with different amounts of petroleum acids present in the oil phase. The factors that have been identified in this work as most likely influencing deposition of hydrates to the pipeline wall are the presence of free water, surface material and crude oil composition. It may seem as if hydrate deposition will not occur unless free water is present. When the pipeline wall material has a low surface free energy, such as epoxy coated surfaces, deposition seems to be reduced. Crude oils that are assumed as non-plugging and contain high concentrations of acids seems to reduce the probability for deposition to occur. (Author)

  15. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  16. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated

  17. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-07-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  18. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-06-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  19. Effect of Vanadium(IV)-Doping on the Visible Light-Induced Catalytic Activity of Titanium Dioxide Catalysts for Methylene Blue Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Churng; Lin, Yo-Jane

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Vanadium(IV)-doped titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalyst powders were prepared by the sol–gel method and characterized by Brunauer–Emmett–Teller–specific surface area, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. V-doping in the TiO2 increases the crystal grain size, which decreases the specific surface areas of powders. This V-doping changes the band gap of TiO2, leading to extend the absorption to visible light regions (400–800 nm). Photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) in water was investigated as a function of the vanadium content in TiO2 and was found to follow pseudo first-order rate kinetics. Appropriate content of V-doping is an effective means to improve the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 for MB degradation under visible light irradiation. PMID:22693413

  20. Effect of Vanadium(IV)-Doping on the Visible Light-Induced Catalytic Activity of Titanium Dioxide Catalysts for Methylene Blue Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Churng; Lin, Yo-Jane

    2012-06-01

    Vanadium(IV)-doped titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) photocatalyst powders were prepared by the sol-gel method and characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller-specific surface area, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. V-doping in the TiO(2) increases the crystal grain size, which decreases the specific surface areas of powders. This V-doping changes the band gap of TiO(2), leading to extend the absorption to visible light regions (400-800 nm). Photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) in water was investigated as a function of the vanadium content in TiO(2) and was found to follow pseudo first-order rate kinetics. Appropriate content of V-doping is an effective means to improve the photocatalytic activity of TiO(2) for MB degradation under visible light irradiation.

  1. Vanadium(V) removal from aqueous solution and real wastewater using quaternized pine sawdust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiviskä, T; Keränen, A; Vainionpää, N; Al Amir, J; Hormi, O; Tanskanen, J

    2015-01-01

    Cross-linked and quaternized pine sawdust was tested for vanadium removal from a synthetic aqueous solution as well as from real industrial wastewater which had a considerable amount of vanadium and other ions such as sulphate, ammonium and nickel. The maximum vanadium sorption capacity of the modified pine sawdust was found to be 130 mg/g in synthetic solution and 103 mg/g in real wastewater. Modified pine sawdust worked well over a wide range of pH. Column studies with real wastewater proved that vanadium was efficiently desorbed from the material with 2 M NaOH and that the material could be reused.

  2. Environmentally geochemical characteristics of vanadium in the topsoil in the Panzhihua mining area, Sichuan Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TENG Yanguo; JIAO Xudong; WANG Jinsheng; XU Wei; YANG Jie

    2009-01-01

    Vanadium is a trace element, which may be biologically beneficial and possibly essential but certainly harmful to human beings and some living organisms if excessive. After over 40 years of development, the mining industry has caused serious environmental problems in the Panzhihua mining area. Vanadium is significantly accu-mulated in the soil of the Panzhihua area. Human activities have intensified the pollution and release of vanadium and caused serious damages to the ecological system there. In the past few years, the authors have made investiga-tions into and assessments on the geochemical distribution, chemical speciation, adsorption characteristics and transfer behavior of vanadium in the topsoil in the Panzhihua mining area. The results showed that: (1) the difference in the contents of vanadium in soil between premonsoon and monsoon is insignificant; (2) the adsorption isotherms of vanadium on soil in the Panzhihua mining area ate well described by the Langmuir type; (3) the transfer ability of vanadium in soil is interrelated to soil properties; and (4) the chemical speciation of vanadium shows an order of insoluble residue > oxidizable=reducible > soluble component. According to the above results, some countermea-sures to control pollution of vanadium in soil should be put forward.

  3. Experimental Study of Natural Gas Storage in Hydrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙志高; 王如竹; 郭开华; 樊栓狮

    2004-01-01

    Hydrate formation rate plays an important role in the making of hydrates for natural gas storage. The effect of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), alkyl polysaccharide glycoside (APG) and cyclopentane (CP) on natural gas hydrate formation rate, induction time and storage capacity was studied. Micellar surfactant solutions were found to increase hydrate formation rate in a quiescent system and improve hydrate formation rate and natural gas storage capacity. The process of hydrate formation includes two stages with surfactant presence. Hydrate forms quickly in the first stage, and then the formation rate is slowed down. Surfactants (SDS or APG) reduce the induction time of hydrate formation. The effect of an anionic surfactant (SDS) on gas storage in hydrates is more pronounced compared to a nonionic surfactant (APG). CP also reduces the induction time of hydrate formation, but can not improve the natural gas storage capacity in hydrates.

  4. Effect of Different Calcination Duration on Physicochemical Properties of Vanadium Phosphate Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Hin Taufiq-Yap

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vanadium phosphate catalysts have been prepared by calcining VOHPO44·0.5H2O which were prepared via two methods i.e. organic (VPO method and dihydrate (VPD method routes for different duration under anaerobic atmosphere. Increasing the calcinations duration led to a decrease in total surface area. It is also promote the formation of V5+ phase in the catalysts. Scanning electron microscopy clearly revealed that the morphologies of all catalysts composed of plate-like crystallites that were arranged into the characteristic of rosette cluster. However, by increasing the pretreatment duration in an inert environment, the rosette-shape of the clusters which normally obtained in reaction condition was collapsed. Prolong the duration of N2 calcination also resulted in an increment in the amount of oxygen desorbed (from O2-TPD and removed (obtained from H2-TPR.

  5. Study on Co-Permeation of Solid Rare Earth, Boron and Vanadium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶小克; 董桂霞; 彭日升; 孙永昌

    2001-01-01

    The effect of rare earth compound of CeCl3 on the kinetic process, composition, microstructure and mechanical properties of co-permeating of solid powder boron-vanadium (B-V) was investigated. The results indicate that the addition of CeCl3 to permeating agent not only has obviously catalytic effect on permeating rate, which increases by more than 40%, but also greatly improves the hardness and abrasion resistant of the permeating layer owing to the formation of new phase of CeFe2 after Ce permeates into the layer of the part as an alloying ingredient. It is believed that rare earth elements accelerate the permeating rate of B and V by increasing the potentials of B and V of the agent, activating the surface of the workpiece, and decreasing the activation energy of diffusion of the B and V atoms.

  6. Hydrocarbon oxidation catalyzed by vanadium polyoxometalate supported on mesoporous MCM-41 under ultrasonic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangestaninejad, Shahram; Mirkhani, Valiollah; Moghadam, Majid; Mohammadpoor-Baltork, Iraj; Shams, Esmaeil; Salavati, Hossein

    2008-04-01

    Vanadium polyoxometalate (PVMo) supported on mesoporous MCM-41, MCM-41-NH(2), as efficient and heterogeneous catalysts, with large surface area, for hydrocarbon oxidation with hydrogen peroxide is reported. Oxidation of the alkenes and alkanes gave product selectivities, which are similar to those observed for corresponding homogeneous catalyst. PVMo-MCM was prepared by introduction of PVMo into the mesoporous molecule sieves of MCM-41 by impregnation and adsorption techniques. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), FT-IR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-Vis and cyclic voltametry (CV). Ultrasonic irradiation has a particular effect on MCM-41 structural uniformity and reduced the reaction times and improved the product yields. In addition, the solid catalysts could be recovered and reused several times without loss of its activity.

  7. Tuning the conductivity of vanadium dioxide films by swift heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrhardt, Paul; Hofsaess, Hans; Gehrke, Hans-Gregor [II. Physikalisches Institut, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Krauser, Johann [Hochschule Harz, University of Applied Sciences, Friedrichstrasse 57-59, 38855 Wernigerode (Germany); Trautmann, Christina [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Ramanathan, Shriram [Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate the generation of a persistent conductivity increase in vanadium dioxide thin films by irradiation with swift heavy ions at room temperature. VO{sub 2} undergoes a temperature driven metal-insulator-transition (MIT) at 67 C. After the ion irradiation the conductivity of the films we observe a strong increase in conductivity below the transition temperature proportional to the ion fluence. This change in conductivity is persistent and remains after several cycles of heating. Low temperature measurements down to 15 K show no further MIT below room temperature. Although the conductivity increase after irradiation at such low fluences is due to single ion tr