WorldWideScience

Sample records for hydrated nucleoside anions

  1. Photoelectron spectroscopic study of the hydrated nucleoside anions: Uridine(-)(H(2)O)(n=0-2), cytidine(-)(H(2)O)(n=0-2), and thymidine(-)(H(2)O)(n=0,1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Haopeng; Bowen, Kit H

    2010-10-14

    The hydrated nucleoside anions, uridine(-)(H(2)O)(n=0-2), cytidine(-)(H(2)O)(n=0-2), and thymidine(-)(H(2)O)(n=0,1), have been prepared in beams and studied by anion photoelectron spectroscopy in order to investigate the effects of a microhydrated environment on parent nucleoside anions. Vertical detachment energies (VDEs) were measured for all eight anions, and from these, estimates were made for five sequential anion hydration energies. Excellent agreement was found between our measured VDE value for thymidine(-)(H(2)O)(1) and its calculated value in the companion article by S. Kim and H. F. Schaefer III.

  2. Photoelectron spectroscopic study of the hydrated nucleoside anions: Uridine-(H2O)n=0-2, cytidine-(H2O)n=0-2, and thymidine-(H2O)n=0,1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Haopeng; Bowen, Kit H.

    2010-10-01

    The hydrated nucleoside anions, uridine-(H2O)n=0-2, cytidine-(H2O)n=0-2, and thymidine-(H2O)n=0,1, have been prepared in beams and studied by anion photoelectron spectroscopy in order to investigate the effects of a microhydrated environment on parent nucleoside anions. Vertical detachment energies (VDEs) were measured for all eight anions, and from these, estimates were made for five sequential anion hydration energies. Excellent agreement was found between our measured VDE value for thymidine-(H2O)1 and its calculated value in the companion article by S. Kim and H. F. Schaefer III.

  3. Binding Hydrated Anions with Hydrophobic Pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokkalingam, Punidha; Shraberg, Joshua; Rick, Steven W; Gibb, Bruce C

    2016-01-13

    Using a combination of isothermal titration calorimetry and quantum and molecular dynamics calculations, we demonstrate that relatively soft anions have an affinity for hydrophobic concavity. The results are consistent with the anions remaining partially hydrated upon binding, and suggest a novel strategy for anion recognition.

  4. ARE MODELS OF ANION HYDRATION OVERBOUND ? THE SOLVATION OF THE ELECTRON AND CHLORIDE ANION COMPARED

    OpenAIRE

    Sprik, M.

    1991-01-01

    By means of a fully polarizable model for the chloride ion-water interaction we show that the modelling of anion solvation suffers from a similar inconsistency as the current electron-solvent potentials. Either the bulk hydration enthalpies are correct with the first hydration shell overbound, or the potential is adapted to describe the local environment of the solute at the expense of a major loss of solvation enthalpy. It is argued that boundary effects in the simulation are at least partly...

  5. Structures and energetics of hydrated oxygen anion clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipman, Daniel M; Bentley, John

    2005-08-25

    Hydration of the atomic oxygen radical anion is studied with computational electronic structure methods, considering (O(-))(H(2)O)(n) clusters and related proton-transferred (OH(-))(OH)(H(2)O)(n)(-)(1) clusters having n = 1-5. A total of 67 distinct local-minimum structures having various interesting hydrogen bonding motifs are obtained and analyzed. On the basis of the most stable form of each type, (O(-))(H(2)O)(n)) clusters are energetically favored, although for n > or = 3, there is considerable overlap in energy between other members of the (O(-))(H(2)O)(n) family and various members of the (OH(-))(OH)(H(2)O)(n)(-)(1) family. In the lower-energy (O(-))(H(2)O)(n) clusters, the hydrogen bonding arrangement about the oxygen anion center tends to be planar, leaving the oxygen anion p-like orbital containing the unpaired electron uninvolved in hydrogen bonding with any water molecule. In (OH(-))(OH)(H(2)O)(n)(-)(1) clusters, on the other hand, nonplanar arrangements are the rule about the anionic oxygen center that accepts hydrogen bonds. No instances are found of OH(-) acting as a hydrogen bond donor. Those OH bonds that form hydrogen bonds to an anionic O(-) or OH(-) center are significantly stretched from their equilibrium value in isolated water or hydroxyl. A quantitative inverse correlation is established for all hydrogen bonds between the amount of the OH bond stretch and the distance to the other oxygen involved in the hydrogen bond.

  6. Communication: Solute Anisotropy Effects in Hydrated Anion and Neutral Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Hui; Hou, Gao-Lei; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Valiev, Marat; Wang, Xue B.

    2013-01-21

    Specific ion effects in solvation processes are often rationalized in terms of spherically symmetric models involving an ion’s size, charge, and polarizability. The effects of permanent charge anisotropy, related to the polyatomic nature of complex solutes, are expected to play a role in solvation but the extent of their importance remains unexplored. In this work we provide compelling experimental and theoretical evidence that the anisotropic nature of complex polyoxyanion solutes can have a critical influence on the solvation process. Combined photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical modeling results show that the electron binding energy (EBE) of IO3-(H2O)n (n = 0 - 12) clusters is characterized by an anomalous drop at n = 10. Such behavior is unprecedented for rigid solute molecules, and is related to the anisotropy of the neutral iodate radical that displays a strong selectivity to solvent configurations generated by the charged anion complex. These results highlight the significance of solute anisotropy and its potential impact on ion specificity and selectivity in aqueous environments.

  7. Negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy of the copper-aspartic acid anion and its hydrated complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Haopeng; Bowen, Kit H.; Martínez, Ana; Salpin, Jean-Yves; Schermann, Jean-Pierre

    2010-08-01

    Negative ions of copper-aspartic acid Cu(Asp)- and its hydrated complexes have been produced in the gas phase and studied by anion photoelectron spectroscopy. The vertical detachment energies (VDE) of Cu(Asp)- and Cu(Asp)-(H2O)1,2 were determined to be 1.6, 1.95, and 2.20 eV, respectively. The spectral profiles of Cu(Asp)-(H2O)1 and Cu(Asp)-(H2O)2 closely resembled that of Cu(Asp)-, indicating that hydration had not changed the structure of Cu(Asp)- significantly. The successive shifts to higher electron binding energies by the spectra of the hydrated species provided measures of their stepwise solvation energies. Density functional calculations were performed on anionic Cu(Asp)- and on its corresponding neutral. The agreement between the calculated and measured VDE values implied that the structure of the Cu(Asp)- complex originated with a zwitterionic form of aspartic acid in which a copper atom had inserted into the N-H bond.

  8. Influence of Hydration Level on Polymer and Water Dynamics in Alkaline Anion Exchange Fuel Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, Jacob; Kim, Jenny; Tyagi, Madhu; Soles, Christopher; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Coughlin, Bryan

    2015-03-01

    Triblock copolymers based on poly(chloromethylstyrene)-b-poly(ethylene)-b-poly(chloromethylstyrene) can be quaternized to different extents to yield anion exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cells. In the absence of moisture, these membranes demonstrate bilayer lamellar morphology. Upon high levels of hydration, however, in-situ small angle neutron scattering reveals the emergence of higher-order diffraction peaks. This phenomena has previously been observed in analogous diblock copolymer-based membranes and has been attributed to the induction of a multilayer lamellar morphology in which selective striping of water occurs in the center of the ion-rich domain. By conducting humidity-resolved quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements using deuterated water, we are able to isolate differences in the pico- to nanosecond timescale dynamics of the hydrogenated membrane upon hydration. QENS measurements in the presence of a hydrogenated water source subsequently permit deconvolution and isolation of the translational and rotational dynamics of water as a function of relative humidity, revealing spatial and temporal changes in polymer and water motion at high levels of hydration.

  9. Hydration and sorption characteristics of a polyfunctional weak-base anion exchanger after the sorption of vanillin and ethylvanillin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, D. O.; Voronyuk, I. V.; Eliseeva, T. V.

    2016-07-01

    Features of the sorption of substituted aromatic aldehydes by a weak-base anion exchanger under equilibrium conditions are investigated using vanillin and ethylvanillin as examples. Analysis of the sorption isotherms of carbonyl compounds at different temperatures allows us to calculate the equilibrium characteristics of their sorption and assess the entropy and enthalpy contributions to the energy of the process. Hydration characteristics of the macroporous weak-base anion exchanger before and after the sorption of aromatic aldehydes are compared.

  10. Cluster-Continuum Calculations of Hydration Free Energies of Anions and Group 12 Divalent Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardi, Demian; Guo, Hao-Bo; Parks, Jerry M; Gu, Baohua; Liang, Liyuan; Smith, Jeremy C

    2013-01-08

    Understanding aqueous phase processes involving group 12 metal cations is relevant to both environmental and biological sciences. Here, quantum chemical methods and polarizable continuum models are used to compute the hydration free energies of a series of divalent group 12 metal cations (Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and Hg(2+)) together with Cu(2+) and the anions OH(-), SH(-), Cl(-), and F(-). A cluster-continuum method is employed, in which gas-phase clusters of the ion and explicit solvent molecules are immersed in a dielectric continuum. Two approaches to define the size of the solute-water cluster are compared, in which the number of explicit waters used is either held constant or determined variationally as that of the most favorable hydration free energy. Results obtained with various polarizable continuum models are also presented. Each leg of the relevant thermodynamic cycle is analyzed in detail to determine how different terms contribute to the observed mean signed error (MSE) and the standard deviation of the error (STDEV) between theory and experiment. The use of a constant number of water molecules for each set of ions is found to lead to predicted relative trends that benefit from error cancellation. Overall, the best results are obtained with MP2 and the Solvent Model D polarizable continuum model (SMD), with eight explicit water molecules for anions and 10 for the metal cations, yielding a STDEV of 2.3 kcal mol(-1) and MSE of 0.9 kcal mol(-1) between theoretical and experimental hydration free energies, which range from -72.4 kcal mol(-1) for SH(-) to -505.9 kcal mol(-1) for Cu(2+). Using B3PW91 with DFT-D3 dispersion corrections (B3PW91-D) and SMD yields a STDEV of 3.3 kcal mol(-1) and MSE of 1.6 kcal mol(-1), to which adding MP2 corrections from smaller divalent metal cation water molecule clusters yields very good agreement with the full MP2 results. Using B3PW91-D and SMD, with two explicit water molecules for anions and six for divalent metal cations, also

  11. Cluster-Continuum Calculations of Hydration Free Energies of Anions and Group 12 Divalent Cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Hao-Bo [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Riccardi, Demian M [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Understanding aqueous phase processes involving group 12 metal cations is relevant to both environmental and biological sciences. Here, quantum chemical methods and polarizable continuum models are used to compute the hydration free energies of a series of divalent group 12 metal cations (Zn2+, Cd2+, and Hg2+) together with Cu2+ and the anions OH , SH , Cl , and F . A cluster-continuum method is employed, in which gas-phase clusters of the ion and explicit solvent molecules are immersed in a dielectric continuum. Two approaches to define the size of the solute-water cluster are compared, in which the number of explicit waters used is either held constant or determined variationally as that of the most favorable hydration free energy. Results obtained with various polarizable continuum models are also presented. Each leg of the relevant thermodynamic cycle is analyzed in detail to determine how different contributions yield the observed mean signed error (MSE) and the standard deviation of the error (STDEV) between theory and experiment. The use of a constant number of water molecules for each set of ions is found to lead to predicted relative trends that benefit from error cancellation. Overall, the best results are obtained with MP2 and the Solvent Model D polarizable continuum model (SMD), with eight explicit water molecules for anions and ten for the metal cations, yielding a STDEV of 2.3 kcal/mol and MSE of 0.9 kcal/mol between theoretical to experimental hydration free energies, which range from -72.4 kcal/mol for SH to -505.9 kcal/mol for Cu2+. Using B3PW91 with DFT-D3 dispersion corrections (B3PW91-D) and SMD yields a STDEV of 3.3 kcal mol 1 and MSE of 1.6 kcal/mol, to which adding MP2 corrections from smaller divalent metal ion water molecule clusters yields very good agreement with the full MP2 results. Using B3PW91-D and SMD, with two explicit water molecules for anions and six for divalent metal cations also yields reasonable agreement with experiment

  12. The Structure of Hydrated Electron. Part 1. Magnetic Resonance of Internally Trapping Water Anions: A Density Functional Theory Study

    CERN Document Server

    Shkrob, I A

    2006-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is used to rationalize magnetic parameters of hydrated electron trapped in alkaline glasses as observed using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopies. To this end, model water cluster anions (n=4-8 and n=20,24) that localize the electron internally are examined. It is shown that EPR parameters of such water anions (such as hyperfine coupling tensors of H/D nuclei in the water molecules) are defined mainly by the cavity size and the coordination number of the electron; the water molecules in the second solvation shell play a relatively minor role. An idealized model of hydrated electron (that is usually attributed to L. Kevan) in which six hydroxyl groups arranged in an octahedral pattern point towards the common center is shown to provide the closest match to the experimental parameters, such as isotropic and anisotropic hyperfine coupling constants for the protons (estimated from ESEEM), the second moment of the E...

  13. Hydration Leads to Efficient Reactions of the Carbonate Radical Anion with Hydrogen Chloride in the Gas Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wai Kit; van der Linde, Christian; Siu, Chi-Kit; Beyer, Martin K

    2017-01-12

    The carbonate radical anion CO3(•-) is a key intermediate in tropospheric anion chemistry. Despite its radical character, only a small number of reactions have been reported in the literature. Here we investigate the gas-phase reactions of CO3(•-) and CO3(•-)(H2O) with HCl under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Bare CO3(•-) forms OHCl(•-) with a rate constant of 4.2 × 10(-12) cm(3) s(-1), which corresponds to an efficiency of only 0.4%. Hydration accelerates the reaction, and ligand exchange of H2O against HCl proceeds with a rate of 2.7 × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1). Quantum chemical calculations reveal that OHCl(•-) is best described as an OH(•) hydrogen bonded to Cl(-), while the ligand exchange product is Cl(-)(HCO3(•)). Under tropospheric conditions, where CO3(•-)(H2O) is the dominant species, Cl(-)(HCO3(•)) is efficiently formed. These reactions must be included in models of tropospheric anion chemistry.

  14. Electron Photodetachment from Aqueous Anions. I. Quantum Yields for Generation of Hydrated Electron by 193 and 248 nm Laser Photoexcitation of Miscellaneous Inorganic Anions

    CERN Document Server

    Sauer, M C; Shkrob, I A; Sauer, Myran C.; Shkrob, Ilya A.

    2004-01-01

    Time resolved transient absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine quantum yields for electron photodetachment in 193 nm and (where possible) 248 nm laser excitation of miscellaneous aqueous anions, including hexacyanoferrate(II), sulfate, sulfite, halide anions (Cl-, Br-, and I-), pseudohalide anions (OH-, HS-, CNS-), and several common inorganic anions for which no quantum yields have been reported heretofore: SO3=, NO2-, NO3-, ClO3- and ClO4-. Molar extinction coefficients for these anions and photoproducts of electron detachment from these anions at the excitation wavelengths were also determined. These results are discussed in the context of recent ultrafast kinetic studies and compared with the previous data obtained by product analyses. We suggest using electron photodetachment from the aqueous halide and pseudohalide anions as actinometric standard for time-resolved studies of aqueous photosystems in the UV.

  15. High-Resolution Coarse-Grained Model of Hydrated Anion-Exchange Membranes that Accounts for Hydrophobic and Ionic Interactions through Short-Ranged Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jibao; Jacobson, Liam C; Perez Sirkin, Yamila A; Molinero, Valeria

    2017-01-10

    Molecular simulations provide a versatile tool to study the structure, anion conductivity, and stability of anion-exchange membrane (AEM) materials and can provide a fundamental understanding of the relation between structure and property of membranes that is key for their use in fuel cells and other applications. The quest for large spatial and temporal scales required to model the multiscale structure and transport processes in the polymer electrolyte membranes, however, cannot be met with fully atomistic models, and the available coarse-grained (CG) models suffer from several challenges associated with their low-resolution. Here, we develop a high-resolution CG force field for hydrated polyphenylene oxide/trimethylamine chloride (PPO/TMACl) membranes compatible with the mW water model using a hierarchical parametrization approach based on Uncertainty Quantification and reference atomistic simulations modeled with the Generalized Amber Force Field (GAFF) and TIP4P/2005 water. The parametrization weighs multiple properties, including coordination numbers, radial distribution functions (RDFs), self-diffusion coefficients of water and ions, relative vapor pressure of water in the solution, hydration enthalpy of the tetramethylammonium chloride (TMACl) salt, and cohesive energy of its aqueous solutions. We analyze the interdependence between properties and address how to compromise between the accuracies of the properties to achieve an overall best representability. Our optimized CG model FFcomp quantitatively reproduces the diffusivities and RDFs of the reference atomistic model and qualitatively reproduces the experimental relative vapor pressure of water in solutions of tetramethylammonium chloride. These properties are of utmost relevance for the design and operation of fuel cell membranes. To our knowledge, this is the first CG model that includes explicitly each water and ion and accounts for hydrophobic, ionic, and intramolecular interactions explicitly

  16. Renal transepithelial transport of nucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, J A; Vidale, E; Enigbokan, M

    1988-01-01

    Previous work from this and other laboratories has suggested that the mammalian kidney has unique mechanisms for handling purine nucleosides. For example, in humans and in mice, adenosine undergoes net renal reabsorption whereas deoxyadenosine is secreted [Kuttesch and Nelson: Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol. 8, 221 (1982)]. The relationships between these renal transport systems and classical renal organic cation and anion, carbohydrate, and cell membrane nucleoside transport carriers are not established. To investigate possible relationships between such carriers, we have tested effects of selected classical transport inhibitors on the renal clearances of adenosine, deoxyadenosine, 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5'-dFUR), and 5-fluorouracil in mice. The secretion of deoxyadenosine and 5'-dFUR, but not the reabsorption of adenosine or 5-fluorouracil, was prevented by the classical nucleoside transport inhibitors, dipyridamole and nitrobenzylthioinosine. Cimetidine, an inhibitor of the organic cation secretory system, also inhibited the secretion of 5'-dFUR, although it did not inhibit deoxyadenosine secretion in earlier studies [Nelson et al.: Biochem. Pharmacol. 32, 2323 (1983)]. The specific inhibitor of glucose renal reabsorption, phloridzin, failed to inhibit the reabsorption of adenosine or the secretion of deoxyadenosine. Failure of the nucleoside transport inhibitors and phloridzin to prevent adenosine reabsorption suggests that adenosine reabsorption may occur via a unique process. On the other hand, inhibition of the net secretion of deoxyadenosine and 5'-dFUR by dipyridamole and nitrobenzylthioinosine implies a role for the carrier that is sensitive to these compounds in the renal secretion (active transport) of these nucleosides.

  17. Influence of the anions on the N-cationic benzethonium salts in the solid state and solution: Chloride, bromide, hydroxide and citrate hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paradies, Henrich H., E-mail: hparadies@aol.com, E-mail: hparadies@jacobs-university.de [The University of Salford, Joule Physics Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Environment, Manchester M5 4 WT (United Kingdom); Jacobs University Bremen, Life Sciences and Chemistry Department, Campus Ring 1, D-28759 Bremen (Germany); Reichelt, Hendrik [The University of Salford, Joule Physics Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Environment, Manchester M5 4 WT (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    The crystal structures of the hydrated cationic surfactant benzethonium (Bzth) chloride, bromide, hydroxide, and citrate have been determined by X-ray diffraction analysis and compared with their structures in solution well above their critical micelle concentration. The differences in the nature of the various anions of the four Bzth-X materials lead to unique anion environments and 3-D molecular arrangements. The water molecule in the monoclinic Bzth-Cl or Bzth-Br forms is hydrogen bonded to the halides and particularly to the hydrogens of the methoxy groups of the Bzth moiety notwithstanding the weak Brønsted acidity of the methoxy hydrogens. The citrate strongly interacts with the hydrogens of the methoxy group forming an embedded anionic spherical cluster of a radius of 2.6 Å. The Bzth-OH crystallizes in a hexagonal lattice with two water molecules and reveals free water molecules forming hydrogen bonded channels through the Bzth-OH crystal along the c-axis. The distances between the cationic nitrogen and the halides are 4.04 Å and 4.20 Å, significantly longer than expected for typical van der Waals distances of 3.30 Å. The structures show weakly interacting, alternating apolar and polar layers, which run parallel to the crystallographic a-b planes or a-c planes. The Bzth-X salts were also examined in aqueous solution containing 20% (v/v) ethanol and 1.0 % (v/v) glycerol well above their critical micelle concentration by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The [1,1,1] planes for the Bzth Cl or Br, the [0,0,2] and [1,1,0] planes for the Bzth-citrate, the [2,-1,0] planes and the [0,0,1] planes for the Bzth-OH found in the crystalline phase were also present in the solution phase, accordingly, the preservation of these phases are a strong indication of periodicity in the solution phase.

  18. Investigation on Gas Storage in Methane Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigao Sun; Rongsheng Ma; Shuanshi Fan; Kaihua Guo; Ruzhu Wang

    2004-01-01

    The effect of additives (anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), nonionic surfactant alkyl polysaccharide glycoside (APG), and liquid hydrocarbon cyclopentane (CP)) on hydrate induction time and formation rate, and storage capacity was studied in this work. Micelle surfactant solutions were found to reduce hydrate induction time, increase methane hydrate formation rate and improve methane storage capacity in hydrates. In the presence of surfactant, hydrate could form quickly in a quiescent system and the energy costs of hydrate formation were reduced. The critical micelle concentrations of SDS and APG water solutions were found to be 300× 10-6 and 500× 10-6 for methane hydrate formation system respectively. The effect of anionic surfactant (SDS) on methane storage in hydrates is more pronounced compared to a nonionic surfactant (APG). CP also reduced hydrate induction time and improved hydrate formation rate, but could not improve methane storage in hydrates.

  19. Proton transfer from water to ketyl radical anion: Assessment of critical size of hydrated cluster and free energy barrier in solution from first principles simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sohag; Dasgupta, Teesta; Mallik, Bhabani S.

    2016-09-01

    We present the reactivity of an organic intermediate by studying the proton transfer process from water to ketyl radical anion using gas phase electronic structure calculations and the metadynamics method based first principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulations. Our results indicate that during the micro solvation of anion by water molecules systematically, the presence of minimum three water molecules in the gas phase cluster is sufficient to observe the proton transfer event. The analysis of trajectories obtained from initial FPMD simulation of an aqueous solution of the anion does not show any evident of complete transfer of the proton from water. The cooperativity of water molecules and the relatively weak anion-water interaction in liquid state prohibit the full release of the proton. Using biasing potential through first principles metadynamics simulations, we report the observation of proton transfer reaction from water to ketyl radical anion with a barrier height of 16.0 kJ/mol.

  20. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Microhydrated Conjugate Base Anions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asmis, K. R.; Neumark, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Conjugate-base anions are ubiquitous in aqueous solution. Understanding the hydration of these anions at the molecular level represents a long-standing goal in chemistry. A molecular-level perspective on ion hydration is also important for understanding the surface speciation and reactivity of aeros

  1. Stepwise hydration of the cyanide anion: a temperature-controlled photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio computational study of CN-(H2O)n, n=2-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Bin; Kowalski, Karol; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Xantheas, Sotiris S

    2010-03-28

    We report the study of microsolvated CN(-)(H(2)O)(n) (n=1-5) clusters in the gas phase using a combination of experimental and computational approaches. The hydrated cyanide clusters were produced by electrospray and their structural and energetic properties were probed using temperature-controlled photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and ab initio electronic structure calculations. Comparison between the low temperature (LT,T=12 K) and the room-temperature (RT) spectra shows a 0.25 eV spectral blueshift in the binding energy of the n=1 cluster and a significant spectral sharpening and blueshift for n=2 and 3. The experimental results are complemented with ab initio electronic structure calculations at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory that identified several isomers on the ground state potential energy function arising from the ability of CN(-) to form hydrogen bonds with water via both the C and N ends. In all cases the N end seems to be the preferred hydration site for the water network. The excellent agreement between the low temperature measured PES spectra and the basis set- and correlation-corrected [at the CCSD(T) level of theory] calculated vertical detachment energies, viz., 3.85 versus 3.84 eV (n=0), 4.54 versus 4.54 eV (n=1), 5.20 versus 5.32 eV (n=2), 5.58 versus 5.50 eV (n=3), and 5.89 versus 5.87 eV (n=4), allow us to establish the hydration motif of cyanide. Its microsolvation pattern was found to be similar to that of the halide anions (Cl(-), Br(-), and I(-)) as well as other diatomic anions having cylindrical symmetry such as NO(-), resulting to structures in which the ion resides on the surface of a water cluster. The exception is CN(-)(H(2)O)(2), for which one water molecule is bound to either side of the anion resulting in a quasilinear structure. For the n=3 cluster the anion was found to freely "tumble" on the surface of a water trimer, since the inclusion of zero-point energy even at T=0 K stabilizes the configuration of C(3) symmetry with

  2. Nucleotides, Nucleosides, and Nucleobases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Dandanell, Gert; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    2008-01-01

    We review literature on the metabolism of ribo- and deoxyribonucleotides, nucleosides, and nucleobases in Escherichia coli and Salmonella,including biosynthesis, degradation, interconversion, and transport. Emphasis is placed on enzymology and regulation of the pathways, at both the level of gene...

  3. Substrate specificity of pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases of NP-II family probed by X-ray crystallography and molecular modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Prokofev, I. I.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Mironov, A. S.; Betzel, C.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases, which are widely used in the biotechnological production of nucleosides, have different substrate specificity for pyrimidine nucleosides. An interesting feature of these enzymes is that the three-dimensional structure of thymidine-specific nucleoside phosphorylase is similar to the structure of nonspecific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase. The three-dimensional structures of thymidine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium and nonspecific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Bacillus subtilis in complexes with a sulfate anion were determined for the first time by X-ray crystallography. An analysis of the structural differences between these enzymes demonstrated that Lys108, which is involved in the phosphate binding in pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase, corresponds to Met111 in thymidine phosphorylases. This difference results in a decrease in the charge on one of the hydroxyl oxygens of the phosphate anion in thymidine phosphorylase and facilitates the catalysis through SN2 nucleophilic substitution. Based on the results of X-ray crystallography, the virtual screening was performed for identifying a potent inhibitor (anticancer agent) of nonspecific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase, which does not bind to thymidine phosphorylase. The molecular dynamics simulation revealed the stable binding of the discovered compound—2-pyrimidin-2-yl-1H-imidazole-4-carboxylic acid—to the active site of pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase.

  4. Nucleoside phosphorylation in amide solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoffstall, A. M.; Kokko, B.

    1978-01-01

    The paper deals with phosphorylation in possible prebiotic nonaqueous solvents. To this end, phosphorylation of nucleosides using inorganic phosphates in amide solutions is studied at room and elevated temperatures. Reaction proceeds most readily in formamide and N-methylformamide. Products obtained at elevated temperature are nucleotides, nucleoside 2',3'-cyclic phosphates, and when the phosphate concentration is high, nucleoside diphosphates. At room temperature, adenosine afforded a mixture of nucleotides, but none of the cyclic nucleotide. Conditions leading to the highest relative percentage of cyclic nucleotide involve the use of low concentrations of phosphate and an excess of nucleoside.

  5. Theoretical characterization of four distinct isomer types in hydrated-electron clusters, and proposed assignments for photoelectron spectra of water cluster anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Leif D; Herbert, John M

    2011-12-14

    Water cluster anions, (H(2)O)(N)(-), are examined using mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics based on a one-electron pseudopotential model that incorporates many-body polarization and predicts vertical electron detachment energies (VDEs) with an accuracy of ~0.1 eV. By varying the initial conditions under which the clusters are formed, we are able to identify four distinct isomer types that exhibit different size-dependent VDEs. On the basis of a strong correlation between the electron's radius of gyration and its optical absorption maximum, and extrapolating to the bulk limit (N → ∞), our analysis supports the assignment of the "isomer Ib" data series, observed in photoelectron spectra of very cold clusters, as arising from cavity-bound (H(2)O)(N)(-) cluster isomers. The "isomer I" data reported in warmer experiments are assigned to surface-bound isomers in smaller clusters, transitioning to partially embedded isomers in larger clusters. The partially embedded isomers are characterized by a partially formed solvent cavity at the cluster surface, and they are spectroscopically quite similar to internalized cavity isomers. These assignments are consistent with various experimental data, and our theoretical characterization of these isomers sheds new light on a long-standing assignment problem. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  6. Experimental Study of Natural Gas Storage in Hydrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙志高; 王如竹; 郭开华; 樊栓狮

    2004-01-01

    Hydrate formation rate plays an important role in the making of hydrates for natural gas storage. The effect of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), alkyl polysaccharide glycoside (APG) and cyclopentane (CP) on natural gas hydrate formation rate, induction time and storage capacity was studied. Micellar surfactant solutions were found to increase hydrate formation rate in a quiescent system and improve hydrate formation rate and natural gas storage capacity. The process of hydrate formation includes two stages with surfactant presence. Hydrate forms quickly in the first stage, and then the formation rate is slowed down. Surfactants (SDS or APG) reduce the induction time of hydrate formation. The effect of an anionic surfactant (SDS) on gas storage in hydrates is more pronounced compared to a nonionic surfactant (APG). CP also reduces the induction time of hydrate formation, but can not improve the natural gas storage capacity in hydrates.

  7. Hydration of highly charged ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Thomas S; Weiss, Alexander K H; Randolf, Bernhard R; Rode, Bernd M

    2011-08-01

    Based on a series of ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) simulations, the broad spectrum of structural and dynamical properties of hydrates of trivalent and tetravalent ions is presented, ranging from extreme inertness to immediate hydrolysis. Main group and transition metal ions representative for different parts of the periodic system are treated, as are 2 threefold negatively charged anions. The results show that simple predictions of the properties of the hydrates appear impossible and that an accurate quantum mechanical simulation in cooperation with sophisticated experimental investigations seems the only way to obtain conclusive results.

  8. Investigations into surfactant/gas hydrate relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Rudy; Zhang, Guochang; Dearman, Jennifer; Woods, Charles [Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Gas hydrates have unique physical properties portending useful industrial applications of gas storage, gas separation, or water desalination. When gas hydrates were found in the early 1990s to occur naturally and abundantly in seafloors, three other primary interests and concerns emerged: potential new energy source, climate threat from their greenhouse gases, and seafloor instabilities. This paper presents research showing how anionic synthetic surfactants helped develop an industrial gas hydrate storage process for natural gas and how naturally-occurring in-situ anionic biosurfactants influence the formation and placement of gas hydrates in ocean sediments. The catalytic effects, mechanisms, and surface specificities imparted by synthetic surfactants in the gas storage process and imparted by biosurfactants in porous media are discussed. The Bacillus subtilis bacterium that is indigenous to gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico was cultured in the laboratory. Its biosurfactant was separated and found to catalyze gas hydrates in porous media. The experiments indicate that seafloor-biosurfactants can be produced rapidly in-situ to achieve threshold concentrations whereby hydrates are promoted. The biosurfactants accumulate and promote hydrate formation on specific mineral surfaces such as sodium montmorillonite. (author)

  9. Anion conductance selectivity mechanism of the CFTR chloride channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsdell, Paul

    2016-04-01

    All ion channels are able to discriminate between substrate ions to some extent, a process that involves specific interactions between permeant anions and the so-called selectivity filter within the channel pore. In the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion-selective channel, both anion relative permeability and anion relative conductance are dependent on anion free energy of hydration--anions that are relatively easily dehydrated tend to show both high permeability and low conductance. In the present work, patch clamp recording was used to investigate the relative conductance of different anions in CFTR, and the effect of mutations within the channel pore. In constitutively-active E1371Q-CFTR channels, the anion conductance sequence was Cl(-) > NO3(-) > Br(-) > formate > SCN(-) > I(-). A mutation that disrupts anion binding in the inner vestibule of the pore (K95Q) disrupted anion conductance selectivity, such that anions with different permeabilities showed almost indistinguishable conductances. Conversely, a mutation at the putative narrowest pore region that is known to disrupt anion permeability selectivity (F337A) had minimal effects on anion relative conductance. Ion competition experiments confirmed that relatively tight binding of permeant anions resulted in relatively low conductance. These results suggest that the relative affinity of ion binding in the inner vestibule of the pore controls the relative conductance of different permeant anions in CFTR, and that the pore has two physically distinct anion selectivity filters that act in series to control anion conductance selectivity and anion permeability selectivity respectively.

  10. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  11. Vibrational spectroscopy of microhydrated conjugate base anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmis, Knut R; Neumark, Daniel M

    2012-01-17

    Conjugate-base anions are ubiquitous in aqueous solution. Understanding the hydration of these anions at the molecular level represents a long-standing goal in chemistry. A molecular-level perspective on ion hydration is also important for understanding the surface speciation and reactivity of aerosols, which are a central component of atmospheric and oceanic chemical cycles. In this Account, as a means of studying conjugate-base anions in water, we describe infrared multiple-photon dissociation spectroscopy on clusters in which the sulfate, nitrate, bicarbonate, and suberate anions are hydrated by a known number of water molecules. This spectral technique, used over the range of 550-1800 cm(-1), serves as a structural probe of these clusters. The experiments follow how the solvent network around the conjugate-base anion evolves, one water molecule at a time. We make structural assignments by comparing the experimental infrared spectra to those obtained from electronic structure calculations. Our results show how changes in anion structure, symmetry, and charge state have a profound effect on the structure of the solvent network. Conversely, they indicate how hydration can markedly affect the structure of the anion core in a microhydrated cluster. Some key results include the following. The first few water molecules bind to the anion terminal oxo groups in a bridging fashion, forming two anion-water hydrogen bonds. Each oxo group can form up to three hydrogen bonds; one structural result, for example, is the highly symmetric, fully coordinated SO(4)(2-)(H(2)O)(6) cluster, which only contains bridging water molecules. Adding more water molecules results in the formation of a solvent network comprising water-water hydrogen bonding in addition to hydrogen bonding to the anion. For the nitrate, bicarbonate, and suberate anions, fewer bridging sites are available, namely, three, two, and one (per carboxylate group), respectively. As a result, an earlier onset of water

  12. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    and the role it plays in the global climate and the future of fuels. Russia, Japan, Nigeria, Peru, Chile, Pakistan, Indonesia, Korea, etc are various countries who are perusing the gas hydrates studies as a future resource for fuel. Indian Initiative..., 1993, Free gas at the base of the gas hydrate zone in the vicinity of the Chile Triple junction: Geology, v. 21, pp. 905-908. Borowski, W.S., C.K. Paull, and U. William, III, 1999, Global and local variations of interstitial sulfate gradients...

  13. Nucleoside transporters and liver cell growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valdés, Raquel; Mata, João F; Del Santo, Belén; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal; Felipe, Antonio; Casado, F Javier

    1998-01-01

    .... This review summarizes work performed in our laboratory on these transport systems, particularly nucleoside transporters, which are up-regulated in physiological situations associated with liver cell growth...

  14. Nucleoside antibiotics: biosynthesis, regulation, and biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2015-02-01

    The alarming rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens has coincided with a decline in the supply of new antibiotics. It is therefore of great importance to find and create new antibiotics. Nucleoside antibiotics are a large family of natural products with diverse biological functions. Their biosynthesis is a complex process through multistep enzymatic reactions and is subject to hierarchical regulation. Genetic and biochemical studies of the biosynthetic machinery have provided the basis for pathway engineering and combinatorial biosynthesis to create new or hybrid nucleoside antibiotics. Dissection of regulatory mechanisms is leading to strategies to increase the titer of bioactive nucleoside antibiotics.

  15. Synthesis of Nucleoside Derivatives Containing Benzophenoxazinone Moiety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu GAO; Wu Xin ZOU; Ling WU; Jin Shui LI; Ji Tao WANG; Ji Ben MENG

    2004-01-01

    Two new nucleoside derivatives containing benzophenoxazinone moiety were synthesized. Their luminescence spectra show that they have strong near infrared fluorescence. Our study provides a new method for direct introduction of near infrared fluorescent probe to bioactive molecules.

  16. Clathrate hydrates in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Keith C; Brewer, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    Scientific knowledge of natural clathrate hydrates has grown enormously over the past decade, with spectacular new findings of large exposures of complex hydrates on the sea floor, the development of new tools for examining the solid phase in situ, significant progress in modeling natural hydrate systems, and the discovery of exotic hydrates associated with sea floor venting of liquid CO2. Major unresolved questions remain about the role of hydrates in response to climate change today, and correlations between the hydrate reservoir of Earth and the stable isotopic evidence of massive hydrate dissociation in the geologic past. The examination of hydrates as a possible energy resource is proceeding apace for the subpermafrost accumulations in the Arctic, but serious questions remain about the viability of marine hydrates as an economic resource. New and energetic explorations by nations such as India and China are quickly uncovering large hydrate findings on their continental shelves.

  17. SOME RECENT FINDINGS IN THE BIOTECHNOLOGY OF BIOLOGICALLY IMPORTANT NUCLEOSIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mikhailopulo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Some recent findings in the biotechnology of biologically important nucleosides will be discussed, viz., (i a new strategy of the cascade one-pot transformation of D-pentoses into nucleosides based on the extension and deepening of the knowledge of the mechanism of functioning of the ribokinase, phosphopentomutase, and uridine, thymidine and purine nucleoside (PNP phosphorylases, and the role of different factors (structural, electronic, stereochemical in the glycoside bond formation, (ii the modern chemistries of the chemo-enzymatic syntheses of nucleosides, (iii the transglycosylation reaction using natural and sugar modified nucleosides as donors of carbohydrate residues and heterocyclic bases as acceptors catalyzed by nucleoside phosphorylases (NP.

  18. Effect of Gemini-type surfactant on methane hydrate formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, K.E.; Park, J.M.; Kim, C.U.; Chae, H.J.; Jeong, S.Y. [Korea Research Inst. of Chemical Technology, Jang-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Natural gas hydrates are formed from water and natural gas molecules at particular temperatures and pressures that become ice-like inclusion compounds. Gas hydrates offer several benefits such as energy resource potential and high storage capacity of natural gas in the form of hydrates. However, the application of natural gas hydrates has been deterred by its low formation rate and low conversion ratio of water into hydrate resulting in low actual storage capacity. This paper presented an experimental study to determine the effect of adding a novel Gemini-type surfactant on methane hydrate formation. The experimental study was described with reference to the properties of prepared diols and properties of prepared disulfonates. Gemini surfactant is the family of surfactant molecules possessing more than one hydrophobic tail and hydrophilic head group. They generally have better surface-active properties than conventional surfactants of equal chain length. The paper presented the results of the study in terms of the reactions of diols with propane sultone; storage capacity of hydrate formed with and without surfactant; and methane hydrate formation with and without disulfonate. It was concluded that the methane hydrate formation was accelerated by the addition of novel anionic Gemini-type surfactants and that hydrate formation was influenced by the surfactant concentration and alkyl chain length. For a given concentration, the surfactant with the highest chain length demonstrated the highest formation rate and storage capacity. 5 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  19. Synthesis of Methoxyethyl Nucleoside Dimer Phosphoramidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Gi Weon; Kang, Yong Han [Hanyang University, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Four types of methoxyethyl (MOE) nucleoside phosphoramidites, which are categorized as second-generation building blocks of antisense oligonucleotide drugs, were synthesized. Also, three types of MOE nucleoside dimer phosphoramidites were synthesized to increase the efficiency and oligomer purity in solid phase synthesis. The block-like dimer phosphoramidites can prevent or minimize the formation of the (N-1) mer impurity, thereby affording the fabrication of pure oligonucleotides and reducing the synthesis time by performing coupling reactions in the order of 2 + 2 + 2.

  20. Cation Hydration Constants by Proton NMR: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Studies the polarization effect on water by cations and anions. Describes an experiment to illustrate the polarization effect of sodium, lithium, calcium, and strontium ions on the water molecule in the hydration spheres of the ions. Analysis is performed by proton NMR. (MVL)

  1. Dual reorientation relaxation routes of water molecules in oxyanion’s hydration shell: A molecular geometry perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Wen Jun; Yang, Yi Isaac; Gao, Yi Qin, E-mail: gaoyq@pku.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering and Biodynamic Optical Imaging Center, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-12-14

    In this study, we examine how complex ions such as oxyanions influence the dynamic properties of water and whether differences exist between simple halide anions and oxyanions. Nitrate anion is taken as an example to investigate the hydration properties of oxyanions. Reorientation relaxation of its hydration water can occur through two different routes: water can either break its hydrogen bond with the nitrate to form one with another water or switch between two oxygen atoms of the same nitrate. The latter molecular mechanism increases the residence time of oxyanion’s hydration water and thus nitrate anion slows down the translational motion of neighbouring water. But it is also a “structure breaker” in that it accelerates the reorientation relaxation of hydration water. Such a result illustrates that differences do exist between the hydration of oxyanions and simple halide anions as a result of different molecular geometries. Furthermore, the rotation of the nitrate solute is coupled with the hydrogen bond rearrangement of its hydration water. The nitrate anion can either tilt along the axis perpendicularly to the plane or rotate in the plane. We find that the two reorientation relaxation routes of the hydration water lead to different relaxation dynamics in each of the two above movements of the nitrate solute. The current study suggests that molecular geometry could play an important role in solute hydration and dynamics.

  2. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-14

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  3. Understanding and modeling removal of anionic organic contaminants (AOCs) by anion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huichun; Shields, Anthony J; Jadbabaei, Nastaran; Nelson, Maurice; Pan, Bingjun; Suri, Rominder P S

    2014-07-01

    Ionic organic contaminants (OCs) are a growing concern for water treatment and the environment and are removed inefficiently by many existing technologies. This study examined removal of anionic OCs by anion exchange resins (AXRs) as a promising alternative. Results indicate that two polystyrene AXRs (IRA910 and IRA96) have higher sorption capacities and selectivity than a polyacrylate resin (A860). For the polystyrene resins, selectivity follows: phenolates ≥ aromatic dicarboxylates > aromatic monocarboxylates > benzenesulfonate > aliphatic carboxylates. This trend can be explained based on hydration energy, the number of exchange groups, and aromaticity and hydrophobicity of the nonpolar moiety (NPM) of the anions. For A860, selectivity only varies within a narrow range (0.13-1.64). Despite the importance of the NPM of the anions, neutral solutes were sorbed much less, indicating synergistic combinations of electrostatic and nonelectrostatic interactions in the overall sorption. By conducting multiple linear regression between Abraham's descriptors and nature log of selectivity, induced dipole-related interactions and electrostatic interactions were found to be the most important interaction forces for sorption of the anions, while solute H-bond basicity has a negative effect. A predictive model was then developed for carboxylates and phenolates based on the poly parameter linear free energy relationships established for a diverse range of 16 anions and 5 neutral solutes, and was validated by accurate prediction of sorption of five test solutes within a wide range of equilibrium concentrations and that of benzoate at different pH.

  4. Anion exchange membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-05-07

    An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

  5. Anions in Cometary Comae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of negative ions (anions) in cometary comae is known from Giotto mass spectrometry of IP/Halley. The anions 0-, OH-, C-, CH- and CN- have been detected, as well as unidentified anions with masses 22-65 and 85-110 amu (Chaizy et al. 1991). Organic molecular anions are known to have a significant impact on the charge balance of interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes and have been shown to act as catalysts for the gas-phase synthesis of larger hydrocarbon molecules in the ISM, but their importance in cometary comae has not yet been explored. We present details of the first attempt to model the chemistry of anions in cometary comae. Based on the combined chemical and hydro dynamical model of Rodgers & Charnley (2002), we investigate the role of large carbon-chain anions in cometary coma chemistry. We calculate the effects of these anions on coma thermodynamics, charge balance and examine their impact on molecule formation.

  6. Distribution of Nucleosides in Populations of Cordyceps cicadae

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Bo Zeng; Hong Yu; Feng Ge; Jun-Yuan Yang; Zi-Hong Chen; Yuan-Bing Wang; Yong-Dong Dai; Alison Adams

    2014-01-01

    A rapid HPLC method had been developed and used for the simultaneous determination of 10 nucleosides (uracil, uridine, 2'-deoxyuridine, inosine, guanosine, thymidine, adenine, adenosine, 2'-deoxyadenosine and cordycepin) in 10 populations of Cordyceps cicadae, in order to compare four populations of Ophicordyceps sinensis and one population of Cordyceps militaris. Statistical analysis system (SAS) 8.1 was used to analyze the nucleoside data. The pattern of nucleoside distribution was analyzed...

  7. Hydration Assessment of Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS · Although there is no scientific consensus for 1 ) howbest to assess the hydration status of athletes, 2)what criteria to use as acceptable outcome measurements, or 3) the best time to apply practical assessment methods, there are methods that can be used toprovide athletes with useful feedback about their hydration status

  8. Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Ostrovskii

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper develops the Life Origination Hydrate Hypothesis (LOH-hypothesis, according to which living-matter simplest elements (LMSEs, which are N-bases, riboses, nucleosides, nucleotides, DNA- and RNA-like molecules, amino-acids, and proto-cells repeatedly originated on the basis of thermodynamically controlled, natural, and inevitable processes governed by universal physical and chemical laws from CH4, niters, and phosphates under the Earth's surface or seabed within the crystal cavities of the honeycomb methane-hydrate structure at low temperatures; the chemical processes passed slowly through all successive chemical steps in the direction that is determined by a gradual decrease in the Gibbs free energy of reacting systems. The hypothesis formulation method is based on the thermodynamic directedness of natural movement and consists ofan attempt to mentally backtrack on the progression of nature and thus reveal principal milestones alongits route. The changes in Gibbs free energy are estimated for different steps of the living-matter origination process; special attention is paid to the processes of proto-cell formation. Just the occurrence of the gas-hydrate periodic honeycomb matrix filled with LMSEs almost completely in its final state accounts for size limitation in the DNA functional groups and the nonrandom location of N-bases in the DNA chains. The slowness of the low-temperature chemical transformations and their “thermodynamic front” guide the gross process of living matter origination and its successive steps. It is shown that the hypothesis is thermodynamically justified and testable and that many observed natural phenomena count in its favor.

  9. Effect of nucleoside analogue antimetabolites on the structure of PEO–PPO–PEO micelles investigated by SANS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Youngkyu; Zhang, Zhe; Smith, Gregory S.; Do, Changwoo

    2017-01-01

    The effect of three nucleoside analogue antimetabolites (5-fluorouracil, floxuridine, and gemcitabine) on the structure of Pluronic L62 copolymer micelles was investigated using small-angle neutron scattering. These antimetabolites used for cancer chemotherapy have analogous molecular structures but different molecular sizes and aqueous solubilities. It was found that the addition of the three antimetabolites slightly reduced the micellar size and aggregation number, and the micellar anisotropy. The added antimetabolites also changed the internal molecular distribution of the micelles as measured by the scattering length densities, resulting in enhanced hydration of the hydrophobic core region of the micelle. The strength of the effect was found to correlate with the molecular properties of the model drugs, i.e. a larger molecular size and a higher aqueous solubility lead to enhanced hydration of the micellar core.

  10. C5-Modified nucleosides exhibiting anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon-Suk; Park, Sun Min; Kim, Hwan Mook; Park, Song-Kyu; Lee, Kiho; Lee, Chang Woo; Kim, Byeang Hyean

    2009-08-15

    We describe (i) a simple method for the synthesis of C5-modified nucleosides from 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine and (ii) their activity against six types of human cancer cell lines (HCT15, MM231, NCI-H23, NUGC-3, PC-3, ACHN). We generated nitrile oxides in situ from oximes using a commercial bleaching agent; their cycloadditions with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine yielded isoxazole derivatives possessing activity against the cancer cell lines. We synthesized several azides from benzylic bromides and their click reactions with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine provided triazole derivatives.

  11. Hybridization accompanying FRET event in labeled natural nucleoside-unnatural nucleoside containing chimeric DNA duplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Subhendu Sekhar; Das, Suman K; Pradhan, Manoj Kumar; Jana, Subhashis

    2016-09-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a highly efficient strategy in illuminating the structures, structural changes and dynamics of DNA, proteins and other biomolecules and thus is being widely utilized in studying such phenomena, in designing molecular/biomolecular probes for monitoring the hybridization event of two single stranded DNA to form duplex, in gene detection and in many other sensory applications in chemistry, biology and material sciences. Moreover, FRET can give information about the positional status of chromophores within the associated biomolecules with much more accuracy than other methods can yield. Toward this end, we want to report here the ability of fluorescent unnatural nucleoside, triazolylphenanthrene ((TPhen)BDo) to show FRET interaction upon hybridization with fluorescently labeled natural nucleosides, (Per)U or (OxoPy)U or (Per)U, forming two stable chimeric DNA duplexes. The pairing selectivity and the thermal duplex stability of the chimeric duplexes are higher than any of the duplexes with natural nucleoside formed. The hybridization results in a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from donor triazolylphenanthrene of (TPhen)BDo to acceptor oxopyrene of (OxoPy)U and/or to perylene chromophore of (Per)U, respectively, in two chimeric DNA duplexes. Therefore, we have established the FRET process in two chimeric DNA duplexes wherein a fluorescently labeled natural nucleoside ((OxoPy)U or (Per)U) paired against an unnatural nucleoside ((TPhen)BDo) without sacrificing the duplex stability and B-DNA conformation. The hybridization accompanying FRET event in these classes of interacting fluorophores is new. Moreover, there is no report of such designed system of chimeric DNA duplex. Our observed phenomenon and the design can potentially be exploited in designing more of such efficient FRET pairs for useful application in the detection and analysis of biomolecular interactions and in material science application. Copyright

  12. Two nucleoside transporters in Lactococcus lactis with different substrate specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Sørensen, Claus; Jendresen, Christian Bille

    2010-01-01

    at both genetic and physiological level, using mutagenesis and by measuring the growth and uptake of nucleosides in the different mutants supplemented with different nucleosides. Two high affinity transporters were identified: BmpA-NupABC was shown to be an ABC transporter with the ability to actively...

  13. Repair effect of thymine radical anion by echinocoside using pulse radiolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雯艳; 郑荣梁; 赵松岭; 姜岳; 林念芸

    1996-01-01

    Repair activities of thymine radical anion by echinocoside, isolated from Pedicularis plicata. were studied using pulse radiolysis technique. The thymine radical anion was produced by the reaction of hydrated electron with thymine. Echinocoside. one of the polyphenols of phenylpropanoid glycoside, was added to the thymine aqueous solution saturated with N2. Kinetic analysis by transient absorption spectrum showed that thymine radical anion was formed at first, and then after several decades of microseconds of pulse radiolysis. the spectrum of thymine radical anion was changed to that of echinocoside radical anion. The evidence indicated that thymine radical anion was repaired through one-electron-transfer between the DNA base radical anion and echinocoside. The rate constant of electron transfer by echinocoside was 1.45× 109 dm3 · mol1 · s 1.

  14. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years.

  15. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  16. Wet hydrate dissolution plant

    OpenAIRE

    Stanković Mirjana S.; Kovačević Branimir T.; Pezo Lato L.

    2003-01-01

    The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant with capacity of 50,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE), Italy, in 1997, for increasing detergent zeolite production from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate ...

  17. An Efficient and Facile Methodology for Bromination of Pyrimidine and Purine Nucleosides with Sodium Monobromoisocyanurate (SMBI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Stromberg

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available An efficient and facile strategy has been developed for bromination of nucleosides using sodium monobromoisocyanurate (SMBI. Our methodology demonstrates bromination at the C-5 position of pyrimidine nucleosides and the C-8 position of purine nucleosides. Unprotected and also several protected nucleosides were brominated in moderate to high yields following this procedure.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of anionic clays containing glutamic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian; Ni, Zheming; Yao, Ping; Li, Yuan

    2010-08-01

    Supra-molecular structure of glutamic acid intercalated ZnAl layered double hydroxides (Glu-ZnAl-LDH) was modeled by molecular dynamics (MD) methods. Hydrogen bonding, hydration and swelling properties of Glu-LDH have been investigated. For Nw layers and anions. When A-W type H-bonds gradually reached a saturation state, water molecules continued to form hydrogen bonds with the hydroxyls of the layers. The L-W type H-bonds gradually substituted the L-A type H-bonds and Glu anions moved to the center of an interlayer and then separated with the layers. Last, a well-ordered structural water layer was formed on the surface hydroxyls of Glu-LDH. The lower releasing content of Glu-LDH maybe was influenced by the lower balance hydration energy and existence of L-A type H-bonds in high water content.

  19. Hydrated Electron Transfer to Nucleobases in Aqueous Solutions Revealed by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Mei; Fu, Aiyun; Yang, Hongfang; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-08-03

    We present an ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation study into the transfer dynamics of an excess electron from its cavity-shaped hydrated electron state to a hydrated nucleobase (NB)-bound state. In contrast to the traditional view that electron localization at NBs (G/A/C/T), which is the first step for electron-induced DNA damage, is related only to dry or prehydrated electrons, and a fully hydrated electron no longer transfers to NBs, our AIMD simulations indicate that a fully hydrated electron can still transfer to NBs. We monitored the transfer dynamics of fully hydrated electrons towards hydrated NBs in aqueous solutions by using AIMD simulations and found that due to solution-structure fluctuation and attraction of NBs, a fully hydrated electron can transfer to a NB gradually over time. Concurrently, the hydrated electron cavity gradually reorganizes, distorts, and even breaks. The transfer could be completed in about 120-200 fs in four aqueous NB solutions, depending on the electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs and the structural fluctuation of the solution. The transferring electron resides in the π*-type lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the NB, which leads to a hydrated NB anion. Clearly, the observed transfer of hydrated electrons can be attributed to the strong electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs over the hydrated electron cavity, which is the driving force, and the transfer dynamics is structure-fluctuation controlled. This work provides new insights into the evolution dynamics of hydrated electrons and provides some helpful information for understanding the DNA-damage mechanism in solution. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Novel purine nucleoside analogues for hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korycka, Anna; Lech-Marańda, Ewa; Robak, Tadeusz

    2008-06-01

    Recently, the search for more effective and safer antineoplastic agents has led to synthesis and introduction into preclinical and clinical studies of a few new purine nucleoside analogues (PNA). Three of them: clofarabine (CAFdA), nelarabine, and forodesine (immucillin H, BCX-1777), despite belonging to the same group of drugs such as PNA, have shown some differences concerning their active forms, metabolic properties and mechanism of action. However, all these drugs have demonstrated promising activity in patients with relapsed and refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). CAFdA was approved for the therapy of relapsed or refractory ALL in the third line of treatment. It has proved promising in pediatric patients as well as in some patients who are able to proceed to allogenic hematopietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Moreover, the drug exhibits an efficacy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), blast crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML-BP) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Nelarabine is recommended for T-ALL and T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL) with the overall response rates ranging from 11 to 60%. However, the use of the drug is limited by potentially severe neurotoxicity. Forodesine is a purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) inhibitor and it has shown activity in relapsed and refractory T- and B-cells leukemias as well as in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Recently patented, a few of inventions in the field of pharmaceutical preparation of new PNA have also been published. Great hopes are currently set on the use of these drugs in the treatment of lymphoid and myeloid malignancies in adult and in pediatric patients, however ongoing studies will help to define their role in the standard therapy.

  1. [Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, V; Yeni, P

    2000-06-01

    The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) directly inhibit the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) by binding in a reversible and non-competitive manner to the enzyme. The currently available NNRTIs are nevirapine, delavirdine, and efavirenz; other compounds are under evaluation. NNRTIs are extensively metabolized in the liver through cytochrome P450, leading to pharmacokinetic interactions with compounds utilizing the same metabolic pathway, particularly PIs, whose plasma levels are altered in the presence of NNRTIs. NNRTIs are drugs with a low genetic barrier, i.e. a single mutation in RT genoma induces a high-level of phenotypic resistance, preventing the use of NNRTIs as monotherapy. In naive patients, several trials have shown the value of NNRTIs in combination with nucleosides and/or protease inhibitors. Small pilot studies have shown that NNRTIs may be useful as second-line therapy. However, due to the rapid emergence of resistant virus to these compounds in case of incomplete viral suppression, NNRTIs should not be added to current failing antiretroviral regimen. The most common side-effect reported with nevirapine and delavirdine is rash. The incidence of rash is rather similar under these two compounds, but severe rash is less frequent with delavirdine. The most common adverse reactions reported with efavirenz are central nervous system complaints such as dizziness. Rash is reported less frequently than with nevirapine or delavirdine, and is usually mild. NNRTIs resistance mutations are located in the amino acid residues aligning the NNRTI-binding "pocket" site. High-level resistance is often associated with a single point mutation which develops within this site (especially codon groups 100 - 108 and 181 - 190). Patients failing on one NNRTI are very likely to possess multiple NNRTI resistance mutations. NNRTIs should always be used as part of a potent antiretroviral therapy to insure suppression of viral replication, thus circumventing

  2. nucleoside DNA methyltransferase 1 inhibitors for treating epi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Epi-mutation, DNA methyltransferase, Non-nucleoside, DNMT1 inhibitor, Docking .... associated genes [18] and the effect could not be ... compound that may inhibit DNA methylation non- ... potential of which is over estimated [16];.

  3. Palladium-Catalyzed Modification of Unprotected Nucleosides, Nucleotides, and Oligonucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin H. Shaughnessy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic modification of nucleoside structures provides access to molecules of interest as pharmaceuticals, biochemical probes, and models to study diseases. Covalent modification of the purine and pyrimidine bases is an important strategy for the synthesis of these adducts. Palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling is a powerful method to attach groups to the base heterocycles through the formation of new carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds. In this review, approaches to palladium-catalyzed modification of unprotected nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides are reviewed. Polar reaction media, such as water or polar aprotic solvents, allow reactions to be performed directly on the hydrophilic nucleosides and nucleotides without the need to use protecting groups. Homogeneous aqueous-phase coupling reactions catalyzed by palladium complexes of water-soluble ligands provide a general approach to the synthesis of modified nucleosides, nucleotides, and oligonucleotides.

  4. A Modular Approach to Phosphoglycosyltransferase Inhibitors Inspired by Nucleoside Antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walvoort, Marthe T C; Lukose, Vinita; Imperiali, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoglycosyltransferases (PGTs) represent "gatekeeper" enzymes in complex glycan assembly pathways by catalyzing transfer of a phosphosugar from an activated nucleotide diphosphosugar to a membrane-resident polyprenol phosphate. The unique structures of selected nucleoside antibiotics, such as tu

  5. Current prodrug strategies for improving oral absorption of nucleoside analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youxi Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nucleoside analogues are first line chemotherapy in various severe diseases: AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency disease syndrome, cytomegalovirus infections, cancer, etc. However, many nucleoside analogues exhibit poor oral bioavailability because of their high polarity and low intestinal permeability. In order to get around this drawback, prodrugs have been utilized to improve lipophilicity by chemical modification of the parent drug. Alternatively, prodrugs targeting transporters present in the intestine have been applied to promote the transport of the nucleoside analogues. Valacyclovir and valganciclovir are two classic valine ester prodrugs transported by oligopeptide transporter 1. The ideal prodrug achieves delivery of a parent drug by attaching a non-toxic moiety that is stable during transport, but is readily degraded to the parent drug once at the target. This article presents advances of prodrug approaches for enhancing oral absorption of nucleoside analogues.

  6. Crystal structure of a concentrative nucleoside transporter from Vibrio cholerae at 2.4;#8201;Å

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Zachary Lee; Cheong, Cheom-Gil; Lee, Seok-Yong (Duke)

    2012-07-11

    Nucleosides are required for DNA and RNA synthesis, and the nucleoside adenosine has a function in a variety of signalling processes. Transport of nucleosides across cell membranes provides the major source of nucleosides in many cell types and is also responsible for the termination of adenosine signalling. As a result of their hydrophilic nature, nucleosides require a specialized class of integral membrane proteins, known as nucleoside transporters (NTs), for specific transport across cell membranes. In addition to nucleosides, NTs are important determinants for the transport of nucleoside-derived drugs across cell membranes. A wide range of nucleoside-derived drugs, including anticancer drugs (such as Ara-C and gemcitabine) and antiviral drugs (such as zidovudine and ribavirin), have been shown to depend, at least in part, on NTs for transport across cell membranes. Concentrative nucleoside transporters, members of the solute carrier transporter superfamily SLC28, use an ion gradient in the active transport of both nucleosides and nucleoside-derived drugs against their chemical gradients. The structural basis for selective ion-coupled nucleoside transport by concentrative nucleoside transporters is unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of a concentrative nucleoside transporter from Vibrio cholerae in complex with uridine at 2.4 {angstrom}. Our functional data show that, like its human orthologues, the transporter uses a sodium-ion gradient for nucleoside transport. The structure reveals the overall architecture of this class of transporter, unravels the molecular determinants for nucleoside and sodium binding, and provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of nucleoside and nucleoside drug transport across cell membranes.

  7. Distribution of nucleosides in populations of Cordyceps cicadae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wen-Bo; Yu, Hong; Ge, Feng; Yang, Jun-Yuan; Chen, Zi-Hong; Wang, Yuan-Bing; Dai, Yong-Dong; Adams, Alison

    2014-05-14

    A rapid HPLC method had been developed and used for the simultaneous determination of 10 nucleosides (uracil, uridine, 2'-deoxyuridine, inosine, guanosine, thymidine, adenine, adenosine, 2'-deoxyadenosine and cordycepin) in 10 populations of Cordyceps cicadae, in order to compare four populations of Ophicordyceps sinensis and one population of Cordyceps militaris. Statistical analysis system (SAS) 8.1 was used to analyze the nucleoside data. The pattern of nucleoside distribution was analyzed in the sampled populations of C. cicadae, O. sinensis and C. militaris, using descriptive statistical analysis, nested analysis and Q cluster analysis. The total amount of the 10 nucleosides in coremium was 1,463.89-5,678.21 µg/g in 10 populations of C. cicadae, 1,369.80-3,941.64 µg/g in sclerotium. The average contents of the 10 analytes were 4,392.37 µg/g and 3,016.06 µg/g in coremium and sclerotium, respectively. The coefficient of variation (CV) of nucleosides ranged from 8.36% to 112.36% in coremium of C. cicadae, and from 10.77% to 155.87% in sclerotium of C. cicadae. The CV of the nucleosides was wide within C. cicadae populations. The nested variation analysis by the nine nucleosides' distribution indicated that about 42.29% of the nucleoside variability in coremium was attributable to the differentiation among populations, and the remaining 57.71% resided in the populations. It was also shown that about 28.94% of the variation in sclerotium was expressed between populations, while most of the variation (71.06%) corresponded to the populations.

  8. The Nucleoside Uridine Isolated in the Gas Phase**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Herein we present the first experimental observation of the isolated nucleoside uridine, placed in the gas phase by laser ablation and characterized by Fourier transform microwave techniques. Free from the bulk effects of their native environments, anti/C2’-endo-g+ conformation has been revealed as the most stable form of uridine. Intramolecular hydrogen bonds involving uracil and ribose moieties have been found to play an important role in the stabilization of the nucleoside. PMID:25683559

  9. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  10. Urinary nucleosides as biological markers for patients with colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Fang Zheng; Jun Yang; Xin-Jie Zhao; Bo Feng; Hong-Wei Kong; Ying-Jie Chen; Shen Lv; Min-Hua Zheng; Guo-Wang Xu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Fourteen urinary nucleosides, primary degradation products of tRNA, were evaluated to know the potential as biological markers for patients with colorectal cancer.METHODS: The concentrations of 14 kinds of urinary nucleosides from 52 patients with colorectal cancer, 10patients with intestinal villous adenoma and 60 healthy adults were determined by column switching high performance liquid chromatography method.RESULTS: The mean levels of 12 kinds of urinary nucleosides (except uridine and guanosine) in the patients with colorectal cancer were significantly higher than those in patients with intestinal villous adenoma or the healthy adults. Using the levels of 14 kinds of urinary nucleosides as the data vectors for principal component analysis, 71% (37/52) patients with colorectal cancer were correctly classified from healthy adults, in which the identification rate was much higher than that of CEA method (29%).Only 10% (1/10) of patients with intestinal villous adenoma were indistinguishable from patients with colorectal cancer. The levels of m1G, Pseu and m1A were positively related with tumor size and Duke's stages of colorectal cancer. When monitoring the changes in urinary nucleoside concentrations of patients with colorectal cancer associated with surgery, it was found that the overall correlations with clinical assessment were 84% (27/32)and 91% (10/11) in response group and progressive group, respectively.CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that urinary nucleosides determined by column switching high performance liquid chromatography method may be useful as biological markers for colorectal cancer.

  11. Antimalarial action of nitrobenzylthioinosine in combination with purine nucleoside antimetabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gero, A M; Scott, H V; O'Sullivan, W J; Christopherson, R I

    1989-04-01

    The infection of human erythrocytes by two strains of the human malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum (FCQ-27 or the multi-drug-resistant strain K-1), markedly changed the transport characteristics of the nucleosides, adenosine and tubercidin, compared to uninfected erythrocytes. A component of the transport of these nucleosides was insensitive to the classical mammalian nucleoside transport inhibitor nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR). In vitro studies with tubercidin demonstrated ID50 values of 0.43 and 0.51 microM for FCQ-27 and K-1, respectively. In addition, the nucleoside transport inhibitors NBMPR, nitrobenzylthioguanosine (NBTGR), dilazep and dipyridamole also independently exhibited antimalarial activity in vitro. The combination of tubercidin and NBMPR or NBTGR in vitro demonstrated synergistic activity, whilst tubercidin together with dilazep or dipyridamole showed subadditive activity. Analysis by HPLC indicated that NBMPR could permeate the infected cell membrane and provided evidence for the catabolism of NBMPR in vitro, with subsequent alteration of the purine pool in the infected erythrocyte. These observations further indicated the possibility of the utilization of cytotoxic nucleosides against P. falciparum infection in conjunction with a nucleoside transport inhibitor to protect the host tissue.

  12. Synthesis of coumarin or ferrocene labeled nucleosides via Staudinger ligation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kois Pavol

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reaction of azides with triaryl phosphines under mild conditions gives iminophosphoranes which can react with almost any kind of electrophilic reagent, e.g. aldehydes/ketones to form imines or esters to form amides. This so-called Staudinger ligation has been employed in a wide range of applications as a general tool for bioconjugation including specific labeling of nucleic acids. Results A new approach for the preparation of labeled nucleosides via intermolecular Staudinger ligation is described. Reaction of azidonucleosides with triphenylphosphine lead to iminophosphorane intermediates, which react subsequently with derivatives of coumarin or ferrocene to form coumarin or ferrocene labeled nucleosides. Fluorescent properties of coumarin labeled nucleosides are determined. Conclusion New coumarin and ferrocene labeled nucleosides were prepared via intermolecular Staudinger ligation. This reaction joins the fluorescent coumarin and biospecific nucleoside to the new molecule with promising fluorescent and electrochemical properties. The isolated yields of products depend on the structure of azidonucleoside and carboxylic acids. A detailed study of the kinetics of the Staudinger ligation with nucleoside substrates is in progress.

  13. Flexibility as a Strategy in Nucleoside Antiviral Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, H L; Ku, T C; Seley-Radtke, K L

    2015-01-01

    As far back as Melville Wolfrom's acyclic sugar synthesis in the 1960's, synthesis of flexible nucleoside analogues have been an area of interest. This concept, however, went against years of enzyme-substrate binding theory. Hence, acyclic methodology in antiviral drug design did not take off until the discovery and subsequent FDA approval of such analogues as Acyclovir and Tenofovir. More recently, the observation that flexible nucleosides could overcome drug resistance spawned a renewed interest in the field of nucleoside drug design. The next generation of flexible nucleosides shifted the focus from the sugar moiety to the nucleobase. With analogues such as Seley-Radtke "fleximers", and Herdewijn's C5 substituted 2'-deoxyuridines, the area of base flexibility has seen great expansion. More recently, the marriage of these methodologies with acyclic sugars has resulted in a series of acyclic flex-base nucleosides with a wide range of antiviral properties, including some of the first to exhibit anti-coronavirus activity. Various flexible nucleosides and their corresponding nucleobases will be compared in this review.

  14. Formation of porous gas hydrates

    CERN Document Server

    Salamatin, Andrey N

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates grown at gas-ice interfaces are examined by electron microscopy and found to have a submicron porous texture. Permeability of the intervening hydrate layers provides the connection between the two counterparts (gas and water molecules) of the clathration reaction and makes further hydrate formation possible. The study is focused on phenomenological description of principal stages and rate-limiting processes that control the kinetics of the porous gas hydrate crystal growth from ice powders. Although the detailed physical mechanisms involved in the porous hydrate formation still are not fully understood, the initial stage of hydrate film spreading over the ice surface should be distinguished from the subsequent stage which is presumably limited by the clathration reaction at the ice-hydrate interface and develops after the ice grain coating is finished. The model reveals a time dependence of the reaction degree essentially different from that when the rate-limiting step of the hydrate formation at...

  15. Photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory studies on the uridine homodimer radical anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jae Ko, Yeon; Storoniak, Piotr; Wang, Haopeng; Bowen, Kit H.; Rak, Janusz

    2012-11-01

    We report the photoelectron spectrum (PES) of the homogeneous dimer anion radical of uridine, (rU)2•-. It features a broad band consisting of an onset of ˜1.2 eV and a maximum at the electron binding energy (EBE) ranging from 2.0 to 2.5 eV. Calculations performed at the B3LYP/6-31++G** level of theory suggest that the PES is dominated by dimeric radical anions in which one uridine nucleoside, hosting the excess charge on the base moiety, forms hydrogen bonds via its O8 atom with hydroxyl of the other neutral nucleoside's ribose. The calculated adiabatic electron affinities (AEAGs) and vertical detachment energies (VDEs) of the most stable homodimers show an excellent agreement with the experimental values. The anionic complexes consisting of two intermolecular uracil-uracil hydrogen bonds appeared to be substantially less stable than the uracil-ribose dimers. Despite the fact that uracil-uracil anionic homodimers are additionally stabilized by barrier-free electron-induced proton transfer, their relative thermodynamic stabilities and the calculated VDEs suggest that they do not contribute to the experimental PES spectrum of (rU)2•-.

  16. Anion-π catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yingjie; Beuchat, César; Domoto, Yuya; Gajewy, Jadwiga; Wilson, Adam; Mareda, Jiri; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2014-02-05

    The introduction of new noncovalent interactions to build functional systems is of fundamental importance. We here report experimental and theoretical evidence that anion-π interactions can contribute to catalysis. The Kemp elimination is used as a classical tool to discover conceptually innovative catalysts for reactions with anionic transition states. For anion-π catalysis, a carboxylate base and a solubilizer are covalently attached to the π-acidic surface of naphthalenediimides. On these π-acidic surfaces, transition-state stabilizations up to ΔΔGTS = 31.8 ± 0.4 kJ mol(-1) are found. This value corresponds to a transition-state recognition of KTS = 2.7 ± 0.5 μM and a catalytic proficiency of 3.8 × 10(5) M(-1). Significantly increasing transition-state stabilization with increasing π-acidity of the catalyst, observed for two separate series, demonstrates the existence of "anion-π catalysis." In sharp contrast, increasing π-acidity of the best naphthalenediimide catalysts does not influence the more than 12 000-times weaker substrate recognition (KM = 34.5 ± 1.6 μM). Together with the disappearance of Michaelis-Menten kinetics on the expanded π-surfaces of perylenediimides, this finding supports that contributions from π-π interactions are not very important for anion-π catalysis. The linker between the π-acidic surface and the carboxylate base strongly influences activity. Insufficient length and flexibility cause incompatibility with saturation kinetics. Moreover, preorganizing linkers do not improve catalysis much, suggesting that the ideal positioning of the carboxylate base on the π-acidic surface is achieved by intramolecular anion-π interactions rather than by an optimized structure of the linker. Computational simulations are in excellent agreement with experimental results. They confirm, inter alia, that the stabilization of the anionic transition states (but not the neutral ground states) increases with the π-acidity of the

  17. Anopheles gambiae Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase: Catalysis, Structure, and Inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor,E.; Rinaldo-Matthis, A.; Li, L.; Ghanem, M.; Hazleton, K.; Cassera, M.; Almo, S.; Schramm, V.

    2007-01-01

    The purine salvage pathway of Anopheles gambiae, a mosquito that transmits malaria, has been identified in genome searches on the basis of sequence homology with characterized enzymes. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is a target for the development of therapeutic agents in humans and purine auxotrophs, including malarial parasites. The PNP from Anopheles gambiae (AgPNP) was expressed in Escherichia coli and compared to the PNPs from Homo sapiens (HsPNP) and Plasmodium falciparum (PfPNP). AgPNP has kcat values of 54 and 41 s-1 for 2'-deoxyinosine and inosine, its preferred substrates, and 1.0 s-1 for guanosine. However, the chemical step is fast for AgPNP at 226 s-1 for guanosine in pre-steady-state studies. 5'-Deaza-1'-aza-2'-deoxy-1'-(9-methylene)-Immucillin-H (DADMe-ImmH) is a transition-state mimic for a 2'-deoxyinosine ribocation with a fully dissociated N-ribosidic bond and is a slow-onset, tight-binding inhibitor with a dissociation constant of 3.5 pM. This is the tightest-binding inhibitor known for any PNP, with a remarkable Km/Ki* of 5.4 x 107, and is consistent with enzymatic transition state predictions of enhanced transition-state analogue binding in enzymes with enhanced catalytic efficiency. Deoxyguanosine is a weaker substrate than deoxyinosine, and DADMe-Immucillin-G is less tightly bound than DADMe-ImmH, with a dissociation constant of 23 pM for AgPNP as compared to 7 pM for HsPNP. The crystal structure of AgPNP was determined in complex with DADMe-ImmH and phosphate to a resolution of 2.2 Angstroms to reveal the differences in substrate and inhibitor specificity. The distance from the N1' cation to the phosphate O4 anion is shorter in the AgPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmH{center_dot}PO4 complex than in HsPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmH{center_dot}SO4, offering one explanation for the stronger inhibitory effect of DADMe-ImmH for AgPNP.

  18. [Hydration in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maristany, Cleofé Pérez-Portabella; Segurola Gurruchaga, Hegoi

    2011-01-01

    Water is an essential foundation for life, having both a regulatory and structural function. The former results from active and passive participation in all metabolic reactions, and its role in conserving and maintaining body temperature. Structurally speaking it is the major contributer to tissue mass, accounting for 60% of the basis of blood plasma, intracellular and intersticial fluid. Water is also part of the primary structures of life such as genetic material or proteins. Therefore, it is necessary that the nurse makes an early assessment of patients water needs to detect if there are signs of electrolyte imbalance. Dehydration can be a very serious problem, especially in children and the elderly. Dehydrations treatment with oral rehydration solution decreases the risk of developing hydration disorders, but even so, it is recommended to follow preventive measures to reduce the incidence and severity of dehydration. The key to having a proper hydration is prevention. Artificial nutrition encompasses the need for precise calculation of water needs in enteral nutrition as parenteral, so the nurse should be part of this process and use the tools for calculating the patient's requirements. All this helps to ensure an optimal nutritional status in patients at risk. Ethical dilemmas are becoming increasingly common in clinical practice. On the subject of artificial nutrition and hydration, there isn't yet any unanimous agreement regarding hydration as a basic care. It is necessary to take decisions in consensus with the health team, always thinking of the best interests of the patient.

  19. Distribution of Nucleosides in Populations of Cordyceps cicadae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Bo Zeng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A rapid HPLC method had been developed and used for the simultaneous determination of 10 nucleosides (uracil, uridine, 2'-deoxyuridine, inosine, guanosine, thymidine, adenine, adenosine, 2'-deoxyadenosine and cordycepin in 10 populations of Cordyceps cicadae, in order to compare four populations of Ophicordyceps sinensis and one population of Cordyceps militaris. Statistical analysis system (SAS 8.1 was used to analyze the nucleoside data. The pattern of nucleoside distribution was analyzed in the sampled populations of C. cicadae, O. sinensis and C. militaris, using descriptive statistical analysis, nested analysis and Q cluster analysis. The total amount of the 10 nucleosides in coremium was 1,463.89–5,678.21 µg/g in 10 populations of C. cicadae, 1,369.80–3,941.64 µg/g in sclerotium. The average contents of the 10 analytes were 4,392.37 µg/g and 3,016.06 µg/g in coremium and sclerotium, respectively. The coefficient of variation (CV of nucleosides ranged from 8.36% to 112.36% in coremium of C. cicadae, and from 10.77% to 155.87% in sclerotium of C. cicadae. The CV of the nucleosides was wide within C. cicadae populations. The nested variation analysis by the nine nucleosides’ distribution indicated that about 42.29% of the nucleoside variability in coremium was attributable to the differentiation among populations, and the remaining 57.71% resided in the populations. It was also shown that about 28.94% of the variation in sclerotium was expressed between populations, while most of the variation (71.06% corresponded to the populations.

  20. Interactions of Organic Additives with Ionic Crystal Hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füredi-Milhofer, H.; Sikirić, M.; Tunik, L.; Filipović-Vinceković, N.; Garti, N.

    The interactions of two groups of hydrated model crystals, calcium hydrogenphosphate dihydrate (DCPD) vs. octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) vs. calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) with different organic additives are considered. DCPD precipitates as platelet-like crystals with the dominant faces shielded by hydrated layers and charged lateral faces. In the second system COM has charged surfaces, while all faces of COD are covered with layers containing water molecules. The organic molecules tested include negatively charged, flexible and rigid small and macromolecules (glutamic and aspartic acid, citrate, hexaammonium polyphosphate, phytate and polyaspartate) and anionic surfactants (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS, sodium diisooctyl sulfosuccinate, AOT, sodium cholate NaC and disodium oleoamido PEG-2 sulfosuccinate, PEG). Two types of effects have been demonstrated: (1) Effect on crystal growth morphology: Flexible organic molecules with high charge density and anionic surfactants affected the growth morphology of DCPD and COM by selectively interacting with the charged lateral faces while rigid molecules (phytate, polyaspartate) specifically recognized the dominant (010) face of DCPD due to structural and stereochemical compatibility. (2) Effect on phase composition: Anionic surfactants at concentrations above the cmc promoted growth of OCP and COD respectively by selectively adsorbing at, and inhibiting growth oif nuclei of DCPD and/or COM, which were dominant in the respective control systems. The effect was especially pronounced in the calcium oxalate precipitation system, where in some cases complete reversal of the phase composition occurred. The important role of the hydrated layer, as part of the structure of the investigated crystal hydrates, in the above crystal additive interactions is discussed.

  1. Potentiometric anion selective sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonisse, Martijn M.G.; Reinhoudt, David N.

    1999-01-01

    In comparison with selective receptors (and sensors) for cationic species, work on the selective complexation and detection of anions is of more recent date. There are three important components for a sensor, a transducer element, a membrane material that separates the transducer element and the aqu

  2. Hydration number of alkali metal ions determined by insertion in a conducting polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Steen

    2008-01-01

    . The solvation of alkali metal ions has been discussed for many years without a clear consensus. This work presents a systematic study of the hydration numbers of the 5 alkali metal ions, using the electrochemical insertion of the ions in a conducting polymer (polypyrrole containing the large immobile anion DBS...

  3. Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy shows a sparingly hydrated interface and low counterion mobility in triflate micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Filipe S; Chaimovich, Hernan; Cuccovia, Iolanda M; Buchner, Richard

    2013-08-13

    The properties of ionic micelles are affected by the nature of the counterion. Specific ion effects can be dramatic, inducing even shape and phase changes in micellar solutions, transitions apparently related to micellar hydration and counterion binding at the micellar interface. Thus, determining the hydration and dynamics of ions in micellar systems capable of undergoing such transitions is a crucial step in understanding shape and phase changes. For cationic micelles, such transitions are common with large organic anions as counterions. Interestingly, however, phase separation also occurs for dodecyltrimethylammonium triflate (DTATf) micelles in the presence of sodium triflate (NaTf). Specific ion effects for micellar solutions of dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DTAC), bromide (DTAB), methanesulfonate (DTAMs), and triflate (DTATf) were studied with dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS), a technique capable of monitoring hydration and counterion dynamics of micellar aggregates. In comparison to DTAB, DTAC, and DTAMs, DTATf micelles were found to be considerably less hydrated and showed reduced counterion mobility at the micellar interface. The obtained DTATf and DTAMs data support the reported central role of the anion's -CF3 moiety with respect to the properties of DTATf micelles. The reduced hydration observed for DTATf micelles was rationalized in terms of the higher packing of this surfactant compared to that of other DTA-based systems. The decreased mobility of Tf(-) anions condensed at the DTATf interface strongly suggests the insertion of Tf(-) in the micellar interface, which is apparently driven by the strong hydrophobicity of -CF3.

  4. New insights into the synergism of nucleoside analogs with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael W; Parker, William B; Xu, Bo

    2013-09-26

    Nucleoside analogs have been frequently used in combination with radiotherapy in the clinical setting, as it has long been understood that inhibition of DNA repair pathways is an important means by which many nucleoside analogs synergize. Recent advances in our understanding of the structure and function of deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), a critical enzyme required for the anti-tumor activity for many nucleoside analogs, have clarified the mechanistic role this kinase plays in chemo- and radio-sensitization. A heretofore unrecognized role of dCK in the DNA damage response and cell cycle machinery has helped explain the synergistic effect of these agents with radiotherapy. Since most currently employed nucleoside analogs are primarily activated by dCK, these findings lend fresh impetus to efforts focused on profiling and modulating dCK expression and activity in tumors. In this review we will briefly review the pharmacology and biochemistry of the major nucleoside analogs in clinical use that are activated by dCK. This will be followed by discussions of recent advances in our understanding of dCK activation via post-translational modifications in response to radiation and current strategies aimed at enhancing this activity in cancer cells.

  5. Interactions between Hofmeister anions and the binding pocket of a protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jerome M; Kang, Kyungtae; Sherman, Woody; Héroux, Annie; Sastry, G Madhavi; Baghbanzadeh, Mostafa; Lockett, Matthew R; Whitesides, George M

    2015-03-25

    This paper uses the binding pocket of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCAII, EC 4.2.1.1) as a tool to examine the properties of Hofmeister anions that determine (i) where, and how strongly, they associate with concavities on the surfaces of proteins and (ii) how, upon binding, they alter the structure of water within those concavities. Results from X-ray crystallography and isothermal titration calorimetry show that most anions associate with the binding pocket of HCAII by forming inner-sphere ion pairs with the Zn(2+) cofactor. In these ion pairs, the free energy of anion-Zn(2+) association is inversely proportional to the free energetic cost of anion dehydration; this relationship is consistent with the mechanism of ion pair formation suggested by the "law of matching water affinities". Iodide and bromide anions also associate with a hydrophobic declivity in the wall of the binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that anions, upon associating with Zn(2+), trigger rearrangements of water that extend up to 8 Å away from their surfaces. These findings expand the range of interactions previously thought to occur between ions and proteins by suggesting that (i) weakly hydrated anions can bind complementarily shaped hydrophobic declivities, and that (ii) ion-induced rearrangements of water within protein concavities can (in contrast with similar rearrangements in bulk water) extend well beyond the first hydration shells of the ions that trigger them. This study paints a picture of Hofmeister anions as a set of structurally varied ligands that differ in size, shape, and affinity for water and, thus, in their ability to bind to—and to alter the charge and hydration structure of—polar, nonpolar, and topographically complex concavities on the surfaces of proteins.

  6. Modeling Hydrates and the Gas Hydrate Markup Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Wang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates, as an important potential fuels, flow assurance hazards, and possible factors initiating the submarine geo-hazard and global climate change, have attracted the interest of scientists all over the world. After two centuries of hydrate research, a great amount of scientific data on gas hydrates has been accumulated. Therefore the means to manage, share, and exchange these data have become an urgent task. At present, metadata (Markup Language is recognized as one of the most efficient ways to facilitate data management, storage, integration, exchange, discovery and retrieval. Therefore the CODATA Gas Hydrate Data Task Group proposed and specified Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML as an extensible conceptual metadata model to characterize the features of data on gas hydrate. This article introduces the details of modeling portion of GHML.

  7. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  8. A study on gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byoung Jae; Jung, Tae Jin; Sunwoo, Don [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Sufficient documents were reviewed to understand solid components of water and gaseous hydrocarbon known as gas hydrates, which represent an important potential energy resource of the future. The review provides us with valuable information on crystal structures, kinetics, origin and distribution of gas hydrates. In addition, the review increased our knowledge of exploration and development methods of gas hydrates. Large amounts of methane, the principal component of natural gas, in the form of solid gas hydrate are found mainly offshore in outer continental margin sediment and, to a lesser extent, in polar regions commonly associated with permafrost. Natural gas hydrates are stable in some environments where the hydrostatic pressure exerted by overlying water column is sufficient for hydrate formation and stability. The required high pressures generally restrict gas hydrate to sediments beneath water of approximately 400 m. Higher sediment temperatures at greater subbottom depths destabilize gas hydrates. Based on the pressure- temperature condition, the outer continental margin of East Sea where water depth is deep enough to form gas hydrate is considered to have high potential of gas hydrate accumulations. (author). 56 refs., tabs., figs.

  9. Synthesis and Antiviral Activity of 3-Aminoindole Nucleosides of 2-Acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelrahman, Adel A. H.; Elessawy, Farag A.; Barakat, Yousif A. [Menoufia Univ., Shebin El-Koam (Egypt); Ellatif, Mona M. Abd [The British Univ. in Egypt, Cairo (Egypt)

    2012-10-15

    A new method for the construction of 3-aminoindole nucleosides of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose based is presented. Nitration and acetylation of the indole nucleosides by acetic anhydride-nitric acid mixture followed by reduction using silver catalyst (SNSM) impregnated on silica gel, afforded the corresponding amino indole nucleosides. The nucleosides were tested for antiviral activity against hepatitis B virus (HBV) to show different degrees of antiviral activities or inhibitory actions.

  10. Milestones in the discovery of antiviral agents: nucleosides and nucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik de Clercq

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, a number of milestones in the antiviral research field on nucleosides and nucleotides are reviewed in which the author played a significant part, especially in the initial stages of their development. Highlighted are the amino acyl esters of acyclovir, particularly valacyclovir (VACV, brivudin (BVDU and the valine ester of Cf1743 (FV-100, the 2′,3′-dideoxynucleosides (nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, NRTIs, the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (S-HPMPA, (S-HPMPC (cidofovir and alkoxyalkyl esters thereof (HDP-, ODE-CDV, adefovir and adefovir dipivoxil, tenofovir and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF, combinations containing TDF and emtricitabine, i.e., Truvada®, Atripla®, Complera®/Eviplera® and the Quad pill, and the phosphonoamidate derivatives GS-7340, GS-9131, GS-9191 and GS-9219.

  11. Drilling Gas Hydrates on hydrate Ridge, Oregon continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehu, A. M.; Bohrmann, G.; Leg 204 Science Party

    2002-12-01

    During Leg 204, we cored and logged 9 sites on the Oregon continental margin to determine the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates in an accretionary ridge and adjacent slope basin, investigate the mechanisms that transport methane and other gases into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and obtain constraints on physical properties of hydrates in situ. A 3D seismic survey conducted in 2000 provided images of potential subsurface fluid conduits and indicated the position of the GHSZ throughout the survey region. After coring the first site, we acquired Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) data at all but one site to provide an overview of downhole physical properties. The LWD data confirmed the general position of key seismic stratigraphic horizons and yielded an initial estimate of hydrate concentration through the proxy of in situ electrical resistivity. These records proved to be of great value in planning subsequent coring. The second new hydrate proxy to be tested was infrared thermal imaging of cores on the catwalk as rapidly as possible after retrieval. The thermal images were used to identify hydrate samples and to estimate the distribution and texture of hydrate within the cores. Geochemical analyses of interstitial waters and of headspace and void gases provide additional information on the distribution and concentration of hydrate within the stability zone, the origin and pathway of fluids into and through the GHSZ, and the rates at which gas hydrate is forming. Bio- and lithostratigraphic description of cores, measurement of physical properties, and in situ pressure core sampling and thermal measurements complement the data set, providing ground-truth tests of inferred physical and sedimentological properties. Among the most interesting preliminary results are: 1) that gas hydrates are distributed through a broad depth range within the GHSZ and that different physical and chemical proxies for hydrate distribution and concentration give generally

  12. Nucleoside H-boranophosphonates: synthesis and properties of a new class of nucleotide analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashida, Renpei; Kawanaka, Toshihide; Oka, Natsuhisa; Wada, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    Nucleoside H-boranophosphonates were synthesized via the condensation reactions of appropriately protected nucleosides with monopyridinium H-boranophosphonate. The condensation reactions gave only the mono-esterified products under the optimized conditions without formation of di-esterified byproducts. Deprotection of the condensation products was achieved under basic conditions to afford the fully-deprotected nucleoside H-boranophosphonates in excellent yields.

  13. Nucleoside triphosphate synthesis catalysed by adenylate kinase is ADP dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    Adenylate kinase (Adk) that catalyses the synthesis of ADP from ATP and AMP has also been shown to perform an ATP dependent phosphorylation of ribo- and deoxynucleoside diphosphates to their corresponding nucleoside triphosphate; ATP+(d)NDPADP+(d)NTP. This reaction, suggested to occur by the tran......Adenylate kinase (Adk) that catalyses the synthesis of ADP from ATP and AMP has also been shown to perform an ATP dependent phosphorylation of ribo- and deoxynucleoside diphosphates to their corresponding nucleoside triphosphate; ATP+(d)NDPADP+(d)NTP. This reaction, suggested to occur...

  14. Synthesis of Novel 1,3-Dioxolane Nucleoside Analogues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡冬梅; 林昆华; 李明宗; 温集武; 李鸿艳; 尤田耙

    2004-01-01

    Novel 1,3-dioxolane C-nucleoside analogues of tiazofurin 2-(2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl)-1,3-thiazole-4-carboxamide as well as N-nucleoside analogues of substituted imidazoles 1-(2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl)-4-nitroimidazole and 1-(2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl)-4,5-dicyanoimidazole were synthesized frommethyl acrylate through a multistep procedure. Their structures were confirmed by IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectra and elemental analysis.

  15. Enantiomeric Synthesis of Novel Apiosyl Nucleosides as Potential Antiviral Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ai Hong; Hong, Joon Hee [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-15

    A series of 2',3'-dideoxy-3'-fluoro-D-apiosyl nucleosides 15, 16, 17 and 18 were synthesized enantiomerically with L-Gulonic-{gamma}-lactone as the starting material. The reduction of butenolide 1 with DIBAL-H followed by the Luche procedure afforded the allylic alcohol 2. Ozonolysis and the reduction of compound 4 induced the cyclized lactol, which was acetylated to give the acetate 7. Condensation of the acetate 7 with silylated pyrimidine (N{sup 4}-benzoyl cytosine) and a purine base (6-chloropurine) under Vorbruggen conditions and deblocking afforded a series of fluorinated apiosyl nucleosides

  16. Synthesis of some novel hydrazono acyclic nucleoside analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad N. Soltani Rad

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The syntheses of novel hydrazono acyclic nucleosides similar to miconazole scaffolds are described. In this series of acyclic nucleosides, pyrimidine as well as purine and other azole derivatives replaced the imidazole function in miconazole and the ether group was replaced with a hydrazone moiety using phenylhydrazine. To interpret the dominant formation of (E-hydrazone derivatives rather than (Z-isomers, PM3 semiempirical quantum mechanic calculations were carried out which indicated that the (E-isomers had the lower heats of formation.

  17. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  18. Effect of distortion degree on the hydration of red mud base cementitious material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Wen-biao; FENG Xiang-peng; ZHAO Guang-xing

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of Si anions with AI sites during the hydration process was ob-served by NMR,IR and SEM to understand the reaction mechanism of the hydrates for-mation mixed with oil shale calcined at different temperatures.As the reaction progressed,the coordination of AI (Ⅳ,Ⅴ,and Ⅵ) changed almost completely to Ⅳ,when mixed with oil shale calcined at 700 ℃.However,when mixed with oil shale calcined at 400℃,some 6-coordination of AI still remained in the hydrates.Under the function of alkaline solutions,which were produced with the hydration of clinker,a certain amount of Si and AI atoms dissolved or hydrolyzed from aluminosilicate,formed geomonomers in solutions,and then polycondensed to form networks.

  19. Nucleoside triphosphate synthesis catalysed by adenylate kinase is ADP dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoes, Martin; Kilstrup, M.

    2005-01-01

    Adenylate kinase (Adk) that catalyses the synthesis of ADP from ATP and AMP has also been shown to perform an ATP dependent phosphorylation of ribo- and deoxynucleoside diphosphates to their corresponding nucleoside triphosphate; ATP + (d)NDP ¿ ADP + (d)NTP. This reaction, suggested to occur...

  20. [Quantitative analysis of nucleosides in four Cordyceps genus by HPLC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zheng-Ming; Li, Wen-Qing; Wang, Chuan-Xi; Zhou, Miao-Xia; Sun, Min-Tian; Gao, Hao; Li, Wen-Jia

    2016-07-01

    To compare the main nucleosides in Cordyceps genus herbs (C. sinensis, C. millitaris, Hirsutella sinensis and C. sobolifera), an HPLC method for simultaneous determination of uridine, inosine, guanosine, adenosine and cordycepine in Cordyceps genus herbs was developed. The sample was extracted with 0.5% phosphoric acid solution to prepare test solution. The separation was performed on a Zorbax SB-Aq (4.6 mm×150 mm, 5 μm) column with gradient elution by 0.04 mol•L⁻¹ potassium dihydrogen phosphate solution and acetonitrile, column temperature 30 ℃,flow rate 0.8 mL•min⁻¹,and detection wavelength 260 nm. The content of nucleosides in four Cordyceps genus herbs was evaluated by fingerprint analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). The calibration curves of five nucleosides showed good linear regression (r>0.99) and the average recoveries were between 95.0% and 105.0%. The contents of the five nucleosides in the four Cordyceps genus herbs were different and could be obviously distinguished by HCA. The fingerprint analysis result showed that the similarity between C. sinensis and the others was less than 0.9. The method was accurate and reliable, which can be used for quality control of Cordyceps genus herbs. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  1. Deoxyribonucleoside kinases activate nucleoside antibiotics in severely pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Shannon, O.; Clausen, A.R.;

    2007-01-01

    Common bacterial pathogens are becoming progressively more resistant to traditional antibiotics, representing a major public-health crisis. Therefore, there is a need for a variety of antibiotics with alternative modes of action. In our study, several nucleoside analogs were tested against...... alternative for combating pathogenic bacteria....

  2. Synthesis, bioanalysis and pharmacology of nucleoside and nucleotide analogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.S.

    2009-01-01

    Nucleoside analogs are an important class of drugs in anticancer and antiviral therapy. The compounds are, however, only active after intracellular conversion to their mono-, di- and triphosphate nucleotide form. In this thesis the development of sensitive liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mas

  3. Synthesis and Bioactivity of Novel Trisubstituted Triazole Nucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yi-ning; Zhang, Zhi-feng; Liu, Ning-ning; Xiang, Yu-hong; Zhang, Zhuo-yong; Andrei, Graciela; Snoeck, Robert; Schols, Dominique; Zhang, Qing-shan; Wu, Qin-pei

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel trisubstituted 1,2,3-triazole purine nucleosides were efficiently synthesized via Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition in good yields. Bioactivity against cytomegalovirus (CMV) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in human embryonic lung cell cultures was evaluated and all compounds show low antiviral activity.

  4. Synthesis of Peptidomimetic Conjugates of Acyclic Nucleoside Phosphonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpi, Michaela; Zakharova, Valeria M.; Krylov, Ivan S.; McKenna, Charles E.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclic nucleoside phosphonates connected through a P-O-C linkage to a promoiety represent a class of prodrugs designed to overcome the low oral bioavailability of parent antiviral acyclic nucleoside phosphonates. In our prodrug approach, a non-toxic promoiety such as an amino acid or dipeptide is conjugated to the cyclic form of the parent drug by esterification of the phosphonic acid moiety by an alcoholic amino acid side chain (Ser, Tyr, and analogues) or through a glycol linker. For the biological evaluation and investigation of the pharmacokinetic profiles of these modified nucleoside phosphonates, a reliable synthetic procedure that allows preparation of sufficient amount of potential prodrugs is needed. This unit describes a method for generating peptidomimetic conjugates of two potent antiviral acyclic nucleoside phosphonates: 1-[(2S)-3-hydroxy-2-phosphonomethoxypropyl]cytosine ((S)-HPMPC, and 9-[(2S)-3-hydroxy-2-phosphonomethoxypropyl]adenine ((S)-HPMPA). Two alternate strategies allowing synthesizing selected amino acid, dipeptide, or ethylene glycol-linked amino acid prodrugs of (S)-HPMPC and (S)-HPMPA in solution and using a solid-phase approach are presented. PMID:21154529

  5. Hydration and physical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Bob

    2007-10-01

    There is a rich scientific literature regarding hydration status and physical function that began in the late 1800s, although the relationship was likely apparent centuries before that. A decrease in body water from normal levels (often referred to as dehydration or hypohydration) provokes changes in cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, metabolic, and central nervous function that become increasingly greater as dehydration worsens. Similarly, performance impairment often reported with modest dehydration (e.g., -2% body mass) is also exacerbated by greater fluid loss. Dehydration during physical activity in the heat provokes greater performance decrements than similar activity in cooler conditions, a difference thought to be due, at least in part, to greater cardiovascular and thermoregulatory strain associated with heat exposure. There is little doubt that performance during prolonged, continuous exercise in the heat is impaired by levels of dehydration >or= -2% body mass, and there is some evidence that lower levels of dehydration can also impair performance even during relatively short-duration, intermittent exercise. Although additional research is needed to more fully understand low-level dehydration's effects on physical performance, one can generalize that when performance is at stake, it is better to be well-hydrated than dehydrated. This generalization holds true in the occupational, military, and sports settings.

  6. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  7. Some thermodynamical aspects of protein hydration water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallamace, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.mallamace@unime.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Corsaro, Carmelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Mallamace, Domenico [Dipartimento SASTAS, Università di Messina, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Sebastiano [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Cirino [CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Stanley, H. Eugene [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Chen, Sow-Hsin [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    We study by means of nuclear magnetic resonance the self-diffusion of protein hydration water at different hydration levels across a large temperature range that includes the deeply supercooled regime. Starting with a single hydration shell (h = 0.3), we consider different hydrations up to h = 0.65. Our experimental evidence indicates that two phenomena play a significant role in the dynamics of protein hydration water: (i) the measured fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover temperature is unaffected by the hydration level and (ii) the first hydration shell remains liquid at all hydrations, even at the lowest temperature.

  8. Two nucleoside uptake systems in Lactococcus lactis: Competition between purine nucleosides and cytidine allows for modulation of intracellular nucleotide pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Wadskov-Hansen, Steen Lyders Lerche; Hammer, Karin

    2003-01-01

    in Lactococcus lactis were investigated by measuring the uptake of radioactively labeled nucleosides. The K. for for inosine, cytidine, and uridine was determined to be in the micromolar range. Furthermore, it was found that cytidine and inosine are competitive inhibitors of each other, whereas no competition...

  9. Tetrahydrofuran-promoted clathrate hydrate phase equilibria of CO{sub 2} in aqueous electrolyte solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabil, K.M.; Roman, V.R. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Delft (Netherlands). Physical Chemistry and Molecular Thermodynamics; Witkamp, G.J.; Peters, C.J. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Delft, (Netherlands). Laboratory of Process Equipment, Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering

    2008-07-01

    The phase behavior of a system consisting of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) hydrates is of significant importance for many industrial and natural processes. Carbon dioxide and water are part of natural gas streams and they are also found in oil reservoirs during enhanced oil recovery. Formation of hydrate in these cases may cause problems during production and processing. Alternatively, carbon dioxide hydrate formation may be desirable since it can facilitate separation processes, freezing and refrigeration processes and sequestration of CO{sub 2}. The need for phase equilibrium data of systems, particularly electrolyte solutions containing CO{sub 2} are therefore needed. This paper presented a study that attempted to measure the hydrate equilibrium condition for quaternary system consisting of CO{sub 2}, tetrahydrofuran (THF), an electrolyte and water. The purpose of the study was to examine the competing effect of tetrahydrofuran and an electrolyte on the phase behavior of CO{sub 2} hydrates when both were simultaneously present in a system at hydrate forming condition and to compare the effect of different salts inhibition on tetrahydrofuran-promoted CO{sub 2} hydrate. Six different electrolytes were utilized, including sodium chloride, calcium chloride, magnesium chloride, potassium bromide, sodium fluoride and sodium bromide. It was concluded that the inhibiting effect among the cations increased with increasing charge of the cation and its radius. It was also found that the inhibiting effect of the anions decreased with a decrease on their ion radius. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Resonant spectra of quadrupolar anions

    CERN Document Server

    Fossez, K; Nazarewicz, W; Michel, N; Garrett, W R; Płoszajczak, M

    2016-01-01

    In quadrupole-bound anions, an extra electron is attached at a sufficiently large quadrupole moment of a neutral molecule, which is lacking a permanent dipole moment. The nature of the bound states and low-lying resonances of such anions is of interest for understanding the threshold behavior of open quantum systems in general. In this work, we investigate the properties of quadrupolar anions as extreme halo systems, the formation of rotational bands, and the transition from a subcritical to supercritical electric quadrupole moment. We solve the electron-plus-molecule problem using a non-adiabatic coupled-channel formalism by employing the Berggren ensemble, which explicitly contains bound states, narrow resonances, and the scattering continuum. We demonstrate that binding energies and radii of quadrupolar anions strictly follow the scaling laws for two-body halo systems. Contrary to the case of dipolar anions, ground-state band of quadrupolar anions smoothly extend into the continuum, and many rotational ban...

  11. Flow assurance intervention, hydrates remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Christopher S. [Oceaneering International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the issues of removing hydrates in sub sea flow lines and associated equipment with an Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) of opportunity and a multi-service-vessel (MSV). The paper is split into three topics: the equipment used with the ROV, assessing the interface points and handling fluids produced from drawing down the pressure. Each section is explained thoroughly and backed up with real world experience. The equipment section details information from actual jobs performed and why the particular components were utilized. The system is generally contained in an ROV mounted skid. Pumps are utilized to draw down the pressure inside the hydrated section of equipment, removing one of the three necessary components for hydrates formation. Once the section is pumped down, several options exist for handling the fluids pumped out of the system: pumping to surface, re-injection into the well, or injection into an operating flow line. This method of hydrates remediation is both economical and timely. Hydrate blockages form in low temperatures and high pressures. Reducing the pressure or increasing the temperature so the conditions lie to the right of the hydrate dissociation curve will slowly decompose the blockage. Depressurization and the use of MEG or methanol will give favorable conditions to remove the hydrate plug. Oceaneering has the capabilities to remove hydrates using the FRS in conjunction with an installation vessel to dispose of the gas and fluid removed from the flow line. Hydrate remediation techniques should be implemented into the initial design to reduce costs later. The cost of stopped production combined with the day rate for equipment needed for hydrate removal outweighs the costs if no technique is utilized. (author)

  12. Surfactant behavior of "ellipsoidal" dicarbollide anions: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrot, G; Schurhammer, R; Wipff, G

    2006-05-18

    We report a molecular dynamics study of cobalt bis(dicarbollide) anions [(B(9)C(2)H(8)X(3))(2)Co](-) (XCD(-)) commonly used in liquid-liquid extraction (X = H, Me, Cl, or Br), showing that these anions, although lacking the amphiphilic topology, behave as anionic surfactants. In pure water, they display "hydrophobic attractions", leading to the formation of aggregates of different sizes and shapes depending on the counterions. When simulated at a water/"oil" interface, the different anions (HCD(-), MeCD(-), CCD(-), and BrCD(-)) are found to be surface active. As a result, the simulated M(n+) counterions (M(n+) = Na(+), K(+), Cs(+), H(3)O(+), UO(2)(2+), Eu(3+)) concentrate on the aqueous side of the interface, forming a "double layer" whose characteristics are modulated by the hydrophobic character of the anion and by M(n+). The highly hydrophilic Eu(3+) or UO(2)(2+) cations that are generally "repelled" by aqueous interfaces are attracted by dicarbollides near the interface, which is crucial as far as the mechanism of assisted cation extraction to the oil phase is concerned. These cations interact with interfacial XCD(-) in their fully hydrated Eu(H(2)O)(9)(3+) and UO(2)(H(2)O)(5)(2+) forms, whereas the less hydrophilic monocharged cations display intimate contacts via their X substituents. The results obtained with the TIP3P and OPLS models for the solvents are confirmed with other water models (TIP5P or a polarizable 4P-Pol water) and with more polar "oil" models. The importance of interfacial phenomena is further demonstrated by simulations with a high oil-water ratio, leading to the formation of a micelle covered with CCD's. We suggest that the interfacial activity of dicarbollides and related hydrophobic anions is an important feature of synergism in liquid-liquid extraction of hard cations (e.g., for nuclear waste partitioning).

  13. Hydration of the cyanide ion: an ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moin, Syed Tarique; Hofer, Thomas S

    2014-12-21

    This paper presents an ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics simulation study of the cyanide anion (CN(-)) in aqueous solution where hydrogen bond formation plays a dominant role in the hydration process. Preferential orientation of water hydrogens compared to oxygen atoms was quantified in terms of radial, angular as well as coordination number distributions. All structural results indicate that the water hydrogens are attracted towards CN(-) atoms, thus contributing to the formation of the hydration layer. Moreover, a clear picture of the local arrangement of water molecules around the ellipsoidal CN(-) ion is provided via angular-radial distribution and spatial distribution functions. Apart from the structural analysis, the evaluation of water dynamics in terms of ligand mean residence times and H-bond correlation functions indicates the weak structure making capacity of the CN(-) ion. The similar values of H-bond lifetimes obtained for the NHwat and CHwat bonds indicate an isokinetic behaviour of these H-bonds, since there is a very small difference in the magnitude of the lifetimes. On the other hand, the H-bond lifetimes between water molecules of the hydration shell, and between solute and solvent evidence the slightly stable hydration of the CN(-). Overall, the H-bonding dominates in the hydration process of the cyanide anion enabling it to become soluble in the aqueous environment associated to chemical and biological processes.

  14. The SLC28 (CNT) and SLC29 (ENT) nucleoside transporter families: a 30-year collaborative odyssey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, James D

    2016-06-15

    Specialized nucleoside transporter (NT) proteins are required for passage of nucleosides and hydrophilic nucleoside analogues across biological membranes. Physiologic nucleosides serve as central salvage metabolites in nucleotide biosynthesis, and nucleoside analogues are used as chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of cancer and antiviral diseases. The nucleoside adenosine modulates numerous cellular events via purino-receptor cell signalling pathways. Human NTs are divided into two structurally unrelated protein families: the SLC28 concentrative nucleoside transporter (CNT) family and the SLC29 equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) family. Human CNTs are inwardly directed Na(+)-dependent nucleoside transporters found predominantly in intestinal and renal epithelial and other specialized cell types. Human ENTs mediate bidirectional fluxes of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides down their concentration gradients and are ubiquitously found in most, possibly all, cell types. Both protein families are evolutionarily old: CNTs are present in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes; ENTs are widely distributed in mammalian, lower vertebrate and other eukaryote species. This mini-review describes a 30-year collaboration with Professor Stephen Baldwin to identify and understand the structures and functions of these physiologically and clinically important transport proteins.

  15. Anionic surface binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aljaž-Rožič Mateja

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The MELAMIN Chemical Factory in Kočevje manufactures synthetic resins and binders for the paper industry. Binders based on AKD (alkyl ketene dimer are produced which are used for binding paper and cardboard in the range of neutral and partially basic pH. Cationic and, lately, anionic binders are mostly used for the bulk binding of paper and board. The possibility of using AKD binders on paper or board surfaces is presented. In this case partially cationic AKD binders may be applied. When optical whiteners are used, the application of AKD binders is recommended. In the case of paper it is possible to substitute acrylate binders by AKD binders. The best results are obtained when the paper is first partly treated in bulk and subsequently surface treated.

  16. On the freezing behavior and diffusion of water in proximity to single-supported zwitterionic and anionic bilayer lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiec, A.; Buck, Z. N.; Brown, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    We compare the freezing/melting behavior of water hydrating single-supported bilayers of a zwitterionic lipid DMPC with that of an anionic lipid DMPG. For both membranes, the temperature dependence of the elastically scattered neutron intensity indicates distinct water types undergoing translatio...

  17. Hydrates fighting tools; Des outils de lutte contre les hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2003-04-01

    Shell Exploration and Production company (SEPCo) is the operator of the 'Popeye' deep offshore field in the Gulf of Mexico. Thanks to the introduction of a low dosing hydrates inhibitor (LDHI) elaborated by Shell Global Solutions, the company has added a 7.5 Gpc extra volume of gas to its recoverable reserves. This new technology avoids the plugging of pipes by hydrates formation. (J.S.)

  18. A study of the relationship between water and anions of the Hofmeister series using pressure perturbation calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, Jordan W; Falconer, Robert J

    2015-06-07

    Pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC) was used to study the relationship between water and sodium salts with a range of different anions. At temperatures around 25 °C the heat on pressurisation (ΔQ) from 1 to 5 bar was negative for all solutions relative to pure water. The raw data showed that as the temperature rose, the gradient was positive relative to pure water and the transition temperature where ΔQ was zero was related to anion surface charge density and was more pronounced for the low-charge density anions. A three component model was developed comprising bulk water, the hydration layer and the solute to calculate the molar expansivity of the hydration layer around the ions in solution. The calculated molar expansivities of water in the hydration layer around the ions were consistently less than pure water. ΔQ at different disodium hydrogen phosphate concentrations showed that the change in molar enthalpy relative to pure water was not linear even as it approached infinite dilution suggesting that while hydration layers can be allocated to the water around ions this does not rule out interactions between water and ions extending beyond the immediate hydration layer.

  19. Resonant spectra of quadrupolar anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossez, K.; Mao, Xingze; Nazarewicz, W.; Michel, N.; Garrett, W. R.; Płoszajczak, M.

    2016-09-01

    In quadrupole-bound anions, an extra electron is attached at a sufficiently large quadrupole moment of a neutral molecule, which is lacking a permanent dipole moment. The nature of the bound states and low-lying resonances of such anions is of interest for understanding the threshold behavior of open quantum systems in general. In this work, we investigate the properties of quadrupolar anions as halo systems, the formation of rotational bands, and the transition from a subcritical to supercritical electric quadrupole moment. We solve the electron-plus-rotor problem using a nonadiabatic coupled-channel formalism by employing the Berggren ensemble, which explicitly contains bound states, narrow resonances, and the scattering continuum. The rotor is treated as a linear triad of point charges with zero monopole and dipole moments and nonzero quadrupole moment. We demonstrate that binding energies and radii of quadrupolar anions strictly follow the scaling laws for two-body halo systems. Contrary to the case of dipolar anions, ground-state band of quadrupolar anions smoothly extend into the continuum, and many rotational bands could be identified above the detachment threshold. We study the evolution of a bound state of an anion as it dives into the continuum at a critical quadrupole moment and we show that the associated critical exponent is α =2 . Everything considered, quadrupolar anions represent a perfect laboratory for the studies of marginally bound open quantum systems.

  20. Compositions containing nucleosides and manganese and their uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, Michael J.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Levine, Rodney L.; Wehr, Nancy B.

    2015-11-17

    This invention encompasses methods of preserving protein function by contacting a protein with a composition comprising one or more purine or pyrimidine nucleosides (such as e.g., adenosine or uridine) and an antioxidant (such as e.g., manganese). In addition, the invention encompasses methods of treating and/or preventing a side effect of radiation exposure and methods of preventing a side effect of radiotherapy comprising administration of a pharmaceutically effective amount of a composition comprising one or more purine or pyrimidine nucleosides (such as e.g., adenosine or uridine) and an antioxidant (such as e.g., manganese) to a subject in need thereof. The compositions may comprise D. radiodurans extracts.

  1. Mildiomycin: a nucleoside antibiotic that inhibits protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduchi, E; Cosín, M; Carrasco, L

    1985-03-01

    Mildiomycin, a new nucleoside antibiotic, selectively inhibits protein synthesis in HeLa cells, and is less active in the inhibition of RNA or DNA synthesis. An increased inhibition of translation by mildiomycin is observed in cultured HeLa cells when they are permeabilized by encephalomyocarditis virus. This observation suggests that this antibiotic does not easily pass through the cell membrane, as occurs with other nucleoside and aminoglycoside antibiotics. The inhibition of translation is also observed in cell-free systems, such as endogenous protein synthesis in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate or the synthesis of polyphenylalanine directed by poly (U). Finally the mode of action of mildiomycin was investigated and the results suggest that the compound blocks the peptidyl-transferase center.

  2. Modified Nucleoside Triphosphates for in-vitro Selection Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribarren, Adolfo; Dellafiore, María; Montserrat, Javier

    2016-05-01

    The development of SELEX (Selective Enhancement of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) provides a powerful tool for the search of functional oligonucleotides with the ability to bind ligands with high affinity and selectivity (aptamers) and for the discovery of nucleic acid sequences with diverse enzymatic activities (ribozymes and DNAzymes). This technique has been extensively applied to the selection of natural DNA or RNA molecules but, in order to improve chemical and structural diversity as well as for particular applications where further chemical or biological stability is necessary, the extension of this strategy to modified oligonucleotides is desirable. Taking into account these needs, this review intends to collect the research carried out during the past years, focusing mainly on the use of modified nucleotides in SELEX and the development of mutant enzymes for broadening nucleoside triphosphates acceptance. In addition, comments regarding the synthesis of modified nucleoside triphosphate will be briefly discussed.

  3. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency in two unrelated Saudi patients

    OpenAIRE

    Alangari, Abdullah; Al-Harbi, Abdullah; Al-Ghonaium, Abdulaziz; Santisteban, Ines; Hershfield, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disorder that results in combined immunodeficiency, neurologic dysfunction and autoimmunity. PNP deficiency has never been reported from Saudi Arabia or in patients with an Arabic ethnic background. We report on two Saudi girls with PNP deficiency. Both showed severe lymphopenia and neurological involvement. Sequencing of the PNP gene of one girl revealed a novel missense mutation Pro146>Leu in exon 4 due...

  4. Evaluation of anti-HIV-1 mutagenic nucleoside analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivet-Boudou, Valérie; Isel, Catherine; El Safadi, Yazan; Smyth, Redmond P; Laumond, Géraldine; Moog, Christiane; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2015-01-02

    Because of their high mutation rates, RNA viruses and retroviruses replicate close to the threshold of viability. Their existence as quasi-species has pioneered the concept of "lethal mutagenesis" that prompted us to synthesize pyrimidine nucleoside analogues with antiviral activity in cell culture consistent with an accumulation of deleterious mutations in the HIV-1 genome. However, testing all potentially mutagenic compounds in cell-based assays is tedious and costly. Here, we describe two simple in vitro biophysical/biochemical assays that allow prediction of the mutagenic potential of deoxyribonucleoside analogues. The first assay compares the thermal stabilities of matched and mismatched base pairs in DNA duplexes containing or not the nucleoside analogues as follows. A promising candidate should display a small destabilization of the matched base pair compared with the natural nucleoside and the smallest gap possible between the stabilities of the matched and mismatched base pairs. From this assay, we predicted that two of our compounds, 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine, should be mutagenic. The second in vitro reverse transcription assay assesses DNA synthesis opposite nucleoside analogues inserted into a template strand and subsequent extension of the newly synthesized base pairs. Once again, only 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine are predicted to be efficient mutagens. The predictive potential of our fast and easy first line screens was confirmed by detailed analysis of the mutation spectrum induced by the compounds in cell culture because only compounds 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine and 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine were found to increase the mutation frequency by 3.1- and 3.4-fold, respectively.

  5. Obsidian Hydration: A New Paleothermometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Riciputi, Lee R [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Fayek, Mostafa [ORNL; Elam, J. Michael [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2006-01-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  6. Obsidian hydration: A new paleothermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Riciputi, Lee R.; Cole, David R.; Fayek, Mostafa; Elam, J. Michael

    2006-07-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  7. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  8. Nucleobase and nucleoside transport and integration into plant metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher eGirke

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide metabolism is an essential process in all living organisms. Besides newly synthesized nucleotides, the recycling (salvage of partially degraded nucleotides i.e. nucleosides and nucleobases serves to keep the homeostasis of the nucleotide pool. Both types of metabolites are substrates of at least six families of transport proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis with a total of 49 members. In the last years several members of such transport proteins have been analyzed allowing to present a more detailed picture of nucleoside and nucleobase transport and the physiological function of these processes. Besides functioning in nucleotide metabolism it turned out that individual members of the before named transporters exhibit the capacity to transport a wide range of different substrates including vitamins and phytohormones. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on nucleobase and nucleoside transport processes in plants and integrate this into nucleotide metabolism in general. Thereby, we will focus on those proteins which have been characterized at the biochemical level.

  9. Nucleobase and nucleoside transport and integration into plant metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girke, Christopher; Daumann, Manuel; Niopek-Witz, Sandra; Möhlmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotide metabolism is an essential process in all living organisms. Besides newly synthesized nucleotides, the recycling (salvage) of partially degraded nucleotides, i.e., nucleosides and nucleobases serves to keep the homeostasis of the nucleotide pool. Both types of metabolites are substrates of at least six families of transport proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) with a total of 49 members. In the last years several members of such transport proteins have been analyzed allowing to present a more detailed picture of nucleoside and nucleobase transport and the physiological function of these processes. Besides functioning in nucleotide metabolism it turned out that individual members of the before named transporters exhibit the capacity to transport a wide range of different substrates including vitamins and phytohormones. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on nucleobase and nucleoside transport processes in plants and integrate this into nucleotide metabolism in general. Thereby, we will focus on those proteins which have been characterized at the biochemical level.

  10. Storing natural gas as frozen hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudmundsson, J.S.; Khokhar, A.A. (Univ. of Trondheim (Norway)); Parlaktuna, M. (Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey))

    1994-02-01

    The formation of natural gas hydrates is a well-known problem in the petroleum and natural gas industries. Hydrates are solid materials that form when liquid water and natural gas are brought in contact under pressure. Hydrate formation need not be a problem. On the contrary, it can be an advantage. The volume of hydrates is much less than that of natural gas. At standard conditions, hydrates occupy 150 to 170 times less volume than the corresponding gas. Typically, natural gas hydrates contain 15% gas and 85% water by mass. It follows that hydrates can be used for large-scale storage of natural gas. Benesh proposed using hydrates to improve the load factor of natural gas supply systems. The author suggested that hydrates could be produced by bringing liquid water into contact with natural gas at the appropriate temperature and high pressure. The hydrate then would be stored at a temperature and pressure where it was stable. When gas was needed for the supply system, the hydrate would be melted at low pressure. The stability of a natural gas hydrate during storage at atmospheric pressure and below-freezing temperatures was studied in the laboratory. The gas hydrate was produced in a stirred vessel at 2- to 6-MPa pressure and temperatures from 0 to 20 C. The hydrate was refrigerated and stored in deep freezers at [minus]5, [minus]10, and [minus]18 C for up to 10 days. The natural gas hydrate remained stable when kept frozen at atmospheric pressure.

  11. Airway Hydration and COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arunava; Boucher, R.C.; Tarran, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the prevalent causes of worldwide mortality and encompasses two major clinical phenotypes, i.e., chronic bronchitis (CB) and emphysema. The most common cause of COPD is chronic tobacco inhalation. Research focused on the chronic bronchitic phenotype of COPD has identified several pathological processes that drive disease initiation and progression. For example, the lung’s mucociliary clearance (MCC) system performs the critical task of clearing inhaled pathogens and toxic materials from the lung. MCC efficiency is dependent on: (i) the ability of apical plasma membrane ion channels such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) to maintain airway hydration; (ii) ciliary beating; and, (iii) appropriate rates of mucin secretion. Each of these components is impaired in CB and likely contributes to the mucus stasis/accumulation seen in CB patients. This review highlights the cellular components responsible for maintaining MCC and how this process is disrupted following tobacco exposure and with CB. We shall also discuss existing therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic bronchitis and how components of the MCC can be used as biomarkers for the evaluation of tobacco or tobacco-like-product exposure. PMID:26068443

  12. Mechanism of gypsum hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco, G.

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an hypothesis that the mechanism o f gypsum hydration and dehydration is performed through two simultaneous phenomena. In this study we try to clear up this phenomenon using chlorides as accelerators or a mixture of ethanol-methanol as retarders to carry out the gypsum setting. Natural Mexican gypsum samples and a hemihydrate prepared in the laboratory are used. The following analytical techniques are used: MO, DRX, DTA, TG and DTG. In agreement with the obtained results, it can be concluded: that colloid formation depends on the action of accelerators or retarders and the crystals are a consequence of the quantity of hemihydrate formed.

    En el mecanismo de hidratación y deshidratación del yeso existe la hipótesis de que éste se efectúa por dos fenómenos simultáneos. Este estudio intenta esclarecer estos fenómenos, empleando: cloruros como aceleradores o mezcla etanol-metanol como retardadores para efectuar el fraguado del yeso. Se emplean muestras de yeso de origen natural mexicano y hemihydrate preparado en laboratorio; se utilizan técnicas analíticas: MO, DRX, DTA, TG y DTG. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos se puede deducir: que la formación del coloide depende de la acción de los agentes aceleradores o retardadores y que los cristales son consecuencia de la cantidad de hemihidrato formado.

  13. Phosphazene-promoted anionic polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Junpeng

    2014-01-01

    In the recent surge of metal-free polymerization techniques, phosphazene bases have shown their remarkable potential as organic promoters/catalysts for the anionic polymerization of various types of monomers. By complexation with the counterion (e.g. proton or lithium cation), phosphazene base significantly improve the nucleophilicity of the initiator/chain-end resulting in rapid and usually controlled anionic/quasi-anionic polymerization. In this review, we will introduce the general mechanism, i.e. in situ activation (of initiating sites) and polymerization, and summarize the applications of such a mechanism on macromolecular engineering toward functionalized polymers, block copolymers and complex macromolecular architectures.

  14. Gauthierite, KPb[(UO{sub 2}){sub 7}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 7}].8H{sub 2}O, a new uranyl-oxide hydroxy-hydrate mineral from Shinkolobwe with a novel uranyl-anion sheet-topology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olds, Travis A. [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences; Plasil, Jakub [ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. of Physics; Kampf, Anthony R. [Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Mineral Sciences Dept.; Skoda, Radek [Masaryk Univ., Brno (Czech Republic). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Burns, Peter C. [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences; Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry,; Cejka, Jiri [National Museum, Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Mineralogy and Petrology; Bourgoin, Vincent; Boulliard, Jean-Claude [Pierre et Marie Curie Univ., Paris (France). Association Jean Wyart, Collection des Mineraux de Jussieu

    2017-03-15

    Gauthierite, KPb[(UO{sub 2}){sub 7}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 7}].8H{sub 2}O, is a new uranyl-oxide hydroxy-hydrate mineral from the Shinkolobwe Mine, Democratic Republic of Congo, Africa. It occurs on a matrix of uraninite-bearing quartz gangue associated with soddyite and a minor metazeunerite.metatorbernite series mineral. It is a product of oxidation.hydration weathering of uraninite. Gauthierite is monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/c, with a = 29.844(2) Aa, b = 14.5368(8) Aa, c = 14.0406(7) Aa, β = 103.708(6) , V = 5917.8(6)Aa{sup 3} and Z = 8. Prismatic crystals have pronounced lengthwise striations and reach about 1mm in length. Gauthierite is yellowish orange with a light orange streak and vitreous lustre. The Mohs hardness is ∝ 3 to 4. It is brittle with an uneven fracture and perfect cleavage on {0 1 0}. The calculated density based on the empirical formula is 5.437 g/cm{sup 3}. Optically, gauthierite is biaxial (-), with α = 1.780(5), β = 1.815(5), γ = 1.825(5) (white light), 2V{sub meas.} = 58(1) ; dispersion is extreme (r>>v). The optical orientation is X = b, Y∼a{sup *}, Z∼c (or X = b, Y and a=14 in obtuse β); it is pleochroic with X very pale yellow, Y and Z orange-yellow; X<

  15. Tetrahydrofuran hydrate decomposition characteristics in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongchen; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Shenglong; Zhao, Jiafei; Yang, Mingjun

    2016-12-01

    Many tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate properties are similar to those of gas hydrates. In the present work THF hydrate dissociation in four types of porous media is studied. THF solution was cooled to 275.15 K with formation of the hydrate under ambient pressure, and then it dissociated under ambient conditions. THF hydrate dissociation experiments in each porous medium were conducted three times. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to obtain images. Decomposition time, THF hydrate saturation and MRI mean intensity (MI) were measured and analyzed. The experimental results showed that the hydrate decomposition time in BZ-4 and BZ-3 was similar and longer than that in BZ-02. In each dissociation process, the hydrate decomposition time of the second and third cycles was shorter than that of the first cycle in BZ-4, BZ-3, and BZ-02. The relationship between THF hydrate saturation and time is almost linear.

  16. Pentaarylfullerenes as noncoordinating cyclopentadienyl anions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwkamp, Marco W.; Meetsma, Auke

    2009-01-01

    The first example of an early-transition-metal complex involving a pentaarylfullerene was prepared. Instead of half-sandwich complexes, solvent separated ion pairs were obtained in which the pentaarylfullerene moiety acts as noncoordinating cyclopentadienyl anion.

  17. Hydration energies of deprotonated amino acids from gas phase equilibria measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincel, Henryk

    2008-08-01

    Singly hydrated clusters of deprotonated amino acids were studied using an electrospray high-pressure mass spectrometer equipped with a pulsed ion-beam reaction chamber. Thermochemical data, DeltaH(o), DeltaS(o), and DeltaG(o), for the hydration reaction [AA - H](-) + H(2)O = [AA - H](-).(H(2)O) were obtained from gas-phase equilibria determinations for AA = Gly, Ala, Val, Pro, Phe, Lys, Met, Trp, Gln, Arg, and Asp. The hydration free-energy changes are found to depend significantly on the side-chain substituents. The water binding energy in [AA - H](-).(H(2)O) increases with the gas-phase acidity of AA. The anionic hydrogen bond strengths in [AA - H](-).(H(2)O) are compared with those of the cationic bonds in the corresponding AAH(+).(H(2)O) systems.

  18. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.;

    1999-01-01

    Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations...... and experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6...

  19. Progress of Gas Hydrate Studies in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊栓狮; 汪集旸

    2006-01-01

    A brief overview is given on the gas hydrate-related research activities carried out by Chinese researchers in the past 15 years. The content involves: (1) Historical review. Introducing the gas hydrate research history in China; (2) Gas hydrate research groups in China. There are nearly 20 groups engaged in gas hydrate research now; (3) Present studies.Including fundamental studies, status of the exploration of natural gas hydrate resources in the South China Sea region, and development of hydrate-based new techniques; (4) Future development.

  20. Hydration of fly ash cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etsuo Sakai; Shigeyoshi Miyahara; Shigenari Ohsawa; Seung-Heun Lee; Masaki Daimon [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Graduate School of Science and Engineering

    2005-06-01

    It is necessary to establish the material design system for the utilization of large amounts of fly ash as blended cement instead of disposing of it as a waste. Cement blended with fly ash is also required as a countermeasure to reduce the amount of CO{sub 2} generation. In this study, the influences of the glass content and the basicity of glass phase on the hydration of fly ash cement were clarified and hydration over a long curing time was characterized. Two kinds of fly ash with different glass content, one with 38.2% and another with 76.6%, were used. The hydration ratio of fly ash was increased by increasing the glass content in fly ash in the specimens cured for 270 days. When the glass content of fly ash is low, the basicity of glass phase tends to decrease. Reactivity of fly ash is controlled by the basicity of the glass phase in fly ash during a period from 28 to 270 days. However, at an age of 360 days, the reaction ratios of fly ash show almost identical values with different glass contents. Fly ash also affected the hydration of cement clinker minerals in fly ash cement. While the hydration of alite was accelerated, that of belite was retarded at a late stage.

  1. Two purine nucleoside phosphorylases in Bacillus subtilis. Purification and some properties of the adenosine-specific phosphorylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1978-01-01

    Two purine nucleoside phosphorylases (purine-nucleoside:orthophosphate ribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.1) were purified from vegetative Bacillus subtilis cells. One enzyme, inosine-guanosine phosphorylase, showed great similarity to the homologous enzyme of Bacillus cereus. It appeared...

  2. Comparison of stromal hydration techniques for clear corneal cataract incisions: conventional hydration versus anterior stromal pocket hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifflin, Mark D; Kinard, Krista; Neuffer, Marcus C

    2012-06-01

    Anterior stromal pocket hydration was compared with conventional hydration for preventing wound leak after 2.8 mm uniplanar clear corneal incisions (CCIs) in patients having routine cataract surgery. Conventional hydration involves hydration of the lateral walls of the main incision with visible whitening of the stroma. The anterior stromal pocket hydration technique involves creation of an additional supraincisional stromal pocket overlying the main incision, which is then hydrated instead of the main incision. Sixty-six eyes of 48 patients were included in the data analysis with 33 assigned to each study group. The anterior stromal pocket hydration technique was significantly better than conventional hydration in preventing wound leak due to direct pressure on the posterior lip of the incision. Copyright © 2012 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Carboranyl Nucleosides & Oligonucleotides for Neutron Capture Therapy Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schinazi, Raymond F.

    2004-12-01

    This proposal enabled us to synthesize and develop boron-rich nucleosides and oligonucleotide analogues for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and the treatment of various malignancies. First, we determined the relationship between structure, cellular accumulation and tissue distribution of 5-o-carboranyl-2'-deoxyuridine (D-CDU) and its derivatives D-ribo-CU and 5-o-carboranyluracil (CU), to potentially target brain and other solid tumors for neutron capture therapy. Synthesized carborane containing nucleoside derivatives of CDU, D- and L-enantiomers of CDU, D-ribo-CU and CU were used. We measured tissue disposition in xenografted mice bearing 9479 human prostate tumors xenografts and in rats bearing 9L gliosarcoma isografts in their flanks and intracranially. The accumulation of D-CDU, 1-({beta}-L-arabinosyl)-5-o-carboranyluracil, D-ribo-CU, and CU were also studied in LnCap human prostate tumor cells and their retention was measured in male nude mice bearing LnCap and 9479 human prostate tumor xenografts. D-CDU, D-ribo-CU and CU levels were measured after administration in mice bearing 9479 human prostate tumors in their flanks. D-CDU achieved high cellular concentrations in LnCap cells and up to 2.5% of the total cellular compound was recovered in the 5'-monophosphorylated form. D-CDU cellular concentrations were similar in LnCap and 9479 tumor xenografts. Studies in tumor bearing animals indicated that increasing the number of hydroxyl moieties in the sugar constituent of the carboranyl nucleosides lead to increased rate and extent of renal elimination, a decrease in serum half-lives and an increased tissue specificity. Tumor/brain ratios were greatest for CDU and D-ribo-CU, while tumor/prostate ratios were greatest with CU. CDU and D-ribo-CU have potential for BNCT of brain malignancies, while CU may be further developed for prostate cancer. A method was developed for the solid phase synthesis of oligonucleotides containing (ocarboran-1-yl

  4. Gas hydrates forming and decomposition conditions analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Павленко

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of gas hydrates has been defined; their brief description has been given; factors that affect the formation and decomposition of the hydrates have been reported; their distribution, structure and thermodynamic conditions determining the gas hydrates formation disposition in gas pipelines have been considered. Advantages and disadvantages of the known methods for removing gas hydrate plugs in the pipeline have been analyzed, the necessity of their further studies has been proved. In addition to the negative impact on the process of gas extraction, the hydrates properties make it possible to outline the following possible fields of their industrial use: obtaining ultrahigh pressures in confined spaces at the hydrate decomposition; separating hydrocarbon mixtures by successive transfer of individual components through the hydrate given the mode; obtaining cold due to heat absorption at the hydrate decomposition; elimination of the open gas fountain by means of hydrate plugs in the bore hole of the gushing gasser; seawater desalination, based on the hydrate ability to only bind water molecules into the solid state; wastewater purification; gas storage in the hydrate state; dispersion of high temperature fog and clouds by means of hydrates; water-hydrates emulsion injection into the productive strata to raise the oil recovery factor; obtaining cold in the gas processing to cool the gas, etc.

  5. Nucleoside Inhibitors of Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyer, Luděk; Valdés, James J.; Gil, Victor A.; Nencka, Radim; Hřebabecký, Hubert; Šála, Michal; Salát, Jiří; Černý, Jiří; Palus, Martin; De Clercq, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is a leading cause of human neuroinfections in Europe and Northeast Asia. There are no antiviral therapies for treating TBEV infection. A series of nucleoside analogues was tested for the ability to inhibit the replication of TBEV in porcine kidney cells and human neuroblastoma cells. The interactions of three nucleoside analogues with viral polymerase were simulated using advanced computational methods. The nucleoside analogues 7-deaza-2′-C-methyladenosine (7-deaza-2′-CMA), 2′-C-methyladenosine (2′-CMA), and 2′-C-methylcytidine (2′-CMC) inhibited TBEV replication. These compounds showed dose-dependent inhibition of TBEV-induced cytopathic effects, TBEV replication (50% effective concentrations [EC50]of 5.1 ± 0.4 μM for 7-deaza-2′-CMA, 7.1 ± 1.2 μM for 2′-CMA, and 14.2 ± 1.9 μM for 2′-CMC) and viral antigen production. Notably, 2′-CMC was relatively cytotoxic to porcine kidney cells (50% cytotoxic concentration [CC50] of ∼50 μM). The anti-TBEV effect of 2′-CMA in cell culture diminished gradually after day 3 posttreatment. 7-Deaza-2′-CMA showed no detectable cellular toxicity (CC50 > 50 μM), and the antiviral effect in culture was stable for >6 days posttreatment. Computational molecular analyses revealed that compared to the other two compounds, 7-deaza-2′-CMA formed a large cluster near the active site of the TBEV polymerase. High antiviral activity and low cytotoxicity suggest that 7-deaza-2′-CMA is a promising candidate for further investigation as a potential therapeutic agent in treating TBEV infection. PMID:26124166

  6. Bound anionic states of adenine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-03-20

    Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases, are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the new-found anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of: (i) a new experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a new combinatorial/ quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules. The computational portion of this work was supported by the: (i) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grants: DS/8000-4-0140-7 (M.G.) and N204 127 31/2963 (M.H.), (ii) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.), and (iii) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic

  7. Anion exchange polymer electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu Seung; Kim, Dae Sik; Lee, Kwan-Soo

    2013-07-23

    Solid anion exchange polymer electrolytes and compositions comprising chemical compounds comprising a polymeric core, a spacer A, and a guanidine base, wherein said chemical compound is uniformly dispersed in a suitable solvent and has the structure: ##STR00001## wherein: i) A is a spacer having the structure O, S, SO.sub.2, --NH--, --N(CH.sub.2).sub.n, wherein n=1-10, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH.sub.3--, wherein n=1-10, SO.sub.2-Ph, CO-Ph, ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.5, R.sub.6, R.sub.7 and R.sub.8 each are independently --H, --NH.sub.2, F, Cl, Br, CN, or a C.sub.1-C.sub.6 alkyl group, or any combination of thereof; ii) R.sub.9, R.sub.10, R.sub.11, R.sub.12, or R.sub.13 each independently are --H, --CH.sub.3, --NH.sub.2, --NO, --CH.sub.nCH.sub.3 where n=1-6, HC.dbd.O--, NH.sub.2C.dbd.O--, --CH.sub.nCOOH where n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--C(NH.sub.2)--COOH where n=1-6, --CH--(COOH)--CH.sub.2--COOH, --CH.sub.2--CH(O--CH.sub.2CH.sub.3).sub.2, --(C.dbd.S)--NH.sub.2, --(C.dbd.NH)--N--(CH.sub.2).sub.nCH.sub.3, where n=0-6, --NH--(C.dbd.S)--SH, --CH.sub.2--(C.dbd.O)--O--C(CH.sub.3).sub.3, --O--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH--(NH.sub.2)--COOH, where n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH.dbd.CH wherein n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH--CN wherein n=1-6, an aromatic group such as a phenyl, benzyl, phenoxy, methylbenzyl, nitrogen-substituted benzyl or phenyl groups, a halide, or halide-substituted methyl groups; and iii) wherein the composition is suitable for use in a membrane electrode assembly.

  8. Novel inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth based on modified pyrimidine nucleosides and their analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmalenyuk, E. R.; Kochetkov, S. N.; Alexandrova, L. A.

    2013-09-01

    The review summarizes data on the synthesis and antituberculosis activity of pyrimidine nucleoside derivatives and their analogues. Enzymes from M. tuberculosis as promising targets for prototypes of new-generation drugs are considered. Nucleosides as inhibitors of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains are characterized. The bibliography includes 101 references.

  9. Synthesis of Antiviral Acyclic C-nucleosides Incorporating 4-Thiazolinones Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yan; CAO Ling-Hua

    2003-01-01

    @@ Carbohydrates are useful molecules to creatures. They take part in life processes in different ways. [ 1] C-nucleo sides are well known nucleoside analogues. A number of nucleoside analogues have been found to show a broad spectrum of biological activity, some of posses important anticancer and antiviral activities. [2

  10. Syntheses of Nucleoside Derivatives Containing Fmoc- or Trityl-protected Amino Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Hui; ZOU Wu-xin; JI Qi; MA Yu-xin; MENG Ji-ben

    2005-01-01

    Facile direct esterification reactions between 2′,3′-O-isopropylidene-nucleosides and Fmoc- or trityl-protected amino acids via N,N-dicyclohexyl-carbodiimide(DCC) mediated condensation are described. These reactions offer a mild and convenient method to synthesize aminoacylated nucleoside derivatives.

  11. A procedure for the preparation and isolation of nucleoside-5’-diphosphates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi J. Korhonen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tris[bis(triphenylphosphoranylideneammonium] pyrophosphate (PPN pyrophosphate was used in the SN2 displacements of the tosylate ion from 5’-tosylnucleosides to afford nucleoside-5’-diphosphates. Selective precipitation permitted the direct isolation of nucleoside-5’-diphosphates from crude reaction mixtures.

  12. Nucleoside H-boranophosphonates: a new class of boron-containing nucleotide analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashida, Renpei; Oka, Natsuhisa; Kawanaka, Toshihide; Wada, Takeshi

    2009-05-14

    A study on the synthesis of nucleoside H-boranophosphonates, a new class of nucleotide analogues having a P-->BH(3) and a P-H group, via condensation of the corresponding nucleosides with H-boranophosphonate derivatives is described.

  13. Chemical and isotopic characteristics of gas hydrate- and pore-water samples obtained from gas hydrate-bearing sediment cores retrieved from a mud volcano in the Kukuy Canyon, Lake Baikal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, H.; Hachikubo, A.; Krylov, A.; Sakagami, H.; Ohashi, M.; Bai, J.; Kataoka, S.; Yamashita, S.; Takahashi, N.; Shoji, H. [Kitami Inst. of Technology, Kitami (Japan); Khlystov, O.; Zemskaya, T.; Grachev, M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Irkutsk (Russian Federation). Limnological Inst.

    2008-07-01

    This paper provided details of a method developed to obtain gas hydrate water samples from a mud volcano in Lake Baikal, Russia. Chemical and isotopic analyses were conducted to examine the hydrate and pore water samples as well as to evaluate the original water involved in shallow gas hydrate accumulations in the region. Lake sediment core samples were retrieved from the bottom of the lake with gravity corers. A squeezer was used to take pore water samples from the sediments. Hydrate samples were taken from a gas hydrate placed on a polyethylene funnel. Dissolved hydrate water was filtered through a membrane into bottles. Both samples were kept under chilled or liquid nitrogen temperatures. Ion chromatography was used to determine concentrations of anions and hydrogen carbonate ions. Sodium and magnesium concentrations were determined using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. An absorption spectrometer was used to determine potassium and calcium concentrations, and a mass spectrometer was used to analyze stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen. Results of the study suggested that the gas dissolved in pore water and adsorbed on the surfaces of sediment particles was not the original gas from the hydrates retrieved at the mud volcano. Original gas hydrate-forming fluids were chemically different from the pore- and lake-water samples. The oxygen isotopic composition of the gas hydrate water samples correlated well with hydrogen values. It was concluded that ascending fluid and water delivered the gas into the gas stability zone, and is the main gas hydrate-forming fluid in the area of study. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  14. The structure of the hydrated electron in bulk and at interfaces: Does the hydrated electron occupy a cavity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Jennifer Ryan

    Since its discovery over fifty years ago, the hydrated electron has been the subject of much interest. Hydrated electrons, which are free electrons in water, are found in fields ranging from biochemistry to radiation chemistry, so it is important that we understand the structure and dynamics of this species. Because of its high reactivity, the hydrated electron's structure has proven difficult to pin down, especially its molecular details. One-electron mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations have proven useful in helping elucidate the structure of the hydrated electron. The picture most commonly presented from these studies is one of the electron residing in a cavity, disrupting the local water structure much like an anion the size of bromide. Our group has recently proposed a completely different structure for the hydrated electron, which arose from rigorous calculations of a new electron-water potential. The picture that emerged was of an electron that does not occupy a cavity but instead draws water within itself; this non-cavity electron resides in a region of enhanced water density. The one-electron cavity and non-cavity models all predict similar experimental observables that probe the electronic structure of the hydrated electron, such as the optical absorption spectrum, which makes it difficult to determine which model most accurately describes the true structure of the hydrated electron. In this thesis, we work to calculate experimental observables for various simulated cavity and non-cavity models that are particularly sensitive to the local water structure near the electron, in an effort to distinguish the various models from each other. Two particular observables we are interested in are the resonance Raman spectrum and the temperature dependent optical absorption spectrum of the hydrated electron. We find that for both of these experiments, only the non-cavity model has qualitative agreement with experiment; the cavity models miss the

  15. Great Market Potential of Hydrazine Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Yuying

    2007-01-01

    @@ Stable consumption growth worldwide Hydrazine hydrate is an organic chemical raw material with extensive applications. The world's capacity to produce hydrazine hydrate has reached more than 200 thousand t/atoday (based on 100% hydrazine content).

  16. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  17. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lina

    2017-05-13

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10 was conducted for tricalcium silicate (C3S) to interpret long-term hydration process and investigate the formation, structure and properties of C-S-H. Based on results from XRD, IR, SEM, NMR and so forth, loose and dense clusters of C-S-H with analogous C/S ratio were obtained along with the corresponding chemical formulae proposed as Ca5Si4O13∙6.2H2O. Crystalline structure inside C-S-H was observed by TEM, which was allocated at the foil-like proportion as well as the edge of wrinkles of the product. The long-term hydration process of C3S in dilute suspension could be sketchily described as migration of calcium hydroxide and in-situ growth of C-S-H with equilibrium silicon in aqueous solution relatively constant and calcium varied.

  18. Amide-based Fluorescent Macrocyclic Anion Receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG, Zhen-Ya(曾振亚); XU, Kuo-Xi(徐括喜); HE, Yong-Bing(何永炳); LIU, Shun-Ying(刘顺英); WU, Jin-Long(吴进龙); WEI, Lan-Hua(隗兰华); MENG, Ling-Zhi(孟令芝)

    2004-01-01

    Two fluorescent anion receptors (1 and 2) based on amide macrocycle were synthesized and corresponding fluorescence quenching induced by anion complexation was observed in different degree. Receptors form 1: 1 complexes with anions by hydrogen bonding interactions. Receptor 1 bound anions in the order of F->Cl->H2PO4->CH3COO->>Br-, I- and receptor 2 showed high selectivity to F- over other anions.

  19. A high-yielding, strictly regioselective prebiotic purine nucleoside formation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Sidney; Thoma, Ines; Deutsch, Amrei; Gehrke, Tim; Mayer, Peter; Zipse, Hendrik; Carell, Thomas

    2016-05-13

    The origin of life is believed to have started with prebiotic molecules reacting along unidentified pathways to produce key molecules such as nucleosides. To date, a single prebiotic pathway to purine nucleosides had been proposed. It is considered to be inefficient due to missing regioselectivity and low yields. We report that the condensation of formamidopyrimidines (FaPys) with sugars provides the natural N-9 nucleosides with extreme regioselectivity and in good yields (60%). The FaPys are available from formic acid and aminopyrimidines, which are in turn available from prebiotic molecules that were also detected during the Rosetta comet mission. This nucleoside formation pathway can be fused to sugar-forming reactions to produce pentosides, providing a plausible scenario of how purine nucleosides may have formed under prebiotic conditions.

  20. Nicotinamide riboside, an unusual, non-typical, substrate of purified purine-nucleoside phosphorylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielgus-Kutrowska, B; Kulikowska, E; Wierzchowski, J; Bzowska, A; Shugar, D

    1997-01-15

    Nicotinamide 1-beta-D-riboside (Nir), the cationic, reducible moiety of the coenzyme NAD+, has been confirmed as an unusual substrate for purified purine-nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) from a mammalian source (calf spleen). It is also a substrate of the enzyme from Escherichia coli. The Km values at pH 7, 1.48 mM and 0.62 mM, respectively, were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than for the natural substrate inosine, but the Vmax values were comparable, 96% and 35% that for Ino. The pseudo first-order rate constants, Vmax/Km, were 1.1% and 2.5% for the calf spleen and E. coli enzymes. The aglycon, nicotinamide, was neither a substrate nor an inhibitor of PNP. Nir was a weak inhibitor of inosine phosphorolysis catalyzed by both enzymes, with Ki values close to the Km for its phosphorolysis, consistent with simple competitive inhibition; this was further confirmed by Dixon plots. Phosphorolysis of the fluorescent positively charged substrate 7-methylguanosine was also inhibited in a competitive manner by both Ino and Nir. Phosphorolysis of Nir by both enzymes was inhibited competitively by several specific inhibitors of calf spleen and E. coli PNP, with Ki values similar to those for inhibition of other natural substrates. The pH dependence of the kinetic constants for the phosphorolysis of Nir and of a variety of other substrates, was extensively investigated, particularly in the alkaline pH range, where Nir exhibited abnormally high substrate activity relative to the reduced reaction rates of both enzymes towards other anionic or neutral substrates. The overall results are discussed in relation to present concepts regarding binding and phosphorolysis of substrates by PNP based on crystallographic data of enzyme-inhibitor complexes, and current studies on enzymatic and nonenzymatic mechanisms of the cleavage of the Nir glycosidic bond.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-30

    properties of key hydrated cement constituent calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) at the molecular, nanometer scale level. Due to complexity, still unknown...public release; distribution is unlimited. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate- Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure The views... Cement Molecular Structure Report Title Multi-scale modeling of complex material systems requires starting from fundamental building blocks to

  2. Hydration and Thermal Expansion in Anatase Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, He; Li, Qiang; Ren, Yang; Fan, Longlong; Chen, Jun; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2016-08-01

    A tunable thermal expansion is reported in nanosized anatase by taking advantage of surface hydration. The coefficient of thermal expansion of 4 nm TiO2 along a-axis is negative with a hydrated surface and is positive without a hydrated surface. High-energy synchrotron X-ray pair distribution function analysis combined with ab initio calculations on the specific hydrated surface are carried out to reveal the local structure distortion that is responsible for the unusual negative thermal expansion.

  3. Hydration and Thermal Expansion in Anatase Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, He [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Li, Qiang [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Ren, Yang [Argonne National Laboratory, X-Ray Science Division, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Fan, Longlong [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Chen, Jun [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Deng, Jinxia [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Xing, Xianran [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China

    2016-06-06

    A tunable thermal expansion is reported in nanosized anatase by taking advantage of surface hydration. The coefficient of thermal expansion of 4 nm TiO2 along a-axis is negative with a hydrated surface and is positive without a hydrated surface. High-energy synchrotron X-ray pair distribution function analysis combined with ab initio calculations on the specific hydrated surface are carried out to reveal the local structure distortion that is responsible for the unusual negative thermal expansion.

  4. Neutral and anionic superhalogen hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swierszcz, Iwona [Department of Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Anusiewicz, Iwona, E-mail: iwonaa@chem.univ.gda.pl [Department of Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)

    2011-05-26

    Graphical abstract: The energy profile for the Na(OH){sub 2}{sup -} anionic hydroxide formation according to the NaOH+OH{sup -}{yields}Na(OH){sub 2}{sup -} reaction. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} The superhalogen hydroxides and their anions were studied at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level. {yields} All anionic superhalogen hydroxides were found to be thermodynamically stable. {yields} The VDE values calculated for the M(OH){sub k+1}{sup -} anions exceed 4 eV in all cases. {yields} The largest VDEs were found for the Al(OH){sub 4}{sup -} (6.07 eV) and Ga(OH){sub 4}{sup -} (6.21 eV). - Abstract: The properties of superhalogen M(OH){sub k+1}{sup -} anions and their M(OH){sub k+1} neutral parents (where M = Li, Na, K, Be, Mg, Ca, B, Al, Ga) were investigated at the ab initio CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,3pd)//MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. All the M(OH){sub k+1}{sup -} anions and some of their M(OH){sub k+1} neutral parents (k is the maximal formal valence of M) were found to be thermodynamically stable against the fragmentations (OH, OH{sup -}, O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O loss). The vertical electron detachment energies (VDE) of the M(OH){sub k+1}{sup -} anions were calculated with the OVGF method and using the 6-311++G(3df,3pd) basis sets. The VDE values calculated for the anions studied exceed 4 eV in all cases, whereas the largest values of the electron binding energies were found for the Al(OH){sub 4}{sup -} (6.07 eV) and Ga(OH){sub 4}{sup -} anions (6.21 eV). Finally, formation of most of the species considered was predicted to be spontaneous due to the lack of kinetic barriers for these processes and their thermodynamic favorability.

  5. Nucleosides and ODN electrochemical detection onto boron doped diamond electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Elodie; Chane-Tune, Jérôme; Mailley, Pascal; Szunerits, Sabine; Marcus, Bernadette; Petit, Jean-Pierre; Mermoux, Michel; Vieil, Eric

    2004-06-01

    Boron doped diamond (BDD) is a promising material for electroanalytical chemistry due mainly to its chemical stability, its high electrical conductivity and to the large amplitude of its electroactive window in aqueous media. The latter feature allowed us to study the direct oxidation of the two electroactive nucleosides, guanosine and adenosine. The BDD electrode was first activated by applying high oxidizing potentials, allowing to increase anodically its working potential window through the oxidation of CH surface groups into hydroxyl and carbonyl terminations. Guanosine (1.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl) and adenosine (1.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl) could then be detected electrochemically with an acceptable signal to noise ratio. The electrochemical signature of each oxidizable base was assessed using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), in solutions containing one or both nucleosides. These experiments pointed out the existence of adsorption phenomena of the oxidized products onto the diamond surface. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) was used to investigate these adsorption effects at the microscopic scale. The usefulness of BDD electrodes for the direct electrochemical detection of synthetic oligonucleotides is also evidenced.

  6. Cladribine Analogues via O6-(Benzotriazolyl Derivatives of Guanine Nucleosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakilam Satishkumar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cladribine, 2-chloro-2′-deoxyadenosine, is a highly efficacious, clinically used nucleoside for the treatment of hairy cell leukemia. It is also being evaluated against other lymphoid malignancies and has been a molecule of interest for well over half a century. In continuation of our interest in the amide bond-activation in purine nucleosides via the use of (benzotriazol-1yl-oxytris(dimethylaminophosphonium hexafluorophosphate, we have evaluated the use of O6-(benzotriazol-1-yl-2′-deoxyguanosine as a potential precursor to cladribine and its analogues. These compounds, after appropriate deprotection, were assessed for their biological activities, and the data are presented herein. Against hairy cell leukemia (HCL, T-cell lymphoma (TCL and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, cladribine was the most active against all. The bromo analogue of cladribine showed comparable activity to the ribose analogue of cladribine against HCL, but was more active against TCL and CLL. The bromo ribose analogue of cladribine showed activity, but was the least active among the C6-NH2-containing compounds. Substitution with alkyl groups at the exocyclic amino group appears detrimental to activity, and only the C6 piperidinyl cladribine analogue demonstrated any activity. Against adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells, cladribine and its ribose analogue were most active.

  7. An azide-modified nucleoside for metabolic labeling of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neef, Anne B; Luedtke, Nathan W

    2014-04-14

    Metabolic incorporation of azido nucleoside analogues into living cells can enable sensitive detection of DNA replication through copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) and strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC) "click" reactions. One major limitation to this approach is the poor chemical stability of nucleoside derivatives containing an aryl azide group. For example, 5-azido-2'-deoxyuridine (AdU) exhibits a 4 h half-life in water, and it gives little or no detectable labeling of cellular DNA. In contrast, the benzylic azide 5-(azidomethyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (AmdU) is stable in solution at 37 °C, and it gives robust labeling of cellular DNA upon addition of fluorescent alkyne derivatives. In addition to providing the first examples of metabolic incorporation into and imaging of azide groups in cellular DNA, these results highlight the general importance of assessing azide group stability in bioorthogonal chemical reporter strategies. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Properties of mammalian nuclear-envelope nucleoside triphosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agutter, P S; Cockrill, J B; Lavine, J E; McCaldin, B; Sim, R B

    1979-09-01

    The nucleoside triphosphatase activities of the nuclear envelopes from rat liver, pig liver and simian-virus-40-transformed mouse-embryo 3T3 cells were shown to exhibit similar parperties. All three preparations hydrolyse ATP, 2'-dATP, 3'-dATP, GTP, CTP and UTP in the presence of Mg2+, Ca2+, Mn2+ and Co2+ with a pH optimum of 8.0, are sensitive to inhibition by mercurials, arsenicals, quercetin, proflavin and adenosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate and are partially inactivated by exposure to high ionic strength. The kinetic behaviour is similar for all substrates irrespective of the source of material. The typical Eadie-Hofstee plot, which is concave upwards at pH 8.0 when the ionic strength is 20mM, becomes linear when the pH is increased to 8.5 or the ionic strength to 160mM. The overall evidence, particularly the labelling of only one polypeptide by [gamma-32P]ATP, suggests that under the conditions of preparation and assay used only one class of nucleoside triphosphatase active sites is detectable in nuclear envelopes. The importance of these results for an understanding of the role of the enzyme in vivo is discussed.

  9. Kinetic and biochemical characterization of Trypanosoma evansi nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Paulo Henrique Exterchoter; Batista, Franciane; Wagner, Glauber; Magalhães, Maria de Lourdes Borba; Miletti, Luiz Claudio

    2015-06-01

    Nucleoside triphosphate diphospho-hydrolases (NTPDases) catalyze the hydrolysis of several nucleosides tri and diphosphate playing major roles in eukaryotes including purinergic signaling, inflammation, hemostasis, purine salvage and host-pathogen interactions. These enzymes have been recently described in parasites where several evidences indicated their involvement in virulence and infection. Here, we have investigated the presence of NTPDase in the genome of Trypanosoma evansi. Based on the genomic sequence from Trypanosoma brucei, we have amplified an 1812 gene fragment corresponding to the T. evansi NTPDase gene. The protein was expressed in the soluble form and purified to homogeneity and enzymatic assays were performed confirming the enzyme identity. Kinetic parameters and substrate specificity were determined. The dependence of cations on enzymatic activity was investigated indicating the enzyme is stimulated by divalent cations and carbohydrates but inhibited by sodium. Bioinformatic analysis indicates the enzyme is a membrane bound protein facing the extracellular side of the cell with 98% identity to the T. brucei homologous NTPDase gene.

  10. Terahertz sensing of corneal hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul S; Tewari, Priyamvada; Bourges, Jean Louis; Hubschman, Jean Pierre; Bennett, David B; Taylor, Zachary D; Lee, H; Brown, Elliott R; Grundfest, Warren S; Culjat, Martin O

    2010-01-01

    An indicator of ocular health is the hydrodyanmics of the cornea. Many corneal disorders deteriorate sight as they upset the normal hydrodynamics of the cornea. The mechanisms include the loss of endothelial pump function of corneal dystophies, swelling and immune response of corneal graft rejection, and inflammation and edema, which accompany trauma, burn, and irritation events. Due to high sensitivity to changes of water content in materials, a reflective terahertz (300 GHz and 3 THz) imaging system could be an ideal tool to measure the hydration level of the cornea. This paper presents the application of THz technology to visualize the hydration content across ex vivo porcine corneas. The corneas, with a thickness variation from 470 - 940 µm, were successfully imaged using a reflective pulsed THz imaging system, with a maximum SNR of 50 dB. To our knowledge, no prior studies have reported on the use of THz in measuring hydration in corneal tissues or other ocular tissues. These preliminary findings indicate that THz can be used to accurately sense hydration levels in the cornea using a pulsed, reflective THz imaging system.

  11. Physical properties of gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliner, J.T.R.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Gas hydrates are naturally occurring, solid crystalline compounds (clathrates) that encapsulate gas molecules inside the lattices of hydrogen bonded water molecules within a specific temperature-pressure stability zone. Estimates of the total quantity of available methane gas in natural occurring hydrates are based on twice the energy content of known conventional fossil fuels reservoirs. Accurate and reliable in-situ quantification techniques are essential in determining the economic viability of this potential energy yield, which is dependent upon several factors such as sensitivity of the temperature-pressure stability zone, sediment type, porosity, permeability, concentration/abundance of free gas, spatial distribution in pore spaces, specific cage occupancy, and the influence of inhibitors. Various techniques like acoustic P and S waves, time domain reflectometry, and electrical resistance have been used to analyze the quantity and spatial distribution of the gas hydrate samples. These techniques were reviewed and the results obtained in the course of gas hydrate research were presented. 34 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Hydration kinetics of transgenic soybeans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Francielle Fracasso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic and experimental analyses of the hydration process of transgenic soybeans (BRS 225 RR are provided. The importance of the hydration process consists of the grain texture modifications which favor grinding and extraction of soybeans. The soaking isotherms were obtained for four different temperatures. Results showed that temperature affected transgenic soybeans´ hydration rate and time. Moisture content d.b. of the soybeans increased from 0.12 ± 0.01 kg kg-1 to 1.45 ± 0.19 kg kg-1 during 270 min. of process. Two models were used to fit the kinetic curves: an empirical model developed by Peleg (1988 and a phenomenological one, proposed by Omoto et al. (2009. The two models adequately represented the hydration kinetics. Peleg model was applied to the experimental data and the corresponding parameters were obtained and correlated to temperature. The model by Omoto et al. (2009 showed a better statistical fitting. Although Ks was affected by temperature (Ks = 0.38079 exp (-2289.3 T-1, the equilibrium concentration remained practically unchanged.

  13. Anions in Nucleic Acid Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ascenzo, Luigi; Auffinger, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid crystallization buffers contain a large variety of chemicals fitting specific needs. Among them, anions are often solely considered for pH-regulating purposes and as cationic co-salts while their ability to directly bind to nucleic acid structures is rarely taken into account. Here we review current knowledge related to the use of anions in crystallization buffers along with data on their biological prevalence. Chloride ions are frequently identified in crystal structures but display low cytosolic concentrations. Hence, they are thought to be distant from nucleic acid structures in the cell. Sulfate ions are also frequently identified in crystal structures but their localization in the cell remains elusive. Nevertheless, the characterization of the binding properties of these ions is essential for better interpreting the solvent structure in crystals and consequently, avoiding mislabeling of electron densities. Furthermore, understanding the binding properties of these anions should help to get clues related to their potential effects in crowded cellular environments.

  14. Pu Anion Exchange Process Intensification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-08

    This project seeks to improve the efficiency of the plutonium anion-exchange process for purifying Pu through the development of alternate ion-exchange media. The objective of the project in FY15 was to develop and test a porous foam monolith material that could serve as a replacement for the current anion-exchange resin, Reillex® HPQ, used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for purifying Pu. The new material provides advantages in efficiency over the current resin by the elimination of diffusive mass transport through large granular resin beads. By replacing the large resin beads with a porous foam there is much more efficient contact between the Pu solution and the anion-exchange sites present on the material. Several samples of a polystyrene based foam grafted with poly(4-vinylpyridine) were prepared and the Pu sorption was tested in batch contact tests.

  15. Adsorption of hydrated hydroxide and hydronium ions on Ag(1 1 1). A quantum mechanical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrito, E. M.; Paredes-Olivera, P.

    2003-03-01

    In this paper we have studied comparatively the adsorption of hydroxide and hydronium ions, extending our previous study on hydronium adsorption [J. Phys. Chem. B. 105 (2001) 7227] and emphasizing the adsorption of hydroxide. The calculations were performed on the 111 surface of silver using ab initio quantum mechanical methods (Hartree-Fock+Moller-Plesset second order perturbation theory). The adsorption was investigated for the bare and the hydrated ions (up to three water molecules). Binding energies, equilibrium structures and charge transfer processes were investigated. While the successive hydration of hydronium detaches the ion from the surface, the hydrated hydroxide anion remains specifically adsorbed. Charge transfer processes between the adsorbates and the surface were studied using electron density difference plots and effective charges obtained from Mulliken populations and from surface-dipole moment curves. The energetics of the surface reactions leading to the formation of the hydrated hydronium and hydroxide ions from the bare adsorbed ions and water molecules was also investigated. Both reactions are exothermic mainly due to the formation of strong hydrogen bonds. The effect of an external homogeneous electric field perpendicular to the surface on different adsorbate properties was investigated for the bare and hydrated hydroxide ion in order to model the environment of the electrical double layer. The electric field affects the orientation of the water molecules on the surface and the hydroxide surface distance.

  16. Physical activity, hydration and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascensión Marcos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of mankind, man has sought ways to promote and preserve health as well as to prevent disease. Hydration, physical activity and exercise are key factors for enhancing human health. However, either a little dose of them or an excess can be harmful for health maintenance at any age. Water is an essential nutrient for human body and a major key to survival has been to prevent dehydration. However, there is still a general controversy regarding the necessary amount to drink water or other beverages to properly get an adequate level of hydration. In addition, up to now the tools used to measure hydration are controversial. To this end, there are several important groups of variables to take into account such as water balance, hydration biomarkers and total body water. A combination of methods will be the most preferred tool to find out any risk or situation of dehydration at any age range. On the other hand, physical activity and exercise are being demonstrated to promote health, avoiding or reducing health problems, vascular and inflammatory diseases and helping weight management. Therefore, physical activity is also being used as a pill within a therapy to promote health and reduce risk diseases, but as in the case of drugs, dose, intensity, frequency, duration and precautions have to be evaluated and taken into account in order to get the maximum effectiveness and success of a treatment. On the other hand, sedentariness is the opposite concept to physical activity that has been recently recognized as an important factor of lifestyle involved in the obesogenic environment and consequently in the risk of the non-communicable diseases. In view of the literature consulted and taking into account the expertise of the authors, in this review a Decalogue of global recommendations is included to achieve an adequate hydration and physical activity status to avoid overweight/obesity consequences.

  17. Expression, purification, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a recombinant nucleoside hydrolase from Leishmania donovani, a vaccine candidate for preventing cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAtee, C Patrick; Seid, Christopher A; Hammond, Molly; Hudspeth, Elissa; Keegan, Brian P; Liu, Zhuyun; Wei, Junfei; Zhan, Bin; Arjona-Sabido, Raul; Cruz-Chan, Vladimir; Dumonteil, Eric; Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2017-02-01

    The nucleoside hydrolase gene from Leishmania donovani was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as a full length 36-kDa protein (LdNH36). Following lysis and extraction, the protein was purified by anion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The purified protein had a molecular mass of approximately 36-kDa and was confirmed to be >99% pure. Using a nucleoside hydrolase assay, the protein was found to exhibit a Km of 741 ± 246 μM. Protein integrity was confirmed by lithium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (LDS-PAGE), mass spectrometry (MS), and enzymatic assay. Analysis of antibody levels from immunized mice indicated that LdNH36 alone or in a stable emulsion with the Toll-like receptor-4 ligand glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant (GLA-SE) as immunostimulant induced high levels of antigen-specific IgG antibodies. The cellular immune response indicated a Th1 response in mice immunized with LdNH36, but only when formulated with GLA-SE. Mice immunized with the LdNH36 antigen in combination with the GLA-SE adjuvant and challenged with Leishmania mexicana showed significant reductions (>20 fold) in parasite burden, confirming the protective efficacy of this vaccine candidate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Structural Investigations of Portland Cement Components, Hydration, and Effects of Admixtures by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Jørgen Bengaard; Andersen, Morten D.; Jakobsen, Hans Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    Solid-state, magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy represents a valuable tool for structural investigations on the nanoscale of the most important phases in anhydrous and hydrated Portland cements and of various admixtures. This is primarily due to the fact that the method reflects the first...... in the cement phases. The role of flouride ions is of special interest for mineralized Portland cements and it demonstrated that the location of these anions in anhydrous and hydrated Portland cements can be clarified using 19F MAS or 29Si{19F} CP/MAS NMR despite these cements contain only about 0.2 wt...

  19. Seismic reflections associated with submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassen, K.

    1995-12-31

    Gas hydrates are often suggested as a future energy resource. This doctoral thesis improves the understanding of the concentration and distribution of natural submarine gas hydrates. The presence of these hydrates are commonly inferred from strong bottom simulating reflection (BSR). To investigate the nature of BSR, this work uses seismic studies of hydrate-related BSRs at two different locations, one where gas hydrates are accepted to exist and interpreted to be very extensive (in the Beaufort Sea), the other with good velocity data and downhole logs available (offshore Oregon). To ascertain the presence of free gas under the BSR, prestack offset data must supplement near-vertical incidence seismic data. A tentative model for physical properties of sediments partially saturated with gas hydrate and free gas is presented. This model, together with drilling information and seismic data containing the BSR beneath the Oregon margin and the Beaufort Sea, made it possible to better understand when to apply the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) method to constrain BSR gas hydrate and gas models. Distribution of natural gas hydrates offshore Norway and Svalbard is discussed and interpreted as reflections from the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, overlying sediments containing free gas. Gas hydrates inferred to exist at the Norwegian-Svalbard continental margin correlate well with Cenozoic depocenters, and the associated gas is assumed to be mainly biogenic. Parts of that margin have a high potential for natural gas hydrates of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. 235 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. The many ways of making anionic clays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Michael Rajamathi; Grace S Thomas; P Vishnu Kamath

    2001-10-01

    Together with hydrotalcite-like layered double hydroxides, bivalent and trivalent metal hydroxides and their hydroxy salts are actually anionic clays consisting of positively charged hydroxide layers with anions intercalated in the interlayer region. The anionic clays exhibit anion sorption, anion diffusion and exchange properties together with surface basicity making them materials of importance for many modern applications. In this article, we discuss many different ways of making anionic clays and compare and contrast the rich diversity of this class of materials with the better-known cationic clays.

  1. Handbook of gas hydrate properties and occurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuustraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.

    1983-12-01

    This handbook provides data on the resource potential of naturally occurring hydrates, the properties that are needed to evaluate their recovery, and their production potential. The first two chapters give data on the naturally occurring hydrate potential by reviewing published resource estimates and the known and inferred occurrences. The third and fourth chapters review the physical and thermodynamic properties of hydrates, respectively. The thermodynamic properties of hydrates that are discussed include dissociation energies and a simplified method to calculate them; phase diagrams for simple and multi-component gases; the thermal conductivity; and the kinetics of hydrate dissociation. The final chapter evaluates the net energy balance of recovering hydrates and shows that a substantial positive energy balance can theoretically be achieved. The Appendices of the Handbook summarize physical and thermodynamic properties of gases, liquids and solids that can be used in designing and evaluating recovery processes of hydrates. 158 references, 67 figures, 47 tables.

  2. Separation of water through gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boch Andersen, Torben; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goa...... volumes and the needs for high pressure. The process could be interesting for concentration of heat sensitive, high value products......Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goal...... of the project was to formulate an alternative separation concept, which can replace the traditional water evaporation process in the sugar production. Work with the separation concept showed that gas hydrates can be used for water separation. The process is not suitable for sugar production because of large...

  3. Purine and pyrimidine nucleosides preserve human astrocytoma cell adenylate energy charge under ischemic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestri, Francesco; Giannecchini, Michela; Sgarrella, Francesco; Carta, Maria Caterina; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Camici, Marcella

    2007-02-01

    The brain depends on both glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for maintenance of ATP pools. Astrocytes play an integral role in brain functions providing trophic supports and energy substrates for neurons. In this paper, we report that human astrocytoma cells (ADF) undergoing ischemic conditions may use both purine and pyrimidine nucleosides as energy source to slow down cellular damage. The cells are subjected to metabolic stress conditions by exclusion of glucose and incubation with oligomycin (an inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation). This treatment brings about a depletion of the ATP pool, with a concomitant increase in the AMP levels, which results in a significant decrease of the adenylate energy charge. The presence of purine nucleosides in the culture medium preserves the adenylate energy charge, and improves cell viability. Besides purine nucleosides, also pyrimidine nucleosides, such as uridine and, to a lesser extent, cytidine, are able to preserve the ATP pool. The determination of lactate in the incubation medium indicates that nucleosides can preserve the ATP pool through anaerobic glycolysis, thus pointing to a relevant role of the phosphorolytic cleavage of the N-glycosidic bond of nucleosides which generates, without energy expense, the phosphorylated pentose, which through the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis can be converted to energetic intermediates also in the absence of oxygen. In fact, ADF cells possess both purine nucleoside phosphorylase and uridine phosphorylase activities.

  4. Synthesis and photophysical characterisation of a fluorescent nucleoside analogue that signals the presence of an abasic site in RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanpure, Arun A; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G

    2012-11-05

    The synthesis and site-specific incorporation of an environment-sensitive fluorescent nucleoside analogue (2), based on a 5-(benzofuran-2-yl)pyrimidine core, into DNA oligonucleotides (ONs), and its photophysical properties within these ONs are described. Interestingly and unlike 2-aminopurine (a widely used nucleoside analogue probe), when incorporated into an ON and hybridised with a complementary ON, the emissive nucleoside 2 displays significantly higher emission intensity than the free nucleoside. Furthermore, photophysical characterisation shows that the fluorescence properties of the nucleoside analogue within ONs are significantly influenced by flanking bases, especially by guanosine. By utilising the responsiveness of the nucleoside to changes in base environment, a DNA ON reporter labelled with the emissive nucleoside 2 was constructed; this signalled the presence of an abasic site in a model depurinated sarcin/ricin RNA motif of a eukaryotic 28S rRNA.

  5. Well log characterization of natural gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2011-01-01

    In the last 25 years we have seen significant advancements in the use of downhole well logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrate in nature: From an early start of using wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gas hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments to today where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. The most established and well known use of downhole log data in gas hydrate research is the use of electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data (both compressional- and shear-wave data) to make estimates of gas hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. New downhole logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation resistivity log measurements have provided the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly inter-bedded and fracture dominated gas hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing have also allowed for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids (i.e., free-water along with clay and capillary bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms controlling the formation and occurrence of gas hydrate in nature along with data on gas hydrate reservoir properties (i.e., permeabilities) needed to accurately predict gas production rates for various gas hydrate

  6. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn

    2009-11-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  7. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, D.D.; Martin, A.I.; Yun, T.S.; Francisca, F.M.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. The effect of hydrate saturation on water retention curves in hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabadi, Nariman; Zheng, Xianglei; Jang, Jaewon

    2016-05-01

    The experimental measurement of water retention curve in hydrate-bearing sediments is critically important to understand the behavior of hydrate dissociation and gas production. In this study, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is selected as hydrate former. The pore habit of THF hydrates is investigated by visual observation in a transparent micromodel. It is confirmed that THF hydrates are not wetting phase on the quartz surface of the micromodel and occupy either an entire pore or part of pore space resulting in change in pore size distribution. And the measurement of water retention curves in THF hydrate-bearing sediments with hydrate saturation ranging from Sh = 0 to Sh = 0.7 is conducted for excess water condition. The experimental results show that the gas entry pressure and the capillary pressure increase with increasing hydrate saturation. Based on the experimental results, fitting parameters for van Genuchten equation are suggested for different hydrate saturation conditions.

  9. Anion binding in biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feiters, Martin C [Department of Organic Chemistry, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Faculty of Science, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram [EMBL Hamburg Outstation at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Kostenko, Alexander V; Soldatov, Alexander V [Faculty of Physics, Southern Federal University, Sorge 5, Rostov-na-Donu, 344090 (Russian Federation); Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris-VI, Station Biologique de Roscoff, Place Georges Teissier, BP 74, F-29682 Roscoff cedex, Bretagne (France); Kuepper, Frithjof C [Scottish Association for Marine Science, Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory, Oban, Argyll PA37 1QA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, ETH Zuerich, Schafmattstrasse 20, Zuerich, 8093 (Switzerland); Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R, E-mail: m.feiters@science.ru.n [Department of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L{sub 3} (2p{sub 3/2}) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  10. Anion binding in biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  11. Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory) and the explanation of the biological diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovskii, Victor E; Kadyshevich, Elena A

    2014-12-01

    The Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory) considers the life origination process as a sequence of thermodynamically caused regular and inevitable chemical transformations regulated by universal physical and chemical laws. The LOH-Theory bears on a number of experimental, thermodynamic, observation, and simulation researches. N-bases, riboses, nucleosides, and nucleotides and DNAs and RNAs are formed repeatedly within structural cavities of localizations of underground and underseabed honeycomb CH4-hydrate deposits from CH4 and nitrate and phosphate ions that diffused into the hydrate structures; proto-cells and their agglomerates originated from these DNAs and from the same minerals in the semi-liquid soup after liquation of the hydrate structures. Each localization gave rise to a multitude of different DNAs and living organisms. The species diversity is caused by the spatial and temporal repeatability of the processes of living matter origination under similar but not identical conditions, multiplicity of the DNA forms in each living matter origination event, variations in the parameters of the native medium, intraspecific variations, and interspecific variations. The contribution of the last to the species diversity is, likely, significant for prokaryotes and those eukaryotes that are only at low steps of their biological organization; however, in the light of the LOH-Theory, of available long-term paleontological investigations, and of studies of reproduction of proliferous organisms, we conclude that, in toto, the contribution of interspecific variations to the species diversity was earlier overestimated by some researchers. The reason of this overestimation is that origination of scores of «spores» of different organisms in any one event and multiple reproductions of such events in time and Earth's space were not taken into consideration.

  12. Interaction between N-Phospho-Amino Acids and Nucleoside in Aqueous Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Nucleosides were phosphorylated with different N- (O, O-diisopropyl) phosphoryl amino acids to give nucleoside mono phosphates in aqueous solution. 2', 3', and 5'-isomers had been confirmed by comparison with authentic samples on the basis of HPLC analysis. The conversion percentage of nucleoside indicated that N- (O, O-diisopropyl) phosphoryl aspartic acid reacted with adenosine and guanosine at a much higher rate than other kinds of N- phosphoryl amino acids, while phosphorylation of cytidine and uridine was relatively easy by using N- (O, O-diisopropyl) phosphoryl threonine. The result could give some clue to the prebiotic code origin of nucleic acid and protein.

  13. Studies on yeast nucleoside triphosphate-nucleoside diphosphate transphosphorylase (nucleoside diphosphokinase). IV. Steady-state kinetic properties with thymidine nucleotides (including 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine analogues).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuby, S A; Fleming, G; Alber, T; Richardson, D; Takenaka, H; Hamada, M

    1991-01-01

    A study of the steady-state kinetics of the crystalline brewer's yeast (Saccharomyces carlsbergensis) nucleoside diphosphokinase, with the magnesium complexes of the adenine and thymidine nucleotides as reactants, has led to a postulated kinetic mechanism which proceeds through a substituted enzyme. This agrees with the earlier conclusions of Garces and Cleland [Biochemistry 1969; 8:633-640] who characterized a reaction between the magnesium complexes of the adenine and uridine nucleotides. An advantage of using thymidine nucleotides as reactants is that they permit accurate, rapid and continuous assays of the enzymatic activity in coupled-enzymatic tests. Through measurements of the initial velocities and product inhibition studies, the Michaelis constants, maximum velocities, and inhibition constants could be evaluated for the individual substrates. Competitive substrate inhibition was encountered at relatively high substrate concentrations, which also permitted an evaluation of their ability to act as 'dead-end' inhibitors. The Michaelis constants for the 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AzT) analogues were also evaluated and, although these values were only somewhat higher than those of their natural substrates, the Km's for the adenine nucleotides as paired substrates were lower and the Vmax's were drastically reduced. The pharmacological implications of these observations are touched upon and extrapolated to the cases where therapeutic doses of AzT may be employed.

  14. Genome shuffling improved the nucleosides production in Cordyceps kyushuensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanming; Zhang, Guoying; Zhao, Xuan; Ling, Jianya

    2017-10-20

    Genome shuffling was first applied to improve the production of nucleosides in Cordyceps kyushuensis. Six improved strains were selected for genome shuffling by UV and HNO2 mutagenesis. Ten improved genome shuffling strains with good genetic stability were obtained, among which, the production of cordycepin in R6 was 9.624 times higher than that of the ancestor. While in R18 and R19, the yield of cordycepin, adenosine, guanosine and uridine were all increased greatly compared with the ancestor. Based on the four phenotypes of the content of cordycepin, adenosine, guanosine and uridine, hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to infer the relationships between genome shuffling strains and mutants. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Tripodal Receptors for Cation and Anion Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuswandi, Bambang; Nuriman,; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2006-01-01

    This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selectiverecognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure andselectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometricion sensing

  16. Dynamic metabolic labeling of DNA in vivo with arabinosyl nucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neef, Anne B; Luedtke, Nathan W

    2011-12-20

    Commonly used metabolic labels for DNA, including 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) and BrdU, are toxic antimetabolites that cause DNA instability, necrosis, and cell-cycle arrest. In addition to perturbing biological function, these properties can prevent metabolic labeling studies where subsequent tissue survival is needed. To bypass the metabolic pathways responsible for toxicity, while maintaining the ability to be metabolically incorporated into DNA, we synthesized and evaluated a small family of arabinofuranosyl-ethynyluracil derivatives. Among these, (2'S)-2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-5-ethynyluridine (F-ara-EdU) exhibited selective DNA labeling, yet had a minimal impact on genome function in diverse tissue types. Metabolic incorporation of F-ara-EdU into DNA was readily detectable using copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne "click" reactions with fluorescent azides. F-ara-EdU is less toxic than both BrdU and EdU, and it can be detected with greater sensitivity in experiments where long-term cell survival and/or deep-tissue imaging are desired. In contrast to previously reported 2'-arabino modified nucleosides and EdU, F-ara-EdU causes little or no cellular arrest or DNA synthesis inhibition. F-ara-EdU is therefore ideally suited for pulse-chase experiments aimed at "birth dating" DNA in vivo. As a demonstration, Zebrafish embryos were microinjected with F-ara-EdU at the one-cell stage and chased by BrdU at 10 h after fertilization. Following 3 d of development, complex patterns of quiescent/senescent cells containing only F-ara-EdU were observed in larvae along the dorsal side of the notochord and epithelia. Arabinosyl nucleoside derivatives therefore provide unique and effective means to introduce bioorthogonal functional groups into DNA for diverse applications in basic research, biotechnology, and drug discovery.

  17. Uridine Nucleoside Thiation: Gas-Phase Structures and Energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlow, Lucas; Lee, Justin; Rodgers, M. T.; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos

    2016-06-01

    The naturally occurring thiated uridine nucleosides, 4-thiouridine (s4Urd) and 2-thiouridine (s2Urd), play important roles in the function and analysis of a variety of RNAs. 2-Thiouridine and its C5 modified analogues are commonly found in tRNAs and are believed to play an important role in codon recognition possibly due to their different structure, which has been shown by NMR to be predominantly C3'-endo. 2-Thiouridine may also play an important role in facilitating nonenzymatic RNA replication and transcription. 4-Thiouridine is a commonly used photoactivatable crosslinker that is often used to study RNA-RNA and RNA-protein cross-linking behavior. Differences in the base pairing between uracil and 4-thiouracil with adenine and guanine are an important factor in their role as a cross linker. The photoactivity of s4Urd may also aid in preventing near-UV lethality in cells. An understanding of their intrinsic structure in the gas-phase may help further elucidate the roles these modified nucleosides play in the regulation of RNAs. In this work, infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectra of the protonated forms of s2Urd and s4Urd were collected in the IR fingerprint region. Structural information is determined by comparison with theoretical linear IR spectra generated from density functional theory calculations using molecular modeling to generate low-energy candidate structures. Present results are compared with analogous results for the protonated forms of uridine and 2'-deoxyuridine as well as solution phase NMR data and crystal structures.

  18. Synthesis of hydrated lutetium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Liu [South China Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Guangdong (China); Rong-jun Ma [Changsha Research Institute of Minig and Metallurgy, Hunan (China)

    1997-09-01

    Crystalline lutetium carbonate was synthesized for the corresponding chloride using ammonium bicarbonate as precipitant. The chemical analyses suggest that the synthesized lutetium carbonate is a hydrated basic carbonate or oxycarbonate. The X-ray powder diffraction data are presented. The IR data for the compound show the presence of two different carbonate groups. There is no stable intermediate carbonate in the process of thermal decomposition of the lutetium carbonate. (au) 15 refs.

  19. Crystallite size distributions of marine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klapp, S.A.; Bohrmann, G.; Abegg, F. [Bremen Univ., Bremen (Germany). Research Center of Ocean Margins; Hemes, S.; Klein, H.; Kuhs, W.F. [Gottingen Univ., Gottingen (Germany). Dept. of Crystallography

    2008-07-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to determine the crystallite size distributions of natural gas hydrate samples retrieved from the Gulf of Mexico, the Black Sea, and a hydrate ridge located near offshore Oregon. Synchrotron radiation technology was used to provide the high photon fluxes and high penetration depths needed to accurately analyze the bulk sediment samples. A new beam collimation diffraction technique was used to measure gas hydrate crystallite sizes. The analyses showed that gas hydrate crystals were globular in shape. Mean crystallite sizes ranged from 200 to 400 {mu}m for hydrate samples taken from the sea floor. Larger grain sizes in the hydrate ridge samples suggested differences in hydrate formation ages or processes. A comparison with laboratory-produced methane hydrate samples showed half a lognormal curve with a mean value of 40{mu}m. Results of the study showed that a cautious approach must be adopted when transposing crystallite-size sensitive physical data from laboratory-made gas hydrates to natural settings. It was concluded that crystallite size information may also be used to resolve the formation ages of gas hydrates when formation processes and conditions are constrained. 48 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  20. IMPORTANCE OF HYDRATION IN SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Vasić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Importance of hydration is detrmined by importance of functions of water in the human organism: i.e. regulation of body temperature, transport, excretion of waste materials through urine, digestion of food which is facilititated by saliva and gastric juices, maintenance of flexibility of organs and tissues About 60 % body mass of an adult person (males: 61 %, females: 54 % is made up of water. Water content of a newly born baby reaches 77 %, and it is up to 50 % in adults. It is very important for sportsmen to provide adequate hydration during and after the time of bodily activities. A symptom of water shortage is thirst. However, thirst is a late response of an organism and it occurs when dehydration has already taken place. Minimum in take of fluids in humans should range between one-and-half to two liters. It has been known for a long time that there is no success in sport without proper hydration in a sportsman.

  1. Influence of silicate anions structure on desilication in silicate-bearing sodium aluminate solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂华; 张闻; 齐天贵; 彭志宏; 周秋生; 李小斌

    2016-01-01

    The structural changes of silicate anions in the desilication process with the addition of calcium hydrate alumino-carbonate were studied by measuring Raman spectra, infrared spectra and corresponding second derivative spectra. The results show that the desilication ratio in the solution prepared by the addition of sodium silicate (solution-SS) is much greater than that in the solution by the addition of green liquor (solution-GL), and low alumina concentration in the sodium aluminate solutions facilitates the desilication process. It is also shown that alumino-silicate anions in the solution-GL, and Q3 polymeric silicate anions in solution-SS are predominant, respectively. In addition, increasing the concentration of silica favors respectively the formation of the alumino-silicate or the Q3 silicate anions in the solution-GL or the solution-SS. Therefore, it can be inferred that the low desilication ratio in the silicate-bearing aluminate solution is mainly attributed to the existence of alumino-silicate anions.

  2. Efficient Amide Based Halogenide Anion Receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Xing WU; Feng Hua LI; Hai LIN; Shou Rong ZHU; Hua Kuan LIN

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the synthesis and anion recognition properties of the amide based phenanthroline derivatives 1, 2 and 3. In all cases 1:1 receptor: anion complexes were observed. The receptors were found to be selective for fluoride and chloride respectively over other putative anionic guest species.

  3. Methods and systems for measuring anions

    KAUST Repository

    Masih, Dilshad

    2016-08-18

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for methods for detecting the presence and/or concentration of anions in a solution, systems for detecting the presence and/or concentration of anions in a solution, anion sensor systems, and the like.

  4. Anions make the difference: insights from the interaction of big cations and anions with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) chains and microgels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Fuentes, Leonor; Drummond, Carlos; Faraudo, Jordi; Bastos-González, Delfi

    2015-07-07

    Minute concentrations of big hydrophobic ions have the ability to induce substantial effects in soft matter systems, including novel phases in lipid layers, giant charge inversion in colloids and nanostructuration in polymer surfaces in contact with water. The effects are so strong that the term "soft matter disruptors" was coined to describe their deep impact on interfaces, which goes far beyond that found by using the classical ions considered in lyotropic (Hofmeister) sequences. In these effects, solvation thermodynamics plays a fundamental role. Interestingly, it is possible to obtain big hydrophobic cations and anions with an almost identical size and structure (e.g. Ph4B(-), Ph4As(+)), which only differ in their central atom. Here we employ different techniques (Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, electrophoretic mobility and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)) to demonstrate the dramatic differences in the interaction of Ph4B(-) and Ph4As(+) with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM), a thermoresponsive polymer with expanded (well hydrated) and collapsed (poorly hydrated) states. Although both ions interact strongly with neutral PNIPAM chains and cationic or anionic PNIPAM microgels in the collapsed states, the effects of Ph4B(-) on PNIPAM are always substantially stronger than the effects of Ph4As(+). MD simulations predict that ion-PNIPAM free energy of interaction is four times larger for Ph4B(-) than for Ph4As(+). Electrokinetic and AFM experiments show that, acting as counter-ions, both ions are able to invert the charge of anionic or cationic PNIPAM microgels at minute concentrations, but the charge inversion due to Ph4B(-) is much larger than that obtained with Ph4As(+). Therefore, even for big ions of identical size, shape and valence, the affinity of anions and cations for interfaces is intrinsically different.

  5. Study of Formation Mechanisms of Gas Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    Gas hydrates, which had been found in subsurface geological environments of deep-sea sediments and permafrost regions, are solid crystalline compounds of gas molecules and water. The estimated energy resources of hydrates are at least twice of that of the conventional fossil fuel in the world. Gas hydrates have a great opportunity to become a dominating future energy. In the past years, many laboratory experiments had been conducted to study chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of gas hydrates in order to investigate the formation and dissociation mechanisms of hydrates. However, it is difficult to observe the formation and dissociation of hydrates in a porous media from a physical experiment directly. The purpose of this study was to model the dynamic formation mechanisms of gas hydrate in porous media by reservoir simulation. Two models were designed for this study: 1) a closed-system static model with separated gas and water zones; this model was a hydrate equilibrium model to investigate the behavior of the formation of hydrates near the initial gas-water contact; and 2) an open-system dynamic model with a continuous bottom-up gas flow; this model simulated the behavior of gas migration and studied the formation of hydrates from flowed gas and static formation water in porous media. A phase behavior module was developed in this study for reservoir simulator to model the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) behavior of hydrates. The thermodynamic equilibriums and chemical reactions were coupled with the phase behavior module to have functions modelling the formation and dissociation of hydrates from/to water and gas. The simulation models used in this study were validated from the code-comparison project proposed by the NETL. According to the modelling results of the closed-system static model, we found that predominated location for the formation of hydrates was below the gas-water contact (or at the top of water zone). The maximum hydrate saturation

  6. Metabolic engineering of an industrial polyoxin producer for the targeted overproduction of designer nucleoside antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jianzhao; Liu, Jin; Wan, Dan; Cai, You-Sheng; Wang, Yinghu; Li, Shunying; Wu, Pan; Feng, Xuan; Qiu, Guofu; Yang, Sheng-Ping; Chen, Wenqing; Deng, Zixin

    2015-09-01

    Polyoxin and nikkomycin are naturally occurring peptidyl nucleoside antibiotics with potent antifungal bioactivity. Both exhibit similar structural features, having a nucleoside skeleton and one or two peptidyl moieties. Combining the refactoring of the polyoxin producer Streptomyces aureochromogenes with import of the hydroxypyridylhomothreonine pathway of nikkomycin allows the targeted production of three designer nucleoside antibiotics designated as nikkoxin E, F, and G. These structures were determined by NMR and/or high resolution mass spectrometry. Remarkably, the introduction of an extra copy of the nikS gene encoding an ATP-dependent ligase significantly enhanced the production of the designer antibiotics. Moreover, all three nikkoxins displayed improved bioactivity against several pathogenic fungi as compared with the naturally-occurring antibiotics. These data provide a feasible model for high efficiency generation of nucleoside antibiotics related to polyoxins and nikkomycins in a polyoxin cell factory via synthetic biology strategy.

  7. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus NDK: preliminary crystallographic analysis of the first viral nucleoside diphosphate kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Jeudy, Sandra; Coutard, Bruno; Lebrun, Régine; Abergel, Chantal

    2005-01-01

    A. polyphaga mimivirus, the largest known double-stranded DNA virus, is the first virus to exhibit a nucleoside diphosphate kinase gene. The expression and crystallization of the viral NDK are reported.

  8. The preparation of trisubstituted alkenyl nucleoside phosphonates under ultrasound-assisted olefin cross-metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Ozkan; Hamada, Manabu; Roy, Vincent; Nolan, Steven P; Agrofoglio, Luigi A

    2013-09-01

    Intermolecular ultrasound-assisted olefin cross-metathesis is reported. This approach allows an easy access to challenging trisubstituted alkenyl nucleoside phosphonates. Regioselective chemoenzymatic deacetylation and Mitsunobu coupling are also described.

  9. Nucleoside, nucleotide and oligonucleotide based amphiphiles: a successful marriage of nucleic acids with lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissot, Arnaud; Camplo, Michel; Grinstaff, Mark W; Barthélémy, Philippe

    2008-04-21

    Amphiphilic molecules based on nucleosides, nucleotides and oligonucleotides are finding more and more biotechnological applications. This Perspective highlights their synthesis, supramolecular organization as well as their applications in the field of biotechnology.

  10. Modification of Purine and Pyrimidine Nucleosides by Direct C-H Bond Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal-catalyzed modifications of the activated heterocyclic bases of nucleosides as well as DNA or RNA fragments employing traditional cross-coupling methods have been well-established in nucleic acid chemistry. This review covers advances in the area of cross-coupling reactions in which nucleosides are functionalized via direct activation of the C8-H bond in purine and the C5-H or C6-H bond in uracil bases. The review focuses on Pd/Cu-catalyzed couplings between unactivated nucleoside bases with aryl halides. It also discusses cross-dehydrogenative arylations and alkenylations as well as other reactions used for modification of nucleoside bases that avoid the use of organometallic precursors and involve direct C-H bond activation in at least one substrate. The scope and efficiency of these coupling reactions along with some mechanistic considerations are discussed.

  11. Importance of mammalian nuclear-envelope nucleoside triphosphatase in nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of ribonucleoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agutter, P S; McCaldin, B; McArdle, H J

    1979-09-15

    The nucleoside triphosphate-stimulated efflux of RNA from isolated nuclei was studied under a range of conditions, and the effects of these conditions on the process were compared with the properties of the nucleoside triphosphatase located in the pore complex. A marked similarity between the rate of efflux and the rate of nucleoside triphosphate hydrolysis was apparent, in terms of substrate specificity, sensitivity to treatment with insolubilized trypsin, kinetics and the effects of increased ionic strength and of many inhibitors. These results are taken, in view of earlier evidence, to suggest that the activity of the nucleoside triphosphatase is a prerequisite for nucleo-cytoplasmic RNA transport in vivo. There are some indications that the nuclear-envelope lipid is also involved in regulating the efflux process.

  12. SEISMIC STUDIES OF MARINE GAS HYDRATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Haibin

    2003-01-01

    We give a brief introduction of developments of seismic methods in the studies of marine gas hydrates. Then we give an example of seismic data processing for BSRs in western Nankai accretionary prism, a typical gas hydrate distribution region. Seismic data processing is proved to be important to obtain better images of BSRs distribution. Studies of velocity structure of hydrated sediments are useful for better understanding the distribution of gas hydrates. Using full waveform inversion, we successfully derived high-resolution velocity model of a double BSR in eastern Nankai Trough area. Recent survey and research show that gas hydrates occur in the marine sediments of the South China Sea and East China Sea.But we would like to say seismic researches on gas hydrate in China are very preliminary.

  13. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  14. Laser Cooling of Molecular Anions

    CERN Document Server

    Yzombard, Pauline; Gerber, Sebastian; Doser, Michael; Comparat, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme for laser cooling of negatively charged molecules. We briefly summarise the requirements for such laser cooling and we identify a number of potential candidates. A detailed computation study with C$\\_2^-$, the most studied molecular anion, is carried out. Simulations of 3D laser cooling in a gas phase show that this molecule could be cooled down to below 1 mK in only a few tens of milliseconds, using standard lasers. Sisyphus cooling, where no photo-detachment process is present, as well as Doppler laser cooling of trapped C$\\_2^-$, are also simulated. This cooling scheme has an impact on the study of cold molecules, molecular anions, charged particle sources and antimatter physics.

  15. Polymerization of anionic wormlike micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiyuan; González, Yamaira I; Xu, Hangxun; Kaler, Eric W; Liu, Shiyong

    2006-01-31

    Polymerizable anionic wormlike micelles are obtained upon mixing the hydrotropic salt p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC) with the reactive anionic surfactant sodium 4-(8-methacryloyloxyoctyl)oxybenzene sulfonate (MOBS). Polymerization captures the cross-sectional radius of the micelles (approximately 2 nm), induces micellar growth, and leads to the formation of a stable single-phase dispersion of wormlike micellar polymers. The unpolymerized and polymerized micelles were characterized using static and dynamic laser light scattering, small-angle neutron scattering, 1H NMR, and stopped-flow light scattering. Stopped-flow light scattering was also used to measure the average lifetime of the unpolymerized wormlike micelles. A comparison of the average lifetime of unpolymerized wormlike micelles with the surfactant monomer propagation rate was used to elucidate the mechanism of polymerization. There is a significant correlation between the ratio of the average lifetime to the monomer propagation rate and the average aggregation number of the polymerized wormlike micelles.

  16. Laser cooling of molecular anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yzombard, Pauline; Hamamda, Mehdi; Gerber, Sebastian; Doser, Michael; Comparat, Daniel

    2015-05-29

    We propose a scheme for laser cooling of negatively charged molecules. We briefly summarize the requirements for such laser cooling and we identify a number of potential candidates. A detailed computation study with C_{2}^{-}, the most studied molecular anion, is carried out. Simulations of 3D laser cooling in a gas phase show that this molecule could be cooled down to below 1 mK in only a few tens of milliseconds, using standard lasers. Sisyphus cooling, where no photodetachment process is present, as well as Doppler laser cooling of trapped C_{2}^{-}, are also simulated. This cooling scheme has an impact on the study of cold molecules, molecular anions, charged particle sources, and antimatter physics.

  17. The interaction of certain inorganic anions with clays and soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de F.A.M.

    1965-01-01

    Interaction between anions and soil colloids was governed by 2 antagonistic processes, anion exclusion and positive anion adsorption. The predominantly negative charge on the colloids caused anion repulsion; positively charged sites and chemisorption resulted in positive

  18. Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy for Structure-II Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeya, Kei; Zhang, Caihong; Kawayama, Iwao

    2009-01-01

    For the nondestructive inspection of gas hydrates, terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) was applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate and propane hydrate. The absorption of propane hydrate monotonically increases with frequency, similar to the case of ice, while THF hydrate has a charact...

  19. Aqueous microwave-assisted cross-coupling reactions applied to unprotected nucleosides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, Gwénaëlle; Len, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Metal catalyzed cross-coupling reactions have been the preferred tools to access to modified nucleosides (on the C5-position of pyrimidines and on the C7- or C8-positions of purines). Our objective is to focus this mini-review on the Suzuki-Miyaura and on the Heck cross-couplings of nucleosides using microwave irradiations which is an alternative technology compatible with green chemistry and sustainable development PMID:25741506

  20. Ionol (BHT) produces superoxide anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, E G; Lyubimov, Yu I; Malinina, T G; Lyubimova, E Yu; Alexandrushkina, N I; Vanyushin, B F; Kolesova, G M; Yaguzhinsky, L S

    2002-11-01

    In aqueous medium etiolated wheat seedlings release superoxide anion (O2*-). Interaction of a synthetic antioxidant, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT, ionol), with oxygen in the aqueous medium is accompanied by O2*- formation. This suggests that under certain conditions BHT behaves as a prooxidant. A natural antioxidant, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and also a wound healing preparation, emulsified denatured placenta (EDP), do not exhibit the prooxidant properties. In contrast to BHT, they reduce O2*- production by the etiolated wheat seedling system.

  1. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...... prehydration may occur. In the report both theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during water vapour exposure is nucleation controlled....

  2. Hosting anions. The energetic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtchen, Franz P

    2010-10-01

    Hosting anions addresses the widely spread molecular recognition event of negatively charged species by dedicated organic compounds in condensed phases at equilibrium. The experimentally accessible energetic features comprise the entire system including the solvent, any buffers, background electrolytes or other components introduced for e.g. analysis. The deconvolution of all these interaction types and their dependence on subtle structural variation is required to arrive at a structure-energy correlation that may serve as a guide in receptor construction. The focus on direct host-guest interactions (lock-and-key complementarity) that have dominated the binding concepts of artificial receptors in the past must be widened in order to account for entropic contributions which constitute very significant fractions of the total free energy of interaction. Including entropy necessarily addresses the ambiguity and fuzziness of the host-guest structural ensemble and requires the appreciation of the fact that most liquid phases possess distinct structures of their own. Apparently, it is the perturbation of the intrinsic solvent structure occurring upon association that rules ion binding in polar media where ions are soluble and abundant. Rather than specifying peculiar structural elements useful in anion binding this critical review attempts an illumination of the concepts and individual energetic contributions resulting in the final observation of specific anion recognition (95 references).

  3. Nature's combinatorial biosynthesis and recently engineered production of nucleoside antibiotics in Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shawn; Kinney, William A; Van Lanen, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Modified nucleosides produced by Streptomyces and related actinomycetes are widely used in agriculture and medicine as antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer and antiviral agents. These specialized small-molecule metabolites are biosynthesized by complex enzymatic machineries encoded within gene clusters in the genome. The past decade has witnessed a burst of reports defining the key metabolic processes involved in the biosynthesis of several distinct families of nucleoside antibiotics. Furthermore, genome sequencing of various Streptomyces species has dramatically increased over recent years. Potential biosynthetic gene clusters for novel nucleoside antibiotics are now apparent by analysis of these genomes. Here we revisit strategies for production improvement of nucleoside antibiotics that have defined mechanisms of action, and are in clinical or agricultural use. We summarize the progress for genetically manipulating biosynthetic pathways for structural diversification of nucleoside antibiotics. Microorganism-based biosynthetic examples are provided and organized under genetic principles and metabolic engineering guidelines. We show perspectives on the future of combinatorial biosynthesis, and present a working model for discovery of novel nucleoside natural products in Streptomyces.

  4. Lipases in green chemistry: acylation and alcoholysis on steroids and nucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldessari, Alicia; Iglesias, Luis E

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we describe the application of lipases in acylation and alcoholysis reactions on steroids and nucleosides. In the field of steroids, a variety of acetyl and fatty acid derivatives of androstanes, pregnanes, and cholestanes have been prepared through lipase-catalyzed acylation and alcoholysis reactions taking advantage of the high regio- and stereoselectivity of these enzymes. The substrates as well as the products show a high degree of biological activity as neurosteroids, hormones, and glucocorticoids. The regioselective preparation of diacylated nucleosides by means of an enzymatic alcoholysis allowed the synthesis of nucleosides prodrugs or modified nucleosides. The quantitative full deacylation and dealkoxycarbonylation of nucleosides and steroids is a mild synthetic method for the deprotection of these labile compounds. Some of the reported steroid and nucleoside products are novel, and it is not possible to obtain them satisfactorily by following traditional synthetic procedures. The advantages presented by this methodology, such as selectivity, mild reaction conditions, and low environmental impact, make the lipases an important tool in the application of the principles of Green Chemistry, offering a convenient way to prepare derivatives of natural compounds with a great potential in the pharmaceutical industry.

  5. Prediction of Refrigerant Gas Hydrates Formation Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deqing Liang; Ruzhu Wang; Kaihua Guo; Shuanshi Fan

    2001-01-01

    A fugacity model was developed for prediction of mixed refrigerant gas hydrates formation conditions based on the molecule congregation and solution theories. In this model, g as hydrates were regarded as non-ideal solid solution composed of water groups and guest molecules, and the expressions of fugacity of guest molecules in hydrate phase was proposed accordingly. It has been shown that the developed model can indicate successfully the effect of guest-guest molecule interaction. The results showed that the model can describe better the characteristics of phase equilibrium of mixed refrigerant gas hydrates and predictions are in good agreement with experimental data.

  6. Desalination utilizing clathrate hydrates (LDRD final report).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Greathouse, Jeffery A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Majzoub, Eric H. (University of Missouri, Columbia, MO)

    2008-01-01

    Advances are reported in several aspects of clathrate hydrate desalination fundamentals necessary to develop an economical means to produce municipal quantities of potable water from seawater or brackish feedstock. These aspects include the following, (1) advances in defining the most promising systems design based on new types of hydrate guest molecules, (2) selection of optimal multi-phase reactors and separation arrangements, and, (3) applicability of an inert heat exchange fluid to moderate hydrate growth, control the morphology of the solid hydrate material formed, and facilitate separation of hydrate solids from concentrated brine. The rate of R141b hydrate formation was determined and found to depend only on the degree of supercooling. The rate of R141b hydrate formation in the presence of a heat exchange fluid depended on the degree of supercooling according to the same rate equation as pure R141b with secondary dependence on salinity. Experiments demonstrated that a perfluorocarbon heat exchange fluid assisted separation of R141b hydrates from brine. Preliminary experiments using the guest species, difluoromethane, showed that hydrate formation rates were substantial at temperatures up to at least 12 C and demonstrated partial separation of water from brine. We present a detailed molecular picture of the structure and dynamics of R141b guest molecules within water cages, obtained from ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and Raman spectroscopy. Density functional theory calculations were used to provide an energetic and molecular orbital description of R141b stability in both large and small cages in a structure II hydrate. Additionally, the hydrate of an isomer, 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, does not form at ambient conditions because of extensive overlap of electron density between guest and host. Classical molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory trials support the results for the isomer hydrate. Molecular dynamics simulations

  7. The inhibition of methane hydrate formation by water alignment underneath surface adsorption of surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ngoc N.; Nguyen, Anh V.; Dang, Liem X.

    2017-06-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been widely shown to strongly promote the formation of methane hydrate. Here we show that SDS displays an extraordinary inhibition effect on methane hydrate formation when the surfactant is used in sub-millimolar concentration (around 0.3 mM). We have also employed Sum Frequency Generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) to elucidate the molecular mechanism of this inhibition. The SFG and MDS results revealed a strong alignment of water molecules underneath surface adsorption of SDS in its sub-millimolar solution. Interestingly, both the alignment of water and the inhibition effect (in 0.3 mM SDS solution) went vanishing when an oppositely-charged surfactant (tetra-n-butylammonium bromide, TBAB) was suitably added to produce a mixed solution of 0.3 mM SDS and 3.6 mM TBAB. Combining structural and kinetic results, we pointed out that the alignment of water underneath surface adsorption of dodecyl sulfate (DS-) anions gave rise to the unexpected inhibition of methane hydration formation in sub-millimolar solution of SDS. The adoption of TBAB mitigated the SDS-induced electrostatic field at the solution’s surface and, therefore, weakened the alignment of interfacial water which, in turn, erased the inhibition effect. We discussed this finding using the concept of activation energy of the interfacial formation of gas hydrate. The main finding of this work is to reveal the interplay of interfacial water in governing gas hydrate formation which sheds light on a universal molecular-scale understanding of the influence of surfactants on gas hydrate formation. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  8. Waters of Hydration of Cupric Hydrates: A Comparison between Heating and Absorbance Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2011-01-01

    The empirical formulas of four cupric hydrates are determined by measuring the absorbance in aqueous solution. The Beer-Lambert Law is verified by constructing a calibration curve of absorbance versus known Cu[superscript 2+](aq) concentration. A solution of the unknown hydrate is prepared by using 0.2-0.3 g of hydrate, and water is added such…

  9. Proton hydration in aqueous solution: Fourier transform infrared studies of HDO spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śmiechowski, Maciej; Stangret, Janusz

    2006-11-01

    hydration layer, shared with the anion, as well as loosely bound water molecules interacting with free electron pairs of the central complex were detected in the affected spectra.

  10. Role of Mechanical Stress in Regulating Airway Surface Hydration and Mucus Clearance Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Brian; Boucher, Richard C.

    2008-01-01

    Effective clearance of mucus is a critical innate airway defense mechanism, and under appropriate conditions, can be stimulated to enhance clearance of inhaled pathogens. It has become increasingly clear that extracellular nucleotides (ATP and UTP) and nucleosides (adenosine) are important regulators of mucus clearance in the airways as a result of their ability to stimulate fluid secretion, mucus hydration, and cilia beat frequency (CBF). One ubiquitous mechanism to stimulate ATP release is through external mechanical stress. This article addresses the role of physiologically-relevant mechanical forces in the lung and their effects on regulating mucociliary clearance (MCC). The effects of mechanical forces on the stimulating ATP release, fluid secretion, CBF, and MCC are discussed. Also discussed is evidence suggesting that airway hydration and stimulation of MCC by stress-mediated ATP release may play a role in several therapeutic strategies directed at improving mucus clearance in patients with obstructive lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). PMID:18585484

  11. Hydration in soccer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. The rates that carbohydrate and water are absorbed by the organism are limited by the rates of gastric emptying and intestinal absorption. The composition of drinks offered to the players should be influenced by the relative importance of the need of supplying carbohydrates or water; it should be remembered that the depletion of carbohydrate can result in fatigue and decrease of performance, but it is not usually a life-threatening condition. The addition of carbohydrate in these drinks increases the concentrations of blood glucose, increases the use of external fuel through the increase of the glucose oxidation in the muscles and it spares muscle glycogen. So, the ingestion of carbohydrate before and during the exercise can delay the emergence of fatigue and increase the players' performance. Several tactics can be used to avoid dehydration, like hyperhydration before exercise and player's acclimatization. The ideal situation to restore the player's fluid losses is between the sessions of exercises. Since soccer is a sport with quite peculiar characteristics related to hydration, the players should be concerned and educated about the importance of fluid ingestion before, during and after the exercise.

  12. Structure and water exchange dynamics of hydrated oxo halo ions in aqueous solution using QMCF MD simulation, large angle X-ray scattering and EXAFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Lars; Hofer, Tomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) has been applied in conjunction with experimental large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and EXAFS measurements to study structure and dynamics of the hydrated oxo chloro anions chlorite, ClO2−, chlorate, ClO3−, and perchlorate, ClO4−. In addition, the structures of the hydrated hypochlorite, ClO−, bromate, BrO3−, iodate, IO3− and metaperiodate, IO4−, ions have been determined in aqueous solution by means of LAXS. The structures of the bromate, metaperiodate, and orthoperiodate, H2IO63−, ions have been determined by EXAFS as solid sodium salts and in aqueous solution as well. The results show clearly that the only form of periodate present in aqueous solution is metaperiodate. The Cl-O bond distances in the hydrated oxo chloro anions as determined by LAXS and obtained in the QMCF MD simulations are in excellent agreement, being 0.01–0.02 Å longer than in solid anhydrous salts due to hydration through hydrogen bonding to water molecules. The oxo halo anions, all with unit negative charge, have low charge density making them typical structure breakers, thus the hydrogen bonds formed to the hydrating water molecules are weaker and more short-lived than those between water molecules in pure water. The water exchange mechanism of the oxo chloro anions resembles those of the oxo sulfur anions with a direct exchange at the oxygen atoms for perchlorate and sulfate. The water exchange rate for the perchlorate ion is significantly faster, τ0.5=1.4 ps, compared to the hydrated sulfate ion and pure water, τ0.5=2.6 and 1.7 ps, respectively. The angular radial distribution functions show that the chlorate and sulfite ions have a more complex water exchange mechanism. As the chlorite and chlorate ions are more weakly hydrated than the sulfite ion the spatial occupancy is less well-defined and it is not possible to follow any well-defined migration pattern as it is difficult to

  13. Hydration behaviour of polyhydroxylated fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Zavala, J G [Departamento de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnologicas, Centro Universitario de Los Lagos, Universidad de Guadalajara, Enrique Diaz de Leon S/N, 47460 Jalisco (Mexico); Barajas-Barraza, R E [Departamento de Matematicas y Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Occidente, Periferico Sur, Manuel Gomez MorIn No 8585, 45604 Jalisco (Mexico); Padilla-Osuna, I; Guirado-Lopez, R A, E-mail: jgrz@culagos.udg.mx, E-mail: ebarajas@iteso.mx, E-mail: ismael@ifisica.uaslp.mx, E-mail: guirado@ifisica.uaslp.mx [Instituto de Fisica ' Manuel Sandoval Vallarta' , Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, 78000 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2011-10-28

    We have performed semi-empirical as well as density functional theory calculations in order to analyse the hydration properties of both bare C{sub 60} and highly hydroxylated C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} fullerenes. In all of our calculations, a total of 42 and 98 water molecules are always surrounding our here-considered carbon nanostructures. We found different wetting properties as a function of the chemical composition and structure of the OH-molecular over-layer covering the fullerene surface. In the case of bare C{sub 60}, water adsorption reveals that the H{sub 2}O species are not uniformly arranged around the carbon network but rather forms water droplets of different sizes, clearly revealing the hydrophobic nature of the C{sub 60} structure. In contrast, in the polyhydroxylated C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} fullerenes, the degree of wetting is strongly influenced by the precise location of the hydroxyl groups. We found that different adsorbed configurations for the OH-molecular coating can lead to the formation of partially hydrated or completely covered C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} compounds, a result that could be used to synthesize fullerene materials with different degrees of wettability. By comparing the relative stability of our hydroxylated structures in both bare and hydrated conditions we obtain that the energy ordering of the C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} isomers can change in the presence of water. The radial distribution function of our hydrated fullerenes reveals that water near these kinds of surfaces is densely packed. In fact, by counting the number of H{sub 2}O molecules which are adsorbed, by means of hydrogen bonds, to the surface of our more stable C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} isomer, we found that it varies in the range of 5-10, in good agreement with experiments. Finally, by comparing the calculated optical absorption spectra of various C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} structures in the presence and absence of water molecules, we note that only slight variations in the position and

  14. Protein dynamics: hydration and cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Heremans

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-pressure behavior of proteins seems to be unique among the biological macromolecules. Thermodynamic as well as kinetic data show the typical elliptical stability diagram. This may be extended by assuming that the unfolded state gives rise to volume and enthalpy-driven liquid-liquid transitions. A molecular interpretation follows from the temperature and the pressure dependence of the hydration and cavities. We suggest that positron annihilation spectroscopy can provide additional quantitative evidence for the contributions of cavities to the dynamics of proteins. Only mature amyloid fibrils that form from unfolded proteins are very resistant to pressure treatment.

  15. Anion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vadivel Murugan

    2003-01-01

    . Its characterization is investigated by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The hybrid material presents predominantly high electronic conductivities of around 2.0 and 7.0 S cm-1 at 300 and 400K respectively.

  16. Coarse-grained model of water diffusion and proton conductivity in hydrated polyelectrolyte membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we simulate nanoscale segregation, water diffusion, and proton conductivity in hydrated sulfonated polystyrene (sPS). We employ a novel model [Lee et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11(9), 4395-4403 (2015)] that incorporates protonation/deprotonation equilibria into DPD simulations. The polymer and water are modeled by coarse-grained beads interacting via short-range soft repulsion and smeared charge electrostatic potentials. The proton is introduced as a separate charged bead that forms dissociable Morse bonds with the base beads representing water and sulfonate anions. Morse bond formation and breakup artificially mimics the Grotthuss mechanism of proton hopping between the bases. The DPD model is parameterized by matching the proton mobility in bulk water, dissociation constant of benzenesulfonic acid, and liquid-liquid equilibrium of water-ethylbenzene solutions. The DPD simulations semi-quantitatively predict nanoscale segregation in the hydrated sPS into hydrophobic and hydrophilic subphases, water self-diffusion, and proton mobility. As the hydration level increases, the hydrophilic subphase exhibits a percolation transition from isolated water clusters to a 3D network. The analysis of hydrophilic subphase connectivity and water diffusion demonstrates the importance of the dynamic percolation effect of formation and breakup of temporary junctions between water clusters. The proposed DPD model qualitatively predicts the ratio of proton to water self-diffusion and its dependence on the hydration level that is in reasonable agreement with experiments.

  17. Coarse-grained model of water diffusion and proton conductivity in hydrated polyelectrolyte membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V., E-mail: aneimark@rutgers.edu [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 98 Brett Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8058 (United States)

    2016-01-07

    Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we simulate nanoscale segregation, water diffusion, and proton conductivity in hydrated sulfonated polystyrene (sPS). We employ a novel model [Lee et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11(9), 4395-4403 (2015)] that incorporates protonation/deprotonation equilibria into DPD simulations. The polymer and water are modeled by coarse-grained beads interacting via short-range soft repulsion and smeared charge electrostatic potentials. The proton is introduced as a separate charged bead that forms dissociable Morse bonds with the base beads representing water and sulfonate anions. Morse bond formation and breakup artificially mimics the Grotthuss mechanism of proton hopping between the bases. The DPD model is parameterized by matching the proton mobility in bulk water, dissociation constant of benzenesulfonic acid, and liquid-liquid equilibrium of water-ethylbenzene solutions. The DPD simulations semi-quantitatively predict nanoscale segregation in the hydrated sPS into hydrophobic and hydrophilic subphases, water self-diffusion, and proton mobility. As the hydration level increases, the hydrophilic subphase exhibits a percolation transition from isolated water clusters to a 3D network. The analysis of hydrophilic subphase connectivity and water diffusion demonstrates the importance of the dynamic percolation effect of formation and breakup of temporary junctions between water clusters. The proposed DPD model qualitatively predicts the ratio of proton to water self-diffusion and its dependence on the hydration level that is in reasonable agreement with experiments.

  18. Formation rate of natural gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, Marit

    2002-07-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 deg C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted to hydrate. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by gas injection rate and pressure. The effect of stirring rate is less significant and subcooling has no observable effect on the formation rate. Hydrate crystal concentration and gas composition do not influence the hydrate formation rate. Observations of produced hydrate crystals indicate that the crystals are elongated, about 5 micron in diameter and 10 micron long. Analysis of the results shows that the rate of hydrate formation is dominated by gas-liquid mass transfer. A mass transfer model, the bubble-to-crystal model, was developed for the hydrate formation rate in a continuous stirred tank reactor, given in terms of concentration driving force and an overall mass transfer coefficient. The driving force is the difference between the gas concentration at the gas-liquid interface and at the hydrate crystal surface. These concentrations correspond to the solubility of gas in water at experimental temperature and pressure and the solubility of gas at hydrate equilibrium temperature and experimental pressure, respectively. The overall mass transfer coefficient is expressed in terms of superficial gas velocity and impeller power consumption, parameters commonly used in study of stirred tank reactors. Experiments and modeling show that the stirred tank reactor has a considerable potential for increased production capacity. However, at higher hydrate production rates the

  19. Removal of methyl orange from aqueous solutions through adsorption by calcium aluminate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Tianqi; Qian, Guangren; Wu, Daishe; Frost, Ray L

    2014-07-15

    Methyl orange (MO) is a kind of anionic dye and widely used in industry. In this study, tricalcium aluminate hydrates (Ca-Al-LDHs) are used as an adsorbent to remove methyl orange (MO) from aqueous solutions. The resulting products were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (MIR), thermal analysis (TG-DTA) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The XRD results indicated that the MO molecules were successfully intercalated into the tricalcium aluminate hydrates, with the basal spacing of Ca-Al-LDH expanding to 2.48 nm. The MIR spectrum for CaAl-MO-LDH shows obvious bands assigned to the N=N, N=H stretching vibrations and S=O, SO3(-) group respectively, which are considered as marks to assess MO(-) ion intercalation into the interlayers of LDH. The overall morphology of CaAl-MO-LDH displayed a "honey-comb" like structure, with the adjacent layers expanded.

  20. Hydrogen bond fluctuations of the hydration shell of the bromide anion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, R.L.A.; Bakker, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    We study the hydrogen bond dynamics of solutions of LiBr and NaBr in isotopically diluted water (2% HDO:D2O) with femtosecond spectral hole-burning spectroscopy. We study the frequency fluctuations of the O-H stretch vibrations of the HDO molecules and observe spectral dynamics with time constants o

  1. Hofmeister Effect on PNIPAM in Bulk and at an Interface: Surface Partitioning of Weakly Hydrated Anions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghaddam, Saeed Zajforoushan; Thormann, Esben

    2017-01-01

    The effect of sodium fluoride, sodium trichloroacetate, and sodium thiocyanate on the stability and conformation of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), in bulk solution and at the gold-aqueous interface, is investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic light scattering, quartz crystal...

  2. Exit channel dynamics in a micro-hydrated SN2 reaction of the hydroxyl anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, R; Brox, J; Trippel, S; Stei, M; Best, T; Wester, R

    2013-08-29

    We report on the reaction dynamics of the monosolvated SN2 reaction of cold OH(-)(H2O) with CH3I that have been studied using crossed beam ion imaging. Two SN2 reaction channels are possible for this reaction: Formation of unsolvated I(-) and of solvated I(-)(H2O) products. We find a strong preference for the formation of unsolvated I(-) reaction products with respect to the energetically favored reaction toward solvated I(-)(H2O). Angle differential cross section measurements reveal similar velocity and angular distributions for all solvated and parts of the unsolvated reaction products. We furthermore find that the contribution of these two products to the total product flux can be described by the same collision energy dependence. We interpret our findings in terms of a joint reaction mechanism in which a CH3OH(H2O)···I(-) complex is formed that decays into either solvated or unsolvated products. Quantum chemical calculation are used to support this assumption.

  3. Effect of Hydration on the Mechanical Properties of Anion Exchange Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-19

    dimethylacetamide, about 25 cm3, decanted from molecular sieves , at a temperature of 100°C. The perfluorosulfonyl material was aminated using a 10-fold... molecular excess of the diamine, consisting of a 3 carbon 25 methylene chain with a primary amine on one end and a tertiary amine on the other, such...Exposure to carbon dioxide causes the hydroxide ions in the liquid electrolyte to form insoluble potassium carbonate /bicarbonate precipitates that can

  4. Synthesis of acylamino acid esters of nucleoside 5'-phosphates and their investigation with PMR and CD spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhayev, A V; Popovkina, S V; Tarussova, N B; Kirpichnikov, M P; Florentiev, V L; Krayevsky, A A; Kukhanova, M K; Gottikh, B P

    1977-01-01

    The acylamino acid esters of nucleoside 5'-phosphates are synthesized via condensation of N-(N'-acylaminoacyl) imidazoles with nucleoside 5'-phosphates. The PMR and CD spectra of the esters obtained are studied. The 3'-isomers of the substances under study are observed to have a shift in the conformational N in equilibrium S equilibrium of the carbohydrate moiety in favour of the S-form as compared to the initial nucleosides and their 2'-acyl esters. PMID:909771

  5. Suiciding of lymphocytic precursor cells by tritiated nucleosides, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyeki, E M; Nishimura, T; Bisel, T U

    1978-02-01

    Differences in suiciding by various tritiated nucleosides were observed between two functional assays for in vitro lymphocytic precursor cell development, the hemolysin plaque-forming cell (PFC) assay and the B lymphocytic colony-forming cell (CFC-L) assay, using BDF1 mouse spleen cells. PFC growth was markedly reduced by an early (days 0-1) pulse of tritiated deoxyadenosine ([3H]dAdo), but relatively unaffected by a pulse of tritiated thymidine ([3H]dThd) during the same interval. In contrast, CFC-L formation significantly dropped after an early (day 0) [3H]dThd pulse, as well as after pulses of [3H]dAdo and the corresponding tritiated ribosides, uridine and adenosine. This implied a cycling state in an early lymphocytic precursor cell, as opposed to the PFC insensitivity to an early [3H]dThd pulse. The response pattern of colonies and clusters to [3H]dThd supported our notion of a delayed suiciding of CFC contributing to the increase in cluster numbers.

  6. Antibacterial Nucleoside-Analog Inhibitor of Bacterial RNA Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffioli, Sonia I; Zhang, Yu; Degen, David; Carzaniga, Thomas; Del Gatto, Giancarlo; Serina, Stefania; Monciardini, Paolo; Mazzetti, Carlo; Guglierame, Paola; Candiani, Gianpaolo; Chiriac, Alina Iulia; Facchetti, Giuseppe; Kaltofen, Petra; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Dehò, Gianni; Donadio, Stefano; Ebright, Richard H

    2017-06-15

    Drug-resistant bacterial pathogens pose an urgent public-health crisis. Here, we report the discovery, from microbial-extract screening, of a nucleoside-analog inhibitor that inhibits bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) and exhibits antibacterial activity against drug-resistant bacterial pathogens: pseudouridimycin (PUM). PUM is a natural product comprising a formamidinylated, N-hydroxylated Gly-Gln dipeptide conjugated to 6'-amino-pseudouridine. PUM potently and selectively inhibits bacterial RNAP in vitro, inhibits bacterial growth in culture, and clears infection in a mouse model of Streptococcus pyogenes peritonitis. PUM inhibits RNAP through a binding site on RNAP (the NTP addition site) and mechanism (competition with UTP for occupancy of the NTP addition site) that differ from those of the RNAP inhibitor and current antibacterial drug rifampin (Rif). PUM exhibits additive antibacterial activity when co-administered with Rif, exhibits no cross-resistance with Rif, and exhibits a spontaneous resistance rate an order-of-magnitude lower than that of Rif. PUM is a highly promising lead for antibacterial therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. DNA nucleoside composition and methylation in several species of microalgae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, E.E.; Dunahay, T.G.; Brown, L.M. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States))

    1992-06-01

    Total DNA was isolated from 10 species of microalgae, including representatives of the Chlorophyceae (Chlorella ellipsoidea, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and Monoraphidium minutum), Bacillariophyceae (Cyclotella cryptica, Navicula saprophila, Nitzschia pusilla, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum), Charophyceae (Stichococcus sp.), Dinophyceae (Crypthecodinium cohnii), and Prasinophyceae (Tetraselmis suecica). Control samples of Escherichia coli and calf thymus DNA were also analyzed. The nucleoside base composition of each DNA sample was determined by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. All samples contained 5-methyldeoxycytidine, although at widely varying levels. In M. minutum, about one-third of the cytidine residues were methylated. Restriction analysis supported this high degree of methylation in M. minutum and suggested that methylation is biased toward 5[prime]-CG dinucleotides. The guanosine + cytosine (GC) contents of the green algae were, with the exception of Stichococcus sp., consistently higher than those of the diatoms. Monoraphidium minutum exhibited an extremely high GC content of 71%. Such a value is rare among eukaryotic organisms and might indicate an unusual codon usage. This work is important for developing strategies for transformation and gene cloning in these algae. 46 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Dynamics of a photoexcited hydrated electron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pshenichnikov, M.S.; Baltuška, A.; Wiersma, D.A.; Kärtner, F.X.

    2004-01-01

    Combining photon-echo and frequency-resolved pump-probe techniques with extremely short laser pulses that consist of only few optical cycles, we investigate the dynamics of the equilibrated hydrated electron. The pure dephasing time of the hydrated electron deduced from the photon-echo measurements

  9. Gas hydrate inhibition of drilling fluid additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaolan, L.; Baojiang, S.; Shaoran, R. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Dongying (China). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates that form during offshore well drilling can have adverse impacts on well operational safety. The hydrates typically form in the risers and the annulus between the casing and the drillstring, and can stop the circulation of drilling fluids. In this study, experiments were conducted to measure the effect of drilling fluid additives on hydrate inhibition. Polyalcohols, well-stability control agents, lubricating agents, and polymeric materials were investigated in a stirred tank reactor at temperatures ranging from -10 degree C to 60 degrees C. Pressure, temperature, and torque were used to detect onset points of hydrate formation and dissociation. The inhibitive effect of the additives on hydrate formation was quantified. Phase boundary shifts were measured in terms of temperature difference or sub-cooling gained when chemicals were added to pure water. Results showed that the multiple hydroxyl groups in polyalcohol chemicals significantly inhibited hydrate formation. Polymeric and polyacrylamide materials had only a small impact on hydrate formation, while sulfonated methyl tannins were found to increase hydrate formation. 6 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  10. Hydration shells exchange charge with their protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abitan, Haim; Lindgård, Per-Anker; Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert;

    2010-01-01

    Investigation of the interaction between a protein and its hydration shells is an experimental and theoretical challenge. Here, we used ultrasonic pressure waves in aqueous solutions of a protein to explore the conformational states of the protein and its interaction with its hydration shells. In...

  11. A new geotechnical gas hydrates research laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Gas hydrates encapsulate natural gas molecules in a very compact form, as ice-like compounds composed of water molecules. Permafrost environments and offshore areas contain vast quantities of gas hydrates within soil and rock. This paper describes the role played by gas hydrates in submarine slope instability, their potential as a sustainable energy source, and their effects on global climate change. A new state-of-the-art laboratory located at the University of Calgary, which was developed to study the geomechanical behaviour of gas hydrate-sediment mixtures, was also presented. A specialized high pressure low temperature triaxial apparatus capable of performing a suite of tests on gas hydrate-sediment mixtures is housed in this laboratory. Extensive renovations were required in order to enable the use of methane gas to simulate natural hydrate formation conditions. The laboratory is specifically designed to examine the properties and behaviour of reconstituted gas hydrate-sediment mixtures and natural gas hydrate core samples. 26 refs., 9 figs.

  12. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  13. Vibrational Autodetachment in Nitroalkane Anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Christopher L.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2010-06-01

    Nitroalkanes have electron affinities ge 1370 cm-1, well below the excitation energies for CH stretching modes, with the excess charge localized on the nitro group. Upon absorption of an IR photon in a CH stretching vibrational mode, the absorbed energy is redistributed in the molecule. If enough energy is transferred to the NO2 stretching/wagging modes, the excess electron residing on the nitro group is emitted. Vibrational autodetachment (VAD) spectra encode information regarding intramolecular vibrational relaxation (IVR) processes leading up to electron emission. We present VAD photoelectron spectroscopy of polyatomic molecular anions and discuss how a VAD photoelectron spectrum can be modeled.

  14. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the

  15. Human concentrative nucleoside transporter 3 transfection with ultrasound and microbubbles in nucleoside transport deficient HEK293 cells greatly increases gemcitabine uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paproski, Robert J; Yao, Sylvia Y M; Favis, Nicole; Evans, David; Young, James D; Cass, Carol E; Zemp, Roger J

    2013-01-01

    Gemcitabine is a hydrophilic clinical anticancer drug that requires nucleoside transporters to cross plasma membranes and enter cells. Pancreatic adenocarcinomas with low levels of nucleoside transporters are generally resistant to gemcitabine and are currently a clinical problem. We tested whether transfection of human concentrative nucleoside transporter 3 (hCNT3) using ultrasound and lipid stabilized microbubbles could increase gemcitabine uptake and sensitivity in HEK293 cells made nucleoside transport deficient by pharmacologic treatment with dilazep. To our knowledge, no published data exists regarding the utility of using hCNT3 as a therapeutic gene to reverse gemcitabine resistance. Our ultrasound transfection system--capable of transfection of cell cultures, mouse muscle and xenograft CEM/araC tumors--increased hCNT3 mRNA and (3)H-gemcitabine uptake by >2,000- and 3,400-fold, respectively, in dilazep-treated HEK293 cells. Interestingly, HEK293 cells with both functional human equilibrative nucleoside transporters and hCNT3 displayed 5% of (3)H-gemcitabine uptake observed in cells with only functional hCNT3, suggesting that equilibrative nucleoside transporters caused significant efflux of (3)H-gemcitabine. Efflux assays confirmed that dilazep could inhibit the majority of (3)H-gemcitabine efflux from HEK293 cells, suggesting that hENTs were responsible for the majority of efflux from the tested cells. Oocyte uptake transport assays were also performed and provided support for our hypothesis. Gemcitabine uptake and efflux assays were also performed on pancreatic cancer AsPC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 cells with similar results to that of HEK293 cells. Using the MTS proliferation assay, dilazep-treated HEK293 cells demonstrated 13-fold greater resistance to gemcitabine compared to dilazep-untreated HEK293 cells and this resistance could be reversed by transfection of hCNT3 cDNA. We propose that transfection of hCNT3 cDNA using ultrasound and microbubbles may be a

  16. Compound Natural Gas Hydrate: A Natural System for Separation of Hydrate-Forming Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, M. D.; Osegovic, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Natural processes that separate materials from a mixture may exert a major influence on the development of the atmospheres and surfaces of planets, moons, and other planetary bodies. Natural distillation and gravity separation, amongst others, are well known means of differentiating materials through liquid-gas partitioning. One of the least known attributes of clathrate (gas) hydrates is their potential effect on the evolution of planetary system oceans and atmospheres. Gas hydrates separate gases from mixtures of gases by concentrating preferred hydrate-forming materials (HFM) guests within the water-molecule cage structure of crystalline hydrate. Different HFMs have very different fields of stability. When multiple hydrate formers are present, a preference series based on their selective uptake exists. Compound hydrate, which is formed from two or more species of HFM, extract preferred HFM from a mixture in very different proportions to their relative percentages of the original mixture. These compound hydrates can have different formation and dissociation conditions depending on the evolution of the environment. That is, the phase boundary of the compound hydrate that is required for dissociation lies along a lower pressure - higher temperature course. Compound hydrates respond to variations in temperature, pressure, and HFM composition. On Earth, the primary naturally occurring hydrate of interest to global climate modeling is methane hydrate. Oceanic hydrate on Earth is the largest store of carbon in the biosphere that is immediately reactive to environmental change, and is capable of releasing large amounts of methane into the atmosphere over a short geological time span. Hydrate formation is essentially metastable and is very sensitive to environmental change and to gas flux. Where natural variations in temperature and pressure varies so that hydrate will form and dissociate in some cyclical manner, such as in oceans where sea level is capable of rising and

  17. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  18. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated

  19. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-07-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  20. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-06-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  1. Schlenk Techniques for Anionic Polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Ratkanthwar, Kedar

    2015-09-01

    Anionic polymerization-high vacuum techniques (HVTs) are doubtlessly the most prominent and reliable experimental tools to prepare polymer samples with well-defined and, in many cases, complex macromolecular architectures. Due to the high demands for time and skilled technical personnel, HVTs are currently used in only a few research laboratories worldwide. Instead, most researchers in this filed are attracted to more facile Schlenk techniques. The basic principle of this technique followed in all laboratories is substantially the same, i.e. the use of alternate vacuum and inert gas atmosphere in glass apparatus for the purification/charging of monomer, solvents, additives, and for the manipulation of air-sensitive compounds such as alkyl metal initiators, organometallic or organic catalysts. However, it is executed quite differently in each research group in terms of the structure of Schlenk apparatus (manifolds, connections, purification/storage flasks, reactors, etc.), the use of small supplementary devices (soft tubing, cannulas, stopcocks, etc.) and experimental procedures. The operational methods are partly purpose-oriented while also featured by a high flexibility, which makes it impossible to describe in detail each specific one. In this chapter we will briefly exemplify the application of Schlenk techniques for anionic polymerization by describing the performance of a few experiments from our own work.

  2. Tunable electronic interactions between anions and perylenediimide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Flynt S; Panda, Dillip K; Ray, Shuvasree; Mitra, Atanu; Guha, Samit; Saha, Sourav

    2013-08-07

    Over the past decade anion-π interaction has emerged as a new paradigm of supramolecular chemistry of anions. Taking advantage of the electronic nature of anion-π interaction, we have expanded its boundaries to charge-transfer (CT) and formal electron transfer (ET) events by adjusting the electron-donating and accepting abilities of anions and π-acids, respectively. To establish that ET, CT, and anion-π interactions could take place between different anions and π-acids as long as their electronic and structural properties are conducive, herein, we introduce 3,4,9,10-perylenediimide (PDI-1) that selectively undergoes thermal ET from strong Lewis basic hydroxide and fluoride anions, but remains electronically and optically silent to poor Lewis basic anions, as ET and CT events are turned OFF. These interactions have been fully characterized by UV/Vis, NMR, and EPR spectroscopies. These results demonstrate the generality of anion-induced ET events in aprotic solvents and further refute a notion that strong Lewis basic hydroxide and fluoride ions can only trigger nucleophilic attack to form covalent bonds instead of acting as sacrificial electron donors to π-acids under appropriate conditions.

  3. Adsorption affinity of anions on metal oxyhydroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechenyuk, S. I.; Semushina, Yu. P.; Kuz'mich, L. F.

    2013-03-01

    The dependences of anion (phosphate, carbonate, sulfate, chromate, oxalate, tartrate, and citrate) adsorption affinity anions from geometric characteristics, acid-base properties, and complex forming ability are generalized. It is shown that adsorption depends on the nature of both the anions and the ionic medium and adsorbent. It is established that anions are generally grouped into the following series of adsorption affinity reduction: PO{4/3-}, CO{3/2-} > C2O{4/2-}, C(OH)(CH2)2(COO){3/3-}, (CHOH)2(COO){2/2-} > CrO{4/2-} ≫ SO{4/2-}.

  4. Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

    2011-04-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with

  5. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a

  6. Apoplastic Nucleoside Accumulation in Arabidopsis Leads to Reduced Photosynthetic Performance and Increased Susceptibility Against Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daumann, Manuel; Fischer, Marietta; Niopek-Witz, Sandra; Girke, Christopher; Möhlmann, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between plant and pathogen often occur in the extracellular space and especially nucleotides like ATP and NAD have been identified as key players in this scenario. Arabidopsis mutants accumulating nucleosides in the extracellular space were generated and studied with respect to susceptibility against Botrytis cinerea infection and general plant fitness determined as photosynthetic performance. The mutants used are deficient in the main nucleoside uptake system ENT3 and the extracellular nucleoside hydrolase NSH3. When grown on soil but not in hydroponic culture, these plants markedly accumulate adenosine and uridine in leaves. This nucleoside accumulation was accompanied by reduced photosystem II efficiency and altered expression of photosynthesis related genes. Moreover, a higher susceptibility toward Botrytis cinerea infection and a reduced induction of pathogen related genes PR1 and WRKY33 was observed. All these effects did not occur in hydroponically grown plants substantiating a contribution of extracellular nucleosides to these effects. Whether reduced general plant fitness, altered pathogen response capability or more direct interactions with the pathogen are responsible for these observations is discussed.

  7. Apoplastic nucleoside accumulation in Arabidopsis leads to reduced photosynthetic performance and increased susceptibility against Botrytis cinerea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel eDaumann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Interactions between plant and pathogen often occur in the extracellular space and especially nucleotides like ATP and NAD have been identified as key players in this scenario. Arabidopsis mutants accumulating nucleosides in the extracellular space were generated and studied with respect to susceptibility against Botrytis cinerea infection and general plant fitness determined as photosynthetic performance. The mutants used are deficient in the main nucleoside uptake system ENT3 and the extracellular nucleoside hydrolase NSH3. When grown on soil but not in hydroponic culture, these plants markedly accumulate adenosine and uridine in leaves. This nucleoside accumulation was accpmpanied by reduced photosystem II efficiency and altered expression of photosynthesis related genes. Moreover, a higher susceptibility towards Botrytis cinerea infection and a reduced induction of pathogen related genes PR1 and WRKY33 was observed. All these effects did not occur in hydroponically grown plants substantiating a contribution of extracellular nucleosides to these effects. Whether reduced general plant fitness, altered pathogen response capability or more direct interactions with the pathogen are responsible for these observations is discussed.

  8. Mass fractionation of noble gases in synthetic methane hydrate: Implications for naturally occurring gas hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Stern, Laura; Pohlman, John W.; Ruppel, Carolyn; Moscati, Richard J.; Landis, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of contemporary or longer term (since 15 ka) climate warming, gas hydrates in some settings may presently be dissociating and releasing methane and other gases to the ocean-atmosphere system. A key challenge in assessing the impact of dissociating gas hydrates on global atmospheric methane is the lack of a technique able to distinguish between methane recently released from gas hydrates and methane emitted from leaky thermogenic reservoirs, shallow sediments (some newly thawed), coal beds, and other sources. Carbon and deuterium stable isotopic fractionation during methane formation provides a first-order constraint on the processes (microbial or thermogenic) of methane generation. However, because gas hydrate formation and dissociation do not cause significant isotopic fractionation, a stable isotope-based hydrate-source determination is not possible. Here, we investigate patterns of mass-dependent noble gas fractionation within the gas hydrate lattice to fingerprint methane released from gas hydrates. Starting with synthetic gas hydrate formed under laboratory conditions, we document complex noble gas fractionation patterns in the gases liberated during dissociation and explore the effects of aging and storage (e.g., in liquid nitrogen), as well as sampling and preservation procedures. The laboratory results confirm a unique noble gas fractionation pattern for gas hydrates, one that shows promise in evaluating modern natural gas seeps for a signature associated with gas hydrate dissociation.

  9. Bound anions differentially stabilize multiprotein complexes in the absence of bulk solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Linjie; Hyung, Suk-Joon; Mayers, Jonathan J S; Ruotolo, Brandon T

    2011-07-27

    the known Hofmeister salt series in solution. While this is an expected outcome of our work, due to the diminished influence of anion and protein solvation by water, our data correlates well to expected anion binding in solution and highlights the fact that both hydration layer and anion-protein binding effects are critical for Hofmeister-type stabilization in solution. Finally, we present a detailed mechanism of action for counterion stabilization of proteins and their complexes in the gas-phase, which indicates that anions must bind with high affinity, but must dissociate readily from the protein in order to be an effective stabilizer. Anion-resolved data acquired for smaller protein systems allows us to classify anions into three categories based on their ability to stabilize protein and protein complex structure in the absence of bulk solvent.

  10. Hydration Properties of Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag (GGBS Under Different Hydration Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua LIU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The hydration properties of various cementitious materials containing Ground Granulated Blast-furnace Slag (GGBS, two alkali-activated slag cements (AAS-1 and AAS-2 in which sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide act as alkaline activators respectively, supersulfated cement (SSC and slag Portland cement(PSC, are compared with ordinary Portland cement (OPC to investigate the effect of activating environment on the hydration properties in this study by determining the compressive strength of the pastes, the hydration heat of binders within 96 hours, and the hydration products at age of 28 days. The results show that C-S-H gels are the main hydrated products for all cementitious systems containing GGBS. Ca(OH2 is the hydration products of OPC and PSC paste. However, ettringite and gypsum crystals instead of Ca(OH2 are detected in SSC paste. Additionally, tobermorite, a crystalline C-S-H, and calcite are hydrated products in AAS-1. Tobermorite, cowlesite and calcite are hydrated products of AAS-2 as well. Based on strength results, AAS-1 paste exhibits the highest compressive strength followed by POC, PSC, SSC in order at all testing ages and AAS-2 give the lowest compressive strength except for the early age at 3 days, which is higher than SSC but still lower than PSC. From hydration heat analysis, alkalinity in the reaction solution is a vital factor influencing the initial hydration rate and the initial hydration rate from higher to lower is AAS-2, AAS-1, OPC, PSC and SSC. Although AAS possesses a faster reaction rate in the initial hours, cumulative hydration heat of AAS is comparably lower than that of OPC, but higher than those of PSC and SSC in turn, which indicates that the hydration heat of clinkers is much higher than that of slag.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.14934

  11. Human organic anion transporter 2 is an entecavir, but not tenofovir, transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furihata, Tomomi; Morio, Hanae; Zhu, Meiyan; Suzuki, Yuki; Ide, Hideyuki; Tsubota, Akihito; Fu, Zhongguo; Anzai, Naohiko; Chiba, Kan

    2017-02-01

    Entecavir (ETV) and tenofovir (TFV) are essential nucleoside analogues in current hepatitis B virus (HBV) treatments. Since these drugs target the HBV polymerase that is localized within human hepatocytes, determining of their cellular uptake process is an important step in fully understanding their pharmacological actions. However, the human hepatic transporters responsible for their uptake have remained unidentified. Therefore, this study aimed at identifying the primary ETV and TFV uptake transporter(s) in human hepatocytes. In transport assays, temperature-sensitive ETV and TFV uptake by human hepatocytes were observed, and their uptake were strongly inhibited by bromosulfophthalein, which is an inhibitor of organic anion transporters/organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATs/OATPs). Given these results, ETV and TFV uptake activities in several human OAT/OATP expression systems were examined. The results showed that, among the transporters tested, only OAT2 possessed ETV transport activity. On the other hand, none of the transporters showed any TFV uptake activity. To summarize, our results identify that human OAT2 is an ETV transporter, thereby suggesting that it plays an important part in the mechanisms underlying ETV antiviral activity. Furthermore, although the hepatic TFV transporters remain unknown, our results have, at least, clarified that these two anti-HBV drugs have different hepatocyte entry routes. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

    2011-12-31

    This project seeks to understand regional differences in gas hydrate systems from the perspective of as an energy resource, geohazard, and long-term climate influence. Specifically, the effort will: (1) collect data and conceptual models that targets causes of gas hydrate variance, (2) construct numerical models that explain and predict regional-scale gas hydrate differences in 2-dimensions with minimal 'free parameters', (3) simulate hydrocarbon production from various gas hydrate systems to establish promising resource characteristics, (4) perturb different gas hydrate systems to assess potential impacts of hot fluids on seafloor stability and well stability, and (5) develop geophysical approaches that enable remote quantification of gas hydrate heterogeneities so that they can be characterized with minimal costly drilling. Our integrated program takes advantage of the fact that we have a close working team comprised of experts in distinct disciplines. The expected outcomes of this project are improved exploration and production technology for production of natural gas from methane hydrates and improved safety through understanding of seafloor and well bore stability in the presence of hydrates. The scope of this project was to more fully characterize, understand, and appreciate fundamental differences in the amount and distribution of gas hydrate and how this would affect the production potential of a hydrate accumulation in the marine environment. The effort combines existing information from locations in the ocean that are dominated by low permeability sediments with small amounts of high permeability sediments, one permafrost location where extensive hydrates exist in reservoir quality rocks and other locations deemed by mutual agreement of DOE and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations were Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location was Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the project was to understand

  13. Prospecting for marine gas hydrate resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Shipp, Craig; Reichel, Thomas; Shelander, Dianna; Saeki, Tetsuo; Frye, Matthew; Shedd, William; Collett, Timothy S.; McConnell, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    As gas hydrate energy assessment matures worldwide, emphasis has evolved away from confirmation of the mere presence of gas hydrate to the more complex issue of prospecting for those specific accumulations that are viable resource targets. Gas hydrate exploration now integrates the unique pressure and temperature preconditions for gas hydrate occurrence with those concepts and practices that are the basis for conventional oil and gas exploration. We have aimed to assimilate the lessons learned to date in global gas hydrate exploration to outline a generalized prospecting approach as follows: (1) use existing well and geophysical data to delineate the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), (2) identify and evaluate potential direct indications of hydrate occurrence through evaluation of interval of elevated acoustic velocity and/or seismic events of prospective amplitude and polarity, (3) mitigate geologic risk via regional seismic and stratigraphic facies analysis as well as seismic mapping of amplitude distribution along prospective horizons, and (4) mitigate further prospect risk through assessment of the evidence of gas presence and migration into the GHSZ. Although a wide range of occurrence types might ultimately become viable energy supply options, this approach, which has been tested in only a small number of locations worldwide, has directed prospect evaluation toward those sand-hosted, high-saturation occurrences that were presently considered to have the greatest future commercial potential.

  14. Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2009-12-09

    Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

  15. Gas hydrate dissociation structures in submarine slopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidley, I.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Studies have suggested that gas hydrates may play a role in submarine slope failures. However, the mechanics surrounding such failures are poorly understood. This paper discussed experimental tests conducted on a small-scale physical model of submarine soils with hydrate inclusions. The laboratory tests investigated the effects of slope angle and depth of burial of the hydrate on gas escape structures and slope stability. Laponite was used to model the soils due to its ability to swell and produce a clear, colorless thixotropic gel when dispersed in water. An R-11 refrigerant was used to form hydrate layers and nodules. The aim of the experiment was to investigate the path of the fluid escape structures and the development of a subsequent slip plane caused by the dissociation of the R-11 hydrates. Slope angles of 5, 10, and 15 degrees were examined. Slopes were examined using high-resolution, high-speed imaging techniques. Hydrate placement and slope inclinations were varied in order to obtain stability data. Results of the study showed that slope angle influenced the direction of travel of the escaping gas, and that the depth of burial affected sensitivity to slope angle. Theoretical models developed from the experimental data have accurately mapped deformations and stress states during testing. Further research is being conducted to investigate the influence of the size, shape, and placement of the hydrates. 30 refs., 15 figs.

  16. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by Maurer Technology, Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. We plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. We also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. We are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. We hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, our goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

  17. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release as much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  18. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  19. Determination of nucleoside analog mono-, di-, and tri-phosphates in cellular matrix by solid phase extraction and ultra-sensitive LC-MS/MS detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushman, Lane R; Kiser, Jennifer J; Rower, Joseph E; Klein, Brandon; Zheng, Jia-Hua; Ray, Michelle L; Anderson, Peter L

    2011-09-10

    An ultra-sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay was developed and validated to facilitate the assessment of clinical pharmacokinetics of nucleotide analogs from lysed intracellular matrix. The method utilized a strong anion exchange isolation of mono-(MP), di-(DP), and tri-phosphates (TP) from intracellular matrix. Each fraction was then dephosphorylated to the parent moiety yielding a molar equivalent to the original nucleotide analog intracellular concentration. The analytical portion of the methodology was optimized in specific nucleoside analog centric modes (i.e. tenofovir (TFV) centric, zidovudine (ZDV) centric), which included desalting/concentration by solid phase extraction and detection by LC-MS/MS. Nucleotide analog MP-, DP-, and TP-determined on the TFV centric mode of analysis include TFV, lamivudine (3TC), and emtricitibine (FTC). The quantifiable linear range for TFV was 2.5-2000 fmol/sample, and that for 3TC/FTC was 0.1 200 pmol/sample. Nucleoside analog MP-, DP-, and TP-determined on the ZDV centric mode of analysis included 3TC and ZDV. The quantifiable linear range for 3TC was 0.1 100 pmol/sample, and 5-2000 fmol/sample for ZDV. Stable labeled isotopic internal standards facilitated accuracy and precision in alternative cell matrices, which supported the intended use of the method for MP, DP, and TP determinations in various cell types. The method was successfully applied to clinical research samples generating novel intracellular information for TFV, FTC, ZDV, and 3TC nucleotides. This document outlines method development, validation, and application to clinical research.

  20. Proton percolation on hydrated lysozyme powders

    OpenAIRE

    Careri, G; Giansanti, A; Rupley, John A.

    1986-01-01

    The framework of percolation theory is used to analyze the hydration dependence of the capacitance measured for protein samples of pH 3-10, at frequencies from 10 kHz to 4 MHz. For all samples there is a critical value of the hydration at which the capacitance sharply increases with increase in hydration level. The threshold hc = 0.15 g of water per g of protein is independent of pH below pH 9 and shows no solvent deuterium isotope effect. The fractional coverage of the surface at hc is in cl...

  1. Ursodeoxycholic acid and superoxide anion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Predrag Ljubuncic; Omar Abu-Salach; Arieh Bomzon

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) to scavenge superoxide anion (O2-).METHODS: We assessed the ability of UDCA to scavenge (O2-) generated by xanthine-xanthine oxidase (X-XO) in a cell-free system and its effect on the rate of O2--induced ascorbic acid (AA) oxidation in hepatic post-mitochondrial supernatants.RESULTS: UDCA at a concentration as high as 1 mmol/Ldid not impair the ability of the X-XO system to generate O2-, but could scavenge O2- at concentrations of 0.5 and 1 mmol/L, and decrease the rate of AA oxidation at a concentration of 100 μmol/L.CONCLUSION: UDCA can scavenge O2-, an action that may be beneficial to patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

  2. Human Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 (hENT1 in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Towards Individualized Treatment Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Spratlin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers, where curative surgical resections are rare and less than 5% of patients experience long-term survival. Despite numerous clinical trials, improvements in the systemic treatment of this disease have been limited. Gemcitabine, a nucleoside analogue, is still considered the standard of care chemotherapy for most patients in the advanced disease setting. To exert its cytotoxic effects, gemcitabine must enter cells via nucleoside transporters, most notably human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1. Increasingly strong evidence suggests hENT1 is a prognostic biomarker in gemcitabine-treated pancreatic cancer, and may well be a predictive biomarker of gemcitabine efficacy. In this review, we synthesize the literature surrounding hENT1 in pancreatic cancer, identify the key outstanding questions, and suggest strategies to prospectively evaluate the clinical utility of hENT1 in future clinical studies.

  3. Synthesis of azole nucleoside analogues of D-pinitol as potential antitumor agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Tianrong; Lou, Hongxiang

    2007-05-07

    A convenient strategy is reported for the synthesis of azole nucleoside analogues of D-pinitol (=3-O-methyl-D-chiro-inositol). The key intermediate 3-O-methyl-4,5-epoxy-D-chiro-inositol was obtained in excellent yield via an epoxidation from mono-methanesulfonate of D-pinitol. The process of opening of the epoxy ring by azole-bases appeared strongly regioselective in the presence of 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene. All newly synthesized carbocyclic azole nucleosides were assayed against lung and bladder cancer in vitro. Only the triazole and benzotriazole nucleoside analogues inhibited the growth of human lung cancer cell lines (PG) with EC(50) of 11.3 and 22.6 microM, respectively, and showed much less inhibitory activity against human bladder cell lines (T(24)).

  4. Glass powder blended cement hydration modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Huda

    The use of waste materials in construction is among the most attractive options to consume these materials without affecting the environment. Glass is among these types of potential waste materials. In this research, waste glass in powder form, i.e. glass powder (GP) is examined for potential use in enhancing the characteristics of concrete on the basis that it is a pozzolanic material. The experimental and the theoretical components of the work are carried out primarily to prove that glass powder belongs to the "family" of the pozzolanic materials. The chemical and physical properties of the hydrated activated glass powder and the hydrated glass powder cement on the microstructure level have been studied experimentally and theoretically. The work presented in this thesis consists of two main phases. The first phase contains experimental investigations of the reaction of glass powder with calcium hydroxide (CH) and water. In addition, it includes experiments that are aimed at determining the consumption of water and CH with time. The reactivity, degree of hydration, and nature of the pore solution of the glass powder-blended cement pastes and the effect of adding different ratios of glass powder on cement hydration is also investigated. The experiments proved that glass powder has a pozzolanic effect on cement hydration; hence it enhances the chemical and physical properties of cement paste. Based on the experimental test results, it is recommended to use a glass powder-to-cement ratio (GP/C) of 10% as an optimum ratio to achieve the best hydration and best properties of the paste. Two different chemical formulas for the produced GP C-S-H gel due to the pure GP and GP-CH pozzolanic reaction hydration are proposed. For the pure GP hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a calcium-to-silica ratio (C/S) of 0.164, water-to-silica ratio (H/S) of 1.3 and sodium/silica ratio (N/S) of 0.18. However, for the GP-CH hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a C/S ratio of 1

  5. Quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen analysis in hepatitis B e antigen-positive nucleoside-naive patients treated with entecavir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.G. Gish; T. Chang; C.L. Lai (Chen); R.A. de Man (Robert); A. Gadano; C. Llamoso (Cyril); H. Tang (Hui)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Entecavir is a potent nucleoside analogue for treating chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (qHBsAg) levels are predictive of response to interferon-α in CHB treatment; however, the clinical utility of qHBsAg in nucleoside/nucleotide

  6. Effect of Some Admixtures on the Hydration of Silica Fume and Hydrated Lime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The effects of sodium salt of naphthalene formaldehyde sulfonic acid and stearic acid on the hydration of silica fume and Ca(0H)2 have been investigated. The hydration was carried out at 60℃ and W/S ratio of 4 for various time intervals namely, 1, 3, 7 and 28 days and in the presence of 0.2% and 5% superplasticizer and stearic acid. The results of the hydration kinetics show that both admixtures accelerate the hydration reaction of silica fume and calcium hydroxide during the first 7 days. Whereas, after 28 days hydration there is no significant effect. Generally, most of free calcium hydroxide seems to be consumed after 28 days. In addition, the phase composition as well as the microstructure of the formed hydrates was examined by using X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) respectively.

  7. Vectorial transport of nucleoside analogs from the apical to the basolateral membrane in double-transfected cells expressing the human concentrative nucleoside transporter hCNT3 and the export pump ABCC4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Maria; Keller, Daniela; Brom, Manuela; Hummel-Eisenbeiss, Johanna; Lyko, Frank; Keppler, Dietrich

    2010-07-01

    The identification of the transport proteins responsible for the uptake and the efflux of nucleosides and their metabolites enables the characterization of their vectorial transport and a better understanding of their absorption, distribution, and elimination. Human concentrative nucleoside transporters (hCNTs/SLC28A) are known to mediate the transport of natural nucleosides and some nucleoside analogs into cells in a sodium-dependent and unidirectional manner. On the other hand, several human multidrug resistance proteins [human ATP-binding cassette transporter, subfamily C (ABCC)] cause resistance against nucleoside analogs and mediate transport of phosphorylated nucleoside derivatives out of the cells in an ATP-dependent manner. For the integrated analysis of uptake and efflux of these compounds, we established a double-transfected Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) II cell line stably expressing the human uptake transporter hCNT3 in the apical membrane and the human efflux pump ABCC4 in the basolateral membrane. The direction of transport was from the apical to the basolateral compartment, which is in line with the unidirectional transport and the localization of both recombinant proteins in the MDCKII cells. Recombinant hCNT3 mediated the transport of several known nucleoside substrates, and we identified 5-azacytidine as a new substrate for hCNT3. It is of interest that coexpression of both transporters was confirmed in pancreatic adenocarcinomas, which represent an important clinical indication for the therapeutic use of nucleoside analogs. Thus, our results establish a novel cell system for studies on the vectorial transport of nucleosides and their analogs from the apical to the basolateral compartment. The results contribute to a better understanding of the cellular transport characteristics of nucleoside drugs.

  8. Apoptosis induced by nucleosides in the human hepatoma HepG2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suh-Ching Yang; Che-Lin Chiu; Chi-Chang Huang; Jiun-Rong Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the apoptotic effects of nucleosides on the human hepatoma HepG2.METHODS: The nucleosides included inosine (I), cytidine(C), uridine (U), thymidine (T), adenosine (A), and guanosine (G). Cells were incubated by the mediums with or without nucleosides at 37 ℃ in a 50 mL/L CO2 humidified atmosphere.RESULTS: It was found that the cell viabilities were significantly decreased, when cells were treated with 30 mmol/L I, 30 mmol/L C, 30 mmol/L U, 30 mmol/L T,0.5 mmol/L A, and 0.5 mmol/L G after 12 h incubation (P<0.05). About the apoptotic phenomenon, the cell percentages of sub-G1 cells were significantly increased in the mediums containing nucleosides such as C, U, T,A, and G (P<0.05). Furthermore, the caspase-3 activity was increased, when the cells were incubated with T(P<0.05). The protein expressions of p53 and p21 showed no difference in each group. To investigate the mechanism of apoptosis induced by nucleosides, it was found that the contents of soluble Fas ligand contents were increased in HepG2 cells following I, U, T, and A treatment (P<0.05).But, TNF-α and cytochrome c were undetectable.CONCLUSION: Thymidine may induce the apoptosis in HepG2, but the effective dosages and reactive time must be investigated in the future study. However, the apoptosis-inducing abilities of other nucleosides were still unclear in this study.

  9. 6-Methylpurine derived sugar modified nucleosides: Synthesis and evaluation of their substrate activity with purine nucleoside phosphorylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Abdalla E A; Abou-Elkhair, Reham A I; Parker, William B; Allan, Paula W; Secrist, John A

    2016-04-01

    6-Methylpurine (MeP) is cytotoxic adenine analog that does not exhibit selectivity when administered systemically, and could be very useful in a gene therapy approach to cancer treatment involving Escherichia coli PNP. The prototype MeP releasing prodrug, 9-(β-d-ribofuranosyl)-6-methylpurine, MeP-dR has demonstrated good activity against tumors expressing E. coli PNP, but its antitumor activity is limited due to toxicity resulting from the generation of MeP from gut bacteria. Therefore, we have embarked on a medicinal chemistry program to identify non-toxic MeP prodrugs that could be used in conjunction with E. coli PNP. In this work, we report on the synthesis of 9-(6-deoxy-β-d-allofuranosyl)-6-methylpurine (3) and 9-(6-deoxy-5-C-methyl-β-d-ribo-hexofuranosyl)-6-methylpurine (4), and the evaluation of their substrate activity with several phosphorylases. The glycosyl donors; 1,2-di-O-acetyl-3,5-di-O-benzyl-α-d-allofuranose (10) and 1-O-acetyl-3-O-benzyl-2,5-di-O-benzoyl-6-deoxy-5-C-methyl-β-d-ribohexofuran-ose (15) were prepared from 1,2:5,6-di-O-isopropylidine-α-d-glucofuranose in 9 and 11 steps, respectively. Coupling of 10 and 15 with silylated 6-methylpurine under Vorbrüggen glycosylation conditions followed conventional deprotection of the hydroxyl groups furnished 5'-C-methylated-6-methylpurine nucleosides 3 and 4, respectively. Unlike 9-(6-deoxy-α-l-talo-furanosyl)-6-methylpurine, which showed good substrate activity with E. coli PNP mutant (M64V), the β-d-allo-furanosyl derivative 3 and the 5'-di-C-methyl derivative 4 were poor substrates for all tested glycosidic bond cleavage enzymes.

  10. Three-dimensional distribution of gas hydrate beneath southern Hydrate Ridge: Constraints from ODP Leg 204

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehu, A.M.; Long, P.E.; Torres, M.E.; Bohrmann, G.; Rack, F.R.; Collett, T.S.; Goldberg, D.S.; Milkov, A.V.; Riedel, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Bangs, N.L.; Barr, S.R.; Borowski, W.S.; Claypool, G.E.; Delwiche, M.E.; Dickens, G.R.; Gracia, E.; Guerin, G.; Holland, M.; Johnson, J.E.; Lee, Y.-J.; Liu, C.-S.; Su, X.; Teichert, B.; Tomaru, H.; Vanneste, M.; Watanabe, M. E.; Weinberger, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Large uncertainties about the energy resource potential and role in global climate change of gas hydrates result from uncertainty about how much hydrate is contained in marine sediments. During Leg 204 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) to the accretionary complex of the Cascadia subduction zone, we sampled the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) from the seafloor to its base in contrasting geological settings defined by a 3D seismic survey. By integrating results from different methods, including several new techniques developed for Leg 204, we overcome the problem of spatial under-sampling inherent in robust methods traditionally used for estimating the hydrate content of cores and obtain a high-resolution, quantitative estimate of the total amount and spatial variability of gas hydrate in this structural system. We conclude that high gas hydrate content (30-40% of pore space or 20-26% of total volume) is restricted to the upper tens of meters below the seafloor near the summit of the structure, where vigorous fluid venting occurs. Elsewhere, the average gas hydrate content of the sediments in the gas hydrate stability zone is generally <2% of the pore space, although this estimate may increase by a factor of 2 when patchy zones of locally higher gas hydrate content are included in the calculation. These patchy zones are structurally and stratigraphically controlled, contain up to 20% hydrate in the pore space when averaged over zones ???10 m thick, and may occur in up to ???20% of the region imaged by 3D seismic data. This heterogeneous gas hydrate distribution is an important constraint on models of gas hydrate formation in marine sediments and the response of the sediments to tectonic and environmental change. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Experimental Investigation of Effect on Hydrate Formation in Spray Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of reaction condition on hydrate formation were conducted in spray reactor. The temperature, pressure, and gas volume of reaction on hydrate formation were measured in pure water and SDS solutions at different temperature and pressure with a high-pressure experimental rig for hydrate formation. The experimental data and result reveal that additives could improve the hydrate formation rate and gas storage capacity. Temperature and pressure can restrict the hydrate formation. Lower temperature and higher pressure can promote hydrate formation, but they can increase production cost. So these factors should be considered synthetically. The investigation will promote the advance of gas storage technology in hydrates.

  12. Synthesis of Novel Homo-N-Nucleoside Analogs Composed of a Homo-1,4-Dioxane Sugar Analog and Substituted 1,3,5-Triazine Base Equivalents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Yu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Enantioselective syntheses from dimethyl tartrate of 1,3,5-triazine homo-N-nucleoside analogs, containing a 1,4-dioxane moiety replacing the sugar unit in natural nucleosides, were accomplished. The triazine heterocycle in the nucleoside analogs was further substituted with combinations of NH2, OH and Cl in the 2,4-triazine positions.

  13. Creating molecular macrocycles for anion recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar H. Flood

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The creation and functionality of new classes of macrocycles that are shape persistent and can bind anions is described. The genesis of triazolophane macrocycles emerges out of activity surrounding 1,2,3-triazoles made using click chemistry; and the same triazoles are responsible for anion capture. Mistakes made and lessons learnt in anion recognition provide deeper understanding that, together with theory, now provides for computer-aided receptor design. The lessons are acted upon in the creation of two new macrocycles. First, cyanostars are larger and like to capture large anions. Second is tricarb, which also favors large anions but shows a propensity to self-assemble in an orderly and stable manner, laying a foundation for future designs of hierarchical nanostructures.

  14. Highly selective capture of nucleosides with boronic acid functionalized polymer brushes prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ting; Zhu, Shuqiang; Zhu, Bin; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Haixia

    2016-04-01

    The nucleoside or modified nucleoside level in biological fluids reflects the pathological or physiological state of the body. Boronate affinity absorbents are widely used to selectively extract nucleosides from complex samples. In this work, a novel functionalized absorbent was synthesized by attaching 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid to gold nanoparticles on modified attapulgite. The surface of the attapulgite was modified by poly(acryloyloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride) by atom transfer radical polymerization, creating many polymer brushes on the surface. The resultant material exhibited superior binding capacity (30.83 mg/g) for adenosine and was able to capture cis-diol nucleosides from 1000-fold interferences. Finally, to demonstrate its potential for biomolecule extraction, this boronate affinity material was used to preconcentrate nucleosides from human urine and plasma.

  15. A Hydrate Database: Vital to the Technical Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Sloan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates may contain more energy than all the combined other fossil fuels, causing hydrates to be a potentially vital aspect of both energy and climate change. This article is an overview of the motivation, history, and future of hydrate data management using a CODATA vehicle to connect international hydrate databases. The basis is an introduction to the Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML to connect various hydrate databases. The accompanying four articles on laboratory hydrate data by Smith et al., on field hydrate data by L?wner et al., on hydrate modeling by Wang et al., and on construction of a Chinese gas hydrate system by Xiao et al. provide details of GHML in their respective areas.

  16. Biotransformation of 2,6-diaminopurine nucleosides by immobilized Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Benedetti, Eliana C; Rivero, Cintia W; Britos, Claudia N; Lozano, Mario E; Trelles, Jorge A

    2012-01-01

    An efficient and green bioprocess to obtain 2,6-diaminopurine nucleosides using thermophilic bacteria is herein reported. Geobacillus stearothermophilus CECT 43 showed a conversion rate of 90 and 83% at 2 h to obtain 2,6-diaminopurine-2'-deoxyriboside and 2,6-diaminopurine riboside, respectively. The selected biocatalyst was successfully stabilized in an agarose matrix and used to produce up to 23.4 g of 2,6-diaminopurine-2'-deoxyriboside in 240 h of process. These nucleoside analogues can be used as prodrug precursors or in antisense oligonucleotide synthesis.

  17. In situ enzymatic removal of orthophosphate by the nucleoside phosphorylase catalyzed phosphorolysis of nicotinamide riboside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriver, J W; Sykes, B D

    1982-09-01

    An enzymatic orthophosphate removal system is described which can be effectively used to continuously remove orthophosphate from biochemical samples. The phosphorolysis of nicotinamide riboside is catalyzed by calf spleen nucleoside phosphorylase to give ribose-1-PO4 and nicotinamide along with a proton. At pH 8 the production of ribose-1-PO4 from orthophosphate is essentially quantitative. This reaction can be monitored optically or by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Equations are given for determining the time required to remove a given amount of phosphate from a typical NMR sample with a known amount of nucleoside phosphorylase. The effects of a competing orthophosphate-producing reaction are considered.

  18. [Substrate specificity and kinetic properties of a soluble nucleoside triphosphatase from bovine kidneys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivuk, V F; Rusina, I M; Luchko, T A; Makarchikov, A F

    2008-01-01

    Soluble nucleoside triphosphatase differing in its properties from all known proteins with NTPase activity was partially purified from bovine kidneys. The enzyme has pH optimum of 7.5, molecular mass of 60 kDa, as estimated by gel chromatography, and shows an absolute dependence on divalent metal ions. NTPase obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics in the range of substrate concentration tested from 45 to 440 microM; the apparent Km for inosine-5'-triphosphate was calculated to be 23.3 microM. The enzyme was found to possess a broad substrate specificity, being capable of hydrolyzing various nucleoside-5'-tri- as well as diphosphates.

  19. Versatile synthesis of amino acid functionalized nucleosides via a domino carboxamidation reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicky Gheerardijn

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Functionalized oligonucleotides have recently gained increased attention for incorporation in modified nucleic acid structures both for the design of aptamers with enhanced binding properties as well as the construction of catalytic DNA and RNA. As a shortcut alternative to the incorporation of multiple modified residues, each bearing one extra functional group, we present here a straightforward method for direct linking of functionalized amino acids to the nucleoside base, thus equipping the nucleoside with two extra functionalities at once. As a proof of principle, we have introduced three amino acids with functional groups frequently used as key-intermediates in DNA- and RNAzymes via an efficient and straightforward domino carboxamidation reaction.

  20. Facile synthesis of 1',2'-cis-beta-pyranosyladenine nucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Takayuki; Shinohara, Hisashi; Luo, Xiong; Kandeel, Mahmoud; Kitade, Yukio

    2007-12-10

    1',2'-cis-beta-Glycosyladenine nucleosides, such as beta-altroside, beta-mannoside, and beta-idoside, were efficiently synthesized from the corresponding 1',2'-trans-beta-6-chloropurine derivatives, beta-glucoside, and beta-galactoside. Nucleophilic substitution of the O-trifluoromethanesulfonyl groups at the C-2' and/or 3' was carried out using tetrabutylammonium acetate or cesium acetate under mild conditions. Subsequent deprotection and amidation afforded the desired compounds, 1',2'-cis-beta-pyranosyladenine nucleosides.

  1. Vibrational dynamics of hydration water in amylose

    CERN Document Server

    Cavatorta, F; Albanese, G; Angelini, N

    2002-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamical properties of hydration water associated with amylose helices, based on low-temperature vibrational spectra collected using the TOSCA inelastic spectrometer at ISIS. The structural constraints of the polysaccharidic chains favour the formation of a high-density structure for water, which has been suggested by Imberty and Perez on the basis of conformational analysis. According to this model, hydration water can only enter the pores formed by six adjacent helices and completely fills the pores at a hydration level of about 0.27-g water/g dry amylose. Our measurements show that the dynamical behaviour of hydration water is similar to that observed in high-density amorphous ice. (orig.)

  2. ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrate Production Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoderbek, David; Farrell, Helen; Howard, James; Raterman, Kevin; Silpngarmlert, Suntichai; Martin, Kenneth; Smith, Bruce; Klein, Perry

    2013-06-30

    Work began on the ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrates Production Test (DOE award number DE-NT0006553) on October 1, 2008. This final report summarizes the entire project from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013.

  3. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Thomas Williams; Bjorn Paulsson; Alexander Goertz

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a drilling hazard by the oil and gas industry for years. Drilling engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous problems, including drilling kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates as a potential energy source agree that the resource potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained from physical samples taken from actual hydrate-bearing rocks. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The project team drilled and continuously cored the Hot Ice No. 1 well on Anadarko-leased acreage beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and used for determining physical characteristics of hydrates and surrounding rock. After the well was logged, a 3D vertical seismic profile (VSP) was recorded to calibrate the shallow geologic section with seismic data and to investigate techniques to better resolve lateral subsurface variations of potential hydrate-bearing strata. Paulsson Geophysical Services, Inc. deployed their 80 level 3C clamped borehole seismic receiver array in the wellbore to record samples every 25 ft. Seismic vibrators were successively positioned at 1185 different surface positions in a circular pattern around the wellbore. This technique generated a 3D image of the subsurface. Correlations were

  4. Polyethylene oxide hydration in grafted layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Wang, Zilu

    Hydration of water soluble polymers is one of the key-factors defining their conformation and properties, similar to biopolymers. Polyethylene oxide (PEO) is one of the most important biomedical-applications polymers and is known for its reverse temperature solubility due to hydrogen bonding with water. As in many practical applications PEO chains are grafted to surfaces, e.g. of nanoparticles or planar surfaces, it is important to understand PEO hydration in such grafted layers. Using atomistic molecular dynamic simulations we investigate the details of molecular conformation and hydration of PEO end-grafted to gold surfaces. We analyze polymer and water density distribution as a function of distance from the surface for different grafting densities. Based on a detailed analysis of hydrogen bonding between polymer and water in grafted PEO layers, we will discuss the extent of PEO hydration and its implication for polymer conformation, mobility and layer properties. This research is supported by NSF (DMR-1410928).

  5. Formulating formation mechanism of natural gas hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palodkar, Avinash V; Jana, Amiya K

    2017-07-25

    A large amount of energy, perhaps twice the total amount of all other hydrocarbon reserves combined, is trapped within gas hydrate deposits. Despite emerging as a potential energy source for the world over the next several hundred years and one of the key factors in causing future climate change, gas hydrate is poorly known in terms of its formation mechanism. To address this issue, a mathematical formulation is proposed in the form of a model to represent the physical insight into the process of hydrate growth that occurs on the surface and in the irregular nanometer-sized pores of the distributed porous particles. To evaluate the versatility of this rigorous model, the experimental data is used for methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) hydrates grown in different porous media with a wide range of considerations.

  6. Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Savidge

    2008-10-31

    The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

  7. Quantifying hydrate formation and kinetic inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloan, E.D.; Subramanian, S.; Matthews, P.N.; Lederhos, J.P.; Khokhar, A.A. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Hydrate Research

    1998-08-01

    In the Prausnitz tradition, molecular and macroscopic evidence of hydrate formation and kinetic inhibition is presented. On the microscopic level, the first Raman spectra are presented for the formation of both uninhibited and inhibited methane hydrates with time. This method has the potential to provide a microscopic-based kinetics model. Three macroscopic aspects of natural gas hydrate kinetic inhibition are also reported: (1) The effect of hydrate dissociation residual structures was measured, which has application in decreasing the time required for subsequent formation. (2) The performance of a kinetic inhibitor (poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) or PVCap) was measured and correlated as a function of PVCap molecular weight and concentrations of PVCap, methanol, and salt in the aqueous phase. (3) Long-duration test results indicated that the use of PVCap can prevent pipeline blockage for a time exceeding the aqueous phase residence time in some gas pipelines.

  8. Anion stripping as a general method to create cationic porous framework with mobile anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Chengyu; Kudla, Ryan A; Zuo, Fan; Zhao, Xiang; Mueller, Leonard J; Bu, Xianhui; Feng, Pingyun

    2014-05-28

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with cationic frameworks and mobile anions have many applications from sensing, anion exchange and separation, to fast ion conductivity. Despite recent progress, the vast majority of MOFs have neutral frameworks. A common mechanism for the formation of neutral frameworks is the attachment of anionic species such as F(-) or OH(-) to the framework metal sites, neutralizing an otherwise cationic scaffolding. Here, we report a general method capable of converting such neutral frameworks directly into cationic ones with concurrent generation of mobile anions. Our method is based on the differential affinity between distinct metal ions with framework anionic species. Specifically, Al(3+) is used to strip F(-) anions away from framework Cr(3+) sites, leading to cationic frameworks with mobile Cl(-) anions. The subsequent anion exchange with OH(-) further leads to a porous network with mobile OH(-) anions. New materials prepared by anion stripping can undergo ion exchange with anionic organic dyes and also exhibit much improved ionic conductivity compared to the original unmodified MOFs.

  9. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  10. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2004-11-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained

  11. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained

  12. On the applicability of one- and many-electron quantum chemistry models for hydrated electron clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turi, László

    2016-04-21

    We evaluate the applicability of a hierarchy of quantum models in characterizing the binding energy of excess electrons to water clusters. In particular, we calculate the vertical detachment energy of an excess electron from water cluster anions with methods that include one-electron pseudopotential calculations, density functional theory(DFT) based calculations, and ab initio quantum chemistry using MP2 and eom-EA-CCSD levels of theory. The examined clusters range from the smallest cluster size (n = 2) up to nearly nanosize clusters with n = 1000 molecules. The examined cluster configurations are extracted from mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics trajectories of cluster anions with n = 1000 water molecules using two different one-electron pseudopotenial models. We find that while MP2 calculations with large diffuse basis set provide a reasonable description for the hydrated electron system, DFT methods should be used with precaution and only after careful benchmarking. Strictly tested one-electron psudopotentials can still be considered as reasonable alternatives to DFT methods, especially in large systems. The results of quantum chemistry calculations performed on configurations, that represent possible excess electron binding motifs in the clusters, appear to be consistent with the results using a cavitystructure preferring one-electron pseudopotential for the hydrated electron, while they are in sharp disagreement with the structural predictions of a non-cavity model.

  13. Experimental Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Through Depressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgfeldt, T.; Flemings, P. B.; Meyer, D.; You, K.

    2015-12-01

    We dissociated methane hydrates by stepwise depressurization. The initial hydrates were formed by injecting gas into a cylindrical sample of brine-saturated, coarse-grained sand at hydrate-stable conditions with the intention of reaching three-phase equilibrium. The sample was initially at 1°C with a pore pressure of 1775 psi and a salinity of 7 wt. % NaBr. The depressurization setup consisted of one pump filled with tap water attached to the confining fluid port and a second pump attached to the inlet port where the methane was injected. Depressurization was conducted over sixteen hours at a constant temperature of 1°C. The pore pressure was stepwise reduced from 1775 psi to atmospheric pressure by pulling known volumes of gas from the sample. After each extraction, we recorded the instantaneous and equilibrium pore pressure. 0.503 moles of methane were removed from the sample. The pore pressure decreased smoothly and nonlinearly with the cumulative gas withdrawn from the sample. We interpret that hydrate began to dissociate immediately with depressurization, and it continued to dissociate when the pressure decreased below the three-phase pressure for 1°C and 0 wt. % salinity. Two breaks in slope in the pressure vs. mass extracted data are bounded by smooth, nonlinear curves with differing slopes on either side. We attribute the breaks to dissociation of three zones of hydrate concentration. We created a box model to simulate the experimental behavior. For a 10% initial gas saturation (estimated from the hydrate formation experiment and based on mass conservation), an initial hydrate saturation of 55% is required to match the total methane extracted from the sample. Future experiments will be conducted over a longer timespan while monitoring hydrate dissociation with CT imaging throughout the process.

  14. Hydration of polyethylene glycol-grafted liposomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Tirosh, O; Barenholz, Y.; Katzhendler, J; Priev, A

    1998-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the effect of polyethylene glycol of 2000 molecular weight (PEG2000) attached to a dialkylphosphatidic acid (dihexadecylphosphatidyl (DHP)-PEG2000) on the hydration and thermodynamic stability of lipid assemblies. Differential scanning calorimetry, densitometry, and ultrasound velocity and absorption measurements were used for thermodynamic and hydrational characterization. Using a differential scanning calorimetry technique we showed that each molecule of PEG...

  15. Exploitation of subsea gas hydrate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas hydrates are considered to be a potential energy resource in the future. They occur in permafrost areas as well as in subsea sediments and are stable at high pressure and low temperature conditions. According to estimations the amount of carbon bonded in natural gas hydrates worldwide is two times larger than in all known conventional fossil fuels. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e.g. depressurization and/or injection of carbon dioxide) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR«. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into a numerical model. The physics of the process leads to strong non-linear couplings between hydraulic fluid flow, hydrate dissociation and formation, hydraulic properties of the sediment, partial pressures and seawater solution of components and the thermal budget of the system described by the heat equation. This paper is intended to provide an overview of the recent development regarding the production of natural gas from subsea gas hydrate reservoirs. It aims at giving a broad insight into natural gas hydrates and covering relevant aspects of the exploitation process. It is focused on the thermodynamic principles and technological approaches for the exploitation. The effects occurring during natural gas production within hydrate filled sediment layers are identified and discussed by means of numerical simulation results. The behaviour of relevant process parameters such as pressure, temperature and phase saturations is described and compared for different strategies. The simulations are complemented by calculations for different safety relevant problems.

  16. Preservation of methane hydrate at 1 atm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    A "pressure-release" method that enables reproducible bulk preservation of pure, porous, methane hydrate at conditions 50 to 75 K above its equilibrium T (193 K) at 1 atm is refined. The amount of hydrate preserved by this method appears to be greatly in excess of that reported in the previous citations, and is likely the result of a mechanism different from ice shielding.

  17. Surfactant effects on SF6 hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo Ram; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Ryu, Young Bok; Lee, Man Sig; Kim, Young Seok; Englezos, Peter; Kim, Myung Hyun; Kim, Yang Do

    2009-03-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) has been widely used in a variety of industrial processes, but it is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. For this reason, it is necessary to separate or collect it from waste gas streams. One separation method is through hydrate crystal formation. In this study, SF(6) hydrate was formed in aqueous surfactant solutions of 0.00, 0.01, 0.05, 0.15 and 0.20 wt% to investigate the effects of surfactants on the hydrate formation rates. Three surfactants, Tween 20 (Tween), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LABS), were tested in a semi-batch stirred vessel at the constant temperature and pressures of 276.2 K and 0.78 MPa, respectively. All surfactants showed kinetic promoter behavior for SF(6) hydrate formation. It was also found that SF(6) hydrate formation proceeded in two stages with the second stage being the most rapid. In situ Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that the increased gas consumption rate with the addition of surfactant was possibly due to the increased gas filling rate in the hydrate cavity.

  18. Evaluation of the thermal effect on separation selectivity in anion-exchange processes using superheated water ion-exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibukawa, Masami; Taguchi, Akihiko; Suzuki, Yusuke; Saitoh, Kazunori; Hiaki, Toshihiko; Yarita, Takashi

    2012-07-07

    The thermal effect on retention and separation selectivity of inorganic anions and aromatic sulfonate ions in anion-exchange chromatography is studied on a quaternized styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer anion-exchange column in the temperature range of 40-120 °C using superheated water chromatography. The selectivity coefficient for a pair of identically charged anions approaches unity as temperature increases provided the ions have the same effective size, such that the retention of an analyte ion decreases with an increase in temperature when the analyte ion has stronger affinity for the ion-exchanger than that of the eluent counterion, whereas it increases when it has weaker affinity. The change in anion-exchange selectivity with temperature observed with superheated water chromatography has been discussed on the basis of the effect of temperature on hydration of the ions. At elevated temperatures, especially in superheated water, the electrostatic interaction or association of the ions with the fixed ion in the resin phase becomes a predominant factor resulting in a different separation selectivity from that obtained at ambient temperature.

  19. In Situ Raman Analyses of Natural Gas and Gas Hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, E. T.; White, S. N.; Dunk, R. M.; Brewer, P. G.; Sherman, A. D.; Schmidt, K.; Hester, K. C.; Sloan, E. D.

    2004-12-01

    During a July 2004 cruise to Hydrate Ridge, Oregon, MBARI's sea-going laser Raman spectrometer was used to obtain in situ Raman spectra of natural gas hydrates and natural gas venting from the seafloor. This was the first in situ analysis of gas hydrates on the seafloor. The hydrate spectra were compared to laboratory analyses performed at the Center for Hydrate Research, Colorado School of Mines. The natural gas spectra were compared to MBARI gas chromatography (GC) analyses of gas samples collected at the same site. DORISS (Deep Ocean Raman In Situ Spectrometer) is a laboratory model laser Raman spectrometer from Kaiser Optical Systems, Inc modified at MBARI for deployment in the deep ocean. It has been successfully deployed to depths as great as 3600 m. Different sampling optics provide flexibility in adapting the instrument to a particular target of interest. An immersion optic was used to analyze natural gas venting from the seafloor at South Hydrate Ridge ( ˜780 m depth). An open-bottomed cube was placed over the vent to collect the gas. The immersion optic penetrated the side of the cube as did a small heater used to dissociate any hydrate formed during sample collection. To analyze solid hydrates at both South and North Hydrate Ridge ( ˜590 m depth), chunks of hydrate were excavated from the seafloor and collected in a glass cylinder with a mesh top. A stand-off optic was used to analyze the hydrate inside the cylinder. Due to the partial opacity of the hydrate and the small focal volume of the sampling optic, a precision underwater positioner (PUP) was used to focus the laser spot onto the hydrate. PUP is a stand-alone system with three degrees-of-freedom, capable of moving the DORISS probe head with a precision of 0.1 mm. In situ Raman analyses of the gas indicate that it is primarily methane. This is verified by GC analyses of samples collected from the same site. Other minor constituents (such as CO2 and higher hydrocarbons) are present but may be in

  20. Theoretical study of the hydration of atmospheric nucleation precursors with acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu-Peng; Liu, Yi-Rong; Huang, Teng; Jiang, Shuai; Xu, Kang-Ming; Wen, Hui; Zhang, Wei-Jun; Huang, Wei

    2014-09-11

    While atmosphere is known to contain a significant fraction of organic substance and the effect of acetic acid to stabilize hydrated sulfuric acids is found to be close that of ammonia, the details about the hydration of (CH3COOH)(H2SO4)2 are poorly understood, especially for the larger clusters with more water molecules. We have investigated structural characteristics and thermodynamics of the hydrates using density functional theory (DFT) at PW91PW91/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level. The phenomena of the structural evolution may exist during the early stage of the clusters formation, and we tentatively proposed a calculation path for the Gibbs free energies of the clusters formation via the structural evolution. The results in this study supply a picture of the first deprotonation of sulfuric acids for a system consisting of two sulfuric acid molecules, an acetic acid molecule, and up to three waters at 0 and 298.15 K, respectively. We also replace one of the sulfuric acids with a bisulfate anion in (CH3COOH)(H2SO4)2 to explore the difference of acid dissociation between two series of clusters and interaction of performance in clusters growth between ion-mediated nucleation and organics-enhanced nucleation.

  1. Effect of Sulfuric and Triflic Acids on the Hydration of Vanadium Cations: An ab Initio Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehr, Fatemeh; Paddison, Stephen J

    2015-06-01

    Vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) may be a promising solution for large-scale energy storage applications, but the crossover of any of the redox active species V(2+), V(3+), VO(2+), and VO2(+) through the ion exchange membrane will result in self-discharge of the battery. Hence, a molecular level understanding of the states of vanadium cations in the highly acidic environment of a VRFB is needed. We examine the effects of sulfuric and triflic (CF3SO3H) acids on the hydration of vanadium species as they mimic the electrolyte and functional group of perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) membranes. Hybrid density functional theory in conjunction with a continuum solvation model was utilized to obtain the local structures of the hydrated vanadium cations in proximity to H2SO4, CF3SO3H, and their conjugate anions. The results indicate that none of these species covalently bond to the vanadium cations. The hydration structure of V(3+) is more distorted than that of V(2+) in an acidic medium. The oxo-group of VO2(+) is protonated by either acid, in contrast to VO(2+) which is not protonated. The atomic partial charge of the four oxidation states of vanadium varies from +1.7 to +2.0. These results provide the local solvation structures of vanadium cations in the VRFBs environment that are directly related to the electrolytes stability and diffusion of vanadium ions into the membrane.

  2. Instantaneous, parameter-free methods to define a solute’s hydration shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Anupam [Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, 69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Higham, Jonathan [Manchester Institute of Biotechnology, The University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Henchman, Richard H. [Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, 69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Manchester Institute of Biotechnology, The University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-21

    A range of methods are presented to calculate a solute’s hydration shell from computer simulations of dilute solutions of monatomic ions and noble gas atoms. The methods are designed to be parameter-free and instantaneous so as to make them more general, accurate, and consequently applicable to disordered systems. One method is a modified nearest-neighbor method, another considers solute-water Lennard-Jones overlap followed by hydrogen-bond rearrangement, while three methods compare various combinations of water-solute and water-water forces. The methods are tested on a series of monatomic ions and solutes and compared with the values from cutoffs in the radial distribution function, the nearest-neighbor distribution functions, and the strongest-acceptor hydrogen bond definition for anions. The Lennard-Jones overlap method and one of the force-comparison methods are found to give a hydration shell for cations which is in reasonable agreement with that using a cutoff in the radial distribution function. Further modifications would be required, though, to make them capture the neighboring water molecules of noble-gas solutes if these weakly interacting molecules are considered to constitute the hydration shell.

  3. Supramolecular electron transfer by anion binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Ohkubo, Kei; D'Souza, Francis; Sessler, Jonathan L

    2012-10-11

    Anion binding has emerged as an attractive strategy to construct supramolecular electron donor-acceptor complexes. In recent years, the level of sophistication in the design of these systems has advanced to the point where it is possible to create ensembles that mimic key aspects of the photoinduced electron-transfer events operative in the photosynthetic reaction centre. Although anion binding is a reversible process, kinetic studies on anion binding and dissociation processes, as well as photoinduced electron-transfer and back electron-transfer reactions in supramolecular electron donor-acceptor complexes formed by anion binding, have revealed that photoinduced electron transfer and back electron transfer occur at time scales much faster than those associated with anion binding and dissociation. This difference in rates ensures that the linkage between electron donor and acceptor moieties is maintained over the course of most forward and back electron-transfer processes. A particular example of this principle is illustrated by electron-transfer ensembles based on tetrathiafulvalene calix[4]pyrroles (TTF-C4Ps). In these ensembles, the TTF-C4Ps act as donors, transferring electrons to various electron acceptors after anion binding. Competition with non-redox active substrates is also observed. Anion binding to the pyrrole amine groups of an oxoporphyrinogen unit within various supramolecular complexes formed with fullerenes also results in acceleration of the photoinduced electron-transfer process but deceleration of the back electron transfer; again, this is ascribed to favourable structural and electronic changes. Anion binding also plays a role in stabilizing supramolecular complexes between sulphonated tetraphenylporphyrin anions ([MTPPS](4-): M = H(2) and Zn) and a lithium ion encapsulated C(60) (Li(+)@C(60)); the resulting ensemble produces long-lived charge-separated states upon photoexcitation of the porphyrins.

  4. Molecular anions sputtered from fluorides

    CERN Document Server

    Gnaser, H

    2002-01-01

    The emission of negatively charged ions from different fluoride samples (LiF, CaF sub 2 , LaF sub 3 and HfF sub 4) induced by sputtering with a 14.5-keV Cs sup + ion beam was studied. Sputtered ions were detected in a high-sensitivity double-focusing mass spectrometer. In particular, the possible existence of small doubly charged negative molecular ions was investigated. But whereas singly charged species of the general type MF sub n sup - (where M represents a metal atom) were detected with high abundances, stable dianions were observed in an unambiguous way only for one molecule: HfF sub 6 sup 2 sup -. The flight time through the mass spectrometer of approx 35 mu s establishes a lower limit with respect to the intrinsic lifetime of this doubly charged ion. For singly charged anions abundance distributions and, in selected cases, emission-energy spectra were recorded. For two ion species (Ca sup - and HfF sub 5 sup -) isotopic fractionation effects caused by the (velocity dependent) ionization process were d...

  5. Highly efficient green-light ionization of an aryl radical anion: key step in a catalytic cycle of electron formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerzig, Christoph; Goez, Martin

    2014-12-14

    A sustainable generation of hydrated electrons with green light would allow solar-driven applications of this potent reductant, such as the detoxification of halogenated organic waste. Using two-color laser flash photolysis, we have studied the photoionizations of the 1,5-naphthalene disulfonate radical anion and triplet with 532 nm as well as 355 nm. The radical anion is prepared by reducing the triplet with the bioavailable ascorbate monoanion under physiological conditions; its photoionization recovers the starting substrate, so turns the reaction sequence into a catalytic cycle. A comparison of the four ionizations suggests that their efficiency is strongly influenced by the electronic configuration of the state ejecting the electron. The quantum yield for ionizing the radical anion with 532 nm (0.27) is at least four times higher than for the very few known examples of such green-light ionizations and comparable to the most efficient UV ionizations known to date, so this system might represent a breakthrough towards the "green" production of hydrated electrons.

  6. Anion photoelectron imaging spectroscopy of glyoxal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Tian; Dixon, Andrew R.; Sanov, Andrei

    2016-09-01

    We report a photoelectron imaging study of the radical-anion of glyoxal. The 532 nm photoelectron spectrum provides the first direct spectroscopic determination of the adiabatic electron affinity of glyoxal, EA = 1.10 ± 0.02 eV. This assignment is supported by a Franck-Condon simulation of the experimental spectrum that successfully reproduces the observed spectral features. The vertical detachment energy of the radical-anion is determined as VDE = 1.30 ± 0.04 eV. The reported EA and VDE values are attributed to the most stable (C2h symmetry) isomers of the neutral and the anion.

  7. Using magnetic resonance imaging to monitor CH4 hydrate formation and spontaneous conversion of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Bernard A; Stevens, Jim; Howard, James J; Graue, Arne; Kvamme, Bjorn; Aspenes, Erick; Ersland, Geir; Husebø, Jarle; Zornes, David R

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was used to monitor and quantify methane hydrate formation and exchange in porous media. Conversion of methane hydrate to carbon dioxide hydrate, when exposed to liquid carbon dioxide at 8.27 MPa and approximately 4 degrees C, was experimentally demonstrated with MRI data and verified by mass balance calculations of consumed volumes of gases and liquids. No detectable dissociation of the hydrate was measured during the exchange process.

  8. Vibrational Förster transfer to hydrated protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmer, R L A; Tielrooij, K J; Bakker, H J

    2010-05-21

    We have studied the influence of excess protons on the vibrational energy relaxation of the O-H and O-D stretching modes in water using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Without excess protons, we observe exponential decays with time constants of 1.7 and 4.3 ps for the bulk and anion bound O-D stretch vibrations. The addition of protons introduces a new energy relaxation pathway, which leads to an increasingly nonexponential decay of the O-D stretch vibration. This new pathway is attributed to a distance-dependent long range dipole-dipole (Forster) interaction between the O-D stretching vibration and modes associated with dissolved protons. The high efficiency of hydrated protons as receptors of vibrational energy follows from the very large absorption cross section and broad bandwidth of protons in water. For a proton concentration of 1M we find that Forster energy transfer occurs over an average distance of 4.5 A, which corresponds to a separation of about two water molecules.

  9. Separation and Structure of Chiral S-Malic Acid Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIE,Jing-Jing(聂晶晶); XU,Duan-Jun(徐端钧); WU,Jing-Yun(吴景云); CHIANG,Michael Y.(蒋燕南)

    2002-01-01

    Crystals of the chiral malic acid hydrate ( C4H6O5@H2O ) were unexpectedly obtained from an ethanol ethanol/water solution containing racemic D,L-malic acid and L-asparagine. The crystal belongs to orthorhombic space group P21 21 21 with cell dimensions of a=0.5576(1), b=0.9818(2), c=1.1793(2) nm, V=0.9455(2) nm3, Z=4, μ(Mo Kα) =0.152 mm-1, F(000) =320, Dc= 1.565 g@cm-3, R =0.051, wR =0.136 for 657 observed reflections [I>2σ(I)]. The significant difference in bond distances for carboxyl groups suggests that the crystal consist of malate anion and protonized crystalline water. This is a report for direct separation of racemic mixture, i.e., without the formation of a molecular complex of raceme with a chiral separating reagent.

  10. Enhancement of anion binding in lanthanide optical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Morgan L; Kirby, James P; Gray, Harry B; Ponce, Adrian

    2013-11-19

    established from the ionization energy of Ln(3+) → Ln(4+). These results account for the order Tb(3+) > Dy(3+) > Eu(3+) ≈ Sm(3+). As with many lanthanide properties, ranging from hydration enthalpy to vaporization energy, this AL-induced enhancement shows a large discrepancy between Tb(3+) and Eu(3+) despite their similarity in size, a phenomenon known as the "gadolinium break". This discrepancy, based on the unusual stabilities of the Eu(2+) and Tb(4+) oxidation states, results from the half-shell effect, as both of these ions have half-filled 4f-shells. The high polarizability of Tb(3+) explains the extraordinarily large increase in the binding affinity of anions for terbium compared to other lanthanides. We recommend that researchers consider this AL-induced enhancement when designing lanthanide-macrocycle optical sensors. Ancillary ligands also can reduce the impact of interfering species such as phosphate commonly found in environmental and physiological samples.

  11. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  12. Solid state tungsten oxide hydrate/tin oxide hydrate electrochromic device prepared by electrochemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Kentaro; Matsuo, Ryo; Sasano, Junji; Yokoyama, Seiji; Izaki, Masanobu

    2017-03-01

    The solid state electrochromic device composed of tungsten oxide hydrate (WO3(H2O)0.33) and tin oxide hydrate (Sn(O,OH)) has been constructed by anodic deposition of WO3(H2O)0.33 and Sn(O,OH) layers and showed the color change from clear to blue by applying voltage through an Au electrode.

  13. Kinetic studies of gas hydrate formation with low-dosage hydrate inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Pipeline blockage by gas hydrates is a serious problem in the petroleum industry.Low-dosage inhibitors have been developed for its cost-effective and environmentally acceptable characteristics.In a 1.072-L reactor with methane,ethane and propane gas mixture under the pressure of about 8.5 MPa at 4 °C,hydrate formation was investigated with low-dosage hydrate inhibitors PVP and GHI1,the change of the compressibility factor and gas composition in the gas phase was analyzed,the gas contents in hydrates were compared with PVP and GHI1 added,and the inhibition mechanism of GHI1 was discussed.The results show that PVP and GHI1 could effectively inhibit the growth of gas hydrates but not nucleation.Under the experimental condition with PVP added,methane and ethane occupied the small cavities of the hydrate crystal unit and the ability of ethane entering into hydrate cavities was weaker than that of methane.GHI1 could effectively inhibit molecules which could more readily form hydrates.The ether and hydroxy group of diethylene glycol monobutyl ether have the responsibility for stronger inhibition ability of GHI1 than PVP.

  14. Antiproliferative activity of bicyclic benzimidazole nucleosides: synthesis, DNA-binding and cell cycle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontakke, Vyankat A; Lawande, Pravin P; Kate, Anup N; Khan, Ayesha; Joshi, Rakesh; Kumbhar, Anupa A; Shinde, Vaishali S

    2016-04-26

    An efficient route was developed for synthesis of bicyclic benzimidazole nucleosides from readily available d-glucose. The key reactions were Vörbruggen glycosylation and ring closing metathesis (RCM). Primarily, to understand the mode of DNA binding, we performed a molecular docking study and the binding was found to be in the minor groove region. Based on the proposed binding model, UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques using calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) demonstrated a non-intercalative mode of binding. Antiproliferative activity of nucleosides was tested against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines and found to be active at low micromolar concentrations. Compounds and displayed significant antiproliferative activity as compared to and with the reference anticancer drug, doxorubicin. Cell cycle analysis showed that nucleoside induced cell cycle arrest at the S-phase. Confocal microscopy has been performed to validate the induction of cellular apoptosis. Based on these findings, such modified bicyclic benzimidazole nucleosides will make a significant contribution to the development of anticancer drugs.

  15. Carbocyclic nucleoside analogues: classification, target enzymes, mechanisms of action and synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyugina, E. S.; Khandazhinskaya, A. P.; Kochetkov, Sergei N.

    2012-08-01

    Key biological targets (S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase, telomerase, human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase, herpes virus DNA polymerase and hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase) and the mechanisms of action of carbocyclic nucleoside analogues are considered. Structural types of analogues are discussed. Methods of synthesis for the most promising compounds and the spectrum of their biological activities are described. The bibliography includes 126 references.

  16. Phosphorylation of nm23/nucleoside diphosphate kinase by casein kinase 2 in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engel, M; Issinger, O G; Lascu, I;

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated phosphorylation of human nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) and of homologous NDPK from different species by human casein kinase 2 (CK-2). The human NDPK isotypes A and B were phosphorylated by CK-2 in vitro both when the purified proteins and total lysate of HL-60 leukemia...

  17. Investigation of proton affinities and gas phase vibrational spectra of protonated nucleosides, deoxynucleosides, and their analogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ung, H.U.; Huynh, K.T.; Poutsma, J.C.; Oomens, J.; Berden, G.; Morton, T.H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA nucleobases make use of hydrogen bonding, whether in associating to form the Watson-Crick double-helix or in producing alternative structures such as the G-quadruplex or the i-motif. Nucleoside proton-bound dimers provide an avenue for investigating characteristics that they possess within the

  18. Metabolome analysis via comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography: identification of modified nucleosides from RNA metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Lucas; Erbes, Thalia; Krieger, Sonja; Trafkowski, Jens; Rodamer, Michael; Kammerer, Bernd

    2015-05-01

    Modified nucleosides derived from the RNA metabolism constitute an important chemical class, which are discussed as potential biomarkers in the detection of mammalian breast cancer. Not only the variability of modifications, but also the complexity of biological matrices such as urinary samples poses challenges in the analysis of modified nucleosides. In the present work, a comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS) approach for the analysis of modified nucleosides in biological samples was established. For prepurification of urinary samples and cell culture supernatants, we performed a cis-diol specific affinity chromatography using boronate-derivatized polyacrylamide gel. In order to establish a 2D-LC method, we tested numerous column combinations and chromatographic conditions. In order to determine the target compounds, we coupled the 2D-LC setup to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer performing full scans, neutral loss scans, and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The combination of a Zorbax Eclipse Plus C18 column with a Zorbax Bonus-RP column was found to deliver a high degree of orthogonality and adequate separation. By application of 2D-LC-MS approaches, we were able to detect 28 target compounds from RNA metabolism and crosslinked pathways in urinary samples and 26 target compounds in cell culture supernatants, respectively. This is the first demonstration of the applicability and benefit of 2D-LC-MS for the targeted metabolome analysis of modified nucleosides and compounds from crosslinked pathways in different biological matrices.

  19. Activities of adenine nucleotide and nucleoside degradation enzymes in platelets of rats infected by Trypanosoma evansi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Camila B; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Vargas, Lara B; Bitencourt, Paula E R; Souza, Viviane C G; Costa, Marcio M; Leal, Claudio A M; Moretto, Maria B; Leal, Daniela B R; Lopes, Sonia T A; Monteiro, Silvia G

    2011-05-31

    Nucleotide and nucleoside-degrading enzymes, such as nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrose (NTPDase), 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) are present in the surface membranes of platelets, involved in clotting disturbances of Trypanosoma evansi-infected animals. Thus, this study was aimed at evaluating the activities of these enzymes in platelets of rats experimentally infected with T. evansi. Animals were divided into four groups, according to the level of parasitemia. Blood samples were collected on days 3 (group A: at the beginning of parasitemia), 5 (group B: high parasitemia) and 15 (group C: chronic infection), post-infection. Group D (control group) was composed of non-infected animals for platelet count, separation and enzymatic assays. Animals from groups A and B showed marked thrombocytopenia, but platelet count was not affected in chronically infected rats. NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and ADA activities decreased (pplatelets from rats of groups A and B, when compared to the control group. In group C, only NTPDase and 5'-nucleoside activities decreased (pplatelet count and nucleotide/nucleoside hydrolysis were positive and statistically significant (pPlatelet aggregation was decreased in all infected groups, in comparison to the control group (pplatelets of T. evansi-infected animals might be related to thrombocytopenia, that by reducing the number of platelets, there was less release of ATP and ADP. Another possibility being suggested is that changes have occurred in the membrane of these cells, decreasing the expression of these enzymes in the cell membrane.

  20. Use of nucleoside (tide) analogues in patients with hepatitis B-related acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Doan Y; Seremba, Emmanuel; Ajmera, Veeral;

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of nucleoside(tide) analogues (NA) in the treatment of acute liver failure due to hepatitis B virus (HBV-ALF) remains controversial. We determined retrospectively the impact of NAs in a large cohort of patients with HBV-ALF....

  1. ACTIVATION OF G-PROTEINS BY RECEPTOR-STIMULATED NUCLEOSIDE DIPHOSPHATE KINASE IN DICTYOSTELIUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bominaar, Anthony A.; Molijn, Anco C.; Pestel, Martine; Veron, Michel; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    Recently, interest in the enzyme nucleoside diphosphate kinase (EC 2.7.4.6) has increased as a result of its possible involvement in cell proliferation and development. Since NDP kinase is one of the major sources of GTP in cells, it has been suggested that the effects of an altered NDP kinase

  2. Aspartic acid based nucleoside phosphoramidate prodrugs as potent inhibitors of hepatitis C virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Munmun; Maiti, Mohitosh; Rozenski, Jef; De Jonghe, Steven; Herdewijn, Piet

    2015-05-14

    In view of a persistent threat to mankind, the development of nucleotide-based prodrugs against hepatitis C virus (HCV) is considered as a constant effort in many medicinal chemistry groups. In an attempt to identify novel nucleoside phosphoramidate analogues for improving the anti-HCV activity, we have explored, for the first time, aspartic acid (Asp) and iminodiacetic acid (IDA) esters as amidate counterparts by considering three 2'-C-methyl containing nucleosides, 2'-C-Me-cytidine, 2'-C-Me-uridine and 2'-C-Me-2'-fluoro-uridine. Synthesis of these analogues required protection for the vicinal diol functionality of the sugar moiety and the amino group of the cytidine nucleoside to regioselectively perform phosphorylation reaction at the 5'-hydroxyl group. Anti-HCV data demonstrate that the Asp-based phosphoramidates are ∼550 fold more potent than the parent nucleosides. The inhibitory activity of the Asp-ProTides was higher than the Ala-ProTides, suggesting that Asp would be a potential amino acid candidate to be considered for developing novel antiviral prodrugs.

  3. Pd0-Catalyzed Methyl Transfer on Nucleosides and Oligonucleotides, Envisaged as a PET Tracer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Fouquet

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The methyl transfer reaction from activated monomethyltin, via a modified Stille coupling reaction, was studied under “ligandless” conditions on fully deprotected 5'-modified nucleosides and one dinucleotide. The reaction was optimized to proceed in a few minutes and quantitative yield, even under dilute conditions, thus affording a rapid and efficient new method for oligonucleotide labelling with carbon-11.

  4. Organometallic nucleoside analogues with ferrocenyl linker groups: synthesis and cancer cell line studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huy V; Sallustrau, Antoine; Balzarini, Jan; Bedford, Matthew R; Eden, John C; Georgousi, Niki; Hodges, Nikolas J; Kedge, Jonathan; Mehellou, Youcef; Tselepis, Chris; Tucker, James H R

    2014-07-10

    Examples of organometallic compounds as nucleoside analogues are rare within the field of medicinal bioorganometallic chemistry. We report on the synthesis and properties of two chiral ferrocene derivatives containing a nucleobase and a hydroxyalkyl group. These so-called ferronucleosides show promising anticancer activity, with cytostatic studies on five different cancer cell lines indicating that both functional groups are required for optimal activity.

  5. An efficient and green preparation of 5-aminophosphonate substituted pyrimidine nucleosides under solvent-free conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Ying Zhang; Ying Ying Qu; Xue Sen Fan

    2010-01-01

    An environmentally benign and highly efficient one-pot preparation of α-aminophosphonates under solvent-free conditions was developed.By employing this method,5-aminophosphonate substituted pyrimidine nucleosides were synthesized in good to excellent yields starting from 5-formyl-2'-deoxyuridine,aniline and dimethylphosphite.

  6. Viral fitness: relation to drug resistance mutations and mechanisms involved: nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jan; Henry, Kenneth R; Arts, Eric J; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E

    2007-03-01

    Nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors constitute the backbone of highly active antiretroviral therapy in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. One of the major obstacles in achieving the long-term efficacy of anti-HIV-1 therapy is the development of resistance. The advent of resistance mutations is usually accompanied by a change in viral replicative fitness. This review focuses on the most common nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-associated mutations and their effects on HIV-1 replicative fitness. Recent studies have explained the two main mechanisms of resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and their role in HIV-1 replicative fitness. The first involves mutations directly interfering with binding or incorporation and seems to impact replicative fitness more adversely than the second mechanism, which involves enhanced excision of the newly incorporated analogue. Further studies have helped explain the antagonistic effects between amino acid substitutions, K65R, L74V, M184V, and thymidine analogue mutations, showing how viral replicative fitness influences the evolution of thymidine analogue resistance pathways. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutations impact HIV-1 replicative fitness to a lesser extent than protease resistance mutations. The monitoring of viral replicative fitness may help in the management of HIV-1 infection in highly antiretroviral-experienced individuals.

  7. Chemical and Conformational Diversity of Modified Nucleosides Affects tRNA Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Y. P. Väre

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available RNAs are central to all gene expression through the control of protein synthesis. Four major nucleosides, adenosine, guanosine, cytidine and uridine, compose RNAs and provide sequence variation, but are limited in contributions to structural variation as well as distinct chemical properties. The ability of RNAs to play multiple roles in cellular metabolism is made possible by extensive variation in length, conformational dynamics, and the over 100 post-transcriptional modifications. There are several reviews of the biochemical pathways leading to RNA modification, but the physicochemical nature of modified nucleosides and how they facilitate RNA function is of keen interest, particularly with regard to the contributions of modified nucleosides. Transfer RNAs (tRNAs are the most extensively modified RNAs. The diversity of modifications provide versatility to the chemical and structural environments. The added chemistry, conformation and dynamics of modified nucleosides occurring at the termini of stems in tRNA’s cloverleaf secondary structure affect the global three-dimensional conformation, produce unique recognition determinants for macromolecules to recognize tRNAs, and affect the accurate and efficient decoding ability of tRNAs. This review will discuss the impact of specific chemical moieties on the structure, stability, electrochemical properties, and function of tRNAs.

  8. Intersubunit ionic interactions stabilize the nucleoside diphosphate kinase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgescauld, Florian; Moynie, Lucile; Habersetzer, Johann;

    2013-01-01

    Most nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDPKs) are hexamers. The C-terminal tail interacting with the neighboring subunits is crucial for hexamer stability. In the NDPK from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mt) this tail is missing. The quaternary structure of Mt-NDPK is essential for full enzymatic acti...

  9. Investigation of proton affinities and gas phase vibrational spectra of protonated nucleosides, deoxynucleosides, and their analogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.U. Ung; K.T. Huynh; J.C. Poutsma; J. Oomens; G. Berden; T.H. Morton

    2015-01-01

    DNA nucleobases make use of hydrogen bonding, whether in associating to form the Watson-Crick double-helix or in producing alternative structures such as the G-quadruplex or the i-motif. Nucleoside proton-bound dimers provide an avenue for investigating characteristics that they possess within the i

  10. Experimental characterization of production behavior accompanying the hydrate reformation in methane hydrate bearing sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, T.; Kang, J.M.; Nguyen, H.T. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, C. [Kangwon National Univ., (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. [Korea Inst., of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    This study investigated the production behaviour associated with gas hydrate reformation in methane hydrate-bearing sediment by hot-brine injection. A range of different temperature and brine injection rates were used to analyze the pressure and temperature distribution, the gas production behaviour and the movement of the dissociation front. The study showed that hydrate reformation reduces the production rate considerably at an early time. However, gas production increases during the dissociation, near the outlet because the dissociated methane around the inlet is consumed in reforming the hydrate and increases the hydrate saturation around the outlet. Higher temperature also increases the gas production rate and the speed of the dissociation front. 12 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  11. Authigenic gypsum found in gas hydrate-associated sediments from Hydrate Ridge, the eastern North Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Jiasheng; Erwin; Suess; Dirk; Rickert

    2004-01-01

    Characteristic gypsum micro-sphere and granular mass were discovered by binocular microscope in the gas hydrate-associated sediments at cores SO143-221 and SO143/TVG40-2A respectively on Hydrate Ridge of Cascadia margin, the eastern North Pacific. XRD patterns and EPA analyses show both micro-sphere and granular mass of the crystals have the typical peaks and the typical main chemical compositions of gypsum, although their weight percents are slightly less than the others in the non-gas hydrate-associated marine regions. SEM pictures show that the gypsum crystals have clear crystal boundaries, planes, edges and cleavages of gypsum in form either of single crystal or of twin crystals. In view of the fact that there are meanwhile gas hydrate-associated authigenic carbonates and SO42(-rich pore water in the same sediment cores, it could be inferred reasonably that the gypsums formed also authigenically in the gas hydrate-associated environment too, most probably at the interface between the downward advecting sulfate-rich seawater and the below gas hydrate, which spilled calcium during its formation on Hydrate Ridge. The two distinct forms of crystal intergrowth, which are the granular mass of series single gypsum crystals at core SO143/TVG40-2A and the microsphere of gypsum crystals accompanied with detrital components at core SO143-221 respectively, indicate that they precipitated most likely in different interstitial water dynamic environments. So, the distinct authigenic gypsums found in gas hydrate-associated sediments on Hydrate Ridge could also be believed as one of the parameters which could be used to indicate the presence of gas hydrate in an unknown marine sediment cores.

  12. Renal elimination of organic anions in cholestasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adriana Mónica Tortes

    2008-01-01

    The disposition of most drugs is highly dependent on specialized transporters.OAT1 and OAT3 are two organic anion transporters expressed in the basolateral membrane of renal proximal tubule cells,identified as contributors to xenobiotic and endogenous organic anion secretion.It is well known that cholestasis may cause renal damage.Impairment of kidney function produces modifications in the renal elimination of drugs.Recent studies have demonstrated that the renal abundance of OAT1 and OAT3 plays an important role in the renal elimination of organic anions in the presence of extrahepatic cholestasis.Time elapsed after obstructive cholestasis has an important impact on the regulation of both types of organic anion transporters.The renal expression of OAT1 and OAT3 should be taken into account in order to improve pharmacotherapeutic efficacy and to prevent drug toxicity during the onset of this hepatic disease.

  13. Gas-Phase Reactivity of Microsolvated Anions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ditte Linde

    intrinsic factors and solvent effects is the enhanced reactivity of α-nucleophiles – nucleophiles with a lone-pair adjacent to the attacking site – referred to as the α-effect. This thesis concerns the reactivity of microsolvated anions and in particular how the presence of a single solvent molecule affects...... the gas-phase α-effect. The experimental studies are performed by means of the flowing after glow selected ion flow tube technique, and these are supplemented by electronic structure calculations. The α-nucleophile employed is the microsolvated hydrogen peroxide anion whose reactivity is compared...... to that of a series of microsolvated oxygen centered anions. The association of the nucleophiles with a single water or methanol molecule allows the α-effect to be observed in the SN2 reaction with methyl chloride; this effect was not apparent in the reactions of the unsolvated anions. The results suggest...

  14. A terbium(III)-complex-based on-off fluorescent chemosensor for phosphate anions in aqueous solution and its application in molecular logic gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Wen; Liu, Shun-Bang; Yang, Yan-Ling; Wang, Peng-Zhi; Zhang, Ai-Jiang; Peng, Yu

    2015-02-25

    A new Tb(III) complex based on a tripodal carboxylate ligand has been synthesized for the selective fluorescent recognition of phosphate anions, including inorganic phosphates and nucleoside phosphates (e.g., ATP), in Tris buffer solution. The resulting L · Tb complex shows the characteristic emission bands centered at about 495 and 550 nm from the Tb(III)-centered (5)D4 excited state to (7)FJ transitions with J = 6 and 5, where the chelating ligand acts only as an "antenna". Upon the addition of phosphate anions to the aqueous solution of Tb(III) complex, significant "on-off" fluorescence changes were observed, which were attributed to the inhibition of the "antenna" effect between the ligand and Tb(III) after the incorporation of phosphate anions. Furthermore, this unique Tb(III) complex has been successfully utilized to detect phosphate anions with filter papers and hydrogels. Notably, the Tb(III) complex also can be used for the construction of molecular logic gates with TRANSFER and INHIBIT logic functions by using the above fluorescence changes.

  15. Pulsed laser positive ion desorption from a model hydrated inorganic crystal (CaHPO 4·2H 2O) at 248 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, M. L.; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.

    1998-05-01

    We examine the laser-induced positive ion emission of a typical, wide band gap, hydrated inorganic single crystal, CaHPO 4·2H 2O (brushite), at 248 nm (KrF excimer) in vacuum. As-grown brushite is quite resistant to laser damage and yields little ion emission at fluences below 1 J/cm 2. In the presence of surface damage by abrasion or heating-induced transformations, intense laser-induced ion emission appears at lower fluences. The ion energy and fluence dependence are consistent with a defect mediated, multiple photon emission mechanism. In particular, the transport of hydrated Ca + to the surface, followed by adsorption at anion defects (and removal of water by evaporation), can provide an ideal environment for ion emission. The implications with regard to the UV laser ablation of hydrated environmental and biological minerals are discussed.

  16. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom

  17. ANION-BINDING AND SENSING PROPERTIES OF NOVEL RECEPTORS BASED ON N-(INDOL-3-YLGLYOXYLYLBENZYLAMINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Indole-based receptors such as biindole, carbazole, and indolocarbazole are regarded as some of the most favorable anion receptors in molecular recognition. This is because indole groups possess N–H groups as hydrogen-bonding donors. The introduction of amide groups in the indole framework can induce strong binding properties and good water solubility. In this study, we designed and synthesized a series of N-(indol-3-ylglyoxylylbenzylamine derivatives as novel and simple anion receptors. The receptors derived by aryl and aliphatic amines can selectively recognize F– based on a color change from colorless-to-yellow in DMSO. The receptors derived by hydrazine hydrate can recognize F–, AcO–, and H2PO4– by similar color changes in DMSO and can even enable the selective recognition of F– in a DMSO–H2O binary solution by the naked eye. Spectrographic data indicate that complexes are formed between receptors and anions through multiple hydrogen-bonding interactions in dual solutions.

  18. Mechanisms of metal ion transfer into room-temperature ionic liquids: the role of anion exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark P; Neuefeind, Jörg; Beitz, James V; Skanthakumar, S; Soderholm, L

    2003-12-17

    The structure and stoichiometry of the lanthanide(III) (Ln) complexes with the ligand 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (Htta) formed in a biphasic aqueous room-temperature ionic liquid system have been studied by complementary physicochemical methods. Equilibrium thermodynamics, optical absorption and luminescence spectroscopies, high-energy X-ray scattering, EXAFS, and molecular dynamics simulations all support the formation of anionic Nd(tta)4(-) or Eu(tta)4(-) complexes with no water coordinated to the metal center in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide (C4mim+Tf2N(-)), rather than the hydrated, neutral complexes, M(tta)(3)(H2O)n)(n = 2 or 3), that form in nonpolar molecular solvents, such as xylene or chloroform. The presence of anionic lanthanide complexes in C4mim+Tf2N(-) is made possible by the exchange of the ionic liquid anions into the aqueous phase for the lanthanide complex. The resulting complexes in the ionic liquid phase should be thought of as weak C4mim+Ln(tta)4(-) ion pairs which exert little influence on the structure of the ionic liquid phase.

  19. Mechanisms of metal ion transfer into room-temperature ionic liquids : the role of anion exchange.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. P.; Neuefeind, J.; Beitz, J. V.; Skanthakumar, S.; Soderholm, L.; Chemistry

    2003-12-17

    The structure and stoichiometry of the lanthanide(III) (Ln) complexes with the ligand 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (Htta) formed in a biphasic aqueous room-temperature ionic liquid system have been studied by complementary physicochemical methods. Equilibrium thermodynamics, optical absorption and luminescence spectroscopies, high-energy X-ray scattering, EXAFS, and molecular dynamics simulations all support the formation of anionic Nd(tta){sub 4}{sup -} or Eu(tta){sub 4}{sup -} complexes with no water coordinated to the metal center in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide (C{sub 4}mim{sup +}Tf{sub 2}N{sup -}), rather than the hydrated, neutral complexes, M(tta){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub n} (n = 2 or 3), that form in nonpolar molecular solvents, such as xylene or chloroform. The presence of anionic lanthanide complexes in C{sub 4}mim{sup +}Tf{sub 2}N{sup -} is made possible by the exchange of the ionic liquid anions into the aqueous phase for the lanthanide complex. The resulting complexes in the ionic liquid phase should be thought of as weak C{sub 4}mim{sup +}Ln(tta){sub 4}{sup -} ion pairs which exert little influence on the structure of the ionic liquid phase.

  20. Experimental Determination of Refractive Index of Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bylov, Martin; Rasmussen, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The refractive indexes of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate have been experimentally determined. The refractive indexes were determined in an indirect manner making use of the fact that two non-absorbing materials will have the same refractive index if they cannot be distinguished visually....... For methane hydrate (structure I) the refractive index was found to be 1.346 and for natural gas hydrate (structure II) it was found to be 1.350. The measurements further suggest that the gas hydrate growth rate increases if the water has formed hydrates before. The induction time, on the other hand, seems...

  1. Complex admixtures of clathrate hydrates in a water desalination method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Blake A.; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Anderson, David W.

    2009-07-14

    Disclosed is a method that achieves water desalination by utilizing and optimizing clathrate hydrate phenomena. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds of gas and water that desalinate water by excluding salt molecules during crystallization. Contacting a hydrate forming gaseous species with water will spontaneously form hydrates at specific temperatures and pressures through the extraction of water molecules from the bulk phase followed by crystallite nucleation. Subsequent dissociation of pure hydrates yields fresh water and, if operated correctly, allows the hydrate-forming gas to be efficiently recycled into the process stream.

  2. A new class of organocatalysts: sulfenate anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mengnan; Jia, Tiezheng; Yin, Haolin; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J; Walsh, Patrick J

    2014-09-26

    Sulfenate anions are known to act as highly reactive species in the organic arena. Now they premiere as organocatalysts. Proof of concept is offered by the sulfoxide/sulfenate-catalyzed (1-10 mol%) coupling of benzyl halides in the presence of base to generate trans-stilbenes in good to excellent yields (up to 99%). Mechanistic studies support the intermediacy of sulfenate anions, and the deprotonated sulfoxide was determined to be the resting state of the catalyst.

  3. Fluorescence-lifetime-based sensors for anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Maria; Draxler, Sonja; Kieslinger, Dietmar; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1997-05-01

    Sensing of anions has been investigated using the fluorescence decaytime as the information carrier. The sensing mechanism is based on the coextraction of an anion and a proton, and the presence of a fluorophore with a rather long fluorescence decaytime inside the membrane to act as a pH indicator. The relevant theory is discussed shortly. As an example a sensor for nitrate is shown, and the influence of ionic additives on the working function has been investigated.

  4. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.

    2014-07-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  5. Interfacial phenomena in gas hydrate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Zachary M; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-03-21

    Gas hydrates are crystalline inclusion compounds, where molecular cages of water trap lighter species under specific thermodynamic conditions. Hydrates play an essential role in global energy systems, as both a hinderance when formed in traditional fuel production and a substantial resource when formed by nature. In both traditional and unconventional fuel production, hydrates share interfaces with a tremendous diversity of materials, including hydrocarbons, aqueous solutions, and inorganic solids. This article presents a state-of-the-art understanding of hydrate interfacial thermodynamics and growth kinetics, and the physiochemical controls that may be exerted on both. Specific attention is paid to the molecular structure and interactions of water, guest molecules, and hetero-molecules (e.g., surfactants) near the interface. Gas hydrate nucleation and growth mechanics are also presented, based on studies using a combination of molecular modeling, vibrational spectroscopy, and X-ray and neutron diffraction. The fundamental physical and chemical knowledge and methods presented in this review may be of value in probing parallel systems of crystal growth in solid inclusion compounds, crystal growth modifiers, emulsion stabilization, and reactive particle flow in solid slurries.

  6. Experimental investigation of smectite hydration from the simulation of 001 X-ray diffraction lines. Implications for the characterization of mineralogical modifications of the 'argilite' from the Meuse - Haute Marne site as a result of a thermal perturbation; Etude experimentale de l'hydratation des smectites par simulation des raies OOl de diffraction des rayons X. Implications pour l'etude d'une perturbation thermique sur la mineralogie de l'argilite du site Meuse-Haute Marne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrage, E

    2004-10-15

    The structural modifications affecting the reactive mineral constituents of the clay barriers (smectite) and possibly resulting from the thermal pulse related to nuclear waste storage are essentially limited to the amount and location of the layer charge deficit. These modifications likely impact the hydration properties of these minerals, and a specific methodology has thus been developed to describe, using simulation of X-ray diffraction profiles (001 reflections), these hydration properties and specifically the heterogeneity resulting from the inter-stratification of different layer types, each exhibiting a specific hydration state. The detailed study of the hydration properties of a low-charge montmorillonite (octahedral charge) has shown that the affinity of the interlayer cation for water rules the hydration state and the thickness of hydrated smectite layers. If the layer charge is increased, the transition between the different hydration states is shifted, following a water desorption isotherm, towards lower relative humidities. In addition, the hydration of studied beidellites (tetrahedral charge) was shown to be more heterogeneous than that of montmorillonites. The developed methodology also allowed describing the structural modifications resulting from a chemical perturbation (chlorinated anionic background, pH). Finally, the link between the thickness of elementary layers and the amount of interlayer water molecules has been evidenced. A new structure model has also been determined for these interlayer species allowing an improved description of their positional distribution in bi-hydrated interlayers. (author)

  7. Analysis of the Nucleoside Content of Cordyceps sinensis Using the Stepwise Gradient Elution Technique of Thin-Layer Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA,King-Wah(马敬桦); CHAU,Foo-Tim(周福添); WU,Jian-Yong(吴建勇)

    2004-01-01

    Nucleoside is the main class of active components in Cordyceps sinensis. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is one of the most commonly used methods in pharmacopoeias for analyzing chemical components of herbal medicine. Since the isocratic elution method cannot be applied successfully in TLC analysis for separating all the nucleoside components, the stepwise gradient elution has been developed in this work to separate eight nucleoside standards with success. In this way, quantitative analyses of the samples of Cordyceps sinensis were achieved via the proposed TLC procedure coupled with the scanning densitometric techniques of CAMAG and TLCQA methods for qualitative and quantitative analysis.

  8. Stability evaluation of hydrate-bearing sediments during thermally-driven hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, T.; Cho, G.; Santamarina, J.; Kim, H.; Lee, J.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrate-bearing sediments may destabilize spontaneously as part of geological processes, unavoidably during petroleum drilling/production operations, or intentionally as part of gas extraction from the hydrate itself. In all cases, high pore fluid pressure generation is anticipated during hydrate dissociation. This study examined how thermal changes destabilize gas hydrate-bearing sediments. First, an analytical formulation was derived for predicting fluid pressure evolution in hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to thermal stimulation without mass transfer. The formulation captures the self-preservation behavior, calculates the hydrate and free gas quantities during dissociation, considering effective stress-controlled sediment compressibility and gas solubility in aqueous phase. Pore fluid pressure generation is proportional to the initial hydrate fraction and the sediment bulk stiffness; is inversely proportional to the initial gas fraction and gas solubility; and is limited by changes in effective stress that cause the failure of the sediment. Second, the analytical formulation for hydrate dissociation was incorporated as a user-defined function into a verified finite difference code (FLAC2D). The underlying physical processes of hydrate-bearing sediments, including hydrate dissociation, self-preservation, pore pressure evolution, gas dissolution, and sediment volume expansion, were coupled with the thermal conduction, pore fluid flow, and mechanical response of sediments. We conducted the simulations for a duration of 20 years, assuming a constant-temperature wellbore transferred heat to the surrounding hydrate-bearing sediments, resulting in dissociation of methane hydrate in the well vicinity. The model predicted dissociation-induced excess pore fluid pressures which resulted in a large volume expansion and plastic deformation of the sediments. Furthermore, when the critical stress was reached, localized shear failure of the sediment around the borehole was

  9. Methane hydrates in nature - Current knowledge and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated effort, the United States Congress enacted the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. At the same time, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan launched a research program to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. India, China, the Republic of Korea, and other nations also have established large methane hydrate research and development programs. Government-funded scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrates in nature. Numerous studies have shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world may exceed the volume of known organic carbon sources. However, methane hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge, and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of methane hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various methane hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural methane hydrates, (5) analyzing the methane hydrate role as a geohazard, (6) establishing the means to detect and characterize methane hydrate accumulations using geologic and geophysical data, and (7) establishing the thermodynamic phase equilibrium properties of methane hydrates as a function of temperature, pressure, and gas composition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) combined their efforts in 2012 to assess the contributions that scientific drilling has made and could continue to make to advance

  10. Apparatus investigates geological aspects of gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, J.S.; Winters, W.J.; Dillon, William P.

    1999-01-01

    The US Geological Survey has developed a laboratory research system which allows the study of the creation and dissociation of gas hydrates under deepwater conditions and with different sediment types and pore fluids. The system called GHASTLI (gas hydrate and sediment test laboratory instrument) comprises a pressure chamber which holds a sediment specimen, and which can simulate water depths to 2,500m and different sediment overburden. Seawater and gas flow through a sediment specimen can be precisely controlled and monitored. It can simulate a wide range of geology and processes and help to improve understanding of gas hydrate processes and aid prediction of geohazards, their control and potential use as an energy source. This article describes GHASTLI and how it is able to simulate natural conditions, focusing on fluid volume, acoustic velocity-compressional and shear wave, electric resistance, temperature, pore pressure, shear strength, and permeability.

  11. Neutral pyrimidine C-H donor as anion receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁迎雪; 吴娜娜; 韩逸飞; 宋相志; 王洪波

    2016-01-01

    Anion receptors including pyrimidine subunit were designed and synthesized and their binding abilities with various anions were investigated by fluorescence and 1H NMR titration experiments. DFT calculations provided some information for anion recognition. It is confirmed that both of two new pyrimidine anion receptors have the selectivity for Cl−.

  12. Simulation of Methane Recovery from Gas Hydrates Combined with Storing Carbon Dioxide as Hydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Janicki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the medium term, gas hydrate reservoirs in the subsea sediment are intended as deposits for carbon dioxide (CO2 from fossil fuel consumption. This idea is supported by the thermodynamics of CO2 and methane (CH4 hydrates and the fact that CO2 hydrates are more stable than CH4 hydrates in a certain P-T range. The potential of producing methane by depressurization and/or by injecting CO2 is numerically studied in the frame of the SUGAR project. Simulations are performed with the commercial code STARS from CMG and the newly developed code HyReS (hydrate reservoir simulator especially designed for hydrate processing in the subsea sediment. HyReS is a nonisothermal multiphase Darcy flow model combined with thermodynamics and rate kinetics suitable for gas hydrate calculations. Two scenarios are considered: the depressurization of an area 1,000 m in diameter and a one/two-well scenario with CO2 injection. Realistic rates for injection and production are estimated, and limitations of these processes are discussed.

  13. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  14. Simulation of subsea gas hydrate exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2014-05-01

    The recovery of methane from gas hydrate layers that have been detected in several subsea sediments and permafrost regions around the world is a promising perspective to overcome future shortages in natural gas supply. Being aware that conventional natural gas resources are limited, research is going on to develop technologies for the production of natural gas from such new sources. Thus various research programs have started since the early 1990s in Japan, USA, Canada, India, and Germany to investigate hydrate deposits and develop required technologies. In recent years, intensive research has focussed on the capture and storage of CO2 from combustion processes to reduce climate impact. While different natural or man-made reservoirs like deep aquifers, exhausted oil and gas deposits or other geological formations are considered to store gaseous or liquid CO2, the storage of CO2 as hydrate in former methane hydrate fields is another promising alternative. Due to beneficial stability conditions, methane recovery may be well combined with CO2 storage in the form of hydrates. Regarding technological implementation many problems have to be overcome. Especially mixing, heat and mass transfer in the reservoir are limiting factors causing very long process times. Within the scope of the German research project »SUGAR« different technological approaches for the optimized exploitation of gas hydrate deposits are evaluated and compared by means of dynamic system simulations and analysis. Detailed mathematical models for the most relevant chemical and physical processes are developed. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into simulation programs. Simulations based on geological field data have been carried out. The studies focus on the potential of gas production from turbidites and their fitness for CO2 storage. The effects occurring during gas production and CO2 storage within

  15. GLASS TRANSITION OF HYDRATED WHEAT GLIADIN POWDERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-min Sun; Li Zhao; Yi-hu Song; Qiang Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Modulated-temperature differential scanning calorimetric and dynamic mechanical analyses and dielectric spectroscopy were used to investigate the glass transition of hydrated wheat gliadin powders with moisture absorption ranged from 2.30 db% to 18.21 db%. Glass transition temperature (Tg) of dry wheat gliadin was estimated according to the GordonTaylor equation. Structural heterogeneity at high degrees of hydration was revealed in dielectric temperature and frequency spectra. The activation energies (Ea) of the two relaxations were calculated from Arrhenius equation.

  16. Component analysis of the protein hydration entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2012-05-01

    We report the development of an atomic decomposition method of the protein solvation entropy in water, which allows us to understand global change in the solvation entropy in terms of local changes in protein conformation as well as in hydration structure. This method can be implemented via a combined approach based on molecular dynamics simulation and integral-equation theory of liquids. An illustrative application is made to 42-residue amyloid-beta protein in water. We demonstrate how this method enables one to elucidate the molecular origin for the hydration entropy change upon conformational transitions of protein.

  17. The effects of halide anions on the dielectric response of potassium halide solutions in visible, UV and far UV region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagieva, F M; Boinovich, L B

    2013-06-07

    Based on the experimentally measured dispersion of refractive indices, we studied the effects of halide anions on the dielectric response of potassium halide solutions in the visible, UV and far UV regions. It was shown that a specific ion effect according to the Hofmeister series is clearly demonstrated for the visible range of spectra. For the near-, mid-, and far UV ranges of spectra, the specific ion effect essentially depends on solution concentration and temperature. The influence of ions on the behavior of dynamic dielectric permittivity of a solution is discussed on the basis of ion/water and ion/ion electrostatic and electrodynamic interactions and hydration shell structure.

  18. Molecular modeling of hydrotalcite structure intercalated with transition metal oxide anions: CrO4(2-) and VO4(3-).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Vinuthaa; Smith, Howard D; Zhang, Hong; Smith, Sean C

    2011-11-24

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to study the interlayer structure, hydrogen bonding, and energetics of hydration of Mg/Al (2:1 and 4:1) layered double hydroxide (LDH) or hydrotalcite (HT) intercalated with oxymetal anions, CrO(4)(2-), and VO(4)(3-). The ab initio forcefield COMPASS is employed for the simulations. The charge on the oxymetal anions is determined by quantum mechanical density functional theory. The structural behavior of the oxymetal anions in LDH directly relates to the energetic relationships, with electrostatic and H-bonding interactions between the anions, hydroxide sites of the metal hydroxide layers, and the interlayer water molecules. Distinct minima in the hydration energy indicate the presence of energetically well-defined structural states with specific water content. The experimentally identified variability in the retention of the CrO(4)(2-) and VO(4)(3-) is well reflected in the calculations and self-diffusion coefficients obtained from the simulations give insight into the mobility of the intercalated species.

  19. Gas hydrate of Lake Baikal: Discovery and varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlystov, Oleg; De Batist, Marc; Shoji, Hitoshi; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Nishio, Shinya; Naudts, Lieven; Poort, Jeffrey; Khabuev, Andrey; Belousov, Oleg; Manakov, Andrey; Kalmychkov, Gennаdy

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of recent gas-hydrate studies in Lake Baikal, the only fresh-water lake in the world containing gas hydrates in its sedimentary infill. We provide a historical overview of the different investigations and discoveries and highlight some recent breakthroughs in our understanding of the Baikal hydrate system. So far, 21 sites of gas hydrate occurrence have been discovered. Gas hydrates are of structures I and II, which are of thermogenic, microbial, and mixed origin. At the 15 sites, gas hydrates were found in mud volcanoes, and the rest six - near gas discharges. Additionally, depending on type of discharge and gas hydrate structure, they were visually different. Investigations using MIR submersibles allowed finding of gas hydrates at the bottom surface of Lake Baikal at the three sites.

  20. Layered double hydroxides as the next generation inorganic anion exchangers: Synthetic methods versus applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubar, Natalia; Gilmour, Robert; Gerda, Vasyl; Mičušík, Matej; Omastova, Maria; Heister, Katja; Man, Pascal; Fraissard, Jacques; Zaitsev, Vladimir

    2017-07-01

    considered in association with the synthetic methods by which the LDHs were produced. Special attention is paid to the LDH properties that are particularly relevant to water treatment, such as exchangeability ease of the interlayer anions and the LDH stability at the solid-water interface. Notably, the LDH properties (e.g., rich speciation, hydration, and the exchangeability ease of the interlayer anions with aqueous anions) are considered in the synthetic strategy context applied to the material preparation. One such promising synthetic method has been developed by the authors who supported their opinions by the unpublished data in addition to reviewing the literature. The reviewing approach allowed for establishing regularities between the parameters: the LDH synthetic method-structure/surface/interlayer-removal-suitability for water treatment. Specifically, this approach allowed for a conclusion about either the unsuitability or promising potential of some synthetic methods (or the removal approaches) used for the preparation of LDHs for water purification at larger scales. The overall reviewing approach undertaken by the authors in this work mainly complements the other reviews on LDHs (published over the past seven to eight years) and for the first time compares the properties of these materials beyond the nanoscale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Studies of anions sorption on natural zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barczyk, K; Mozgawa, W; Król, M

    2014-12-10

    This work presents results of FT-IR spectroscopic studies of anions-chromate, phosphate and arsenate - sorbed from aqueous solutions (different concentrations of anions) on zeolites. The sorption has been conducted on natural zeolites from different structural groups, i.e. chabazite, mordenite, ferrierite and clinoptilolite. The Na-forms of sorbents were exchanged with hexadecyltrimethylammonium cations (HDTMA(+)) and organo-zeolites were obtained. External cation exchange capacities (ECEC) of organo-zeolites were measured. Their values are 17mmol/100g for chabazite, 4mmol/100g for mordenite and ferrierite and 10mmol/100g for clinoptilolite. The used initial inputs of HDTMA correspond to 100% and 200% ECEC of the minerals. Organo-modificated sorbents were subsequently used for immobilization of mentioned anions. It was proven that aforementioned anions' sorption causes changes in IR spectra of the HDTMA-zeolites. These alterations are dependent on the kind of anions that were sorbed. In all cases, variations are due to bands corresponding to the characteristic Si-O(Si,Al) vibrations (occurring in alumino- and silicooxygen tetrahedra building spatial framework of zeolites). Alkylammonium surfactant vibrations have also been observed. Systematic changes in the spectra connected with the anion concentration in the initial solution have been revealed. The amounts of sorbed CrO4(2-), AsO4(3-) and PO4(3-) ions were calculated from the difference between their concentrations in solutions before (initial concentration) and after (equilibrium concentration) sorption experiments. Concentrations of anions were determined by spectrophotometric method.

  2. Superoxide Anion Radical Production in the Tardigrade Paramacrobiotus richtersi, the First Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spin-Trapping Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Aleksandar G; Guidetti, Roberto; Turi, Ana; Pavicevic, Aleksandra; Giovannini, Ilaria; Rebecchi, Lorena; Mojovic, Milos

    2015-01-01

    Anhydrobiosis is an adaptive strategy that allows withstanding almost complete body water loss. It has been developed independently by many organisms belonging to different evolutionary lines, including tardigrades. The loss of water during anhydrobiotic processes leads to oxidative stress. To date, the metabolism of free radicals in tardigrades remained unclear. We present a method for in vivo monitoring of free radical production in tardigrades, based on electron paramagnetic resonance and spin-trap DEPMPO, which provides simultaneous identification of various spin adducts (i.e., different types of free radicals). The spin trap can be easily absorbed in animals, and tardigrades stay alive during the measurements and during 24-h monitoring after the treatment. The results show that hydrated specimens of the tardigrade Paramacrobiotus richtersi produce the pure superoxide anion radical ((•)O2(-)). This is an unexpected result, as all previously examined animals and plants produce both superoxide anion radical and hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) or exclusively hydroxyl radical.

  3. Pharmacological reversal of histone methylation presensitizes pancreatic cancer cells to nucleoside drugs: in vitro optimization and novel nanoparticle delivery studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hung, Sau Wai; Mody, Hardik; Marrache, Sean; Bhutia, Yangzom D; Davis, Franklin; Cho, Jong Hyun; Zastre, Jason; Dhar, Shanta; Chu, Chung K; Govindarajan, Rajgopal

    2013-01-01

    ...), in improving the chemosensitivity of pancreatic cancer to nucleoside analogs (i.e., gemcitabine). DZNep brought delayed but selective cytotoxicity to pancreatic cancer cells without affecting normal human pancreatic ductal epithelial...

  4. Isatinphenylsemicarbazones as efficient colorimetric sensors for fluoride and acetate anions - anions induce tautomerism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakusová, Klaudia; Donovalová, Jana; Cigáň, Marek; Gáplovský, Martin; Garaj, Vladimír; Gáplovský, Anton

    2014-04-05

    The anion induced tautomerism of isatin-3-4-phenyl(semicarbazone) derivatives is studied herein. The interaction of F(-), AcO(-), H2PO4(-), Br(-) or HSO4(-) anions with E and Z isomers of isatin-3-4-phenyl(semicarbazone) and N-methylisatin-3-4-phenyl(semicarbazone) as sensors influences the tautomeric equilibrium of these sensors in the liquid phase. This tautomeric equilibrium is affected by (1) the inter- and intra-molecular interactions' modulation of isatinphenylsemicarbazone molecules due to the anion induced change in the solvation shell of receptor molecules and (2) the sensor-anion interaction with the urea hydrogens. The acid-base properties of anions and the difference in sensor structure influence the equilibrium ratio of the individual tautomeric forms. Here, the tautomeric equilibrium changes were indicated by "naked-eye" experiment, UV-VIS spectral and (1)H NMR titration, resulting in confirmation that appropriate selection of experimental conditions leads to a high degree of sensor selectivity for some investigated anions. Sensors' E and Z isomers differ in sensitivity, selectivity and sensing mechanism. Detection of F(-) or CH3COO(-) anions at high weakly basic anions' excess is possible.

  5. Hydrate bearing clayey sediments: Formation and gas production concepts

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Jaewon

    2016-06-20

    Hydro-thermo-chemo and mechanically coupled processes determine hydrate morphology and control gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments. Force balance, together with mass and energy conservation analyses anchored in published data provide robust asymptotic solutions that reflect governing processes in hydrate systems. Results demonstrate that hydrate segregation in clayey sediments results in a two-material system whereby hydrate lenses are surrounded by hydrate-free water-saturated clay. Hydrate saturation can reach ≈2% by concentrating the excess dissolved gas in the pore water and ≈20% from metabolizable carbon. Higher hydrate saturations are often found in natural sediments and imply methane transport by advection or diffusion processes. Hydrate dissociation is a strongly endothermic event; the available latent heat in a reservoir can sustain significant hydrate dissociation without triggering ice formation during depressurization. The volume of hydrate expands 2-to-4 times upon dissociation or CO2single bondCH4 replacement. Volume expansion can be controlled to maintain lenses open and to create new open mode discontinuities that favor gas recovery. Pore size is the most critical sediment parameter for hydrate formation and gas recovery and is controlled by the smallest grains in a sediment. Therefore any characterization must carefully consider the amount of fines and their associated mineralogy.

  6. Ammonium Bicarbonate Transport in Anion Exchange Membranes for Salinity Gradient Energy

    KAUST Repository

    Geise, Geoffrey M.

    2013-09-17

    Many salinity gradient energy technologies such as reverse electrodialysis (RED) rely on highly selective anion transport through polymeric anion exchange membranes. While there is considerable interest in using thermolytic solutions such as ammonium bicarbonate (AmB) in RED processes for closed-loop conversion of heat energy to electricity, little is known about membrane performance in this electrolyte. The resistances of two commercially available cation exchange membranes in AmB were lower than their resistances in NaCl. However, the resistances of commercially available anion exchange membranes (AEMs) were much larger in AmB than in NaCl, which would adversely affect energy recovery. The properties of a series of quaternary ammonium-functionalized poly(phenylene oxide) and Radel-based AEMs were therefore examined to understand the reasons for increased resistance in AmB to overcome this performance penalty due to the lower mobility of bicarbonate, 4.59 × 10-4 cm2/(V s), compared to chloride, 7.90 × 10-4 cm2/(V s) (the dilute aqueous solution mobility ratio of HCO3 - to Cl- is 0.58). Most membrane resistances were generally consistent with the dilute solution mobilities of the anions. For a few key samples, however, increased water uptake in AmB solution reduced the ionic resistance of the polymer compared to its resistance in NaCl solution. This increased water uptake was attributed to the greater hydration of the bicarbonate ion compared to the chloride ion. The increased resistance due to the use of bicarbonate as opposed to chloride ions in AEMs can therefore be mitigated by designing polymers that swell more in AmB compared to NaCl solutions, enabling more efficient energy recovery using AmB thermolytic solutions in RED. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  7. Structure and selectivity trends in crystalline urea-functionalized anion-binding capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajbanshi, Arbin [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Custelcean, Radu [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    A tripodal trisurea receptor (L1) persistently self-assembles with various divalent oxoanion salts M{sub n}X (M = Na, K, Mg, Ca, Cd; X = SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, SO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) into isomorphous series of crystalline frameworks in three different compositions: MX(L1){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6} (M = Mg, Ca, Cd) (1), Na{sub 2}X(L1){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} (2) and K{sub 2}X(L1){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (3). Single-crystal X-ray structural analysis revealed that all three series of structures adopt a NaCl-type topology, consisting of alternating anionic X(L1){sub 2}{sup 2-} capsules and M(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}{sup 2+}, Na{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}{sup 2+} or K{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}{sup 2+} hydrated cations. The capsules provide a complementary environment to tetrahedral oxoanions via 12 hydrogen bonds from six urea groups lining the cavities of the capsules. The persistent formation of the capsules facilitated the investigation of structural trends and structure-selectivity relationships across series 1-3. First, it was found that the size of the capsules is relatively unresponsive to the change in the encapsulated anion, resulting in good shape and size recognition in the separation of anions by competitive crystallizations. Second, it was found that the size of the capsules varies linearly with the size of the external cation, which provides a way for tuning the anion encapsulation selectivity. However, no straightforward dependence was found between the size of the capsules and the relative selectivity for different-sized tetrahedral oxoanions in competitive crystallizations.

  8. Enhanced anion electroadsorption into carbon molecular sieve electrodes in acidic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliad, Linoam; Salitra, Gregory; Pollak, Elad; Soffer, Abraham; Aurbach, Doron

    2005-11-08

    We previously showed that, for neutral electrolytes of small cations and relatively larger anions, it is possible to design certain pore sizes in active carbons that are large enough to electroadsorb cations but too small to allow anion electroadsorption. This situation leads to an electrical double-layer (EDL) capacitance that is significant only at potentials that are negative to the potential of zero charge (PZC); hence, much smaller capacitance is measured at potentials positive to the PZC. It was found that when the electrolyte is a strong acid (e.g., H(2)SO(4), HCl), a considerable capacitance is observed at positive potentials, even when the average pore size is too small to allow the insertion of large anions in neutral electrolyte solutions. This effect disappears when the pore size becomes considerably larger than the size of the ions. In this case, the EDL capacitance at positive potentials for both neutral and acidic solutions is comparable. The following four-step mechanism was found to comply best with the experimental data: (1) By acid catalysis, the protons form carbonium species within the conjugated carbon network. (2) The anions react with the carbonium ions, providing uncharged species in an activated state, which are chemibound as surface groups to the walls of the pores. (3) Because these surface groups are effectively much smaller in size than are the charged ions, they can migrate by chemical bond exchange within the carbon skeleton via constrictions (known to exist in microporous and molecular sieving carbons), which are too narrow to accommodate hydrated charged species. (4) Upon reaching wider spaces, the uncharged species are reionized and solvated by water molecules, which can fill small pores. The justification for the above mechanism is thoroughly discussed and demonstrated by the experimental results.

  9. Nucleoside modifications in RNA limit activation of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase and increase resistance to cleavage by RNase L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bart R; Muramatsu, Hiromi; Jha, Babal K; Silverman, Robert H; Weissman, Drew; Karikó, Katalin

    2011-11-01

    The interferon-induced enzymes 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) and RNase L are key components of innate immunity involved in sensory and effector functions following viral infections. Upon binding target RNA, OAS is activated to produce 2'-5'-linked oligoadenylates (2-5A) that activate RNase L, which then cleaves single-stranded self and non-self RNA. Modified nucleosides that are present in cellular transcripts have been shown to suppress activation of several RNA sensors. Here, we demonstrate that in vitro transcribed, unmodified RNA activates OAS, induces RNase L-mediated ribosomal RNA (rRNA) cleavage and is rapidly cleaved by RNase L. In contrast, RNA containing modified nucleosides activates OAS less efficiently and induces limited rRNA cleavage. Nucleoside modifications also make RNA resistant to cleavage by RNase L. Examining translation in RNase L(-/-) cells and mice confirmed that RNase L activity reduces translation of unmodified mRNA, which is not observed with modified mRNA. Additionally, mRNA containing the nucleoside modification pseudouridine is translated longer and has an extended half-life. The observation that modified nucleosides in RNA reduce 2-5A pathway activation joins OAS and RNase L to the list of RNA sensors and effectors whose functions are limited when RNA is modified, confirming the role of nucleoside modifications in suppressing immune recognition of RNA.

  10. Dereplication of known nucleobase and nucleoside compounds in natural product extracts by capillary electrophoresis-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junhui; Shi, Qian; Wang, Yanlong; Li, Zhaoyong; Wang, Shuai

    2015-03-26

    Nucleobase and nucleoside compounds exist widely in various organisms. An often occurring problem in the discovery of new bioactive compounds from natural products is reisolation of known nucleobase and nucleoside compounds. To resolve this problem, a capillary electrophoresis-high resolution mass spectrometry (CE-HR-MS) method providing both rapid separation and accurate mass full-scan MS data was developed for the first time to screen and dereplicate known nucleobase and nucleoside compounds in crude extracts of natural products. Instrumental parameters were optimized to obtain optimum conditions for CE separation and electrospray ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF/MS) detection. The proposed method was verified to be precise, reproducible, and sensitive. Using this method, known nucleobase and nucleoside compounds in different marine medicinal organisms including Syngnathus acus Linnaeus; Hippocampus japonicus Kaup and Anthopleura lanthogrammica Berkly were successfully observed and identified. This work demonstrates that CE-HR-MS combined with an accurate mass database may be used as a powerful tool for dereplicating known nucleobase and nucleoside compounds in different types of natural products. Rapid dereplication of known nucleobase and nucleoside compounds allows researchers to focus on other leads with greater potential to yield new substances.

  11. Dereplication of Known Nucleobase and Nucleoside Compounds in Natural Product Extracts by Capillary Electrophoresis-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhui Chen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nucleobase and nucleoside compounds exist widely in various organisms. An often occurring problem in the discovery of new bioactive compounds from natural products is reisolation of known nucleobase and nucleoside compounds. To resolve this problem, a capillary electrophoresis-high resolution mass spectrometry (CE-HR-MS method providing both rapid separation and accurate mass full-scan MS data was developed for the first time to screen and dereplicate known nucleobase and nucleoside compounds in crude extracts of natural products. Instrumental parameters were optimized to obtain optimum conditions for CE separation and electrospray ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF/MS detection. The proposed method was verified to be precise, reproducible, and sensitive. Using this method, known nucleobase and nucleoside compounds in different marine medicinal organisms including Syngnathus acus Linnaeus; Hippocampus japonicus Kaup and Anthopleura lanthogrammica Berkly were successfully observed and identified. This work demonstrates that CE-HR-MS combined with an accurate mass database may be used as a powerful tool for dereplicating known nucleobase and nucleoside compounds in different types of natural products. Rapid dereplication of known nucleobase and nucleoside compounds allows researchers to focus on other leads with greater potential to yield new substances.

  12. Urea-Functionalized M4L6 Cage Receptors: Self-Assembly, Dynamics, and Anion Recognition in Aqueous Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Custelcean, Radu [ORNL; Bonnesen, Peter V [ORNL; Duncan, Nathan C [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL; Hay, Benjamin [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    We present an extensive study of a novel class of de novo designed tetrahedral M{sub 4}L{sub 6} (M = Ni, Zn) cage receptors, wherein internal decoration of the cage cavities with urea anion-binding groups, via functionalization of the organic components L, led to selective encapsulation of tetrahedral oxoanions EO{sub 4}{sup -} (E = S, Se, Cr, Mo, W, n = 2; E = P, n = 3) from aqueous solutions, based on shape, size, and charge recognition. External functionalization with tBu groups led to enhanced solubility of the cages in aqueous methanol solutions, thereby allowing for their thorough characterization by multinuclear ({sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 77}Se) and diffusion NMR spectroscopies. Additional experimental characterization by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, UV-vis spectroscopy, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction, as well as theoretical calculations, led to a detailed understanding of the cage structures, self-assembly, and anion encapsulation. We found that the cage self-assembly is templated by EO{sub 4}{sup -} oxoanions (n {ge} 2), and upon removal of the templating anion the tetrahedral M{sub 4}L{sub 6} cages rearrange into different coordination assemblies. The exchange selectivity among EO{sub 4}{sup -} oxoanions has been investigated with {sup 77}Se NMR spectroscopy using {sup 77}SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-} as an anionic probe, which found the following selectivity trend: PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-} > SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} > SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-} > MoO{sub 4}{sup 2-} > WO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. In addition to the complementarity and flexibility of the cage receptor, a combination of factors have been found to contribute to the observed anion selectivity, including the anions charge, size, hydration, basicity, and hydrogen-bond acceptor abilities.

  13. Effects of microsolvation on uracil and its radical anion: Uracil.(H2O)n (n=1-5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghwan; Schaefer, Henry F.

    2006-10-01

    Microsolvation effects on the stabilities of uracil and its anion have been investigated by explicitly considering the structures of complexes of uracil with up to five water molecules at the B3LYP /DZP++ level of theory. For all five systems, the global minimum of the neutral cluster has a different equilibrium geometry from that of the radical anion. Both the vertical detachment energy (VDE) and adiabatic electron affinity (AEA) of uracil are predicted to increase gradually with the number of hydrating molecules, qualitatively consistent with experimental results from a photodetachment-photoelectron spectroscopy study [J. Schiedt et al., Chem. Phys. 239, 511 (1998)]. The trend in the AEAs implies that while the conventional valence radical anion of uracil is only marginally bound in the gas phase, it will form a stable anion in aqueous solution. The gas-phase AEA of uracil (0.24eV) was higher than that of thymine by 0.04eV and this gap was not significantly affected by microsolvation. The largest AEA is that predicted for uracil•(H2O)5, namely, 0.96eV. The VDEs range from 0.76to1.78eV.

  14. Foam drilling in natural gas hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Na

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The key problem of foam drilling in natural gas hydrate is prediction of characteristic parameters of bottom hole. The simulation shows that when the well depth increases, the foam mass number reduces and the pressure increases. At the same depth, pressure in drill string is always higher than annulus. The research findings provide theoretical basis for safety control.

  15. Alkali binding in hydrated Portland cement paste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, W.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2010-01-01

    The alkali-binding capacity of C–S–H in hydrated Portland cement pastes is addressed in this study. The amount of bound alkalis in C–S–H is computed based on the alkali partition theories firstly proposed by Taylor (1987) and later further developed by Brouwers and Van Eijk (2003). Experimental data

  16. A positron annihilation study of hydrated DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warman, J. M.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1986-01-01

    Positron annihilation measurements are reported for hydrated DNA as a function of water content and as a function of temperature (20 to -180.degree. C) for samples containing 10 and 50% wt of water. The ortho-positronium mean lifetime and its intensity show distinct variations with the degree...

  17. Hydration of protein–RNA recognition sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Amita; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the role of water molecules in 89 protein–RNA complexes taken from the Protein Data Bank. Those with tRNA and single-stranded RNA are less hydrated than with duplex or ribosomal proteins. Protein–RNA interfaces are hydrated less than protein–DNA interfaces, but more than protein–protein interfaces. Majority of the waters at protein–RNA interfaces makes multiple H-bonds; however, a fraction do not make any. Those making H-bonds have preferences for the polar groups of RNA than its partner protein. The spatial distribution of waters makes interfaces with ribosomal proteins and single-stranded RNA relatively ‘dry’ than interfaces with tRNA and duplex RNA. In contrast to protein–DNA interfaces, mainly due to the presence of the 2′OH, the ribose in protein–RNA interfaces is hydrated more than the phosphate or the bases. The minor groove in protein–RNA interfaces is hydrated more than the major groove, while in protein–DNA interfaces it is reverse. The strands make the highest number of water-mediated H-bonds per unit interface area followed by the helices and the non-regular structures. The preserved waters at protein–RNA interfaces make higher number of H-bonds than the other waters. Preserved waters contribute toward the affinity in protein–RNA recognition and should be carefully treated while engineering protein–RNA interfaces. PMID:25114050

  18. Obsidian Hydration Dating in the Undergraduate Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manche, Emanuel P.; Lakatos, Stephen

    1986-01-01

    Provides an overview of obsidian hydration dating for the instructor by presenting: (1) principles of the method; (2) procedures; (3) applications; and (4) limitations. The theory of the method and one or more laboratory exercises can be easily introduced into the undergraduate geology curriculum. (JN)

  19. Obsidian Hydration Dating in the Undergraduate Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manche, Emanuel P.; Lakatos, Stephen

    1986-01-01

    Provides an overview of obsidian hydration dating for the instructor by presenting: (1) principles of the method; (2) procedures; (3) applications; and (4) limitations. The theory of the method and one or more laboratory exercises can be easily introduced into the undergraduate geology curriculum. (JN)

  20. [Terminal phase hydration, pain and delirium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heick, A.

    2009-01-01

    Hydration of the terminal patient may relieve confusion and complaints of "dry mouth". But it may worsen oedema of the brain, lungs, and extremities, worsen terminal rattling and cause a need for frequent changing of diapers. The decision of whether and how to treat a dying patient with fluids...

  1. Acoustic Determination of Methane Hydrate Disssociation Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    centered- cubic orientation which forms naturally in deep oceans from biogenic gases. It is worth not- ing that this molecular geometry can trap great...until January 2010. At that time, the hydrates were packed in a dewar with liquid nitrogen and shipped from the storage fa- cility at the Naval Research

  2. Hydration of Acetylene: A 125th Anniversary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Dmitry A.; Shevchenko, Sergey M.

    2007-01-01

    The year 2006 is the 125th anniversary of a chemical reaction, the discovery of which by Mikhail Kucherov had a profound effect on the development of industrial chemistry in the 19-20th centuries. This was the hydration of alkynes catalyzed by mercury ions that made possible industrial production of acetaldehyde from acetylene. Historical…

  3. Hydration dynamics near a model protein surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-09-01

    The evolution of water dynamics from dilute to very high concentration solutions of a prototypical hydrophobic amino acid with its polar backbone, N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA), is studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation for both the completely deuterated and completely hydrogenated leucine monomer. We observe several unexpected features in the dynamics of these biological solutions under ambient conditions. The NALMA dynamics shows evidence of de Gennes narrowing, an indication of coherent long timescale structural relaxation dynamics. The translational water dynamics are analyzed in a first approximation with a jump diffusion model. At the highest solute concentrations, the hydration water dynamics is significantly suppressed and characterized by a long residential time and a slow diffusion coefficient. The analysis of the more dilute concentration solutions takes into account the results of the 2.0M solution as a model of the first hydration shell. Subtracting the first hydration layer based on the 2.0M spectra, the translational diffusion dynamics is still suppressed, although the rotational relaxation time and residential time are converged to bulk-water values. Molecular dynamics analysis shows spatially heterogeneous dynamics at high concentration that becomes homogeneous at more dilute concentrations. We discuss the hydration dynamics results of this model protein system in the context of glassy systems, protein function, and protein-protein interfaces.

  4. Can Crystal Symmetry and Packing Influence the Active Site Conformation of Homohexameric Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Luić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available It is generaly believed that enzymes retain most of their functionality in the crystal form due to the large solvent content of protein crystals. This is facilitated by the fact that their natural environment in solution is not too far from the one found in the crystal form. Nevertheless, if the nature of the enzyme is such to require conformational changes, overcoming of the crystal packing constraints may prove to be too difficult. Such conformational change is present in one class of enzymes (purine nucleoside phosphorylases, that is the subject of our scientific interest for many years. The influence of crystal symmetry and crystal packing on the conformation of the active sites in the case of homohexameric purine nucleoside phosphorylases is presented and analysed. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

  5. Induction of nucleoside phosphorylase in Enterobacter aerogenes and enzymatic synthesis of adenine arabinoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-Kun; Ding, Qing-Bao; Zhang, Lu; Guo, Yong-Li; Ou, Lin; Wang, Chang-Lu

    2008-07-01

    Nucleoside phosphorylases (NPases) were found to be induced in Enterobacter aerogenes DGO-04, and cytidine and cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP) were the best inducers. Five mmol/L to fifteen mmol/L cytidine or CMP could distinctly increase the activities of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNPase), uridine phosphorylase (UPase) and thymidine phosphorylase (TPase) when they were added into medium from 0 to 8 h. In the process of enzymatic synthesis of adenine arabinoside from adenine and uracil arabinoside with wet cells of Enterobacter aerogenes DGO-04 induced by cytidine or CMP, the reaction time could be shortened from 36 to 6 h. After enzymatic reaction the activity of NPase in the cells induced remained higher than that in the cells uninduced.

  6. Crystal structures of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase complexes with thiocarbamate non-nucleoside inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallarossa, Andrea; Cesarini, Sara; Ranise, Angelo; Ponassi, Marco; Unge, Torsten; Bolognesi, Martino

    2008-01-25

    O-Phthalimidoethyl-N-arylthiocarbamates (TCs) have been recently identified as a new class of potent HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs), by means of computer-aided drug design techniques [Ranise A. Spallarossa, S. Cesarini, F. Bondavalli, S. Schenone, O. Bruno, G. Menozzi, P. Fossa, L. Mosti, M. La Colla, et al., Structure-based design, parallel synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and molecular modeling studies of thiocarbamates, new potent non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor isosteres of phenethylthiazolylthiourea derivatives, J. Med. Chem. 48 (2005) 3858-3873]. To elucidate the atomic details of RT/TC interaction and validate an earlier TC docking model, the structures of three RT/TC complexes were determined at 2.8-3.0A resolution by X-ray crystallography. The conformations adopted by the enzyme-bound TCs were analyzed and compared with those of bioisosterically related NNRTIs.

  7. Purification, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramchik, Yu. A.; Timofeev, V. I.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-07-01

    Crystals of E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase were grown in microgravity by the capillary counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. The X-ray diffraction data set suitable for the determination of the three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution was collected from one crystal at the Spring-8 synchrotron facility to 0.99 Å resolution. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P21 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = 74.1 Å, b = 110.2 Å, c = 88.2 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 111.08°. The crystal contains six subunits of the enzyme comprising a hexamer per asymmetric unit. The hexamer is the biological active form of E. coli. purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

  8. Purification, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from E. coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramchik, Yu. A., E-mail: inna@ns.crys.ras.ru; Timofeev, V. I., E-mail: espiov@ibch.ru; Zhukhlistova, N. E., E-mail: tostars@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin–Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Kuranova, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    Crystals of E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase were grown in microgravity by the capillary counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. The X-ray diffraction data set suitable for the determination of the three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution was collected from one crystal at the Spring-8 synchrotron facility to 0.99 Å resolution. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P2{sub 1} and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = 74.1 Å, b = 110.2 Å, c = 88.2 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 111.08°. The crystal contains six subunits of the enzyme comprising a hexamer per asymmetric unit. The hexamer is the biological active form of E. coli. purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

  9. Three-dimensional structure of E. Coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase at 0.99 Å resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2016-03-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylases (PNPs) catalyze the reversible phosphorolysis of nucleosides and are key enzymes involved in nucleotide metabolism. They are essential for normal cell function and can catalyze the transglycosylation. Crystals of E. coli PNP were grown in microgravity by the capillary counterdiffusion method through a gel layer. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined by the molecular-replacement method at 0.99 Å resolution. The structural features are considered, and the structure of E. coli PNP is compared with the structures of the free enzyme and its complexes with purine base derivatives established earlier. A comparison of the environment of the purine base in the complex of PNP with formycin A and of the pyrimidine base in the complex of uridine phosphorylase with thymidine revealed the main structural features of the base-binding sites. Coordinates of the atomic model determined with high accuracy were deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB_ID: 4RJ2).

  10. Cloning, Expression, and Purification of Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase from Acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhi Sikarwar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is a multidrug resistant pathogenic bacteria associated with hospital acquired infections. This bacterium possesses a variety of resistance mechanisms which makes it more difficult to control the bacterium with conventional drugs, and, so far no effective drug treatment is available against it. Nucleoside diphosphate kinase is an important enzyme, which maintains the total nucleotide triphosphate pool inside the cell by the transfer of γ-phosphate from NTPs to NDPs. The role of nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk has also been observed in pathogenesis in other organisms. However, intensive studies are needed to decipher its other putative roles in Acinetobacter baumannii. In the present study, we have successfully cloned the gene encoding Ndk and achieved overexpression in bacterial host BL-21 (DE3. The overexpressed protein is further purified by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA chromatography.

  11. Cloning, Expression, and Purification of Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase from Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikarwar, Juhi; Kaushik, Sanket; Sinha, Mau; Kaur, Punit; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a multidrug resistant pathogenic bacteria associated with hospital acquired infections. This bacterium possesses a variety of resistance mechanisms which makes it more difficult to control the bacterium with conventional drugs, and, so far no effective drug treatment is available against it. Nucleoside diphosphate kinase is an important enzyme, which maintains the total nucleotide triphosphate pool inside the cell by the transfer of γ-phosphate from NTPs to NDPs. The role of nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk) has also been observed in pathogenesis in other organisms. However, intensive studies are needed to decipher its other putative roles in Acinetobacter baumannii. In the present study, we have successfully cloned the gene encoding Ndk and achieved overexpression in bacterial host BL-21 (DE3). The overexpressed protein is further purified by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) chromatography. PMID:23662205

  12. Induction of nucleoside phosphorylase in Enterobacter aerogenes and enzymatic synthesis of adenine arabinoside

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-kun WEI; Qing-bao DING; Lu ZHANG; Yong-li GUO; Lin OU; Chang-lu WANG

    2008-01-01

    Nucleoside phosphorylases (NPases) were found to be induced in Enterobacter aerogenes DGO-04, and cytidine and cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP) were the best inducers. Five mmol/L to fifteen mmol/L cytidine or CMP could distinctly increase the activities of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNPase), uridine phosphorylase (UPase) and thymidine phosphorylase (TPase) when they were added into medium from 0 to 8 h. In the process of enzymatic synthesis of adenine arabinoside from adenine and uracil arabinoside with wet cells ofEnterobacter aerogenes DCJO-04 induced by cytidine or CMP, the reaction time could be shortened from 36 to 6 h. After enzymatic reaction the activity of NPase in the cells induced remained higher than that in the cells uninduced.

  13. Rapid and liquid-based selection of genetic switches using nucleoside kinase fused with aminoglycoside phosphotransferase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Tominaga

    Full Text Available The evolutionary design of genetic switches and circuits requires iterative rounds of positive (ON- and negative (OFF- selection. We previously reported a rapid OFF selection system based on the kinase activity of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (hsvTK on the artificial mutator nucleoside dP. By fusing hsvTK with the kanamycin resistance marker aminoglycoside-(3'-phosphotransferase (APH, we established a novel selector system for genetic switches. Due to the bactericidal nature of kanamycin and nucleoside-based lethal mutagenesis, both positive and negative selection could be completed within several hours. Using this new selector system, we isolated a series of homoserine lactone-inducible genetic switches with different expression efficiencies from libraries of the Vibrio fischeri lux promoter in two days, using only liquid handling.

  14. Transport of pyrimidine nucleosides in cells of Escherichia coli K 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mygind, B; Munch-Petersen

    1975-11-15

    1. The transport of pyrimidine mucleosides into cells of Escherichis coli has been investigated in mutant strains which cannot metabolize these nucleosides. Such cells transport and concentrate purimidine mucleosides several hindredfold. 2. The transport is inhibited by energy poisons and by sulfhydryl reagents. 3. Pyrimidine mucleosides compete mutually for transport. Adenosine is also a strong competitor while guanosine and inosine are weak competitors. 4. The rate of pyrimidine mucleoside transport is shown to be under control of the cytR and deoR gene products, which are also known to regulate the synthesis of nucleoside-catabolizing enzymes. The transport system is repressed by growth on glucose, as is the synthesis of the enzymes.

  15. Anaerobic oxidation of methane above gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, NE Pacific Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treude, T.; Boetius, A.; Knittel, K.;

    2003-01-01

    At Hydrate Ridge (HR), Cascadia convergent margin, surface sediments contain massive gas hydrates formed from methane that ascends together with fluids along faults from deeper reservoirs. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), mediated by a microbial consortium of archaea and sulfate-reducing...... bacteria, generates high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide in the surface sediments. The production of sulfide supports chemosynthetic communities that gain energy from sulfide oxidation. Depending on fluid flow, the surface communities are dominated either by the filamentous sulfur bacteria Beggiatoa...

  16. Modeling DNA hydration: comparison of calculated and experimental hydration properties of nuclic acid bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltev, V I; Malenkov, G G; Gonzalez, E J; Teplukhin, A V; Rein, R; Shibata, M; Miller, J H

    1996-02-01

    Hydration properties of individual nucleic acid bases were calculated and compared with the available experimental data. Three sets of classical potential functions (PF) used in simulations of nucleic acid hydration were juxtaposed: (i) the PF developed by Poltev and Malenkov (PM), (ii) the PF of Weiner and Kollman (WK), which together with Jorgensen's TIP3P water model are widely used in the AMBER program, and (iii) OPLS (optimized potentials for liquid simulations) developed by Jorgensen (J). The global minima of interaction energy of single water molecules with all the natural nucleic acid bases correspond to the formation of two water-base hydrogen bonds (water bridging of two hydrophilic atoms of the base). The energy values of these minima calculated via PM potentials are in somewhat better conformity with mass-spectrometric data than the values calculated via WK PF. OPLS gave much weaker water-base interactions for all compounds considered, thus these PF were not used in further computations. Monte Carlo simulations of the hydration of 9-methyladenine, 1-methyluracil and 1-methylthymine were performed in systems with 400 water molecules and periodic boundary conditions. Results of simulations with PM potentials give better agreement with experimental data on hydration energies than WK PF. Computations with PM PF of the hydration energy of keto and enol tautomers of 9-methylguanine can account for the shift in the tautomeric equilibrium of guanine in aqueous media to a dominance of the keto form in spite of nearly equal intrinsic stability of keto and enol tautomers. The results of guanine hydration computations are discussed in relation to mechanisms of base mispairing errors in nucleic acid biosynthesis. The data presented in this paper along with previous results on simulation of hydration shell structures in DNA duplex grooves provide ample evidence for the advantages of PM PF in studies of nucleic-acid hydration.

  17. An anionic surfactant for EOR applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagir, Muhammad; Tan, Isa M.; Mushtaq, Muhammad

    2014-10-01

    This work is to investigate the new anionic surfactants for the Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) application. Sulfonated anionic surfactant was produced by attaching SO3 to an ethoxylated alcohol to increase the performance of the surfactant. Methallyl chloride and ethoxylated alcohol was reacted followed by the reaction with sodium bisulfite to produce anionic sulfonated surfactant in 80.3 % yield. The sulfonation reaction parameters such as reactants mole ratio, reaction temperature and catalyst amount were optimized. The generation and stability of foam from the synthesized surfactant is also tested and results are reported. The synthesized novel surfactant was further investigated for the effect on the CO2 mobility in porous media and the findings are presented here. This in house developed surfactant has a great potential for CO2- EOR applications.

  18. Synthesis of Nucleoside Analogues with Potential Antiviral Activity against Negative Strand RNA Virus Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    75 out by the same enzyme responsible for the first phosphorylation. The primary target for their activity is the DNA polymerisation reaction against...was the 229 first nucleoside analogue to have clinical usage for the treatment of herpetic eye infections. It was closely followed by 5...sequence and also to see whether it was possible to make an acid chloride in the presence of hydroxyl groups or whether polymerisation or other side

  19. Detergent inhibited, heat labile nucleoside triphosphatase in cores of avian myeloblastosis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1978-01-01

    Endogenous DNA synthesis was studied in isolated core particles of avian myeloblastosis virus. It was found that cores contained an enzymatic activity which rapidly converted the added nucleoside triphosphates to diphosphates (but not further) at 0 degrees C, thus inhibiting DNA synthesis. This t....... This triphosphatase probably originates from the viral membranes. In the cores the enzyme is completely inactivated by low concentrations (0.02%) of Nonident P-40. Also, the enzyme is very thermolabile and denatures rapidly at 38 degrees C....

  20. Comparison of Clostridium difficile detection by monolayer and by inhibition of nucleoside uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuhr, J.E.; Trent, D.J.; Collmann, I.R.

    1987-02-01

    Detection and identification of Clostridium difficile toxin by traditional monolayer assay were compared with results obtained by a new procedure based on toxin-dependent inhibition of target cell uptake of a radioactive nucleoside. A high degree of correlation was noted between the two determinations. Although the new procedure was quantitative and objective, its value is seen at present as a rapid screen that may support results obtained in monolayers and as a potential assay for other, currently unidentified, toxins.

  1. Inhibitory Effect of Bridged Nucleosides on Thermus aquaticus DNA Polymerase and Insight into the Binding Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Kun Kim

    Full Text Available Modified nucleosides have the potential to inhibit DNA polymerases for the treatment of viral infections and cancer. With the hope of developing potent drug candidates by the modification of the 2',4'-position of the ribose with the inclusion of a bridge, efforts were focused on the inhibition of Taq DNA polymerase using quantitative real time PCR, and the results revealed the significant inhibitory effects of 2',4'-bridged thymidine nucleoside on the polymerase. Study on the mode of inhibition revealed the competitive mechanism with which the 2',4'-bridged thymidine operates. With a Ki value of 9.7 ± 1.1 μM, the 2',4'-bridged thymidine proved to be a very promising inhibitor. Additionally, docking analysis showed that all the nucleosides including 2',4'-bridged thymidine were able to dock in the active site, indicating that the substrate analogs reflect a structural complementarity to the enzyme active site. The analysis also provided evidence that Asp610 was a key binding site for 2',4'-bridged thymidine. Molecular dynamics (MD simulations were performed to further understand the conformational variations of the binding. The root-mean-square deviation (RMSD values for the peptide backbone of the enzyme and the nitrogenous base of the inhibitor stabilized within 0.8 and 0.2 ns, respectively. Furthermore, the MD analysis indicates substantial conformational change in the ligand (inhibitor as the nitrogenous base rotated anticlockwise with respect to the sugar moiety, complemented by the formation of several new hydrogen bonds where Arg587 served as a pivot axis for binding formation. In conclusion, the active site inhibition of Taq DNA polymerase by 2',4'-bridged thymidine suggests the potential of bridged nucleosides as drug candidates.

  2. Human concentrative nucleoside transporter 1-mediated uptake of 5-azacytidine enhances DNA demethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Maria; Stresemann, Carlo; Keller, Daniela; Brom, Manuela; Schirrmacher, Esther; Keppler, Dietrich; Lyko, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The DNA methyltransferase inhibitors 5-azacytidine (5-azaCyd) and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine have found increasing use for the treatment of myeloid leukemias and solid tumors. Both nucleoside analogues must be transported into cells and phosphorylated before they can be incorporated into DNA and inactivate DNA methyltransferases. The members of the human equilibrative and concentrative nucleoside transporter families mediate transport of natural nucleosides and some nucleoside analogues into cells. However, the molecular identity of the transport proteins responsible for mediating the uptake of 5-azanucleosides has remained unknown. To this end, we have generated a stably transfected Madin-Darby canine kidney strain II cell line expressing recombinant hCNT1. An antiserum directed against hCNT1 specifically detected the protein in the apical membrane of hCNT1-expressing Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Using [14C]5-azaCyd, we show here that hCNT1 mediated the Na+-dependent uptake of this drug with a Km value of 63 micromol/L. Na+-dependent transport of radiolabeled cytidine, uridine, and 5-fluoro-5'-deoxyuridine further showed the functionality of the transporter. hCNT1-expressing cells were significantly more sensitive to 5-azaCyd, and drug-dependent covalent trapping of DNA methyltransferase 1 was substantially more pronounced. Importantly, these results correlated with a significant sensitization of hCNT1-expressing cells toward the demethylating effects of 5-azaCyd and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. In conclusion, our study identifies 5-azaCyd as a novel substrate for hCNT1 and provides direct evidence that hCNT1 is involved in the DNA-demethylating effects of this drug.

  3. Novel indazole non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors using molecular hybridization based on crystallographic overlays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lyn H; Allan, Gill; Barba, Oscar; Burt, Catherine; Corbau, Romuald; Dupont, Thomas; Knöchel, Thorsten; Irving, Steve; Middleton, Donald S; Mowbray, Charles E; Perros, Manos; Ringrose, Heather; Swain, Nigel A; Webster, Robert; Westby, Mike; Phillips, Chris

    2009-02-26

    A major problem associated with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) for the treatment of HIV is their lack of resilience to mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme. Using structural overlays of the known inhibitors efavirenz and capravirine complexed in RT as a starting point, and structure-based drug design techniques, we have created a novel series of indazole NNRTIs that possess excellent metabolic stability and mutant resilience.

  4. Investigating the role of nucleoside transporters in the resistance of colorectal cancer to 5-fluorouracil therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, Lee Cheng; Mal, Mainak; Koh, Poh Koon; Cheah, Peh Yean; Chan, Eric Chun Yong; Ho, Han Kiat

    2013-03-01

    Resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5FU) poses a constant challenge to the management of colorectal cancer (CRC). Consistent efforts were called for to identify molecular markers that can effectively predict patients' response. This study investigated the role of nucleoside transporters, particularly human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1), in predicting clinical treatment outcome with 5FU-based therapy. Expression of a panel of nucleoside transporters in biopsied tumors from 7 CRC patients was measured by real-time PCR prior to 5FU-based chemotherapy. To provide mechanistic support for the role of hENT1 in 5FU resistance, cell viability of Caco-2 cells was measured, following incubation with varying concentrations of 5FU and a hENT1 inhibitor. Biopsied tumors were further subjected to global metabonomic profiling using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. High hENT1 levels in tumor tissue correlated with poor clinical response to 5FU. Corroborating with the clinical findings, chemical inhibition of hENT1 in Caco-2 cells resulted in an augmentation of 5FU efficacy. Metabonomic profiling revealed that the pretreatment metabotype associated with non-responders to 5FU therapy was distinct from metabotype of responders (partial least-squares discriminant analysis Q(2) (cumulative) = 0.898, R(2)X = 0.513, R(2)Y = 0.996). This is the first clinical report on the relationships of intratumoral expression of nucleoside transporters and tumor metabotype with response to 5FU among CRC patients. Coupled to the in vitro findings, our preliminary data suggested hENT1 to be a potential codeterminant of clinical response to 5FU.

  5. Synthesis of triazole-nucleoside phosphoramidites and their use in solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Brandon J; Efthymiou, Tim C; Desaulniers, Jean-Paul

    2014-12-19

    Triazole-backbone oligonucleotides are macromolecules that have one or more triazole units that are acting as a backbone mimic. Triazoles within the backbone have been used within oligonucleotides for a variety of applications. This unit describes the preparation and synthesis of two triazole-nucleoside phosphoramidites [uracil-triazole-uracil (UtU) and cytosine-triazole-uracil (CtU)] based on a PNA-like scaffold, and their incorporation within oligonucleotides.

  6. The Synthesis and Study of Azole Carboxamide Nucleosides as Agents Active Against RNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-15

    azole heterocycles and the corresponding nucleosides structurally related to ribavirin have been synthesized. 1,2,4-Triazole, thiazole, pyrrole... Structurally Related to Pyrazofurin . . . .. .. . 18 4. Synthesis of 4-Amino-8-(O--D-ribofuranosylamino)- pyrimido[5,4-dJpyrimidine and Other Miscellaneous...strains of rhinovirus , more than thirty adenovirus strains and over sixty coxsackie and echovirus strains are known. It is virtually impossible or

  7. Direct measurement of methane hydrate composition along the hydrate equilibrium boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    The composition of methane hydrate, namely nW for CH 4??nWH2O, was directly measured along the hydrate equilibrium boundary under conditions of excess methane gas. Pressure and temperature conditions ranged from 1.9 to 9.7 MPa and 263 to 285 K. Within experimental error, there is no change in hydrate composition with increasing pressure along the equilibrium boundary, but nW may show a slight systematic decrease away from this boundary. A hydrate stoichiometry of n W = 5.81-6.10 H2O describes the entire range of measured values, with an average composition of CH4??5.99(??0.07) H2O along the equilibrium boundary. These results, consistent with previously measured values, are discussed with respect to the widely ranging values obtained by thermodynamic analysis. The relatively constant composition of methane hydrate over the geologically relevant pressure and temperature range investigated suggests that in situ methane hydrate compositions may be estimated with some confidence. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  8. Clathrate Hydrates for Thermal Energy Storage in Buildings: Overview of Proper Hydrate-Forming Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Castellani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing energy costs are at the origin of the great progress in the field of phase change materials (PCMs. The present work aims at studying the application of clathrate hydrates as PCMs in buildings. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline structures in which guest molecules are enclosed in the crystal lattice of water molecules. Clathrate hydrates can form also at ambient pressure and present a high latent heat, and for this reason, they are good candidates for being used as PCMs. The parameter that makes a PCM suitable to be used in buildings is, first of all, a melting temperature at about 25 °C. The paper provides an overview of groups of clathrate hydrates, whose physical and chemical characteristics could meet the requirements needed for their application in buildings. Simulations with a dynamic building simulation tool are carried out to evaluate the performance of clathrate hydrates in enhancing thermal comfort through the moderation of summer temperature swings and, therefore, in reducing energy consumption. Simulations suggest that clathrate hydrates have a potential in terms of improvement of indoor thermal comfort and a reduction of energy consumption for cooling. Cooling effects of 0.5 °C and reduced overheating hours of up to 1.1% are predicted.

  9. MORPHOLOGY OF METHANE HYDRATE HOST SEDIMENTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JONES,K.W.; FENG,H.; TOMOV,S.; WINTER,W.J.; EATON,M.; MAHAJAN,D.

    2004-12-01

    Results from simulated experiments in several laboratories show that host sediments influence hydrate formation in accord with known heterogeneity of host sediments at sites of gas hydrate occurrence (1). For example, in Mackenzie Delta, NWT Canada (Mallik 2L-38 well), coarser-grained units (pore-filling model) are found whereas in the Gulf of Mexico, the found hydrate samples do not appear to be lithologically controlled. We have initiated a systematic study of sediments, initially focusing on samples from various depths at a specific site, to establish a correlation with hydrate occurrence (or variations thereof) to establish differences in their microstructure, porosity, and other associated properties. The synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) set-up at the X-27A tomography beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory was used as a tool to study sediments from Blake Ridge at three sub bottom depths of 0.2, 50, and 667 meters. Results from the tomographic analysis of the deepest sample (667 m) are presented here to illustrate how tomography can be used to obtain new insights into the structures of methane hydrate host sediments. The investigation shows the internal grain/pore space resolution in the microstructure and a 3-D visualization of the connecting pathways obtained following data segmentation into pore space and grains within the sediment sample. The analysis gives the sample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity, as well. An earlier report on the experimental program has been given by Mahajan et al. (2).

  10. Identification and characterization of anion binding sites in RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Chase, Elaine; Costantino, David A.; Golden, Barbara L. (Purdue); (Colorado)

    2010-05-24

    Although RNA molecules are highly negatively charged, anions have been observed bound to RNA in crystal structures. It has been proposed that anion binding sites found within isolated RNAs represent regions of the molecule that could be involved in intermolecular interactions, indicating potential contact points for negatively charged amino acids from proteins or phosphate groups from an RNA. Several types of anion binding sites have been cataloged based on available structures. However, currently there is no method for unambiguously assigning anions to crystallographic electron density, and this has precluded more detailed analysis of RNA-anion interaction motifs and their significance. We therefore soaked selenate into two different types of RNA crystals and used the anomalous signal from these anions to identify binding sites in these RNA molecules unambiguously. Examination of these sites and comparison with other suspected anion binding sites reveals features of anion binding motifs, and shows that selenate may be a useful tool for studying RNA-anion interactions.

  11. Determination of nucleosides and nucleobases in the pollen of Typha angustifolia by UPLC-PDA-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Wei; Duan, Jin-Ao; Yang, Nian-Yun; Guo, Sheng; Zhu, Zhen-Hua; Tang, Yu-Ping; Qian, Da-Wei

    2012-01-01

    The pollen of Typha angustifolia L. has been used traditionally for the treatment of dysmenorrhea, stranguria and metrorrhagia in China. Recently, nucleosides and nucleobases have been proven as important bioactive compounds. Exploration of the nucleoside and nucleobase profiles from the pollen of T. angustifolia is important for improving its therapeutic value and could be convenient for its quality evaluation. To establish an UPLC-PDA-MS method for simultaneous determination of nucleosides and nucleobases in the pollen of T. angustifolia. The analysis was performed on an Acuity UPLCHSS T3 column with a gradient elution of 5 mM ammonium acetate and methanol solution at a flow rate of 0.3 mL/min. Satisfactory separation of these compounds was obtained in less than 12 min. All calibration curves showed good linear regression (r²  > 0.9995). The method provided good accuracy, precision, recovery, and sensitivity for the quantification of the 10 compounds analysed. The UPLC method established is very helpful for optimising their content and could be convenient for quality evaluation of the pollen of T. angustifolia, which has not been reported as far as we are aware. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Toxicity of nucleoside analogues used to treat AIDS and the selectivity of the mitochondrial DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Harold; Hanes, Jeremiah; Johnson, Kenneth A

    2003-12-23

    Incorporation of nucleoside analogues by the mitochondrial DNA polymerase has been implicated as the primary cause underlying many of the toxic side effects of these drugs in HIV therapy. Recent success in reconstituting recombinant human enzyme has afforded a detailed mechanistic analysis of the reactions governing nucleotide selectivity of the polymerase and the proofreading exonuclease. The toxic side effects of nucleoside analogues are correlated with the kinetics of incorporation by the mitochondrial DNA polymerase, varying over 6 orders of magnitude in the sequence zalcitabine (ddC) > didanosine (ddI metabolized to ddA) > stavudine (d4T) > lamivudine (3TC) > tenofovir (PMPA) > zidovudine (AZT) > abacavir (metabolized to carbovir, CBV). In this review, we summarize our current efforts to examine the mechanistic basis for nucleotide selectivity by the mitochondrial DNA polymerase and its role in mitochondrial toxicity of nucleoside analogues used to treat AIDS and other viral infections. We will also discuss the promise and underlying challenges for the development of new analogues with lower toxicity.

  13. The chemistry of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) analogues containing C-nucleosides related to nicotinamide riboside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankiewicz, Krzysztof W; Watanabe, Kyoichi A; Lesiak-Watanabe, Krystyna; Goldstein, Barry M; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N

    2002-04-01

    Oncolytic C-nucleosides, tiazofurin (2-beta-D-ribofuranosylthiazole-4-carboxamide) and benzamide riboside (3-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzamide) are converted in cell into active metabolites thiazole-4-carboxamide- and benzamide adenine dinucleotide, TAD and BAD, respectively. TAD and BAD as NAD analogues were found to bind at the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (cofactor NAD) site of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), an important target in cancer treatment. The synthesis and evaluation of anticancer activity of a number of C-nucleosides related to tiazofurin and nicotinamide riboside then followed and are reviewed herein. Interestingly, pyridine C-nucleosides (such as C-nicotinamide riboside) are not metabolized into the corresponding NAD analogues in cell. Their conversion by chemical methods is described. As dinucleotides these compounds show inhibition of IMPDH in low micromolar level. Also, the synthesis of BAD in metabolically stable bis(phosphonate) form is discussed indicating the usefulness of such preformed inhibitors in drug development. Among tiazofurin analogues, Franchetti and Grifantini found, that the replacement of the sulfur by oxygen (as in oxazafurin) but not the removal of nitrogen (tiophenfurin) of the thiazole ring resulted in inactive compounds. The anti cancer activity of their synthetic dinucleotide analogues indicate that inactive compounds are not only poorly metabolized in cell but also are weak inhibitors of IMPDH as dinucleotides.

  14. An unusual UMP C-5 methylase in nucleoside antibiotic polyoxin biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqing Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Polyoxin is a group of structurally-related peptidyl nucleoside antibiotics bearing C-5 modifications on the nucleoside skeleton. Although the structural diversity and bioactivity preference of polyoxin are, to some extent, affected by such modifications, the biosynthetic logic for their occurence remains obscure. Here we report the identification of PolB in polyoxin pathway as an unusual UMP C-5 methylase with thymidylate synthase activity which is responsible for the C-5 methylation of the nucleoside skeleton. To probe its molecular mechanism, we determined the crystal structures of PolB alone and in complexes with 5-Br UMP and 5-Br dUMP at 2.15 Å, 1.76 Å and 2.28 Å resolutions, respectively. Loop 1 (residues 117–131, Loop 2 (residues 192–201 and the substrate recognition peptide (residues 94–102 of PolB exhibit considerable conformational flexibility and adopt distinct structures upon binding to different substrate analogs. Consistent with the structural findings, a PolB homolog that harbors an identical function from Streptomyces viridochromogenes DSM 40736 was identified. The discovery of UMP C5-methylase opens the way to rational pathway engineering for polyoxin component optimization, and will also enrich the toolbox for natural nucleotide chemistry.

  15. In Silico Investigation of Flavonoids as Potential Trypanosomal Nucleoside Hydrolase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Hung Hung Ha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human African Trypanosomiasis is endemic to 37 countries of sub-Saharan Africa. It is caused by two related species of Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies suffer from resistance and public accessibility of expensive medicines. Finding safer and effective therapies of natural origin is being extensively explored worldwide. Pentamidine is the only available therapy for inhibiting the P2 adenosine transporter involved in the purine salvage pathway of the trypanosomatids. The objective of the present study is to use computational studies for the investigation of the probable trypanocidal mechanism of flavonoids. Docking experiments were carried out on eight flavonoids of varying level of hydroxylation, namely, flavone, 5-hydroxyflavone, 7-hydroxyflavone, chrysin, apigenin, kaempferol, fisetin, and quercetin. Using AutoDock 4.2, these compounds were tested for their affinity towards inosine-adenosine-guanosine nucleoside hydrolase and the inosine-guanosine nucleoside hydrolase, the major enzymes of the purine salvage pathway. Our results showed that all of the eight tested flavonoids showed high affinities for both hydrolases (lowest free binding energy ranging from −10.23 to −7.14 kcal/mol. These compounds, especially the hydroxylated derivatives, could be further studied as potential inhibitors of the nucleoside hydrolases.

  16. Promotion of human adipose-derived stem cell proliferation mediated by exogenous nucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Serrano, Fernando; Alvarez, Pablo; Caba, Octavio; Picón, Manuel; Marchal, Juan A; Perán, Macarena; Prados, José; Melguizo, Consolación; Rama, Ana R; Boulaiz, Houria; Aránega, Antonia

    2010-09-01

    Adult stem cells are becoming the best option for regenerative medicine because they have low tumourigenic potential and permit autologous transplantation, even without in vitro culture. Our objectives were to evaluate the effects of exogenous nucleosides on the proliferation of hASCs (human adipose-derived stem cells), with or without co-treatment with 5-aza (5-azacytidine), and to analyse the expression of lamin A/C during cardiomyocyte differentiation of these cells. We isolated hASCs from human lipoaspirates that were positive for mesenchymal stem cell markers. We found that 5-aza induces a dose-dependent inhibition of hASC proliferation [IC50 (inhibitory concentration 50): 5.37 microM], whereas exogenous nucleosides significantly promote the proliferation of hASCs and partially revert the antiproliferative effect of the drug. Multipotentiality of isolated hASCs was confirmed by adipogenic, osteogenic and cardiomyogenic induction. 5-Aza-induced cells expressed cardiac troponins I and T and myosin light chain 2, myocardial markers that were directly correlated with lamin A/C expression. Our results support the importance of the nucleoside supplementation of media to improve conditions for the expansion and maintenance of hASCs in culture. In addition, the quantification of lamin A/C expression appears to be a good marker for the characterization of cardiomyocyte differentiation of stem cells that has rarely been used.

  17. Ion exchange and intercalation properties of layered double hydroxides towards halide anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Umberto; Vivani, Riccardo; Bastianini, Maria; Costantino, Ferdinando; Nocchetti, Morena

    2014-08-14

    A layered double hydroxide (LDH) obtained by the urea method, having an empirical formula [Zn(0.61)Al(0.39)(OH)2](CO3)(0.195)·0.50H2O, has been converted into the corresponding chloride form [Zn(0.61)Al(0.39)(OH)2]Cl(0.39)·0.47H2O by making the solid come into contact with a suitable HCl solution. The intercalation of the other halide anions (X(-) = F(-), Br(-), I(-)) via the Cl(-)/X(-) anion exchange has been attained and the respective anion exchange isotherms have been obtained with the batch method. The analysis of the isotherms indicates that the selectivity of LDH towards the halides decreases with the increase of the X(-) ionic radius, the selectivity order being F(-) > Cl(-)≥ Br(-) > I(-). The CO3(2-)/Cl(-) isotherm has also been reported to highlight the extraordinary selectivity of LDH towards carbonate anions. Samples taken from the isotherms at different exchange degrees were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry and thermodiffractometry to obtain information about the ion exchange mechanism. The Cl(-)/Br(-) and the reverse Br(-)/Cl(-) exchanges occur with the formation of solid solutions, very likely because of the similar ionic radius of the exchanging anions. In contrast, in the Cl(-)/F(-) and Cl(-)/I(-) exchange, the co-existence of the Cl(-) and F(-) (or I(-)) phases in the same sample was detected, indicating the occurrence of a first order phase transition, in which the starting phase is transformed into the final phase, as the process goes on. The variation of the interlayer distances of ZnAl-X intercalation compounds with the hydration degree has been interpreted with a structural model based on the nesting of the guest species into the trigonal pockets of the brucite-like layer surface. Rietveld refinements of the phases with the maximum F(-), Br(-) and I(-) content were also performed and compared with the above model, giving indications of the arrangement and order/disorder of the halide anions in the interlayer region.

  18. Templating irreversible covalent macrocyclization by using anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataev, Evgeny A; Kolesnikov, Grigory V; Arnold, Rene; Lavrov, Herman V; Khrustalev, Victor N

    2013-03-11

    Inorganic anions were used as templates in the reaction between a diamine and an activated diacid to form macrocyclic amides. The reaction conditions were found to perform the macrocyclization sufficiently slow to observe a template effect. A number of analytical methods were used to clarify the reaction mechanisms and to show that the structure of the intermediate plays a decisive role in determining the product distribution. For the macrocyclization under kinetic control, it was shown that the amount of a template, the conformational rigidity of building blocks, and the anion affinities of reaction components and intermediates are important parameters that one should take into consideration to achieve high yields.

  19. High Vacuum Techniques for Anionic Polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Ratkanthwar, Kedar

    2015-09-01

    Anionic polymerization high vacuum techniques (HVTs) are the most suitable for the preparation of polymer samples with well-defined complex macromolecular architectures. Though HVTs require glassblowing skill for designing and making polymerization reactor, it is the best way to avoid any termination of living polymers during the number of steps for the synthesis of polymers with complex structure. In this chapter, we describe the different polymerization reactors and HVTs for the purification of monomers, solvents, and other reagents for anionic polymerization as well as few model reactions for the synthesis of polymers with simple to complex structure.

  20. Krebs cycle anions in metabolic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, Francis G; Morgan, Thomas J

    2005-10-05

    For many years it has been apparent from estimates of the anion gap and the strong ion gap that anions of unknown identity can be generated in sepsis and shock states. Evidence is emerging that at least some of these are intermediates of the citric acid cycle. The exact source of this disturbance remains unclear, because a great many metabolic blocks and bottlenecks can disturb the anaplerotic and cataplerotic pathways that enter and leave the cycle. These mechanisms require clarification with the use of tools such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  1. China's Research on Non-conventional Energy Resources- Gas Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu Ming; Ma Jianguo

    2002-01-01

    @@ Methane exists in ice-like formations called gas hydrate. Hydrate traps methane molecules inside a cage of frozen water. The magnitude of this previously unknown global storehouse of methane is truly staggering and has raised serious inquiry into the possibility of using methane hydrate as a substitute source of energy for oil and conventional natural gas. According to the estimation by PGC, gas hydrate deposits amount to 7.6 × 1018m3 and contain more than twice as much organic carbon as all the world's coal, oil and non-hydrate natural gas combined.

  2. Specific Features of Motion of Cations and Anions in Electrolyte Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Bulavin, L A; Malomuzh, M P; Pankratov, K M

    2012-01-01

    The nature of mobility of ions and water molecules in dilute aqueous solutions of electrolytes (at most fifteen water molecules per ion) is investigated. It is shown that the behavior of the mobility coefficients of water molecules and ions, as well as the self-diffusion coefficients of water molecules, are determined by the radii of their hard shells rather than by the effect of the hydrogen bond network. It is established that the influence of hydration effects on the density of the system and the self-diffusion coefficients of water molecules does not exceed several per cent. Based on microscopic concepts, it is shown that the different behaviors of a $\\rm K^{+}$ cation and an $\\rm F^{-}$ anion with equal rigid radii are in good agreement with specific features of the intermolecular interaction described by the generalized Stillinger--David potential.

  3. Stabilization of {alpha}-amylase by using anionic surfactant during the immobilization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Batal, A.I. [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, P.O. Box 29, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt); Atia, K.S. [Nuclear Research Center, Radioisotopes Applications Division, Abo-Zable, P.O. Box 13759, Cairo (Egypt)]. E-mail: ks_atia@yahoo.com; Eid, M. [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, P.O. Box 29, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt)

    2005-10-01

    This work describes the entrapment of {alpha}-amylase into butylacrylate-acrylic acid copolymer (BuA/AAc) using {gamma} irradiation. The effect of an anionic surfactant (AOT), the reuse efficiency, and kinetic behavior of immobilized {alpha}-amylase were studied. Covering of {alpha}-amylase with bis-(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate sodium salt (AOT) made the enzyme more stable than the uncovered form. The hydrolytic activity of the pre-coated immobilized {alpha}-amylase was increased below the critical micelle concentration (cmc) (10mmol/L). The results showed an increase in the relative activity with increase in the degree of hydration. The pre-coated immobilized {alpha}-amylase showed a higher k{sub cat}/K{sub m} and lower activation energy compared to the free and uncoated-immobilized preparation, respectively. The results suggest that the immobilization of {alpha}-amylase is a potentially useful approach for commercial starch hydrolysis in two-phase systems.

  4. Stabilization of α-amylase by using anionic surfactant during the immobilization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Batal, A. I.; Atia, K. S.; Eid, M.

    2005-10-01

    This work describes the entrapment of α-amylase into butylacrylate-acrylic acid copolymer (BuA/AAc) using γ irradiation. The effect of an anionic surfactant (AOT), the reuse efficiency, and kinetic behavior of immobilized α-amylase were studied. Covering of α-amylase with bis-(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate sodium salt (AOT) made the enzyme more stable than the uncovered form. The hydrolytic activity of the pre-coated immobilized α-amylase was increased below the critical micelle concentration (cmc) (10 mmol/L). The results showed an increase in the relative activity with increase in the degree of hydration. The pre-coated immobilized α-amylase showed a higher k/K and lower activation energy compared to the free and uncoated-immobilized preparation, respectively. The results suggest that the immobilization of α-amylase is a potentially useful approach for commercial starch hydrolysis in two-phase systems.

  5. Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Riedel, M.; Boswell, R.; Presley, J.; Kumar, P.; Sathe, A.; Sethi, A.; Lall, M.; ,

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a naturally occurring “ice-like” combination of natural gas and water that has the potential to serve as an immense resource of natural gas from the world’s oceans and polar regions. However, gas-hydrate recovery is both a scientific and a technical challenge and much remains to be learned about the geologic, engineering, and economic factors controlling the ultimate energy resource potential of gas hydrate. The amount of natural gas contained in the world’s gas-hydrate accumulations is enormous, but these estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 2,800 to 8,000,000 trillion cubic meters of gas. By comparison, conventional natural gas accumulations (reserves and undiscovered, technically recoverable resources) for the world are estimated at approximately 440 trillion cubic meters. Gas recovery from gas hydrate is hindered because the gas is in a solid form and because gas hydrate commonly occurs in remote Arctic and deep marine environments. Proposed methods of gas recovery from gas hydrate generally deal with disassociating or “melting” in situ gas hydrate by heating the reservoir beyond the temperature of gas-hydrate formation, or decreasing the reservoir pressure below hydrate equilibrium. The pace of energy-related gas hydrate assessment projects has accelerated over the past several years.

  6. Solid state interconversion between anhydrous norfloxacin and its hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongcharoen, Wanchai; Byrn, Stephen R; Sutanthavibul, Narueporn

    2008-01-01

    This work is focused on characterizing and evaluating the solid state interconversion of norfloxacin (NF) hydrates. Four stoichiometric NF hydrates, dihydrate, hemipentahydrate, trihydrate, pentahydrate and a disordered NF state, were generated by various methods and characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD), thermal analysis and Karl Fisher titrimetry. XRPD patterns of all NF hydrates exhibited crystalline structures. NF hydrate conversion was studied with respect to mild elevated temperature and various degrees of moisture levels. NF hydrates transformed to anhydrous NF Form A after gentle heating at 60 degrees C for 48 h except dihydrate and trihydrate where mixture in XRPD patterns between anhydrous NF Form A and former structures existed. Desiccation of NF hydrates at 0% RH for 7 days resulted in only partial removal of water molecules from the hydrated structures. The hydrated transitional phase and the disordered NF state were obtained from the incomplete dehydration of NF hydrates after thermal treatment and pentahydrate NF after desiccation, respectively. Anhydrous NF Form A and NF hydrates transformed to pentahydrate NF when exposed to high moisture environment except dihydrate. In conclusion, surrounding moisture levels, temperatures and the duration of exposure strongly influenced the interconversion pathways and stoichiometry of anhydrous NF and its hydrates. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Characterization of un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate™ and MTA Angelus™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J; Sorrentino, F; Damidot, D

    2015-04-01

    BioAggregate™ is a novel material introduced for use as a root-end filling material. It is tricalcium silicate-based, free of aluminium and uses tantalum oxide as radiopacifier. BioAggregate contains additives to enhance the material performance. The purpose of this research was to characterize the un-hydrated and hydrated forms of BioAggregate using a combination of techniques, verify whether the additives if present affect the properties of the set material and compare these properties to those of MTA Angelus™. Un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate and MTA Angelus were assessed. Un-hydrated cement was tested for chemical composition, specific surface area, mineralogy and kinetics of hydration. The set material was investigated for mineralogy, microstructure and bioactivity. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopic analysis, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and isothermal calorimetry were employed. The specific surface area was investigated using a gas adsorption method with nitrogen as the probe. BioAggregate was composed of tricalcium silicate, tantalum oxide, calcium phosphate and silicon dioxide and was free of aluminium. On hydration, the tricalcium silicate produced calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide. The former was deposited around the cement grains, while the latter reacted with the silicon dioxide to form additional calcium silicate hydrate. This resulted in reduction of calcium hydroxide in the aged cement. MTA Angelus reacted in a similar fashion; however, since it contained no additives, the calcium hydroxide was still present in the aged cement. Bioactivity was demonstrated by deposition of hydroxyapatite. BioAggregate exhibited a high specific surface area. Nevertheless, the reactivity determined by isothermal calorimetry appeared to be slow compared to MTA Angelus. The tantalum oxide as opposed to bismuth oxide was inert, and tantalum was not leached in solution. BioAggregate exhibited

  8. Natural Gas Evolution in a Gas Hydrate Melt: Effect of Thermodynamic Hydrate Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujith, K S; Ramachandran, C N

    2017-01-12

    Natural gas extraction from gas hydrate sediments by injection of hydrate inhibitors involves the decomposition of hydrates. The evolution of dissolved gas from the hydrate melt is an important step in the extraction process. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, we study the evolution of dissolved methane from its hydrate melt in the presence of two thermodynamic hydrate inhibitors, NaCl and CH3OH. An increase in the concentration of hydrate inhibitors is found to promote the nucleation of methane nanobubbles in the hydrate melt. Whereas NaCl promotes bubble formation by enhancing the hydrophobic interaction between aqueous CH4 molecules, CH3OH molecules assist bubble formation by stabilizing CH4 bubble nuclei formed in the solution. The CH3OH molecules accumulate around the nuclei leading to a decrease in the surface tension at their interface with water. The nanobubbles formed are found to be highly dynamic with frequent exchange of CH4 molecules between the bubble and the surrounding liquid. A quantitative analysis of the dynamic behavior of the bubble is performed by introducing a unit step function whose value depends on the location of CH4 molecules with respect to the bubble. It is observed that an increase in the concentration of thermodynamic hydrate inhibitors reduces the exchange process, making the bubble less dynamic. It is also found that for a given concentration of the inhibitor, larger bubbles are less dynamic compared to smaller ones. The dependence of the dynamic nature of nanobubbles on bubble size and inhibitor concentration is correlated with the solubility of CH4 and the Laplace pressure within the bubble. The effect of CO2 on the formation of nanobubble in the CH4-CO2 mixed gas hydrate melt in the presence of inhibitors is also examined. The simulations show that the presence of CO2 molecules significantly reduces the induction time for methane nanobubble nucleation. The role of CO2 in the early nucleation of bubble is explained

  9. One-step synthesis of layered yttrium hydroxides in immiscible liquid–liquid systems: Intercalation of sterically-bulky hydrophobic organic anions and doping of europium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Mebae; Fujihara, Shinobu, E-mail: shinobu@applc.keio.ac.jp

    2014-02-15

    Inorganic–organic layered rare-earth compounds were synthesized on the basis of a biphasic liquid–liquid system in one pot. Layered yttrium hydroxides (LYHs) were chosen as a host material for the intercalation of hydrophobic organic guest anions such as benzoate, sebacate, or laurate. In a typical synthesis, an organic phase dissolving carboxylic acid was placed in contact with an equal amount of an aqueous phase dissolving yttrium nitrate n-hydrate and urea. At elevated temperatures up to 80 °C, urea was hydrolyzed to release hydroxyl anions which were used to form yttrium hydroxide layers. LYHs were then precipitated with the intercalation of carboxylate anions delivered from the organic phase under the distribution law. The structure and the morphology of the LYHs could be modulated by the intercalated anions. Doped with Eu{sup 3+} ions, the LYHs exhibited red photoluminescence which was enhanced by the intercalated anions due to the antenna effect. - Graphical abstract: The Eu{sup 3+}-doped layered yttrium hydroxide exhibits intense red photoluminescence after intercalation of benzoate ions. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Immiscible biphasic liquid systems were introduced to synthesize layered yttrium hydroxides. • The temperature of the biphasic systems does not exceed 80 °C in one step of the synthesis. • Hydrophobic organic anions were intercalated between the hydroxide layers in one pot. • Structure and morphology of the hydroxides were modulated by changing the kind of organic anions. • Eu{sup 3+}-doping led to red luminescence from the hydroxides in association with the intercalated organic anions.

  10. Towards a green hydrate inhibitor: imaging antifreeze proteins on clathrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimond Gordienko

    Full Text Available The formation of hydrate plugs in oil and gas pipelines is a serious industrial problem and recently there has been an increased interest in the use of alternative hydrate inhibitors as substitutes for thermodynamic inhibitors like methanol. We show here that antifreeze proteins (AFPs possess the ability to modify structure II (sII tetrahydrofuran (THF hydrate crystal morphologies by adhering to the hydrate surface and inhibiting growth in a similar fashion to the kinetic inhibitor poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP. The effects of AFPs on the formation and growth rate of high-pressure sII gas mix hydrate demonstrated that AFPs are superior hydrate inhibitors compared to PVP. These results indicate that AFPs may be suitable for the study of new inhibitor systems and represent an important step towards the development of biologically-based hydrate inhibitors.

  11. Water retention curve for hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Santamarina, J. Carlos

    2013-11-01

    water retention curve plays a central role in numerical algorithms that model hydrate dissociation in sediments. The determination of the water retention curve for hydrate-bearing sediments faces experimental difficulties, and most studies assume constant water retention curves regardless of hydrate saturation. This study employs network model simulation to investigate the water retention curve for hydrate-bearing sediments. Results show that (1) hydrate in pores shifts the curve to higher capillary pressures and the air entry pressure increases as a power function of hydrate saturation; (2) the air entry pressure is lower in sediments with patchy rather than distributed hydrate, with higher pore size variation and pore connectivity or with lower specimen slenderness along the flow direction; and (3) smaller specimens render higher variance in computed water retention curves, especially at high water saturation Sw > 0.7. Results are relevant to other sediment pore processes such as bioclogging and mineral precipitation.

  12. A Wearable Hydration Sensor with Conformal Nanowire Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shanshan; Myers, Amanda; Malhotra, Abhishek; Lin, Feiyan; Bozkurt, Alper; Muth, John F; Zhu, Yong

    2017-01-27

    A wearable skin hydration sensor in the form of a capacitor is demonstrated based on skin impedance measurement. The capacitor consists of two interdigitated or parallel electrodes that are made of silver nanowires (AgNWs) in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. The flexible and stretchable nature of the AgNW/PDMS electrode allows conformal contact to the skin. The hydration sensor is insensitive to the external humidity change and is calibrated against a commercial skin hydration system on an artificial skin over a wide hydration range. The hydration sensor is packaged into a flexible wristband, together with a network analyzer chip, a button cell battery, and an ultralow power microprocessor with Bluetooth. In addition, a chest patch consisting of a strain sensor, three electrocardiography electrodes, and a skin hydration sensor is developed for multimodal sensing. The wearable wristband and chest patch may be used for low-cost, wireless, and continuous monitoring of skin hydration and other health parameters.

  13. Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gay Hydrate Production Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. D. White; B. P. McGrail; S. K. Wurstner

    2009-06-30

    Displacing natural gas and petroleum with carbon dioxide is a proven technology for producing conventional geologic hydrocarbon reservoirs, and producing additional yields from abandoned or partially produced petroleum reservoirs. Extending this concept to natural gas hydrate production offers the potential to enhance gas hydrate recovery with concomitant permanent geologic sequestration. Numerical simulation was used to assess a suite of carbon dioxide injection techniques for producing gas hydrates from a variety of geologic deposit types. Secondary hydrate formation was found to inhibit contact of the injected CO{sub 2} regardless of injectate phase state, thus diminishing the exchange rate due to pore clogging and hydrate zone bypass of the injected fluids. Additional work is needed to develop methods of artificially introducing high-permeability pathways in gas hydrate zones if injection of CO{sub 2} in either gas, liquid, or micro-emulsion form is to be more effective in enhancing gas hydrate production rates.

  14. Solvent-dependent enthalpic versus entropic anion binding by biaryl substituted quinoline based anion receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhan-Hu; Albrecht, Markus; Raabe, Gerhard; Pan, Fang-Fang; Räuber, Christoph

    2015-01-08

    Anion receptors based on an 8-thiourea substituted quinoline with pentafluorinated (1a) or nonfluorinated (1b) biarylamide groups in the 2-position show similar binding of halide anions with somewhat higher association constants for the more acidic fluorinated derivative. Surprisingly, binding affinities for the halides in the case of the nonfluorinated 1b are similar in nonpolar chloroform or polar DMSO as solvent. Thorough thermodynamic investigations based on NMR van't Hoff analysis show that anion binding in chloroform is mainly enthalpically driven. In DMSO, entropy is the driving force for the binding of the ions with replacement of attached solvent.

  15. In-situ gas hydrate hydrate saturation estimated from various well logs at the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed detailed analysis and interpretation of available 2-D and 3-D seismic data and proposed a viable method for identifying sub-permafrost gas hydrate prospects within the gas hydrate stability zone in the Milne Point area of northern Alaska. To validate the predictions of the USGS and to acquire critical reservoir data needed to develop a long-term production testing program, a well was drilled at the Mount Elbert prospect in February, 2007. Numerous well log data and cores were acquired to estimate in-situ gas hydrate saturations and reservoir properties.Gas hydrate saturations were estimated from various well logs such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), P- and S-wave velocity, and electrical resistivity logs along with pore-water salinity. Gas hydrate saturations from the NMR log agree well with those estimated from P- and S-wave velocity data. Because of the low salinity of the connate water and the low formation temperature, the resistivity of connate water is comparable to that of shale. Therefore, the effect of clay should be accounted for to accurately estimate gas hydrate saturations from the resistivity data. Two highly gas hydrate-saturated intervals are identified - an upper ???43 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 54% and a lower ???53 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 50%; both zones reach a maximum of about 75% saturation. ?? 2009.

  16. The First Synthesis and Anti-retroviral Activity of 5',5'-Difluoro-3'-Hydroxy-Apiosyl Nucleoside Cyclomonophosphonic Acid Analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seyeon; Hong, Joon Hee [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The first synthesis of novel 5',5'-difluoro-30-hydroxy apiose nucleoside cyclomonophosphonic acid analogs was performed as potent anti-retroviral agents. Phosphonation was performed by direct displacement of a triflate intermediate with diethyl(lithiodifluoromethyl) phosphonate to give the corresponding(α, α-difluoroalkyl) phosphonate. Condensation successfully proceeded from a glycosyl donor with persilylated bases to yield the nucleoside phosphonate analogs. Deprotection of diethyl phosphonates provided the target nucleoside cyclomonophosphonic acid analogs. The synthesized nucleoside analogs were subjected to anti-viral screening against the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1). Cytosine analogs show significant anti-HIV activity.

  17. The structure of the hydrated electron. Part 2. A mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics embedded cluster density functional theory: single-excitation configuration interaction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Glover, William J; Larsen, Ross E; Schwartz, Benjamin J

    2007-06-21

    Adiabatic mixed quantum/classical (MQC) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to generate snapshots of the hydrated electron in liquid water at 300 K. Water cluster anions that include two complete solvation shells centered on the hydrated electron were extracted from the MQC MD simulations and embedded in a roughly 18 Ax18 Ax18 A matrix of fractional point charges designed to represent the rest of the solvent. Density functional theory (DFT) with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional and single-excitation configuration interaction (CIS) methods were then applied to these embedded clusters. The salient feature of these hybrid DFT(CIS)/MQC MD calculations is significant transfer (approximately 18%) of the excess electron's charge density into the 2p orbitals of oxygen atoms in OH groups forming the solvation cavity. We used the results of these calculations to examine the structure of the singly occupied and the lower unoccupied molecular orbitals, the density of states, the absorption spectra in the visible and ultraviolet, the hyperfine coupling (hfcc) tensors, and the infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of these embedded water cluster anions. The calculated hfcc tensors were used to compute electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectra for the hydrated electron that compared favorably to the experimental spectra of trapped electrons in alkaline ice. The calculated vibrational spectra of the hydrated electron are consistent with the red-shifted bending and stretching frequencies observed in resonance Raman experiments. In addition to reproducing the visible/near IR absorption spectrum, the hybrid DFT model also accounts for the hydrated electron's 190-nm absorption band in the ultraviolet. Thus, our study suggests that to explain several important experimentally observed properties of the hydrated electron, many-electron effects must be accounted for: one-electron models that do not allow for mixing of the excess

  18. The structure of the hydrated electron. Part 2. A mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics embedded cluster density functional theory : single-excitation configuration interaction study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkrob, I. A.; Glover, W. J.; Larsen, R. E.; Schwartz, B. J.; Chemistry; Univ. of California at Los Angeles

    2007-06-21

    Adiabatic mixed quantum/classical (MQC) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to generate snapshots of the hydrated electron in liquid water at 300 K. Water cluster anions that include two complete solvation shells centered on the hydrated electron were extracted from the MQC MD simulations and embedded in a roughly 18 Angstrom x 18 Angstrom x 18 Angstrom matrix of fractional point charges designed to represent the rest of the solvent. Density functional theory (DFT) with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional and single-excitation configuration interaction (CIS) methods were then applied to these embedded clusters. The salient feature of these hybrid DFT(CIS)/MQC MD calculations is significant transfer ({approx}18%) of the excess electron's charge density into the 2p orbitals of oxygen atoms in OH groups forming the solvation cavity. We used the results of these calculations to examine the structure of the singly occupied and the lower unoccupied molecular orbitals, the density of states, the absorption spectra in the visible and ultraviolet, the hyperfine coupling (hfcc) tensors, and the infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of these embedded water cluster anions. The calculated hfcc tensors were used to compute electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectra for the hydrated electron that compared favorably to the experimental spectra of trapped electrons in alkaline ice. The calculated vibrational spectra of the hydrated electron are consistent with the red-shifted bending and stretching frequencies observed in resonance Raman experiments. In addition to reproducing the visible/near IR absorption spectrum, the hybrid DFT model also accounts for the hydrated electron's 190-nm absorption band in the ultraviolet. Thus, our study suggests that to explain several important experimentally observed properties of the hydrated electron, many-electron effects must be accounted for: one-electron models that do not

  19. Hydration index--a better parameter for explaining small molecule hydration in inhibition of ice recrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Roger Y; Ferreira, Sandra S; Czechura, Pawel; Chaytor, Jennifer L; Ben, Robert N

    2008-12-24

    Several simple mono- and disaccharides have been assessed for their ability to inhibit ice recrystallization. Two carbohydrates were found to be effective recrystallization inhibitors. D-galactose (1) was the best monosaccharide and D-melibiose (5) was the most active disaccharide. The ability of each carbohydrate to inhibit ice growth was correlated to its respective hydration number reported in the literature. A hydration number reflects the number of tightly bound water molecules to the carbohydrate and is a function of carbohydrate stereochemistry. It was discovered that using the absolute hydration number of a carbohydrate does not allow one to accurately predict its ability to inhibit ice recrystallization. Consequently, we have defined a hydration index in which the hydration number is divided by the molar volume of the carbohydrate. This new parameter not only takes into account the number of water molecules tightly bound to a carbohydrate but also the size or volume of a particular solute and ultimately the concentration of hydrated water molecules. The hydration index of both mono- and disaccharides correlates well with experimentally measured RI activity. C-Linked derivatives of the monosaccharides appear to have RI activity comparable to that of their O-linked saccharides but a more thorough investigation is required. The relationship between carbohydrate concentration and RI activity was shown to be noncolligative and a 0.022 M solution of D-galactose (1) and C-linked galactose derivative (10) inhibited recrystallization as well as a 3% DMSO solution. The carbohydrates examined in this study did not possess any thermal hysteresis activity (selective depression of freezing point relative to melting point) or dynamic ice shaping. As such, we propose that they are inhibiting recrystallization at the interface between bulk water and the quasi liquid layer (a semiordered interface between ice and bulk water) by disrupting the preordering of water.

  20. Anionic/cationic complexes in hair care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Lenick, Tony

    2011-01-01

    The formulation of cosmetic products is always more complicated than studying the individual components in aqueous solution. This is because there are numerous interactions between the components, which make the formulation truly more than the sum of the parts. This article will look at interactions between anionic and cationic surfactants and offer insights into how to use these interactions advantageously in making formulations.

  1. Stoichiometry of uranyl salophene anion complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonisse, M.M.G.; Ruel, Bianca H.M.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Reinhoudt, David

    1998-01-01

    In PVC/NPOE ion-selective membranes of potentiometric sensors, the guest-host stoichiometry of the anion complex of H2PO4 - and F- selective uranyl salophene derivatives is 2:1. This stoichiometry is different from the stoichiometry observed in DMSO solution (1H NMR) or solid state (X-ray crystal

  2. Wigner photoemission time delay from endohedral anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashish; Varma, Hari R.; Deshmukh, Pranawa C.; Manson, Steven T.; Dolmatov, Valeriy K.; Kheifets, Anatoli

    2016-10-01

    Characteristic features of Wigner photoemission time delay from endohedral anions A@C60q along with their dependence on the anion charge q are unraveled. Specifically, significant enhancement of the time delay in the innermost dipole photoionization channels near threshold is found, owing to the presence of the Coulomb confined resonances (CRs). Moreover, it is shown that interchannel coupling of the inner-shell Coulomb CRs with outer-shell photoionization channels results in resonantly enhanced time delay in the release of the outer-shell photoelectron well above, several hundreds eV, the outer-shell thresholds. It is also demonstrated that, and explained why, photoionization cross sections of the innermost subshells as well as outer subshells (near the inner-subshell threshold) depends only very weakly on the anion charge q , but the dependence of the corresponding time delays on q can be significant. Furthermore, Coulomb CRs are found to emerge in the innermost quadrupole photoionization channels as well, thereby causing considerable time delay in the quadrupole photoemission. These findings are illustrated in calculations of the photoionization of inner and outer subshells of the endohedral anions Ne@C60-1 and Ne@C60-5 that were chosen as case studies.

  3. Stoichiometry of uranyl salophene anion complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonisse, M.M.G.; Ruel, Bianca H.M.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Reinhoudt, David

    1998-01-01

    In PVC/NPOE ion-selective membranes of potentiometric sensors, the guest-host stoichiometry of the anion complex of H2PO4 - and F- selective uranyl salophene derivatives is 2:1. This stoichiometry is different from the stoichiometry observed in DMSO solution (1H NMR) or solid state (X-ray crystal st

  4. Simultaneous anion and cation mobility in polypyrrole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Steen; Bay, Lasse; Vidanapathirana, K.;

    2003-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) polymer films permanently doped with large, immobile anion dodecyl benzene sulfonate (DBS) have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry in order to clarify the roles of cations and anions in the aqueous electrolyte as mobile ions in the film. Aqueous solutions of 0.05-0.1 M...... alkali metal chlorides as well as BaCl2, NaBr and (CH3CH2CH2)(4)NBr were used to investigate the effects of both the ionic charge, size and shape. In 1: 1 electrolytes using small ions only three peaks are present: a sharp cathodic peak at ca. - 0.6 V vs, SCE representing both the insertion of cations...... complicating reproducibility when employing PPy(DBS) polymers as actuators. When the cation is doubly charged, it enters the film less readily, and anions dominate the mobility. Using a large and bulky cation switches the mechanism to apparently total anion motion. The changes in area of the three peaks...

  5. Synthesis of azaphenanthridines via anionic ring closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henriette Møller; Lysén, M.; Begtrup, M.;

    2005-01-01

    A new and convergent synthesis of azaphenanthridines via an anionic ring closure is reported. Ortho-lithiation/in situ borylation of cyanopyridines produces the corresponding cyanopyridylboronic esters, which undergo a Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling to give the key intermediates. Addition of lithium...

  6. Donnan Membrane Technique (DMT) for Anion Measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso Vega, M.F.; Weng, L.P.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2010-01-01

    Donnan membrane technique (DMT) is developed and tested for determination of free anion concentrations. Time needed to reach the Donnan membrane equilibrium depends on type of ions and the background. The Donnan membrane equilibrium is reached in 1 day for Cl-, 1-2 days for NO3-, 1-4 days for SO42-

  7. Neutral Resonant Ionization in Hydrogen Anion Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, John

    2013-09-01

    Dissociative ionization of molecules causes gas phase H- but fails to explain anion intensity. Atomic collisions on surfaces with reduced work function give anions, but also fail to explain intensity, lowered electron density, and diagnostics. Neutral resonant ionization of H(2s) atoms to ion pairs is here predicted with a very high cross section. H(2s,p) atoms are resonant with numerous short-lived excited states (``resonances'') of H- as well as the putative doubly-excited stable state of H- which resists production by other means. This state decays through 1Σu+ (2s σu2) to a singly excited ion pair, leaving both proton and anion with 3.8 eV energy. H(2s,p) atoms arise from dissociative recombination of trihydrogen ion (H3+)which dominates ion content of hydrogen plasmas. Initial H(2s,p) are resonantly produced by ground state Cs atoms or excited Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms, but these initiators are not needed to sustain anion production. This theory may explain the intense ion source at Cal Tech that produced 1.5 mA/cm2 H3 in the mid-1980's (1). A full CRM calculation is not complete, but equilibrium calculations suggest that >1 mA/cm2 H- may be predicted.

  8. Stoichiometry of uranyl salophene anion complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonisse, Martijn M.G.; Snellink-Ruel, Bianca H.M.; Engbersen, Johan F.J.; Reinhoudt, David N.

    1998-01-01

    In PVC/NPOE ion-selective membranes of potentiometric sensors, the guest-host stoichiometry of the anion complex of H2PO4 - and F- selective uranyl salophene derivatives is 2:1. This stoichiometry is different from the stoichiometry observed in DMSO solution (1H NMR) or solid state (X-ray crystal st

  9. Molecular simulation study of temperature effect on ionic hydration in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qing; Huang, Liangliang; Zhou, Jian; Lu, Linghong; Zhang, Luzheng; Lu, Xiaohua; Jiang, Shaoyi; Gubbins, Keith E; Shen, Wenfeng

    2008-04-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the hydration of Li(+), Na(+), K(+), F(-), and Cl(-) inside the carbon nanotubes at temperatures ranging from 298 to 683 K. The structural characteristics of the coordination shells of ions are studied, including the ion-oxygen radial distribution functions, the coordination numbers, and the orientation distributions of the water molecules. Simulation results show that the first coordination shells of the five ions still exist in the nanoscale confinement. Nevertheless, the first coordination shell structures of cations change more significantly than those of anions because of the preferential orientation of the water molecules induced by the carbon nanotube. The first coordination shells of cations are considerably less ordered in the nanotube than in the bulk solution, whereas the change of the first coordination shell structures of the anions is minor. Furthermore, the confinement induces the anomalous behavior of the coordination shells of the ions with temperature. The first coordination shell of K(+) are found to be more ordered as the temperature increases only in the carbon nanotube with the effective diameter of 1.0 nm, implying the enhancement of the ionic hydration with temperature. This is contrary to that in the bulk solution. The coordination shells of the other four ions do not have such behavior in the carbon nanotube with the effective diameter ranging from 0.73 to 1.00 nm. The easier distortion of the coordination shell of K(+) and the match of the shell size and the nanotube size may play roles in this phenomenon. The exchange of water molecules in the first coordination shells of the ions with the solution and the ion diffusion along the axial direction of the nanotube are also investigated. The mobility of the ions and the stability of the coordination shells are greatly affected by the temperature in the nanotube as in the bulk solutions. These results help to understand the

  10. Geologic implications of gas hydrates in the offshore of India: results of the National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Boswell, Ray; Cochran, J.R.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Lall, Malcolm; Mazumdar, Aninda; Ramana, Mangipudi Venkata; Ramprasad, Tammisetti; Riedel, Michael; Sain, Kalachand; Sathe, Arun Vasant; Vishwanath, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 (NGHP-01) is designed to study the occurrence of gas hydrate along the passive continental margin of the Indian Peninsula and in the Andaman convergent margin, with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. The NGHP-01 expedition established the presence of gas hydrates in the Krishna-Godavari and Mahanadi Basins, and the Andaman Sea. The expedition discovered in the Krishna-Godavari Basin one of the thickest gas hydrate accumulations ever documented, in the Andaman Sea one of the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zones in the world, and established the existence of a fully developed gas hydrate petroleum system in all three basins.

  11. Anionic phospholipids modulate peptide insertion into membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L P; Deber, C M

    1997-05-06

    While the insertion of a hydrophobic peptide or membrane protein segment into the bilayer can be spontaneous and driven mainly by the hydrophobic effect, anionic lipids, which comprise ca. 20% of biological membranes, provide a source of electrostatic attractions for binding of proteins/peptides into membranes. To unravel the interplay of hydrophobicity and electrostatics in the binding of peptides into membranes, we designed peptides de novo which possess the typical sequence Lys-Lys-Ala-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Ala-Trp-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Al a-Ala-Lys-Lys-Lys-Lys-amide, where X residues correspond to "guest" residues which encompass a range of hydrophobicity (Leu, Ile, Gly, and Ser). Circular dichroism spectra demonstrated that peptides were partially (40-90%) random in aqueous buffer but were promoted to form 100% alpha-helical structures by anionic lipid micelles. In neutral lipid micelles, only the relatively hydrophobic peptides (X = L and I) spontaneously adopted the alpha-helical conformation, but when 25% of negatively charged lipids were mixed in to mimic the content of anionic lipids in biomembranes, the less hydrophobic (X = S and G) peptides then formed alpha-helical conformations. Consistent with these findings, fluorescence quenching by the aqueous-phase quencher iodide indicated that in anionic (dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol) vesicles, the peptide Trp residue was buried in the lipid vesicle hydrophobic core, while in neutral (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) vesicles, only hydrophobic (X = L and I) peptides were shielded from the aqueous solution. Trp emission spectra of peptides in the presence of phospholipids doxyl-labeled at the 5-, 7-, 10-, 12-, and 16-fatty acid positions implied not only a transbilayer orientation for inserted peptides but also that mixed peptide populations (transbilayer + surface-associated) may arise. Overall results suggest that for hydrophobic peptides with segmental threshold hydrophobicity below that which

  12. The chemoenzymatic synthesis of clofarabine and related 2′-deoxyfluoroarabinosyl nucleosides: the electronic and stereochemical factors determining substrate recognition by E. coli nucleoside phosphorylases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilja V. Fateev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Two approaches to the synthesis of 2-chloro-9-(2-deoxy-2-fluoro-β-D-arabinofuranosyladenine (1, clofarabine were studied. The first approach consists in the chemical synthesis of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-α-D-arabinofuranose-1-phosphate (12a, 2FAra-1P via three step conversion of 1,3,5-tri-O-benzoyl-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-α-D-arabinofuranose (9 into the phosphate 12a without isolation of intermediary products. Condensation of 12a with 2-chloroadenine catalyzed by the recombinant E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP resulted in the formation of clofarabine in 67% yield. The reaction was also studied with a number of purine bases (2-aminoadenine and hypoxanthine, their analogues (5-aza-7-deazaguanine and 8-aza-7-deazahypoxanthine and thymine. The results were compared with those of a similar reaction with α-D-arabinofuranose-1-phosphate (13a, Ara-1P. Differences of the reactivity of various substrates were analyzed by ab initio calculations in terms of the electronic structure (natural purines vs analogues and stereochemical features (2FAra-1P vs Ara-1P of the studied compounds to determine the substrate recognition by E. coli nucleoside phosphorylases. The second approach starts with the cascade one-pot enzymatic transformation of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-arabinose into the phosphate 12a, followed by its condensation with 2-chloroadenine thereby affording clofarabine in ca. 48% yield in 24 h. The following recombinant E. coli enzymes catalyze the sequential conversion of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-arabinose into the phosphate 12a: ribokinase (2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-arabinofuranose-5-phosphate, phosphopentomutase (PPN; no 1,6-diphosphates of D-hexoses as co-factors required (12a, and finally PNP. The substrate activities of D-arabinose, D-ribose and D-xylose in the similar cascade syntheses of the relevant 2-chloroadenine nucleosides were studied and compared with the activities of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-arabinose. As expected, D-ribose exhibited the best substrate

  13. Origin and character of gaseous hydrocarbons in the hydrate and non-hydrate charged sediments on the Norway - Svalbard margins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaular, Espen Nesheim

    2011-05-15

    Gas incubated in clathrate water-structures, stabilizes the hydrogen bonded substance termed gas hydrate. In the marine environment vast amount of carbon is stored as gas hydrates within the temperature and pressure zone these ice-like structures are stable. Natural gas hydrate mapping and characterization is important basic research that brings about critical knowledge concerning various topics. Natural gas hydrates is a vital part of the carbon cycle, it is a potential energy resource (and thereby a potential climate agent) and it is a potential geo-hazard. One of the goals the GANS initiative aimed at exploring, was the hydrate bearing sediment of the Norway -Svalbard margins, to investigate the character and expansion of natural gas hydrates. Part of the investigation was to define how the gas in the hydrated sediment was produced and where it came from. As a result this thesis addresses the matter of light hydrocarbon characterization and origin in two Norwegian hydrate deposits. On cruises to Vestnesa on the Svalbard margin and to Nyegga in the mid-Norwegian margin, samples of hydrate charged and non-hydrate charged sediments were obtained and analyzed. Through compositional and isotopic analyses the origin of the hydrate bound gas in the fluid escape feature G11 at Nyegga was determined. The hydrate incubated methane is microbial produced as well as parts of the hydrate bound ethane. The compositional analysis in both the Nyegga area and at the Vestnesa Ridge points at thermogenic contributions in the sediment interstitials and pore water. The two hydrate bearing margins show large differences in hydrocarbon content and microbial activity in the pockmarks investigated. The gravity cores from the penetrated pockmark at Vestnesa showed low hydrocarbon content and thus suggest ceased or periodic venting. The fluid flow escape features at Nyegga show large variety of flux rates based on ROV monitoring and headspace analysis of the sediment and pore water. The

  14. A statistical mechanical description of biomolecular hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    We present an efficient and accurate theoretical description of the structural hydration of biological macromolecules. The hydration of molecules of almost arbitrary size (tRNA, antibody-antigen complexes, photosynthetic reaction centre) can be studied in solution and in the crystal environment. The biomolecular structure obtained from x-ray crystallography, NMR, or modeling is required as input information. The structural arrangement of water molecules near a biomolecular surface is represented by the local water density analogous to the corresponding electron density in an x-ray diffraction experiment. The water-density distribution is approximated in terms of two- and three-particle correlation functions of solute atoms with water using a potentials-of-mean-force expansion.

  15. Experimental techniques for cement hydration studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Luttge

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cement hydration kinetics is a complex problem of dissolution, nucleation and growth that is still not well understood, particularly in a quantitative way. While cement systems are unique in certain aspects they are also comparable to natural mineral systems. Therefore, geochemistry and particularly the study of mineral dissolution and growth may be able to provide insight and methods that can be utilized in cement hydration research. Here, we review mainly what is not known or what is currently used and applied in a problematic way. Examples are the typical Avrami approach, the application of Transition State Theory (TST to overall reaction kinetics and the problem of reactive surface area. Finally, we suggest an integrated approach that combines vertical scanning interferometry (VSI with other sophisticated analytical techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM and theoretical model calculations based on a stochastic treatment.

  16. Predicting hydration energies for multivalent ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2014-01-01

    (TZVP) level. Agreement with experimental data for monovalent and divalent ions is good and shows no significant systematic errors. Predictions are noticeably better than with standard COSMO. The agreement with experimental data for trivalent and tetravalent ions is slightly worse and shows systematic...... errors. Our results indicate that quantum chemical calculations combined with COSMO-RS solvent treatment is a reliable method for treating multivalent ions in solution, provided one hydration shell of explicit water molecules is included for metal cations. The accuracy is not high enough to allow...... absolute predictions of hydration energies but could be used to investigate trends for several ions, thanks to the low computational cost, in particular for ligand exchange reactions....

  17. Obsidian hydration dating of volcanic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I.; Obradovich, J.

    1981-01-01

    Obsidian hydration dating of volcanic events had been compared with ages of the same events determined by the 14C and KAr methods at several localities. The localities, ranging in age from 1200 to over 1 million yr, include Newberry Craters, Oregon; Coso Hot Springs, California; Salton Sea, California; Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming; and Mineral Range, Utah. In most cases the agreement is quite good. A number of factors including volcanic glass composition and exposuretemperature history must be known in order to relate hydration thickness to age. The effect of composition can be determined from chemical analysis or the refractive index of the glass. Exposure-temperature history requires a number of considerations enumerated in this paper. ?? 1981.

  18. Methane hydrates and contemporary climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2011-01-01

    As the evidence for warming climate became better established in the latter part of the 20th century (IPCC 2001), some scientists raised the alarm that large quantities of methane (CH4) might be liberated by widespread destabilization of climate-sensitive gas hydrate deposits trapped in marine and permafrost-associated sediments (Bohannon 2008, Krey et al. 2009, Mascarelli 2009). Even if only a fraction of the liberated CH4 were to reach the atmosphere, the potency of CH4 as a greenhouse gas (GHG) and the persistence of its oxidative product (CO2) heightened concerns that gas hydrate dissociation could represent a slow tipping point (Archer et al. 2009) for Earth's contemporary period of climate change.

  19. Advances in understanding hydration of Portland cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scrivener, Karen L., E-mail: Karen.scrivener@epfl.ch [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 (Switzerland); Juilland, Patrick [Sika Technology AG, Zürich (Switzerland); Monteiro, Paulo J.M. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California at Berkeley (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Progress in understanding hydration is summarized. Evidence supports the geochemistry dissolution theory as an explanation for the induction period, in preference to the inhibiting layer theory. The growth of C–S–H is the principal factor controlling the main heat evolution peak. Electron microscopy indicates that C–S–H “needles” grow from the surface of grains. At the peak, the surface is covered, but deceleration cannot be attributed to diffusion control. The shoulder peak comes from renewed reaction of C{sub 3}A after depletion of sulfate in solution, but release of sulfate absorbed on C–S–H means that ettringite continues to form. After several days space becomes the major factor controlling hydration. The use of new analytical technique is improving our knowledge of the action of superplasticizers and leading to the design of molecules for different applications. Atomistic modeling is becoming a topic of increasing interest. Recent publications in this area are reviewed.

  20. Propane hydrate nucleation: Experimental investigation and correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    In this work the nucleation kinetics of propane gas hydrate has been investigated experimentally using a stirred batch reactor. The experiments have been performed isothermally recording the pressure as a function of time. Experiments were conducted at different stirring rates, but in the same......) to the aqueous phase was found to reduce the gas dissolution rate slightly. However the induction times were prolonged quite substantially upon addition of PVP.The induction time data were correlated using a newly developed induction time model based on crystallization theory also capable of taking into account...... the presence of additives. In most cases reasonable agreement between the data and the model could be obtained. The results revealed that especially the effective surface energy between propane hydrate and water is likely to change when the stirring rate varies from very high to low. The prolongation...

  1. A Proposed Unified Theory of Hydrated Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivkin, Andrew S.

    2016-10-01

    The last decade has seen tremendous growth in the study of hydrated and hydroxylated minerals (hereafter simply called "hydrated minerals") on asteroids. Several workers have used absorptions in the 3-µm region and a correlated absorption near 0.7 µm to determine not only the presence or absence of these minerals but gain insight into the compositions of asteroid surfaces. Spectra of hundreds of asteroids have been measured and published or presented at meetings, and we are in a position to use these newer datasets to globally assess the patterns and relationships we see, as previously done by Jones et al. (1990) and Takir et al. (2012). There are several points to be addressed by any such assessment. Several different band shapes are seen in the 3-µm region, only one of which is seen in the hydrated meteorites in our collections. However, each of the main 3-µm band shapes is represented among parent bodies of collisional families. There seems to be little correlation in general between asteroid spectral class and 3-µm band shape, save for the Ch meteorites which are overwhelmingly likely to share the same band shape as the CM meteorites. Ceres has an unusual but not unique band shape, which has thus far only been found on the largest asteroids. I will present an outline scenario for the formation and evolution of hydrated asteroids, where aqueous alteration serves to lithify some objects while other objects remain unlithified and still others differentiate and suffer collisional modification. While some details will no doubt be altered to account for better or new information, this scenario is offered as a starting point for discussion.

  2. Bioimpedance in medicine: Measuring hydration influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlubik, J.; Hlubik, P.; Lhotska, L.

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the paper is to present results of our ongoing research focused on the influence of body hydration on the body impedance measurements and also on the influence of the frequency used for the measurement. The question is why to measure human body composition and if these values have beneficial results. First goal of the work deals with a question of measuring human body composition. The performed measurements showed certain influence which must be verified by repeated experiments.

  3. Methane storage in dry water gas hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weixing; Bray, Christopher L; Adams, Dave J; Cooper, Andrew I

    2008-09-03

    Dry water stores 175 v(STP)/v methane at 2.7 MPa and 273.2 K in a hydrate form which is close to the Department of Energy volumetric target for methane storage. Dry water is a silica-stabilized free-flowing powder (95% wt water), and fast methane uptakes were observed (90% saturation uptake in 160 min with no mixing) as a result of the relatively large surface-to-volume ratio of this material.

  4. Biomimetic hydration lubrication with various polyelectrolyte layers on cross-linked polyethylene orthopedic bearing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyomoto, Masayuki; Moro, Toru; Saiga, Kenichi; Hashimoto, Masami; Ito, Hideya; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Takatori, Yoshio; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2012-06-01

    Natural joints rely on fluid thin-film lubrication by the hydrated polyelectrolyte layer of cartilage. However, current artificial joints with polyethylene (PE) surfaces have considerably less efficient lubrication and thus much greater wear, leading to osteolysis and aseptic loosening. This is considered a common factor limiting prosthetic longevity in total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, such wear could be mitigated by surface modification to mimic the role of cartilage. Here we report the development of nanometer-scale hydrophilic layers with varying charge (nonionic, cationic, anionic, or zwitterionic) on cross-linked PE (CLPE) surfaces, which could fully mimic the hydrophilicity and lubricity of the natural joint surface. We present evidence to support two lubrication mechanisms: the primary mechanism is due to the high level of hydration in the grafted layer, where water molecules act as very efficient lubricants; and the secondary mechanism is repulsion of protein molecules and positively charged inorganic ions by the grafted polyelectrolyte layer. Thus, such nanometer-scaled hydrophilic polymers or polyelectrolyte layers on the CLPE surface of acetabular cup bearings could confer high durability to THA prosthetics.

  5. Hydration process in Portland cement blended with activated coal gangue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-ping LIU; Pei-ming WANG; Min-ju DING

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the hydration of a blend of Portland cement and activated coal gangue in order to determine the relationship between the degree of hydration and compressive strength development.The hydration process was investigated by various means:isothermal calorimetry,thermal analysis,non-cvaporable water measurement,and X-ray diffraction analysis.The results show that the activated coal gangue is a pozzolanic material that contributes to the hydration of the cement blend.The pozzolanic reaction occurs over a period of between 7 and 90 d,consuming portlandite and forming both crystal hydrates and ill-crystallized calcium silicate hydrates.These hydrates are similar to those found in pure Portland cement.The results show that if activated coal gangue is substituted for cement at up to 30% (w/w),it does not significantly affect the final compressive strength of the blend.A long-term compressive strength improvement can in fact be achieved by using activated coal gangue as a supplementary cementing material.The relationship between compressive strength and degree of hydration for both pure Portland cement and blended cement can be described with the same equation.However,the parameters are different since blended cement produces fewer calcium silicate hydrates than pure Portland cement at the same degree of hydration.

  6. Gas Hydrate Growth Kinetics: A Parametric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remi-Erempagamo Tariyemienyo Meindinyo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas hydrate growth kinetics was studied at a pressure of 90 bars to investigate the effect of temperature, initial water content, stirring rate, and reactor size in stirred semi-batch autoclave reactors. The mixing energy during hydrate growth was estimated by logging the power consumed. The theoretical model by Garcia-Ochoa and Gomez for estimation of the mass transfer parameters in stirred tanks has been used to evaluate the dispersion parameters of the system. The mean bubble size, impeller power input per unit volume, and impeller Reynold’s number/tip velocity were used for analyzing observed trends from the gas hydrate growth data. The growth behavior was analyzed based on the gas consumption and the growth rate per unit initial water content. The results showed that the growth rate strongly depended on the flow pattern in the cell, the gas-liquid mass transfer characteristics, and the mixing efficiency from stirring. Scale-up effects indicate that maintaining the growth rate per unit volume of reactants upon scale-up with geometric similarity does not depend only on gas dispersion in the liquid phase but may rather be a function of the specific thermal conductance, and heat and mass transfer limitations created by the limit to the degree of the liquid phase dispersion is batched and semi-batched stirred tank reactors.

  7. Intermolecular Hydrogen Transfer in Isobutane Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Sugahara

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Electron spin resonance (ESR spectra of butyl radicals induced with γ-ray irradiation in the simple isobutane (2-methylpropane hydrate (prepared with deuterated water were investigated. Isothermal annealing results of the γ-ray-irradiated isobutane hydrate reveal that the isobutyl radical in a large cage withdraws a hydrogen atom from the isobutane molecule through shared hexagonal-faces of adjacent large cages. During this “hydrogen picking” process, the isobutyl radical is apparently transformed into a tert-butyl radical, while the sum of isobutyl and tert-butyl radicals remains constant. The apparent transformation from isobutyl to tert-butyl radicals is an irreversible first-order reaction and the activation energy was estimated to be 35 ± 3 kJ/mol, which was in agreement with the activation energy (39 ± 5 kJ/mol of hydrogen picking in the γ-ray-irradiated propane hydrate with deuterated water.

  8. Anion-π interactions involving [MX(n)](m-) anions: a comprehensive theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estarellas, Carolina; Quiñonero, David; Deyà, Pere M; Frontera, Antonio

    2013-01-14

    In this manuscript we perform a systematic study on the geometric and energetic features of anion-π complexes, wherein the anion is a metal complex of variable shapes and charges. Such a study is lacking in the literature. For the calculations we used the ab initio RI-MP2/def2-TZVPP level of theory. A search in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) provides the experimental starting point that inspired the subsequent theoretical study. The influence of [MX(n)](m-) on the anion-π interaction was analyzed in terms of energetic, geometric, and charge transfer properties and Bader's theory of "atom-in-molecules" (AIM). The binding energy depends on the coordination index, geometric features and different orientations adopted by the metallic anion. The binding mode resembling a stacking interaction for linear, trigonal planar and square-planar anions is the most favorable. For tetrahedral and octahedral anions the most favorable orientation is the one with three halogen atoms pointing to the ring.

  9. Supramolecular Chemistry of Selective Anion Recognition for Anions of Environmental Relevance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonathan L. Sessler

    2007-09-21

    The major thrust of this project, led by the University of Kansas (Prof. Kristin Bowman-James), entails an exploration of the basic determinants of anion recognition and their application to the design, synthesis, and testing of novel sulfate extractants. A key scientific inspiration for the work comes from the need, codified in simple-to-appreciate terms by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory component of the team (viz. Dr. Bruce Moyer), for chemical entities that can help in the extractive removal of species that have low solubilities in borosilicate glass. Among such species, sulfate anion, has been identified as particularly insidious. Its presence interferes with the vitrification process, thus rendering the remediation of tank waste from, e.g., the Hanford site far more difficult and expensive. The availability of effective extractants, that would allow for the separation of separating sulfate from the major competing anions in the waste, especially nitrate, could allow for pre-vitrification removal of sulfate via liquid-liquid extraction. The efforts at The University of Texas, the subject of this report, have thus concentrated on the development of new sulfate receptors. These systems are designed to increase our basic understanding of anion recognition events and set the stage for the development of viable sulfate anion extractants. In conjunction with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) members of the research team, several of these new receptors were studied as putative extractants, with two of the systems being shown to act as promising synergists for anion exchange.

  10. Hydration of potassium iodide dimer studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ren-Zhong; Zeng, Zhen; Hou, Gao-Lei; Xu, Hong-Guang; Zhao, Xiang; Gao, Yi Qin; Zheng, Wei-Jun

    2016-11-01

    We measured the photoelectron spectra of (KI)2-(H2O)n (n = 0-3) and conducted ab initio calculations on (KI)2-(H2O)n anions and their corresponding neutrals up to n = 6. Two types of spectral features are observed in the experimental spectra of (KI)2-(H2O) and (KI)2-(H2O)2, indicating that two types of isomers coexist, in which the high EBE feature corresponds to the hydrated chain-like (KI)2- while the low EBE feature corresponds to the hydrated pyramidal (KI)2-. In (KI)2-(H2O)3, the (KI)2- unit prefers a pyramidal configuration, and one of the K-I distances is elongated significantly, thus a K atom is firstly separated out from the (KI)2- unit. As for the neutrals, the bare (KI)2 has a rhombus structure, and the structures of (KI)2(H2O)n are evolved from the rhombus (KI)2 unit by the addition of H2O. When the number of water molecules reaches 4, the K-I distances have significant increment and one of the I atoms prefers to leave the (KI)2 unit. The comparison of (KI)2(H2O)n and (NaI)2(H2O)n indicates that it is slightly more difficult to pry apart (KI)2 than (NaI)2 via hydration, which is in agreement with the lower solubility of KI compared to that of NaI.

  11. The interaction of climate change and methane hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.; Kessler, John D.

    2017-01-01

    Gas hydrate, a frozen, naturally-occurring, and highly-concentrated form of methane, sequesters significant carbon in the global system and is stable only over a range of low-temperature and moderate-pressure conditions. Gas hydrate is widespread in the sediments of marine continental margins and permafrost areas, locations where ocean and atmospheric warming may perturb the hydrate stability field and lead to release of the sequestered methane into the overlying sediments and soils. Methane and methane-derived carbon that escape from sediments and soils and reach the atmosphere could exacerbate greenhouse warming. The synergy between warming climate and gas hydrate dissociation feeds a popular perception that global warming could drive catastrophic methane releases from the contemporary gas hydrate reservoir. Appropriate evaluation of the two sides of the climate-methane hydrate synergy requires assessing direct and indirect observational data related to gas hydrate dissociation phenomena and numerical models that track the interaction of gas hydrates/methane with the ocean and/or atmosphere. Methane hydrate is likely undergoing dissociation now on global upper continental slopes and on continental shelves that ring the Arctic Ocean. Many factors—the depth of the gas hydrates in sediments, strong sediment and water column sinks, and the inability of bubbles emitted at the seafloor to deliver methane to the sea-air interface in most cases—mitigate the impact of gas hydrate dissociation on atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations though. There is no conclusive proof that hydrate-derived methane is reaching the atmosphere now, but more observational data and improved numerical models will better characterize the climate-hydrate synergy in the future.

  12. Three hydroxy aurone compounds as chemosensors for cyanide anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huihui; Sun, Yunhui; Zhou, Chuanjian; Cao, Duxia; Liu, Zhiqiang; Ma, Lin

    2013-12-01

    Three new 4-hydroxy aurone compounds 1-3 with dimethylamino (1), bromine (2) and cyano (3) as terminal group have been synthesized. Their photophysical properties as well as recognition properties for cyanide anions in acetonitrile and aqueous solution have also been examined. These compounds exhibit remarkable response to cyanide anions with obvious color and fluorescence change owing to hydrogen bonding reaction between cyanide anions and the O-H moiety of the sensors, which allows naked eye detection of cyanide anions.

  13. Evaluation of molecularly imprinted polymers using 2',3',5'-tri-O-acyluridines as templates for pyrimidine nucleoside recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstulja, Aleksandra; Lettieri, Stefania; Hall, Andrew J; Delépée, Raphael; Favetta, Patrick; Agrofoglio, Luigi A

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we describe the synthesis and evaluation of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), prepared using 2',3',5'-tri-O-acyluridines as 'dummy' templates, for the selective recognition of uridine nucleosides. The MIPs were synthesised using a non-covalent approach with 2,6-bis-acrylamidopyridine (BAAPy) acting as the binding monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linking agent. The MIPs were evaluated in terms of capacity, selectivity and specificity by analytical and frontal liquid chromatography measurements. The results obtained in organic mobile phases suggest that the nucleosides are specifically bound to the polymer by the complementary hydrogen bonding motifs of the binding monomer and the nucleoside bases. The MIPs exhibited relatively high imprinting factors for 2',3',5'-tri-O-acyluridines, while they did not show any binding capacity for other nucleosides lacking the imide moiety on their base. Moreover, the presence of ester-COO groups in the EGDMA cross-linker may lead to the formation of additional hydrogen bonds with the 2',3' and/or 5'-OH of sugar part, allowing enhancement of the recognition of the uridine nucleosides. In aqueous media, results show that the binding is driven by hydrophobic interactions.

  14. The halo-substituent effect on Pseudomonas cepacia lipase-mediated regioselective acylation of nucleosides: A comparative investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhao-Yu; Bi, Yan-Hong; Yang, Rong-Ling; Duan, Zhang-Qun; Nie, Ling-Hong; Li, Xiang-Qian; Zong, Min-Hua; Wu, Jie

    2015-10-20

    In this work, comparative experiments were explored to investigate the substrate specificity of Pseudomonas cepacia lipase in regioselective acylation of nucleosides carrying various substituents (such as the H, F, Cl, Br, I) at 2'- and 5-positions. Experimental data indicated that the catalytic performance of the enzyme depended very much on the halo-substituents in nucleosides. The increased bulk of 2'-substituents in ribose moiety of the nucleoside might contribute to the improved 3'-regioselectivity (90-98%, nucleosides a-d) in enzymatic decanoylation, while the enhancement of regioselectivity (93-99%) in 3'-O-acylated nucleosides e-h could be attributable to the increasing hydrophobicity of the halogen atoms at 5-positions. With regard to the chain-length selectivity, P. cepacia lipase displayed the highest 3'-regioselectivity toward the longer chain (C14) as compared to shorter (C6 and C10) ones. The position, orientation and property of the substituent, specific structure of the lipase's active site, and acyl structure could account for the diverse results.

  15. A novel nucleoside kinase from Burkholderia thailandensis: a member of the phosphofructokinase B-type family of enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Hiroko; Sakasegawa, Shin-Ichi; Yasuda, Yuko; Imamura, Shigeyuki; Tamura, Tomohiro

    2008-12-01

    The genome of the mesophilic Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia thailandensis contains an open reading frame (i.e. the Bth_I1158 gene) that has been annotated as a putative ribokinase and PFK-B family member. Notably, although the deduced amino acid sequence of the gene showed only 29% similarity to the recently identified nucleoside kinase from hyperthermophilic archaea Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, 15 of 17 residues reportedly involved in the catalytic activity of M. jannaschii nucleoside kinase were conserved. The gene was cloned and functionally overexpressed in Rhodococcus erythropolis, and the purified enzyme was characterized biochemically. The substrate specificity of the enzyme was unusually broad for a bacterial PFK-B protein, and the specificity extended not only to purine and purine-analog nucleosides but also to uridine. Inosine was the most effective phosphoryl acceptor, with the highest k(cat)/K(m) value (80 s(-1).mm(-1)) being achieved when ATP served as the phosphoryl donor. By contrast, this enzyme exhibited no activity toward ribose, indicating that the recombinant enzyme was a nucleoside kinase rather than a ribokinase. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed analysis of a bacterial nucleoside kinase in the PFK-B family.

  16. Environment-responsive fluorescent nucleoside analogue probe for studying oligonucleotide dynamics in a model cell-like compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Maroti G; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G

    2013-11-21

    The majority of fluorescent nucleoside analogue probes that have been used in the in vitro study of nucleic acids are not suitable for cell-based biophysical assays because they exhibit excitation maxima in the UV region and low quantum yields within oligonucleotides. Therefore, we propose that the photophysical characterization of oligonucleotides labeled with a fluorescent nucleoside analogue in reverse micelles (RM), which are good biological membrane models and UV-transparent, could provide an alternative approach to studying the properties of nucleic acids in a cell-like confined environment. In this context, we describe the photophysical properties of an environment-sensitive fluorescent uridine analogue (1), based on the 5-(benzo[b]thiophen-2-yl)pyrimidine core, in micelles and RM. The emissive nucleoside, which is polarity- and viscosity-sensitive, reports the environment of the surfactant assemblies via changes in its fluorescence properties. The nucleoside analogue, incorporated into an RNA oligonucleotide and hybridized to its complementary DNA and RNA oligonucleotides, exhibits a significantly higher fluorescence intensity, lifetime, and anisotropy in RM than in aqueous buffer, which is consistent with the environment of RM. Collectively, our results demonstrate that nucleoside 1 could be utilized as a fluorescent label to study the function of nucleic acids in a model cellular milieu.

  17. In vivo reshaping the catalytic site of nucleoside 2'-deoxyribosyltransferase for dideoxy- and didehydronucleosides via a single amino acid substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Pierre Alexandre; Dacher, Priscilla; Dugué, Laurence; Pochet, Sylvie

    2008-07-18

    Nucleoside 2'-deoxyribosyltransferases catalyze the transfer of 2-deoxyribose between bases and have been widely used as biocatalysts to synthesize a variety of nucleoside analogs. The genes encoding nucleoside 2'-deoxyribosyltransferase (ndt) from Lactobacillus leichmannii and Lactobacillus fermentum underwent random mutagenesis to select variants specialized for the synthesis of 2',3'-dideoxynucleosides. An Escherichia coli strain, auxotrophic for uracil and unable to use 2',3'-dideoxyuridine, cytosine, and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine as a source of uracil was constructed. Randomly mutated lactobacilli ndt libraries from two species, L. leichmannii and L. fermentum, were screened for the production of uracil with 2',3'-dideoxyuridine as a source of uracil. Several mutants suitable for the synthesis of 2',3'-dideoxynucleosides were isolated. The nucleotide sequence of the corresponding genes revealed a single mutation (G --> A transition) leading to the substitution of a small aliphatic amino acid by a nucleophilic one, A15T (L. fermentum) or G9S (L. leichmannii), respectively. We concluded that the "adaptation" of the nucleoside 2'-deoxyribosyltransferase activity to 2,3-dideoxyribosyl transfer requires an additional hydroxyl group on a key amino acid side chain of the protein to overcome the absence of such a group in the corresponding substrate. The evolved proteins also display significantly improved nucleoside 2',3'-didehydro-2',3'-dideoxyribosyltransferase activity.

  18. Color Responses of a Tripodal Colorimetric Sensor toward Anions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Lan-Hua; HE Yong-Bing; WU Jin-Long; QIN Hai-Juan; XU Kuo-Xi; MENG Ling-Zhi

    2005-01-01

    A thiourea-based tripodal colorimetric anion sensor was synthesized. Its binding abilities with AcO- and halide anions in DMSO were studied by UV-Vis spectra. The sensor showed different color responses to these anions. The association constants and different stoichiometries were deduced by nonlinear least-square curve fitting or linear fitting.

  19. Microcalorimetric study of adsorption of glycomacropeptide on anion-exchange chromatography adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Rafael A; Minim, Luis A; Bonomo, Renata C F; Minim, Valéria P R; da Silva, Luis H M; da Silva, Maria C H

    2009-05-15

    The adsorption of glycomacropeptide (GMP) from cheese whey on an anion-exchange adsorbent was investigated using isothermal titration microcalorimetry to measure thermodynamic information regarding such processes. Isotherms data were measured at temperatures of 25 and 45 degrees C, pH 8.2 and various ionic strengths (0-0.08 molL(-1) NaCl). The equilibrium data were fit using the Langmuir model and the process was observed to be reversible. Temperature was observed to positively affect the interaction of the protein and adsorbent. Microcalorimetric studies indicated endothermic adsorption enthalpy in all cases, except at 45 degrees C and 0.0 molL(-1) NaCl. The adsorption process was observed to be entropically driven at all conditions studied. It was concluded that the increase in entropy, attributed to the release of hydration waters as well as bounded ions from the adsorbent and protein surface due to interactions of the protein and adsorbent, was a major driving force for the adsorption of GMP on the anion-exchange adsorbent. These results could allow for design of more effective ion-exchange separation processes for proteins.

  20. Octa-coordination and the hydrated Ba2+(aq) ion

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I; Rempe, Susan B

    2014-01-01

    The hydration structure of Ba^{2+} ion is important for understanding blocking mechanisms in potassium ion channels. Here, we combine statistical mechanical theory, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, and electronic structure methods to calculate the hydration free energy and local hydration structure of Ba^{2+}(aq). The predicted hydration free energy (-302.9$\\pm$0.7 kcal/mol) matches the experimental value (-302.56 kcal/mol) when the fully occupied and exclusive inner solvation shell is treated. In the local environment defined by the inner and first shell of hydrating waters, Ba^{2+} is directly coordinated by eight (8) waters. Octa-coordination resembles the structure of Ba^{2+} and K^+ bound in potassium ion channels, but differs from the local hydration structure of K^+(aq) determined earlier.