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Sample records for hydrated larvae irradiated

  1. Blue LED irradiation to hydration of skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Priscila F. C.; Requena, Michelle B.; Lizarelli, Rosane F., Z.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    Blue LED system irradiation shows many important properties on skin as: bacterial decontamination, degradation of endogenous skin chromophores and biostimulation. In this clinical study we prove that the blue light improves the skin hydration. In the literature none authors reports this biological property on skin. Then this study aims to discuss the role of blue light in the skin hydration. Twenty patients were selected to this study with age between 25-35 years old and phototype I, II and III. A defined area from forearm was pre determined (A = 4.0 cm2). The study was randomized in two treatment groups using one blue light device (power of 5.3mW and irradiance of 10.8mW/cm2). The first treatment group was irradiated with 3J/cm2 (277seconds) and the second with 6J/cm2 (555 seconds). The skin hydration evaluations were done using a corneometer. The measurements were collected in 7, 14, 21 and 30 days, during the treatment. Statistical test of ANOVA, Tukey and T-Student were applied considering 5% of significance. In conclusion, both doses were able to improve the skin hydration; however, 6J/cm2 has kept this hydration for 30 days.

  2. Irradiation effects in hydrated zirconium molybdate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourdrin, C., E-mail: chloe.fourdrin@polytechnique.edu [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC/SECR/LSRM, 91 191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); CEA Saclay, DSM/IRAMIS/SIS2M-UMR 3299/Lrad, 91 191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Esnouf, S. [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRAMIS/SIS2M-UMR 3299/Lrad, 91 191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dauvois, V. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC/SECR/LSRM, 91 191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Renault, J.-P. [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRAMIS/SIS2M-UMR 3299/Lrad, 91 191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Venault, L. [CEN Valrho, DEN/DRCP/SCPS/LC2A, 30 207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Tabarant, M. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC/LRSI, 91 191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Durand, D. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC/SECR/LSRM, 91 191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Cheniere, A. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC/LRSI, 91 191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Lamouroux-Lucas, C. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC/SECR/LSRM, 91 191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Cochin, F. [AREVA NC Tour, AREVA, 92 084 Paris La Defense cedex (France)

    2012-07-15

    Hydrated zirconium molybdate is a precipitate formed during the process of spent nuclear fuel dissolution. In order to study the radiation stability of this material, we performed gamma and electron irradiation in a dose range of 10-100 kGy. XRD patterns showed that the crystalline structure is not affected by irradiation. However, the yellow original sample exhibits a blue-grey color after exposure. The resulting samples were analyzed by means of EPR and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Two sites for trapped electrons were evidenced leading to a d{sup 1} configuration responsible for the observed coloration. Moreover, a third defect corresponding to a hole trapped on oxygen was observed after electron irradiation at low temperature.

  3. Vaccination of lambs with irradiated larvae of Bunostomum trigonocephalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, V.K.; Singh, K.S.; Subramanian, G.

    1987-01-01

    Vaccination with a single dose of 2,000 infective larvae of Bunostomum trigonocephalum, irradiated at 40 kR, caused 80 per cent reduction in worm establishment and such lambs withstood a challenge infection which was otherwise fatal to non-vaccinated lambs. The female worms, which developed from irradiated larvae, were irregular in shape, had cuticular thickening at the genital opening and in many male worms the copulatory bursa was rudimentary. The sex ratio was adversely affected in worms developing from irradiated larvae. The population had preponderant sterile females and a very few male worms. (author)

  4. Preliminary study of killing the larva of plodia interpunella by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jide; Ma Xiaoping

    1994-01-01

    The results of killing the larva of plodia interpunella in the fruit by 60 Co γ-irradiation are described. The lowest effective dose for killing larva by irradiation is ca. 2000 Gy; the effective dose for immediately killing larva is 3000 Gy. The method is simple and easy and also suitable for the study of commercial irradiation of dry-fruit

  5. Thermal Regeneration of Sulfuric Acid Hydrates after Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, Mark J.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to more completely understand the surface chemistry of the jovian icy satellites, we have investigated the effect of heating on two irradiated crystalline sulfuric acid hydrates, H2SO4 4H2O and H2SO4 H2O. At temperatures relevant to Europa and the warmer jovian satellites, post-irradiation heating recrystallized the amorphized samples and increased the intensities of the remaining hydrate's infrared absorptions. This thermal regeneration of the original hydrates was nearly 100% efficient, indicating that over geological times, thermally-induced phase transitions enhanced by temperature fluctuations will reform a large fraction of crystalline hydrated sulfuric acid that is destroyed by radiation processing. The work described is the first demonstration of the competition between radiation-induced amorphization and thermally-induced recrystallization in icy ionic solids relevant to the outer Solar System.

  6. The immunogenic effect of irradiated Hemonchus contortus larvae in goats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de la Cruz, B.; Perfuse, W.

    1980-01-01

    The development of radiation-attenuated vaccines against parasitic disease has been reported in literature. The use of irradiated larvae as vaccines enables one to take advantage of the special immunological properties of living parasites; the radiation treatment can largely suppress the pathogenic effects of the vaccines and the reproductive capacity of the parasites involved. This report deals with our attempts to produce a radiation-attenuated vaccine against Hemonchus contortus infection in adult goats. Hemonchus contortus infection in ruminants is prevalent in the Philippines, especially among cattle and goats. The results presented indicate that a certain degree of resistance against Hemonchus contortus infection can be induced in adult goats immunized with irradiated larvae. The shelf-life of the vaccine was also determined. (author)

  7. Irradiation of Eggs and Larvae of Bactrocera Carambolae (Drew and Hancock) Fruit Fly to Produce Irradiation Host for Its Parasitoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achmad Nasroh Kuswadi; Murni lndarwatmi; Nasution, Indah Arastuti

    2004-01-01

    Bactrocera carambolae (Drew and Hancock) fruit fly, a major pests of commercial fruits in Indonesia, is attacked by several species of parasitoids in the field, such as by Biosteres sp. that attacks on early instar larvae and Opius sp. on late instar larvae. In order to produce irradiated host in mass rearing of both species, several dosage of gamma were tested on both eggs and larvae. Egg masses of 0.5 ml were irradiated with 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 Gy and then inoculated into artificial diet. Viability of the eggs, the larval period and the number of pupae produced were observed. About 200 third instar larvae irradiated with 0, 10, 30, 50,70 dan 90 Gy and the number and quality of the pupae developed were then observed. The results showed that the eggs irradiated with tested dosage did not reduce its viability however it reduced the survival of larvae emerged. Number of pupae produced from 0.5 ml irradiated eggs were reduced from 2740 pupae to 407, 167, 113, 53 and 44 pupae, besides the pupation delayed up to three days. Irradiation on third instars larvae did not reduce its pupation, since pupae were developed from > 85 % of irradiated larvae. However, irradiation did reduced the fly emergence from the pupae. Irradiated hosts for Biosteres sp and Opius sp can be produced by irradiating eggs however it should be evaluated since the survival rate of the larvae reduced. Irradiation of third instar larvae may produce irradiated host for Opius sp So, the use of irradiated eggs or irradiated larvae as host in the colonization of the parasitoids will insure no hosts emerged as adult. However it remain to be proved whether irradiated hosts are prefered and able to support the life of parasitoid. (author)

  8. Immunization with irradiated larvae against Dictyocaulus filaria in young lambs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhar, D.N.; Sharma, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    In the lungworm-endemic areas of Kashmir, 6-10 week old lambs of Karnah and Kashmir Merino breeds were vaccinated with two doses of 50 kR gamma-irradiated larvae of Dictyocaulus filaria, given a month apart. Assessed on the basis of reduced prevalence and significantly lower faecal larval output over an eight-month observation period, vaccinated lambs showed a high degree of resistance to naturally acquired D. filaria infection. The results also show that vaccination against D. filaria provided some degree of protection against infection with other lungworm species.

  9. Immunization with irradiated larvae against Dictyocaulus filaria in young lambs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhar, D.N.; Sharma, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    In the lungworm-endemic areas of Kashmir, 6-10 week old lambs of Karnah and Kashmir Merino breeds were vaccinated with two doses of 50 kR gamma-irradiated larvae of Dictyocaulus filaria, given a month apart. Assessed on the basis of reduced prevalence and significantly lower faecal larval output over an eight-month observation period, vaccinated lambs showed a high degree of resistance to naturally acquired D. filaria infection. The results also show that vaccination against D. filaria provided some degree of protection against infection with other lungworm species. (Auth.)

  10. Effect of electronic beam irradiation on last instar larvae of lasioderma serricorne fabricius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yuntang; Guo Dongquan; Lu Xiaohua; Zhang Jianwei; Yang Baoan; Du Yueguang; Liu Jiangyu; Tian Zhanjun; Zhang Xiaoyan

    2010-01-01

    The electronic beam irradiation effects on the last instar larvae of cigarette beetle (Lasioderma serricorne Fabricius) in tobacco were studied, and the mortality in 42 days, lethal time, pupation rate, emergence rate and reproductive capacity after irradiation were measured. The results showed that the mortality increased with the increase of irradiation dosage, but the larvae did not dead immediately. The last instar larvae irradiated by the dosages higher than 480 Gy could prevent the development of larvae to adults. No new generation was found after 300 Gy treatment of the last instar larvae. So 300 Gy irradiation could be considered as a suitable dose to prevent the reproduction of cigarette beetle of the last instar larvae in the tobacco. (authors)

  11. Infectivity and development of X-irradiated third-stage larvae of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiu, Yoshinori

    1989-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis third-stage larvae were exposed to less than 10Krad of X-radiation and then given orally to white rats to examine the effects of X-radiation on infectivity and development of the irradiated third-stage larvae and on fecundity of adults developing from the irradiated third-stage larvae. The deleterious effects of X-radiation were observed at relatively lower dosage in the above three parameters. A degree in susceptibility on X-radiation was shown to be radiation-dose-dependent. Comparing to the irradiation of larvae in vitro, the irradiation of larvae in snails caused less deleterious effects at the same dose of X-irradiation. Application of X-radiation to food hygiene was also discussed. (author)

  12. Irradiation effect of electronic beam on older larvae of Lasioderma serricorne (Fabricius)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yuntang; Guo Dongquan; Zhang Jianwei; Yang Baoan

    2010-01-01

    Cigarette beetle [ Lasioderma serricorne (Fabricius) ] is an important pest of stored tobacco distributing over the world, and it is also one of the most serious pests in the tobacco warehouse. The larvae is the most serious detriment in the four states of cigarette beetle. The objective of this study was to control the damage on tobacco from cigarette beetle. The irradiation effects of electronic beam on the older larvae of cigarette beetle in tobacco were studied. The results showed that the older larvae irradiated by the doses higher than 480 Gy could prevent the development to adults; and no new generation was found after 300 Gy irradiation for older larvae. Thus 300Gy irradiation could prevent the reproduction of cigarette beetle for the older larvae in the tobacco. (authors)

  13. Effects of irradiation on the biology of the infective larvae of Toxocara canis in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga, O.O.; Myser, W.C.

    1987-02-01

    Mice were infected with either 2000 normal or irradiated embryonated eggs of Toxocara canis and the number of larvae in their livers, lungs, brains, and carcasses investigated at 5, 20, and 33 days of infection. Mortality of mice infected with normal eggs was 33% between day 4 and 8 postinfection but there was no mortality among mice infected with irradiated eggs. Irradiation with 60, 90, or 150 kr of X-rays inhibited the migration of larvae from the livers and lungs and their accumulation in brain and carcass in proportion to the irradiation dose. By day 33 of infection, the ratio of larvae in liver and lungs to larvae in brain and carcass was 0.16 in normal mice, 0.42 in 60-kr mice, 0.98 in 90-kr mice, and 23.3 in 150-kr mice. Irradiated larvae, particularly those migrating through the peritoneal cavity, died faster than normal larvae until day 20. Irradiation favored survival after day 20. By days 20 and 33 postinfection the total parasite load was 29% and 8%, respectively, of the administered dose in control mice, 18% and 12% in 60-kr mice, 8% and 4% in 90-kr mice, and 0.9% and 0.3% in 150-kr mice. Irradiation of infective T. canis larvae, then, reduces their pathogenicity, inhibits their migration from liver and lungs, kills some of the parasites during the first 3 weeks of infection, but favors their late survival in the host.

  14. Influence of UV-irradiation on the nauplius larvae of the barnacle Chthamalus sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Masayuki; Nagayama, Shougo; Kawabe, Atsushi; Yamashita, Keiji.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of UV-irradiation on the nauplius larvae of the barnacle and to use this as the basis for researching the possibility of UV-irradiation as a new method for anti-macrofouling control. The nauplius larvae in the petri dishes were exposed to UV-irradiation (λ max = 253.7 nm), then the larval states and behaviour were observed. UV-intensisties were 3.0 mW·cm -2 -7.0 mW·cm -2 and the exposure time was 15 sec -10 min. The water in the petri dishes was changed intermittently but the larvae were not fed. The results were as follows: 1) UV-irradiation may have a delayed lethal effect and metamorphosis-inhibitory effect on the nauplius larvae. 2) The lethal effect of the sum of the dosages of UV on the larvae may nearly equate each other despite differences in each UV-intensity. 3) Within ca. 72 hr, 100 % of UV-irradiated larvae were dead with the dosage of at least 672 mW·sec·cm -2 and were incapable of swimming with the dosage of at least 168 mW·sec·cm -2 . 4) UV-irradiated larvae could not exuviate with the dosage of at least 246 mW·sec·cm -2 and could only exuviate with the dosage of 45 mW·sec·cm -2 . 5) After UV-irradiation even the 'actively swimming' larvae may have suffered some sort of physiological damage. (author)

  15. Studies on immunization with irradiated larvae against dictyocaulus filaria in guinea-pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akyol, F.; Cerci, H.; Duzgun, A.

    1986-01-01

    In this study, 32 guinea-pigs were immunized orally with two doses of infective D. filaria attenuated by exposure to 40 krad (group I) and 50 krad (group II) of Cs-137 source at 15 days interval. The first dose was administrated as 1000 larvae and the second was 2000 larvae. After 15 days of the second infection they were challenged with 5000 non-irradiated infective larvae. Eight guinea-pigs were used as control (group III). The control group received the challenge only. The controls developed signs of lungworm disease and 3 animals died after 10 days of challenge. The vaccinated animals showed no clinical signs. All of the surviving animals were killed 12 days after challenge and their lungs were carefully examined for detailed parasitological and pathomorphological examinations. At autopsy, an average of 91 worms was recovered from the lungs of control groups. Four worms recovered from animals given larvae irradiated at 40 krad and the pathological changes were the lightest in this group. It was established that gamma rays at 50 krad attenuated infective larvae of D. filaria to such a degree that their administration did not cause any serious pathomorphological effect in the lungs of the animals. A higher degree of protection against challenge with infective D. filaria larvae was confered on the guinea-pigs by double dose of irradiated larvae. (auhtor)

  16. Effect of irradiation and cystamine on the secondary induction of cornea in anura larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, D.V.; Starodubov, S.M.

    1977-01-01

    Secondary induction of cornea in the transplanted skin has been studied in amphibian larvae after the effect of irradiation and cystamine on the recipients and donors. Comparison of the results obtained with those reported earlier has demonstrated that the irradiated tissue is more responsive to inductive effects than the intact one

  17. Studies with normal and gamma irradiated third stage larvae of Oesophagostomum columbianum in lambs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.L.; Dhar, D.N.

    1979-01-01

    Results of work on the host-parasite relationship of Oesophagostomum columbianum in sheep, carried out at the Regional Centre, Srinagar, are presented. Primary infections with small numbers of O. columbianum third larvae in lambs caused establishment of more adult worms in the intestine. As the number of larvae administered to lambs in primary infections was increased, a significant decrease in the establishment of adult worms in the intestine was observed. Higher levels of primary infections in lambs resulted in stunting of both male and female adult worms in intestine but this did not affect the resultant egg production by the worms. The severity of the disease in lambs was directly related to the number of larvae administered in primary infections. Attenuation of the third stage larvae of O.columbianum was obtained when they were irradiated at 40 and 50 Krad doses from a gamma source. Whereas it was possible to stimulate only a partial protection in young lambs to O. columbianum with a single dose of 2000, 40 Krad irradiated larvae. Vaccination with the same numbers of larvae, but irradiated at 50 Krad failed to protect the animals. The presence of adult worms of O.columbianum in sites outside the intestine in lambs has been reported for the first time. (auth.)

  18. Development of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) larvae after gamma irradiation of eggs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, V.K.; Sethi, G.R.; Garg, A.K.

    1990-01-01

    Development of Rust-red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum larvae, after gamma irradiation of eggs of two different age groups was studied. Results indicated that, if 2 to 3 day old eggs were irradiated with 6 Krad, the development of larvae emerging from such eggs is completely arrested at the end of 18 days after hatching. In case of comparatively older eggs (3 to 4 day old), 8 Krad dose of gamma radiation was required to produce the similar results. However, treatment with 10 Krad resulted in 100 per cent egg mortality in both the age groups. The studies thus reveal that survival of the larvae depends not only on the radiation dose and the time period elapsed after irradiation but also on the age of eggs at the time of exposure. (author). 9 refs., 1 tab

  19. Effect of gamma radiation on the Mediterranean flour moth, Ephestia Kuehniella, mature larvae and acceptability of irradiated larvae by Bracon hebetor females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, M.

    2011-06-01

    Mediterranean flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella, mature 5 t h instar larvae were exposed to gamma radiation dosages ranging from 50-350 Gy at 50 Gy increment and the effects of gamma radiation on pupation, adult emergence and sex ratio were investigated. In addition, effects of irradiation on the rate of development to pupae and adults and the acceptance of irradiated larvae by B. hebetor females were examined. Results showed that the radio-sensitivity of E. kuehniella larvae increased with increasing dose. Pupation was significantly affected at 100 Gy dose, and completely prevented at 350 Gy dose. Adult emergence was only slightly different from pupation; emergence was significantly affected at 100 Gy dose and completely prevented at 300 Gy dose. Irradiation also negatively affected the rate of development of larvae to pupae and adults. While more than 98% of control larvae pupated within 10 days of treatment, this ratio decreased to about 79% in larvae exposed to 50 Gy and less than 4% in larvae exposed to 100 Gy dose. The rate of development to the adult stage was also similarly affected. While 97% of control insects emerged as adults in the 1st 20 days of treatment, this ratio decreased to about 53, 2 and zero percent in larvae exposed to 50, 100 and 150 Gy dose respectively. In addition, irradiation significantly affected male: female ratio; sex ratio was skewed in favor of males, and at 250 Gy dose all emerged moths were males. Furthermore, irradiation had no adverse effect on the degree of acceptance of mature larvae to parasitization; irradiated insects were as acceptable to B. hebetor females as unirradiated ones. (author)

  20. Effect of gamma radiation on the Mediterranean flour moth, Ephestia Kuehniella, mature larvae and acceptability of irradiated larvae by Bracon hebetor female

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, M.

    2012-01-01

    Mediterranean flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella, mature 5 t h instar larvae were exposed to gamma radiation dosages ranging from 50-350 Gy at 50 Gy increment and the effects of gamma radiation on pupation, adult emergence and sex ratio were investigated. In addition, effects of irradiation on the rate of development to pupae and adults and the acceptance of irradiated larvae by B. hebetor females were examined. Results showed that the radio-sensitivity of E. kuehniella larvae increased with increasing dose. Pupation was significantly affected at 100 Gy dose, and completely prevented at 350 Gy dose. Adult emergence was only slightly different from pupation; emergence was significantly affected at 100 Gy dose and completely prevented at 300 Gy dose. Irradiation also negatively affected the rate of development of larvae to pupae and adults. While more than 98% of control larvae pupated within 10 days of treatment, this ratio decreased to about 79% in larvae exposed to 50 Gy and less than 4% in larvae exposed to 100 Gy dose. The rate of development to the adult stage was also similarly affected. While 97% of control insects emerged as adults in the 1st 20 days of treatment, this ratio decreased to about 53, 2 and zero percent in larvae exposed to 50, 100 and 150 Gy dose respectively. In addition, irradiation significantly affected male: female ratio; sex ratio was skewed in favor of males, and at 250 Gy dose all emerged moths were males. Furthermore, irradiation had no adverse effect on the degree of acceptance of mature larvae to parasitization; irradiated insects were as acceptable to B. hebetor females as unirradiated ones. (author)

  1. An appraisal of certain larval behavioural activities as affected by gamma irradiation of Spodoptera larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, R.K.; Sehgal, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    Gamma irradiation of Spodoptera litura larvae induced an abatement in their locomotor activity. The food perception range and feeding behaviour of the larvae were also impaired. Of various dosages tested, 4 Krad (the sterilizing dose for larvae) caused a decline in locomotor speed. The first instar larvae, for instance showed decline in a speed of 3.74 cm/min to 2.96 cm/min. Similarly at this dose, the third instar larvae exhibited a reduction in speed to the extent of 38 to 45 per cent, the normal speed being 8.02 cm/min. The reactive distances of the first and third instar normal larvae were 5.30 cm and 7.36, respectively. This reactive distance was reduced by about 25 per cent after irradiation at 4 Krad, thus decreasing the food perception capacity significantly. The feeding behaviour too was significantly affected whereas the dose range less than 4 Krad did not induce such a marked impact. (author). 9 refs., 2 tables

  2. Influence of irradiation on development of Caribbean fruit fly (diptera: tephritidae) larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nation, J.L.; Milne, K.; Dykstra, T.M.

    1995-01-01

    Larvae of the Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa (Loew), were irradiated at hatching with 0, 5, 10, 20, 50, 75, 100 and 150 Gy doses from a Cesium-137 source and dissected for measurements of the supraesophageal ganglion (brain) and proventriculus (B/Prv) as mature third instars. Cross-sectional area of a plane through the brain and proventriculus, and simple dorsal width measurements of the two organs were evaluated as indicators of radiation exposure. Brain area, brain width, and brain/proventriculus (B/Prv) ratios were significantly different from controls in insects treated with a dose ≥20 Gy. Detailed dissections of hatching larvae exposed to 50 Gy revealed reductions in brain growth, small and misshapen compound eye and leg imaginal disks, and a ventral nerve cord that was elongated and sinuous. Larvae irradiated on the 1st d of each of the three instars had smaller brains, with the percentage of reduction in brain size being greater the younger the larvae were at the time of exposure. Brain and proventriculus measurements and calculated B/Prv values are indicative of irradiation in Caribbean fruit fly larvae, but the procedure may not be adaptable for routine use by quarantine inspectors. 14 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Effects of gamma irradiation on the grape vine moth, Lobesia botrana, mature larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, M.; Al-Attar, J.

    2014-01-01

    Mature 5th instars of the grape vine moth, Lobesia botrana (Denis and Schiffermuller) were exposed to gamma radiation dosages ranging from 50 to 250 Gy. The effects of gamma radiation on pupation, adult emergence, sex ratio and rate of development were examined. Results showed that the radiosensitivity of the grape vine moth larvae increased with increasing radiation dose. The severity of the effect, however, depends on the criterion used for measuring effectiveness; adult emergence was more severely affected than pupation. Pupation was significantly affected at 150 Gy and decreased by about 25% at 250 Gy. Adult emergence, on the other hand, was significantly affected at 100 Gy and completely prevented at 200 Gy. Probit analysis of dose mortality data for pupation and adult emergence show that the LD 99 for preventing subsequent development to pupae and adults was 2668 and 195 Gy, respectively. In addition, the rate of development of mature larvae to the adult stage was negatively affected and sex ratio was skewed in favor of males. - Highlights: • Effects of gamma irradiation on Lobesia botrana mature larvae are examined. • Results showed that a dose of 200 Gy was sufficient to prevent adult emergence from mature larvae. • This dose (200 Gy) is less than the suggested generic phytosanitary irradiation dose of 250 Gy for Lepidopteran larvae. • The dose is also much lower than the maximum allowed dose for irradiation of fresh fruits and vegetables

  4. Attempts at immunization against Malayan filariasis using X-irradiated infective larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, C.P.

    1975-01-01

    Recent studies on immunity to helminthic infections have shown that some degree of protective immunity may be stimulated by inoculations of attenuated living worms or their metabolites. Although much on these lines has been done with several helminths, little if any has been done with filarial infections in general. Experiments were designed to observe the effects of attempted immunization in the rhesus monkey as well as the domestic cat by the use of attenuated infective larvae of Brugia malayi. The sub-periodic strain of Brugia malayi, the major filarial parasite of man in Malaysia, maintained in the laboratory on experimentally infected cats and rhesus monkeys were used for the preparation of X-irradiated vaccines as well as for challenge inoculations. Third-stage infective larvae of Brugia malayi were obtained from experimentally fed Aedes togoi mosquitoes. Infective larvae were irradiated by X-rays, using a Dermopan X-ray unit at exposures between 10 - 40 kR. Rhesus monkeys and cats were inoculated twice with 100 - 400 attenuated larvae per inoculation at 2 week intervals and challenged about a month later by inoculation of 100 normal larvae. Control animals for each vaccination dose as well as for challenge doses were maintained. In rhesus monkeys persistent immunity to challenge infections (expressed as failure to cause microfilaraemia) were obtained in animals vaccinated with 200 infective larvae attenuated by X-irradiation at 20000 R. Encouraged with the results obtained on rhesus monkeys, similar experiments on an enlarged scale using varying strengths of the vaccines were carried out on the domestic cat, which is a more receptive animal host for Brugia malayi. However, all cats vaccinated when challenged came down with patent infection indicating lack of any definite immunity. In all these experiments, results of vaccine control animals showed that inoculation of irradiated larvae was not followed by the infection of microfilaria in the blood, indicating

  5. Effect of infection by irradiated Trichinella Spirals larvae on mice and assessment the role of Al bendazole in treating them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moawad, M.A.F.; Amin, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of infection with irradiated Trichinella Spiralis larvae on mice and to asses the role of albendazole in treating them. This study included parasitological and histopathological studies on mice infected with irradiated Trichinella Spiralis larvae in comparison with mice infected with non-irradiated Trichinella Spiralis only or with mice treated after infection by albendazole. The obtained data revealed that, in mice infected with irradiated Trichinella Spiralis larvae (50 Krad or 80 Krad), the number and length of worms in the small intestine, as well as, the number of encysted larvae in muscles of mice, especially diaphragm and tongue, were significantly decreased. Also, using al bendazole 24 hours after infection with irradiated larvae lead to high significant decrease in all the previously mentioned parameters

  6. Susceptibility of irradiated Galleria mellonella F1Larvae to Entomopathogenic Nematodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, H.M.; Rizk, S.A.; Sayed, R.M.; Hussein, M.A; Hafez, S.E

    2008-01-01

    Combined effect of substerilizing doses of gamma radiation (40 and 100 Gy) and different concentrations of entomopathogenic nematodes (20, 40, 60, and 80 IJs) on the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella was studied. The 4th larval instar resulted from irradiated male parent pupae mated with normal female were tested for susceptibility to Heterorhabditis bacteriophora BA1 and Steinernema carpocapsae BA2. The mortality rate of the larvae increased by increrasing radiation dose and nematode concentrations. The reproduction of both nematode strains decreased significantly with increasing the treatments (radiation dose and nematode concentrations). In addition, exposure to gamma radiation and entomopathogenic nematodes significantly decreased the total haemocyte count (THC) of the larvae with increasing radiation doses (40 and 100 Gy) and both nematode strains concentrations (20 and 40 IJs) and reached the minimal count at the combiend effect. Finally, larvae were more susceptible to Steinernema carpocapsa than Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. (author)

  7. The role of thresholds in the response of lambs to vaccination with irradiated Trichostrongylus colubriformis larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windon, R.G.; Dineen, J.K.; Gregg, P.; Donald, A.D.; Griffiths, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    A piecewise logarithmic model fitted to worm counts of ewe lambs vaccinated and challenged in pens with a range of doses of irradiated and normal Trichostrongylus colubriformis larvae respectively, indicated that the threshold for response to both vaccine (V 0 =4400) and challenge dose is exceeded by 5000 larvae. Whereas response was vaccine dose dependent, it was independent of challenge dose. Ram lambs vaccinated at low dose levels were as resistant against challenge as ewe lambs, but by contrast, failed to show increased protection after vaccination with high doses of irradiated larvae. Serum titre of antiworm complement-fixing antibodies at the time of challenge also indicated that ram lambs were less responsive immunologically than ewe lambs following vaccination at the higher dose levels. A field study showed that response to vaccination was only apparent after transfer of the sheep to heavily contaminated pastures, suggesting that previous exposure of the vaccinated animals to the low dose of infective larvae available on a lightly contaminated pasture constituted a challenge which was below the threshold. (author)

  8. Influence of X-rays on oogenesis in Tilapia mossambica. 3. Irradiation of 20 days old larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmilevskij, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Tilapia mossambica Peters larvae of 20 days old after hatching were irradiated with a dose of 350 R. Gonads recovery in irradiated fishes began from the age of 95 days; anatomic sexual differentiation in gonads delayed; death of developing oocytes was noted: gonads development in the irradiated fishes of 144 days old was sharply suppressed, some fishes were sterile

  9. Effect of Vaccination with Irradiated Third Stage Larvae of Haemonchus Contortus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beriajaya; Sukardji, P.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of vaccination with irradiated third stage larvae of Haemonchus contortus on immune responses in sheep. A number of 15 young male thin-tail sheep freed of worms were divided into 3 groups of 5. The first group was vaccinated with 50.000 irradiated third larvae of H. contortus . The second group was vaccinated as group 1 but without challenged. The third group was not vaccinated but challenged as group 1. Observations were carried out on egg counts, worn counts, total serum protein and antibody titer against H. contortus. The results showed there was no significant differences (P>0.05) on egg counts, worn counts and antibody titer, but a significant difference was seen on value of serum protein between vaccinated group and non vaccinated group. The results showed no protective immunity which is showed in worn counts of vaccinated and non vaccinated groups. Key word: Haemonchus contortus, irradiated larvae, sheep, vaccine

  10. Effects of irradiation to larvae of Bombyx mori in relation to nutritional conditions and to moulting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulon, M.

    1976-01-01

    Silkworms (Bombyx mori) were exposed to irradiation in the 1st and 2nd larval instars. The effects, as indicated by mortality or by failure to moult, were studied in relation to a period of starvation (24 hours at 22deg). Before the initiation of feeding, in either instar, the larvae were very resistant to irradiation and fasting did not modify this resistance. Probably this was due to physiological quiescence. After the initiation of feeding, the interposition of a fast either augmented or decreased radiation tolerance, probably according to the phase of the physiological cycle involving feeding and moulting

  11. Effect of X-ray irradiation on morphophysiological reactions of epidermal melanophor cells in the larvae of Rana temporaria L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, D.V.; Kalistratova, E.N.; Kaluzhina, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    Dynamics of physiological reactions of epidermal melanophors of larvae Rana temporaria L.. adapted to white and black backgrounds and irradiated with a dose of 700 R has been investigated. Ouring the first day after irradiation no day changes of melanophor index characteristic of intact tadpoles were discovered in whitebackground animals; melanophors preserve the aggregation state. Comparison of black background irradiated and control larvae didn't show confident differences in changes of their melanophor indices. Irradiation affects differently epidermal melanophors in the state of pigment dispersion and aggregation. It is suggested that pigment dispersion and aggregation in melanophor is realized at the expense of different cellular structures. It is shown that by the end of the experiment (21-st day) the amount of epidermal melanophor per surface unit is two times larger in black-ground larvae. General biological signaficance of revealed facts from the point of view of ontogenesis evolution is discussed

  12. The effect of irradiation and hydration upon the mechanical properties of tendon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.W.; Kearney, J.N.

    1996-01-01

    Irradiation sterilization is in wide use among tissue banks, for both hard and soft tissue grafts. Irradiation of tendon can impair its mechanical properties. Following implantation of a tendon graft, re-vascularization and resorption processes reduce its mechanical performance. Tendon with severely impaired properties may not be suitable for use as a load-bearing graft, e.g. as anterior cruciate ligament replacement. An important factor determining the extent of the reduction of the mechanical performance is the condition of the tendon during irradiation, especially the presence of water. There has not yet been a study of the effects of both irradiation dose and hydration on tendon mechanical properties. This study measured the changes in tensile mechanical properties, including strength and stiffness, following γ irradiation doses of 15 kGy (1.5 MRad) and 25 kGy irradiated tendons was lower compared to fresh tendons, whereas the strength of the frozen irradiated tendons was very similar to that of the fresh. The tangent modulus of both of the freeze-dried irradiated groups were lower than the fresh tendons, as was the 15 kGy frozen group. The modulus of the 25 kGy frozen irradiated group was similar to the fresh. The general pattern of the results indicate that the two freeze-dried tendon groups were more affected than the frozen irradiated, and of the frozen irradiated groups the 25 kGy group was least affected. The results fit well with suggested mechanisms for the action of irradiation upon collagen; that intramolecular crosslinking and scission of the tropocollagen α chains occur when water is present, and α chain scission alone occurs when water is absent. Irradiation of tendons for use as grafts may produce minimal deleterious changes if the irradiation is performed while the tendon is frozen with water present. (Author)

  13. Effects of gamma irradiation on larvae development of Monochamns altevnatus hope in packing wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wentuan; Zhong Guohua; Hu Meiying; Chen Xiaofan; Luo Zijuan; Pan Guoqi

    2006-01-01

    Effects of gamma irradiation on Monochamns altevnatus Hope larvae were studied. The results showed that mortality of Monchamns altevnatus Hope on the 21 st day reached over 90% by a dose of 500 Gy treatment. The pupating rate decreased below 10% with the dose higher than 400 Gy, while the abnormal pupae began to appear at this dose, and there are no eclosion at 450 Gy. The relationship between death rate and absorbed dose could be described by dose-response curve for tested pest. (authors)

  14. Blood biochemical changes in lambs infected with normal and gamma irradiated third stage larvae of Dictyocaulus filaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, T.K.; Dhar, D.N.; Bansal, G.C.; Sharma, R.L. (Indian Veterinary Research Inst., Srinagar (India). Regional Centre)

    1984-09-01

    Primary infections with normal third stage larvae of Dictyocaulus filaria at a dose of 150 1/kg caused significant decrease in the levels of haemoglobin, blood glucose, serum total proteins, serum albumin, albumin/globulin ratio and increase in levels of total globulins and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in lambs. Almost similar changes in the above blood constituents excepting for haemoglobin, blood glucose and LDH activity were noticed in lambs immunised with two doses of gamma irradiation larvae and subsequently challenged with normal larvae of D. filaria at a dose of 150 1/kg. In both the infected groups, serum calcium, inorganic phosphorus, malate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase activities were, however, not affected.

  15. Electron migration in hydrated biopolymers following pulsed irradiation at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lith, D. van.

    1987-01-01

    Charge migration in biopolymer-water mixtures and the effect of water concentration on the charge migration is investigated by measuring the electrical conductivity and the light emission with the pulse radiolysis technique. A preliminary account of the microwave conductivity observed in hydrated DNA and collagen at low temperature after pulsed irradiation is given. The results show that when hydrated DNA or collagen are irradiated at low temperatures, conductivity transients with microsecond lifetime are observed. It is tentatively concluded that these transients are due to the highly mobile dry electron. The effect of water concentration on mobility, lifetime and migration distance of the electron is discussed. The effect of additives to the hydrated systems on the behaviour of the electron is described. It is shown that the observed effects of the additives confirm the earlier conclusions that the dry electron is the species responsible for the radiation induced conductivity. The water concentration in the DNA- and collagen-systems could be varied only between zero and approximately fifty percent, due to inhomogeneities which occur at higher water concentrations. Experiments on gelatin, a biopolymer which forms homogeneous samples with levels of hydration varying from almost zero to 100% water (ice) are described. Both the radiation induced and the dark microwave conductivity have been studied as a function of water content. Preliminary results of a study of the light emission from pulse irradiated DNA-water mixtures are reported in an attempt to establish a relation between the observed electron migration and the formation of excited states via charge neutralization. (Auth.)

  16. Effect of X-rays on oogenesis of Tilapia mossambica Peters 2. Irradiation of 15 days old larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmilevskij, D.A. (Leningradskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR). Biologicheskij Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst.)

    1982-07-01

    Tilapia larvae of 15 days old after hatching were exposed to x-rays at a dose of 350 R and gonad state in fishes of up to 120 days old was studied. The largest part of sex cells was perished in fishes of 20-30 days old. At the age of 60 days the process of gonad recovery began in consequence of which the number of sex cells in experimental fishes till the end of experiment (fishes of 120 days old after hatching) was the same as in control fishes of the same age. However, unlike the experiment with irradiation of larvae of 6 days old, during irradiation of larvae of 15 days old there was no complete recovery of gonads-oocytes of the irradiated fishes didn't reach the stage of oocyte development under control.

  17. Effect of X-rays on oogenesis of Telapia mossambica Peters 2. Irradiation of 15 days old larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmilevskij, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    Tilapia larvae of 15 days old after hatching were exposed to x-rays at a dose of 350 R and gonad state in fishes of up to 120 days old was studied. The largest part of sex cells was perished in fishes of 20-30 days old. At the age of 60 days the process of gonad recovery began in consequence of which the number of sex cells in experimetnal fishes tall the end of experiment (fishes of 120 days old after hatching) was the same as in control fishes of the same age. However, unlike the experiment with irradiation of larvae of 6 days old, during irradiation of larvae of 15 days old there was no complete recovery of gonads-oocutes of the irradiated fishes didn't reach the stage of oocyte development under control

  18. Control age - and irradiation-induced seed deterioration in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) by hydration-dehydration treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punjabi, Bina; Basu, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    Hydration-dehydration treatment of stored lettuce seed (1-year-old, medium-vigour), greatly slowed down their deterioration during subsequent storage under accelerated and natural ageing conditions. Hydration-dehydration of seeds, before or soon after X- and γ-irradiation, considerably minimized the adverse effect of irradiation on the development of biological after-effects responsible for the fall in germinibility, especially the large reduction of root growth of seedlings. Pre- and post-irradiation treatments gave broadly similar effects. The results have been discussed in terms of a possible involvement of a cellular (biochemical) repair mechanism in the hydration phase and also on the basis of a physico-chemical control of free radical pathology in the aged and irradiated seed. (author)

  19. Control age - and irradiation-induced seed deterioration in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. ) by hydration-dehydration treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punjabi, B; Basu, R N [University Coll. of Agriculture, Calcutta (India)

    1982-04-01

    Hydration-dehydration treatment of stored lettuce seed (1-year-old, medium-vigour), greatly slowed down their deterioration during subsequent storage under accelerated and natural ageing conditions. Hydration-dehydration of seeds, before or soon after X- and ..gamma..-irradiation, considerably minimized the adverse effect of irradiation on the development of biological after-effects responsible for the fall in germinibility, especially the large reduction of root growth of seedlings. Pre- and post-irradiation treatments gave broadly similar effects. The results have been discussed in terms of a possible involvement of a cellular (biochemical) repair mechanism in the hydration phase and also on the basis of a physico-chemical control of free radical pathology in the aged and irradiated seed.

  20. Combined use of gamma irradiation and the bioinsecticide, DIPEL 2X, in controlling larvae of the indian meal moth, ''Plodia interpunctella'' (Huebner) (''Lepidipthera phycitidae'')

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatowicz, S.

    1996-01-01

    The bioinsecticide DIPEL 2X irradiated with doses of gamma radiation up to 2.0 kGy preserves its insecticidal efficiency against larvae of the Indian meal moth, ''Plodia interpunctella'' (Huebner). The amount of DIPEL 2X-treated food taken in by larvae irradiated with 0.1-0.7 kGy is sufficient for bringing about the death of these larvae. (author). 20 refs, 8 figs, 3 tabs

  1. Revealing the Effect of Irradiation on Cement Hydrates: Evidence of a Topological Self-Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, N M Anoop; Wang, Bu; Sant, Gaurav; Phillips, James C; Bauchy, Mathieu

    2017-09-20

    Despite the crucial role of concrete in the construction of nuclear power plants, the effects of radiation exposure (i.e., in the form of neutrons) on the calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H, i.e., the glue of concrete) remain largely unknown. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we systematically investigate the effects of irradiation on the structure of C-S-H across a range of compositions. Expectedly, although C-S-H is more resistant to irradiation than typical crystalline silicates, such as quartz, we observe that radiation exposure affects C-S-H's structural order, silicate mean chain length, and the amount of molecular water that is present in the atomic network. By topological analysis, we show that these "structural effects" arise from a self-organization of the atomic network of C-S-H upon irradiation. This topological self-organization is driven by the (initial) presence of atomic eigenstress in the C-S-H network and is facilitated by the presence of water in the network. Overall, we show that C-S-H exhibits an optimal resistance to radiation damage when its atomic network is isostatic (at Ca/Si = 1.5). Such an improved understanding of the response of C-S-H to irradiation can pave the way to the design of durable concrete for radiation applications.

  2. Hydration effect on ion exchange resin irradiated by swift heavy ions and gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughattas, I.; Labed, V.; Gerenton, A.; Ngono-Ravache, Y.; Dannoux-Papin, A.

    2018-06-01

    Gamma radiolysis of ion exchange resins (IER) is widely studied since the sixties, as a function of different parameters (resin type, dose, atmosphere, water content …). However, to our knowledge, there are very few data concerning hydrogen emission from anionic and cationic resins irradiated at high Linear Energy Transfers (LET). In the present work, we focus on the influence of hydration on hydrogen emission, in anionic and cationic resins irradiated under inert atmosphere using Swift Heavy Ions (SHI) and gamma irradiations. The radiation chemical yield of molecular hydrogen is nonlinear with water content for both resins. The molecular hydrogen production depends first on the water form in IER (free or linked) and second on the solubility of degradation products. Three steps have been observed: at lower water content where G(H2) is stable, at 50%, G(H2) increases due to reactions between water radiolytic species and the resin functional groups and at high water content, G(H2) decreases probably due to its accumulation in water and its consumption by hydroxyl radicals in the supernatant.

  3. Histopathological effects of Bacillus Thuringiensis and gamma irradiation on F1 Larvae of the greater Wax Moth, Galleria Mellonella L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, H.F.; Mikhaiel, A.A.; Abul-Fadl, H.A.

    2006-01-01

    Full grown male pupae of the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella L., were gamma irradiated with 50, 100, 200, 300 and 400 Gy. The resulting F1 larvae were treated at the fourth instar with different concentrations (0, 5, 10, 20, and 40 %) of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt.) var. kurstaki. Combined effects of the two doses of gamma radiation (50 and 100 Gy) and / or Bt. (LC 50 ) on certain biological aspects in addition to histological effects on larval mid gut were studied. The obtained results indicated that Bt. or irradiation treatments either alone or in combination decreased the number of F1 larvae that reached the adult stage as compared to the control. Also, the reduction in survived individuals was obvious at dose level 400 Gy than 50, 100 and 200 Gy (the lower doses). The larval mortality, percent pupation, percent emergence and adult survival were decreased gradually by increasing the concentration of Bt. especially at the combined treatments. The sex ratio was altered in favour of males at either Bt. and / or irradiation treatments. Certain histological changes through longitudinal sections of the mid gut of F1 larvae due to irradiation and / or Bt. treatments were detected. The damage of tissues was increased by increasing the dose of irradiation and / or concentration of Bt. The cytoplasmic extrusion was appeared as the apical margin of cells as a confluent mass and the muscular layers were broken in some parts, large amount of secretions was released in the lumen of the mid gut while a few amounts were attached to the apical margin of the cells. Much destruction of the mid gut took place when the Bt. treatments were combined with gamma irradiation where large number of epithelial cells became vacuolated and the cytoplasm was appeared as confluent masses because of the hydropic analysis of the epithelium

  4. Effects of gamma irradiation on the emergence of larvae of curculio sikkimensis (Heller) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Cydia kurokoi (Amsel) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Taro; Todoriki, Setsuko; Miyanoshita, Akihiro; Hayashi, Toru

    2004-01-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation on the emergence of larvae of the chestnut weevil, Curculio sikkimensis (Heller), were investigated. One hundred chestnuts were irradiated in a 60 Co irradiator (Gammacell 220, Nordion, Canada) at a dose rate of 0.40 kGy/h. The doses at which irradiation was carried out were 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 1000 Gy. After treatment, the chestnuts were kept at 25degC, 70% RH and emerged larvae were counted daily. Larvae of the nut fruit moth, Cydia kurokoi (Amsel), also emerged from the chestnuts. The data on the chestnut weevil were subjected to probit analysis and the LD 99.9 of weevil larvae was estimated to be about 500 Gy. (author)

  5. X-irradiation effects on growth and metamorphosis of gastropod larvae (Crepidula fornicata): A model for environmental radiation teratogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, L.; Lord, A.; Pechenik, J.; Kase, K.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Greenberger, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    Little information is available on the effects of x-irradiation on multicellular marine organisms. C. fornicata larvae were irradiated at 200 rad/min, 250 kVp x-rays to doses between 50 and 20,000 rad in a single fraction. Shell length, biomass, metamorphosis to the next stage of development, and mortality were measured. The results demonstrated a dose-dependent decrease in 20 day shell length at doses above 2000 rad (control 850 +- 110 μm length, 820 +- 100μm for 50 rad, 750 +- 30 μm for 2000 rad, 710 +- 30 μm for 5000 rad, 620 +- 30 μm for 10,000 rad, 580 +- 15 μm for 20,000 rad). There was a dose dependent decrease in shell length growth between days 1 and 20. Biomass was significantly decreased per 100μm shell length for doses above 10,000 rad. A significant increase in larvae mortality was detected with doses above 2000 rad. Most significantly, the cumulative percent of larval metamorphosis was significantly decreased by doses as low as 500 rad and was detectable as early as 18 days after irradiation. C. fornicata may provide a very sensitive system in which to study teratogenic effects of x-irradiation on multicellular organisms

  6. X-irradiation effects on growth and metamorphosis of gastropod larvae (Crepidula fornicata): a model for environmental radiation teratogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberger, J S; Pechenik, J; Lord, A; Gould, L; Naparstek, E; Kase, K; FitzGerald, T J

    1986-02-01

    Little information is available on the effects of x-irradiation on the development of multicellular marine organisms. Larvae of the marine gastropod Crepidula fornicata were irradiated at 200 rad/min, 250 kVp X-rays, to doses between 500 and 20,000 rad in a single fraction. During the weeks following exposure, changes in shell length and biomass, incidence of metamorphosis to the juvenile stage of development, and mortality were measured. The results over a 20-day period demonstrated a dose-dependent decrease in growth rate of larval shells following doses above 2000 rad (control at day 20 = 850 +/- 110 ..mu..m length, 820 +/- 11 ..mu..m for 500 rad, 750 +/- 30 ..mu..m for 2000 rad, 710 +/- 30 ..mu..m for 5000 rad, 620 +/- 30 ..mu..m for 10,000 rad, and 580 +/- 15 ..mu..m for 20,000 rad). Shell length-specific biomass was significantly decreased for doses above 10,000 rad. A significant increase in larval mortality was detected with doses above 2000 rad. The cumulative percent of larval metamorphosis was decreased by exposures to 5000 rad and was detectable as early as 18 days after irradiation; however, metamorphosis of larvae after 5000 rad occurred faster by day 21 while other groups metamorphosis required 34-35 days for completion. Crepidula fornicata may provide a very sensitive and convenient system in which to study teratogenic effects of x-irradiation on multicellular organisms.

  7. The effect of sire selection on the response of lambs to vaccination with irradiated Trichostrongylus colubriformis larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dineen, J.K.; Windon, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    Rams selected for responsiveness and unresponsiveness to vaccination with irradiated T. colubriformis larvae at an early age were mated to unselected random bred ewes. Progeny were vaccinated with 20,000 irradiated larvae at 8 and 12 weeks of age, given anthelmintic treatment at 16 weeks and challenged with 20,000 normal larvae at 17 weeks. The results, based on wether worm counts and ewe faecal egg counts, showed significant differences between responder and non-responder progeny. There was a significant correlation between worm counts and faecal egg counts of half-sibs from the same sire group. The occurrence of globule leucocytes was inversely related to worm burdens of wether progeny, however, no clear relationship was found with eosinophils. In vitro lymphocyte stimulation using T. colubriformis L 3 antigen, concanavalin A and lipopolysaccharide showed that statistically defined responder progeny, pooled from both responder and non-responder sire groups, gave higher responses than non-responder lambs after vaccination. The results confirm that genetically-determined factors are involved in the response of lambs to vaccination at an early age, and indicate that rapid genetic progress may be achieved in the type of mating usually carried out under field conditions. (author)

  8. Damage induced by hydroxyl radicals generated in the hydration layer of γ-irradiated frozen aqueous solution of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, Hideki; Matsuda, Akira; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Iida, Yoshiharu.

    1996-01-01

    Aqueous DNA solutions with or without the spin trap α-phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN) were exposed to γ-rays at 77 K. After thawing the solutions, three experiments were carried out to confirm the generation of OH radicals in the hydration layer of DNA and to examine whether they act as an inducer of DNA strand breaks and base alterations. Observation with the EZR-spin tapping method showed ESR signals from PBN-OH adducts in the solution containing PBN and DNA, but there were few signals in the solution containing PBN alone, suggesting that reactive OH radicals were produced in the hydration layer of γ-irradiated DNA and were effectively scavenged by PBN, and that unreactive OH radicals were produced in the free water layer of γ-irradiated DNA. Agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA proved that PBN had no effect on the formation of strand breaks, whereas examination with the high-performance liquid chromatography-eloctrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) method showed that PBN suppressed the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG). From these results it was concluded that OH radicals generated in the hydration layer of γ-irradiated DNA did not induce DNA strand breaks but induced base alterations. (author)

  9. Chronic low-dose γ-irradiation of Drosophila melanogaster larvae induces gene expression changes and enhances locomotive behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Cha Soon; Lee, Byung Sub; Lee, In Kyung; Yang, Kwang Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Nam, Seon Young; Seong, Ki Moon

    2015-01-01

    Although radiation effects have been extensively studied, the biological effects of low-dose radiation (LDR) are controversial. This study investigates LDR-induced alterations in locomotive behavior and gene expression profiles of Drosophila melanogaster. We measured locomotive behavior using larval pupation height and the rapid iterative negative geotaxis (RING) assay after exposure to 0.1 Gy γ-radiation (dose rate of 16.7 mGy/h). We also observed chronic LDR effects on development (pupation and eclosion rates) and longevity (life span). To identify chronic LDR effects on gene expression, we performed whole-genome expression analysis using gene-expression microarrays, and confirmed the results using quantitative real-time PCR. The pupation height of the LDR-treated group at the first larval instar was significantly higher (∼2-fold increase in PHI value, P < 0.05). The locomotive behavior of LDR-treated male flies (∼3 − 5 weeks of age) was significantly increased by 7.7%, 29% and 138%, respectively (P < 0.01), but pupation and eclosion rates and life spans were not significantly altered. Genome-wide expression analysis identified 344 genes that were differentially expressed in irradiated larvae compared with in control larvae. We identified several genes belonging to larval behavior functional groups such as locomotion (1.1%), oxidation reduction (8.0%), and genes involved in conventional functional groups modulated by irradiation such as defense response (4.9%), and sensory and perception (2.5%). Four candidate genes were confirmed as differentially expressed genes in irradiated larvae using qRT-PCR (>2-fold change). These data suggest that LDR stimulates locomotion-related genes, and these genes can be used as potential markers for LDR. (author)

  10. Effects of gamma irradiation used to inhibit potato sprouting on potato tuber moth eggs, larvae and pupae Phthorimaea Operculella zeller (Lep., Gelechiidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saour, G.; Makee, H.

    2002-12-01

    Different age groups of potato tuber moth, Phthorimaea Operculella zeller, eggs were exposed to gamma irradiation at incremental doses up to 150 Gy (the upper dose limit allowed for potato sprout inhibition). Young eggs were more sensitive to gamma irradiation than older eggs and the sensitivity level declined with eggs age. The exposure of 3 - 3.5 d-old eggs to 150 Gy resulted in an 26% increase in egg incubation period compared with unirradiated eggs. The minimum dose required to 75 Gy, 9.7% of larvae survived to the adult stage but emerged as deformed moths. At 100 and 125 Gy, 10.2 and 9.6% of larvae pupated, respectively; however no adult eclosion was recorded. Whereas at 150 Gy, the larvae remained in mid-instar stage and eventually died. Young larvae and pupae were more susceptible to irradiation injuries than older ones. When larvae and of different ages were exposed to doses equal or higher than 100 Gy, only 13 to 35% pupated, but no adult emergence was obtained . The exposure of 1 - 1.5 or 3 - 3.5 day old pupae to 150 Gy induced high level of sterility and remarkable reduction in female mating ability and fecundity whereas, the reduction was less noticeable for 5 - 5.5 day-old pupae. Gamma irradiation doses applied to inhibit potato sprouting could used as an efficient control approach against potato tuber moth eggs, larval and pupal infestations (authors)

  11. Effects of gamma irradiation used to inhibit potato sprouting on potato tuber moth eggs, larvae and pupae Phthorimaea Operculella zeller (Lep., Gelechiidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saour, G.; Makee, H.

    2003-01-01

    Different age groups of potato tuber moth, Phthorimaea Operculella zeller, eggs were exposed to gamma irradiation at incremental doses up to 150 Gy (the upper dose limit allowed for potato sprout inhibition). Young eggs were more sensitive to gamma irradiation than older eggs and the sensitivity level declined with eggs age. The exposure of 3 - 3.5 d-old eggs to 150 Gy resulted in an 26% increase in egg incubation period compared with unirradiated eggs. The minimum dose required to 75 Gy, 9.7% of larvae survived to the adult stage but emerged as deformed moths. At 100 and 125 Gy, 10.2 and 9.6% of larvae pupated, respectively. However no adult eclosion was recorded. Whereas at 150 Gy, the larvae remained in mid-in star stage and eventually died. Young larvae and pupae were more susceptible to irradiation injuries than older ones. When larvae and of different ages were exposed to doses equal or higher than 100 Gy, only 13 to 35% pupated, but no adult emergence was obtained . The exposure of 1 - 1.5 or 3 - 3.5 day old pupae to 150 Gy induced high level of sterility and remarkable reduction in female mating ability and fecundity whereas, the reduction was less noticeable for 5 - 5.5 day-old pupae. Gamma irradiation doses applied to inhibit potato sprouting could used as an efficient control approach against potato tuber moth eggs, larval and pupal infestations (authors)

  12. Effects of irradiation of Bombyx mori larvae on the evolution of ecdysteroid titer in haemolymph and ecdysone metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulon, Madeleine; Feyereisen, Rene

    1977-01-01

    Second and third instar larvae of B. mori show a peak of ecdysteroids in the haemolymph towards the end of each instar. Second instar larvae which are X-ray treated at 0 h die at the third ecdysis. In these larvae, titer and metabolism of ecdysone is disturbed. Larvae X-ray treated at 24h in the second instar mostly become permanent larvae of the third instar, having a very low level of circulating ecdysteroids, which hardly metabolize injected ecdysone [fr

  13. Acanthocheilonema viteae: Vaccination of jirds with irradiation-attenuated stage-3 larvae and with exported larval antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucius, R.; Textor, G.; Kern, A.; Kirsten, C.

    1991-01-01

    Jirds (Meriones unguiculatus) were immunized with irradiated (35 krad) stage-3 larvae (L3) of Acanthocheilonema viteae. The induced resistance against homologous challenge infection and the antibody response of the animals were studied. Immunization with 3, 2, or 1 dose of 50 irradiated L3 induced approximately 90% resistance. Immunization with a single dose of only 5 irradiated L3 resulted in 60.8% protection while immunization with a single dose of 25 L3 induced 94.1% protection. The protection induced with 3 doses of 50 irradiated L3 did not decrease significantly during a period of 6 months. Sera of a proportion, but not all resistant jirds, contained antibodies against the surface of vector derived L3 as defined by IFAT. No surface antigens of microfilariae or adult worms were recognized by the sera. Vaccinated animals had antibody responses against antigens in the inner organs of L3 and in the cuticle and reproductive organs of adult worms as shown by IFAT. Immunoblotting with SDS-PAGE-separated L3 antigens and L3-CSN revealed that all sera contained antibodies against two exported antigens of 205 and 68 kDa, and against a nonexported antigen of 18 kDa. The 205-kDa antigen easily degraded into fragments of 165, 140, 125, and 105 kDa which were recognized by resistant jird sera. Various antigens of adult worms, but relatively few antigens of microfilariae, were also recognized. To test the relevance of exported antigens of L3 to resistance, jirds were immunized with L3-CSN together with a mild adjuvant. This immunization induced 67.7% resistance against challenge infection and sera of the immunized animals recognized the 205- and 68-kDa antigens of L3

  14. Reduction of spontaneous somatic mutation frequency by a low-dose X irradiation of Drosophila larvae and possible involvement of DNA single-strand damage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koana, Takao; Takahashi, Takashi; Tsujimura, Hidenobu

    2012-03-01

    The third instar larvae of Drosophila were irradiated with X rays, and the somatic mutation frequency in their wings was measured after their eclosion. In the flies with normal DNA repair and apoptosis functions, 0.2 Gy irradiation at 0.05 Gy/min reduced the frequency of the so-called small spot (mutant cell clone with reduced reproductive activity) compared with that in the sham-irradiated flies. When apoptosis was suppressed using the baculovirus p35 gene, the small spot frequency increased four times in the sham-irradiated control group, but the reduction by the 0.2-Gy irradiation was still evident. In a non-homologous end joining-deficient mutant, the small spot frequency was also reduced by 0.2 Gy radiation. In a mutant deficient in single-strand break repair, no reduction in the small spot frequency by 0.2 Gy radiation was observed, and the small spot frequency increased with the radiation dose. Large spot (mutant cell clone with normal reproductive activity) frequency was not affected by suppression of apoptosis and increased monotonically with radiation dose in wild-type larvae and in mutants for single- or double-strand break repair. It is hypothesized that some of the small spots resulted from single-strand damage and, in wild-type larvae, 0.2 Gy radiation activated the normal single-strand break repair gene, which reduced the background somatic mutation frequency.

  15. Effect ob Bacillus Thuringiensis Aegypti and Gamma Irradiation on the Ultrastructure of the Mid Gut of Arenipses Sabella Larvae Hampson (pyralidae:Lepidoptera)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhaiel, A.A.; Abul Fadl, H.A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of Egyptian Bacillus thuringiensis aegypti on the third larval instar of Arenipses sabella at five concentrations (0.125, 0.25, 0.50, 1 and 2 g/100 ml water). The results showed that the percentages of larval mortality were increased by increasing the applied concentration. A combination of irradiation and B. thuringiensis led to higher mortality in F1 progeny of A. sabella while F1 progeny of irradiated parents with 175 Gy was more susceptible to B. thuringiensis than that of non-irradiated parents. The LC 50 was 0.721 g/100 ml for F1 progeny of non-irradiated parents but 0.237 g/100 ml for those of irradiated parents. There was an inverse relation between the concentration and emergence percentage in non-irradiated larvae and there was a great reduction in the emergence of F1 progeny of irradiated parents as compared to non-irradiated parents. Such reduction was increased by applying a higher concentration of B. thuringiensis. The histopathological studies using ultrastructure microscopy were carried out on the mid gut of the 3rd larval instar after the treatment with LC 50 of the agerin, F1 larvae resulted from irradiated parents with 125 Gy and combined effect of both treatments. Electron microscope observations revealed that the most characteristic effects were mid gut columnar cell vacuolisation, microvilli damages, epithelium cell contents passing into the mid gut lumen and finally the cell death. It could be concluded that the integrated of inherited sterility technique and B. thuringiensis application gave a good control result against A. sabella.

  16. BIOLOGICAL AND ULTRASTRUCTURAL STUDIES ON THE HAEMOCYTES OF F1 LARVAE OF THE GAMMA IRRADIATED GREAT WAX MOTH PUPAE GALLERIA MELLONELLA (L.) (LEPIDOPTERA : GAELLERIDAE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-KHOLY, E.M.S.; EL-NAGGAR, S.E.M.; ABD EL-AZIZ, N.M.

    2008-01-01

    The present study was carried out on the full grown male pupae of the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella L., when irradiated with 100, 150, 300 and 400 Gray of gamma radiation. Two groups of newly moulted 4 th instar larvae were set up, each group consisted of 50 larvae. The first group was exposed in the pupal stage to 100 Gy and the second with 150 Gy then the larval haemolymph was collected. Also, a control group of 50 larvae (non-irradiated) was investigated. The morphological changes in the irradiated blood cells, as compared to the control, were examined using the transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Vacuolization of cytoplasm, disorganization and swelling of mitochondria were appeared. The biological effects of gamma irradiation of the parental male pupae on the reproduction of adult moths when treated males were mated with normal females (male line) and when normal males were mated with treated females (female line) were studied. The latent biological effects of four gamma doses (100, 150, 300 and 400 Gy) on the F1 generation showed that the average number of eggs per mated female, the percentage of egg hatch and the percent of mating were gradually reduced when the given gamma dose to male parents was increased at all treatments (male and female lines). The reduction in the fecundity and the percentage of egg hatch among female line pairings (females descendant of irradiated parental male pupae) was reduced than that among male line pairings (males descendant of irradiated parental male pupae) with increasing the gamma dose

  17. Effect of hydration on the annealing of chemical radiation damage in gamma-irradiated strontium bromate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, S.M.K.; Sahish, T.S.

    1991-01-01

    Rehydration of γ-irradiated anhydrous strontium bromate induces direct recovery of damage. The recovery process is unimolecular and the rehydrated salt is susceptible to thermal annealing. (author) 11 refs.; 2 figs

  18. Immunological studies on Metastrongylus apri infection, 3. Migratory behavior in the guinea pig of 5 x 10/sup 4/R X-irradiated M. apri larvae used as attenuated larval vaccine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, T [Osaka Prefectural Univ., Sakai (Japan). Coll. of Agriculture

    1975-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the migratory behavior of Metastronglylus apri larvae artificially attenuated by X-ray irradiation. Guinea pigs were inoculated orally with 2,000 M. apri larvae irradiated with 5 x 10/sup 4/ R of X-rays and killed at various intervals after inoculation. Various tissues were collected from them and examined for larvae by the pepsin digestion method (group A) and additionally by the microscopical method (group B). All larvae recovered were examined for the number and developmental stage. Results obtained are summarized as follows. On the 1st to 3rd days after inoculation, a large number of 3rd- or 4th-stage larvae were recovered from various tissues, as well as from the same tissues of normal controls. From the lungs, a few female 5th-stage worms were recovered on the 5th to 12th days, but to worms on the 15th day or later. There were no larvae in the thoracic cavity, blood from the right heart, or small intestine on any given day. In the tissues, especially in the walls of the cecum and the anterior part of the colon, and on the omentum, many larvae grew to early 4th-stage ones, but few to advanced 4th-stage ones. All the worms recovered from the lungs grew to early 5th-stage ones, but failed to reach the mature state. On the basis of these findings, it is concluded that 5 x 10/sup 4/ R X-irradiated larvae could penetrate rapidly into the gut and migrated for about 1 to 3 days after inoculation like normal larvae, but that they could grow neither to advanced 4th-stage ones nor to early 5th-stage ones. In other words, it can be seen that 5 x 10/sup 4/ R X-irradiation affected M. apri larvae over, or at least immediately after, the period of transition from the 4th to 5th stage. The 4th stage, however, was sustained longer in the X-irradiated larvae than in normal ones. All the larvae that had invaded tissues may have been caught mainly in the gut, on the omentum, or at other sites to be killed and organized in these tissues.

  19. Free radicals from irradiated lyophilized DNA: influence of water of hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huettermann, J.; Roehrig, M.; Koehnlein, W.

    1992-01-01

    Lyophilized DNA equilibrated with water vapour at various relative humidities (0-95% H 2 O or D 2 O) was X-irradiated at 77 K and analysed for free radicals by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy in the temperature range 77-280 K. Analysis of spectra according to variation in humidity, microwave power and temperature generally yielded a doublet and a triplet spectrum at 77 K. The doublet partially converted into the 5-thymyl radical (TH . ). DNA containing deuterated thymine (dTDNA) revealed that the doublet of ''normal'' DNA should be composed of two similar doublets, one of which should be assigned to the thymine anion, the other possibly the cytosine anion. The triplet signal was more stable and could be related to the guanine cation or its deprotonated successor. Several other patterns were detected among them an allyl radical in highly aquated DNA (95% humidity). Other features occurred either predominantly or exclusively in DNA equilibrated above 66% relative humidity and were ascribed to an influence of the secondary structure. (author)

  20. Combined and separated effects of gamma irradiation and bifuran plant extract on the dietary profile of the black cutworm, agitators ipsilon (Hun.) 1- treatment of the eight days old larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, S.E.M.; Ibrahim, S.M.; Mohamed, H.F.

    2007-01-01

    The combined and separate effects of two sub sterilizing doses 100 or 150 Gy of gamma irradiation and the plant extract Conyza dioscorides (Barnoof) on eight days- old larvae of F1 generation of Agrotis ipsilon as to their ability to consume, digest and utilize food were studied. Gamma irradiation alone reduced the amount of food consumed and digested by the larvae as compared to non-irradiated ones. Also, the utilization efficiency was decreased more significantly at the dose level 150 Gy than at the dose level 100 Gy leading to a reduction in weight gain. The effect of plant extract (Barnoof) alone was non-significantly different at the two tested concentrations 1.5 or 3 % by the solvent (Petroleum ether) treatment. The combined effect of gamma radiation and plant extract on F1 larvae significantly decreased the growth rate of the larvae than when treating them alone as compared to the untreated larvae. Also, the combined effects of gamma radiation and plant extract significantly decreased the utilization of food as indicated by determining both efficiency of conversion of ingested food (E.C.I.) and digested food (E.C.D.) to body matters

  1. The influence of rearing medium on the irradiation sensitivity of eggs and larvae of the flour beetle, Tribolium confusum J. du Val

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunçbilek, A.Ş.; Kansu, I.A.

    1996-01-01

    In this study, gamma radiation was applied at six dose levels over the range of 5–40 Gy for 0–2-day-old eggs, and at eight dose levels between 10–80 Gy for 16–18-day-old larvae of Tribolium confusum. Sterility, mortality and other effects of gamma radiation were investigated. All experiments were performed in incubators maintained at 27 ± 0.5 °C and 70 ± 5% r.h. The development of adults reared on different flours from irradiated eggs and larvae was prevented by exposure to 40 and 50 Gy of gamma radiation, respectively. Rate of development of these stages on different flours and the yield of adults was influenced by rearing medium. Rapidly developing flour beetles are more susceptible to killing by gamma radiation. For each stage reared on different media (wheat, barley and maize flours), LD50 and LD99.9 values were determined, together with sterilizing dose levels (SD50 and SD99.9)

  2. The influence of rearing medium on the irradiation sensitivity of eggs and larvae of the flour beetle, Tribolium confusum J. du Val

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunçbilek, Aydin Ş.; Kansu, I.A.

    1996-01-01

    In this study, gamma radiation was applied at six dose levels over the range of 5–40 Gy for 0–2-day-old eggs, and at eight dose levels between 10–80 Gy for 16–18-day-old larvae of Tribolium confusum. Sterility, mortality and other effects of gamma radiation were investigated. All experiments were performed in incubators maintained at 27 ± 0.5 °C and 70 ± 5% r.h. The development of adults reared on different flours from irradiated eggs and larvae was prevented by exposure to 40 and 50 Gy of gamma radiation, respectively. Rate of development of these stages on different flours and the yield of adults was influenced by rearing medium. Rapidly developing flour beetles are more susceptible to killing by gamma radiation. For each stage reared on different media (wheat, barley and maize flours), LD 50 and LD 99.9 values were determined, together with sterilizing dose levels (SD 50 and SD 99.9 ). (author)

  3. Biological and morphological aspects of Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead, 1905) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) on irradiated larva of Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann, 1824) (Diptera: Tephritidae);Aspectos biologicos e morfologicos de Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead, 1905) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) criado em larvas irradiadas de Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann, 1824) (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, Giuliana Etore do

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this work was evaluate some biological and morphological aspects of Diachasmimorpha longicaudata on irradiated and not irradiated larva of bisexual and tsl strains of Ceratitis capitata. The experiments were developed at the Laboratorio de Irradiacao de Alimentos e Radioentomologia (LIARE) of CENA/USP. For gamma radiation treatment it was used a Cobalt-60 source, model Gamma beam-650. Larva of bisexual strain were irradiated with 65 Gy and the tsl strain with 45 Gy. Experiments were carried out at room temperature of 25 +- 2 deg C, 75 +- 5 % RH and 14 hours of photo phase. After irradiation, the bisexual strain larva were exposed to adults of D. longicaudata for parasitization and parameters of percentage adult emergency and rate of male and female of D. longicaudata were observed. For tsl strain, were used larva from the first and the fourth collection only, and the following parameters were observed: percentage of adult emergency, rate of male and female, and the average unitary volume and weight of pupae at the 8{sup th} and 16 days after the parasitism date. Other parameters evaluated for tsl strain related to the parasitoid morphology such as, the length of the body, antenna, tibia and ovipositor. As result, both of the first and second experiments, the rate of parasitism was satisfactory, as well as showed larger incidence of females than males in parasitized larva, discarding the possibility that gamma radiation interfere in the sexual rate. No significant differences were observed on pupae volume. Some differences on pupae weight were observed at 8th and 16th day after the parasitism date, which should be associated to pre-emerging flies (8th day) and empty pupa (16th day). None significant difference was observed on morphological parameters, so one can conclude that gamma radiation treatment did not interfere in these quality parameters of the parasitoid. (author)

  4. Parasitological and immunological effects induced by immunization of Mandrillus sphinx against the human filarial Loa loa using infective stage larvae irradiated at 40 krad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akue J.P

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Six mandrills were immunized with 150 Loa loa infective stage larvae (L3 irradiated with 40 Krad, and challenged with 100 L3, 60 days after initial vaccination. The parasitological outcome of this immunization was compared to results from six mandrills infected with normal L3. No clear association was seen between vaccination and microfilaremia until day 245 when a significant drop in the level of microfilaria occured in vaccinated compared to infected animals (5 vs 10 mf/ml; p = 0.012. A one-year follow-up of the humoral immune response showed a strong adult, microfilariae (Mf and L3 specific IgG response, with distinct profiles for each extract. In immunized animal a significant decrease in antibody level was systematically observed between days 90-145 for the anti-L3 and anti-adult IgG. However, in the same group anti-Mf antibody levels that peaked around 160-175 days post-challenge, were inversely correlated with the decrease in Mf density between day 200 and day 386. These results suggest that immunization with irradiated L3 using these specific conditions may affect the appearance of Mf.

  5. Ultrastructure changes in the haemocytes of Galleria mellonella larvae treated with gamma irradiated Steinernema carpocapsae BA2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedayat-allah M. Salem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultrastructure studies on the haemolymph of 5th larval instar of Galleria mellonella showed five types of haemocytes; Prohaemocytes, Plasmatocytes, Granulocytes, Oenocytoids and Spherulocytes. After treatment with Steinernema carpocapsae BA2, the haemocytes underwent considerable structural changes. More destructive effects were observed in the haemocytes of G. mellonella treated with gamma irradiated S. carpocapsae.

  6. Ultrastructure changes in the haemocytes of galleria mellonella larvae treated with gamma irradiated steinerrnma carpocapsae BA2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, H. M.; Sayed, R. M.; Hussein, M. A.; Hafez, S. E.; Hussein, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Five types of haemocytes were recognized in the haem lymph of 5 th larval in star of G. mellonella; prohaemocytes, plasmatocytes, Granulocytes, Oenocytoids and Spherulocytes. Structural changes were observed in the haemocytes after Steinernema carpoapsae BA2 treatment. More destructive effects were observed in the haemocytes of G. mellonella treated with gamma irradiated S. carpocapsa . (Author)

  7. Effect of gamma rays on the larvae of Rhipicephalus bursa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gecheva, G.

    1979-01-01

    Rhipicephalus bursa larvae were exposed to a single acute gamma-irradiation from cobalt 60 source in doses from 0.5 to 40 kiloroentgen (kr). Doses higher than 20 kr rilled the larvae, lower than 10 kr produced disturbances in tick development, dependent on radiation; larvae irradiated with 2 to 3 kr started sucking blood as larvae ordinarily do, but could not undergo metamorphosis; larvae irradiated with lower doses (0.5 and 1 kr) had a prolonged metamorphosis, the onset of oviposition was delayed and the percentage of hatched second generation larvae was reduced. (A.B.)

  8. Somatic mutation in larvae of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, induced by heavy ion irradiation to diapause eggs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotani, Eiji; Furusawa, Toshiharu [Kyoto Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Faculty of Textile Science; Nagaoka, Shunji [Fujita Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan). School of Health Sciences] [and others

    2002-12-01

    In order to investigate whether eggs of the black-striped strain (P{sup S}) of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, represent an appropriate model for estimating the biological effect of cosmic radiation, radiosensitivity of the eggs against X-rays and heavy ion particles was examined as ground-based experiments. The exposure of diapause eggs to X-rays or heavy ion particles resulted in somatic mutations appearing as a white spot on the black integument during larval stage. Irradiation of non-diapause eggs with X-rays demonstrated a significant difference in frequency of the mutation between fractionated and single administration doses, but no difference was observed in diapause eggs. Incidence of the mutation as induced by carbon ion beams for 15-day old eggs was higher for eggs that had been kept at 15 deg C than those kept at 25 deg C. Neon beam irradiation of diapause eggs displayed dose- and linear energy transfer (LET)-dependent effects, causing a maximal rate of the mutation at 150 keV/{mu}m. These results confirm that B. mori eggs represent valid models for estimating the biological effects of cosmic radiation. (author)

  9. Study on the use of sheep serum post vaccination of three phase larva (L3) Haemonchus contortus worm irradiated inoculated to rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partodihardjo, Sukardji; Suryadi, Helmi; Purwanti, Endang; Adiwinata, Gatot; Irtisam

    1998-01-01

    Study has been done on rabbit to find out the effect of giving sheep serum post vaccination with irradiated gastric worm challenged with infective H. contortus larva. Forty eight local rabbit divided into 3 groups : K, VI and V2, each groups: consists of 4 rabbit, by using 4 times repetition. K group which only inoculated 10,000L3 H. contortus infective. V1 = group which twice serum inoculated with 21 days interval, inoculation dose were 0,3 ml serum each, and challenged with 10.000 L3 H.contortus infective. V2 = group which 3 times serum inoculation with 21 days interval, inoculation dose 0,3 ml serum each and challenged with 10.000 L3 H.contortus infective. Design model used with Completely Random Design (RAL), Duncan was used as inter treatment test. Parameter observed are total protein fraction, Larva L4 content in gaster, cumulative weight gain, and death percentage rabbits. Result of study showed that on average parameter total protein fraction on K + 2,0086 ± 0,2353 mg/dl, V1 = 3,2781 ± 0,9227 mg/dl and V2 = 5,5035 ± 1,6794 mg/d. Average parameter L4 death showed on K = 10, V1 = 8, and V2 = 4, while L4 alive on K = 3, V1 + 1 and V2 = 0. Commutative Average parameter PCV value on K = 19,91 ± 1,24%, V1= 27,31 ± 1,22%, and V2 35,71 ± 0,56 %. Average parameter weight gain per week on K = 24,46 ± 0,74 g, V1 = 26,04 ± 2.23 g, and V2 = 28,93 ± 1,67 g. Percentage average parameter death rate on K = 37,5 ± 14,46%, V1=18,75 ± 23,90% and V2 = 0± 0%. The conclusion of the study result was serum inoculation on rabbits have positive result on reducing anaemia rate, elevating weight gain, reduce death percentage, reduced L4 alive content in gaster, and able oneelevate immunity respond content that is total protein fraction on rabbits. (author)

  10. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    , not all of them are white like snow. Some hydrates from the deep Gulf of Mexico are richly colored in shades of yellow, orange, or even red. The ice-like masses are beautiful, and contrast with the dull gray of deep sea muds. Hydrates from the Blake... volcanoes and associated gas hydrates: Marine Geology, v. 167, p. 29-42. Milkov, A.V. and R. Sassen, 2001a, Estimate of gas hydrate resource, northwestern Gulf of Mexico continental slope: Marine Geology, v. 179, pp. 71-83. Milkov, A.V., Sassen, R...

  11. Hydration and transparency of the rabbit cornea irradiated with UVB-doses of 0.25 J/cm(2) and 0.5 J/cm(2) compared with equivalent UVB radiation exposure reaching the human cornea from sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejka, Cestmír; Ardan, Taras; Sirc, Jakub; Michálek, Jiří; Beneš, Jiří; Brůnová, Blanka; Rosina, Jozef

    2011-07-01

    Exposure of the cornea to UV radiation from sunlight evokes intraocular inflammation, photokeratitis. Photokeratitis is caused by UVB radiation. It is accompanied by changes of corneal hydration and light absorption. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of two UVB doses on corneal optics in rabbits and to compare these UVB doses with the equivalent exposure of UVB radiation reaching the human cornea from sunlight. Rabbit corneas were irradiated with a daily UVB dose of 0.25 J/cm(2) or 0.5 J/cm(2) for 4 days. One day after finishing the irradiations the rabbits were sacrificed and corneal light absorption measured using our spectrophotometrical method. Corneal hydration was examined using an ultrasonic Pachymeter every experimental day before the irradiation procedure and the last day before sacrificing the animals. Changes in corneal optics appeared after the repeated exposure of the cornea to a UVB dose of 0.25 J/ cm(2) and massively increased after the repeated exposure of the cornea to a UVB dose of 0.5 J/cm(2). The first significant changes in corneal hydration appeared after a single exposure of the cornea to a UVB dose of 0.25 J/cm(2). Changes in corneal hydration appeared after the exposure of the rabbit cornea to a single UVB dose equivalent to 2.6 hours of solar UVB radiation reaching the human cornea, as measured by UVB sensors embedded in the eyes of mannequin heads facing the sun on a beach at noon in July. Repeated exposure of the rabbit cornea to the same UVB dose evoked profound changes in corneal optics. Although comparison of experimental and outdoor conditions are only approximate, the results in rabbits point to the danger for the human eye from UVB radiation when short stays in sunlight are repeated for several consecutive days without UV protection.

  12. Chloral Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if you are allergic to chloral hydrate, aspirin, tartrazine (a yellow dye in some processed foods and ... in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature, away from excess ...

  13. Co-expression of antioxidant enzymes with expression of p53, DNA repair, and heat shock protein genes in the gamma ray-irradiated hermaphroditic fish Kryptolebias marmoratus larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Jae-Sung [Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bo-Mi; Kim, Ryeo-Ok [Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Jung Soo [Pathology Team, National Fisheries Research and Development Institute, Busan 619-902 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Il-Chan [Division of Life Sciences, Korea Polar Research Institute, Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young-Mi, E-mail: ymlee70@smu.ac.kr [Department of Green Life Science, College of Convergence, Sangmyung University, Seoul 110-743 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Seong, E-mail: jslee2@hanyang.ac.kr [Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: •Novel identification of DNA repair-related genes in fish. •Investigation of whole expression profiling of DNA repair genes upon gamma radiation. •Analysis of effects of gamma radiation on antioxidant system and cell stress proteins. •Usefulness of verification of pathway-based profiling for mechanistic understanding. -- Abstract: To investigate effects of gamma ray irradiation in the hermaphroditic fish, Kryptolebias marmoratus larvae, we checked expression of p53, DNA repair, and heat shock protein genes with several antioxidant enzyme activities by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and biochemical methods in response to different doses of gamma radiation. As a result, the level of gamma radiation-induced DNA damage was initiated after 4 Gy of radiation, and biochemical and molecular damage became substantial from 8 Gy. In particular, several DNA repair mechanism-related genes were significantly modulated in the 6 Gy gamma radiation-exposed fish larvae, suggesting that upregulation of such DNA repair genes was closely associated with cell survival after gamma irradiation. The mRNA expression of p53 and most hsps was also significantly upregulated at high doses of gamma radiation related to cellular damage. This finding indicates that gamma radiation can induce oxidative stress with associated antioxidant enzyme activities, and linked to modulation of the expression of DNA repair-related genes as one of the defense mechanisms against radiation damage. This study provides a better understanding of the molecular mode of action of defense mechanisms upon gamma radiation in fish larvae.

  14. A novel technique using DNA denaturation to detect multiply induced single-strand breaks in a hydrated plasmid DNA molecule by X-ray and 4He2+ ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoya, A.; Shikazono, N.; Fujii, K.; Noguchi, M.; Urushibara, A.

    2011-01-01

    To detect multiple single-strand breaks (SSBs) produced in plasmid DNA molecules by direct energy deposition from radiation tracks, we have developed a novel technique using DNA denaturation by which irradiated DNA is analysed as single-strand DNA (SS-DNA). The multiple SSBs that arise in both strands of DNA, but do not induce a double-strand break, are quantified as loss of SS-DNA using agarose gel electrophoresis. We have applied this method to X-ray and 4 He 2+ ion-irradiated samples of fully hydrated pUC18 plasmid DNA. The fractions of both SS-DNA and closed circular DNA (CC-DNA) exponentially decrease with the increasing dose of X rays and 4 He 2+ ions. The efficiency of the loss of SS-DNA was half that of CC-DNA for both types of irradiation, indicating that one of two strands in DNA is not broken when one SSB is produced in CC-DNA by irradiation. Contrary to our initial expectation, these results indicate that SSBs are not multiply induced even by high linear energy transfer radiation distributed in both strands. (authors)

  15. [Skin hydration and hydrating products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplan, H; Nocera, T

    2018-05-01

    One of the skin's principal functions is to protect the body against its environment by maintaining an effective epidermal barrier, not only against external factors, but also to prevent water loss from the body. Indeed, water homeostasis is vital for the normal physiological functioning of skin. Hydration levels affect not only visible microscopic parameters such as the suppleness and softness of skin, but also molecular parameters, enzyme activities and cellular signalling within the epidermis. The body is continually losing some of its water, but this phenomenon is limited and the optimal hydration gradient in skin is ensured via a set of sophisticated regulatory processes that rely on the functional and dynamic properties of the uppermost level of the skin consisting of the stratum corneum. The present article brings together data recently acquired in the fields of skin hydration and the characterisation of dehydrated or dry skin, whether through study of the regulatory processes involved or as a result of changes in the techniques used for in situ measurement, and thus in optimisation of management. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Immunization of baboons with attenuated schistosomula of Schistosoma haematobium: levels of protection induced by immunization with larvae irradiated with 20 and 60 krad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R.A.; Bickle, Q.D.; Sturrock, R.F.; Taylor, M.G.; Webbe, G.; Kiare, S.; James, E.R.; Andrews, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have demonstrated that baboons can be immunized with S. haemotobium schistosomula irradiated with 20 krad in a regimen that induces 90% protection. While this high level of protection has stimulated a discussion on the feasibility of a human volunteer trial (Von Lichtenberg, 1985), results of further studies particularly on (i) the pathogensis of immunization per se (Byram et al., 1989), (ii) the longevity of protection, and (iii) the protective efficacy of cryopreserved irradiated S. haemotobium schistosomula (R. Harrison et al., in preparation), prevent recommending this form of vaccination for human application. (author)

  17. Larvae for layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Lotte; Fischer, Christian Holst; Nordentoft, Steen

    2013-01-01

    Companies and researchers are in close collaboration developing a container- based system for cultivating fly larvae at organic poultry farms. In a one week process, manure will be converted to compost and the live larvae will be harvested and used for feeding laying hens. The larvae are expected...

  18. Radiosensitivity of spores of Paenibacillus larvae ssp. larvae in honey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Wanderley Mendes de [Ministerio da Agricultura, Pecuaria e Abastecimento, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Inspecao de Produtos de Origem Animal]. E-mail: sipa-rj@agricultura.gov.br; Vital, Helio de Carvalho [Centro Tecnologico do Exercito CTEx, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Defesa Quimica, Biologica e Nuclear]. E-mail: vital@ctex.eb.br; Schuch, Dulce Maria Tocchetto [Ministerio da Agricultura, Pecuaria e Abastecimento, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)]. E-mail: micro-lara-rs@agricultura.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    Irradiation, usually used in combination with other conventional methods of conservation, has been proven to be an efficient tool to ensure the safety of many types of foods by destroying pathogenic microorganisms and extending their shelf-lives. This work has investigated the efficacy of gamma irradiation to inactivate spores of the bacterium Paenibacillus larvae that causes the 'American foulbrood', a highly contagious disease still exotic in Brazil that kills bees and contaminates honey, preventing its commercialization and causing great economical losses. In this study, 60 g samples of two types of honey inoculated with 3.5x10{sup 3} spores/mL of that bacterium were irradiated with doses of 0, 5, 7.5, 10, 12.5 and 15 kGy and counted. The analyses indicated a mean reduction of 97.5{+-}0.7% in the number of viable spores exposed to 5 kGy. The application of doses of 7.5 kGy or higher yielded no viable spores above the detection threshold (10/mL). In addition the value of D{sub 10} (3.1{+-}0.3 kGy) was estimated and the logarithm of the population of viable spores of Paenibacillus larvae subsp. larvae was determined as linear and quadratic polynomial functions of the radiation dose. The results indicated that the dose of 10 kGy could be insufficient to assure complete sterilization of honey in some cases while suggesting that 25 kGy would perform such task adequately. (author)

  19. Effects of gamma radiation on the melanization process in larvae of stored product moths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupa, D.

    1998-01-01

    Non-irradiated larvae of the Indian meal moth (Plodia interpunctella Hbn.), the Mediterranean flour moth (Ephestia (Anagasta) kuehniella Zell.), and the almond moth (Cadra cautella Wlk.) showed strong melanization after killing by freezing. However, there were some insects which showed lack of melanization or melanized only partly, sometimes like those that have been irradiated. A part of the larval body was dark black while the rest body was of natural color or only slightly gray. Also, black and gray patches were observed in the larvae. After the irradiation treatment, the number of non-melanized larvae and larvae exhibiting a slight melanization usually increased. The degree of melanization in the treated larvae was significantly different from the untreated insects. Generally, it decreased with increasing dose and time elapsed after the treatment. The melanization test for detecting irradiated moth larvae may produce inconsistent results because (a) irradiation does not completely prevent melanization in mature moth larvae, and (b) the untreated larvae, killed by freezing and examined at room temperature, often show incomplete melanization. An ideal method for detection of irradiated insects should be: (1 ) specific for irradiation and not influenced by other processes, (2) accurate and reproducible, (3) have a detection limit below the minimum dose likely to be applied to agricultural commodity as a quarantine treatment, (4) applicable to a range of pests, (5) quick and easy to perform, and (6) capable of providing an estimate of irradiation dose. The melanization test to detect irradiated larvae of the stored product moths fulfills only some of these requirements. Therefore, additional studies were performed to improve this test before it is recommended for quarantine inspection. Because visual assessment of the effects of irradiation on melanization of the moth larvae is very subjective and difficult to perform, a trial to determine the activity of

  20. Artificial Hydration and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ... Your Health Resources Healthcare Management Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Share Print Patients who ...

  1. Key to marine arthropod larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Fornshell

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this key is restricted to the larvae of marine arthropods. The key is based solely on their morphology, patterns of body segmentation, numbers of appendages, and mode of locomotion. An effort has been made to treat all traditionally named larval forms, both planktonic and benthic. It is intended that this key be useful for a researcher working with archived museum specimens and therefore, does not include habitat information as a identifying trait, even though this information is usually available in the archived records. Within the phylum Arthropoda there are two sub-phyla and eleven classes having larval stages in the marineenvironment. Where feasible the original names of the various larval types have been used. Because this nomenclature is less commonly used today compared to the past, the more recent taxonomic affinities are included in parentheses after the original larval name. The key includes the following thirty-four larvae: Branchhiopoda nauplii; Cephalocarida nauplii; Mystacocarida nauplii; trilobite larva; protonymphon; hexapod larvae; Remipedia nauplii; nauplius - Y larvae; Cirripedia nauplii; Ascothoracida nauplii; Ostracoda nauplii; Euphausiacea nauplii; Penaeidea nauplii; Cyclopoida nauplii; Calanoida nauplii; Harpacticoida nauplii;Polyarthra nauplii; cypris larva; eryonecius larva; cypris-Y larva; elapthocaris larvae; mysis larvae; lucifer zoea; acetes zoea; acanthosoma larva; phyllosoma; antizoea larva; anomuran zoea; brachyuran zoea; calyptopis larvae; furcilia larva; crytopia larva; puerulus larva; alima larva.

  2. Effect of varying concentrations of caffeine and ascorbic acid on the radiosensitivity of barley seed irradiated in oxygenated or oxygen-free hydration medium at 25 and 3700C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afzal, S.M.J.; Kesavan, P.C.

    1977-01-01

    The modification of radiosensitivity of barley seed with 1.75 x 10 -3 M and 3.8 x 10 -3 M concentrations of caffeine and ascorbic acid during irradiation in oxygenated and oxygen-free hydration medium was studied at 25 and 37 0 C, respectively. Both concentrations of caffeine and ascorbic acid afforded protection against oxic radiation damage which was maximal at 25 0 C. Caffeine effectively potentiated the anoxic component of damage but ascorbic acid had no influence at all. At 25 0 C there was no concentration-dependent effect of caffeine or ascorbic acid. At 37 0 C, there was no effect, whatsoever, of either concentration of ascorbic acid, whereas caffeine dramatically potentiated the radiation damage under both oxygenated and oxygen-free conditions, and the magnitude of potentiation was concentration-dependent. The possible reactivity of caffeine and ascorbic acid towards the precursors of oxygen-dependent and -independent components of damage in determining the mode and magnitudes of modification is discussed briefly. (author)

  3. Oesophagostomum columbianum : immunization of young lambs using gamma ray attenuated inefective larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.L.; Dhar, D.N.

    1987-01-01

    Infective Oesophagostomum columbianum larvae were successfully attenuated by exposing them to a gamma radiation dose levels of either 40 or 50 Krad. Lambs receiving a single vaccination dose of 2000 infective larvae attenuated at 40 Krad developed partial protection, whereas those vaccinated with similar dose of infection with 50 Krad irradiated larvae failed to develop any protection. A double vaccination schedule comprising of 500 and 2000 gamma attenuated (40 Krad) infective larvae induced a significantly higher level of protection against the challenge dose. The possible use of radiation attenuated larvae as vaccine for immunoprophylaxis against ovine Oesophagostomiasis has been discussed. (author). 11 refs., 2 tables

  4. Gas hydrate in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2018-01-17

    Gas hydrate is a naturally occurring, ice-like substance that forms when water and gas combine under high pressure and at moderate temperatures. Methane is the most common gas present in gas hydrate, although other gases may also be included in hydrate structures, particularly in areas close to conventional oil and gas reservoirs. Gas hydrate is widespread in ocean-bottom sediments at water depths greater than 300–500 meters (m; 984–1,640 feet [ft]) and is also present in areas with permanently frozen ground (permafrost). Several countries are evaluating gas hydrate as a possible energy resource in deepwater or permafrost settings. Gas hydrate is also under investigation to determine how environmental change may affect these deposits.

  5. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  6. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  7. Baylisascaris Larva Migrans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazacos, Kevin R.; Abbott, Rachel C.; van Riper, Charles

    2016-05-26

    SummaryBaylisascaris procyonis, the common raccoon roundworm, is the most commonly recognized cause of clinical larva migrans (LM) in animals, a condition in which an immature parasitic worm or larva migrates in a host animal’s tissues, causing obvious disease. Infection with B. procyonis is best known as a cause of fatal or severe neurologic disease that results when the larvae invade the brain, the spinal cord, or both; this condition is known as neural larva migrans (NLM). Baylisascariasis is a zoonotic disease, that is, one that is transmissible from animals to humans. In humans, B. procyonis can cause damaging visceral (VLM), ocular (OLM), and neural larva migrans. Due to the ubiquity of infected raccoons around humans, there is considerable human exposure and risk of infection with this parasite. The remarkable disease-producing capability of B. procyonis in animals and humans is one of the most significant aspects of the biology of ascarids (large roundworms) to come to light in recent years. Infection with B. procyonis has important health implications for a wide variety of free-ranging and captive wildlife, zoo animals, domestic animals, as well as human beings, on both an individual and population level. This report, eighth in the series of U.S. Geological Survey Circulars on zoonotic diseases, will help us to better understand the routes of Baylisascaris procyonis infections and how best to adequately monitor this zoonotic disease.

  8. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years.

  9. Intermolecular Hydrogen Transfer in Isobutane Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Sugahara

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Electron spin resonance (ESR spectra of butyl radicals induced with γ-ray irradiation in the simple isobutane (2-methylpropane hydrate (prepared with deuterated water were investigated. Isothermal annealing results of the γ-ray-irradiated isobutane hydrate reveal that the isobutyl radical in a large cage withdraws a hydrogen atom from the isobutane molecule through shared hexagonal-faces of adjacent large cages. During this “hydrogen picking” process, the isobutyl radical is apparently transformed into a tert-butyl radical, while the sum of isobutyl and tert-butyl radicals remains constant. The apparent transformation from isobutyl to tert-butyl radicals is an irreversible first-order reaction and the activation energy was estimated to be 35 ± 3 kJ/mol, which was in agreement with the activation energy (39 ± 5 kJ/mol of hydrogen picking in the γ-ray-irradiated propane hydrate with deuterated water.

  10. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  11. Irradiation as Quarantine Treatment of Rambutan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pransopon, Prapon; Kongratarpon, Titima; Vongchili, Satit; Segsarnviriya, Suchada; Limohpasmanee, Wanith; Eamsiri, Jarurat; Sajjabut, Surasak

    2006-01-01

    Eggs and larvae of Bactrocera dorsalis and Bactrocera correcta were investigated for their tolerant dose of irradiation. Artificially in feasted rambutans were irradiated at target doses of 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 Gy. The results showed that the lowest dose that could inhibit adult emergence was 102.89 Gy for B. dorsalis and 97.61 Gy for B. correcta (P=0.999968, Probit 9). Larvae of B. dorsalis were irradiated at the dose

  12. Visceral larva migrans: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, Alexandre Bortoli; El Achkar, Marice Emanuela

    2003-01-01

    Larva migrans visceral é doença infecciosa, adquirida por ingestão de ovos provenientes dos vermes Toxocara canis e/ou Toxocara cati que infestam cães e gatos; as larvas penetram a parede intestinal e migram através dos tecidos levando a alterações diversas, conseqüentes a uma resposta inflamatória imune.¹ Os autores descrevem um caso clínico de larva migrans visceral com apresentação clínica atípica.Visceral larva migrans is an infectious human disease that occurs following ingestion of eggs...

  13. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate

  14. Cutaneous larva migrans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Wieczorek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . Cutaneous larva migrans (CLM is a tropical zoonosis, caused by parasites, usually Ancylostoma braziliense. Humans are an accidental host. Polish patients with CLM are usually tourists visiting tropical and subtropical countries. The first symptoms do not always appear as creeping eruptions, which complicates the diagnosis. Objective. To present the case of a man with CLM after returning from Thailand to Poland and associated diagnostic difficulties. Case report. We present a case of a 28-year-old man who returned to Poland from Thailand. The first symptoms appeared as disseminated pruritic papules. No improvement after treatment with corticosteroids and antihistamines was observed. The diagnosis was established after the appearance of serpentine erythemas and improvement after albendazole therapy. Conclusions. In the case of returnees from exotic countries suffering from raised, pruritic rashes, and no improvement after treatment with corticosteroids and antihistamines, parasitic etiology should be considered.

  15. Effects of Irradiation on Insect Host-Parasite Relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahalkar, G. W.; Ramakrishnan, V. [Biology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Bombay (India)

    1968-06-15

    Effects of host irradiation on the development of its parasite were investigated. Females of Bracon brevicomis readily accepted irradiated larvae of tile wax moth (Galleria mellonella) and rice moth (Corcyra cephalonica) for oviposition. However, irradiated wax moth larvae adversely influenced the viability of eggs laid on them and also the survival of the parasite grubs feeding on their bodies. The female grubs were affected more than the males. Rice moth larvae, on the other hand, exerted no significant influence on the viability of parasite eggs, but adversely affected the survival of the grubs. The progeny of parents that had been reared on irradiated larvae also exhibited some developmental changes although grown on non-irradiated host larvae, and these changes were more pronounced when G. mellonella was used as the host insect. (author)

  16. Historical methane hydrate project review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Frye, Matt; Goldberg, Dave; Husebo, Jarle; Koh, Carolyn; Malone, Mitch; Shipp, Craig; Torres, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In 1995, U.S. Geological Survey made the first systematic assessment of the volume of natural gas stored in the hydrate accumulations of the United States. That study, along with numerous other studies, has shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world greatly exceeds the volume of known conventional gas resources. However, gas hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of gas hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various gas hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural gas hydrates, and (5) analyzing the effects of methane hydrate on drilling safety.Methane hydrates are naturally occurring crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid water-­‐lattice holds gas molecules in a cage-­‐like structure. The gas and water becomes a solid under specific temperature and pressure conditions within the Earth, called the hydrate stability zone. Other factors that control the presence of methane hydrate in nature include the source of the gas included within the hydrates, the physical and chemical controls on the migration of gas with a sedimentary basin containing methane hydrates, the availability of the water also included in the hydrate structure, and the presence of a suitable host sediment or “reservoir”. The geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrates have become collectively known as the “methane hydrate petroleum system”, which has become the focus of numerous hydrate research programs.Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated

  17. Progress in food irradiation: Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wills, P A

    1982-11-01

    Progress in food irradiation treatment of Australian commodities, such as meat, pepper, honey, fruit is described. Irradiation took place with /sup 60/Co gamma radiation while testing for radiation sensitivity of Staphyllococcus in meat, of Bacillus aureus in pepper, of Streptococcus plutin and Bacillus larvae in honey, and of the fruitfly Dacus tryoni infesting fruit. So far, two State Health Commissions in Australia have authorised irradiation of shrimps with their sale being restricted to the State authorising treatment.

  18. Progress in food irradiation: Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    Progress in food irradiation treatment of Australian commodities, such as meat, pepper, honey, fruit is described. Irradiation took place with 60 Co gamma radiation while testing for radiation sensitivity of Staphyllococcus in meat, of Bacillus aureus in pepper, of Streptococcus plutin and Bacillus larvae in honey, and of the fruitfly Dacus tryoni infesting fruit. Sofar, two State Health Commissions in Australia have authorised irradiation of shrimps with their sale being restricted to the State authorising treatment. (AJ) [de

  19. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C Mark; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-12-07

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  20. Formation of submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soloviev, V.; Ginsburg, G.D. (Reserch Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources of the Ocean ' ' VNII Okeangeologia' ' , St. Petersburg (Russian Federation))

    1994-03-01

    Submarine gas hydrates have been discoverd in the course of deep-sea drilling (DSDP and ODP) and bottom sampling in many offshore regions. This paper reports on expeditions carried out in the Black, Caspian and Okhotsk Seas. Gas hydrate accumulations were discovered and investigated in all these areas. The data and an analysis of the results of the deep-sea drilling programme suggest that the infiltration of gas-bearing fluids is a necessary condition for gas hydrate accumulation. This is confirmed by geological observations at three scale levels. Firstly, hydrates in cores are usually associated with comparatively coarse-grained, permeable sediments as well as voids and fractures. Secondly, hydrate accumulations are controlled by permeable geological structures, i.e. faults, diapirs, mud volcanos as well as layered sequences. Thirdly, in the worldwide scale, hydrate accumulations are characteristic of continental slopes and rises and intra-continental seas where submarine seepages also are widespread. Both biogenic and catagenic gas may occur, and the gas sources may be located at various distances from the accumulation. Gas hydrates presumably originate from water-dissolved gas. The possibility of a transition from dissolved gas into hydrate is confirmed by experimental data. Shallow gas hydrate accumulations associated with gas-bearing fluid plumes are the most convenient features for the study of submarine hydrate formation in general. These accumulations are known from the Black, Caspian and Okhotsk Seas, the Gulf of Mexico and off northern California. (au) (24 refs.)

  1. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  2. Dehydration behaviour of hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dette, S.S.; Stelzer, T.; Jones, M.J.; Ulrich, J. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Zentrum fuer Ingenieurwissenschaften, Verfahrenstechnik/TVT, 06099 Halle (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Immersing a crystalline solvate in a suitable anti-solvent can induce phase transformation to solvent-free solid phase. In certain cases the solvent-mediated phase transition results in the generation of hollow, tubular structures. Both the tube dimensions of sodium-2-keto-L-gulonate anhydrate (skga) and the dehydration kinetics of sodium-2-keto-L-gulonate monohydrate (skgm) can be modified by the antisolvent employed. An explanation for the variable dehydration behaviour of skgm in the antisolvents is presented here. Furthermore, other crystalline hydrates were dehydrated in dry methanol. Providing an operational window can be found, any hydrate material could possibly find use in the production of tubes (micro- or nanotubes for different applications). The experimental conditions selected (dry methanol as antisolvent, dehydration temperature at 25 C) for the dehydration did not lead to the anhydrate tube growth for all hydrates investigated. Based upon the results presented here a first hypothesis is presented to explain this effect. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Decomposition of methane hydrate for hydrogen production using microwave and radio frequency in-liquid plasma methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahim, Ismail; Nomura, Shinfuku; Mukasa, Shinobu; Toyota, Hiromichi

    2015-01-01

    This research involves two in-liquid plasma methods of methane hydrate decomposition, one using radio frequency wave (RF) irradiation and the other microwave radiation (MW). The ultimate goal of this research is to develop a practical process for decomposition of methane hydrate directly at the subsea site for fuel gas production. The mechanism for methane hydrate decomposition begins with the dissociation process of methane hydrate formed by CH_4 and water. The process continues with the simultaneously occurring steam methane reforming process and methane cracking reaction, during which the methane hydrate is decomposed releasing CH_4 into H_2, CO and other by-products. It was found that methane hydrate can be decomposed with a faster rate of CH_4 release using microwave irradiation over that using radio frequency irradiation. However, the radio frequency plasma method produces hydrogen with a purity of 63.1% and a CH conversion ratio of 99.1%, which is higher than using microwave plasma method which produces hydrogen with a purity of 42.1% and CH_4 conversion ratio of 85.5%. - Highlights: • The decomposition of methane hydrate is proposed using plasma in-liquid method. • Synthetic methane hydrate is used as the sample for decomposition in plasma. • Hydrogen can be produced from decomposition of methane hydrate. • Hydrogen purity is higher when using radio frequency stimulation.

  4. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  5. THERMODYNAMIC MODEL OF GAS HYDRATES

    OpenAIRE

    Недоступ, В. И.; Недоступ, О. В.

    2015-01-01

    The interest to gas hydrates grows last years. Therefore working out of reliable settlement-theoretical methods of definition of their properties is necessary. The thermodynamic model of gas hydrates in which the central place occupies a behaviour of guest molecule in cell is described. The equations of interaction of molecule hydrate formative gas with cell are received, and also an enthalpy and energy of output of molecule from a cell are determined. The equation for calculation of thermody...

  6. Dose/dose-rate responses of shrimp larvae to UV-B radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damkaer, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    Previous work indicated dose-rate thresholds in the effects of UV-B on the near-surface larvae of three shrimp species. Additional observations suggest that the total dose response varies with dose-rate. Below 0.002 Wm -2 sub([DNA]) irradiance no significant effect is noted in activity, development, or survival. Beyond that dose-rate threshold, shrimp larvae are significantly affected if the total dose exceeds about 85 Jm -2 sub([DNA]). Predictions cannot be made without both the dose-rate and the dose. These dose/dose-rate thresholds are compared to four-year mean dose/dose-rate solar UV-B irradiances at the experimental site, measured at the surface and calculated for 1 m depth. The probability that the shrimp larvae would receive lethal irradiance is low for the first half of the season of surface occurrence, even with a 44% increase in damaging UV radiation. (orig.)

  7. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lina; Yamauchi, Kazuo; Li, Zongjin; Zhang, Xixiang; Ma, Hongyan; Ge, Shenguang

    2017-01-01

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10

  8. Effect of gamma irradiation on mortality of tribolium castaneum (HERBST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rita Muhamad Awang.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation was made to assess the susceptibility of larvae and adults of Tribolium castaneum to gamma irradiation. The larvae were more susceptible to irradiation than the adults. A dose of 0.05 kGy killed all the larvae but higher dose of 0.15 kGy was required to kill all the adults. Therefore, a dose of 0.15 kGy was found to be the effective dose to kill both the larvae and the adults of T. castaneum. (author)

  9. Enhancing the efficacy of entomopathogenic nematodes by gamma radiation in controlling Spodoptera littoralis larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Sayed

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, finding a safe control program is the aim of all researchers. The goal of this work is to investigate the effect of gamma radiation on the Entomopathogenic nematodes, Steinernema scapterisci and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora Poinar (HP88 efficacy were tested against larvae of cotton leaf worm, Spodoptera littoralis (Boisd. under laboratory conditions. Results showed that 2 Gy irradiated S. scapterisci and H. bacteriophora were substantially effective in controlling S. littoralis larvae, while H. bacteriophora was more potent in controlling insect larvae. The results revealed that total protein concentration was significantly decreased (P < 0.05 after treatment with normal or irradiated H. bacteriophora or S. scapterisci. In addition, larvae infected with normal S. scapterisci or H. bacteriophora showed a significant elevation in phenoloxidase activity and represented significant reduce after treatment with 2 Gy irradiated S. scapterisci or H. bacteriophora as compared to control group. Also, lysozyme activity was significantly decreased after treatment with irradiated H. bacteriophora, but there was no significance with irradiated S. scapterisci, when compared with control. LDH activity was significantly high (p<0.05 in the haemolymph of larvae treated with normal or irradiated H. bacteriophora or S. scapterisci, as compared to control group. Furthermore among all treatments, 2 Gy irradiated H. bacteriophora was the most potent and efficient in the biomarkers changes. Therefore, it could be concluded that 2 Gy irradiated S. scapterisci and H. bacteriophora can serve within an integrated pest management (IPM program in an agroecosystem.

  10. Hydrate-CASM for modeling Methane Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Fuente Ruiz, M.; Vaunat, J.; Marin Moreno, H.

    2017-12-01

    A clear understanding of the geomechanical behavior of methane hydrate-bearing sediments (MHBS) is crucial to assess the stability of the seafloor and submarine infrastructures to human and natural loading changes. Here we present the Hydrate-CASM, a new elastoplastic constitutive model to predict the geomechanical behavior of MHBS. Our model employs the critical state model CASM (Clay and Sand Model) because of its flexibility in describing the shape of the yield surface and its proven ability to predict the mechanical behavior of sands, the most commercially viable hydrate reservoirs. The model considers MHBS as a deformable elastoplastic continuum, and hydrate-related changes in the stress-strain behavior are predicted by a densification mechanism. The densification attributes the mechanical contribution of hydrate to; a reduction of the available void ratio; a decrease of the swelling line slope; and an increase of the volumetric yield stress. It is described by experimentally derived physical parameters except from the swelling slope coefficient that requires empirical calibration. The Hydrate-CASM is validated against published triaxial laboratory tests performed at different confinement stresses, hydrate saturations, and hydrate morphologies. During the validation, we focused on capturing the mechanical behavior of the host sediment and consider perturbations of the sediment's mechanical properties that could result from the sample preparation. Our model successfully captures the experimentally observed influence of hydrate saturation in the magnitude and trend of the stiffness, shear strength, and dilatancy of MHBS. Hence, we propose that hydrate-related densification changes might be a major factor controlling the geomechanical response of MHBS.

  11. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  12. Flow assurance intervention, hydrates remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Christopher S. [Oceaneering International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the issues of removing hydrates in sub sea flow lines and associated equipment with an Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) of opportunity and a multi-service-vessel (MSV). The paper is split into three topics: the equipment used with the ROV, assessing the interface points and handling fluids produced from drawing down the pressure. Each section is explained thoroughly and backed up with real world experience. The equipment section details information from actual jobs performed and why the particular components were utilized. The system is generally contained in an ROV mounted skid. Pumps are utilized to draw down the pressure inside the hydrated section of equipment, removing one of the three necessary components for hydrates formation. Once the section is pumped down, several options exist for handling the fluids pumped out of the system: pumping to surface, re-injection into the well, or injection into an operating flow line. This method of hydrates remediation is both economical and timely. Hydrate blockages form in low temperatures and high pressures. Reducing the pressure or increasing the temperature so the conditions lie to the right of the hydrate dissociation curve will slowly decompose the blockage. Depressurization and the use of MEG or methanol will give favorable conditions to remove the hydrate plug. Oceaneering has the capabilities to remove hydrates using the FRS in conjunction with an installation vessel to dispose of the gas and fluid removed from the flow line. Hydrate remediation techniques should be implemented into the initial design to reduce costs later. The cost of stopped production combined with the day rate for equipment needed for hydrate removal outweighs the costs if no technique is utilized. (author)

  13. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  14. Shifting Focus: From Hydration for Performance to Hydration for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Erica T

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, literature on hydration biomarkers has evolved considerably - from (de)hydration assessment towards a more global definition of biomarkers of hydration in daily life. This shift in thinking about hydration markers was largely driven by investigating the differences that existed between otherwise healthy individuals whose habitual, ad-libitum drinking habits differ, and by identifying physiological changes in low-volume drinkers who subsequently increase their water intake. Aside from obvious differences in urinary volume and concentration, a growing body of evidence is emerging that links differences in fluid intake with small, but biologically significant, differences in vasopressin (copeptin), glomerular filtration rate, and markers of metabolic dysfunction or disease. Taken together, these pieces of the puzzle begin to form a picture of how much water intake should be considered adequate for health, and represent a shifting focus from hydration for performance, toward hydration for health outcomes. This narrative review outlines the key areas of research in which the global hydration process - including water intake, urinary hydration markers, and vasopressin - has been associated with health outcomes, focusing on kidney and metabolic endpoints. It will also provide a commentary on how various hydration biomarkers may be used in hydration for health assessment. Finally, if adequate water intake can play a role in maintaining health, how might we tell if we are drinking enough? Urine output is easily measured, and can take into account differences in daily physical activity, climate, dietary solute load, and other factors that influence daily water needs. Today, targets have been proposed for urine osmolality, specific gravity, and color that may be used by researchers, clinicians, and individuals as simple indicators of optimal hydration. However, there remain a large number of incomplete or unanswered research questions regarding the

  15. Hydration-annealing of chemical radiation damage in calcium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, S.M.K.; James, C.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of hydration on the annealing of chemical radiation damage in anhydrous calcium nitrate has been investigated. Rehydration of the anhydrous irradiated nitrate induces direct recovery of the damage. The rehydrated salt is susceptible to thermal annealing but the extent of annealing is small compared to that in the anhydrous salt. The direct recovery of damage on rehydration is due to enhanced lattice mobility. The recovery process is unimolecular. (author)

  16. Effects of age and liquid holding on the UV-radiation sensitivities of wild-type and mutant Caenorhabditis elegans dauer larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, P S

    1984-01-01

    The dauer larva is a facultative developmental stage in the life cycle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Dauer larvae, which can survive under starvation for over 60 days, resume normal development when feeding is resumed. Wild-type (N2) and 4 radiation-sensitive (rad) mutant dauer larvae were tested for their abilities to develop into adults after UV-irradiation. The rad-3 mutant was over 30 times as sensitive as N2; rad-1, rad-2 and rad-7 mutants were not hypersensitive. Irradiation also delayed development in survivors. Wild-type dauer larvae did not differ in radiation sensitivity from 0 through 50 days of age. There was no liquid holding recovery (LHR); that is, survival did not increase when wild-type dauer larvae were held in buffer after irradiation. (orig.). 28 refs.; 4 figs.

  17. The temperature hydration kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Oroian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the hydration kinetics of lentil seeds (Lens culinaris in water at different temperatures (25, 32.5, 40, 55, 70 and 80 °C for assessing the adequacy of models for describing the absorption phenomena during soaking. The diffusion coefficient values were calculated using Fick’s model for spherical and hemispherical geometries and the values were in the range of 10−6 m2/s. The experimental data were fitted to Peleg, Sigmoidal, Weibull and Exponential models. The models adequacy was determined using regression coefficients (R2, root mean square error (RMSE and reduced chi-square (χ2. The Peleg model is the suitable one for predicting the experimental data. Temperature had a positive and significant effect on the water absorption capacities and absorption was an endothermic process.

  18. [Biotechnological aspects in "loco" larvae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inestrosa, N C; Labarca, R; Perelman, A; Campos, E O; Araneda, R; González, M; Brandan, E; Sánchez, J P; González-Plaza, R

    1990-10-01

    The biology of planktotrophic larvae of Concholepas concholepas is the main bottleneck towards developing biotechnologies to rear this muricid. Data concerning planktonic larvae development, diets and environmental signals triggering larval settlement and recruitment is scarce. We have begun the study of the molecular and cell biology of embryos, larvae and recruits having as a final goal, the development of appropriate biotechnologies to rear this gastropod. First, an inverse ratio between BuChE and AChE enzyme activities was established. This ratio may be a precise developmental marker for this species. Second, for the first time a phosphoinositide related regulatory pathway is reported in a muricid, opening a new approach to the biotechnological management of larvae. Third, the relation between sulfate in sea water and larval motility was studied. Concentrations below 125 microM sulfate decreases larval motility. The sulfate is incorporated in proteoglycans which participate in different developmental phenomena. Lastly, a genomic Concholepas concholepas DNA sequence, similar to that of a human growth hormone probe was detected. This is very interesting since growth factors are key molecules during development, growth and are involved in food conversion rates in fish and also, in a variety of marine invertebrates.

  19. Alcohol cosurfactants in hydrate antiagglomeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, J Dalton; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2008-08-28

    Because of availability, as well as economical and environmental considerations, natural gas is projected to be the premium fuel of the 21st century. Natural gas production involves risk of the shut down of onshore and offshore operations because of blockage from hydrates formed from coproduced water and hydrate-forming species in natural gas. Industry practice has been usage of thermodynamic inhibitors such as alcohols often in significant amounts, which have undesirable environmental and safety impacts. Thermodynamic inhibitors affect bulk-phase properties and inhibit hydrate formation. An alternative is changing surface properties through usage of polymers and surfactants, effective at 0.5 to 3 weight % of coproduced water. One group of low dosage hydrate inhibitors (LDHI) are kinetic inhibitors, which affect nucleation rate and growth. A second group of LDHI are antiagglomerants, which prevent agglomeration of small hydrate crystallites. Despite great potential, work on hydrate antiagglomeration is very limited. This work centers on the effect of small amounts of alcohol cosurfactant in mixtures of two vastly different antiagglomerants. We use a model oil, water, and tetrahydrofuran as a hydrate-forming species. Results show that alcohol cosurfactants may help with antiagglomeration when traditional antiagglomerants alone are ineffective. Specifically, as low as 0.5 wt. % methanol cosurfactant used in this study is shown to be effective in antiagglomeration. Without the cosurfactant there will be agglomeration independent of the AA concentration. To our knowledge, this is the first report of alcohol cosurfactants in hydrate antiagglomerants. It is also shown that a rhamnolipid biosurfactant is effective down to only 0.5 wt. % in such mixtures, yet a quaternary ammonium chloride salt, i. e., quat, results in hydrate slurries down to 0.01 wt. %. However, biochemical surfactants are less toxic and biodegradable, and thus their use may prove beneficial even if at

  20. X-ray inactivation of Caenorhabditis elegans embryos or larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishi, N; Suzuki, K [Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    1990-11-01

    The lethal effects of X-irradiation were examined in staged populations of Caenorhabditis elegans embryos or larvae. Radiation resistance decreased slightly throughout the first, proliferative phase of embryogenesis. This might be due to the increase in target size, since most cells in C. elegans are autonomously determined. Animals irradiated in the second half of embryogenesis were about 40-fold more resistant to the lethal effects of X-rays. This is probably due to the absence of cell divisions during this time. The radiation resistance increased still more with advancing larval stages. A radiation hypersensitive mutant, rad-1, irradiated in the first half of embryogenesis, is about 30-fold more sensitive than wild-type, but in the second half it is the same as wild-type. (author).

  1. Effects of gamma radiation on larvae of Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith, 1797) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) fall armyworm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B.; Silva, Lucia C.A.S.; Franco, Jose G.; Harder, Marcia N.C.; Franco, Suely S.H.; Machi, Andre R.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most harmful insects the corn culture is the Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith, 1797) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), known commonly as fall armyworm, it is would originate of the tropical and subtropical areas of the American continent; its economical importance is due polyphagism, attacking countless grassy, such as corn, sorghum, wheat, barley, rice and pastures. One of the methods more used in the moment is the chemical control that during several applications the insect can turn resistant, then news researches has been made to the control of the insects. Due what was exposed the objective of the research was evaluated the effects of gamma radiation on larvae of S. frugiperda. Insects were rear in artificial diet. Each treatment had 5 repetitions with 20 larvae with 15-20 days of age in the total of 100 larvae per treatment. The larvae were irradiated with doses of gamma radiation of: 0 (control), 50, 100, 200 and 300 Gy, in source of Cobalt-60, type Gammacell-220, at dose rate of 0,508 kGy/hour. After irradiation the insects were keep in room with climatic conditions of 25 ± 5 dec C and 70 ± 5% R.H. Were evaluated the emergence of adults. The results showed that the dose of 300 Gy was the lethal dose to larvae irradiated, and 200 Gy the sterilizing dose to adults. (author)

  2. Effects of gamma radiation on larvae of Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith, 1797) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) fall armyworm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B.; Silva, Lucia C.A.S.; Franco, Jose G.; Harder, Marcia N.C., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br, E-mail: mnharder@terra.com.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Franco, Suely S.H.; Machi, Andre R., E-mail: gilmita@uol.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    One of the most harmful insects the corn culture is the Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith, 1797) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), known commonly as fall armyworm, it is would originate of the tropical and subtropical areas of the American continent; its economical importance is due polyphagism, attacking countless grassy, such as corn, sorghum, wheat, barley, rice and pastures. One of the methods more used in the moment is the chemical control that during several applications the insect can turn resistant, then news researches has been made to the control of the insects. Due what was exposed the objective of the research was evaluated the effects of gamma radiation on larvae of S. frugiperda. Insects were rear in artificial diet. Each treatment had 5 repetitions with 20 larvae with 15-20 days of age in the total of 100 larvae per treatment. The larvae were irradiated with doses of gamma radiation of: 0 (control), 50, 100, 200 and 300 Gy, in source of Cobalt-60, type Gammacell-220, at dose rate of 0,508 kGy/hour. After irradiation the insects were keep in room with climatic conditions of 25 ± 5 dec C and 70 ± 5% R.H. Were evaluated the emergence of adults. The results showed that the dose of 300 Gy was the lethal dose to larvae irradiated, and 200 Gy the sterilizing dose to adults. (author)

  3. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  4. Hydration water and microstructure in calcium silicate and aluminate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fratini, Emiliano; Ridi, Francesca; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Baglioni, Piero

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the state of the hydration water and the microstructure development in a cement paste is likely to be the key for the improvement of its ultimate strength and durability. In order to distinguish and characterize the reacted and unreacted water, the single-particle dynamics of water molecules in hydrated calcium silicates (C 3 S, C 2 S) and aluminates (C 3 A, C 4 AF) were studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering, QENS. The time evolution of the immobile fraction represents the hydration kinetics and the mobile fraction follows a non-Debye relaxation. Less sophisticated, but more accessible and cheaper techniques, like differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, and near-infrared spectroscopy, NIR, were validated through QENS results and they allow one to easily and quantitatively follow the cement hydration kinetics and can be widely applied on a laboratory scale to understand the effect of additives (i.e., superplasticizers, cellulosic derivatives, etc) on the thermodynamics of the hydration process. DSC provides information on the free water index and on the activation energy involved in the hydration process while the NIR band at 7000 cm -1 monitors, at a molecular level, the increase of the surface-interacting water. We report as an example the effect of two classes of additives widely used in the cement industry: superplasticizers, SPs, and cellulose derivatives. SPs interact at the solid surface, leading to a consistent increment of the activation energy for the processes of nucleation and growth of the hydrated phases. In contrast, the cellulosic additives do not affect the nucleation and growth activation energy, but cause a significant increment in the water availability: in other words the hydration process is more efficient without any modification of the solid/liquid interaction, as also evidenced by the 1 H-NMR. Additional information is obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultra small angle neutron scattering (USANS) and wide

  5. Hydration dependent dynamics in RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Greg L.; Bardaro, Michael F.; Echodu, Dorothy C.; Drobny, Gary P.; Varani, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    The essential role played by local and collective motions in RNA function has led to a growing interest in the characterization of RNA dynamics. Recent investigations have revealed that even relatively simple RNAs experience complex motions over multiple time scales covering the entire ms-ps motional range. In this work, we use deuterium solid-state NMR to systematically investigate motions in HIV-1 TAR RNA as a function of hydration. We probe dynamics at three uridine residues in different structural environments ranging from helical to completely unrestrained. We observe distinct and substantial changes in 2 H solid-state relaxation times and lineshapes at each site as hydration levels increase. By comparing solid-state and solution state 13 C relaxation measurements, we establish that ns-μs motions that may be indicative of collective dynamics suddenly arise in the RNA as hydration reaches a critical point coincident with the onset of bulk hydration. Beyond that point, we observe smaller changes in relaxation rates and lineshapes in these highly hydrated solid samples, compared to the dramatic activation of motion occurring at moderate hydration

  6. In vitro evaluation of rutin and rutin hydrate as potential radiation countermeasure agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojha, Himanshu; Sharma, Kulbhushan; Kallepalli, Simhachalam; Raina, Sheetal; Agrawala, Paban Kumar

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage is one of the major consequences of radiation exposure onto the biological systems. A series of compounds including flavanoids were found to render DNA protection against radiation damage. In this study we elucidated the potential of rutin and rutin hydrate to protect plasmid DNA against damage induced by irradiation. DPPH and hydroxyl radical scavenging assays were performed to assess the antiradical potential of rutin and rutin hydrate. Absorption measurements were performed to assess binding parameters of rutin and rutin hydrate with CT-DNA. DNA plasmid relaxation assay was performed to compare the radioprotective potential rutin and rutin hydrate against gamma irradiation mediated oxidative damage of pET28 (plasmid DNA). DPPH· assay indicated fast reaction kinetics for rutin and rutin hydrate however antiradical parameter in terms of EC50 suggested better scavenging capacity for rutin hydrate compared to rutin. Hydroxyl radical scavenging assay further suggested that both the compounds displayed significant reduction in hydroxyl radicals. Absorption binding study with CT-DNA suggested that rutin hydrate has better binding constant value (Ka=8.257x10 4 M -1 ) compared to Ka= 1.834x10 4 M -1 for rutin. Plasmid relaxation study demonstrated that plasmid DNA remains predominantly in the super-coiled form in the presence of both rutin and rutin hydrate after exposure to 100 Gy of γ-radiation. The mechanistic studies suggested that binding and scavenging capacity of rutin hydrate and rutin contributes towards DNA radioprotection. This study may be helpful in devising potent radioprotector molecules helpful for the radiotherapy treatment. (author)

  7. Mechanism of gypsum hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco, G.

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an hypothesis that the mechanism o f gypsum hydration and dehydration is performed through two simultaneous phenomena. In this study we try to clear up this phenomenon using chlorides as accelerators or a mixture of ethanol-methanol as retarders to carry out the gypsum setting. Natural Mexican gypsum samples and a hemihydrate prepared in the laboratory are used. The following analytical techniques are used: MO, DRX, DTA, TG and DTG. In agreement with the obtained results, it can be concluded: that colloid formation depends on the action of accelerators or retarders and the crystals are a consequence of the quantity of hemihydrate formed.

    En el mecanismo de hidratación y deshidratación del yeso existe la hipótesis de que éste se efectúa por dos fenómenos simultáneos. Este estudio intenta esclarecer estos fenómenos, empleando: cloruros como aceleradores o mezcla etanol-metanol como retardadores para efectuar el fraguado del yeso. Se emplean muestras de yeso de origen natural mexicano y hemihydrate preparado en laboratorio; se utilizan técnicas analíticas: MO, DRX, DTA, TG y DTG. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos se puede deducir: que la formación del coloide depende de la acción de los agentes aceleradores o retardadores y que los cristales son consecuencia de la cantidad de hemihidrato formado.

  8. Isolamento de esporos de Paenibacillus larvae subsp. larvae no Brasil Detectionof Paenibacillus larvae subsp. larvae spores in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulce Maria Tocchetto Schuch

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetivou detectar presença de esporos de Paenibacillus larvae subsp. larvae em produtos de um entreposto do interior do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, a identificação de possíveis fontes de contaminação e a avaliação da possibilidade da transferência de esporos para colméias de apiários adjacentes a partir de produtos importados contaminados. Foram analisados mel e pólen importados disponíveis no entreposto, favo do ninho (crias, pólen e mel colhido de uma colméia sadia, mel estocado em um dos apiários e abelhas adultas. Os resultados foram positivosem relação ao mel e pólen importados, a três grupos de abelhas adultas e ao mel do favo.The objective of this work was to detect the presence of Paenibacillus larvae subsp. larvae spores in products from a warehouse located in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, the identification of possible contamination sources, and the assessment of spores transference possibility from contaminated imported products from the warehouse to apiaries located in the surrounding area. Samples of imported pollen and bulk honey stocked in the warehouse, and honeycomb (brood, honey and pollen from a healthy hive, honey from one apiary and adult bees were analyzed. Imported honey and pollen, and three groups of adult bees and the honey collected from the honeycomb resulted positive.

  9. Hydrated electron: a destroyer of perfluorinated carboxylates?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Li; Dong Wenbo; Hou Huiqi

    2006-01-01

    showed that fluorine ion was generated in the mixed solution of K 4 Fe(CN) 6 and PFCAs after irradiation. This phenomenon also proved that hydrated electron could attach to PFCAs and followed by efficient dissociation of PFCAs via heterolytic cleavage of C-F bond. Considering that a majority of hydrated electron are generated in the course of radiation and non-thermal plasma, such technologies are believed to be capable of serving to PFCAs abatement. . (authors)

  10. Reconsideration on Hydration of Sodium Ion: From Micro-Hydration to Bulk Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongquan, Zhou; Chunhui, Fang; Yan, Fang; Fayan, Zhu; Haiwen, Ge; Hongyan, Liu

    2017-12-01

    Micro hydration structures of the sodium ion, [Na(H2O) n ]+, n = 1-12, were probed by density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level in both gaseous and aqueous phase. The predicted equilibrium sodium-oxygen distance of 0.240 nm at the present level of theory. The four-, five- and six-coordinated cluster can transform from each other at the ambient condition. The analysis of the successive water binding energy and natural charge population (NBO) on Na+ clearly shows that the influence of Na+ on the surrounding water molecules goes beyond the first hydration shell with the hydration number of 6. The Car-Parrinello molecular dynamic simulation shows that only the first hydration sphere can be found, and the hydration number of Na+ is 5.2 and the hydration distance ( r Na-O) is 0.235 nm. All our simulations mentioned in the present paper show an excellent agreement with the diffraction result from X-ray scattering study.

  11. A high yield process for hydrate formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giavarini, C.; Maccioni, F. [Univ. of Roma La Sapienza, Roma (Italy). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Due to the large quantities of natural gas stored in deep ocean hydrates, hydrate reservoirs are a substantial energy resource. Hydrates concentrate methane by as much as a factor of 164. As such, several natural gas transportation and storage systems using gas hydrates have been studied, and many of them are nearing practical use. In these systems, the hydrate is produced as a slurry by a spray process at approximately 7 megapascal (MPa), and then shaped into pellets. The use of a spray process, instead of a conventional stirred vessel is necessary in order to reach high hydrate concentrations in the hydrate-ice system. This paper presented a new procedure to produce a bulk of concentrated methane hydrate in a static traditional reactor at moderate pressure, controlling pressure and temperature in the interval between ice melting and the hydrate equilibrium curve. This paper discussed the experimental procedure which included formation of methane hydrate at approximately 5 MPa and 2 degrees Celsius in a reaction calorimeter at a volume of two liters. Results were also discussed. It was concluded that the procedure seemed suitable for the development of a gas hydrate storage and transport technology. It was found that the spray procedure took more time, but could be sped up and made continuous by using two vessels, one for hydrate formation and the other for hydrate concentration. The advantage was the production of a concentrated hydrate, using a simpler equipment and working at lower pressures respect to the spray process. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Radiation inactivation of Paenibacillus larvae and sterilization of American Foul Brood (AFB) infected hives using Co-60 gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Guzman, Zenaida M. [Microbiological Research and Service Laboratory, Atomic Research Division, Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines); Cervancia, Cleofas R. [Institute of Biological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, University of the Philippines, Los Banos, Laguna (Philippines); Dimasuay, Kris Genelyn B.; Tolentino, Mitos M.; Abrera, Gina B.; Cobar, Ma. Lucia C. [Microbiological Research and Service Laboratory, Atomic Research Division, Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines); Fajardo, Alejandro C.; Sabino, Noel G.; Manila-Fajardo, Analinda C. [Institute of Biological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, University of the Philippines, Los Banos, Laguna (Philippines); Feliciano, Chitho P., E-mail: cpfeliciano@pnri.dost.gov.ph [Microbiological Research and Service Laboratory, Atomic Research Division, Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines); Institute of Biology, College of Science, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines)

    2011-10-15

    The effectiveness of gamma radiation in inactivating the Philippine isolate of Paenibacillus larvae was investigated. Spores of P. larvae were irradiated at incremental doses (0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6 kGy) of gamma radiation emitted by a {sup 60}Co source. Surviving spores were counted and used to estimate the decimal reduction (D{sub 10}) value. A dose of 0.2 kGy was sufficient to inactivate 90% of the total recoverable spores from an initial count of 10{sup 5}-9x10{sup 3} spores per glass plate. The sterilizing effect of high doses of gamma radiation on the spores of P. larvae in infected hives was determined. In this study, a minimum dose (D{sub min}) of 15 kGy was tested. Beehives with sub-clinical infections of AFB were irradiated and examined for sterility. All the materials were found to be free of P. larvae indicating its susceptibility to {gamma}-rays. After irradiation, there were no visible changes in the physical appearance of the hives' body, wax and frames. Thus, a dose of 15 kGy is effective enough for sterilization of AFB-infected materials. - Highlights: > We characterized Paenibacillus larvae and determined its radiation sensitivity. > We investigated the effectiveness of gamma rays in inactivating P. larvae. > Gamma radiation inactivates P. larvae. > 15 kGy is effective for the sterilization of P. larvae-infected hives. > Irradiation produces no visible changes in the hives' body, waxes and frames.

  13. Radiation inactivation of Paenibacillus larvae and sterilization of American Foul Brood (AFB) infected hives using Co-60 gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Guzman, Zenaida M.; Cervancia, Cleofas R.; Dimasuay, Kris Genelyn B.; Tolentino, Mitos M.; Abrera, Gina B.; Cobar, Ma. Lucia C.; Fajardo, Alejandro C.; Sabino, Noel G.; Manila-Fajardo, Analinda C.; Feliciano, Chitho P.

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of gamma radiation in inactivating the Philippine isolate of Paenibacillus larvae was investigated. Spores of P. larvae were irradiated at incremental doses (0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6 kGy) of gamma radiation emitted by a 60 Co source. Surviving spores were counted and used to estimate the decimal reduction (D 10 ) value. A dose of 0.2 kGy was sufficient to inactivate 90% of the total recoverable spores from an initial count of 10 5 -9x10 3 spores per glass plate. The sterilizing effect of high doses of gamma radiation on the spores of P. larvae in infected hives was determined. In this study, a minimum dose (D min ) of 15 kGy was tested. Beehives with sub-clinical infections of AFB were irradiated and examined for sterility. All the materials were found to be free of P. larvae indicating its susceptibility to γ-rays. After irradiation, there were no visible changes in the physical appearance of the hives' body, wax and frames. Thus, a dose of 15 kGy is effective enough for sterilization of AFB-infected materials. - Highlights: → We characterized Paenibacillus larvae and determined its radiation sensitivity. → We investigated the effectiveness of gamma rays in inactivating P. larvae. → Gamma radiation inactivates P. larvae. → 15 kGy is effective for the sterilization of P. larvae-infected hives. → Irradiation produces no visible changes in the hives' body, waxes and frames.

  14. Electron spin resonance study on γ-ray-induced radical species in ethylene hydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeya, Kei; Sugahara, Takeshi; Ohgaki, Kazunari; Tani, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) study on γ-irradiated synthetic ethylene hydrate was performed to investigate induced radicals and their thermal stability. ESR spectra of induced 3-butenyl radical (.CH 2 C 2 H 3 =CH 2 ,g=2.0039±0.0005,A α =2.2±0.1mTandA β =3.0±0.1mT) and induced ethyl radical (.C 2 H 5 , g=2.0044±0.0005, A α =2.2±0.1mT and A β =2.7±0.1mT) were observed in irradiated ethylene hydrate. The decay of the 3-butenyl radicals was observed above 200 K with the activation energy of 51.9±4.4kJ/mol. The obvious decay of ethyl radicals starts above 240 K that is close to the dissociation temperature of ethylene hydrate at atmospheric pressure. The activation energy of the ethyl radical decay is estimated as 63.4±8.2kJ/mol and nearly equal to the enthalpy change of ethylene hydrate into liquid water and gaseous ethylene. It is suggested that the decay of ethyl radicals would be caused by the hydrate dissociation and that ethylene hydrate dissociates into water (supercooled) and ethylene at 240-265 K.

  15. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.

    1999-01-01

    and experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6......Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations...

  16. Storage capacity of hydrogen in gas hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, Takaaki; Ogata, Kyohei; Hashimoto, Shunsuke; Sugahara, Takeshi; Sato, Hiroshi; Ohgaki, Kazunari

    2010-01-01

    The storage capacity of H 2 in the THF, THT, and furan hydrates was studied by p-V-T measurements. We confirmed that the storage and release processes of H 2 in all hydrates could be performed reversibly by pressure swing without destroying of hydrate cages. H 2 absorption in both THT and furan hydrates is much faster than THF hydrate in spite of same unit-cell structure. On the other hand, the storage amounts of H 2 are coincident in the all additive hydrates and would reach at about 1.0 mass% asymptotically.

  17. Self mixing of fly larvae during feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkov, Olga; Johnson, Christopher; Hu, David

    How do we sustainably feed a growing world population? One solution of increasing interest is the use of black solider fly larvae, pea-sized grubs envisioned to transform hundreds of tons of food waste into a sustainable protein source. Although startups across the world are raising these larvae, a physical understanding of how they should be raised and fed remains missing. In this study, we present experiments measuring their feeding rate as a function of number of larvae. We show that larger groups of larvae have greater mixing which entrains hungry larvae around the food, increasing feeding rate. Feeding of larvae thus differs from feeding of cattle or other livestock which exhibit less self-mixing.

  18. Gas hydrates forming and decomposition conditions analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Павленко

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of gas hydrates has been defined; their brief description has been given; factors that affect the formation and decomposition of the hydrates have been reported; their distribution, structure and thermodynamic conditions determining the gas hydrates formation disposition in gas pipelines have been considered. Advantages and disadvantages of the known methods for removing gas hydrate plugs in the pipeline have been analyzed, the necessity of their further studies has been proved. In addition to the negative impact on the process of gas extraction, the hydrates properties make it possible to outline the following possible fields of their industrial use: obtaining ultrahigh pressures in confined spaces at the hydrate decomposition; separating hydrocarbon mixtures by successive transfer of individual components through the hydrate given the mode; obtaining cold due to heat absorption at the hydrate decomposition; elimination of the open gas fountain by means of hydrate plugs in the bore hole of the gushing gasser; seawater desalination, based on the hydrate ability to only bind water molecules into the solid state; wastewater purification; gas storage in the hydrate state; dispersion of high temperature fog and clouds by means of hydrates; water-hydrates emulsion injection into the productive strata to raise the oil recovery factor; obtaining cold in the gas processing to cool the gas, etc.

  19. Biology of Paenibacillus larvae, a deadly pathogen of honey bee larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebeling, Julia; Knispel, Henriette; Hertlein, Gillian; Fünfhaus, Anne; Genersch, Elke

    2016-09-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus larvae is the etiological agent of American Foulbrood of honey bees, a notifiable disease in many countries. Hence, P. larvae can be considered as an entomopathogen of considerable relevance in veterinary medicine. P. larvae is a highly specialized pathogen with only one established host, the honey bee larva. No other natural environment supporting germination and proliferation of P. larvae is known. Over the last decade, tremendous progress in the understanding of P. larvae and its interactions with honey bee larvae at a molecular level has been made. In this review, we will present the recent highlights and developments in P. larvae research and discuss the impact of some of the findings in a broader context to demonstrate what we can learn from studying "exotic" pathogens.

  20. Hyperprolinemic larvae of the drosophilid fly, Chymomyza costata, survive cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostál, Vladimír; Zahradnícková, Helena; Šimek, Petr

    2011-08-09

    The larva of the drosophilid fly, Chymomyza costata, is probably the most complex metazoan organism that can survive submergence in liquid nitrogen (-196 °C) in a fully hydrated state. We examined the associations between the physiological and biochemical parameters of differently acclimated larvae and their freeze tolerance. Entering diapause is an essential and sufficient prerequisite for attaining high levels of survival in liquid nitrogen (23% survival to adult stage), although cold acclimation further improves this capacity (62% survival). Profiling of 61 different metabolites identified proline as a prominent compound whose concentration increased from 20 to 147 mM during diapause transition and subsequent cold acclimation. This study provides direct evidence for the essential role of proline in high freeze tolerance. We increased the levels of proline in the larval tissues by feeding larvae proline-augmented diets and found that this simple treatment dramatically improved their freeze tolerance. Cell and tissue survival following exposure to liquid nitrogen was evident in proline-fed nondiapause larvae, and survival to adult stage increased from 0% to 36% in proline-fed diapause-destined larvae. A significant statistical correlation was found between the whole-body concentration of proline, either natural or artificial, and survival to the adult stage in liquid nitrogen for diapause larvae. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis suggested that high proline levels, in combination with a relatively low content of osmotically active water and freeze dehydration, increased the propensity of the remaining unfrozen water to undergo a glass-like transition (vitrification) and thus facilitated the prevention of cryoinjury.

  1. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  2. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na 2 SO 4 –H 2 O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions

  3. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lina

    2017-05-13

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10 was conducted for tricalcium silicate (C3S) to interpret long-term hydration process and investigate the formation, structure and properties of C-S-H. Based on results from XRD, IR, SEM, NMR and so forth, loose and dense clusters of C-S-H with analogous C/S ratio were obtained along with the corresponding chemical formulae proposed as Ca5Si4O13∙6.2H2O. Crystalline structure inside C-S-H was observed by TEM, which was allocated at the foil-like proportion as well as the edge of wrinkles of the product. The long-term hydration process of C3S in dilute suspension could be sketchily described as migration of calcium hydroxide and in-situ growth of C-S-H with equilibrium silicon in aqueous solution relatively constant and calcium varied.

  4. Impacts of Hydrate Distribution on the Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Properties of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Seol, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In general, hydrate makes the sediments hydraulically less conductive, thermally more conductive, and mechanically stronger; yet the dependency of these physical properties on hydrate saturation varies with hydrate distribution and morphology. Hydrate distribution in sediments may cause the bulk physical properties of their host sediments varying several orders of magnitude even with the same amount of hydrate. In natural sediments, hydrate morphology is inherently governed by the burial depth and the grain size of the host sediments. Compare with patchy hydrate, uniformly distributed hydrate is more destructive to fluid flow, yet leads to higher gas and water permeability during hydrate dissociation due to the easiness of forming percolation paths. Water and hydrate have similar thermal conductivity values; the bulk thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments depends critically on gas-phase saturation. 60% of gas saturation may result in evident thermal conductivity drop and hinder further gas production. Sediments with patchy hydrate yield lower stiffness than that with cementing hydrate but higher stiffness than that with pore filling and loading bearing hydrate. Besides hydrate distribution, the stress state and loading history also play an important role in the mechanical behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments.

  5. Barley seed radiosensitivity following post-hydration in oxygen-, nitrogen- and nitrous oxide-saturated water, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.P.; Kesavan, P.C.

    1990-01-01

    Dry (∼3.5 and 4.0 per cent moisture content) barley seeds were exposed to 350 Gy of 60 Co-γ-rays in vacuo and post-hydrated at 4degC for 8 h in O 2 -, N 2 -, or N 2 O-saturated water. The effect of caffeine and t-butyl alcohol (t-BuOH) dissolved in the post-hydration medium on the magnitude of damage developing under these three different gaseous circumstances was studied. The post-irradiation damage and its modification by caffeine and t-BuOH was assessed in terms of 8-day-old seedling injury, peroxidase activity and total peroxides in the 8-day-old seedlings. Post-irradiation O 2 -saturated hydration caused maximal 8-day-old seedling injury, and increased peroxidase activity with concomitant reduction in total peroxides. Both caffeine and t-BuOH afforded significant radioprotection against post-irradiation O 2 -dependent damage. Post-irradiation N 2 O-saturated hydration was even more significantly radioprotective than the N 2 -saturated post-hydration. Under these circumstances, t-BuOH exerted no effect whatsoever on the N 2 - and N 2 O-mediated post-irradiation damage. Caffeine, on the other hand, significantly potentiated these two components of damage. A brief consideration of the physicochemical events which possibly account for the observed effects is presented. (author)

  6. PRODUCTION OF HYDRATED ELECTRONS FROM PHOTOIONIZATION OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN NATURAL WATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under UV irradiation, an important primary photochemical reaction of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is electron ejection, producing hydrated electrons (e-aq). The efficiency of this process has been studied in both fresh and seawater samples with both steady-state scave...

  7. Larval x-ray irradiation influences protein expression in pupae of the Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera Dorsalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Third instar larvae were exposed to X-ray treatment of the Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis. Irradiated pupae were collected daily. Biological performance parameters of pupae and adults of larvae treated with X-ray irradiation were evaluated. Standard proteomics procedures such as densitometr...

  8. Is Br2 hydration hydrophobic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Torres, A; Gamboa-Suárez, A; Bernal-Uruchurtu, M I

    2017-02-28

    The spectroscopic properties of bromine in aqueous systems suggest it can behave as either hydrophilic or hydrophobic solute. In small water clusters, the halogen bond and the hydrogen-halogen interaction are responsible for its specific way of binding. In water hydrates, it is efficiently hosted by two different cages forming the crystal structure and it has been frequently assumed that there is little or no interaction between the guest and the host. Bromine in liquid solution poses a challenging question due to its non-negligible solubility and the large blue shift measured in its absorption spectra. Using a refined semi-empirical force field, PM3-PIF, we performed a Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics study of bromine in liquid water. Here we present a detailed study in which we retrieved the most representative hydration structures in terms of the most frequent positions around bromine and the most common water orientations. Albeit being an approximate description of the total hydration phenomenon, it captures the contribution of the leading molecular interactions in form of the recurrent structures. Our findings confirm that the spectroscopic signature is mainly caused by the closest neighbors. The dynamics of the whole first hydration shell strongly suggests that the external molecules in that structure effectively isolate the bulk from the presence of bromine. The solvation structure fluctuates from a hydrophilic to a hydrophobic-like environment along the studied trajectory.

  9. Hydration modeling of calcium sulphates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korte, A.C.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Al-Mattarneh, Hashem; Mustapha, Kamal N.; Nuruddin, Muhd Fadhil

    2008-01-01

    The CEMHYD3D model has been extended at the University of Twente in the last ten years [1,2]. At present the cement hydration model is extended for the use of gypsum. Although gypsum was present in the model already, the model was not suitable for high contents of gypsum and did not include the

  10. Workbook on Identification of Aedes Aegypti Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Harry D.; And Others

    This self-instructional booklet is designed to enable yellow fever control workers to identify the larvae of "Aedes aegypti." The morphological features of mosquito larvae are illustrated in this partially programed text, and the distinguishing features of "A. aegypti" indicated. A glossary is included. (AL)

  11. Coral larvae move toward reef sounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeij, M.J.A.; Marhaver, K.L.; Huijbers, C.M.; Nagelkerken, I.; Simpson, S.D.

    2010-01-01

    Free-swimming larvae of tropical corals go through a critical life-phase when they return from the open ocean to select a suitable settlement substrate. During the planktonic phase of their life cycle, the behaviours of small coral larvae (<1 mm) that influence settlement success are difficult to

  12. Irradiation as a quarantine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burditt, A.K. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The use of irradiation as an alternative treatment for commodities subject to infestation by pests of quarantine importance is outlined in this article. A dose of 300 Gy or less has been found to prevent adult emergence when insect eggs or larvae are irradiated and research has shown that such doses will not affect the quality of most commodities. The use of gamma rays from cobalt-60 or caesium-137 sources, as well as electrons or X-rays from linear accelerators, has been approved for food irradiation. Irradiation facilities must meet regulations promulgated by nuclear, health and agricultural quarantine agencies with regard to location, facility design, sources, operation, personnel, dosimetry and other requirements. Education of industry operators and the general public is needed in order to gain acceptance of irradiation as a quarantine treatment. (author). 21 refs, 1 tab

  13. Detection methods for irradiated mites and insects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatowicz, S.

    1999-01-01

    Results of the study on the following tests for separation of irradiated pests from untreated ones are reported: (a) test for identification of irradiated mites (Acaridae) based on lack of fecundity of treated females; (b) test for identification of irradiated beetles based on their locomotor activity; (c) test for identification of irradiated pests based on electron spin resonance (ESR) signal derived from treated insects; (d) test for identification of irradiated pests based on changes in the midgut induced by gamma radiation; and (e) test for identification of irradiated pests based on the alterations in total proteins of treated adults. Of these detection methods, only the test based on the pathological changes induced by irradiation in the insect midgut may identify consistently either irradiated larvae or adults. This test is simple and convenient when a rapid processing technique for dehydrating and embedding the midgut is used. (author)

  14. Observed gas hydrate morphologies in marine sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Roberts, J.; Druce, M. [Geotek Ltd., Daventry, Northamptonshire (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    The morphology of gas hydrate in marine sediments determines the basic physical properties of the sediment-hydrate matrix and provides information regarding the formation of gas hydrate deposits, and the nature of the disruption that will occur on dissociation. Small-scale morphology is useful in estimating the concentrations of gas hydrate from geophysical data. It is also important for predicting their response to climate change or commercial production. Many remote techniques for gas hydrate detection and quantification depend on hydrate morphology. In this study, morphology of gas hydrate was examined in HYACINTH pressure cores from recent seagoing expeditions. Visual and infrared observations from non-pressurized cores were also used. The expeditions and pressure core analysis were described in detail. This paper described the difference between two types of gas hydrate morphologies, notably pore-filling and grain-displacing. Last, the paper addressed the impact of hydrate morphology. It was concluded that a detailed morphology of gas hydrate is an essential component for a full understanding of the past, present, and future of any gas hydrate environment. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Seismic reflections associated with submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassen, K

    1996-12-31

    Gas hydrates are often suggested as a future energy resource. This doctoral thesis improves the understanding of the concentration and distribution of natural submarine gas hydrates. The presence of these hydrates are commonly inferred from strong bottom simulating reflection (BSR). To investigate the nature of BSR, this work uses seismic studies of hydrate-related BSRs at two different locations, one where gas hydrates are accepted to exist and interpreted to be very extensive (in the Beaufort Sea), the other with good velocity data and downhole logs available (offshore Oregon). To ascertain the presence of free gas under the BSR, prestack offset data must supplement near-vertical incidence seismic data. A tentative model for physical properties of sediments partially saturated with gas hydrate and free gas is presented. This model, together with drilling information and seismic data containing the BSR beneath the Oregon margin and the Beaufort Sea, made it possible to better understand when to apply the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) method to constrain BSR gas hydrate and gas models. Distribution of natural gas hydrates offshore Norway and Svalbard is discussed and interpreted as reflections from the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, overlying sediments containing free gas. Gas hydrates inferred to exist at the Norwegian-Svalbard continental margin correlate well with Cenozoic depocenters, and the associated gas is assumed to be mainly biogenic. Parts of that margin have a high potential for natural gas hydrates of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. 235 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Seismic reflections associated with submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassen, K.

    1995-12-31

    Gas hydrates are often suggested as a future energy resource. This doctoral thesis improves the understanding of the concentration and distribution of natural submarine gas hydrates. The presence of these hydrates are commonly inferred from strong bottom simulating reflection (BSR). To investigate the nature of BSR, this work uses seismic studies of hydrate-related BSRs at two different locations, one where gas hydrates are accepted to exist and interpreted to be very extensive (in the Beaufort Sea), the other with good velocity data and downhole logs available (offshore Oregon). To ascertain the presence of free gas under the BSR, prestack offset data must supplement near-vertical incidence seismic data. A tentative model for physical properties of sediments partially saturated with gas hydrate and free gas is presented. This model, together with drilling information and seismic data containing the BSR beneath the Oregon margin and the Beaufort Sea, made it possible to better understand when to apply the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) method to constrain BSR gas hydrate and gas models. Distribution of natural gas hydrates offshore Norway and Svalbard is discussed and interpreted as reflections from the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, overlying sediments containing free gas. Gas hydrates inferred to exist at the Norwegian-Svalbard continental margin correlate well with Cenozoic depocenters, and the associated gas is assumed to be mainly biogenic. Parts of that margin have a high potential for natural gas hydrates of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. 235 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Influence of fluorosurfactants on hydrate formation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C.U.; Jeong, K.E.; Chae, H.J.; Jeong, S.Y. [Korea Reasearch Inst. of Chemical Technology, Alternative Chemicals/Fuel Research Center, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates, or clathrates, are ice-like solids that forms when natural gas is in contact with liquid water or ice under high pressure and low temperature. There is significant interest in studying the storage and transportation of gas in the form of hydrates. However, a critical problem impacting the industrial application of gas hydrates for storage and transportation of natural gas is the slow formation rate of natural gas hydrate. Researchers have previously reported on the promotion effect of some additives on gas hydrate formation and hydrate gas content. Fluorosurfactants are significantly superior to nonfluorinated surfactants in wetting action, as well as stability in harsh environments, both thermal and chemical. This paper discussed an experimental investigation into the effects of fluorosurfactants with different ionic types on the formation of methane hydrate. The surfactants used were FSN-100 of DuPont Zonyl as non-ionic surfactant and FC-143 of DuPont as anionic surfactant. The paper discussed the experimental apparatus for methane hydrate formation. It also discussed hydrate formation kinetics and the series of hydrate formation experiments that were conducted in the presence of fluorosurfactants. Last, the paper explored the results of the study. It was concluded that anionic fluorosurfactant of FC-143 had a better promoting effect on methane hydrate formation compared with nonionic surfactant of FSN-100. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  18. Feeding for larvae of catfish Pangasionodon sp. larvae in different ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Agus Suprayudi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Sludge worm (Tubifex sp. as natural feed on catfish (Pangasionodon sp. larvae rearing is available in limited amount especially during rainy season. It becomes a constraint factor for larvae rearing sector. This research was conducted to evaluate the appropriate initial age of catfish larvae to get artificial feed as sludge worm replacement. Evaluation was conducted on the growth and survival of catfish larvae in 14 days of culture. There were four treatments of feeding in triplicates i.e. larvae were given natural feed without artificial feed, given artificial feed started from d3, d6, and d9 with three replications. The results showed that larvae fed on artificial feed on d3 had the lowest growth compared to the other treatments, whereas the survival was not significantly different (P>0.05 among the treatments. As a conclusion, artificial feed could be used to replace natural feed for catfish larvae started at the age of nine days. Keywords: sludge worm, catfish larvae, artificial feed  ABSTRAK Cacing sutra (Tubifex sp. tersedia dalam jumlah terbatas terutama pada musim penghujan sebagai pakan alami dalam usaha pembenihan ikan patin (Pangasionodon sp.. Ini menjadi kendala dalam usaha pembenihan. Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengevaluasi umur larva ikan patin yang tepat untuk mulai diberi pakan buatan menggantikan cacing sutra. Evaluasi dilakukan pada pertumbuhan dan kelangsungan hidup larva ikan patin umur 14 hari. Selama pemeliharaan, larva diberi pakan dengan empat perlakuan; pemberian pakan alami tanpa pakan buatan, pemberian pakan buatan mulai d3, d6, dan d9 dengan tiga ulangan untuk masing-masing perlakuan. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa perlakuan pemberian pakan buatan mulai d3 memiliki pertumbuhan panjang yang terkecil dibandingkan perlakuan lain, sedangkan tingkat kelangsungan hidup larva tidak berbeda nyata (P>0,05 antarperlakuan. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian, dapat disimpulkan bahwa pakan buatan dapat digunakan

  19. Effects of gamma radiation on respiration of larvae of Pieris brassicae L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, M.A.H.

    1979-01-01

    The oxygen consumption and respiratory quotient of larvae of Pieris brassicae, the cabbage white butterfly were studied following treatment with 6, 9 and 12 krad of gamma radiation from a 60 Co source. The dose rate was 1.229 krad/min. Oxygen consumption and R.Q. were measured at 25 0 C with a Warburg respirometer. There was no difference in oxygen consumption and R.Q. between larvae of each sex though the rate of oxygen consumption with body weight increased in females and decreased in males. Irradiation did not produce any noticeable change in oxygen consumption of larvae. But the R.Q.'s in the treated individuals were higher than in the untreated ones indicating greater use of carbohydrates. (author)

  20. Fire extinction utilizing carbon dioxide hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatakeyama, T.; Aida, E.; Yokomori, T.; Ohmura, R.; Ueda, T. [Keio Univ., Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Clathrate hydrates formed with nonflammable gases may be suitable for use as fire extinguishing agents because dissociation of the hydrates results in the temperature decrease in the combustion field and the nonflammable gases released from the dissociated hydrates prevent the supply of the oxygen to the combustion field. This paper discussed experiments in which ordinary ice and dry ice were used to evaluate the performance of CO{sub 2} hydrate as a fire extinguishing agent. The paper described the apparatus and procedure for the preparation of CO{sub 2} hydrate crystals. A schematic of the reactor to form CO{sub 2} hydrate and a photograph of CO{sub 2} hydrate crystal formed in the study were also presented. Other illustrations, photographs, and tables that were presented included a schematic diagram of the experimental apparatus used for the flame extinction experiments; a photograph of CO{sub 2} hydrate powder; sequential video graphs of the flame extinction by the supply of CO{sub 2} hydrate crystals to the methanol pool flame and the relevant illustration; and heat of CO{sub 2} hydrate dissociation, water vaporization and sublimation of dry ice. It was concluded that the critical mass of the CO{sub 2} hydrate required to extinguish a flame was much less than that of ordinary ice, indicating the superiority of CO{sub 2} hydrate to the ice. In addition, the experiments also revealed that the size of the CO{sub 2} hydrate particles had a significant effect on the performance of flame extinction. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  1. Larva migrans visceral: relato de caso

    OpenAIRE

    Machado Alexandre Bortoli; El Achkar Marice Emanuela

    2003-01-01

    Larva migrans visceral é doença infecciosa, adquirida por ingestão de ovos provenientes dos vermes Toxocara canis e/ou Toxocara cati que infestam cães e gatos; as larvas penetram a parede intestinal e migram através dos tecidos levando a alterações diversas, conseqüentes a uma resposta inflamatória imune.¹ Os autores descrevem um caso clínico de larva migrans visceral com apresentação clínica atípica.

  2. Effect of sublethal doses of radiation and cystamine on the dynamics of Rana temporaria L. larvae development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, D.V.

    1979-01-01

    The longevity of Rana temporaria L. larvae in the 45th stage of development is studied after irradiation in sublethal doses (10.000-20.000 R) and irradiation with preliminary cystamine protection. It has been shown that the protective effect of cystamine is revealed in partial normalization of the larvae development rate but does not eliminate the typical anomalies of extremity development and does not prolong the time of animal survival. It has been found that LD 50/30 dose for R. temporaria tadpoles in the 45th stage of development is slightly higher than 10.000 R. The selective effect of X-radiation on the formative bonds at cornea induction in Anura larvae is concluded

  3. TIME management by medicinal larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, David I; Čeřovský, Václav; Nigam, Yamni; Pickles, Samantha F; Cazander, Gwendolyn; Nibbering, Peter H; Bültemann, Anke; Jung, Wilhelm

    2016-08-01

    Wound bed preparation (WBP) is an integral part of the care programme for chronic wounds. The acronym TIME is used in the context of WBP and describes four barriers to healing in chronic wounds; namely, dead Tissue, Infection and inflammation, Moisture imbalance and a non-migrating Edge. Larval debridement therapy (LDT) stems from observations that larvae of the blowfly Lucilia sericata clean wounds of debris. Subsequent clinical studies have proven debriding efficacy, which is likely to occur as a result of enzymatically active alimentary products released by the insect. The antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and wound healing activities of LDT have also been investigated, predominantly in a pre-clinical context. This review summarises the findings of investigations into the molecular mechanisms of LDT and places these in context with the clinical concept of WBP and TIME. It is clear from these findings that biotherapy with L. sericata conforms with TIME, through the enzymatic removal of dead tissue and its associated biofilm, coupled with the secretion of defined antimicrobial peptides. This biotherapeutic impact on the wound serves to reduce inflammation, with an associated capacity for an indirect effect on moisture imbalance. Furthermore, larval serine proteinases have the capacity to alter fibroblast behaviour in a manner conducive to the formation of granulation tissue. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Image-based automatic recognition of larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Ru; Yu, Guiying; Fan, Weijun; Guo, Tiantai

    2010-08-01

    As the main objects, imagoes have been researched in quarantine pest recognition in these days. However, pests in their larval stage are latent, and the larvae spread abroad much easily with the circulation of agricultural and forest products. It is presented in this paper that, as the new research objects, larvae are recognized by means of machine vision, image processing and pattern recognition. More visional information is reserved and the recognition rate is improved as color image segmentation is applied to images of larvae. Along with the characteristics of affine invariance, perspective invariance and brightness invariance, scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) is adopted for the feature extraction. The neural network algorithm is utilized for pattern recognition, and the automatic identification of larvae images is successfully achieved with satisfactory results.

  5. Extreme morphologies of mantis shrimp larvae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haug, Carolin; Ahyong, Shane T.; Wiethase, Joris H.

    2016-01-01

    Larvae of stomatopods (mantis shrimps) are generally categorized into four larval types: antizoea, pseudozoea (both representing early larval stages), alima and erichthus (the latt er two representing later larval stages). These categories, however, do not refl ect the existing morphological...

  6. CalCOFI Larvae Counts Positive Tows

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for eggs captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  7. Recovery of uranium from an irradiated solid target after removal of molybdenum-99 produced from the irradiated target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Sean Douglas; May, Iain; Copping, Roy; Dale, Gregory Edward

    2017-10-17

    A process for minimizing waste and maximizing utilization of uranium involves recovering uranium from an irradiated solid target after separating the medical isotope product, molybdenum-99, produced from the irradiated target. The process includes irradiating a solid target comprising uranium to produce fission products comprising molybdenum-99, and thereafter dissolving the target and conditioning the solution to prepare an aqueous nitric acid solution containing irradiated uranium. The acidic solution is then contacted with a solid sorbent whereby molybdenum-99 remains adsorbed to the sorbent for subsequent recovery. The uranium passes through the sorbent. The concentrations of acid and uranium are then adjusted to concentrations suitable for crystallization of uranyl nitrate hydrates. After inducing the crystallization, the uranyl nitrate hydrates are separated from a supernatant. The process results in the purification of uranyl nitrate hydrates from fission products and other contaminants. The uranium is therefore available for reuse, storage, or disposal.

  8. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...... prehydration may occur. In the report both theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during water vapour exposure is nucleation controlled....

  9. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate–saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate–bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  10. Extreme morphologies of mantis shrimp larvae

    OpenAIRE

    Haug, Carolin; Ahyong, Shane T.; Wiethase, Joris H.; Olesen, Jørgen; Haug, Joachim T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Larvae of stomatopods (mantis shrimps) are generally categorized into four larval types: antizoea, pseudozoea (both representing early larval stages), alima and erichthus (the latter two representing later larval stages). These categories, however, do not reflect the existing morphological diversity of stomatopod larvae, which is largely unstudied. We describe here four previously unknown larval types with extreme morphologies. All specimens were found in the collections of the Zoolo...

  11. Activity of R(+ limonene against Anisakis larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Giarratana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to evaluate the activity of R(+ limonene of against Anisakidae larvae. Its effectiveness was tested in vitro. The results obtained showing a significant activity of the compound against Anisakis larvae, suggesting further investigation on its potential use in the industrial marinating process. In this regard, the use of R(+ limonene in seafood products could be interesting, also due the sensory attributes resulting from its use and its relatively safe status.

  12. URAM-2 Cryogenic Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Shabalin, E P; Kulikov, S A; Kulagin, E N; Melihov, V V; Belyakov, A A; Golovanov, L B; Borzunov, Yu T; Konstantinov, V I; Androsov, A V

    2002-01-01

    The URAM-2 irradiation facility has been built and mounted at the channel No. 3 of the IBR-2 reactor. It was constructed for study of radiolysis effects by fast neutron irradiation in some suitable for effective cold neutron production materials (namely: solid methane, methane hydrate, water ice, etc.). The facility cooling system is based on using liquid helium as a coolant material. The original charging block of the rig allows the samples to be loaded by condensing gas into irradiation cavity or by charging beads of ice prepared before. Preliminary tests for each facility block and assembling them at the working position were carried out. Use of the facility for study accumulation of chemical energy under irradiation at low temperature in materials mentioned above and its spontaneous release was started.

  13. Extreme morphologies of mantis shrimp larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Haug

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Larvae of stomatopods (mantis shrimps are generally categorized into four larval types: antizoea, pseudozoea (both representing early larval stages, alima and erichthus (the latter two representing later larval stages. These categories, however, do not reflect the existing morphological diversity of stomatopod larvae, which is largely unstudied. We describe here four previously unknown larval types with extreme morphologies. All specimens were found in the collections of the Zoological Museum, University of Copenhagen and were collected during the Danish Dana Expedition round the world 1928-30. These new larval types all represent erichthus-type larvae, especially differing in their shield morphologies. The shield morphology ranges from almost spherical to rather disc-like, with sometimes extremely elongated spines, but only a general systematic assignment of the larvae was possible. Further investigations of these larvae are crucial to understand their life habits and ecological impact, especially as stomatopod and other crustacean larvae might have a much more important position in the marine ecosystems than their corresponding adults.

  14. Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabitto, Jorge [Prairie View A& M University; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Methane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 1016?m3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detected by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed.

  15. Accelerated hydration of high silica cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Colin; Yui, Mikazu

    2012-01-01

    Current Japanese designs for high level radioactive waste (HLW) repositories anticipate the use of both bentonite (buffer and backfill material) and cement based materials. Using hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) as a grouting material is undesirable because the associated high pH buffer will have an undisputed detrimental effect on the performance of the bentonite buffer and backfill and of the host rock by changing its porosity. Instead, hydrated low pH cement (LopHC) grouting materials are being developed to provide a pH inferior or equal to 11 to reduce these detrimental effects. LopHC grouting materials use mixtures of superfine OPC (SOPC) clinker and silica fume (SF), and are referred as high silica cements (HSC). The focus of the present study was to identify the development of the unhydrated and hydrated mineral assemblage and the solution chemistry during the hydration of HSC. Since hydration experiments of cementitious materials are notably slow, a ball mill was used to accelerate hydration. This was done for two reasons. Firstly, to develop a method to rapidly hydrate cement based materials without the need for higher temperatures (which can alter the mineral assemblage), and secondly, to ensure that the end point of hydration was reached in a reasonable time frame and so to realize the final mineralogy and solution chemistry of hydrated HSC

  16. Microstructure of natural hydrate host sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.; Kerkar, P.B.; Mahajan, D.; Lindquist, W.B.; Feng, H.

    2007-01-01

    There is worldwide interest in the study of natural gas hydrate because of its potential impact on world energy resources, control on seafloor stability, significance as a drilling hazard and probable impact on climate as a reservoir of a major greenhouse gas. Gas hydrates can (a) be free floating in the sediment matrix (b) contact, but do not cement, existing sediment grains, or (c) actually cement and stiffen the bulk sediment. Seismic surveys, often used to prospect for hydrates over a large area, can provide knowledge of the location of large hydrate concentrations because the hydrates within the sediment pores modify seismic properties. The ability to image a sample at the grain scale and to determine the porosity, permeability and seismic profile is of great interest since these parameters can help in determining the location of hydrates with certainty. We report here on an investigation of the structure of methane hydrate sediments at the grain-size scale using the synchrotron radiation-based computed microtomography (CMT) technique. Work has started on the measurements of the changes occurring as tetrahydrofuran hydrate, a surrogate for methane hydrate, is formed in the sediment

  17. Dose/dose-rate responses of shrimp larvae to UV-B radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damkaer, D.M.; Dey, D.B.; Heron, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Previous work indicated dose-rate thresholds in the effects of UV-B on the near-surface larvae of three shrimp species. Additional observations suggest that the total dose response varies with dose-rate. Below 0.002 Wm/sup -2/sub((DNA)) irradiance no significant effect is noted in activity, development, or survival. Beyond that dose-rate threshold, shrimp larvae are significantly affected if the total dose exceeds about 85 Jm/sup -2/sub((DNA)). Predictions cannot be made without both the dose-rate and the dose. These dose/dose-rate thresholds are compared to four-year mean dose/dose-rate solar UV-B irradiances at the experimental site, measured at the surface and calculated for 1 m depth. The probability that the shrimp larvae would receive lethal irradiance is low for the first half of the season of surface occurrence, even with a 44% increase in damaging UV radiation.

  18. Application of empirical hydration distribution functions around polar atoms for assessing hydration structures of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Daisuke; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Empirical distribution functions of water molecules in protein hydration are made. ► The functions measure how hydrogen-bond geometry in hydration deviate from ideal. ► The functions assess experimentally identified hydration structures of protein. - Abstract: To quantitatively characterize hydrogen-bond geometry in local hydration structures of proteins, we constructed a set of empirical hydration distribution functions (EHDFs) around polar protein atoms in the main and side chains of 11 types of hydrophilic amino acids (D. Matsuoka, M. Nakasako, Journal of Physical Chemistry B 113 (2009) 11274). The functions are the ensemble average of possible hydration patterns around the polar atoms, and describe the anisotropic deviations from ideal hydrogen bond geometry. In addition, we defined probability distribution function of hydration water molecules (PDFH) over the hydrophilic surface of a protein as the sum of EHDFs of solvent accessible polar protein atoms. The functions envelop most of hydration sites identified in crystal structures of proteins (D. Matsuoka, M. Nakasako, Journal of Physical Chemistry B 114 (2010) 4652). Here we propose the application of EHDFs and PDFHs for assessing crystallographically identified hydration structures of proteins. First, hydration water molecules are classified with respect to the geometry in hydrogen bonds in referring EHDFs. Difference Fourier electron density map weighted by PDFH of protein is proposed to identify easily density peaks as candidates of hydration water molecules. A computer program implementing those ideas was developed and used for assessing hydration structures of proteins

  19. Waters of Hydration of Cupric Hydrates: A Comparison between Heating and Absorbance Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2011-01-01

    The empirical formulas of four cupric hydrates are determined by measuring the absorbance in aqueous solution. The Beer-Lambert Law is verified by constructing a calibration curve of absorbance versus known Cu[superscript 2+](aq) concentration. A solution of the unknown hydrate is prepared by using 0.2-0.3 g of hydrate, and water is added such…

  20. Improvement of physical properties of soyabeans by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, M.-W.; Kwon, J.-H.; Mori, Tomohiko

    1993-01-01

    Physical properties of gamma-irradiated soybeans were evaluated at different temperatures by determining water absorption pattern and cooking characteristics of the sample. Irradiation at 2.5-10 kGy caused the reduction of soaking time in soybeans by 2-5 hours and the increase of hydration capacity by 10-20%, respectively, compared to the non-irradiated control at 20 o C. The activation energy for water absorption was lower in irradiated soybeans than in the non-irradiated control. Irradiation at 2.5-10 kGy caused the reduction of cooking time in soybeans by 30-60% compared to the non-irradiated control and the cooking rate constant of irradiated samples was higher about 2 times than that of the non-irradiated control. The irradiation efficacy on physical quality improvement was also recognized in the stored soybeans for one year at room temperature. (author)

  1. Hydration in soccer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. The rates that carbohydrate and water are absorbed by the organism are limited by the rates of gastric emptying and intestinal absorption. The composition of drinks offered to the players should be influenced by the relative importance of the need of supplying carbohydrates or water; it should be remembered that the depletion of carbohydrate can result in fatigue and decrease of performance, but it is not usually a life-threatening condition. The addition of carbohydrate in these drinks increases the concentrations of blood glucose, increases the use of external fuel through the increase of the glucose oxidation in the muscles and it spares muscle glycogen. So, the ingestion of carbohydrate before and during the exercise can delay the emergence of fatigue and increase the players' performance. Several tactics can be used to avoid dehydration, like hyperhydration before exercise and player's acclimatization. The ideal situation to restore the player's fluid losses is between the sessions of exercises. Since soccer is a sport with quite peculiar characteristics related to hydration, the players should be concerned and educated about the importance of fluid ingestion before, during and after the exercise.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of alanine boron hydrate for its use in thermal neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanez S, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Alanine boron hydrate was synthesized for its possible use as intercomparison dosimeter for thermal neutron irradiation. The irradiations were performed in the Nuclear Reactor of the Nuclear Center of Mexico. The salt was prepared by reacting alanine and boric acid in a (1:1) stoichiometric ratio in neutral pH 7.5 aqueous solution and also in a basic pH 13 solution. The latter reaction was prepared with the addition of ammonia hydroxide (25%). Solutions were stirred and afterwards were let to evaporate. The obtained product in each reaction is a white solid. Dosimeters were prepared with the obtained reaction products and irradiated under thermal neutron flux of 5 x 10 7 n/cm 2 s. For 30 hours. The analysis of irradiated samples was made in a Variant E-15 Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectrometer. The observed response of the samples prepared with the reaction product at the basic pH is approximately 50% higher than the neutral pH samples. In order to investigate the optimum signal enhancement samples were prepared in a basic pH medium in the following stoichiometric ratios: (1:0.5); (1:0.75); (1:1.25); (1:1.5) and (1:1.75). It was observed that the samples of the reaction (1:0.75) produced the higher response. The response was 2728% higher than the alanine only dosimeters. The reaction product was chemically characterized by X-ray diffraction, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Chromatography, Refractometry and Solubility tests. Results indicate that alanine boron hydrate is formed in basic media and in a stoichiometric ratio (1:0.75). The dosimetric characterization of alanine boron hydrate was performed, results are reported. It is concluded that alanine boron hydrate may be a good intercomparison dosimeter for thermal neutron irradiation. (Author)

  3. Gas Hydrates | Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preliminary Report - Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrates, Volume 204 Initial Report Mallik 2002 GSC Bulletin 585 : Scientific results from the Mallik 2002 gas hydrate production well program Offshore gas hydrate sample

  4. Simulation and Characterization of Methane Hydrate Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, S.; Gupta, I.

    2017-12-01

    The ever rising global energy demand dictates human endeavor to explore and exploit new and innovative energy sources. As conventional oil and gas reserves deplete, we are constantly looking for newer sources for sustainable energy. Gas hydrates have long been discussed as the next big energy resource to the earth. Its global occurrence and vast quantity of natural gas stored is one of the main reasons for such interest in its study and exploration. Gas hydrates are solid crystalline substances with trapped molecules of gas inside cage-like crystals of water molecules. Gases such as methane, ethane, propane and carbon dioxide can form hydrates but in natural state, methane hydrates are the most common. Subsurface geological conditions with high pressure and low temperature favor the formation and stability of gas hydrates. While the occurrence and potential of gas hydrates as energy source has long been studied, there are still gaps in knowledge, especially in the quantitative research of gas hydrate formation and reservoir characterization. This study is focused on exploring and understanding the geological setting in which gas hydrates are formed and the subsequent changes in rock characteristics as they are deposited. It involves the numerical simulation of methane gas flow through fault to form hydrates. The models are representative of the subsurface geologic setting of Gulf of Mexico with a fault through layers of shale and sandstone. Hydrate formation simulated is of thermogenic origin. The simulations are conducted using TOUGH+HYDRATE, a numerical code developed at the Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory for modeling multiphase flow through porous medium. Simulation results predict that as the gas hydrates form in the pores of the model, the porosity, permeability and other rock properties are altered. Preliminary simulation results have shown that hydrates begin to form in the fault zone and gradually in the sandstone layers. The increase in hydrate

  5. Formation rate of natural gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, Marit

    2002-07-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 deg C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted to hydrate. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by gas injection rate and pressure. The effect of stirring rate is less significant and subcooling has no observable effect on the formation rate. Hydrate crystal concentration and gas composition do not influence the hydrate formation rate. Observations of produced hydrate crystals indicate that the crystals are elongated, about 5 micron in diameter and 10 micron long. Analysis of the results shows that the rate of hydrate formation is dominated by gas-liquid mass transfer. A mass transfer model, the bubble-to-crystal model, was developed for the hydrate formation rate in a continuous stirred tank reactor, given in terms of concentration driving force and an overall mass transfer coefficient. The driving force is the difference between the gas concentration at the gas-liquid interface and at the hydrate crystal surface. These concentrations correspond to the solubility of gas in water at experimental temperature and pressure and the solubility of gas at hydrate equilibrium temperature and experimental pressure, respectively. The overall mass transfer coefficient is expressed in terms of superficial gas velocity and impeller power consumption, parameters commonly used in study of stirred tank reactors. Experiments and modeling show that the stirred tank reactor has a considerable potential for increased production capacity. However, at higher hydrate production rates the

  6. Gamma irradiation effects on larval and pupal stages on the saw toothed grain beetle oryzaephilus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younes, M.W.; Ahmed, M.Y.Y.

    1978-01-01

    Effects of gamma irradiation from Co 60 on larval and pupal stages of the saw-toothed grain beetle. Oryzaephilus surinamensis L. were determined. Larval and pupal sensitivity depended on age at treatment, the older the larvae or pupae, the less susceptible. No adults emerged in the 10- to 12-day larvae and 4-day old pupae when irradiated at 10 and 100 Krad. respectively. Irradiation of larvae and pupae especially at high doses, resulted in reduced percent adult emergence in incomplete emergence, and in structural deformities. The percentage sterility for both sexes at each dosage used were determined. Males and females irradiated asl-d and 4-d-old pupae, then mated with normal unmated adults of the opposite sex laid infertile eggs when irradiated at 12 Krad. Adult mortality from irradiated pupae (1- or 4-d-old) was increased with the increase of the dose

  7. Cherry Irradiation Studies. 1984 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eakin, D.E.; Hungate, F.P.; Tingey, G.L.; Olsen, K.L.; Fountain, J.B.; Burditt, A.K. Jr.; Moffit, H.R.; Johnson, D.A.; Lunden, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    Fresh cherries, cherry fruit fly larvae, and codling moth larvae were irradiated using the PNL cobalt-60 facility to determine the efficacy of irradiation treatment for insect disinfestation and potential shelf life extension. Irradiation is an effective disinfestation treatment with no significant degradation of fruit at doses well above those required for quarantine treatment. Sufficient codling moth control was achieved at projected doses of less than 25 krad; cherry fruit fly control, at projected doses of less than 15 krad. Dose levels up to 60 krad did not adversely affect cherry quality factors tested. Irradiation above 60 krad reduced the firmness of cherries but had no significant impact on other quality factors tested. Irradiation of cherries below 80 krad did not result in any significant differences in sensory evaluations (appearance, flavor, and firmness) in tests conducted at OSU. Irradiation up to 200 krad at a temperature of about 25 0 C (77 0 F) did not measurably extend shelf life. Irradiation at 500 krad at 25 0 C (77 0 F) increased mold and rotting of cherries tested. There is no apparent advantage of irradiation over low-temperature fumigation

  8. Free energy of hydration of niobium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Some of the glasses being formulated by SRTC researchers contain niobium oxide. In this report, the free energy of hydration of the oxide is calculated from the free energies of formation of the oxide, the hydroxide, and water. This value can be used in calculations of the free energy of hydration of glasses containing niobium

  9. Investigations into surfactant/gas hydrate relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Rudy; Zhang, Guochang; Dearman, Jennifer; Woods, Charles [Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Gas hydrates have unique physical properties portending useful industrial applications of gas storage, gas separation, or water desalination. When gas hydrates were found in the early 1990s to occur naturally and abundantly in seafloors, three other primary interests and concerns emerged: potential new energy source, climate threat from their greenhouse gases, and seafloor instabilities. This paper presents research showing how anionic synthetic surfactants helped develop an industrial gas hydrate storage process for natural gas and how naturally-occurring in-situ anionic biosurfactants influence the formation and placement of gas hydrates in ocean sediments. The catalytic effects, mechanisms, and surface specificities imparted by synthetic surfactants in the gas storage process and imparted by biosurfactants in porous media are discussed. The Bacillus subtilis bacterium that is indigenous to gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico was cultured in the laboratory. Its biosurfactant was separated and found to catalyze gas hydrates in porous media. The experiments indicate that seafloor-biosurfactants can be produced rapidly in-situ to achieve threshold concentrations whereby hydrates are promoted. The biosurfactants accumulate and promote hydrate formation on specific mineral surfaces such as sodium montmorillonite. (author)

  10. 75 FR 9886 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane... the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential...

  11. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  12. Multicomponent modelling of Portland cement hydration reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ukrainczyk, N.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    The prospect of cement and concrete technologies depends on more in depth understanding of cement hydration reactions. Hydration reaction models simulate the development of the microstructures that can finally be used to estimate the cement based material properties that influence performance and

  13. Novel binder-free forming of Al2O3 ceramics by microwave-assisted hydration reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Takashi; Yasuoka, Masaki; Watari, Koji

    2008-01-01

    A novel binder-free forming of ceramics via microwave irradiation is developed. The irradiation of microwave to an alumina green body enhances the hydration reaction strongly between water and particle surfaces, creating surface aluminum trihydroxides structure adjacent to particles that bind them together tightly. This process makes it possible to manufacture mechanically strong green bodies with excellent shape retention ability without the use of organic binders

  14. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the

  15. Conjugated effects of thyroxine and X-rays on the intestinal wall of Alytes obstetricans Larvae (Anuran Amphibian)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauca, M.; Hourdry, J.

    1979-01-01

    The conjoined effects of thyroxine and X-rays on the intestinal wall were studied using Alytes obstetricans tadpoles in premetamorphosis. Thyroxine alone induced degeneration of the larval epithelium (primary epithelium) and its replacement by a secondary epithelium. The latter is derived from stem cells via the development of islets. In animals submitted to irradiation only, many of these stem cells showed signs of necrosis. In irradiated larvae treated with thyroxine, the secondary epitheliocytes were rare and never formed islets. Radioautographic observations confirmed their very low proliferation rate. Contrary to what was observed in the hormone treated larvae, cell fragments of the primary epithelium were extruded in the connective tissue, and phagocytes appear to infiltrate the epithelium. In animals treated with thyroxine and later submitted to irradiation, islets of secondary epitheliocytes developed while some cells degenerated. There again, the phagocytes were noted in both the connective tissue and the epithelium. (orig.) [de

  16. Experimental Setup to Characterize Bentonite Hydration Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bru, A.; Casero, D.; Pastor, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    We present an experimental setup to follow-up the hydration process of a bentonite. Clay samples, of 2 cm x 12 cm x 12 cm, were made and introduced in a Hele-Shaw cell with two PMM windows and two steel frames. In hydration experiments, a fluid enters by an orifice in the frame, located both at the top and the bottom of the cell, to perform hydration in both senses. To get a uniform hydration we place a diffuser near the orifice. Volume influxes in hydration cells are registered in time. The evolution of the developed interface was recorded on a videotape. The video cameras was fixed to a holder so that the vertical direction in the monitor was the same as the direction of the larger extension of the cell. (Author) 6 refs

  17. Volume of hydration in terminal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruera, E; Belzile, M; Watanabe, S; Fainsinger, R L

    1996-03-01

    In this retrospective study we reviewed the volume and modality of hydration of consecutive series of terminal cancer patients in two different settings. In a palliative care unit 203/290 admitted patients received subcutaneous hydration for 12 +/- 8 days at a daily volume of 1015 +/- 135 ml/day. At the cancer center, 30 consecutive similar patients received intravenous hydration for 11.5 +/- 5 days (P > 0.2) but at a daily volume of 2080 +/- 720 ml/day (P palliative care unit patients required discontinuation of hydration because of complications. Hypodermoclysis was administered mainly as a continuous infusion, an overnight infusion, or in one to three 1-h boluses in 62 (31%), 98 (48%) and 43 (21%) patients, respectively. Our findings suggest that, in some settings, patients may be receiving excessive volumes of hydration by less comfortable routes such as the intravenous route. Increased education and research in this area are badly needed.

  18. Hydration shells exchange charge with their protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abitan, Haim; Lindgård, Per-Anker; Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2010-01-01

    . In our experiments, the amplitude of an ultrasonic pressure wave is gradually increased (0–20 atm) while we simultaneously measure the Raman spectra from the hydrated protein (β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme). We detected two types of spectral changes: first, up to 70% increase in the intensity......Investigation of the interaction between a protein and its hydration shells is an experimental and theoretical challenge. Here, we used ultrasonic pressure waves in aqueous solutions of a protein to explore the conformational states of the protein and its interaction with its hydration shells...... the presence of an ultrasonic pressure, a protein and its hydration shells are in thermodynamic and charge equilibrium, i.e. a protein and its hydration shells exchange charges. The ultrasonic wave disrupts these equilibria which are regained within 30–45 min after the ultrasonic pressure is shut off....

  19. Chironomidae bloodworms larvae as aquatic amphibian food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fard, Mojdeh Sharifian; Pasmans, Frank; Adriaensen, Connie; Laing, Gijs Du; Janssens, Geert Paul Jules; Martel, An

    2014-01-01

    Different species of chironomids larvae (Diptera: Chironomidae) so-called bloodworms are widely distributed in the sediments of all types of freshwater habitats and considered as an important food source for amphibians. In our study, three species of Chironomidae (Baeotendipes noctivagus, Benthalia dissidens, and Chironomus riparius) were identified in 23 samples of larvae from Belgium, Poland, Russia, and Ukraine provided by a distributor in Belgium. We evaluated the suitability of these samples as amphibian food based on four different aspects: the likelihood of amphibian pathogens spreading, risk of heavy metal accumulation in amphibians, nutritive value, and risk of spreading of zoonotic bacteria (Salmonella, Campylobacter, and ESBL producing Enterobacteriaceae). We found neither zoonotic bacteria nor the amphibian pathogens Ranavirus and Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in these samples. Our data showed that among the five heavy metals tested (Hg, Cu, Cd, Pb, and Zn), the excess level of Pb in two samples and low content of Zn in four samples implicated potential risk of Pb accumulation and Zn inadequacy. Proximate nutritional analysis revealed that, chironomidae larvae are consistently high in protein but more variable in lipid content. Accordingly, variations in the lipid: protein ratio can affect the amount and pathway of energy supply to the amphibians. Our study indicated although environmentally-collected chironomids larvae may not be vectors of specific pathogens, they can be associated with nutritional imbalances and may also result in Pb bioaccumulation and Zn inadequacy in amphibians. Chironomidae larvae may thus not be recommended as single diet item for amphibians. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Self-heating by large insect larvae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Nikita L; Emlen, Douglas J; Woods, H Arthur

    2016-12-01

    Do insect larvae ever self-heat significantly from their own metabolic activity and, if so, under what sets of environmental temperatures and across what ranges of body size? We examine these questions using larvae of the Japanese rhinoceros beetle (Trypoxylus dichotomus), chosen for their large size (>20g), simple body plan, and underground lifestyle. Using CO 2 respirometry, we measured larval metabolic rates then converted measured rates of gas exchange into rates of heat production and developed a mathematical model to predict how much steady state body temperatures of underground insects would increase above ambient depending on body size. Collectively, our results suggest that large, extant larvae (20-30g body mass) can self-heat by at most 2°C, and under many common conditions (shallow depths, moister soils) would self-heat by less than 1°C. By extending the model to even larger (hypothetical) body sizes, we show that underground insects with masses >1kg could heat, in warm, dry soils, by 1.5-6°C or more. Additional experiments showed that larval critical thermal maxima (CT max ) were in excess of 43.5°C and that larvae could behaviorally thermoregulate on a thermal gradient bar. Together, these results suggest that large larvae living underground likely regulate their temperatures primarily using behavior; self-heating by metabolism likely contributes little to their heat budgets, at least in most common soil conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated

  2. PERKEMBANGAN AWAL LARVA KERAPU KERTANG (Epinephelus lanceolatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Teguh Imanto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Observasi pada larva kerapu kertang (E. lanceolatus dilaksanakan di Balai Besar Riset Perikanan Budidaya Laut (BBRPBL, Gondol-Bali, untuk mengumpulkan informasi dasar tentang perkembangan awal morfologi larva yang penting untuk menunjang keberhasilan pembenihannya. Larva berasal dari telur hasil pemijahan yang dirangsang dengan hormon (di Taiwan dan ditransportasikan segera setelah menetas (D-0 melalui transportasi udara ke laboratotium pembenihan BBRPBL, Gondol. Pengamatan dilakukan dengan memanfaatkan fasilitas tangki 500 L dengan sistem air resirkulasi. Dari data yang dihimpun diketahui bahwa rata-rata panjang total larva (D-1 2,48 mm; D-8 3,17 mm; dan tumbuh dengan cepat mencapai 10,79 mm pada D-19. Kuning telur larva yang berumur sehari (D-1 rata-rata bervolume 150,3 x 10-4 mm3 dan pada hari ketiga terserap 42,61% dan habis pada hari keempat (D-4. Butir minyak larva D-1 sebesar 41,9 x 10-4 mm3 dan masih tersisa sebesar 0,34 x 10-4 mm3 sampai dengan D-6. Mulut larva diperhitungkan sudah mencapai lebar sebesar 200 μm pada D-2. dan mampu untuk memangsa rotifer sejalan dengan pigmentasi mata yang mulai terjadi pada D-2 dan sempurna pada D-3. Dari analisis pertumbuhan terjadi titik belok (flexion point pada D-8 dan setelah itu terjadi kurva pertumbuhan yang cepat y= 0,6747x-2,5508. Berdasarkan hasil observasi tersebut maka pemberian pakan awal untuk larva kerapu kertang sudah bisa diberikan pada D-2 akhir (sore, pada D-8 komposisi pakan alami sudah harus diubah dengan memberikan pakan yang lebih besar dan bernutrisi tinggi. Observation on early development of E. lanceolatus larvae have been conducted in laboratory condition at Gondol Research Institute for Mariculture (GRIM Bali; the purpose was to gain basic data mainly on the larval development stage to support both larval rearing and aquaculture technique of this species. The larvae from egg were produced by induced spawning technique and transported on D-0 to GRIM. Observation have been

  3. Irradiation inhibits the regeneration of aneurogenic limbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, H.; Maden, M.

    1976-01-01

    The developing arms of axolotl larvae from the 2-digit stage onward and the aneurogenic arms of surgically denervated larvae maintained in parabiosis are able to regenerate after amputation. Such regeneration is uniformly inhibited by local irradiation of the arm, whether innervated or not. This demonstration refutes a recent hypothesis that x-rays interfere with a special activity of nerves required for regeneration, and supports the earlier concept that x-rays act directly on those cells which must proliferate to form the regenerated tissues

  4. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a

  5. Can hydrate dissolution experiments predict the fate of a natural hydrate system?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hester, K.C.; Peltzer, E.T.; Dunk, R.M.; Walz, P.M.; Brewer, P.G. [Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Inst., Moss Landing, CA (United States); Dendy Sloan, E. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Hydrate Research

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates are naturally occurring compounds found in permafrost regions and in oceans. In the natural environment, sufficient temperature and pressure conditions for hydrate formation exist over a significant portion of the ocean. However, in addition to pressure and temperature, the chemical potential of the gas in the hydrate must be equal to the surrounding waters. If the concentration of the gas in surrounding water is under-saturated with respect to the gas in the hydrate, the hydrate will dissolve to drive the system towards chemical equilibrium. This paper presented a dissolution study of exposed hydrate from outcrops at Barkley Canyon, located off Vancouver Island, British Columbia. A previous field experiment on synthetic methane hydrate samples had demonstrated that mass transfer controlled dissolution in under-saturated seawater. However, seafloor hydrate outcrops have been shown to have significant longevity compared to expected dissolution rates based upon convective boundary layer diffusion calculations. An in-situ dissolution experiment was performed on two distinct natural hydrate fabrics in order to help resolve this apparent disconnect between the dissolution rates of synthetic and natural hydrate. The paper presented a map of Barkley Canyon and discussed the field measurements and methods for the study. Exposed outcrops of gas hydrates were cored using a specially constructed stainless steel coring device and a hydraulic ram was located inside the corer. Hydrate samples were cored directly using the a manipulator arm and then injected into a sampling cell. The hydrate was then added to an open mesh exposure container, which allowed for exposure to ambient benthic currents with minimal disturbance. As well, in order to observe the slow dissolution of the hydrate in seawater at Barkley Canyon, time-lapse photography was employed. Last, the paper presented the results of the hydrate fabric porosities and hydrate dissolution rates. It was

  6. Gamma irradiation effects on the larval stage of the mediterranean flour moth Ephestia Kuehniella (Zell.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, Y.S.; Ahmed, M.Y.Y.; El-Banby, M.A.; Abdel-Baky, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Larvae of Ephestia Kuehniella Z. were irradiated with different doses of gamma radiation to study the effect of irradiation on immature stages, pupation, emergence, malformation and sex ratio of the produced insects. Mortality percent of irradiated larvae was increased progressively with increasing the dose. Sublethal doses retarded the duration of the immature stages. There was a gradual decrease in adult eclosion and adult longevity with increasing the dose. Fecundity and fertility of the resulting adults were gradually reduced with the increase of the dose. No complete sterility occurred after larval irradiation. Malformed adults of both sexes increased as the dose was increased

  7. Hydration Properties of Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag (GGBS Under Different Hydration Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua LIU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The hydration properties of various cementitious materials containing Ground Granulated Blast-furnace Slag (GGBS, two alkali-activated slag cements (AAS-1 and AAS-2 in which sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide act as alkaline activators respectively, supersulfated cement (SSC and slag Portland cement(PSC, are compared with ordinary Portland cement (OPC to investigate the effect of activating environment on the hydration properties in this study by determining the compressive strength of the pastes, the hydration heat of binders within 96 hours, and the hydration products at age of 28 days. The results show that C-S-H gels are the main hydrated products for all cementitious systems containing GGBS. Ca(OH2 is the hydration products of OPC and PSC paste. However, ettringite and gypsum crystals instead of Ca(OH2 are detected in SSC paste. Additionally, tobermorite, a crystalline C-S-H, and calcite are hydrated products in AAS-1. Tobermorite, cowlesite and calcite are hydrated products of AAS-2 as well. Based on strength results, AAS-1 paste exhibits the highest compressive strength followed by POC, PSC, SSC in order at all testing ages and AAS-2 give the lowest compressive strength except for the early age at 3 days, which is higher than SSC but still lower than PSC. From hydration heat analysis, alkalinity in the reaction solution is a vital factor influencing the initial hydration rate and the initial hydration rate from higher to lower is AAS-2, AAS-1, OPC, PSC and SSC. Although AAS possesses a faster reaction rate in the initial hours, cumulative hydration heat of AAS is comparably lower than that of OPC, but higher than those of PSC and SSC in turn, which indicates that the hydration heat of clinkers is much higher than that of slag.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.14934

  8. Calcium and magnesium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lothenbach, B.; L'Hopital, E.; Nied, D.; Achiedo, G.; Dauzeres, A.

    2015-01-01

    Deep geological disposals are planed to discard long-lived intermediate-level and high-level radioactive wastes. Clay-based geological barriers are expected to limit the ingress of groundwater and to reduce the mobility of radioelements. In the interaction zone between the cement and the clay based material alteration can occur. Magnesium silicate hydrates (M-S-H) have been observed due to the reaction of magnesium sulfate containing groundwater with cements or in the interaction zone between low-pH type cement and clays. M-S-H samples synthesized in the laboratory showed that M-S-H has a variable composition within 0.7 ≤ Mg/Si ≤ 1.5. TEM/EDS analyses show an homogeneous gel with no defined structure. IR and 29 Si NMR data reveal a higher polymerization degree of the silica network in M-S-H compared to calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H). The presence of mainly Q 3 silicate tetrahedrons in M-S-H indicates a sheet like or a triple-chain silica structure while C-S-H is characterised by single chain-structure. The clear difference in the silica structure and the larger ionic radius of Ca 2+ (1.1 Angstrom) compared to Mg 2+ (0.8 Angstrom) make the formation of an extended solid solution between M-S-H and C-S-H gel improbable. In fact, the analyses of synthetic samples containing both magnesium and calcium in various ratios indicate the formation of separate M-S-H and C-S-H gels with no or very little uptake of magnesium in CS-H or calcium in M-S-H

  9. Gamma radiation sensitivity of the eggs, larvae and pupae of Indian meal moth Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayvaz, Abdurrahman; Albayrak, Sevil; Karaborklu, Salih

    2008-05-01

    This study focused on determining the minimal effective gamma radiation dose that prevents commodity damage caused by the Indian meal moth Plodia interpunctella (Hübner). The study was also designed to assess the effect of releasing either partially sterilized males alone or both partially sterilized males and females on the reproductive potential of P. interpunctella populations. The dose of radiation required to prevent larval emergence from irradiated eggs was 350 Gy, and the same dose was also required to prevent adult emergence from mature larvae. A dose of 300 Gy was not able to prevent adult emergence from irradiated pupae. The dose at which 100% sterility was achieved in treated females mated to treated males was 300 Gy for the parental generation of irradiated pupae. Fertility of the parental males from irradiated pupae was 48.17% at 300 Gy in treated males crossed with untreated females, but male progeny of irradiated male parents had a residual fertility of 11.06% at the same dose. F(1) males from irradiated pupae were more sterile than parental males. To prevent larval emergence from irradiated eggs, a dose of 350 Gy is required. The same dose is required to prevent the larvae from reaching the adult stage. Copyright (c) 2008 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

    2011-12-31

    This project seeks to understand regional differences in gas hydrate systems from the perspective of as an energy resource, geohazard, and long-term climate influence. Specifically, the effort will: (1) collect data and conceptual models that targets causes of gas hydrate variance, (2) construct numerical models that explain and predict regional-scale gas hydrate differences in 2-dimensions with minimal 'free parameters', (3) simulate hydrocarbon production from various gas hydrate systems to establish promising resource characteristics, (4) perturb different gas hydrate systems to assess potential impacts of hot fluids on seafloor stability and well stability, and (5) develop geophysical approaches that enable remote quantification of gas hydrate heterogeneities so that they can be characterized with minimal costly drilling. Our integrated program takes advantage of the fact that we have a close working team comprised of experts in distinct disciplines. The expected outcomes of this project are improved exploration and production technology for production of natural gas from methane hydrates and improved safety through understanding of seafloor and well bore stability in the presence of hydrates. The scope of this project was to more fully characterize, understand, and appreciate fundamental differences in the amount and distribution of gas hydrate and how this would affect the production potential of a hydrate accumulation in the marine environment. The effort combines existing information from locations in the ocean that are dominated by low permeability sediments with small amounts of high permeability sediments, one permafrost location where extensive hydrates exist in reservoir quality rocks and other locations deemed by mutual agreement of DOE and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations were Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location was Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the project was to understand

  11. Basics of development of gas hydrate deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makogon, Yuri F.; Holditch, Stephen A.; Makogon, Taras Y.

    2005-07-01

    Natural gas hydrate deposits could possibly be an important energy resource during this century. However, many problems associated with producing these deposits must first be solved. The industry must develop new technologies to produce the gas, to forecast possible tectonic cataclysms in regions of gas hydrate accumulations, and to prevent damage to the environment. These global issues must be addressed by every company or country who wants to produce gas hydrate deposits. Cooperative research between industry and universities can lead to technology breakthroughs in coming years. This paper reviews the Messoyakha field and the Blake Ridge and Nankai areas to explain a methodology for estimating how much gas might be producible from gas hydrate deposits (GHDs) under various conditions. The Messoyakha field is located on land, while the Blake Ridge and Nankai areas are offshore. Messoyakha is the first and the only GHD where gas production from hydrates has reached commercial flow rates. The Blake Ridge GHD has been studied for 20 years and 11 wells have been drilled to collect gas-hydrate samples. The potential resources of gas (gas in place) from Blake Ridge is estimated at 37.7Oe10{sup 12} m{sup 3} (1.330 Tcf) in hydrate form and 19.3Oe10{sup 12}m{sup 3} (681 Bcf) [5] in free gas. To estimate how much of the potential resource can be produced we need a thorough understanding of both the geologic and the thermodynamic characteristics of the formations. (Author)

  12. Gas hydrate exploration activities in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keun-Pil Park, K.P. [Korea Inst. of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Gas Hydrate R and D Organization, Ministry of Knowledge Economy, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Korea's first gas hydrate research project was launched in 1996 to study the gas hydrate potential in the Ulleung Basin of the East Sea. It involved a series of laboratory experiments followed by a preliminary offshore seismic survey and regional reconnaissance geophysical and marine geological surveys. The bottom simulating reflector (BSR) was interpreted to show wide area distribution in the southern part of the Ulleung Basin, and its average burial depth was 187 m below the sea floor in the East Sea. A three-phase 10-year National Gas Hydrate Development Program was launched in 2004 to estimate the potential reserves in the East Sea. It will involve drilling to identify natural gas hydrates and to determine the most optimized production methods. Drilling sites were proposed based on five indicators that imply gas hydrate occurrence, notably BSR, gas vent, enhanced seismic reflection, acoustic blanking and gas seeping structure. The UBGH-X-01 gas hydrate expedition in the East Sea Ulleung Basin involved 5 logging while drilling (LWD) surveys at three high priority sites. One wire line logging was implemented at the site of the UBGH09. A total 334 m of non-pressurized conventional cores and 16 pressure cores were obtained in late 2007. The UBGH-X-01 was successfully completed, recovering many natural samples of gas hydrate from 3 coring sites in the East Sea. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  13. Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2009-12-09

    Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

  14. The reaction rates of electrons with native and irradiated ribonuclease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuessler, H.; Ebert, M.; Davies, J.V.

    1977-01-01

    The rate of reaction of hydrated electrons with proteins depends, amongst other things, on the conformational structure of the protein, and irradiation itself causes conformational changes in proteins. A study has been made of variations in the reaction rates of hydrated electrons with RNase pre-irradiated by the Linac or by a 60 Co γ-source. The reaction rate constants varied with the pre-irradiation dose, the concentration of phosphate buffer, the enzyme concentration and also the presence of 10 -2 M ethanol. These variations serve to emphasize the importance of the tertiary structure of biological molecules in irradiation processes and have significant implications in the mathematical analysis of the inactivation of enzymes in steady-state irradiation processes. (U.K.)

  15. Supramolecular Organization of Nonstoichiometric Drug Hydrates: Dapsone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Doris E.; Griesser, Ulrich J.

    2018-01-01

    The observed moisture- and temperature dependent transformations of the dapsone (4,4′-diaminodiphenyl sulfone, DDS) 0. 33-hydrate were correlated to its structure and the number and strength of the water-DDS intermolecular interactions. A combination of characterization techniques was used, including thermal analysis (hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis), gravimetric moisture sorption/desorption studies and variable humidity powder X-ray diffraction, along with computational modeling (crystal structure prediction and pair-wise intermolecular energy calculations). Depending on the relative humidity the hydrate contains between 0 and 0.33 molecules of water per molecule DDS. The crystal structure is retained upon dehydration indicating that DDS hydrate shows a non-stoichiometric (de)hydration behavior. Unexpectedly, the water molecules are not located in structural channels but at isolated-sites of the host framework, which is counterintuitively for a hydrate with non-stoichiometric behavior. The water-DDS interactions were estimated to be weaker than water-host interactions that are commonly observed in stoichiometric hydrates and the lattice energies of the isomorphic dehydration product (hydrate structure without water molecules) and (form III) differ only by ~1 kJ mol−1. The computational generation of hypothetical monohydrates confirms that the hydrate with the unusual DDS:water ratio of 3:1 is more stable than a feasible monohydrate structure. Overall, this study highlights that a deeper understanding of the formation of hydrates with non-stoichiometric behavior requires a multidisciplinary approach including suitable experimental and computational methods providing a firm basis for the development and manufacturing of high quality drug products. PMID:29520359

  16. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release as much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  17. Tapping methane hydrates for unconventional natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    Methane hydrate is an icelike form of concentrated methane and water found in the sediments of permafrost regions and marine continental margins at depths far shallower than conventional oil and gas. Despite their relative accessibility and widespread occurrence, methane hydrates have never been tapped to meet increasing global energy demands. With rising natural gas prices, production from these unconventional gas deposits is becoming economically viable, particularly in permafrost areas already being exploited for conventional oil and gas. This article provides an overview of gas hydrate occurrence, resource assessment, exploration, production technologies, renewability, and future challenges.

  18. On the electrolytic generation of hydrated electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh Mazumdar, A.S.; Guha, S.N.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations on the electrolytic generation of hydrated electron in oxygenated as well as oxygen-free solutions at different pH were undertaken. Since sup(-e)aq is known to react rapidly with O 2 yielding the transient O 2 - ion, the latter was looked for through its interaction with phosphite ions resulting in their oxidation near the cathode. It appears from the results that in electrolytic processes, the primary electron (esup(-)sub(cathode)) probably reacts directly with reactive solutes like oxygen, bypassing the hydration step. Data obtained in oxygen-free solutions, however, support the possible formation of hydrated electron at least in alkaline solutions. (author)

  19. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soothill, R.

    1987-01-01

    The issue of food irradiation has become important in Australia and overseas. This article discusses the results of the Australian Consumers' Association's (ACA) Inquiry into food irradiation, commissioned by the Federal Government. Issues discussed include: what is food irradiation; why irradiate food; how much food is consumer rights; and national regulations

  20. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names CI to CO

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  1. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names DH to EC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  2. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names TF to U

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  3. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names HJ to ID

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  4. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names AN to AR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  5. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names SJ to ST

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  6. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names CP to DE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  7. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names C to CE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  8. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names EV to GN

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  9. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names V to Z

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  10. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names ED to EU

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  11. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names SD to SI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  12. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names MB to MO

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  13. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names LJ to MA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  14. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names AS to BA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  15. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names SB to SC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  16. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names MP to NA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  17. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names SU to TE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  18. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names PL to PO

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  19. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names IE to LA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  20. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names A to AM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  1. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names HB to HI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  2. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names OM to OX

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  3. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names Q to SA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  4. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names PP to PZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  5. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names GO to HA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  6. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names NB to OL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  7. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names LB to LI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  8. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names BCE to BZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  9. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names CD to CH

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  10. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names OY to PI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  11. Bothid larvae (Pleuronectiformes-Pisces) of the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devi, C.B.L.

    the Indian Ocean, their regional, seasonal as well as diurnal variations. Engyprosopon grandisquamis dominated contributing to 23.2% of the total larvae. Numerically the incidence of bothid larvae suggested a uniform pattern of distribution during the two...

  12. Decapod larvae from the nearshore waters of Karwar

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, V.R.; Paulinose, V.T.

    Abundance of decapod larvae at three stations in Binge Bay, Karwar has been reported based on surface collections taken during the period October 1975 to September 1976. The larvae were very common in the Bay and the postmonsoon months sustained...

  13. Crustacean Larvae-Vision in the Plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Thomas W; Bok, Michael J; Lin, Chan

    2017-11-01

    We review the visual systems of crustacean larvae, concentrating on the compound eyes of decapod and stomatopod larvae as well as the functional and behavioral aspects of their vision. Larval compound eyes of these macrurans are all built on fundamentally the same optical plan, the transparent apposition eye, which is eminently suitable for modification into the abundantly diverse optical systems of the adults. Many of these eyes contain a layer of reflective structures overlying the retina that produces a counterilluminating eyeshine, so they are unique in being camouflaged both by their transparency and by their reflection of light spectrally similar to background light to conceal the opaque retina. Besides the pair of compound eyes, at least some crustacean larvae have a non-imaging photoreceptor system based on a naupliar eye and possibly other frontal eyes. Larval compound-eye photoreceptors send axons to a large and well-developed optic lobe consisting of a series of neuropils that are similar to those of adult crustaceans and insects, implying sophisticated analysis of visual stimuli. The visual system fosters a number of advanced and flexible behaviors that permit crustacean larvae to survive extended periods in the plankton and allows them to reach acceptable adult habitats, within which to metamorphose. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Suppressing bullfrog larvae with carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jackson A.; Ray, Andrew; Sepulveda, Adam J.; Watten, Barnaby J.; Densmore, Christine L.; Layhee, Megan J.; Mark Abbey-Lambert,; ,

    2014-01-01

    Current management strategies for the control and suppression of the American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus = Rana catesbeiana Shaw) and other invasive amphibians have had minimal effect on their abundance and distribution. This study evaluates the effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) on pre- and prometamorphic Bullfrog larvae. Bullfrogs are a model organism for evaluating potential suppression agents because they are a successful invader worldwide. From experimental trials we estimated that the 24-h 50% and 99% lethal concentration (LC50 and LC99) values for Bullfrog larvae were 371 and 549 mg CO2/L, respectively. Overall, larvae that succumbed to experimental conditions had a lower body condition index than those that survived. We also documented sublethal changes in blood chemistry during prolonged exposure to elevated CO2. Specifically, blood pH decreased by more than 0.5 pH units after 9 h of exposure and both blood partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and blood glucose increased. These findings suggest that CO2 treatments can be lethal to Bullfrog larvae under controlled laboratory conditions. We believe this work represents the necessary foundation for further consideration of CO2 as a potential suppression agent for one of the most harmful invaders to freshwater ecosystems.

  15. (Herklotsichthys quadrimaculatus) Larvae on Sofala Bank

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract—Vertical larval fish movement influences their survival and dispersal, hence recruitment variability. This study presents the vertical behaviour of gold- spot herring (Herklotsichthys quadrimaculatus) larvae observed on the Sofala Bank. (Mozambique) throughout a 48-hour period when depth-stratified samples were.

  16. Monograph On Bothid Larvae (Pleuronectiformes - Pisces)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devi, C.B.L.

    in the preparation of a descriptive document on the larvae of flat fishes from the Indian Ocean. However, study of the larval forms from the Indian Ocean has been made possible due to the availability of material from the Naga Expedition (1959-61) from the Gulf...

  17. Experimental Investigation of Effect on Hydrate Formation in Spray Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of reaction condition on hydrate formation were conducted in spray reactor. The temperature, pressure, and gas volume of reaction on hydrate formation were measured in pure water and SDS solutions at different temperature and pressure with a high-pressure experimental rig for hydrate formation. The experimental data and result reveal that additives could improve the hydrate formation rate and gas storage capacity. Temperature and pressure can restrict the hydrate formation. Lower temperature and higher pressure can promote hydrate formation, but they can increase production cost. So these factors should be considered synthetically. The investigation will promote the advance of gas storage technology in hydrates.

  18. Gas hydrate concentration and characteristics within Hydrate Ridge inferred from multicomponent seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhananjay; Sen, Mrinal K.; Bangs, Nathan L.

    2007-12-01

    A seismic experiment composed of streamer and ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) surveys was conducted in the summer of 2002 at southern Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon, to map the gas hydrate distribution within the hydrate stability zone. Gas hydrate concentrations within the reservoir can be estimated with P wave velocity (Vp); however, we can further constrain gas hydrate concentrations using S wave velocity (Vs), and use Vs through its relationship to Vp (Vp/Vs) to reveal additional details such as gas hydrate form within the matrix (i.e., hydrate cements the grains, becomes part of the matrix frame or floats in pore space). Both Vp and Vs can be derived simultaneously by inverting multicomponent seismic data. In this study, we use OBS data to estimate seismic velocities where both gas hydrate and free gas are present in the shallow sediments. Once Vp and Vs are estimated, they are simultaneously matched with modeled velocities to estimate the gas hydrate concentration. We model Vp using an equation based on a modification of Wood's equation that incorporates an appropriate rock physics model and Vs using an empirical relation. The gas hydrate concentration is estimated to be up to 7% of the rock volume, or 12% of the pore space. However, Vp and Vs do not always fit the model simultaneously. Vp can vary substantially more than Vs. Thus we conclude that a model, in which higher concentrations of hydrate do not affect shear stiffness, is more appropriate. Results suggest gas hydrates form within the pore space of the sediments and become part of the rock framework in our survey area.

  19. A Hydrate Database: Vital to the Technical Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Sloan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates may contain more energy than all the combined other fossil fuels, causing hydrates to be a potentially vital aspect of both energy and climate change. This article is an overview of the motivation, history, and future of hydrate data management using a CODATA vehicle to connect international hydrate databases. The basis is an introduction to the Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML to connect various hydrate databases. The accompanying four articles on laboratory hydrate data by Smith et al., on field hydrate data by L?wner et al., on hydrate modeling by Wang et al., and on construction of a Chinese gas hydrate system by Xiao et al. provide details of GHML in their respective areas.

  20. ISOLASI BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS DARI LARVA DAN PENGUJIAN PATOGENISITASNYA TERHADAP LARVA NYAMUK VEKTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blondine Ch. P.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A study to evaluate pathogenic organisms as cause of mosquito larvae death was conducted at Wonokerto and Pabelan villages, Salatiga Luar Kota subdistrict, Semarang regency in Central Java from May 1991 through December 1991. Bacterial isolation from dead larvae showed that 31 B. thuringicnsis isolates were obtained from 31 larvae samples collected from 2 location e.g Wonokerto village (3 samples, Pabelan village (28 samples. Nineteen isolates (61,3% showed a pathogenicity of more than 50% to third toward instar larvae of Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus respectively 24 hours after exposure. This study shows the possible use of B. thuringiensis for biologic control of mosquitoes which can act as vectors for human diseases.

  1. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindqvist, H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is a review of food irradiation and lists plants for food irradiation in the world. Possible applications for irradiation are discussed, and changes induced in food from radiation, nutritional as well as organoleptic, are reviewed. Possible toxicological risks with irradiated food and risks from alternative methods for treatment are also brought up. Ways to analyze weather food has been irradiated or not are presented. 8 refs

  2. Exogenous origin of hydration on asteroid (16) Psyche: the role of hydrated asteroid families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdellidou, C.; Delbo', M.; Fienga, A.

    2018-04-01

    Asteroid (16) Psyche, which for a long time was the largest M-type with no detection of hydration features in its spectrum, was recently discovered to have a weak 3-μm band and thus it was eventually added to the group of hydrated asteroids. Its relatively high density, in combination with the high radar albedo, led researchers to classify the asteroid as a metallic object. It is believed that it is possibly a core of a differentiated body, a remnant of `hit-and-run' collisions. The detection of hydration is, in principle, inconsistent with a pure metallic origin for this body. Here, we consider the scenario in which the hydration on its surface is exogenous and was delivered by hydrated impactors. We show that impacting asteroids that belong to families whose members have the 3-μm band can deliver hydrated material to Psyche. We developed a collisional model with which we test all dark carbonaceous asteroid families, which contain hydrated members. We find that the major source of hydrated impactors is the family of Themis, with a total implanted mass on Psyche of the order of ˜1014 kg. However, the hydrated fraction could be only a few per cent of the implanted mass, as the water content in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, the best analogue for the Themis asteroid family, is typically a few per cent of their mass.

  3. Lagrangian Observations and Modeling of Marine Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Claire B.; Irisson, Jean-Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Just within the past two decades, studies on the early-life history stages of marine organisms have led to new paradigms in population dynamics. Unlike passive plant seeds that are transported by the wind or by animals, marine larvae have motor and sensory capabilities. As a result, marine larvae have a tremendous capacity to actively influence their dispersal. This is continuously revealed as we develop new techniques to observe larvae in their natural environment and begin to understand their ability to detect cues throughout ontogeny, process the information, and use it to ride ocean currents and navigate their way back home, or to a place like home. We present innovative in situ and numerical modeling approaches developed to understand the underlying mechanisms of larval transport in the ocean. We describe a novel concept of a Lagrangian platform, the Drifting In Situ Chamber (DISC), designed to observe and quantify complex larval behaviors and their interactions with the pelagic environment. We give a brief history of larval ecology research with the DISC, showing that swimming is directional in most species, guided by cues as diverse as the position of the sun or the underwater soundscape, and even that (unlike humans!) larvae orient better and swim faster when moving as a group. The observed Lagrangian behavior of individual larvae are directly implemented in the Connectivity Modeling System (CMS), an open source Lagrangian tracking application. Simulations help demonstrate the impact that larval behavior has compared to passive Lagrangian trajectories. These methodologies are already the base of exciting findings and are promising tools for documenting and simulating the behavior of other small pelagic organisms, forecasting their migration in a changing ocean.

  4. Feeding frequency and caste differentiation in Bombus terrestris larvae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro, M.F.; Velthuis, H.H.W.; Duchateau, Marie José; Tweel, I. van der

    1998-01-01

    The frequency with which bumble bee larvae are fed during their development was studied using video-recordings. The behaviour of the workers while feeding worker, male and queen larvae of Bombus terrestris was recorded. At the beginning of development, female larvae of both castes were fed at a

  5. Oceanic hydrates: more questions than answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laherrere, Jean

    2000-01-01

    Methane hydrates create problems by blocking pipelines and casing; they are also accused of contributing to environmental problems (e.g. global warming). Methane hydrates are also found in permafrost areas and in oceanic sediments where the necessary temperature and pressure for stability occur. Claims for the widespread occurrence in thick oceanic deposits are unfounded: apparently indirect evidence from seismic reflectors, seismic hydrocarbon indicators, logs and free samples is unreliable. At one time, hydrate was seen as a static, biogenic, continuous, huge resource but that view is changing to one of a dynamic, overpressurised, discontinuous and unreliable resource. Only Japan and India are currently showing any serious interest in hydrates. Academic research has raised more questions than answers. It is suggested that more hard exploratory evidence rather than theoretical study is required

  6. Vibrational dynamics of hydration water in amylose

    CERN Document Server

    Cavatorta, F; Albanese, G; Angelini, N

    2002-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamical properties of hydration water associated with amylose helices, based on low-temperature vibrational spectra collected using the TOSCA inelastic spectrometer at ISIS. The structural constraints of the polysaccharidic chains favour the formation of a high-density structure for water, which has been suggested by Imberty and Perez on the basis of conformational analysis. According to this model, hydration water can only enter the pores formed by six adjacent helices and completely fills the pores at a hydration level of about 0.27-g water/g dry amylose. Our measurements show that the dynamical behaviour of hydration water is similar to that observed in high-density amorphous ice. (orig.)

  7. Separation of water through gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boch Andersen, Torben; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goal...... of the project was to formulate an alternative separation concept, which can replace the traditional water evaporation process in the sugar production. Work with the separation concept showed that gas hydrates can be used for water separation. The process is not suitable for sugar production because of large...... volumes and the needs for high pressure. The process could be interesting for concentration of heat sensitive, high value products...

  8. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  9. ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrate Production Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoderbek, David [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Farrell, Helen [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Howard, James [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Raterman, Kevin [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Silpngarmlert, Suntichai [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Martin, Kenneth [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Smith, Bruce [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Klein, Perry [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-06-30

    Work began on the ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrates Production Test (DOE award number DE-NT0006553) on October 1, 2008. This final report summarizes the entire project from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013.

  10. Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Savidge

    2008-10-31

    The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

  11. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  12. Larva migrans visceral: relato de caso Visceral larva migrans: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Bortoli Machado

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Larva migrans visceral é doença infecciosa, adquirida por ingestão de ovos provenientes dos vermes Toxocara canis e/ou Toxocara cati que infestam cães e gatos; as larvas penetram a parede intestinal e migram através dos tecidos levando a alterações diversas, conseqüentes a uma resposta inflamatória imune.¹ Os autores descrevem um caso clínico de larva migrans visceral com apresentação clínica atípica.Visceral larva migrans is an infectious human disease that occurs following ingestion of eggs from the environment originating from roundworms which commonly infect dogs and cats, Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati. The larvae penetrate the gut wall and migrate through the tissues causing disorders consequent to an inflammatory immune response¹. The authors describe a clinical case of visceral larva migrans with an unusual clinical presentation and also its clinical aspects, diagnosis and treatment are reviewed.

  13. Lethal infection thresholds of Paenibacillus larvae for honeybee drone and worker larvae (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Dieter; Forsgren, Eva; Fries, Ingemar; Moritz, Robin F A

    2010-10-01

    We compared the mortality of honeybee (Apis mellifera) drone and worker larvae from a single queen under controlled in vitro conditions following infection with Paenibacillus larvae, a bacterium causing the brood disease American Foulbrood (AFB). We also determined absolute P. larvae cell numbers and lethal titres in deceased individuals of both sexes up to 8 days post infection using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Our results show that in drones the onset of infection induced mortality is delayed by 1 day, the cumulative mortality is reduced by 10% and P. larvae cell numbers are higher than in worker larvae. Since differences in bacterial cell titres between sexes can be explained by differences in body size, larval size appears to be a key parameter for a lethal threshold in AFB tolerance. Both means and variances for lethal thresholds are similar for drone and worker larvae suggesting that drone resistance phenotypes resemble those of related workers. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Supramolecular Organization of Nonstoichiometric Drug Hydrates: Dapsone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris E. Braun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The observed moisture- and temperature dependent transformations of the dapsone (4,4′-diaminodiphenyl sulfone, DDS 0. 33-hydrate were correlated to its structure and the number and strength of the water-DDS intermolecular interactions. A combination of characterization techniques was used, including thermal analysis (hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis, gravimetric moisture sorption/desorption studies and variable humidity powder X-ray diffraction, along with computational modeling (crystal structure prediction and pair-wise intermolecular energy calculations. Depending on the relative humidity the hydrate contains between 0 and 0.33 molecules of water per molecule DDS. The crystal structure is retained upon dehydration indicating that DDS hydrate shows a non-stoichiometric (dehydration behavior. Unexpectedly, the water molecules are not located in structural channels but at isolated-sites of the host framework, which is counterintuitively for a hydrate with non-stoichiometric behavior. The water-DDS interactions were estimated to be weaker than water-host interactions that are commonly observed in stoichiometric hydrates and the lattice energies of the isomorphic dehydration product (hydrate structure without water molecules and (form III differ only by ~1 kJ mol−1. The computational generation of hypothetical monohydrates confirms that the hydrate with the unusual DDS:water ratio of 3:1 is more stable than a feasible monohydrate structure. Overall, this study highlights that a deeper understanding of the formation of hydrates with non-stoichiometric behavior requires a multidisciplinary approach including suitable experimental and computational methods providing a firm basis for the development and manufacturing of high quality drug products.

  15. Preservation of methane hydrate at 1 atm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    A "pressure-release" method that enables reproducible bulk preservation of pure, porous, methane hydrate at conditions 50 to 75 K above its equilibrium T (193 K) at 1 atm is refined. The amount of hydrate preserved by this method appears to be greatly in excess of that reported in the previous citations, and is likely the result of a mechanism different from ice shielding.

  16. Repair and regeneration of heavy ion beam locally irradiated embryonic hemopoietic organs of silkworm, Bombyx mori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Shiqing; Tu Zhenli

    2003-01-01

    Eggs of silkworm, Bombyx mori were irradiated by 12 C 5+ ions, at the embryonic wings, where the hemopoietic organs attached. Changes in the development of the silkworm larvae and pupae, especially in the repair and regeneration of the hemopoietic organs represented by their morphological and functional characteristics, were observed. The results showed that the silkworm larvae and pupae developed from the irradiated eggs grew with the physiological obstruction due to exsanguinations, such as difficulty in their metamorphosis and their marked lower survival rates. After 100 Gy irradiation, some of the larvae and pupae died during the periods of larval molting stages, pupation stage and eclosion stage. With increased doses, the deficiencies in the silkworm development became more significant. After 200 Gy irradiation, the average hemocyte density for the 5 th larvae decreased markedly, but the hemocyte density for some individuals were comparable to the control, and regenerated hemopoietic organs was found in these larvae. The results suggested that the silkworm larvae might be capable of self-repair and self-regeneration of the hemopoietic organs after the heave ion irradiation

  17. Food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenewald, T

    1985-01-01

    Food irradiation has become a matter of topical interest also in the Federal Republic of Germany following applications for exemptions concerning irradiation tests of spices. After risks to human health by irradiation doses up to a level sufficient for product pasteurization were excluded, irradiation now offers a method suitable primarily for the disinfestation of fruit and decontamination of frozen and dried food. Codex Alimentarius standards which refer also to supervision and dosimetry have been established; they should be adopted as national law. However, in the majority of cases where individual countries including EC member-countries so far permitted food irradiation, these standards were not yet used. Approved irradiation technique for industrial use is available. Several industrial food irradiation plants, partly working also on a contractual basis, are already in operation in various countries. Consumer response still is largely unknown; since irradiated food is labelled, consumption of irradiated food will be decided upon by consumers.

  18. In Situ Raman Analyses of Natural Gas and Gas Hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, E. T.; White, S. N.; Dunk, R. M.; Brewer, P. G.; Sherman, A. D.; Schmidt, K.; Hester, K. C.; Sloan, E. D.

    2004-12-01

    During a July 2004 cruise to Hydrate Ridge, Oregon, MBARI's sea-going laser Raman spectrometer was used to obtain in situ Raman spectra of natural gas hydrates and natural gas venting from the seafloor. This was the first in situ analysis of gas hydrates on the seafloor. The hydrate spectra were compared to laboratory analyses performed at the Center for Hydrate Research, Colorado School of Mines. The natural gas spectra were compared to MBARI gas chromatography (GC) analyses of gas samples collected at the same site. DORISS (Deep Ocean Raman In Situ Spectrometer) is a laboratory model laser Raman spectrometer from Kaiser Optical Systems, Inc modified at MBARI for deployment in the deep ocean. It has been successfully deployed to depths as great as 3600 m. Different sampling optics provide flexibility in adapting the instrument to a particular target of interest. An immersion optic was used to analyze natural gas venting from the seafloor at South Hydrate Ridge ( ˜780 m depth). An open-bottomed cube was placed over the vent to collect the gas. The immersion optic penetrated the side of the cube as did a small heater used to dissociate any hydrate formed during sample collection. To analyze solid hydrates at both South and North Hydrate Ridge ( ˜590 m depth), chunks of hydrate were excavated from the seafloor and collected in a glass cylinder with a mesh top. A stand-off optic was used to analyze the hydrate inside the cylinder. Due to the partial opacity of the hydrate and the small focal volume of the sampling optic, a precision underwater positioner (PUP) was used to focus the laser spot onto the hydrate. PUP is a stand-alone system with three degrees-of-freedom, capable of moving the DORISS probe head with a precision of 0.1 mm. In situ Raman analyses of the gas indicate that it is primarily methane. This is verified by GC analyses of samples collected from the same site. Other minor constituents (such as CO2 and higher hydrocarbons) are present but may be in

  19. Effect of gamma radiation on the growth, survival, hematology and histological parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oujifard, Amin, E-mail: oujifard.amin@gmail.com [Fisheries Department, Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Persian Gulf University, Borazjan, Bushehr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amiri, Roghayeh [Department of Veterinary, Agricultural Medical and Industrial Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, AEOI, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahhosseini, Gholamreza [Fisheries Department, Faculty of Natural Resources and Marine Sciences, TarbiatModares University, Noor, Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Davoodi, Reza [Fisheries Department, Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Persian Gulf University, Borazjan, Bushehr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moghaddam, Jamshid Amiri [Fisheries Department, Faculty of Natural Resources and Marine Sciences, TarbiatModares University, Noor, Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Incrementing of gamma radiation reveals the negative effects on fish larvae. • Radiation adversely affected the weight, blood cells and intestinal morphology of the larvae. • No mortality was observed at low dosage of gamma radiation on fish larvae. - Abstract: Effects of low (1, 2.5 and 5 Gy) and high doses (10, 20 and 40 Gy) of gamma radiation were examined on the growth, survival, blood parameters and morphological changes of the intestines of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) larvae (103 ± 20 mg) after 12 weeks of exposure. Negative effects of gamma radiation on growth and survival were observed as radiation level and time increased. Changes were well documented at 10 and 20 Gy. All the fish were dead at the dose of 40 Gy. In all the treatments, levels of red blood cells (RBC), hematocrit (HCT) and hemoglobin (HB) were significantly (P < 0.05) declined as the irradiation levels increased, whereas the amount of mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) did not change. No significant differences (P > 0.05) were found in the levels of white blood cells (WBC), lymphocytes and monocytes. Destruction of the intestinal epithelium cells was indicated as the irradiation levels increased to 1 Gy and above. The highest levels of growth, survival, specific growth rate (SGR), condition factor (CF) and protein efficiency rate (PER) were obtained in the control treatment. The results showed that gamma rays can be a potential means for damaging rainbow trout cells.

  20. Effect of gamma radiation on the growth, survival, hematology and histological parameters of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oujifard, Amin; Amiri, Roghayeh; Shahhosseini, Gholamreza; Davoodi, Reza; Moghaddam, Jamshid Amiri

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Incrementing of gamma radiation reveals the negative effects on fish larvae. • Radiation adversely affected the weight, blood cells and intestinal morphology of the larvae. • No mortality was observed at low dosage of gamma radiation on fish larvae. - Abstract: Effects of low (1, 2.5 and 5 Gy) and high doses (10, 20 and 40 Gy) of gamma radiation were examined on the growth, survival, blood parameters and morphological changes of the intestines of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) larvae (103 ± 20 mg) after 12 weeks of exposure. Negative effects of gamma radiation on growth and survival were observed as radiation level and time increased. Changes were well documented at 10 and 20 Gy. All the fish were dead at the dose of 40 Gy. In all the treatments, levels of red blood cells (RBC), hematocrit (HCT) and hemoglobin (HB) were significantly (P < 0.05) declined as the irradiation levels increased, whereas the amount of mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) did not change. No significant differences (P > 0.05) were found in the levels of white blood cells (WBC), lymphocytes and monocytes. Destruction of the intestinal epithelium cells was indicated as the irradiation levels increased to 1 Gy and above. The highest levels of growth, survival, specific growth rate (SGR), condition factor (CF) and protein efficiency rate (PER) were obtained in the control treatment. The results showed that gamma rays can be a potential means for damaging rainbow trout cells

  1. Analysis of feeding behavior of Drosophila larvae on liquid food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ping

    2012-05-01

    The food responses of Drosophila larvae offer an excellent opportunity to study the genetic and neural regulation of feeding behavior. Compared with fed larvae, hungry larvae are more likely to display aggressive foraging, rapid food intake, compensatory feeding, and stress-resistant food procurement. Behavioral assays have been developed to quantitatively assess particular aspects of the hunger-driven food response. In combination, these assays help define the specific role of signaling molecules or neurons in the regulation of feeding behavior in foraging larvae. This protocol describes the analysis of larvae feeding on liquid food. The test is designed for quantitative assessment of the food ingestion rate of individual larvae under different energy states. It provides a simple and reliable way to measure the graded modification of the baseline feeding rate of larvae as food deprivation is prolonged. The test is applicable to routine functional testing and larger-scale screening of genetic mutations and biologics that might affect food consumption.

  2. The influence of Na2O on the hydration of C3A II. Suspension hydration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierings, G.A.C.M.; Stein, H.N.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of Na2O on the hydration of C3A was studied in suspensions from the start of the reaction onwards. The heat evolution rate in very early stages of the hydration, measured at varying NaOH concentrations, and SEM, indicate that at NaOH concentrations larger then 0.1 M the reaction

  3. Distinguishing between hydrated, partially hydrated or unhydrated clinker in hardened concrete using microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valcke, S.L.A.; Rooij, M.R. de; Visser, J.H.M.; Nijland, T.G.

    2010-01-01

    Hydration of clinker particles is since long a topic of interest in both designing and optimizing cement composition and its quantity used in concrete. The interest for carefully observing and also quantifying the type or stage of clinker hydration in hardened cement paste is twofold. Firstly, the

  4. Methane hydrate dissociation using inverted five-spot water flooding method in cubic hydrate simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Gang; Li, Xiao-Sen; Li, Bo; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The combination forms of the hydrate dissociation methods in different well systems are divided into 6 main patterns. Dissociation processes of methane hydrate in porous media using the inverted five-spot water flooding method (Pattern 4) are investigated by the experimental observation and numerical simulation. In situ methane hydrate is synthesized in the Cubic Hydrate Simulator (CHS), a 5.832-L cubic reactor. A center vertical well is used as the hot water injection well, while the four vertical wells at the corner are the gas and water production wells. The gas production begins simultaneously with the hot water injection, while after approximately 20 min of compression, the water begins to be produced. One of the common characteristics of the inverted five-spot water flooding method is that both the gas and water production rates decrease with the reduction of the hydrate dissociation rate. The evaluation of the energy efficiency ratio might indicate the inverted five-spot water flooding as a promising gas producing method from the hydrate reservoir. - Highlights: • A three-dimensional 5.8-L cubic pressure vessel is developed. • Gas production of hydrate using inverted five-spot flooding method is studied. • Water/gas production rate and energy efficiency ratio are evaluated. • Temperature distributions of numerical simulation and experiment agree well. • Hydrate dissociation process is a moving boundary problem in this study

  5. Effect of electronic beam irradiation on development of Plodia interpunctella (Huebner)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Jialin; Chen Yuntang; Li Xuzhao; Guo Dongquan; Lu Xiaohua; Zhang Jianwei; Yang Bao'an; Liu Jiangyu; Tian Zhanjun; Zhang Xiaoyan

    2011-01-01

    The electronic beam irradiation effects on different developed stages of Plodia interpunctella Huebner were studied. The hatch rate, pupation rate, emergence rate and reproductive capacity of insect after irradiation were tested. The results showed that the order of sensitivity of the life stages of Plodia interpunctella Huebner to electron beam irradiation was: egg > larva > pupae > adult. The hatch rate, pupation rate, emergence rate and reproductive capacity significantly decreased with the increasing of irradiation dose (P<0.05). The egg, larvae, pupae couldn't grow to adults after irradiation at 100, 250 and 600 Gy, respectively. No new generation adult was found after the adults were irradiation at 600 Gy. It is concluded that 600 Gy irradiation could be used as a suitable dose to prevent the reproduction of Plodia interpunctella Huebner during the storage of tobacco. (authors)

  6. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  7. Electron spin resonance study on γ-ray-induced ethyl radical in ethane hydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeya, Kei; Nango, Kouhei; Sugahara, Takeshi; Ohgaki, Kazunari; Tani, Atsushi; Ito, Hironori; Okada, Michio; Kasai, Toshio

    2007-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies have been performed to investigate radicals induced in ethane hydrate irradiated by γ-rays at 77K. Two ESR spectra are observed and identified as the induced ethyl radical (g=2.0031±0.0005, A α sub(perpendicular)=2.2±0.1mT, A α sub(parallel)=2.5±0.1mT, A β =2.7±0.1mT) and induced atomic hydrogen (g=2.0026±0.0005, A=50.5±0.1mT). From the results of ESR analysis and gas mass spectroscopy, it is concluded that the ethyl radical decays into butane by dimerization in the first-order reaction in the temperature region of 250-265K. The activation energy of the decay reaction is 73.1±6.3kJ/mol, which is near the dissociation enthalpy change of ethane hydrate to liquid water and gaseous ethane. This finding implies that ethane hydrate does not dissociate into ice but supercooled water in the present temperature region, similar to the dissociation of methane hydrate in our previous study. (author)

  8. Hydration of urea and alkylated urea derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaatze, Udo

    2018-01-01

    Compressibility data and broadband dielectric spectra of aqueous solutions of urea and some of its alkylated derivatives have been evaluated to yield their numbers Nh of hydration water molecules per molecule of solute. Nh values in a broad range of solute concentrations are discussed and are compared to hydration numbers of other relevant molecules and organic ions. Consistent with previous results, it is found that urea differs from other solutes in its unusually small hydration number, corresponding to just one third of the estimated number of nearest neighbor molecules. This remarkable hydration behavior is explained by the large density φH of hydrogen bonding abilities offered by the urea molecule. In terms of currently discussed models of reorientational motions and allied dynamics in water and related associating liquids, the large density φH causes a relaxation time close to that of undisturbed water with most parts of water encircling the solute. Therefore only a small part of disturbed ("hydration") water is left around each urea molecule. Adding alkyl groups to the basic molecule leads to Nh values which, within the series of n-alkylurea derivatives, progressively increase with the number of methyl groups per solute. With n-butylurea, Nh from dielectric spectra, in conformity with many other organic solutes, slightly exceeds the number of nearest neighbors. Compared to such Nh values, hydration numbers from compressibility data are substantially smaller, disclosing incorrect assumptions in the formula commonly used to interpret the experimental compressibilities. Similar to other series of organic solutes, effects of isomerization have been found with alkylated urea derivatives, indicating that factors other than the predominating density φH of hydrogen bond abilities contribute also to the hydration properties.

  9. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tomotaro; Aoki, Shohei

    1976-01-01

    Definition and significance of food irradiation were described. The details of its development and present state were also described. The effect of the irradiation on Irish potatoes, onions, wiener sausages, kamaboko (boiled fish-paste), and mandarin oranges was evaluated; and healthiness of food irradiation was discussed. Studies of the irradiation equipment for Irish potatoes in a large-sized container, and the silo-typed irradiation equipment for rice and wheat were mentioned. Shihoro RI center in Hokkaido which was put to practical use for the irradiation of Irish potatoes was introduced. The state of permission of food irradiation in foreign countries in 1975 was introduced. As a view of the food irradiation in the future, its utilization for the prevention of epidemics due to imported foods was mentioned. (Serizawa, K.)

  10. Improvement in the textural qualities of irradiated legumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nene, S.P.; Vakil, U.K.; Sreenivasan, A.

    1975-01-01

    The potential for use of gamma radiation processing to improve texture, hydration and cooking quality of pulses, particularly red gram, has been examined. The textural changes in irradiated pulses in terms of softening is measured by a texturometer, Radiation (1 Mrad) processing of pulses resulted in reduction of cooking time varying from 8 to 39%, red gram showing the maximum reduction. Initial higher hydration rate on soaking and cooking, stabilized on prolonged cooking and resulted in better and uniform texture of irradiated red gram. In the uncooked, irradiated (1 Mrad) sample, destruction of riboflavin was negligible, whereas thiamine and niacin showed about 7% loss. However, the vitamins were retained better in the samples irradiated and then cooked, compared to the corresponding control ones. (F.J.)

  11. Improvement in the textural qualities of irradiated legumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nene, S P; Vakil, U K; Sreenivasan, A [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Biochemistry and Food Technology Div.

    1975-01-01

    The potential for use of gamma radiation processing to improve texture, hydration and cooking quality of pulses, particularly red gram, has been examined. The textural changes in irradiated pulses in terms of softening is measured by a texturometer, Radiation (1 Mrad) processing of pulses resulted in reduction of cooking time varying from 8 to 39%, red gram showing the maximum reduction. Initial higher hydration rate on soaking and cooking, stabilized on prolonged cooking and resulted in better and uniform texture of irradiated red gram. In the uncooked, irradiated (1 Mrad) sample, destruction of riboflavin was negligible, whereas thiamine and niacin showed about 7% loss. However, the vitamins were retained better in the samples irradiated and then cooked, compared to the corresponding control ones.

  12. Caffeine taste signaling in Drosophila larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthi A Apostolopoulou

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Drosophila larva has a simple peripheral nervous system with a comparably small number of sensory neurons located externally at the head or internally along the pharynx to assess its chemical environment. It is assumed that larval taste coding occurs mainly via external organs (the dorsal, terminal and ventral organ. However, the contribution of the internal pharyngeal sensory organs has not been explored. Here we find that larvae require a single pharyngeal gustatory receptor neuron pair called D1, which is located in the dorsal pharyngeal sensilla, in order to avoid caffeine and to associate an odor with caffeine punishment. In contrast, caffeine-driven reduction in feeding in non-choice situations does not require D1. Hence, this work provides data on taste coding via different receptor neurons, depending on the behavioral context. Furthermore, we show that the larval pharyngeal system is involved in bitter tasting. Using ectopic expressions, we show that the caffeine receptor in neuron D1 requires the function of at least four receptor genes: the putative coreceptors Gr33a, Gr66a, the putative caffeine-specific receptor Gr93a, and yet unknown additional molecular component(s. This suggests that larval taste perception is more complex than previously assumed already at the sensory level. Taste information from different sensory organs located outside at the head or inside along the pharynx of the larva is assembled to trigger taste guided behaviours.

  13. Gamma irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonet, G.

    1986-09-01

    Fiability of devices set around reactors depends on material resistance under irradiation noticeably joints, insulators, which belongs to composition of technical, safety or physical incasurement devices. The irradiated fuel elements, during their desactivation in a pool, are an interesting gamma irradiation device to simulate damages created in a nuclear environment. The existing facility at Osiris allows to generate an homogeneous rate dose in an important volume. The control of the element distances to irradiation box allows to control this dose rate [fr

  14. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The article explains what radiation does to food to preserve it. Food irradiation is of economic importance to Canada because Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is the leading world supplier of industrial irradiators. Progress is being made towards changing regulations which have restricted the irradiation of food in the United States and Canada. Examples are given of applications in other countries. Opposition to food irradiation by antinuclear groups is addressed

  15. Hydrates on tap: scientists say natural gas hydrates may be tough nut to crack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J.

    2001-12-01

    Gas hydrates are methane molecules trapped in cages of water molecules, yielding a substance with a slushy, sherbet-like consistency. Drilling for hydrates is similar to conventional oil and gas drilling, however, the secret to economic production still remains hidden. Hydrates exist in abundance in such places as deep ocean floor and below ground in some polar regions. The real challenge lies in producing gas from this resource, inasmuch as there is no existing technology for production of gas specifically from methane hydrates. This paper describes an international research program, involving a five-country partnership to spud the first of three wells into the permafrost of the Mackenzie River Delta in the Northwest Territories. The project, worth about $15 million, has brought together public funding and expertise from Japan, Germany, India as well as the Canadian and US Geological Surveys and the US Dept. of Energy in an effort to gain information on the production response of gas hydrates. The operator of the project is Japan Petroleum Exploration Company of Canada, a subsidiary of Japan National Oil Corporation. Since Japan is poor in domestic hydrocarbon resources, but is surrounded by deep water that contains potential for gas hydrates, Japan has a great deal riding on the success of this project. Germany and the United States are also very much interested. Current thinking is that gas is in contact with the hydrates and that it should be possible to develop a free gas reservoir as if it were a conventional deposit. As the free gas is drawn off, the pressure is reduced on the hydrates in contact with it , the hydrates dissociate from the gas and replenish the conventional reservoir. So far this is still only a theory, but it appears to be a sensible approach to hydrate production. 1 photo.

  16. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyers, M.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives of food irradiation are outlined. The interaction of irradiation with matter is then discussed with special reference to the major constituents of foods. The application of chemical analysis in the evaluation of the wholesomeness of irradiated foods is summarized [af

  17. Effects of Gamma Irradiation and Leaves Extract of Barnoof Plant on Larval Development of Agrotis ipsilon (Hufngel)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, H.F.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of irradiating parental male full grown pupae agrotis ipsilon with the two sub sterile doses 100 and 150 Gray (Gy) followed by treated F1 4 th instar larvae with three concentrations of the barnoof plant leaves extract (0,15000 and 30000 ppm) or each of them alone were studied. the combined treatment of gamma irradiation and the barnoof plant extract to F1 larvae had a deleterious effects on average larval duration, average weight of last larval instar, total morality, pupation, adult emergence and survival when compared with the effect of gamma irradiation or plant leaves extract which of them alone. gamma irradiation increased the susceptibility of F 1 Larvae descendant from irradiated parental male pupae with 100 and 150 Gy to the barnoof plant leaves extract. A gradual increase in susceptibility was noticed as the dose of radiation increase. the efficiency of gamma irradiation and/or plant leaves extract to inhibit the 4 th instar larvae of A-. ipsilon was evaluated. the results showed highly toxic effect to the 4 th instar larvae at the two concentrations (15000 and 30000 ppm). on the other hand the dose 150 Gy combined with 30000 ppm of plant extract treatment (Acetone or petroleum ether solvents) had highly effect on the 4 th instar larvae as compared with the other treatments

  18. Efficacy of Entomopathogenic Fungus Beauveria Bassiana and Gamma Irradiation Against the Greater Date Moth, Arenipses Sabella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhaiel, A.A.; Abul Fadl, H.A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The fungus Beauveria bassiana (Bals.) was isolated locally from dead larvae of the greater date moth, Arenipses sabella (Hampson) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). The effect of three exposure methods and two environmental factors (temperature and relative humidity) on pathogenicity of the fungus with different concentrations to A. sabella second instar larvae were examined. The study demonstrated that the entomopathogenic fungus was most efficient in the control of second instar larvae at 25 degree C and 100% humidity and the percent of mortality was increased when increasing the concentration of fungus. The mode of exposure of fungus to larvae directly sprayed, larvae exposed to the treated dates or larvae both sprayed and exposed to the treated dates showed 56.66, 26.66 and 75% mortality, respectively, at concentration 1x10 10 spores/ml and three days post-treatment. The F1 larvae resulting from irradiated male pupae with 150 Gy were more susceptible to pathogenic fungus at low concentration ((1x10 8 spores/ml) than non-irradiated ones. The scanning electron microscope was used to delineate the morphological stages of fungus to the germinated conidia and the hyphae penetrating the larva cuticle.

  19. Experimental Determination of Refractive Index of Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bylov, Martin; Rasmussen, Peter

    1997-01-01

    . For methane hydrate (structure I) the refractive index was found to be 1.346 and for natural gas hydrate (structure II) it was found to be 1.350. The measurements further suggest that the gas hydrate growth rate increases if the water has formed hydrates before. The induction time, on the other hand, seems......The refractive indexes of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate have been experimentally determined. The refractive indexes were determined in an indirect manner making use of the fact that two non-absorbing materials will have the same refractive index if they cannot be distinguished visually...

  20. Development of hydrate risk quantification in oil and gas production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Piyush N.

    Subsea flowlines that transport hydrocarbons from wellhead to the processing facility face issues from solid deposits such as hydrates, waxes, asphaltenes, etc. The solid deposits not only affect the production but also pose a safety concern; thus, flow assurance is significantly important in designing and operating subsea oil and gas production. In most subsea oil and gas operations, gas hydrates form at high pressure and low temperature conditions, causing the risk of plugging flowlines, with a undesirable impact on production. Over the years, the oil and gas industry has shifted their perspective from hydrate avoidance to hydrate management given several parameters such as production facility, production chemistry, economic and environmental concerns. Thus, understanding the level of hydrate risk associated with subsea flowlines is an important in developing efficient hydrate management techniques. In the past, hydrate formation models were developed for various flow-systems (e.g., oil dominated, water dominated, and gas dominated) present in the oil and gas production. The objective of this research is to extend the application of the present hydrate prediction models for assessing the hydrate risk associated with subsea flowlines that are prone to hydrate formation. It involves a novel approach for developing quantitative hydrate risk models based on the conceptual models built from the qualitative knowledge obtained from experimental studies. A comprehensive hydrate risk model, that ranks the hydrate risk associated with the subsea production system as a function of time, hydrates, and several other parameters, which account for inertial, viscous, interfacial forces acting on the flow-system, is developed for oil dominated and condensate systems. The hydrate plugging risk for water dominated systems is successfully modeled using The Colorado School of Mines Hydrate Flow Assurance Tool (CSMHyFAST). It is found that CSMHyFAST can be used as a screening tool in

  1. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom

  2. Experimental investigation of methane release from hydrate formation in sandstone through both hydrate dissociation and CO{sub 2} sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husebo, J.; Graue, A.; Kvamme, B. [Bergen Univ., Bergen (Norway). Dept. of Physics and Technology; Stevens, J.; Howard, J.J. [ConocoPhillips, Ponca City, OK (United States); Baldwin, B.A. [Green Country Petrophysics LLC, Dewey, OK (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Large amounts of natural gas trapped in hydrate reservoirs are found in Arctic regions and in deep offshore locations around the world. Natural gas production from hydrate deposits offer significant potential for future energy needs. However, research is needed in order to propose potential production schemes for natural gas hydrates. Natural gas molecules can be freed from hydrate structured cages by depressurization, by heating and by exposing the hydrate to a substance that will form a thermodynamically more stable hydrate structure. This paper provided a comparison of two approaches for releasing methane from methane hydrate in porous sandstone. The study scope covered the dissociation rate of methane hydrate in porous media through depressurization, and also referred to previous work done on producing methane from hydrates in sandstone while sequestering carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The study was conducted in a laboratory setting. The paper discussed the experimental design which included the placing of a pressure- and temperature-controlled sample holder inside the bore of a magnetic resonance imager. The experimental procedures were then outlined, with reference to hydrate formation; carbon dioxide sequestration; hydrate dissociation experiments with constant volume; and hydrate dissociation experiments at constant pressure. The constant volume experiments demonstrated that in order to dissociate a large amount of hydrate, the initial depressurization had to be significantly lower than the hydrate stability pressure. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Strength Estimation for Hydrate-Bearing Sediments From Direct Shear Tests of Hydrate-Bearing Sand and Silt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhichao; Dai, Sheng; Ning, Fulong; Peng, Li; Wei, Houzhen; Wei, Changfu

    2018-01-01

    Safe and economic methane gas production, as well as the replacement of methane while sequestering carbon in natural hydrate deposits, requires enhanced geomechanical understanding of the strength and volume responses of hydrate-bearing sediments during shear. This study employs a custom-made apparatus to investigate the mechanical and volumetric behaviors of carbon dioxide hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to direct shear. The results show that both peak and residual strengths increase with increased hydrate saturation and vertical stress. Hydrate contributes mainly the cohesion and dilatancy constraint to the peak strength of hydrate-bearing sediments. The postpeak strength reduction is more evident and brittle in specimens with higher hydrate saturation and under lower stress. Significant strength reduction after shear failure is expected in silty sediments with high hydrate saturation Sh ≥ 0.65. Hydrate contribution to the residual strength is mainly by increasing cohesion at low hydrate saturation and friction at high hydrate saturation. Stress state and hydrate saturation are dominating both the stiffness and the strength of hydrate-bearing sediments; thus, a wave velocity-based peak strength prediction model is proposed and validated, which allows for precise estimation of the shear strength of hydrate-bearing sediments through acoustic logging data. This method is advantageous to geomechanical simulators, particularly when the experimental strength data of natural samples are not available.

  4. Hydraulic and Mechanical Effects from Gas Hydrate Conversion and Secondary Gas Hydrate Formation during Injection of CO2 into CH4-Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, N.; Deusner, C.; Kossel, E.; Schicks, J. M.; Spangenberg, E.; Priegnitz, M.; Heeschen, K. U.; Abendroth, S.; Thaler, J.; Haeckel, M.

    2014-12-01

    The injection of CO2 into CH4-hydrate-bearing sediments has the potential to drive natural gas production and simultaneously sequester CO2 by hydrate conversion. The process aims at maintaining the in situ hydrate saturation and structure and causing limited impact on soil hydraulic properties and geomechanical stability. However, to increase hydrate conversion yields and rates it must potentially be assisted by thermal stimulation or depressurization. Further, secondary formation of CO2-rich hydrates from pore water and injected CO2 enhances hydrate conversion and CH4 production yields [1]. Technical stimulation and secondary hydrate formation add significant complexity to the bulk conversion process resulting in spatial and temporal effects on hydraulic and geomechanical properties that cannot be predicted by current reservoir simulation codes. In a combined experimental and numerical approach, it is our objective to elucidate both hydraulic and mechanical effects of CO2 injection and CH4-CO2-hydrate conversion in CH4-hydrate bearing soils. For the experimental approach we used various high-pressure flow-through systems equipped with different online and in situ monitoring tools (e.g. Raman microscopy, MRI and ERT). One particular focus was the design of triaxial cell experimental systems, which enable us to study sample behavior even during large deformations and particle flow. We present results from various flow-through high-pressure experimental studies on different scales, which indicate that hydraulic and geomechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments are drastically altered during and after injection of CO2. We discuss the results in light of the competing processes of hydrate dissociation, hydrate conversion and secondary hydrate formation. Our results will also contribute to the understanding of effects of temperature and pressure changes leading to dissociation of gas hydrates in ocean and permafrost systems. [1] Deusner C, Bigalke N, Kossel E

  5. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.

    2014-07-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  6. Effect of overpressure on gas hydrate distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, G.; Chapman, W.G.; Hirasaki, G.J. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Dickens, G.R.; Dugan, B. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    2008-07-01

    Natural gas hydrate systems can be characterized by high sedimentation rates and/or low permeability sediments, which can lead to pore pressure higher than hydrostatic. This paper discussed a study that examined this effect of overpressure on gas hydrate and free gas distribution in marine sediments. A one-dimensional numerical model that coupled sedimentation, fluid flow, and gas hydrate formation was utilized. In order to quantify the relative importance of sedimentation rates and low permeability sediments, a dimensionless sedimentation-compaction group (scN) was defined, that compared the absolute permeability of the sediments to the sedimentation rate. Higher values of scN mean higher permeability or low sedimentation rate which generally yield hydrostatic pore pressure while lower values of scN normally create pore pressure greater than hydrostatic. The paper discussed non-hydrostatic consolidation in gas hydrate systems, including mass balances; constitutive relationships; normalized variables; and dimensionless groups. A numerical solution to the problem was presented. It was concluded that simulation results demonstrated that decreasing scN not only increased pore pressure above hydrostatic values, but also lowered the lithostatic stress gradient and gas hydrate saturation. This occurred because overpressure resulted in lower effective stress, causing higher porosity and lower bulk density of the sediment. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 appendix.

  7. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.; Yoon, S.; Wentzcovitch, R. M.; Monteiro, P. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  8. Methane hydrates in quaternary climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennett, J. P.; Hill, T. M.; Behl, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    The hydrate reservoir in marine sediments is known to contain a large volume of exchangeable carbon stored as solid methane hydrate and associated free gas. This reservoir has been shown to be potentially unstable in response to changing intermediate water temperature and sea level (pressure). Evidence continues to grow for past episodes of major methane release at times of climatic warming. Yet few studies of late Quaternary climate change include methane hydrates as an integral part of the global climate system, in spite of the largest known oscillations at this time in sea level and upper ocean temperature changes for the Cenozoic or earlier, conditions that favor instability of the methane hydrate reservoir. Abrupt increases in atmospheric methane recorded in polar ice cores are widely believed to have resulted, not from ocean-floor methane degassing, but instead from continental wetland activation, a hypothesis thus far unsupported by geological data. Furthermore, as part of this Wetland Methane Hypothesis, the abrupt methane increases have been seen as a response to climatic warming rather than contributing significantly to the change. An alternative view (formulated as the Clathrate Gun Hypothesis) is that the speed, magnitude and timing of abrupt climate change in the recent geologic past are consistent with the process of major degassing of methane hydrates. We summarize aspects of this hypothesis here and needs to test this hypothesis. (Author)

  9. Garlic essential oil increases rates of eggs fertilization and hatching of Rhamdia quelen larvae in an artificial incubation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Garcia Marengoni

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of garlic (Allium sativum essential oil on the rates of eggs fertilization and hatching and on the normal development of larvae of artificially incubated silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen. The experiment was carried out using a completely randomized experimental design with four treatments and five replicates. The treatments consisted of introducing garlic essential oil into the incubators, which used a closed system of water recirculation, at concentrations of 0, 1, 3, and 5mg L-1. Rates of eggs fertilization and larval hatching were determined at 10 and 24h after the beginning of eggs hydration. Morphology of larvae was assessed with the aid of a stereo microscope to determine the rate of normal development. The concentration of 5mg L-1 promoted better rates of eggs fertilization and larval hatching. Concentrations of garlic essential oil had a linear effect on eggs fertilization rates and larval hatching. Garlic oil did not influence the morphology of the larvae (P>0.05. It is recommended to use 5mg L-1 of garlic essential oil to promote better rates of eggs fertilization and larval hatching of artificially incubated silver catfish.

  10. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macklin, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Queensland Government has given its support the establishment of a food irradiation plant in Queensland. The decision to press ahead with a food irradiation plant is astonishing given that there are two independent inquiries being carried out into food irradiation - a Parliamentary Committee inquiry and an inquiry by the Australian Consumers Association, both of which have still to table their Reports. It is fair to assume from the Queensland Government's response to date, therefore, that the Government will proceed with its food irradiation proposals regardless of the outcomes of the various federal inquiries. The reasons for the Australian Democrats' opposition to food irradiation which are also those of concerned citizens are outlined

  11. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchacek, V.

    1989-01-01

    The ranges of doses used for food irradiation and their effect on the processed foods are outlined. The wholesomeness of irradiated foods is discussed. The present food irradiation technology development in the world is described. A review of the irradiated foods permitted for public consumption, the purposes of food irradiaton, the doses used and a review of the commercial-scale food irradiators are tabulated. The history and the present state of food processing in Czechoslovakia are described. (author). 1 fig., 3 tabs., 13 refs

  12. Irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrington, Hugh

    1988-06-01

    This special edition of 'Food Manufacture' presents papers on the following aspects of the use of irradiation in the food industry:- 1) an outline view of current technology and its potential. 2) Safety and wholesomeness of irradiated and non-irradiated foods. 3) A review of the known effects of irradiation on packaging. 4) The problems of regulating the use of irradiation and consumer protection against abuse. 5) The detection problem - current procedures. 6) Description of the Gammaster BV plant in Holland. 7) World outline review. 8) Current and future commercial activities in Europe. (U.K.)

  13. Feeding behavior of giant gourami, Osphronemus gouramy (Lacepede larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thumronk Amornsakun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Feeding experiments were carried out in 15-liter glass aquaria with 10 liters of water containing 1000 larvae aged 1.5 days post-hatching (before mouth opening in three replicates. It was found that the feeding scheme of larval giant gourami aged 5-17 days (TL 8.36-13.40 mm consumed Moina. The larvae aged 14-17 days (TL 12.40-13.40 mm consumed both Moina and artificial pellet. Larvae aged more than 18-days (TL 13.60 mm consumed only artificial pellet. Daily food uptake by the larvae and juvenile were determined in a 15-liter aquaria (water volume 10 liters containing 500 larvae. The larvae were fed with Moina at density of 10 ind/ml. Aquaria without larvae were also set for a control of natural fluctuation in food density. The amount of food intake was calculated based on changes of food density in the aquarium with and without fish larvae. It was found the average uptake of Moina in digestive tract per day of larvae aged 5, 8, 11, 14 and 17 days old were 38, 52, 182, 205 and 266 individual/larva, respectively at density of 1.27, 1.73, 6.07, 6.83, and 8.87 individual/ml, respectively.

  14. The Identification of Congeners and Aliens by Drosophila Larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Del Pino

    Full Text Available We investigated the role of Drosophila larva olfactory system in identification of congeners and aliens. We discuss the importance of these activities in larva navigation across substrates, and the implications for allocation of space and food among species of similar ecologies. Wild type larvae of cosmopolitan D. melanogaster and endemic D. pavani, which cohabit the same breeding sites, used species-specific volatiles to identify conspecifics and aliens moving toward larvae of their species. D. gaucha larvae, a sibling species of D. pavani that is ecologically isolated from D. melanogaster, did not respond to melanogaster odor cues. Similar to D. pavani larvae, the navigation of pavani female x gaucha male hybrids was influenced by conspecific and alien odors, whereas gaucha female x pavani male hybrid larvae exhibited behavior similar to the D. gaucha parent. The two sibling species exhibited substantial evolutionary divergence in processing the odor inputs necessary to identify conspecifics. Orco (Or83b mutant larvae of D. melanogaster, which exhibit a loss of sense of smell, did not distinguish conspecific from alien larvae, instead moving across the substrate. Syn97CS and rut larvae of D. melanogaster, which are unable to learn but can smell, moved across the substrate as well. The Orco (Or83b, Syn97CS and rut loci are necessary to orient navigation by D. melanogaster larvae. Individuals of the Trana strain of D. melanogaster did not respond to conspecific and alien larval volatiles and therefore navigated randomly across the substrate. By contrast, larvae of the Til-Til strain used larval volatiles to orient their movement. Natural populations of D. melanogaster may exhibit differences in identification of conspecific and alien larvae. Larval locomotion was not affected by the volatiles.

  15. An irradiation marker for mango seed weevil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heather, N.W.; Lescano, H.G.; Congdon, B.C.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to look for a method to determine whether live mango seed weevil, Sternochetus mangifera (Fabricius) present in fruit had been irradiated at a quarantine dose or lower. We looked specifically for anatomical effects on the supra-oesophageal ganglion of larvae and tested a biochemical method for detection of the effects of irradiation on the protein profile of pupae. Neither method was successful. However, because for most international export markets mangoes need only be found free of the pest at inspection sourcing from pest-free production orchards and quality control systems incorporating requisite pest management components could prove practicable and satisfy most markets. (author)

  16. Water and sewage sludge disinfection by irradiation. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandre, D.

    1978-01-01

    In view of disinfestation of water and sludges qualitative aspects of irradiation are given. Effects of different parameters: pH, dose rate, hydratation, synergism of oxygen, heat and chlorine are examined. No toxic products are created by radiations. Filtrability and decantability of sludges are improved [fr

  17. Moisture desorption out of portland cement under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugak, E.B.; Denisov, A.V.; Muzalevskij, L.P.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents the results of measuring residual water content and water losses of the basic hydrated mine rals of clinker and cement stone irradiated at three different reactors. Structural parameters of the binding agent and binding water quantity are calculated on the basis of binding agent physical model and are compared with the experimental data

  18. Effects of Nanosilica on Early Age Stages of Cement Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forood Torabian Isfahani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of nanosilica on cement hydration have been broadly investigated in the literature and early age cement hydration, as a whole, has been mainly considered, disregarding the substages of the hydration. The hydration of cement is characterized by different substages and nanosilica effect on the hydration could be a result of diverse, even contradictory, behavior of nanosilica in individual stages of the hydration. In this study, effects of nanosilica on different substages of cement hydration are investigated. Isothermal calorimetry results show that at early ages (initial 72 hours the effects of nanosilica depend on the phenomenon by which the hydration is governed: when the hydration is chemically controlled, that is, during initial reaction, dormant period, and acceleratory period, the hydration rate is accelerated by adding nanosilica; when the hydration is governed by diffusion process, that is, during postacceleratory period, the hydration rate is decelerated by adding nanosilica. The Thermal Gravimetric Analysis on the samples at the hardened state (after 28 days of curing reveals that, after adding nanosilica, the hydration degree slightly increased compared to the plain paste.

  19. Morphology studies on gas hydrates interacting with silica gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, J.; Servio, P. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Clathrate hydrates or gas hydrates are non-stoichiometric, crystalline compounds that form when small molecules come in contact with water at certain temperatures and pressures. Natural gas hydrates are found in the ocean bottom and in permafrost regions. It is thought that the amount of energy stored in natural hydrates is at least twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. In addition, trapping carbon dioxide as a hydrate in the bottom of the ocean has been suggested as an alternative means of reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. Naturally occurring clathrates are found in close interaction with fine grained particles of very small mean pore diameters. Even though an increasing amount of hydrate equilibrium data for small diameter porous media has become available, the morphological behavior of hydrates subject to such conditions is yet to be explored. This paper presented a study that visually examined hydrate formation and decomposition of gas hydrates while interacting with fine grains of silica gel. The study showed still frames from high-resolution video recordings for hydrate formation and decomposition. The paper discussed the experiment including the apparatus as well as the results of hydrate formation and hydrate dissociation. This study enabled for the first time to observe clathrate morphology while hydrates interacted closely with fine grain particles with small mean pore diameters. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Transcriptional response of honey bee larvae infected with the bacterial pathogen Paenibacillus larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornman, Robert Scott; Lopez, Dawn; Evans, Jay D

    2013-01-01

    American foulbrood disease of honey bees is caused by the bacterium Paenibacillus larvae. Infection occurs per os in larvae and systemic infection requires a breaching of the host peritrophic matrix and midgut epithelium. Genetic variation exists for both bacterial virulence and host resistance, and a general immunity is achieved by larvae as they age, the basis of which has not been identified. To quickly identify a pool of candidate genes responsive to P. larvae infection, we sequenced transcripts from larvae inoculated with P. larvae at 12 hours post-emergence and incubated for 72 hours, and compared expression levels to a control cohort. We identified 75 genes with significantly higher expression and six genes with significantly lower expression. In addition to several antimicrobial peptides, two genes encoding peritrophic-matrix domains were also up-regulated. Extracellular matrix proteins, proteases/protease inhibitors, and members of the Osiris gene family were prevalent among differentially regulated genes. However, analysis of Drosophila homologs of differentially expressed genes revealed spatial and temporal patterns consistent with developmental asynchrony as a likely confounder of our results. We therefore used qPCR to measure the consistency of gene expression changes for a subset of differentially expressed genes. A replicate experiment sampled at both 48 and 72 hours post infection allowed further discrimination of genes likely to be involved in host response. The consistently responsive genes in our test set included a hymenopteran-specific protein tyrosine kinase, a hymenopteran specific serine endopeptidase, a cytochrome P450 (CYP9Q1), and a homolog of trynity, a zona pellucida domain protein. Of the known honey bee antimicrobial peptides, apidaecin was responsive at both time-points studied whereas hymenoptaecin was more consistent in its level of change between biological replicates and had the greatest increase in expression by RNA-seq analysis.

  1. Methane hydrates in nature - Current knowledge and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated effort, the United States Congress enacted the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. At the same time, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan launched a research program to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. India, China, the Republic of Korea, and other nations also have established large methane hydrate research and development programs. Government-funded scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrates in nature. Numerous studies have shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world may exceed the volume of known organic carbon sources. However, methane hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge, and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of methane hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various methane hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural methane hydrates, (5) analyzing the methane hydrate role as a geohazard, (6) establishing the means to detect and characterize methane hydrate accumulations using geologic and geophysical data, and (7) establishing the thermodynamic phase equilibrium properties of methane hydrates as a function of temperature, pressure, and gas composition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) combined their efforts in 2012 to assess the contributions that scientific drilling has made and could continue to make to advance

  2. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel O.; Walsh, Michael M.

    1999-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel in order to mix its respective portion of liquid water with the corresponding portion of the stream. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  3. Hydration dynamics of hyaluronan and dextran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Johannes; Bernecker, Anja; Bakker, Huib J; Bonn, Mischa; Richter, Ralf P

    2012-07-03

    Hyaluronan is a polysaccharide, which is ubiquitous in vertebrates and has been reported to be strongly hydrated in a biological environment. We study the hydration of hyaluronan in solution using the rotational dynamics of water as a probe. We measure these dynamics with polarization-resolved femtosecond-infrared and terahertz time-domain spectroscopies. Both experiments reveal that a subensemble of water molecules is slowed down in aqueous solutions of hyaluronan amounting to ∼15 water molecules per disaccharide unit. This quantity is consistent with what would be expected for the first hydration shell. Comparison of these results to the water dynamics in aqueous dextran solution, a structurally similar polysaccharide, yields remarkably similar results. This suggests that the observed interaction with water is a common feature for hydrophilic polysaccharides and is not specific to hyaluronan. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Multicavity SCRF calculation of ion hydration energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercksen, B.H.F.; Karelson, M.; Tamm, T.

    1994-01-01

    The hydration energies of the proton, hydroxyl ion, and several inorganic ions were calculated using the multicavity self-consistent reaction field (MCa SCRF) method developed for the quantum-mechanical modeling of rotationally or flexible systems in dielectric media. The ionic complexes H 3 O + (H2O) 4 , OH - (H2O) 4 , NH + 4 (H2O) 4 , and Hal - (H2O) 4 , where Hal = F, Cl, or Br, have been studied. Each complex was divided between five spheres, corresponding to the central ion and four water molecules in their first coordination sphere, respectively. Each cavity was surrounded by a polarizable medium with the dielectric permittivity of water at room temperature (80). The ionic hydration energies of ions were divided into specific and nonspecific parts. After accounting for the cavity-formation energy using scaled particle theory, good agreement between the total calculated and experimental hydration energies was obtained for all ions studied

  5. Thermal expansion properties of calcium aluminate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Tae Woong

    1986-01-01

    In order to eliminate the effect of impurities and aggregates on the thermomechanical properties of the various calcium aluminate hydrates, and to prepare clinkers in which all calcium aluminates are mixed homogeneously, chemically pure CaO and Al 2 O 3 were weighed, blended and heated in various conditions. After quantitative X-ray diffractometry(QXRD), the synthesized clinker was hydrated and cured under the conditions of 30 deg C, W/C=0.5, relative humidity> 90% respectively during 24 hours. And then differential thermal analysis(DTA), thermogravimetry(TG), micro calorimetry, thermomechanical analysis(TMA) and scanning electron microanalysis(SEM) were applied to examine the thermal properties of samples containing, calcium aluminate hydrates in various quantity. (Author)

  6. THz characterization of hydrated and anhydrous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolnikov, Andre

    2011-06-01

    The characterization of anhydrous and hydrated forms of materials is of great importance to science and industry. Water content poses difficulties for successful identification of the material structure by THz radiation. However, biological tissues and hydrated forms of nonorganic substances still may be investigated by THz radiation. This paper outlines the range of possibilities of the above characterization, as well as provides analysis of the physical mechanism that allows or prevents penetration of THz waves through the substance. THz-TDS is used to measure the parameters of the characterization of anhydrous and hydrated forms of organic and nonorganic samples. Mathematical methods (such as prediction models of time-series analysis) are used to help identifying the absorption coefficient and other parameters of interest. The discovered dependencies allow designing techniques for material identification/characterization (e.g. of drugs, explosives, etc. that may have water content). The results are provided.

  7. Relaxation mechanism of the hydrated electron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Madeline H; Williams, Holly L; Shreve, Alexander T; Neumark, Daniel M

    2013-12-20

    The relaxation dynamics of the photoexcited hydrated electron have been subject to conflicting interpretations. Here, we report time-resolved photoelectron spectra of hydrated electrons in a liquid microjet with the aim of clarifying ambiguities from previous experiments. A sequence of three ultrashort laser pulses (~100 femtosecond duration) successively created hydrated electrons by charge-transfer-to-solvent excitation of dissolved anions, electronically excited these electrons via the s→p transition, and then ejected them into vacuum. Two distinct transient signals were observed. One was assigned to the initially excited p-state with a lifetime of ~75 femtoseconds, and the other, with a lifetime of ~400 femtoseconds, was attributed to s-state electrons just after internal conversion in a nonequilibrated solvent environment. These assignments support the nonadiabatic relaxation model.

  8. Effects of gamma radiation on the Mediterranean flour moth eggs and acceptability of irradiated eggs by trichogramma cacoeciae females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, M.

    2008-12-01

    The sensitivity of the Mediterranean flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella, eggs in different stages of development to gamma irradiation was studied and the acceptability of irradiated eggs by Trichogramma cacoeciae females was examined. In addition, the developmental rate of immature stages (larvae and pupae), resulting from irradiated eggs, to the adult stage was examined and the acceptance of irradiated eggs to T. cacoeciae females was evaluated. Results showed that the radio-sensitivity of E. kuehniella eggs decreased with increasing age. Irradiation also negatively affected survival to the adult stage and the rate of development of immature stages (larvae and pupae) to adults. In addition, the rate of development of immature stages resulting from irradiated eggs was negatively affected. Furthermore, irradiation positively affected the degree of acceptance of eggs to parasitization; irradiated eggs were more acceptable to T. cacoeciae than cold treated ones. (Author)

  9. General Principles Involved in the Use of Irradiated Larval Vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, T.A.

    1967-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiations on helminth parasites has been under investigation now for about half a century, but only in the last 15 years has extensive and intensive work been conducted. The results have shown that in numerous host-parasite systems, ionizing radiation has attenuated or partially inactivated the parasite and that infection of host animals with irradiated larvae has stimulated immunity without accompanying disease. The immunity of vaccinated animals has subsequently been challenged by infection with normal larvae and, while unvaccinated control animals have suffered severely from the resultant disease and have often died, vaccinated animals survived the challenge of immunity usually without significant signs of disease. Comparison of the worm burdens from challenge infections in vaccinated and in control animals have further confirmed the protective effect of prior vaccination with irradiated larvae. In addition to economically important helminth diseases, various host-parasite relationships in laboratory animals have been investigated and the immunogenic efficacy of X-irradiated vaccines has been further demonstrated. There are at present two irradiated vaccines in commercial use in veterinary practice and their value has been unequivocally proven. It is probable that within the next few years at least one additional irradiated vaccine will be in use in veterinary practice. Some of die concepts and principles involved in the preparation, use and possible method of action of irradiated vaccines, with particular reference to a vaccine for hookworm disease of dogs, are described. (author)

  10. General Principles Involved in the Use of Irradiated Larval Vaccines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, T. A. [Wellcome Laboratories for Experimental Parasitology, University of Glasgow Veterinary Hospital Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    1967-09-15

    The effect of ionizing radiations on helminth parasites has been under investigation now for about half a century, but only in the last 15 years has extensive and intensive work been conducted. The results have shown that in numerous host-parasite systems, ionizing radiation has attenuated or partially inactivated the parasite and that infection of host animals with irradiated larvae has stimulated immunity without accompanying disease. The immunity of vaccinated animals has subsequently been challenged by infection with normal larvae and, while unvaccinated control animals have suffered severely from the resultant disease and have often died, vaccinated animals survived the challenge of immunity usually without significant signs of disease. Comparison of the worm burdens from challenge infections in vaccinated and in control animals have further confirmed the protective effect of prior vaccination with irradiated larvae. In addition to economically important helminth diseases, various host-parasite relationships in laboratory animals have been investigated and the immunogenic efficacy of X-irradiated vaccines has been further demonstrated. There are at present two irradiated vaccines in commercial use in veterinary practice and their value has been unequivocally proven. It is probable that within the next few years at least one additional irradiated vaccine will be in use in veterinary practice. Some of die concepts and principles involved in the preparation, use and possible method of action of irradiated vaccines, with particular reference to a vaccine for hookworm disease of dogs, are described. (author)

  11. Chemical alteration of cement hydrates by dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Daisuke; Fujita, Tomonari; Nakanishi, Kiyoshi

    2000-01-01

    Cementitious material is a potential waste packaging and backfilling material for the radioactive waste disposal, and is expected to provide both physical and chemical containment. In particular, the sorption of radionuclides onto cementitious material and the ability to provide a high pH condition are very important parameters when considering the release of radionuclides from radioactive wastes. For the long term, in the geological disposal environment, cement hydrates will be altered by, for example, dissolution, chemical reaction with ions in the groundwater, and hydrothermal reaction. Once the composition or crystallinity of the constituent minerals of a cement hydrate is changed by these processes, the pH of the repository buffered by cementitious material and its sorption ability might be affected. However, the mechanism of cement alteration is not yet fully understood. In this study, leaching experiments of some candidate cements for radioactive waste disposal were carried out. Hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Blast Furnace Slag blended cement (OPC/BFS) and Highly containing Flyash and Silicafume Cement (HFSC) samples were contacted with distilled water at liquid:solid ratios of 10:1, 100:1 and 1000:1 at room temperature for 200 days. In the case of OPC, Ca(OH) 2 dissolved at high liquid:solid ratios. The specific surface area of all cement samples increased by leaching process. This might be caused by further hydration and change of composition of constituent minerals. A model is presented which predicts the leaching of cement hydrates and the mineral composition in the hydrated cement solid phase, including the incongruent dissolution of CSH gel phases and congruent dissolution of Ca(OH) 2 , Ettringite and Hydrotalcite. Experimental results of dissolution of Ca-O-H and Ca-Si-O-H phases were well predicted by this model. (author)

  12. Ground movements associated with gas hydrate production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siriwardane, H.J.; Kutuk, B.

    1992-03-01

    This report deals with a study directed towards a modeling effort on production related ground movements and subsidence resulting from hydrate dissociation. The goal of this research study was to evaluate whether there could be subsidence related problems that could be an impediment to hydrate production. During the production of gas from a hydrate reservoir, it is expected that porous reservoir matrix becomes more compressible which may cause reservoir compression (compaction) under the influence of overburden weight. The overburden deformations can propagate its influence upwards causing subsidence near the surface where production equipment will be located. In the present study, the reservoir compaction is modeled by using the conventional ''stress equilibrium'' approach. In this approach, the overburden strata move under the influence of body force (i.e. self weight) in response to the ''cavity'' generated by reservoir depletion. The present study is expected to provide a ''lower bound'' solution to the subsidence caused by hydrate reservoir depletion. The reservoir compaction anticipated during hydrate production was modeled by using the finite element method, which is a powerful computer modeling technique. The ground movements at the reservoir roof (i.e. reservoir compression) cause additional stresses and disturbance in the overburden strata. In this study, the reservoir compaction was modeled by using the conventional ''stress equilibrium'' approach. In this approach, the overburden strata move under the influence of body force (i.e. self weight) in response to the ''cavity'' generated by reservoir depletion. The resulting stresses and ground movements were computed by using the finite element method. Based on the parameters used in this investigation, the maximum ground subsidence could vary anywhere from 0.50 to 6.50 inches depending on the overburden depth and the size of the depleted hydrate reservoir

  13. Irrigation port hydration in phacoemulsification surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki H

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hisaharu Suzuki,1 Yoichiro Masuda,2 Yuki Hamajima,1 Hiroshi Takahashi3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Nippon Medical School Musashikosugi Hospital, Kawasaki City, Kanagawa, 2Department of Ophthalmology, The Jikei University, Katsushika Medical Center, Tokyo, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan Background: In most cases, hydration is performed by water injection into the stromal tissue with a needle. The technique is simple, however it is sometimes troublesome.Purpose: We describe a simple technique for hydrating the corneal stroma in cataract surgery using an irrigation port.Patients and methods: The technique began by pushing the irrigation port against the corneal stroma for a few seconds during phacoemulsification, which generated edema in the corneal incision that subsequently prevented leakage. This procedure is called the hydration using irrigation port (HYUIP technique. A total of 60 eyes were randomized and placed in two groups, 30 eyes underwent surgeries using the HYUIP technique (HYUIP group and 30 eyes underwent surgeries without the HYUIP technique (control. The three points evaluated during each surgery included 1 the occurrence of anterior chamber collapse during the pulling out of the I/A tip after inserting the intraocular lens, 2 the need for conventional hydration, and 3 watertight completion at the end stage of surgery.Results: The anterior chamber collapse and the need for conventional hydration were significantly smaller in the HYUIP group compared to the control group. Regarding the self-sealing completion, no significant difference was observed between the two groups.Conclusion: The HYUIP technique is an effective method for creating self-sealing wound. In addition, this technique helps to prevent anterior chamber collapse. Keywords: cataract surgery, hydration, irrigation and aspiration, phacoemulsification, wound, self-sealing 

  14. Hydration and nutrition knowledge in adolescent swimmers. Does water intake affect urine hydration markers after swimming?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Altavilla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Little data exists regarding nutritional knowledge and hydration in adolescent swimmers. The aim of this study was to assess the level of nutrition and hydration knowledge and to describe the fluid balance in adolescent swimmers during training. A study was carried out with a cross-sectional descriptive part and a longitudinal part with repeated measurements over five swimming sessions. Eighty-six adolescent swimmers completed a questionnaire to assess their sport nutrition and hydration knowledge. Fluid balance and urine hydration markers were studied during training. Swimmers showed a limited nutrition knowledge (33.26 % ± SD 12.59 and meagre hydration knowledge (28.61 % ± SD 28.59. Females showed lower scores than male swimmers in nutrition and hydration knowledge. Based on urine specific gravity, swimmers started the training close to the euhydrated threshold (1.019 g/mL ± SD 0.008. Although urine specific gravity and urine colour were reduced after the training, there were minimal changes in body mass (-0.12 Kg ± SD 0.31. Sweat loss (2.67 g/min ± SD 3.23 and the net changes in the fluid balance (-0.22 % ± SD 0.59 were low. The poor knowledge in nutrition and hydration encountered in the swimmers can justify the development of a strategy to incorporate nutritional education programmes for this group. Body water deficit from swimming activity seems to be easily replaced with the water intake to maintain hydration. After the training, the urine of swimmers was diluted regardless of their water intake. Dilution of urine did not reflect real hydration state in swimming.

  15. Generic phytosanitary irradiation treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallman, Guy J.

    2012-01-01

    The history of the development of generic phytosanitary irradiation (PI) treatments is discussed beginning with its initial proposal in 1986. Generic PI treatments in use today are 150 Gy for all hosts of Tephritidae, 250 Gy for all arthropods on mango and papaya shipped from Australia to New Zealand, 300 Gy for all arthropods on mango shipped from Australia to Malaysia, 350 Gy for all arthropods on lychee shipped from Australia to New Zealand and 400 Gy for all hosts of insects other than pupae and adult Lepidoptera shipped to the United States. Efforts to develop additional generic PI treatments and reduce the dose for the 400 Gy treatment are ongoing with a broad based 5-year, 12-nation cooperative research project coordinated by the joint Food and Agricultural Organization/International Atomic Energy Agency Program on Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. Key groups identified for further development of generic PI treatments are Lepidoptera (eggs and larvae), mealybugs and scale insects. A dose of 250 Gy may suffice for these three groups plus others, such as thrips, weevils and whiteflies. - Highlights: ► The history of phytosanitary irradiation (PI) treatments is given. ► Generic PI treatments in use today are discussed. ► Suggestions for future research are presented. ► A dose of 250 Gy for most insects may suffice.

  16. SEBARAN LARVA IKAN DAN KAITANNYA DENGAN KONDISI OSEANOGRAFI LAUT SULAWESI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairul Amri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Laut Sulawesi diketahui sebagai daerah penangkapan ikan yang potensial sekaligus diduga sebagai lokasi pemijahan. Berbagai jenis larva ikan pelagis maupun demersal ditemukan di perairan ini. Kelimpahan dan sebaran larva ikan di suatu perairan sangat dipengaruhi oleh kondisi oseanografi seperti temperatur, salinitas dan sejumlah parameter lainnya termasuk ketersediaan pakan. Untuk mengetahui pengaruh parameter oseanografi terhadap kelimpahan dan sebaran spasial larva ikan di Laut Sulawesi, telah dilakukan penelitian menggunakan kapal riset KR Baruna Jaya VII pada Oktober 2012. Parameter oseanografi yaitu temperatur dan salinitas diukur menggunakan iCTD dan sampling larva menggunakan bonggo net pada 18 stasiun pengukuran. Analisa hubungan kondisi oseanografi dengan sebaran larva dilakukan secara deskriptif dan pemetaan sebarannya dilakukan secara spasial. Hasil menunjukan keterkaitan sejumlah parameter oseanografi dengan kelimpahan dan sebaran spasial larva ikan. Sebaran larva famili Scombroidae dominan berada pada perairan bersalinitas tinggi karena merupakan jenis ikan oseanik. Larva ikan demersal banyak ditemukan di perairan sekitar Kep.Sangihe Talaud. Kelimpahan larva tertinggi ditemukan di perairan bagian utara dan barat lokasi penelitian dimana kelimpahan plankton tinggi ditemukan.   Celebes Sea is known as a potential fishing and spawning grounds for several pelagic fish species. Abundance and distribution of fish larvae are allegedly linked to oceanographic conditions such as temperature, salinity and others oceanographic parameters including food availablity. To see the effect of oceanographic on the abundance and spatial distribution of fish larvae in the Celebes Sea, has conducted a research in October 2012using the research vessel KR Baruna Jaya VII. The measurement of oceanographic parameters including temperature and salinity and larval sampling were done respectively by using iCTD and Bonggo net at 18 measuring stations. The

  17. Thermal decomposition of uranyl sulphate hydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, T.; Ozawa, F.; Ikoma, S.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of uranyl sulphate hydrate (UO 2 SO 4 .3H 2 O) has been investigated by thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and infrared spectrophotometry. As a result, it is concluded that uranyl sulphate hydrate decomposes thermally: UO 2 SO 4 .3H 2 O → UO 2 SO 4 .xH 2 O(2.5 = 2 SO 4 . 2H 2 O → UO 2 SO 4 .H 2 O → UO 2 SO 4 → α-UO 2 SO 4 → β-UO 2 SO 4 → U 3 O 8 . (author)

  18. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.; Chae, S. R.; Benmore, C. J.; Wenk, H. R.; Monteiro, P. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  19. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  20. Spectral Decomposition and Other Seismic Attributes for Gas Hydrate Prospecting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Dan

    2018-02-25

    Studying the sediments at the base of gas hydrate stability is ideal for determining the seismic response to gas hydrate saturation. First, assuming gas migration to the shallow section, this area is more likely to have concentrated gas hydrate because it encompasses the zone in which upward moving buoyant gas transitions to form immobile gas hydrate deposits. Second, this zone is interesting because these areas have the potential to show a hydrate filled zone and a gas filled zone within the same sediments. Third, the fundamental measurement within seismic data is impedance contrasts between velocity*density layers. High saturation gas hydrates and free gas inhabit opposite ends of these measurements making the study of this zone ideal for investigating the seismic characteristics of gas hydrate and, hence, the investigation of other seismic attributes that may indicate gas hydrate fill.

  1. The rates measurement of methane hydrate formation and dissociation using micro-drilling system application for gas hydrate exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bin Dou [Engineering Faculty, China Univ. of Geosciences, Wuhan (China)]|[Inst. of Petroleum Engineering, Technology Univ. of Clausthal (Germany); Reinicke, K.M. [Inst. of Petroleum Engineering, Technology Univ. of Clausthal (Germany); Guosheng Jiang; Xiang Wu; Fulong Ning [Engineering Faculty, China Univ. of Geosciences, Wuhan (China)

    2006-07-01

    When drilling through gas hydrate bearing formations, the energy supplied by virtue of the drilling process may lead to a destabilization of the hydrates surrounding the wellbore. Therefore, as the number of oil and gas fields being development in deepwater and onshore arctic environments increases, greater emphasis should be placed on quantifying the risks, gas hydrates pose to drilling operations. The qualification of these risks requires a comprehensive understanding of gas hydrate-formation and dissociation as a result of drilling induced processes. To develop the required understanding of gas hydrat formation and dissociation, the authors conducted laboratory experiments by using a micro-drilling system, to study the dissociation rates of methane hydrates contained in a tank reactor. The test facility used is a development of China University of Geosciences. The rates of methane hydrate formation and dissociation in the tank reactor were measured at steady-state conditions at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 25 MPa and temperatures ranging from -5 to 20 C. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by the fluid system used to form the hydrates, pressure and temperature, with the influence of the temperature on methane hydrate dissociation being stronger than that of the pressure. Drilling speed, drilling fluids and hydrate dissociation inhibitors were also shown to influence hydrate dissociation rate. The derived results have been used to predict hydrate drilling stability for several drilling fluid systems.

  2. Effect of irradiated food on life cycle of Trogoderma granarium by gamma irradiations infesting stored barley (Hordum vulgare)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisodiya, Manju; Singhvi, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    To study the effect of irradiated food on the life cycle of Trogoderma granarium crushed barley were irradiated by Gamma irradiations. Fresh eggs were collected from stock culture for getting newly hatched first instar larvae. Twenty, first instar larvae were collected and transferred to the culture tubes containing irradiated food. The larva was observed till the emergence of adults. To calculate the survivality of insects the newly emerged adults were counted daily till the last adult and the emerged beetles were removed. The observation was also made in regard to the time required for adult emergence. The test insect was reared on Gamma irradiated food and survival rate, developmental period and growth index were recorded in different does as 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 KGy. The survival rate, developmental period and growth rate of test insect were recorded as 95%, 26.00 and 0.049 respectively at highest dose of 0.5 KGy. Where as 96.67%, 25.33 and 0.051 at lowest dose of 0.1 KGy was recorded. In control condition, they were 98.33%, 29.67 and 0.043 respectively. Irradiation against barley grains had no such effect on the developmental period, survival rate and growth index of Trogoderma granarium. It provides effective alternative to fumigants chemical pesticides which have numerous hazards and create environmental pollution. (author)

  3. Analysis of feeding behavior of Drosophila larvae on solid food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ping

    2012-05-01

    The food responses of Drosophila larvae offer an excellent opportunity to study the genetic and neural regulation of feeding behavior. Compared with fed larvae, hungry larvae are more likely to display aggressive foraging, rapid food intake, compensatory feeding, and stress-resistant food procurement. Behavioral assays have been developed to quantitatively assess particular aspects of the hunger-driven food response. In combination, these assays help define the specific role of signaling molecules or neurons in the regulation of feeding behavior in foraging larvae. This protocol is designed for quantitative assessment of the willingness of individual larvae to procure solid food under different energy states. It provides a simple and reliable way to measure the graded modification of the baseline feeding rate of larvae as the period of food deprivation is increased. The test is applicable to routine functional testing and larger-scale screening of genetic mutations and biologics that might affect food consumption.

  4. Marine Gas Hydrates - An Untapped Non-conventional Energy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Marine Gas Hydrates - An Untapped Non-conventional Energy Resource · Slide 2 · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Gas Hydrate Stability Zone · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Exploration of gas hydrates (seismic) · Characteristics of BSR · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Distribution of Gas Hydrates in KG ...

  5. Modeling peripheral olfactory coding in Drosophila larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek J Hoare

    Full Text Available The Drosophila larva possesses just 21 unique and identifiable pairs of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs, enabling investigation of the contribution of individual OSN classes to the peripheral olfactory code. We combined electrophysiological and computational modeling to explore the nature of the peripheral olfactory code in situ. We recorded firing responses of 19/21 OSNs to a panel of 19 odors. This was achieved by creating larvae expressing just one functioning class of odorant receptor, and hence OSN. Odor response profiles of each OSN class were highly specific and unique. However many OSN-odor pairs yielded variable responses, some of which were statistically indistinguishable from background activity. We used these electrophysiological data, incorporating both responses and spontaneous firing activity, to develop a bayesian decoding model of olfactory processing. The model was able to accurately predict odor identity from raw OSN responses; prediction accuracy ranged from 12%-77% (mean for all odors 45.2% but was always significantly above chance (5.6%. However, there was no correlation between prediction accuracy for a given odor and the strength of responses of wild-type larvae to the same odor in a behavioral assay. We also used the model to predict the ability of the code to discriminate between pairs of odors. Some of these predictions were supported in a behavioral discrimination (masking assay but others were not. We conclude that our model of the peripheral code represents basic features of odor detection and discrimination, yielding insights into the information available to higher processing structures in the brain.

  6. Learning and memory in zebrafish larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Adam C.; Bill, Brent R.; Glanzman, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Larval zebrafish possess several experimental advantages for investigating the molecular and neural bases of learning and memory. Despite this, neuroscientists have only recently begun to use these animals to study memory. However, in a relatively short period of time a number of forms of learning have been described in zebrafish larvae, and significant progress has been made toward their understanding. Here we provide a comprehensive review of this progress; we also describe several promising new experimental technologies currently being used in larval zebrafish that are likely to contribute major insights into the processes that underlie learning and memory. PMID:23935566

  7. Hydrate bearing clayey sediments: Formation and gas production concepts

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Jaewon; Santamarina, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Hydro-thermo-chemo and mechanically coupled processes determine hydrate morphology and control gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments. Force balance, together with mass and energy conservation analyses anchored in published data provide robust asymptotic solutions that reflect governing processes in hydrate systems. Results demonstrate that hydrate segregation in clayey sediments results in a two-material system whereby hydrate lenses are surrounded by hydrate-free water-saturated clay. Hydrate saturation can reach ≈2% by concentrating the excess dissolved gas in the pore water and ≈20% from metabolizable carbon. Higher hydrate saturations are often found in natural sediments and imply methane transport by advection or diffusion processes. Hydrate dissociation is a strongly endothermic event; the available latent heat in a reservoir can sustain significant hydrate dissociation without triggering ice formation during depressurization. The volume of hydrate expands 2-to-4 times upon dissociation or CO2single bondCH4 replacement. Volume expansion can be controlled to maintain lenses open and to create new open mode discontinuities that favor gas recovery. Pore size is the most critical sediment parameter for hydrate formation and gas recovery and is controlled by the smallest grains in a sediment. Therefore any characterization must carefully consider the amount of fines and their associated mineralogy.

  8. Standardization and software infrastructure for gas hydrate data communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroenlein, K.; Chirico, R.D.; Kazakov, A.; Frenkel, M. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States). Physical and Chemical Properties Div.; Lowner, R. [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (Germany); Wang, W. [Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing (China). Computer Network Information Center; Smith, T. [MIT Systems, Flushing, NY (United States); Sloan, E.D. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Centre for Hydrate Research

    2008-07-01

    The perceived value of gas hydrates as an energy resource for the future has led to extensive hydrate research studies and experiments. The hydrate deposits are widely dispersed throughout the world, and many countries are now investigating methods of extracting gas hydrate resources. This paper described a gas hydrates markup language (GHML) developed as an international standard for data transfer and storage within the gas hydrates community. The language is related to a hydrates database developed to facilitate a greater understanding of naturally occurring hydrate interactions with geophysical processes, and aid in the development of hydrate technologies for resource recovery and storage. Recent updates to the GHML included the addition of ThermoML, a communication standard for thermodynamic data into the GHML schema. The standard will be used to represent all gas hydrates thermodynamic data. A new element for the description of crystal structures has also been developed, as well as a guided data capture tool. The tool is available free of charge and is publicly licensed for use by gas hydrate data producers. A web service has also been provided to ensure that access to GHML files for gas hydrates and data files are available for users. It was concluded that the tool will help to ensure data quality assurance for the conversion of data and meta-data within the database. 28 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Small angle X-ray scattering from hydrating tricalcium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollet, D.

    1983-01-01

    The small-angle X-ray scattering technique was used to study the structural evolution of hydrated tricalcium silicate at room temperature. The changes in specific area of the associated porosity and the evolution of density fluctuations in the solid hydrated phase were deduced from the scattering data. A correlation of these variations with the hydration mechanism is tried. (Author) [pt

  10. Hydrate bearing clayey sediments: Formation and gas production concepts

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Jaewon

    2016-06-20

    Hydro-thermo-chemo and mechanically coupled processes determine hydrate morphology and control gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments. Force balance, together with mass and energy conservation analyses anchored in published data provide robust asymptotic solutions that reflect governing processes in hydrate systems. Results demonstrate that hydrate segregation in clayey sediments results in a two-material system whereby hydrate lenses are surrounded by hydrate-free water-saturated clay. Hydrate saturation can reach ≈2% by concentrating the excess dissolved gas in the pore water and ≈20% from metabolizable carbon. Higher hydrate saturations are often found in natural sediments and imply methane transport by advection or diffusion processes. Hydrate dissociation is a strongly endothermic event; the available latent heat in a reservoir can sustain significant hydrate dissociation without triggering ice formation during depressurization. The volume of hydrate expands 2-to-4 times upon dissociation or CO2single bondCH4 replacement. Volume expansion can be controlled to maintain lenses open and to create new open mode discontinuities that favor gas recovery. Pore size is the most critical sediment parameter for hydrate formation and gas recovery and is controlled by the smallest grains in a sediment. Therefore any characterization must carefully consider the amount of fines and their associated mineralogy.

  11. A Madurella mycetomatis Grain Model in Galleria mellonella Larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Kloezen

    Full Text Available Eumycetoma is a chronic granulomatous subcutaneous infectious disease, endemic in tropical and subtropical regions and most commonly caused by the fungus Madurella mycetomatis. Interestingly, although grain formation is key in mycetoma, its formation process and its susceptibility towards antifungal agents are not well understood. This is because grain formation cannot be induced in vitro; a mammalian host is necessary to induce its formation. Until now, invertebrate hosts were never used to study grain formation in M. mycetomatis. In this study we determined if larvae of the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella could be used to induce grain formation when infected with M. mycetomatis. Three different M. mycetomatis strains were selected and three different inocula for each strain were used to infect G. mellonella larvae, ranging from 0.04 mg/larvae to 4 mg/larvae. Larvae were monitored for 10 days. It appeared that most larvae survived the lowest inoculum, but at the highest inoculum all larvae died within the 10 day observation period. At all inocula tested, grains were formed within 4 hours after infection. The grains produced in the larvae resembled those formed in human and in mammalian hosts. In conclusion, the M. mycetomatis grain model in G. mellonella larvae described here could serve as a useful model to study the grain formation and therapeutic responses towards antifungal agents in the future.

  12. Fate of pharmaceuticals and pesticides in fly larvae composting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalander, C., E-mail: cecilia.lalander@slu.se [Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden); Senecal, J.; Gros Calvo, M. [Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden); Ahrens, L.; Josefsson, S.; Wiberg, K. [Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden); Vinnerås, B. [Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden)

    2016-09-15

    A novel and efficient organic waste management strategy currently gaining great attention is fly larvae composting. High resource recovery efficiency can be achieved in this closed-looped system, but pharmaceuticals and pesticides in waste could potentially accumulate in every loop of the treatment system and spread to the environment. This study evaluated the fate of three pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine, roxithromycin, trimethoprim) and two pesticides (azoxystrobin, propiconazole) in a fly larvae composting system and in a control treatment with no larvae. It was found that the half-life of all five substances was shorter in the fly larvae compost (< 10% of control) and no bioaccumulation was detected in the larvae. Fly larvae composting could thus impede the spread of pharmaceuticals and pesticides into the environment. - Highlights: • Degradation of pharmaceuticals and pesticides in fly larvae composting (FLC). • Half-life considerably shorter in FLC than in control with no larvae. • Half-life of carbamazepine was less than two days in FLC. • No bioaccumulation in larvae detected. • FLC could impede the spreading of pharmaceuticals and pesticide in the environment.

  13. Fate of pharmaceuticals and pesticides in fly larvae composting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalander, C.; Senecal, J.; Gros Calvo, M.; Ahrens, L.; Josefsson, S.; Wiberg, K.; Vinnerås, B.

    2016-01-01

    A novel and efficient organic waste management strategy currently gaining great attention is fly larvae composting. High resource recovery efficiency can be achieved in this closed-looped system, but pharmaceuticals and pesticides in waste could potentially accumulate in every loop of the treatment system and spread to the environment. This study evaluated the fate of three pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine, roxithromycin, trimethoprim) and two pesticides (azoxystrobin, propiconazole) in a fly larvae composting system and in a control treatment with no larvae. It was found that the half-life of all five substances was shorter in the fly larvae compost (< 10% of control) and no bioaccumulation was detected in the larvae. Fly larvae composting could thus impede the spread of pharmaceuticals and pesticides into the environment. - Highlights: • Degradation of pharmaceuticals and pesticides in fly larvae composting (FLC). • Half-life considerably shorter in FLC than in control with no larvae. • Half-life of carbamazepine was less than two days in FLC. • No bioaccumulation in larvae detected. • FLC could impede the spreading of pharmaceuticals and pesticide in the environment.

  14. Nutritional condition and vertical distribution of Baltic cod larvae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønkjær, P.; Clemmesen, C.; St. John, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Newly hatched Baltic cod Gadus morhua larvae are typically found at depths >60 m. This is a region of low light and prey availability, hence generating the hypothesis that larvae have to migrate from hatching depth to the surface layer to avoid starvation and improve their nutritional condition...... aged 2-25 days (median 10 days) ranged from 0.4 to 6.2, corresponding to levels exhibited by starving and fast growing larvae in laboratory calibration studies (starvation, protein growth rate, G(pi)=-12.2% day(-1); fast-growing larvae, G(pi)=14.1% day(-1)) respectively. Seventy per cent of the field...

  15. Effect of gut bacterial isolates from Apis mellifera jemenitica on Paenibacillus larvae infected bee larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghamdi, Ahmad; Ali Khan, Khalid; Javed Ansari, Mohammad; Almasaudi, Saad B; Al-Kahtani, Saad

    2018-02-01

    The probiotic effects of seven newly isolated gut bacteria, from the indegenous honey bees of Saudi Arabia were investigated. In vivo bioassays were used to investigate the effects of each gut bacterium namely, Fructobacillus fructosus (T1), Proteus mirabilis (T2), Bacillus licheniformis (T3), Lactobacillus kunkeei (T4), Bacillus subtilis (T5), Enterobacter kobei (T6), and Morganella morganii (T7) on mortality percentage of honey bee larvae infected with P. larvae spores along with negative control (normal diet) and positive control (normal diet spiked with P. larvae spores). Addition of gut bacteria to the normal diet significantly reduced the mortality percentage of the treated groups. Mortality percentage in all treated groups ranged from 56.67% up to 86.67%. T6 treated group exhibited the highest mortality (86.67%), whereas T4 group showed the lowest mortality (56.67%). Among the seven gut bacterial treatments, T4 and T3 decreased the mortality 56.67% and 66.67%, respectively, whereas, for T2, T6, and T7 the mortality percentage was equal to that of the positive control (86.67%). Mortality percentages in infected larval groups treated with T1, and T5 were 78.33% and 73.33% respectively. Most of the mortality occurred in the treated larvae during days 2 and 3. Treatments T3 and T4 treatments showed positive effects and reduced mortality.

  16. Effect of gut bacterial isolates from Apis mellifera jemenitica on Paenibacillus larvae infected bee larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Al-Ghamdi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The probiotic effects of seven newly isolated gut bacteria, from the indegenous honey bees of Saudi Arabia were investigated. In vivo bioassays were used to investigate the effects of each gut bacterium namely, Fructobacillus fructosus (T1, Proteus mirabilis (T2, Bacillus licheniformis (T3, Lactobacillus kunkeei (T4, Bacillus subtilis (T5, Enterobacter kobei (T6, and Morganella morganii (T7 on mortality percentage of honey bee larvae infected with P. larvae spores along with negative control (normal diet and positive control (normal diet spiked with P. larvae spores. Addition of gut bacteria to the normal diet significantly reduced the mortality percentage of the treated groups. Mortality percentage in all treated groups ranged from 56.67% up to 86.67%. T6 treated group exhibited the highest mortality (86.67%, whereas T4 group showed the lowest mortality (56.67%. Among the seven gut bacterial treatments, T4 and T3 decreased the mortality 56.67% and 66.67%, respectively, whereas, for T2, T6, and T7 the mortality percentage was equal to that of the positive control (86.67%. Mortality percentages in infected larval groups treated with T1, and T5 were 78.33% and 73.33% respectively. Most of the mortality occurred in the treated larvae during days 2 and 3. Treatments T3 and T4 treatments showed positive effects and reduced mortality.

  17. Biofilms and Marine Invertebrate Larvae: What Bacteria Produce That Larvae Use to Choose Settlement Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadfield, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Communities of microorganisms form thin coats across solid surfaces in the sea. Larvae of many marine invertebrates use biofilm components as cues to appropriate settlement sites. Research on the tube-dwelling polychaete worm Hydroides elegans, a globally common member of biofouling communities, is described to exemplify approaches to understanding biofilm bacteria as a source of settlement cues and larvae as bearers of receptors for bacterial cues. The association of species of the bacterial genus Pseudoalteromonas with larval settlement in many phyla is described, and the question of whether cues are soluble or surface-bound is reviewed, concluding that most evidence points to surface-bound cues. Seemingly contradictory data for stimulation of barnacle settlement are discussed; possibly both explanations are true. Paleontological evidence reveals a relationship between metazoans and biofilms very early in metazoan evolution, and thus the receptors for bacterial cues of invertebrate larvae are very old and possibly unique. Finally, despite more than 60 years of intense investigation, we still know very little about either the bacterial ligands that stimulate larval settlement or the cellular basis of their detection by larvae.

  18. Foodstuff irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Report written on behalf of the Danish Food Institute summarizes national and international rules and developments within food irradiation technology, chemical changes in irradiated foodstuffs, microbiological and health-related aspects of irradiation and finally technological prospects of this conservation form. Food irradiatin has not been hitherto applied in Denmark. Radiation sources and secondary radiation doses in processed food are characterized. Chemical changes due to irradiation are compared to those due to p.ex. food heating. Toxicological and microbiological tests and their results give no unequivocal answer to the problem whether a foodstuff has been irradiated. The most likely application fields in Denmark are for low radiation dosis inhibition of germination, riping delay and insecticide. Medium dosis (1-10 kGy) can reduce bacteria number while high dosis (10-50 kGy) will enable total elimination of microorganisms and viruses. Food irradiation can be acceptable as technological possibility with reservation, that further studies follow. (EG)

  19. Radiation chemistry of salt-mine brines and hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenks, G.H.; Walton, J.R.; Bronstein, H.R.; Baes, C.F. Jr.

    1981-07-01

    Certain aspects of the radiation chemistry of NaCl-saturated MgCl 2 solutions and MgCl 2 hydrates at temperatures in the range of 30 to 180 0 C were investigated through experiments. A principal objective was to establish the values for the yields of H 2 [G(H 2 )] and accompanying oxidants in the gamma-ray radiolysis of concentrated brines that might occur in waste repositories in salt. We concluded that G(H 2 ) from gamma-irradiated brine solution into a simultaneously irradiated, deaerated atmosphere above the solution is between 0.48 and 0.49 over most of the range 30 to 143 0 C. The yield is probably somewhat lower at the lower end of this range, averaging 0.44 at 30 to 45 0 C. Changes in the relative amounts of MgCl 2 and NaCl in the NaCl-saturated solutions have negligible effects on the yield. The yield of O 2 into the same atmosphere averages 0.13, independent of the temperature and brine composition, showing that only about 50% of the radiolytic oxidant that was formed along with the H 2 was present as O 2 . We did not identify the species that compose the remainder of the oxidant. We concluded that the yield of H 2 from a gamma-irradiated brine solution into a simultaneously irradiated atmosphere containing 5 to 8% air in He may be greater than the yield in deaerated systems by amounts ranging from 0% for temperatures of 73 to 85 0 C, to about 30 and 40% for temperatures in the ranges 100 to 143 0 C and 30 to 45 0 C, respectively. We did not establish the mechanism whereby the air affected the yields of H 2 and O 2 . The values found in this work for G(H 2 ) in deaerated systems are in approximate agreement with the value of 0.44 for the gamma-irradiation yield of H 2 in pure H 2 O at room temperature. They are also in agreement with the values predicted by extrapolation from the findings of previous researchers for the value for G(H 2 ) in 2 M NaCl solutions at room temperature

  20. Radiosensitivity of diapausing and nondiapausing larvae of trogoderma granarium everts to gamma radiation and its effect on the adults reproductive potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharieb, O.H.

    2002-01-01

    Diapausing (D) and nondiapausing (ND) larvae of Trogoderma Granarium Everts were irradiated with a graded series of gamma doses from 20-160 Gy. Larval mortality was much greater in the diapause line, whereas pupal mortality was much greater in the non-diapause line. The percent emergence of both D and ND adults decreased as the dose increased and the D line showed less emergence (17 and 6%) at doses of 60 and 80 Gy while it was (5 and 2%) at doses of 120 and 140 Gy for the ND line. Irradiation delayed the mean emergence time of both D and ND adults and the amount of delay was dose-dependent. Also, Females of both lines were more more sensitive the somatic effects of larval irradiation than were males. Both males and females of the D strain retained a significantly greater production and fertility at each dose as compared to the ND strain. Thus, diapausing larvae have limited value in a sterile insect release program because higher doses would be needed to sterilize D larvae than ND larvae, more somatic damage would occur, and less competitive adults would be produced

  1. Obsidian Hydration Dating in the Undergraduate Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manche, Emanuel P.; Lakatos, Stephen

    1986-01-01

    Provides an overview of obsidian hydration dating for the instructor by presenting: (1) principles of the method; (2) procedures; (3) applications; and (4) limitations. The theory of the method and one or more laboratory exercises can be easily introduced into the undergraduate geology curriculum. (JN)

  2. Gas hydrate resource quantification in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasini, J.; De Santa Ana, H.; Veroslavsky, G.

    2012-01-01

    The gas hydrates are crystalline solids formed by natural gas (mostly methane) and water, which are stable in thermobaric conditions given under high pressures and low temperatures. These conditions are given in permafrost zones and continental margin basins offshore in the nature

  3. Pentagonal dodecahedron methane hydrate cage and methanol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    methane hydrate in sea bed near continental margin and underneath of permafrost ... clathrate structure,6,7 IR spectroscopy analysis of vibra- tional form of guest .... Hydrogen (H71) of the hydroxyl group of methanol is found to have formed ...

  4. A new approach to model mixed hydrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hielscher, S.; Vinš, Václav; Jäger, A.; Hrubý, Jan; Breitkopf, C.; Span, R.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 459, March (2018), s. 170-185 ISSN 0378-3812 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-08218S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : gas hydrate * mixture * modeling Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 2.473, year: 2016 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378381217304983

  5. [Terminal phase hydration, pain and delirium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heick, A.

    2009-01-01

    Hydration of the terminal patient may relieve confusion and complaints of "dry mouth". But it may worsen oedema of the brain, lungs, and extremities, worsen terminal rattling and cause a need for frequent changing of diapers. The decision of whether and how to treat a dying patient with fluids...

  6. Hydration dynamics near a model protein surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of water dynamics from dilute to very high concentration solutions of a prototypical hydrophobic amino acid with its polar backbone, N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA), is studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation for both the completely deuterated and completely hydrogenated leucine monomer. We observe several unexpected features in the dynamics of these biological solutions under ambient conditions. The NALMA dynamics shows evidence of de Gennes narrowing, an indication of coherent long timescale structural relaxation dynamics. The translational water dynamics are analyzed in a first approximation with a jump diffusion model. At the highest solute concentrations, the hydration water dynamics is significantly suppressed and characterized by a long residential time and a slow diffusion coefficient. The analysis of the more dilute concentration solutions takes into account the results of the 2.0M solution as a model of the first hydration shell. Subtracting the first hydration layer based on the 2.0M spectra, the translational diffusion dynamics is still suppressed, although the rotational relaxation time and residential time are converged to bulk-water values. Molecular dynamics analysis shows spatially heterogeneous dynamics at high concentration that becomes homogeneous at more dilute concentrations. We discuss the hydration dynamics results of this model protein system in the context of glassy systems, protein function, and protein-protein interfaces

  7. A positron annihilation study of hydrated DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warman, J. M.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1986-01-01

    Positron annihilation measurements are reported for hydrated DNA as a function of water content and as a function of temperature (20 to -180.degree. C) for samples containing 10 and 50% wt of water. The ortho-positronium mean lifetime and its intensity show distinct variations with the degree...

  8. Gold(III)-Catalyzed Hydration of Phenylacetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, J. Michelle; Tzeel, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    A guided inquiry-based experiment exploring the regioselectivity of the hydration of phenylacetylene is described. The experiment uses an acidic gold(III) catalyst in a benign methanol/water solvent system to introduce students to alkyne chemistry and key principles of green chemistry. The experiment can be easily completed in approximately 2 h,…

  9. [Terminal phase hydration, pain and delirium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heick, A.

    2009-01-01

    Hydration of the terminal patient may relieve confusion and complaints of "dry mouth". But it may worsen oedema of the brain, lungs, and extremities, worsen terminal rattling and cause a need for frequent changing of diapers. The decision of whether and how to treat a dying patient with fluids sh...

  10. Alkali binding in hydrated Portland cement paste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Brouwers, Jos

    2010-01-01

    The alkali-binding capacity of C–S–H in hydrated Portland cement pastes is addressed in this study. The amount of bound alkalis in C–S–H is computed based on the alkali partition theories firstly proposed by Taylor (1987) and later further developed by Brouwers and Van Eijk (2003). Experimental data

  11. Hemibody irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schen, B.C.; Mella, O.; Dahl, O.

    1992-01-01

    In a large number of cancer patients, extensive skeletal metastases or myelomatosis induce vast suffering, such as intolerable pain and local complications of neoplastic bone destruction. Analgetic drugs frequently do not yield sufficient palliation. Irradiation of local fields often has to be repeated, because of tumour growth outside previously irradiated volumes. Wide field irradiation of the lower or upper half of the body causes significant relief of pain in most patients. Adequate pretreatment handling of patients, method of irradiation, and follow-up are of importance to reduce side effects, and are described as they are carried out at the Department of Oncology, Haukeland Hospital, Norway. 16 refs., 2 figs

  12. PERKEMBANGAN ENZIM PENCERNAAN LARVA IKAN PATIN, Pangasius hypophthalmus sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irzal Effendi

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Development of digestive enzymes; protease, lipase and amylase were observed in patin catfish, Pangasius hypophthalmus, larvae.  The 1 day old larvae (day after hatching, with 3,37-3,97 mm length and 0,62-0,79 mg weight, were reared in aquarium 60x50x40 cm with stocking  density of 20 fish/l.  Larvae were fed  Artemia dan tubificid worms 2-8 dan 7-15 days after hatching (dAH,  respectively (schedule I;  2-6 and  5-15 dAH (schedule II; and 2-4 and 5-15 dAH (schedule III.  Chlorella was ready to eat by larvae at the entirely rearing.  For enzyme assay, larvae were sampled from each aquarium at stages of 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 15 dAH.    Protease and lipase activity were detected in digestive tract of  1 dAH larvae.   Digestive enzymes development have a similar pattern in larvae for all feeding schedules.  Protease activity  decreased with the increasing of age until 3 dAH, then increased  until the larvae reached 7 dAH, and sharply decreased until 10 dAH and then slowly decreased thereafter. Lipase activity tended to increase slowly with age up to 3 dAH, and increased sharply until 5 dAH, and then decreased sharply until 7 dAH  before decreased again up to the end of rearing.  Amylase activity in larvae increased slowly with the increasing of age up to 5 dAH, then increased sharply until 7 dAH, and decreased thereafter.  In dimly lighted larvae, amylase activity decreased before increased up to 12 d AH, then decreased thereafter.  The amount of food organisms in larval gut, body weight and length, and survival rate of larvae were also measured and discussed.Key Words:  Digestive enzymes, development, larvae, patin catfish, Pangasius hypophthalmus ABSTRAKPenelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui perkembangan enzim protease, lipase dan amilase saluran pencernaan larva ikan patin akibat perubahan skedul pemberian pakan.  Larva ikan patin (panjang 3,77–3,97 mm dan bobot 0,62-0,79 mg berumur 1 hari dipelihara di akuarium 60x

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus larvae MEX14, Isolated from Honey Bee Larvae from the Xochimilco Quarter in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peréz de la Rosa, D; Pérez de la Rosa, J J; Cossio-Bayugar, R; Miranda-Miranda, E; Lozano, L; Bravo-Díaz, M A; Rocha-Martínez, M K; Sachman-Ruiz, B

    2015-08-27

    Paenibacillus larvae strain MEX14 is a facultative anaerobic endospore-forming bacterium that infects Apis mellifera larvae. Strain MEX14 was isolated from domestic bee larvae collected in a backyard in Mexico City. The estimated genome size was determined to be 4.18 Mb, and it harbors 4,806 protein coding genes (CDSs). Copyright © 2015 Peréz de la Rosa et al.

  14. Sensitivity of the different developmental stages of Callosobruchus maculatus to gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olaifa, J.I.; Adebayo, T.A.; Adesanmi, C.A.; Salau, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    Life stages of the cowpea seed beetle (Callosobruchus maculatus F.) were γ irradiated from a 60 Co source. Arrested development was observed at dosages of 1.0, 4.0, 10.0 and 10.0 Gy in the egg, 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th larvae stages respectively while 4.0 Gy induced sterility. Longevity of 2-day old adults was not affected by irradiation of 100 Gy. Preservation of cowpeas by irradiation is discussed. (author)

  15. Fish larvae from the Gulf of California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Aceves-Medina

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomic composition of fish larvae was analysed from 464 plankton samples obtained during 10 oceanographic surveys in the Gulf of California between 1984 and 1988. We identified 283 taxa: 173 species, 57 genera, and 53 families. Tropical and subtropical species predominated except during the winter, when temperate-subarctic species were dominant. The most abundant species were the mesopelagic Benthosema panamense, Triphoturus mexicanus and Vinciguerria lucetia, but the coastal pelagic species Engraulis mordax, Opisthonema spp., Sardinops caeruleus and Scomber japonicus were also prominent. The taxonomic composition of the ichthyoplankton shows the seasonality of the Gulf as well as environmental changes that occurred between the 1984-1987 warm period and the 1956-1957 cool period previously reported. The presence of E. mordax larvae as one of the most abundant species in the Gulf provides evidence of the reproduction of this species two years before the development of the northern anchovy fishery and the decline of the sardine fishery in the Gulf of California.

  16. Clathrate Hydrates for Thermal Energy Storage in Buildings: Overview of Proper Hydrate-Forming Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Castellani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing energy costs are at the origin of the great progress in the field of phase change materials (PCMs. The present work aims at studying the application of clathrate hydrates as PCMs in buildings. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline structures in which guest molecules are enclosed in the crystal lattice of water molecules. Clathrate hydrates can form also at ambient pressure and present a high latent heat, and for this reason, they are good candidates for being used as PCMs. The parameter that makes a PCM suitable to be used in buildings is, first of all, a melting temperature at about 25 °C. The paper provides an overview of groups of clathrate hydrates, whose physical and chemical characteristics could meet the requirements needed for their application in buildings. Simulations with a dynamic building simulation tool are carried out to evaluate the performance of clathrate hydrates in enhancing thermal comfort through the moderation of summer temperature swings and, therefore, in reducing energy consumption. Simulations suggest that clathrate hydrates have a potential in terms of improvement of indoor thermal comfort and a reduction of energy consumption for cooling. Cooling effects of 0.5 °C and reduced overheating hours of up to 1.1% are predicted.

  17. Enthalpy of dissociation and hydration number of methane hydrate from the Clapeyron equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Graydon K.

    2004-01-01

    The enthalpies of the reactions in which methane hydrate is dissociated to methane vapor and either (1) water, or (2) ice are determined by a new analysis using the Clapeyron equation. The difference in enthalpies of the two reactions is used to infer the hydration number at the quadruple point where hydrate, ice, liquid water, and methane vapor coexist. By appropriate corrections, the hydration number at points removed from the quadruple point is also determined. The most important feature of the new analysis is the direct use of the Clapeyron equation. The method avoids the use of certain simplifying assumptions that have compromised the accuracy of previous analyses in which the Clausius-Clapeyron equation was used. The analysis takes into account the finite volumes of all phases, the non-ideality of the vapor phase, and the solubility of methane in water. The results show that the enthalpy of dissociation and hydration number are constant within experimental error over the entire (hydrate, liquid, vapor) coexistence region. The results are more accurate than but entirely consistent with almost all previous studies

  18. Direct measurement of methane hydrate composition along the hydrate equilibrium boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    The composition of methane hydrate, namely nW for CH 4??nWH2O, was directly measured along the hydrate equilibrium boundary under conditions of excess methane gas. Pressure and temperature conditions ranged from 1.9 to 9.7 MPa and 263 to 285 K. Within experimental error, there is no change in hydrate composition with increasing pressure along the equilibrium boundary, but nW may show a slight systematic decrease away from this boundary. A hydrate stoichiometry of n W = 5.81-6.10 H2O describes the entire range of measured values, with an average composition of CH4??5.99(??0.07) H2O along the equilibrium boundary. These results, consistent with previously measured values, are discussed with respect to the widely ranging values obtained by thermodynamic analysis. The relatively constant composition of methane hydrate over the geologically relevant pressure and temperature range investigated suggests that in situ methane hydrate compositions may be estimated with some confidence. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  19. MORPHOLOGY OF METHANE HYDRATE HOST SEDIMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JONES, K.W.; FENG, H.; TOMOV, S.; WINTER, W.J.; EATON, M.; MAHAJAN, D.

    2004-01-01

    Results from simulated experiments in several laboratories show that host sediments influence hydrate formation in accord with known heterogeneity of host sediments at sites of gas hydrate occurrence (1). For example, in Mackenzie Delta, NWT Canada (Mallik 2L-38 well), coarser-grained units (pore-filling model) are found whereas in the Gulf of Mexico, the found hydrate samples do not appear to be lithologically controlled. We have initiated a systematic study of sediments, initially focusing on samples from various depths at a specific site, to establish a correlation with hydrate occurrence (or variations thereof) to establish differences in their microstructure, porosity, and other associated properties. The synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) set-up at the X-27A tomography beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory was used as a tool to study sediments from Blake Ridge at three sub bottom depths of 0.2, 50, and 667 meters. Results from the tomographic analysis of the deepest sample (667 m) are presented here to illustrate how tomography can be used to obtain new insights into the structures of methane hydrate host sediments. The investigation shows the internal grain/pore space resolution in the microstructure and a 3-D visualization of the connecting pathways obtained following data segmentation into pore space and grains within the sediment sample. The analysis gives the sample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity, as well. An earlier report on the experimental program has been given by Mahajan et al. (2)

  20. Efektivitas Bacillus thuringiensis dalam Pengendalian Larva Nyamuk Anopheles sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Citra Inneke Wibowo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nyamuk Anopheles sp adalah vektor penyakit malaria. Pengendalian vektor penyakit malaria dapat dilakukan secara biologis yaitu dengan menggunakan Bacillus thuringiensis. Tujuan penelitian adalah untuk mengetahui efektivitas konsentrasi Bacillus thuringiensis dalam pengendalian larva nyamuk Anopheles sp.Penelitian ini dilakukan secara eksperimental menggunakan Rancangan Acak Lengkap Faktorial (RAL Faktorial yang terdiri atas dua faktor yaitu konsentrasi Bacillus thuringiensis dan stadia larva Anopheles dengan pengulangan tiga kali.Perlakuan yang dicobakan adalahkonsentrasi Bacillus thuringiensis (A yang terdiri atas 5 taraf:A0: konsentrasi B.thuringiensis 0 CFU.mL-1, A1: konsentrasi B.thuringiensis 102 CFU.mL-1, A2: konsentrasi B.thuringiensis 104 CFU.mL-1, A3: konsentrasi B.thuringiensis 106CFU.mL-1, A4: konsentrasi B.thuringiensis 108CFU.mL-1. Perlakuan tahapan instar larva Anopheles sp. (B adalah sebagai berikut:B1: stadia larva instar I, B2: stadia larva instar II, B3: stadia larva instar III, B4: stadia larva instar IVsehingga terdapat 60 satuan percobaan. Hasil penelitian  menunjukkan konsentrasi B. thuringiensis isolat CK dan IPB CC yang paling berpengaruh dalam pengendalian larva Anopheles sp adalah 108 CFU.mL-1 . Instar larva yang paling peka terhadap B. thuringiensis isolat IPB CC adalah instar I dan II sedangkan instar yang peka terhadap isolat CK adalah instar II, Perlakuan konsentrasi isolat B. thuringiensis dan tingkat instar larva yang paling baik dalam pengendalian larva Anopheles sp. adalah 108 CFU.mL-1, dan instar I dan II.

  1. Barley seed radiosensitivity following post-hydration in oxygen-, nitrogen- and nitrous oxide-saturated water, 1; Influence of caffeine and t-butyl alcohol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.P.; Kesavan, P.C. (Jawaharlal Nehru Univ., New Delhi (India). School of Life Sciences)

    1990-06-01

    Dry ({approx}3.5 and 4.0 per cent moisture content) barley seeds were exposed to 350 Gy of {sup 60}Co-{gamma}-rays in vacuo and post-hydrated at 4degC for 8 h in O{sub 2}-, N{sub 2}-, or N{sub 2}O-saturated water. The effect of caffeine and t-butyl alcohol (t-BuOH) dissolved in the post-hydration medium on the magnitude of damage developing under these three different gaseous circumstances was studied. The post-irradiation damage and its modification by caffeine and t-BuOH was assessed in terms of 8-day-old seedling injury, peroxidase activity and total peroxides in the 8-day-old seedlings. Post-irradiation O{sub 2}-saturated hydration caused maximal 8-day-old seedling injury, and increased peroxidase activity with concomitant reduction in total peroxides. Both caffeine and t-BuOH afforded significant radioprotection against post-irradiation O{sub 2}-dependent damage. Post-irradiation N{sub 2}O-saturated hydration was even more significantly radioprotective than the N{sub 2}-saturated post-hydration. Under these circumstances, t-BuOH exerted no effect whatsoever on the N{sub 2}- and N{sub 2}O-mediated post-irradiation damage. Caffeine, on the other hand, significantly potentiated these two components of damage. A brief consideration of the physicochemical events which possibly account for the observed effects is presented. (author).

  2. Insect disinfestation in smoked fish by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudatis, Boonya; Banditsing, Chettachai

    1982-01-01

    The experiment on insect disinfestation in smoked fish by gamma irradiation was done by irradiating 2-day-old eggs, 28-day-old larvae, 5-day-old pupae, and 5-day-old adults, reared at 26 +- 1 degC and 75-70% RH., with doses of 0-.5, 0-20 Krad respectively for sterility dose and with doses of 0-2, 0-6, 0-60, 20-60 Krad respectively for LD 50 . The results obtained from this experiment are as follows: (1) For the study of all stages of this insect sterility doses, there was no irradiated egg hatch in all doses and only irradiated larvae with 1-5 Krad reached pupal stage but emerged as malformed adults and died. Furthermore, the sterility doses for pupal and adult stage are both at 7.5 Krad. However, the percent of egg hatch from 5 Krad pupae and 5 Krad adults are .18 and .4 respectively. (2) The LD 50 checked at different times after irradiation in each stage for 2-day-old eggs after 2 days, for 28-day-old larvae after 7 days, 5-day-old pupae after 5 days, and for 5-day-old adults after 5 days are .48, 12.85, 18.5 and 29.78 Krad respectively

  3. Effects of electron beam irradiation on cut flowers and mites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohino, Toshiyuki; Tanabe, Kazuo

    1994-01-01

    Two spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae KOCH were irradiated with electron beams (2.5MeV) to develop an alternative quarantine treatment for imported cut flowers. The tolerance of eggs increased with age (1-5-day-old). Immature stages (larva-teleiochrysalis) irradiated at 0.4-0.8kGy increased tolerance with their development. Mated mature females irradiated at 0.4kGy or higher did not produce viable eggs, although temporary recovery was observed at 0.2kGy. Adult males were sterilized at 0.4kGy because non-irradiated virgin females mated with yielded female progeny malformed and sterilized. Various effects of electron beam irradiation were observed when nine species of cut flowers were irradiated in 5MeV Dynamitron accelerator. Chrysanthemum and rose were most sensitive among cut flowers. (author)

  4. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercader, J.P.; Emily Leong

    1985-01-01

    The paper discusses the need for effective and efficient technologies in improving the food handling system. It defines the basic premises for the development of food handling. The application of food irradiation technology is briefly discussed. The paper points out key considerations for the adoption of food irradiation technology in the ASEAN region (author)

  5. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Akira

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews researches, commentaries, and conference and public records of food irradiation, published mainly during the period 1987-1989, focusing on the current conditions of food irradiation that may pose not only scientific or technologic problems but also political issues or consumerism. Approximately 50 kinds of food, although not enough to fill economic benefit, are now permitted for food irradiation in the world. Consumerism is pointed out as the major factor that precludes the feasibility of food irradiation in the world. In the United States, irradiation is feasible only for spices. Food irradiation has already been feasible in France, Hollands, Belgium, and the Soviet Union; has under consideration in the Great Britain, and has been rejected in the West Germany. Although the feasibility of food irradiation is projected to increase gradually in the future, commercial success or failure depends on the final selection of consumers. In this respect, the role of education and public information are stressed. Meat radicidation and recent progress in the method for detecting irradiated food are referred to. (N.K.) 128 refs

  6. Irradiation proctitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Akira

    1977-01-01

    Literatures on late rectal injuries are discussed, referring to two patients with uterine cervical cancer in whom irradiation proctitis occurred after telecobalt irradiation following uterine extirpation. To one patients, a total of 5000 rads was irradiated, dividing into 250 rads at one time, and after 3 months, irradiation with a total of 2000 rads, dividing into 200 rads at one time, was further given. In another one patient, two parallel opposing portal irradiation with a total of 6000 rads was given. About a year after the irradiation, rectal injuries and cystitis, accompanying with hemorrhage, were found in both of the patients. Rectal amputation and proctotoreusis were performed. Cystitis was treated by cystic irradiation in the urological department. Pathohistological studies of the rectal specimen revealed atrophic mucosa, and dilatation of the blood vessels and edema in the colonic submucosa. Incidence of this disease, term when the disease occurs, irradiation dose, type of the disease, treatment and prevention are described on the basis of the literatures. (Kanao, N.)

  7. Irradiation proctitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, A [Osaka Kita Tsishin Hospital (Japan)

    1977-06-01

    Literatures on late rectal injuries are discussed, referring to two patients with uterine cervical cancer in whom irradiation proctitis occurred after telecobalt irradiation following uterine extirpation. To one patients, a total of 5000 rads was irradiated, dividing into 250 rads at one time, and after 3 months, irradiation with a total of 2000 rads, dividing into 200 rads at one time, was further given. In another one patient, two parallel opposing portal irradiation with a total of 6000 rads was given. About a year after the irradiation, rectal injuries and cystitis, accompanying with hemorrhage, were found in both of the patients. Rectal amputation and proctotoreusis were performed. Cystitis was treated by cystic irradiation in the urological department. Pathohistological studies of the rectal specimen revealed atrophic mucosa, and dilatation of the blood vessels and edema in the colonic submucosa. Incidence of this disease, term when the disease occurs, irradiation dose, type of the disease, treatment and prevention are described on the basis of the literatures.

  8. The structure of hydrate bearing fine grained marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priest, J.; Kingston, E.; Clayton, C. [Southampton Univ., Highfield (United Kingdom). School of Civil Engineering and the Environment; Schultheiss, P.; Druce, M. [Geotek Ltd., Daventry (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    This paper discussed the structure of naturally occurring methane gas hydrates in fine-grained sediments from core samples recovered using in situ pressures from the eastern margin of the Indian Ocean. High resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) images were taken of gas hydrate cores. The hydrate structure was examined and comparisons were made between low resolution X-ray images obtained on the cores prior to sub-sectioning and depressurization procedures. The X-ray images showed the presence of high-angle, sub-parallel veins within the recovered sediments. The scans indicated that the hydrates occurred as fracture filing veins throughout the core. Fracture orientation was predominantly sub-vertical. Thick millimetric hydrate veins were composed of sub-millimetric veins with variations in fracture angle. The analysis indicated that hydrate formation was episodic in nature and subject to changes in the stress regime. Results of the study showed that depressurization and subsequent freezing alter the structure of the sediment even when the gas hydrate has not been altered. A large proportion of the hydrate survived when outside of its stability region. The self-preserving behaviour of the hydrate was attributed to the endothermic nature of gas hydrate dissociation. It was concluded that the accurate physical characterization of gas hydrates can only be conducted when the core section remains under in situ stress conditions. 13 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Carbon dioxide hydrate formation in a fixed-bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, S.; Lang, X. [South China Univ. of Technology, Guangzhou (China). Key Laboratory of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation; Wang, Y.; Liang, D. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China). Guangzhou Inst. of Energy Conversion and Guangzhou Center of Natural Gas Hydrate; Sun, X.; Jurcik, B. [Air Liquide Laboratories, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates are thermodynamically stable at high pressures and near the freezing temperature of pure water. Methane hydrates occur naturally in sediments in the deep oceans and permafrost regions and constitute an extensive hydrocarbon reservoir. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) hydrates are of interest as a medium for marine sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Sequestering CO{sub 2} as hydrate has potential advantages over most methods proposed for marine CO{sub 2} sequestration. Because this technique requires a shallower depth of injection when compared with other ocean sequestration methods, the costs of CO{sub 2} hydrate sequestration may be lower. Many studies have successfully used different continuous reactor designs to produce CO{sub 2} hydrates in both laboratory and field settings. This paper discussed a study that involved the design and construction of a fixed-bed reactor for simulation of hydrate formation system. Water, river sands and carbon dioxide were used to simulate the seep kind of hydrate formation. Carbon dioxide gas was distributed as small bubbles to enter from the bottom of the fixed-bed reactor. The paper discussed the experimental data and presented a diagram of the gas hydrate reactor system. The morphology as well as the reaction characters of CO{sub 2} hydrate was presented in detail. The results were discussed in terms of experimental phenomena and hydrate formation rate. A mathematical model was proposed for describing the process. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Riedel, M.; Boswell, R.; Presley, J.; Kumar, P.; Sathe, A.; Sethi, A.; Lall, M.V.; ,

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a naturally occurring “ice-like” combination of natural gas and water that has the potential to serve as an immense resource of natural gas from the world’s oceans and polar regions. However, gas-hydrate recovery is both a scientific and a technical challenge and much remains to be learned about the geologic, engineering, and economic factors controlling the ultimate energy resource potential of gas hydrate. The amount of natural gas contained in the world’s gas-hydrate accumulations is enormous, but these estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 2,800 to 8,000,000 trillion cubic meters of gas. By comparison, conventional natural gas accumulations (reserves and undiscovered, technically recoverable resources) for the world are estimated at approximately 440 trillion cubic meters. Gas recovery from gas hydrate is hindered because the gas is in a solid form and because gas hydrate commonly occurs in remote Arctic and deep marine environments. Proposed methods of gas recovery from gas hydrate generally deal with disassociating or “melting” in situ gas hydrate by heating the reservoir beyond the temperature of gas-hydrate formation, or decreasing the reservoir pressure below hydrate equilibrium. The pace of energy-related gas hydrate assessment projects has accelerated over the past several years.

  11. Radiation-induced luminescence from dry and hydrated DNA and related macromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kazwini, A.T.; O'Neill, P.; Fielden, E.M.; Adams, G.E.

    1988-01-01

    The radiation-induced luminescence from three types of fibrous DNA and a series of polydeoxynucleotides was measured under vacuum or in the presence of oxygen at 77 and 293K. The in-pulse emission spectra, generated by electrons with energies 50% water by wt (1.2:1 w/w, H 2 O/DNA), the in-pulse luminescence spectrum is similar to that of dry DNA. These findings are discussed in terms of energy or charge migration induced in DNA upon irradiation and the possible effects of conformational changes, caused by hydration, on charge migration. (author)

  12. Natural gas hydrates. Experimental techniques and their applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Yuguang; Liu, Changling (eds.) [Qingdao Institute of Marine Geology (China). Gas Hydrate Laboratory

    2013-07-01

    Focuses on gas hydrate experiment in laboratory. Intends to provide practical significant parameters for gas hydrate exploration and exploitation in the oceanic and permafrost environments. Consists of different themes that present up-to-date information on hydrate experiments. ''Natural Gas Hydrates: Experimental Techniques and Their Applications'' attempts to broadly integrate the most recent knowledge in the fields of hydrate experimental techniques in the laboratory. The book examines various experimental techniques in order to provide useful parameters for gas hydrate exploration and exploitation. It provides experimental techniques for gas hydrates, including the detection techniques, the thermo-physical properties, permeability and mechanical properties, geochemical abnormalities, stability and dissociation kinetics, exploitation conditions, as well as modern measurement technologies etc.

  13. Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy for Structure-II Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeya, Kei; Zhang, Caihong; Kawayama, Iwao

    2009-01-01

    For the nondestructive inspection of gas hydrates, terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) was applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate and propane hydrate. The absorption of propane hydrate monotonically increases with frequency, similar to the case of ice, while THF hydrate has...... a characteristic broad absorption peak at 0.5 THz corresponding to the dipole moment of THF molecules. The refractive indices of THF and propane hydrates are 1.725 and 1.775 at 1 THz, respectively, and show a slight but clear difference from the refractive index of ice (1.79). THz-TDS is a potentially useful...... technique for the ondestructive inspection of gas hydrates. # 2009 The Japan Society of Applied Physics...

  14. Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gay Hydrate Production Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. D. White; B. P. McGrail; S. K. Wurstner

    2009-06-30

    Displacing natural gas and petroleum with carbon dioxide is a proven technology for producing conventional geologic hydrocarbon reservoirs, and producing additional yields from abandoned or partially produced petroleum reservoirs. Extending this concept to natural gas hydrate production offers the potential to enhance gas hydrate recovery with concomitant permanent geologic sequestration. Numerical simulation was used to assess a suite of carbon dioxide injection techniques for producing gas hydrates from a variety of geologic deposit types. Secondary hydrate formation was found to inhibit contact of the injected CO{sub 2} regardless of injectate phase state, thus diminishing the exchange rate due to pore clogging and hydrate zone bypass of the injected fluids. Additional work is needed to develop methods of artificially introducing high-permeability pathways in gas hydrate zones if injection of CO{sub 2} in either gas, liquid, or micro-emulsion form is to be more effective in enhancing gas hydrate production rates.

  15. Characterization of un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate™ and MTA Angelus™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J; Sorrentino, F; Damidot, D

    2015-04-01

    BioAggregate™ is a novel material introduced for use as a root-end filling material. It is tricalcium silicate-based, free of aluminium and uses tantalum oxide as radiopacifier. BioAggregate contains additives to enhance the material performance. The purpose of this research was to characterize the un-hydrated and hydrated forms of BioAggregate using a combination of techniques, verify whether the additives if present affect the properties of the set material and compare these properties to those of MTA Angelus™. Un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate and MTA Angelus were assessed. Un-hydrated cement was tested for chemical composition, specific surface area, mineralogy and kinetics of hydration. The set material was investigated for mineralogy, microstructure and bioactivity. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopic analysis, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and isothermal calorimetry were employed. The specific surface area was investigated using a gas adsorption method with nitrogen as the probe. BioAggregate was composed of tricalcium silicate, tantalum oxide, calcium phosphate and silicon dioxide and was free of aluminium. On hydration, the tricalcium silicate produced calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide. The former was deposited around the cement grains, while the latter reacted with the silicon dioxide to form additional calcium silicate hydrate. This resulted in reduction of calcium hydroxide in the aged cement. MTA Angelus reacted in a similar fashion; however, since it contained no additives, the calcium hydroxide was still present in the aged cement. Bioactivity was demonstrated by deposition of hydroxyapatite. BioAggregate exhibited a high specific surface area. Nevertheless, the reactivity determined by isothermal calorimetry appeared to be slow compared to MTA Angelus. The tantalum oxide as opposed to bismuth oxide was inert, and tantalum was not leached in solution. BioAggregate exhibited

  16. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Kikuchi, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Food irradiation can have a number of beneficial effects, including prevention of sprouting; control of insects, parasites, pathogenic and spoilage bacteria, moulds and yeasts; and sterilization, which enables commodities to be stored for long periods. It is most unlikely that all these potential applications will prove commercially acceptable; the extend to which such acceptance is eventually achieved will be determined by practical and economic considerations. A review of the available scientific literature indicates that food irradiation is a thoroughly tested food technology. Safety studies have so far shown no deleterious effects. Irradiation will help to ensure a safer and more plentiful food supply by extending shelf-life and by inactivating pests and pathogens. As long as requirement for good manufacturing practice are implemented, food irradiation is safe and effective. Possible risks of food irradiation are not basically different from those resulting from misuse of other processing methods, such as canning, freezing and pasteurization. (author)

  17. Irradiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, L.M

    2000-07-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization.

  18. Irradiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, L.M.

    2000-01-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization

  19. Structure and lyoluminescent reactions of free radicals of irradiated lactose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matyushkov, V.V.; Panasyuk, S.L.; Yudin, I.V.

    1983-01-01

    To determine mechanisms of processes, resulting in lyoluminescence the structure of fren radicals in γ-irradiated lactose was investigated by the method of electron paramagnetic resonance. Analysis of dependences of different radical content in irradiated crystals and lyoluminescent characteristics of these samples on the period of their storing enabled to confirm suggested earlier luminescence mechanism with lambdasub(max)=630 nm of irradiated carbon-hydrate in neutral and acid media. The possibility of controlling the content of different types of radicals in samples by lyoluminescent method was shown

  20. Effect of Gamma Irradiation on Water Uptake Rate and Gelatinization of Brown Rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, C.S.; Lee, J.W.; Lee, Y.S.; Byun, M.W.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of gamma irradiation on brown rice quality were evaluated. Brown rice was irradiated at absorbed dose of 1, 3 or 5 kGy, and ground. Water uptake, pasting properties, and physicochemical characteristics of flour samples were tested. Water uptake rates of irradiated samples were higher than that of control, and were dose-dependent. Hydration capacity decreased in sample irradiated at 5 kGy due to leaching out of soluble compounds, whereas no differences were observed among other irradiated samples and control

  1. Rapid bioassay to screen potential biopesticides in Tenebrio molitor larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simplified assay was devised to evaluate the response of Tenebrio molitor larvae to potential insect control products. The assay incorporates punched disks of flattened whole-grain bread placed in 96-well plates, with treatments applied topically, and neonate larvae added to each well. To evalua...

  2. The larva of Paracapnia disala (Jewett) (Plecoptera: Capniidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth W. Stewart

    2010-01-01

    The larva of Paracapnia disala (Jewett) was associated from two first order headwater streams in the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Oregon, U.S.A. Larvae of this first western Paracapnia species to be associated, were studied and compared morphologically with those of the eastern Paracapnia angulata...

  3. Occurrence of digenean larvae in freshwater snails in the Ruvu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occurrence of digenean larvae in freshwater snails in the Ruvu basin, Tanzania. G Nkwengulila, ESP Kigadye. Abstract. A survey was carried out on digenean larvae infecting freshwater snails in five habitats in Dar es Salaam, Ruvu and Morogoro. 9424 snails belonging to 12 species from five families were examined for ...

  4. The occurrence of digenean larvae in freshwater snails at Mbezi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of digenean larvae in freshwater snails at Mbezi-Temboni pond, Dar es Salaam. ESP Kigadye, G Nkwengulila. Abstract. The abundance of digenean larvae in snails at a pond in Mbezi-Temboni, Dar es Salaam, was investigated from July 1996 to June 1997. A total of 2,112 snails belonging to three species, ...

  5. Preliminary screening of plant essential oils against larvae of Culex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preliminary screenings of 22 plant essential oils were tested for mortality of the mosquito larvae Culex quinquefasciatus under laboratory conditions. Percent (%) mortality of the mosquito larvae were obtained for each essential oil. At different exposure periods, viz. 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h among the 22 plant oils tested, eight ...

  6. Cutaneous larva migrans: a bad souvenir from the vacation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, Paulo Ricardo; Belda, Walter; Vasconcellos, Cidia; Silva, Cristiana Silveira

    2012-06-15

    Cutaneous larva migrans (CLM) is a common endemic disease in tropical and subtropical countries. This condition is caused by skin-penetrating larvae of nematodes, mainly of the hookworm Ancylostoma braziliense and other nematodes of the family Ancylostomidae. We report three cases of CLM acquired during vacations in different regions of Brazil.

  7. Cultivation of sponge larvae: settlement, survival, and growth of juveniles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caralt, de S.; Otjens, H.; Uriz, M.J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to culture sponge juveniles from larvae. Starting from larvae we expected to enhance the survival and growth, and to decrease the variation in these parameters during the sponge cultures. First, settlement success, morphological changes during metamorphosis, and survival of

  8. Structure and occurrence of cyphonautes larvae (Bryozoa, Ectoprocta)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus; Worsaae, Katrine

    2010-01-01

    We have studied larvae of the freshwater ctenostome Hislopia malayensis with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and LM of serial sections. Some additional observations on larvae of M. membranacea using SEM and CLSM are also reported. The overall configu...

  9. Composition, Abundance and Distribution of Brachyuran Larvae in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Ocypodidae, Grapsidae and Xanthidae. Abundance of brachyuran larvae was significantly positively correlated with total zooplankton abundance (r2 = 0.8) and salinity (r2 = 0.71). Keywords: Brachyuran larvae, abundance, composition, Mida creek, Kenya West Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science Vol. 3 (2) 2004: pp.

  10. Production of live prey for marine fish larvae

    OpenAIRE

    Kraul, S

    1989-01-01

    Tropical marine fish larvae vary in their requirements for live planktonic food. Selection of live prey species for culture depends on larval size and larval tolerance of water quality. This report describes some of the cultured prey species, and their uses and limits as effective food for fish larvae. Methods are presented for the culture of phytoplankton, rotifers, copepods, and other live feeds.

  11. In-situ gas hydrate hydrate saturation estimated from various well logs at the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed detailed analysis and interpretation of available 2-D and 3-D seismic data and proposed a viable method for identifying sub-permafrost gas hydrate prospects within the gas hydrate stability zone in the Milne Point area of northern Alaska. To validate the predictions of the USGS and to acquire critical reservoir data needed to develop a long-term production testing program, a well was drilled at the Mount Elbert prospect in February, 2007. Numerous well log data and cores were acquired to estimate in-situ gas hydrate saturations and reservoir properties.Gas hydrate saturations were estimated from various well logs such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), P- and S-wave velocity, and electrical resistivity logs along with pore-water salinity. Gas hydrate saturations from the NMR log agree well with those estimated from P- and S-wave velocity data. Because of the low salinity of the connate water and the low formation temperature, the resistivity of connate water is comparable to that of shale. Therefore, the effect of clay should be accounted for to accurately estimate gas hydrate saturations from the resistivity data. Two highly gas hydrate-saturated intervals are identified - an upper ???43 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 54% and a lower ???53 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 50%; both zones reach a maximum of about 75% saturation. ?? 2009.

  12. LABORATORY STRATEGIES FOR HYDRATE FORMATION IN FINE-GRAINED SEDIMENTS

    KAUST Repository

    Lei, L.; Santamarina, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Fine‐grained sediments limit hydrate nucleation, shift the phase boundary and hinder gas supply. Laboratory experiments in this study explore different strategies to overcome these challenges, including the use of a more soluble guest molecule rather than methane, grain‐scale gas‐storage within porous diatoms, ice‐to‐hydrate transformation to grow lenses at predefined locations, forced gas injection into water saturated sediments, and long‐term guest molecule transport. Tomographic images, thermal and pressure data provide rich information on hydrate formation and morphology. Results show that hydrate formation is inherently displacive in fine‐grained sediments; lenses are thicker and closer to each other in compressible, high specific surface area sediments subjected to low effective stress. Temperature and pressure trajectories follow a shifted phase boundary that is consistent with capillary effects. Exo‐pore growth results in freshly formed hydrate with a striped and porous structure; this open structure becomes an effective pathway for gas transport to the growing hydrate front. Ice‐to‐hydrate transformation goes through a liquid stage at pre‐melt temperatures; then, capillarity and cryogenic suction compete, and some water becomes imbibed into the sediment faster than hydrate reformation. The geometry of hydrate lenses and the internal hydrate structure continue evolving long after the exothermal response to hydrate formation has completely decayed. Multiple time‐dependent processes occur during hydrate formation, including gas, water and heat transport, sediment compressibility, reaction rate and the stochastic nucleation process. Hydrate formation strategies conceived for this study highlight the inherent difficulties in emulating hydrate formation in fine‐grained sediments within the relatively short time‐scale available for laboratory experiments.

  13. Modeling dissociation behaviour of methane hydrate in porous soil media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayasinghe, A.G.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates, or clathrates, exist in the form of crystalline solid structures of hydrogen bonded water molecules where the lattice cages are occupied by guest gas molecules. Methane gas hydrates are the most common. As such, hydrate bearing sediments are considered to be a potential future energy resource. Gas hydrates also function as a source or sink for atmospheric methane, which may influence global warming. The authors emphasized that an understanding of the behaviour of soils containing gas hydrates is necessary in order to develop ways of recovering the vast gas resources that exist in the form of hydrates, particularly since hydrates are also suspected to be a potential factor in the initiation and propagation of submarine slope failures. Gas hydrate dissociation occurs when water and gas are released, resulting in an increase in pore fluid pressure, thereby causing significant reductions in effective stress leading to sediment failure. Dissociation may occur as a result of pressure reductions or increases in temperature. This study focused on the strength and deformation behaviour of hydrate bearing soils associated with temperature induced dissociation. Modeling the dissociation behavior of hydrates in porous soil media involves an understanding of the geomechanics of hydrate dissociation. This paper addressed the issue of coupling the hydrate dissociation problem with the soil deformation problem. A mathematical framework was constructed in which the thermally stimulated hydrate dissociation process in porous soil media under undrained conditions was considered with conduction heat transfer. It was concluded that a knowledge of geomechanical response of hydrate bearing sediments will enable better estimates of benefits and risks associated with the recovery process, thereby ensuring safe and economical exploration. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 appendix.

  14. LABORATORY STRATEGIES FOR HYDRATE FORMATION IN FINE-GRAINED SEDIMENTS

    KAUST Repository

    Lei, L.

    2018-04-02

    Fine‐grained sediments limit hydrate nucleation, shift the phase boundary and hinder gas supply. Laboratory experiments in this study explore different strategies to overcome these challenges, including the use of a more soluble guest molecule rather than methane, grain‐scale gas‐storage within porous diatoms, ice‐to‐hydrate transformation to grow lenses at predefined locations, forced gas injection into water saturated sediments, and long‐term guest molecule transport. Tomographic images, thermal and pressure data provide rich information on hydrate formation and morphology. Results show that hydrate formation is inherently displacive in fine‐grained sediments; lenses are thicker and closer to each other in compressible, high specific surface area sediments subjected to low effective stress. Temperature and pressure trajectories follow a shifted phase boundary that is consistent with capillary effects. Exo‐pore growth results in freshly formed hydrate with a striped and porous structure; this open structure becomes an effective pathway for gas transport to the growing hydrate front. Ice‐to‐hydrate transformation goes through a liquid stage at pre‐melt temperatures; then, capillarity and cryogenic suction compete, and some water becomes imbibed into the sediment faster than hydrate reformation. The geometry of hydrate lenses and the internal hydrate structure continue evolving long after the exothermal response to hydrate formation has completely decayed. Multiple time‐dependent processes occur during hydrate formation, including gas, water and heat transport, sediment compressibility, reaction rate and the stochastic nucleation process. Hydrate formation strategies conceived for this study highlight the inherent difficulties in emulating hydrate formation in fine‐grained sediments within the relatively short time‐scale available for laboratory experiments.

  15. External Ophthalmomyiasis Caused by a Rare Infesting Larva, Sarcophaga argyrostoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shmuel Graffi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. External ophthalmomyiasis (EO is caused by infesting larvae belonging to various species of flies. Most documented cases result from sheep (Oestrus ovis and Russian (Rhinoestrus purpureus botfly larvae, but we recently discovered a rare case of EO caused by flesh fly (Sarcophaga argyrostoma larvae. Here, we report the case of a patient with EO who had been hospitalized and sedated for 1 week because of unrelated pneumonia. Methods. Case report. Results. A total of 32 larvae were removed from the adnexae of both eyes. Larvae identification was confirmed through DNA analysis. Treatment with topical tobramycin resulted in complete resolution of EO. Conclusion. EO can be caused by S. argyrostoma, and the elderly and debilitated may require extra ocular protection against flies during sedation.

  16. Survival of mayfly larvae under mine acid conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, S. Jr.; Hummon, W.D.

    1976-01-01

    Mayfly larvae were abundant and diverse in riffle zones of three control streams in southeastern Ohio. But none were found in such zones of three streams having current or past histories of mine acid pollution, despite vegetative recovery of reclaimed land bordering two of the streams. Laboratory studies showed stepwise increases in non-predatory mortality of mayfly larvae with increased mine acidity. Dragonfly larvae predation on mayfly larvae was constant at pH 8.1 to 4.1, but decreased at pH 3.1 despite tolerance of dragonfly larvae to low pH conditions. Extensive acid mine pollution thus may threaten aquatic biota through removal of food sources or reduced feeding rates as well as through direct mortality.

  17. Freshly squeezed: anaphylaxis caused by drone larvae juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoevesandt, J; Trautmann, A

    2017-11-30

    Drone larvae are mostly considered a by-product of beekeeping, but have recently been advo-cated as a high-protein source of food. There are as yet no data concerning their allergenic po-tential. We report on a 29-year old bee keeper who experienced an anaphylactic reaction following the consumption of a freshly prepared beverage from raw drone larvae. Larvae-specific sensitization was confirmed by prick-to-prick and basophil activation testing. Bee stings and classical bee products including honey and royal jelly were tolerated. This is the hitherto first report on IgE-mediated allergy to drone larvae. We suggest that a certain awareness towards the allergenicity of bee larvae is required.

  18. FY1995 molecular control technology for mining of methane-gas-hydrate; 1995 nendo methane hydrate no bunshi seigyo mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The objectives of the investigation are as follows: 1) developing a method to control formation/dissociation of methane-gas-hydrate, 2) developing a technology to displace methane gas by CO{sub 2} in methane-gas-hydrate deposit, 3) developing a technology to produce methane gas from the deposit efficiently. The final purpose of the project is to create new mining industry that solves both the problems of energy and global environment. 1) Clustering of water molecules is found to play the key role in the methane gas hydrate formation. 2) Equilibrium properties and kinetics of gas hydrates formation and dissociation in bulk-scale gas-hydrate are clarified in the practical environmental conditions. 3) Particle size of hydrate deposit influences the formation and dissociation of bulk-scale gas-hydrate crystal. 4) Mass transfer between gas and liquid phase in turbulent bubbly flow is a function of bubble diameter. The mass transfer depends on interfacial dynamics. (NEDO)

  19. Geologic implications of gas hydrates in the offshore of India: results of the National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Boswell, Ray; Cochran, J.R.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Lall, Malcolm; Mazumdar, Aninda; Ramana, Mangipudi Venkata; Ramprasad, Tammisetti; Riedel, Michael; Sain, Kalachand; Sathe, Arun Vasant; Vishwanath, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 (NGHP-01) is designed to study the occurrence of gas hydrate along the passive continental margin of the Indian Peninsula and in the Andaman convergent margin, with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. The NGHP-01 expedition established the presence of gas hydrates in the Krishna-Godavari and Mahanadi Basins, and the Andaman Sea. The expedition discovered in the Krishna-Godavari Basin one of the thickest gas hydrate accumulations ever documented, in the Andaman Sea one of the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zones in the world, and established the existence of a fully developed gas hydrate petroleum system in all three basins.

  20. Changes in lens following 60Co irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozsival, P.; Obenberger, J.; Sladkova, J.

    1985-01-01

    Chinchilla rabbit lenses were irradiated using a 60 Co gamma source, and the changes in the transport activities, native weight, water content and dry weight were observed. The heads of rabbits were irradiated with doses of 10 and 20 Gy and functional changes occurring in the lenses were studied till the twenty-fourth week after the irradiation. The weight of the rabbit lens irradiated with a dose of 20 Gy significantly increased after the twelfth week and was maximal 16 weeks after irradiation when also cataracts were observed. The increased weight of lenses was caused by accumulation of water. The decrease in the dry weight of lenses preceded the period of visible cataracts. A decreased uptake of rubidium occurring during in vitro cultivation of lenses was the most sensitive marker for the changes caused by 20 Gy irradiation. It was significantly decreased as early as 8 weeks after irradiation, preceding the increased hydration of lenses by 4 weeks and the presence of visible cataracts by as much as 8 weeks

  1. Changes In Certain Enzymes Activities In Tribolium CONFUSUM As Affected By Vanillin Or GAMMA Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MOHAMED, S.A.; SHOMAN, A.A.; AHMED, Z.A.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of 1 or 4 g vanillin/100 g whole wheat flour on the alkaline phosphatase of one day old larvae revealed that the mean enzyme activity was highly significantly increased in male and non-significant in female Triboluim confusum. As pupae were irradiated, the mean enzyme activity was significantly decreased in males and females (except at dose 300 Gy). Alanine transaminase (ALT or GPT) activity was decreased in males due to the effect of 4% vanillin and increased by irradiation while in female, the activity of ALT was increased when the larvae were reared on flour containing 1% or 4% vanillin and increased when pupae were irradiated at all doses used. There was a positive relationship between all treatments and the activity of aspartate transaminase (AST or GOT) in both sexes. The activity of AST was increased when the male or female larvae were reared on wheat flour containing 1 or 4 % vanillin and when pupae of males or females were irradiated. The choline esterase enzyme in T. confusum adults of both sexes was inhibited according to the effect of treatments with vanillin or gamma irradiation. Treated larvae with 1 or 4 % vanillin or irradiated as pupae at 300, 600 and 800 Gy led to decrease in the activity of choline esterase enzyme with the same pattern in both sexes.

  2. Antibacterial properties of grapefruit seed extract against Paenibacillus larvae subsp. larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semprini, P; Langella, V; Pasini, B; Falda, M T; Calvarese, S

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-one samples of grapefruit seed extract (GSE) either from marketed products or provided by an apiculturist were analysed to verify their inhibition activity, in particular against Paenibacillus larvae subsp. larvae, responsible for American foulbrood. The bactericide capacity of GSE has been measured in Bacillus subtilis BGA, Bacillus cereus 11778, Bacillus cereus K250 and Micrococcus luteus 9341a; these bacteria are normally used in the laboratory to study inhibitors. The results showed that not all GSE have the same inhibitory activity and two of those analysed do not inhibit the five bacteria used. Considering that 19 samples inhibited American foulbrood bacillus, the authors conclude that the use of a natural product (such as GSE) to control this important disease of bees, can be used as a substitute for chemotherapeutic products, after appropriate expedients.

  3. How to kill the honey bee larva: genomic potential and virulence mechanisms of Paenibacillus larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marvin Djukic

    Full Text Available Paenibacillus larvae, a Gram positive bacterial pathogen, causes American Foulbrood (AFB, which is the most serious infectious disease of honey bees. In order to investigate the genomic potential of P. larvae, two strains belonging to two different genotypes were sequenced and used for comparative genome analysis. The complete genome sequence of P. larvae strain DSM 25430 (genotype ERIC II consisted of 4,056,006 bp and harbored 3,928 predicted protein-encoding genes. The draft genome sequence of P. larvae strain DSM 25719 (genotype ERIC I comprised 4,579,589 bp and contained 4,868 protein-encoding genes. Both strains harbored a 9.7 kb plasmid and encoded a large number of virulence-associated proteins such as toxins and collagenases. In addition, genes encoding large multimodular enzymes producing nonribosomally peptides or polyketides were identified. In the genome of strain DSM 25719 seven toxin associated loci were identified and analyzed. Five of them encoded putatively functional toxins. The genome of strain DSM 25430 harbored several toxin loci that showed similarity to corresponding loci in the genome of strain DSM 25719, but were non-functional due to point mutations or disruption by transposases. Although both strains cause AFB, significant differences between the genomes were observed including genome size, number and composition of transposases, insertion elements, predicted phage regions, and strain-specific island-like regions. Transposases, integrases and recombinases are important drivers for genome plasticity. A total of 390 and 273 mobile elements were found in strain DSM 25430 and strain DSM 25719, respectively. Comparative genomics of both strains revealed acquisition of virulence factors by horizontal gene transfer and provided insights into evolution and pathogenicity.

  4. How to kill the honey bee larva: genomic potential and virulence mechanisms of Paenibacillus larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukic, Marvin; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Fünfhaus, Anne; Voss, Jörn; Gollnow, Kathleen; Poppinga, Lena; Liesegang, Heiko; Garcia-Gonzalez, Eva; Genersch, Elke; Daniel, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Paenibacillus larvae, a Gram positive bacterial pathogen, causes American Foulbrood (AFB), which is the most serious infectious disease of honey bees. In order to investigate the genomic potential of P. larvae, two strains belonging to two different genotypes were sequenced and used for comparative genome analysis. The complete genome sequence of P. larvae strain DSM 25430 (genotype ERIC II) consisted of 4,056,006 bp and harbored 3,928 predicted protein-encoding genes. The draft genome sequence of P. larvae strain DSM 25719 (genotype ERIC I) comprised 4,579,589 bp and contained 4,868 protein-encoding genes. Both strains harbored a 9.7 kb plasmid and encoded a large number of virulence-associated proteins such as toxins and collagenases. In addition, genes encoding large multimodular enzymes producing nonribosomally peptides or polyketides were identified. In the genome of strain DSM 25719 seven toxin associated loci were identified and analyzed. Five of them encoded putatively functional toxins. The genome of strain DSM 25430 harbored several toxin loci that showed similarity to corresponding loci in the genome of strain DSM 25719, but were non-functional due to point mutations or disruption by transposases. Although both strains cause AFB, significant differences between the genomes were observed including genome size, number and composition of transposases, insertion elements, predicted phage regions, and strain-specific island-like regions. Transposases, integrases and recombinases are important drivers for genome plasticity. A total of 390 and 273 mobile elements were found in strain DSM 25430 and strain DSM 25719, respectively. Comparative genomics of both strains revealed acquisition of virulence factors by horizontal gene transfer and provided insights into evolution and pathogenicity.

  5. Spatial resolution of gas hydrate and permeability changes from ERT data in LARS simulating the Mallik gas hydrate production test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priegnitz, Mike; Thaler, Jan; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Abendroth, Sven

    2014-05-01

    The German gas hydrate project SUGAR studies innovative methods and approaches to be applied in the production of methane from hydrate-bearing reservoirs. To enable laboratory studies in pilot scale, a large reservoir simulator (LARS) was realized allowing for the formation and dissociation of gas hydrates under simulated in-situ conditions. LARS is equipped with a series of sensors. This includes a cylindrical electrical resistance tomography (ERT) array composed of 25 electrode rings featuring 15 electrodes each. The high-resolution ERT array is used to monitor the spatial distribution of the electrical resistivity during hydrate formation and dissociation experiments over time. As the present phases of poorly conducting sediment, well conducting pore fluid, non-conducting hydrates, and isolating free gas cover a wide range of electrical properties, ERT measurements enable us to monitor the spatial distribution of these phases during the experiments. In order to investigate the hydrate dissociation and the resulting fluid flow, we simulated a hydrate production test in LARS that was based on the Mallik gas hydrate production test (see abstract Heeschen et al., this volume). At first, a hydrate phase was produced from methane saturated saline water. During the two months of gas hydrate production we measured the electrical properties within the sediment sample every four hours. These data were used to establish a routine estimating both the local degrees of hydrate saturation and the resulting local permeabilities in the sediment's pore space from the measured resistivity data. The final gas hydrate saturation filled 89.5% of the total pore space. During hydrate dissociation, ERT data do not allow for a quantitative determination of free gas and remaining gas hydrates since both phases are electrically isolating. However, changes are resolved in the spatial distribution of the conducting liquid and the isolating phase with gas being the only mobile isolating phase

  6. Obsidian hydration dating of volcanic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I.; Obradovich, J.

    1981-01-01

    Obsidian hydration dating of volcanic events had been compared with ages of the same events determined by the 14C and KAr methods at several localities. The localities, ranging in age from 1200 to over 1 million yr, include Newberry Craters, Oregon; Coso Hot Springs, California; Salton Sea, California; Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming; and Mineral Range, Utah. In most cases the agreement is quite good. A number of factors including volcanic glass composition and exposuretemperature history must be known in order to relate hydration thickness to age. The effect of composition can be determined from chemical analysis or the refractive index of the glass. Exposure-temperature history requires a number of considerations enumerated in this paper. ?? 1981.

  7. Experimental techniques for cement hydration studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Luttge

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cement hydration kinetics is a complex problem of dissolution, nucleation and growth that is still not well understood, particularly in a quantitative way. While cement systems are unique in certain aspects they are also comparable to natural mineral systems. Therefore, geochemistry and particularly the study of mineral dissolution and growth may be able to provide insight and methods that can be utilized in cement hydration research. Here, we review mainly what is not known or what is currently used and applied in a problematic way. Examples are the typical Avrami approach, the application of Transition State Theory (TST to overall reaction kinetics and the problem of reactive surface area. Finally, we suggest an integrated approach that combines vertical scanning interferometry (VSI with other sophisticated analytical techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM and theoretical model calculations based on a stochastic treatment.

  8. Limitation of biocompatibility of hydrated nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaychev, V. V.; Teleshev, A. T.; Gorshenev, V. N.; Yakovleva, M. A.; Fomichev, V. A.; Pankratov, A. S.; Menshikh, K. A.; Fadeev, R. S.; Fadeeva, I. S.; Senotov, A. S.; Kobyakova, M. I.; Yurasova, Yu B.; Akatov, V. S.

    2018-04-01

    Nanostructured hydroxyapatite (HA) in the form of hydrated paste is considered to be a promising material for a minor-invasive surgical curing of bone tissue injure. However questions about adhesion of cells on this material and its biocompatibility still remain. In this study biocompatibility of paste-formed nanosized HA (nano-HA) by in vitro methods is investigated. Nano-HA (particles sized about 20 nm) was synthesized under conditions of mechano-acoustic activation of an aqueous reaction mixture of ammonium hydrophosphate and calcium nitrate. It was ascertained that nanocrystalline paste was not cytotoxic although limitation of adhesion, spreading and growth of the cells on its surface was revealed. The results obtained point on the need of modification of hydrated nano-HA in the aims of increasing its biocompatibility and osteoplastic potential.

  9. Predicting hydration energies for multivalent ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2014-01-01

    We have predicted the free energy of hydration for 40 monovalent and multivalent cations and anions using density functional theory and the implicit solvent model COnductor like Screening MOdel for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS) at the Becke-Perdew (BP)/Triple zeta valence with polarization functions...... (TZVP) level. Agreement with experimental data for monovalent and divalent ions is good and shows no significant systematic errors. Predictions are noticeably better than with standard COSMO. The agreement with experimental data for trivalent and tetravalent ions is slightly worse and shows systematic...... errors. Our results indicate that quantum chemical calculations combined with COSMO-RS solvent treatment is a reliable method for treating multivalent ions in solution, provided one hydration shell of explicit water molecules is included for metal cations. The accuracy is not high enough to allow...

  10. Advances in understanding hydration of Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scrivener, Karen L.; Juilland, Patrick; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Progress in understanding hydration is summarized. Evidence supports the geochemistry dissolution theory as an explanation for the induction period, in preference to the inhibiting layer theory. The growth of C–S–H is the principal factor controlling the main heat evolution peak. Electron microscopy indicates that C–S–H “needles” grow from the surface of grains. At the peak, the surface is covered, but deceleration cannot be attributed to diffusion control. The shoulder peak comes from renewed reaction of C 3 A after depletion of sulfate in solution, but release of sulfate absorbed on C–S–H means that ettringite continues to form. After several days space becomes the major factor controlling hydration. The use of new analytical technique is improving our knowledge of the action of superplasticizers and leading to the design of molecules for different applications. Atomistic modeling is becoming a topic of increasing interest. Recent publications in this area are reviewed

  11. Phosphate vibrations as reporters of DNA hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcelli, Steven

    The asymmetric phosphate stretch vibrational frequency is extraordinarily sensitive to its local solvent environment. Using density functional theory calculations on the model compound dimethyl phosphate, the asymmetric phosphate stretch vibrational frequency was found to shift linearly with the magnitude of an electric field along the symmetry axis of the PO2 moiety (i.e. the asymmetric phosphate stretch is an excellent linear vibrational Stark effect probe). With this linear relationship established, asymmetric phosphate stretch vibrational frequencies were computed during the course of a molecular dynamics simulation of fully hydrated DNA. Moreover, contributions to shifts in the frequencies from subpopulations of water molecules (e.g. backbone, minor groove, major groove, etc.) were calculated to reveal how phosphate vibrations report the onset of DNA hydration in experiments that vary the relative humidity of non-condensing (dry) DNA samples.

  12. Advances in understanding hydration of Portland cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scrivener, Karen L., E-mail: Karen.scrivener@epfl.ch [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 (Switzerland); Juilland, Patrick [Sika Technology AG, Zürich (Switzerland); Monteiro, Paulo J.M. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California at Berkeley (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Progress in understanding hydration is summarized. Evidence supports the geochemistry dissolution theory as an explanation for the induction period, in preference to the inhibiting layer theory. The growth of C–S–H is the principal factor controlling the main heat evolution peak. Electron microscopy indicates that C–S–H “needles” grow from the surface of grains. At the peak, the surface is covered, but deceleration cannot be attributed to diffusion control. The shoulder peak comes from renewed reaction of C{sub 3}A after depletion of sulfate in solution, but release of sulfate absorbed on C–S–H means that ettringite continues to form. After several days space becomes the major factor controlling hydration. The use of new analytical technique is improving our knowledge of the action of superplasticizers and leading to the design of molecules for different applications. Atomistic modeling is becoming a topic of increasing interest. Recent publications in this area are reviewed.

  13. Modelling porewater chemistry in hydrated Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berner, U.R.

    1987-01-01

    Extensive employment of concrete is foreseen in radioactive waste repositories. A prerequisite for modelling the interactions between concrete and formation waters is characterization of the concrete system. Available experimental data from high pressure squeezing of cement pore-water indicate that, besides the high pH due to alkali hydroxide dissolution, cement composition itself influences the solubility determining solid phases. A model which simulates the hydration of Portland cement assuming complete hydration of the main clinker minerals is presented. The model also includes parameters describing the reactions between the cement and blending agents. Comparison with measured pore-water data generally gives a consistent picture and, as expected, the model gives correct predictions for pure Portland cements. For blended cements, the required additional parameters can, to some extent, be derived from pore-water analysis. 14 references, 1 figure, 4 tables

  14. Propane hydrate nucleation: Experimental investigation and correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    supersaturation region. The experiments showed that the gas dissolution rate rather than the induction time of propane hydrate is influenced by a change in agitation. This was especially valid at high stirring rates when the water surface was severely disturbed.Addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP......) to the aqueous phase was found to reduce the gas dissolution rate slightly. However the induction times were prolonged quite substantially upon addition of PVP.The induction time data were correlated using a newly developed induction time model based on crystallization theory also capable of taking into account...... the presence of additives. In most cases reasonable agreement between the data and the model could be obtained. The results revealed that especially the effective surface energy between propane hydrate and water is likely to change when the stirring rate varies from very high to low. The prolongation...

  15. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetherington, M.

    1989-01-01

    This popular-level article emphasizes that the ultimate health effects of irradiated food products are unknown. They may include vitamin loss, contamination of food by botulism bacteria, mutations in bacteria, increased production of aflatoxins, changes in food, carcinogenesis from unknown causes, presence of miscellaneous harmful chemicals, and the lack of a way of for a consumer to detect irradiated food. It is claimed that the nuclear industry is applying pressure on the Canadian government to relax labeling requirements on packages of irradiated food in order to find a market for its otherwise unnecessary products

  16. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luecher, O.

    1979-01-01

    Limitations of existing preserving methods and possibilities of improved food preservation by application of nuclear energy are explained. The latest state-of-the-art in irradiation technology in individual countries is described and corresponding recommendations of FAO, WHO and IAEA specialists are presented. The Sulzer irradiation equipment for potato sprout blocking is described, the same equipment being suitable also for the treatment of onions, garlic, rice, maize and other cereals. Systems with a higher power degree are needed for fodder preserving irradiation. (author)

  17. Immediate remediation of heavy metal (Cr(VI)) contaminated soil by high energy electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Guilong; Cai, Dongqing; Wu, Zhengyan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An immediate remediation method for Cr(VI) contaminated soil (CCS) was developed. • High energy electron beam (HEEB) irradiation could reduce Cr(VI) in CCS to Cr(III). • This effect was attributed to electrons, hydrated electrons, and reductive radicals. • This remediation method was effective, environmentally friendly, and low-cost. - Abstract: This work developed an immediate and high-performance remediation method for Cr(VI) contaminated soil (CCS) using high energy electron beam (HEEB) irradiation. The result indicated that, compared with γ-ray irradiation, HEEB irradiation displayed a significant reduction efficiency on Cr(VI) in CCS to Cr(III) with substantially lower toxicity, which was mainly attributed to the reduction effects of electrons, hydrated electrons, and reductive radicals generated in the irradiation process of HEEB. This work could provide a one-step and effective method for the remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil (HMCS)

  18. Immediate remediation of heavy metal (Cr(VI)) contaminated soil by high energy electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Guilong [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei 230031 (China); Bioenergy Forest Research Center of State Forestry Administration, Hefei 230031 (China); Cai, Dongqing, E-mail: dqcai@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei 230031 (China); Bioenergy Forest Research Center of State Forestry Administration, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu, Zhengyan, E-mail: zywu@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei 230031 (China); Bioenergy Forest Research Center of State Forestry Administration, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • An immediate remediation method for Cr(VI) contaminated soil (CCS) was developed. • High energy electron beam (HEEB) irradiation could reduce Cr(VI) in CCS to Cr(III). • This effect was attributed to electrons, hydrated electrons, and reductive radicals. • This remediation method was effective, environmentally friendly, and low-cost. - Abstract: This work developed an immediate and high-performance remediation method for Cr(VI) contaminated soil (CCS) using high energy electron beam (HEEB) irradiation. The result indicated that, compared with γ-ray irradiation, HEEB irradiation displayed a significant reduction efficiency on Cr(VI) in CCS to Cr(III) with substantially lower toxicity, which was mainly attributed to the reduction effects of electrons, hydrated electrons, and reductive radicals generated in the irradiation process of HEEB. This work could provide a one-step and effective method for the remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil (HMCS)

  19. Model of spur processes in aqueous radiation chemistry including spur overlap and a novel initial hydrated electron distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented from computer calculations based upon an improved diffusion-kinetic model of the spur which includes a novel initial distribution for the hydrated electron and an approximate mathematical treatment of the overlap of spurs in three dimensions. Experimental data for the decay of the hydrated electron and hydroxyl radical before one in electron-pulse-irradated, solute-free and air-free water are fit wihtin experimental uncertainty by adjustment of the initial spatial distributions of spur intermediates and the average energy deposited in the spur. Using the same values of these parameters, the hydrated electron decay is computed for times from 1 ps 10 μs after the radiatio pulse. The results of such calcuations for various conditions of pulse dose and concentrations of scavengers of individual primary chemical species in the spur are compared with corresponding experimental data obtained predominantly from water and aqueous solutions irradiated with 10 to 15 MeV electron pulses. Very good agreement between calculated and experimental hydrated electron decay in pure water is observed for the entire time range studied when a pulse dose of approximately 7900 rads is modeled, but the calcuated and experimental curves are observed to deviate for times greater than 10 ns nanoseconds when low pulse doses and low scavenger concentrations are considered. It is shown that this deviation is experimental and calculated hydrated electron decay cannot be explained by assuming the presence of a hydrated electron scavenging impurity nor by employing a distribution of nearest neighbor interspur distances to refine the overlap approximation

  20. Non-invasive measurement of corneal hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, W F; Bauer, N J

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of a confocal Raman spectroscopic technique for the noncontact assessment of corneal hydration in vivo in two legally blind subjects. A laser beam (632.8 nm; 15 mJ) was maintained on the cornea using a microscope objective lens (25x magnification, NA=0.5, f=10 mm) both for focusing the incident light as well as collecting the Raman backscattered light, in a 180 degrees backscatter configuration. An optical fiber, acting as the confocal pinhole for elimination of light from out-of-focus places, was coupled to a spectrometer that dispersed the collected light onto a sensitive array-detector for rapid spectral data acquisition over a range from 2,890 to 3,590 cm(-1). Raman spectra were recorded from the anterior 100 to 150 microm of the cornea over a period of time before and after topical application of a mild dehydrating solution. The ratio between the amplitudes of the signals at 3,400 cm(-1) (OH-vibrational mode of water) and 2,940 cm(-1) (CH-vibrational mode of proteins) was used as a measure of corneal hydration. High signal-to-noise ratio (SNR 25) Raman spectra were obtained from the human corneas using 15 mJ of laser light energy. Qualitative changes in the hydration of the anterior-most part of the corneas could be observed as a result of the dehydrating agent. Confocal Raman spectroscopy could potentially be applied clinically as a noncontact tool for the assessment of corneal hydration in vivo.

  1. Hydration benefits to courtship feeding in crickets

    OpenAIRE

    Ivy, T. M.; Johnson, J. C.; Sakaluk, S. K.

    1999-01-01

    The spermatophore transferred by male decorated crickets (Gryllodes sigillatus) at mating includes a large gelatinous spermatophylax that the female consumes after copulation. Although previous studies have shown that G. sigillatus females gain no nutritional benefits from consuming food gifts, there may be other benefits to their consumption. We examined potential hydration benefits to females by experimentally manipulating both the availability of water and the number of food gifts that fem...

  2. Unraveling halide hydration: A high dilution approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorati, Valentina; Sessa, Francesco; Aquilanti, Giuliana; D'Angelo, Paola

    2014-07-28

    The hydration properties of halide aqua ions have been investigated combining classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) with Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Three halide-water interaction potentials recently developed [M. M. Reif and P. H. Hünenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144104 (2011)], along with three plausible choices for the value of the absolute hydration free energy of the proton (ΔG [minus sign in circle symbol]hyd[H+]), have been checked for their capability to properly describe the structural properties of halide aqueous solutions, by comparing the MD structural results with EXAFS experimental data. A very good agreement between theory and experiment has been obtained with one parameter set, namely LE, thus strengthening preliminary evidences for a ΔG [minus sign in circle symbol]hyd[H] value of -1100 kJ mol(-1) [M. M. Reif and P. H. Hünenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144104 (2011)]. The Cl(-), Br(-), and I(-) ions have been found to form an unstructured and disordered first hydration shell in aqueous solution, with a broad distribution of instantaneous coordination numbers. Conversely, the F(-) ion shows more ordered and defined first solvation shell, with only two statistically relevant coordination geometries (six and sevenfold complexes). Our thorough investigation on the effect of halide ions on the microscopic structure of water highlights that the perturbation induced by the Cl(-), Br(-), and I(-) ions does not extend beyond the ion first hydration shell, and the structure of water in the F(-) second shell is also substantially unaffected by the ion.

  3. Reservoir Models for Gas Hydrate Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, R.

    2016-12-01

    Scientific and industrial drilling programs have now providing detailed information on gas hydrate systems that will increasingly be the subject of field experiments. The need to carefully plan these programs requires reliable prediction of reservoir response to hydrate dissociation. Currently, a major emphasis in gas hydrate modeling is the integration of thermodynamic/hydrologic phenomena with geomechanical response for both reservoir and bounding strata. However, also critical to the ultimate success of these efforts is the appropriate development of input geologic models, including several emerging issues, including (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) understanding of the initial petrophysical characteristics of the system (reservoirs and seals), the dynamic evolution of those characteristics during active dissociation, and the interdependency of petrophysical parameters and (3) the nature of reservoir boundaries. Heterogeneity is ubiquitous aspect of every natural reservoir, and appropriate characterization is vital. However, heterogeneity is not random. Vertical variation can be evaluated with core and well log data; however, core data often are challenged by incomplete recovery. Well logs also provide interpretation challenges, particularly where reservoirs are thinly-bedded due to limitation in vertical resolution. This imprecision will extend to any petrophysical measurements that are derived from evaluation of log data. Extrapolation of log data laterally is also complex, and should be supported by geologic mapping. Key petrophysical parameters include porosity, permeability and it many aspects, and water saturation. Field data collected to date suggest that the degree of hydrate saturation is strongly controlled by/dependant upon reservoir quality and that the ratio of free to bound water in the remaining pore space is likely also controlled by reservoir quality. Further, those parameters will also evolve during dissociation, and not necessary in a simple

  4. The combined effect of thermodynamic promoters tetrahydrofuran and cyclopentane on the kinetics of flue gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraboina, Nagu; von Solms, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    ) hydrate formation using a rocking cell apparatus. Hydrate formation and decomposition kinetics were investigated by constant cooling (hydrate nucleation temperature) and isothermal (hydrate nucleation time) methods. Improved (synergistic) hydrate formation kinetics (hydrate nucleation and growth) were...... of these two promoters is favorable both thermodynamically and kinetically for hydrate formation from flue gas....

  5. Experimental solid state NMR of gas hydrates : problems and solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moudrakovski, I.; Lu, H.; Ripmeester, J. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Steacie Inst. for Molecular Sciences; Kumar, R.; Susilo, R. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Luzi, M. [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Solid State NMR is a suitable spectroscopic technique for hydrate research for several reasons, including its capability to distinguish between different structural types of hydrates, its quantitative nature and potential for both in-situ and time resolved experiments. This study illustrated the applications of solid state NMR for compositional and structural studies of clathrate hydrates, with particular emphasis on experimental techniques and potential ways to overcome technical difficulties. In order to use the method to its full capacity, some instrumental developments are needed to adapt it to the specific experimental requirements of hydrate studies, such as very low temperatures and high pressures. This presentation discussed the quantification of the Carbon-13 spectra with examples from natural and synthetic hydrates prepared from multi-component mixtures of hydrocarbons. The main approach used for the first two examples was Carbon-13 NMR with Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) at -100 degrees C. The detailed characterization of mixed hydrogen hydrates required low temperature hydrogen MAS. The quantification problems encountered during these experiments were also discussed. The purpose of these recent experimental developments was to prompt wider application of Solid State NMR in hydrate research. NMR proved to be a viable method for analyzing the composition and structure of multi-component mixed gas hydrates; characterizing natural gas hydrates; and, evaluating the formation conditions and properties of mixed hydrogen hydrates. The limitations of the method were highlighted and sensible choices of experimental conditions and techniques that ensure accurate results were discussed. 34 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Effect of Gemini-type surfactant on methane hydrate formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, K.E.; Park, J.M.; Kim, C.U.; Chae, H.J.; Jeong, S.Y. [Korea Research Inst. of Chemical Technology, Jang-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Natural gas hydrates are formed from water and natural gas molecules at particular temperatures and pressures that become ice-like inclusion compounds. Gas hydrates offer several benefits such as energy resource potential and high storage capacity of natural gas in the form of hydrates. However, the application of natural gas hydrates has been deterred by its low formation rate and low conversion ratio of water into hydrate resulting in low actual storage capacity. This paper presented an experimental study to determine the effect of adding a novel Gemini-type surfactant on methane hydrate formation. The experimental study was described with reference to the properties of prepared diols and properties of prepared disulfonates. Gemini surfactant is the family of surfactant molecules possessing more than one hydrophobic tail and hydrophilic head group. They generally have better surface-active properties than conventional surfactants of equal chain length. The paper presented the results of the study in terms of the reactions of diols with propane sultone; storage capacity of hydrate formed with and without surfactant; and methane hydrate formation with and without disulfonate. It was concluded that the methane hydrate formation was accelerated by the addition of novel anionic Gemini-type surfactants and that hydrate formation was influenced by the surfactant concentration and alkyl chain length. For a given concentration, the surfactant with the highest chain length demonstrated the highest formation rate and storage capacity. 5 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  7. Carbon dioxide gas hydrates accumulation in freezing and frozen sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuvilin, E.; Guryeva, O. [Moscow State Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Dept. of Geology

    2008-07-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) hydrates and methane hydrates can be formed, and exist under natural conditions. The permafrost area has been considered as an environment for the potential disposal of CO{sub 2}. The favorable factors for preserving CO{sub 2} in liquid and gas hydrate states in frozen sediments and under permafrost horizons are great thickness of frozen sediments; low permeability in comparison with thawed sediments; and favourable conditions for hydrates formation. Therefore, research on the formation and existence conditions of CO{sub 2} gas hydrates in permafrost and under permafrost sediments are of great importance for estimation of CO{sub 2} disposal conditions in permafrost, and for working out specific sequestration schemes. This paper presented the results of an experimental study on the process of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) gas hydrates formation in the porous media of sediments under positive and negative temperatures. Sediment samples of various compositions including those selected in the permafrost area were used. The research was conducted in a special pressure chamber, which allowed to monitor pressure and temperature. The study used the monitoring results in order to make quantitative estimation of the kinetics of CO{sub 2} hydrates accumulation in the model sediments. Results were presented in terms of kinetics of CO{sub 2} hydrates accumulation in the porous media at positive and negative temperatures; kinetics of CO{sub 2} hydrates accumulation in various porous media; gas hydrate-former influence on kinetics of hydrates accumulation in frozen sediments; and influence of freezing on CO{sub 2} hydrates accumulation in porous media. It was concluded that hydrate accumulation took an active place in porous media not only under positive, but also under high negative temperatures, when the water was mainly in the form of ice in porous media. 27 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  8. Polymorphism in Br2 clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschleger, I U; Kerenskaya, G; Janda, K C; Apkarian, V A

    2008-02-07

    The structure and composition of bromine clathrate hydrate has been controversial for more than 170 years due to the large variation of its observed stoichiometries. Several different crystal structures were proposed before 1997 when Udachin et al. (Udachin, K. A.; Enright, G. D.; Ratcliffe, C. I.; Ripmeester, J. A. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1997, 119, 11481) concluded that Br2 forms only the tetragonal structure (TS-I). We show polymorphism in Br2 clathrate hydrates by identifying two distinct crystal structures through optical microscopy and resonant Raman spectroscopy on single crystals. After growing TS-I crystals from a liquid bromine-water solution, upon dropping the temperature slightly below -7 degrees C, new crystals of cubic morphology form. The new crystals, which have a limited thermal stability range, are assigned to the CS-II structure. The two structures are clearly distinguished by the resonant Raman spectra of the enclathrated Br2, which show long overtone progressions and allow the extraction of accurate vibrational parameters: omega(e) = 321.2 +/- 0.1 cm(-1) and omega(e)x(e) = 0.82 +/- 0.05 cm(-1) in TS-I and omega(e) = 317.5 +/- 0.1 cm(-1) and omega(e)x(e) = 0.70 +/- 0.1 cm(-1) in CS-II. On the basis of structural analysis, the discovery of the CS-II crystals implies stability of a large class of bromine hydrate structures and, therefore, polymorphism.

  9. The economics of exploiting gas hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Döpke, Lena-Katharina; Requate, Till

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the optimal exploitation of methane hydrates, a recent discovery of methane resources under the sea floor, mainly located along the continental margins. Combustion of methane (releasing CO2) and leakage through blow-outs (releasing CH4) contribute to the accumulation of greenhouse gases. A second externality arises since removing solid gas hydrates from the sea bottom destabilizes continental margins and thus increases the risk of marine earthquakes. We show that in such a model three regimes can occur: i) resource exploitation will be stopped in finite time, and some of the resource will stay in situ, ii) the resource will be used up completely in finite time, and iii) the resource will be exhausted in infinite time. We also show how to internalize the externalities by policy instruments. - Highlights: • We set up a model of optimal has hydrate exploitation • We incorporate to types of damages: contribution to global warming and geo-hazards • We characterize optimal exploitation paths and study decentralization with an exploitation tax. • Three regimes can occur: • i) exploitation in finite time and some of the stock remaining in situ, • ii) exploitation in finite time and the resource will be exhausted, • iii) exploitation and exhaustion in infinite time

  10. Raman spectroscopic studies of hydrogen clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Timothy A; Sloan, E Dendy; Koh, Carolyn A

    2009-01-07

    Raman spectroscopic measurements of simple hydrogen and tetrahydrofuran+hydrogen sII clathrate hydrates have been performed. Both the roton and vibron bands illuminate interesting quantum dynamics of enclathrated H(2) molecules. The complex vibron region of the Raman spectrum has been interpreted by observing the change in population of these bands with temperature, measuring the absolute H(2) content as a function of pressure, and with D(2) isotopic substitution. Quadruple occupancy of the large sII clathrate cavity shows the highest H(2) vibrational frequency, followed by triple and double occupancies. Singly occupied small cavities display the lowest vibrational frequency. The vibrational frequencies of H(2) within all cavity environments are redshifted from the free gas phase value. At 76 K, the progression from ortho- to para-H(2) occurs over a relatively slow time period (days). The rotational degeneracy of H(2) molecules within the clathrate cavities is lifted, observed directly in splitting of the para-H(2) roton band. Raman spectra from H(2) and D(2) hydrates suggest that the occupancy patterns between the two hydrates are analogous, increasing confidence that D(2) is a suitable substitute for H(2). The measurements suggest that Raman is an effective and convenient method to determine the relative occupancy of hydrogen molecules in different clathrate cavities.

  11. Electronic structure calculations of calcium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterne, P.A.; Meike, A.

    1995-11-01

    Many phases in the calcium-silicate-hydrate system can develop in cement exposed over long periods of time to temperatures above 25 C. As a consequence, chemical reactions involving these phases can affect the relative humidity and water chemistry of a radioactive waste repository that contains significant amounts of cement. In order to predict and simulate these chemical reactions, the authors are developing an internally consistent database of crystalline Ca-Si-hydrate structures. The results of first principles electronic structure calculations on two such phases, wollastonite (CaSiO 3 ) and xonotlite (Ca 6 Si 6 O 17 (OH) 2 ), are reported here. The calculated ground state properties are in very good agreement with experiment, providing equilibrium lattice parameters within about 1--1.4% of the experimentally reported values. The roles of the different types of oxygen atoms, which are fundamental to understanding the energetics of crystalline Ca-Si-hydrates are briefly discussed in terms of their electronic state densities. The good agreement with experiment for the lattice parameters and the consistency of the electronic density of states features for the two structures demonstrate the applicability of these electronic structure methods in calculating the fundamental properties of these phases

  12. Effects of various diets on the calcium and phosphorus composition of mealworms (Tenebrio molitor larvae) and superworms (Zophobas morio larvae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latney, La'Toya V; Toddes, Barbara D; Wyre, Nicole R; Brown, Dorothy C; Michel, Kathryn E; Briscoe, Johanna A

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate whether the nutritive quality of Tenebrio molitor larvae and Zophobas morio larvae, which are commonly cultured as live food sources, is influenced by 4 commercially available diets used as nutritional substrates; identify which diet best improved calcium content of larvae; and identify the feeding time interval that assured the highest calcium intake by larvae. ANIMALS 2,000 Zophobas morio larvae (ie, superworms) and 7,500 Tenebrio molitor larvae (ie, mealworms). PROCEDURES Larvae were placed in control and diet treatment groups for 2-, 7-, and 10-day intervals. Treatment diets were as follows: wheat millings, avian hand feeding formula, organic avian mash diet, and a high-calcium cricket feed. Control groups received water only. After treatment, larvae were flash-frozen live with liquid nitrogen in preparation for complete proximate and mineral analyses. Analyses for the 2-day treatment group were performed in triplicate. RESULTS The nutrient composition of the high-calcium cricket feed groups had significant changes in calcium content, phosphorus content, and metabolizable energy at the 2-day interval, compared with other treatment groups, for both mealworms and superworms. Calcium content and calcium-to-phosphorus ratios for larvae in the high-calcium cricket feed group were the highest among the diet treatments for all treatment intervals and for both larval species. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE A 2-day interval with the high-calcium cricket feed achieved a larval nutrient composition sufficient to meet National Research Council dietary calcium recommendations for nonlactating rats. Mealworm calcium composition reached 2,420 g/1,000 kcal at 48 hours, and superworm calcium composition reached 2,070g/1,000 kcal at 48 hours. These findings may enable pet owners, veterinarians, insect breeders, and zoo curators to optimize nutritive content of larvae fed to insectivorous animals.

  13. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganini, M.C.

    1991-06-01

    Food treatment by means of ionizing energy, or irradiation, is an innovative method for its preservation. In order to treat important volumes of food, it is necessary to have industrial irradiation installations. The effect of radiations on food is analyzed in the present special work and a calculus scheme for an Irradiation Plant is proposed, discussing different aspects related to its project and design: ionizing radiation sources, adequate civil work, security and auxiliary systems to the installations, dosimetric methods and financing evaluation methods of the project. Finally, the conceptual design and calculus of an irradiation industrial plant of tubercles is made, based on the actual needs of a specific agricultural zone of our country. (Author) [es

  14. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Food preservation by irradiation is one part of Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace program that is enjoying renewed interest. Classified as a food additive by the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1958 instead of a processing technique, irradiation lost public acceptance. Experiments have not been done to prove that there are no health hazards from gamma radiation, but there are new pressures to get Food and Drug Administration approval for testing in order to make commercial use of some radioactive wastes. Irradiation causes chemical reactions and nutritional changes, including the destruction of several vitamins, as well as the production of radiolytic products not normally found in food that could have adverse effects. The author concludes that, lacking epidemiological evidence, willing buyers should be able to purchase irradiated food as long as it is properly labeled

  15. Impact of Compound Hydrate Dynamics on Phase Boundary Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osegovic, J. P.; Max, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    Compound hydrate reactions are affected by the local concentration of hydrate forming materials (HFM). The relationship between HFM composition and the phase boundary is as significant as temperature and pressure. Selective uptake and sequestration of preferred hydrate formers (PF) has wide ranging implications for the state and potential use of natural hydrate formation, including impact on climate. Rising mineralizing fluids of hydrate formers (such as those that occur on Earth and are postulated to exist elsewhere in the solar system) will sequester PF before methane, resulting in a positive relationship between depth and BTU content as ethane and propane are removed before methane. In industrial settings the role of preferred formers can separate gases. When depressurizing gas hydrate to release the stored gas, the hydrate initial composition will set the decomposition phase boundary because the supporting solution takes on the composition of the hydrate phase. In other settings where hydrate is formed, transported, and then dissociated, similar effects can control the process. The behavior of compound hydrate systems can primarily fit into three categories: 1) In classically closed systems, all the material that can form hydrate is isolated, such as in a sealed laboratory vessel. In such systems, formation and decomposition are reversible processes with observed hysteresis related to mass or heat transfer limitations, or the order and magnitude in which individual hydrate forming gases are taken up from the mixture and subsequently released. 2) Kinetically closed systems are exposed to a solution mass flow across a hydrate mass. These systems can have multiple P-T phase boundaries based on the local conditions at each face of the hydrate mass. A portion of hydrate that is exposed to fresh mineralizing solution will contain more preferred hydrate formers than another portion that is exposed to a partially depleted solution. Examples of kinetically closed

  16. Fruit irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Food spoilage is a common problem when marketing agricultural products. Promising results have already been obtained on a number of food irradiating applications. A process is described in this paper where irradiation of sub-tropical fruits, especially mangoes and papayas, combined with conventional heat treatment results in effective insect and fungal control, delays ripening and greatly improves the quality of fruit at both export and internal markets

  17. [Toxicity and influencing factors of liquid chlorine on chironomid larvae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xing-Bin; Cui, Fu-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song; Guo, Zhao-Hai; Xu, Feng; Liu, Li-Jun

    2005-09-01

    The excessive propagation of Chironomid larvae (red worm) in the sedimentation tanks is a difficult problem for the normal function of waterworks. The toxic effect of liquid chlorine on the different instar larvae of Chironomid was studied using distilled water as test sample. Furthermore, the effect of pH value, organic matter content, ammonia nitrogen, and algae content on toxicity of liquid chlorine was observed. The results show that the tolerance of Chironomid larvae to liquid chlorine is strengthened with the increase in instar. The 24h semi-lethal concentration (LC50) of liquid chlorine to the 4th instar larvae of Chironomid is 3.39 mg/L. Low pH value and high algae content are helpful to improve the toxic effect of liquid chlorine to Chironomid larvae. In neutral water body, the increase in organic matter content results in the decrease in the death rate of Chironomid larvae. The toxicity of liquid chlorine differs greatly in different concentrations of ammonia nitrogen. The death rate of the 4th instar larvae of Chironomid in raw water is higher by contrast with that in sedimentation tanks water for 24h disposal with various amount of liquid chlorine.

  18. Tissue irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-01-01

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in-vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood-carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170

  19. Blood irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandy, Mammen

    1998-01-01

    Viable lymphocytes are present in blood and cellular blood components used for transfusion. If the patient who receives a blood transfusion is immunocompetent these lymphocytes are destroyed immediately. However if the patient is immunodefficient or immunosuppressed the transfused lymphocytes survive, recognize the recipient as foreign and react producing a devastating and most often fatal syndrome of transfusion graft versus host disease [T-GVHD]. Even immunocompetent individuals can develop T-GVHD if the donor is a first degree relative since like the Trojan horse the transfused lymphocytes escape detection by the recipient's immune system, multiply and attack recipient tissues. T-GVHD can be prevented by irradiating the blood and different centers use doses ranging from 1.5 to 4.5 Gy. All transfusions where the donor is a first degree relative and transfusions to neonates, immunosuppressed patients and bone marrow transplant recipients need to be irradiated. Commercial irradiators specifically designed for irradiation of blood and cellular blood components are available: however they are expensive. India needs to have blood irradiation facilities available in all large tertiary institutions where immunosuppressed patients are treated. The Atomic Energy Commission of India needs to develop a blood irradiator which meets international standards for use in tertiary medical institutions in the country. (author)

  20. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migdal, W.

    1995-01-01

    A worldwide standard on food irradiation was adopted in 1983 by codex Alimentarius Commission of the Joint Food Standard Programme of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and The World Health Organization (WHO). As a result, 41 countries have approved the use of irradiation for treating one or more food items and the number is increasing. Generally, irradiation is used to: food loses, food spoilage, disinfestation, safety and hygiene. The number of countries which use irradiation for processing food for commercial purposes has been increasing steadily from 19 in 1987 to 33 today. In the frames of the national programme on the application of irradiation for food preservation and hygienization an experimental plant for electron beam processing has been established in Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. The plant is equipped with a small research accelerator Pilot (19 MeV, 1 kW) and industrial unit Electronika (10 MeV, 10 kW). On the basis of the research there were performed at different scientific institutions in Poland, health authorities have issued permissions for irradiation for; spices, garlic, onions, mushrooms, potatoes, dry mushrooms and vegetables. (author)

  1. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Processing of food with low levels of radiation has the potential to contribute to reducing both spoilage of food during storage - a particular problem in developing countries - and the high incidence of food-borne disease currently seen in all countries. Approval has been granted for the treatment of more than 30 products with radiation in over 30 countries but, in general, governments have been slow to authorize the use of this new technique. One reason for this slowness is a lack of understanding of what food irradiation entails. This book aims to increase understanding by providing information on the process of food irradiation in simple, non-technical language. It describes the effects that irradiation has on food, and the plant and equipment that are necessary to carry it out safely. The legislation and control mechanisms required to ensure the safety of food irradiation facilities are also discussed. Education is seen as the key to gaining the confidence of the consumers in the safety of irradiated food, and to promoting understanding of the benefits that irradiation can provide. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab [de

  2. Protein Hydration Thermodynamics: The Influence of Flexibility and Salt on Hydrophobin II Hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsing, Richard C; Xi, Erte; Patel, Amish J

    2018-04-05

    The solubility of proteins and other macromolecular solutes plays an important role in numerous biological, chemical, and medicinal processes. An important determinant of protein solubility is the solvation free energy of the protein, which quantifies the overall strength of the interactions between the protein and the aqueous solution that surrounds it. Here we present an all-atom explicit-solvent computational framework for the rapid estimation of protein solvation free energies. Using this framework, we estimate the hydration free energy of hydrophobin II, an amphiphilic fungal protein, in a computationally efficient manner. We further explore how the protein hydration free energy is influenced by enhancing flexibility and by the addition of sodium chloride, and find that it increases in both cases, making protein hydration less favorable.

  3. Studies on the efficiency of an irradiated vaccine against Dictyocaulus viviparus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gennari, S.M.

    1982-04-01

    Studies on the immunization of calves against Dictyocalus viviparus using irradiated vaccines were carried out in two experiments at the Animal Sciences Division of Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA). In the first experiment 18 calves were divided into 3 groups. Group A received the British commercial vaccine Dictor, Group B received the gamma irradiated vaccine prepared at CENA, both orally, and Group C was the unvaccinated control. One month after the second dose, the calves were challenged with normal D. viviparus infective larvae at the rate of 60 larvae per kg body weight and 5 weeks later all animals were killed. (author)

  4. Indian continental margin gas hydrate prospects : results of the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) expedition 01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collett, T [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Riedel, M. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences; Cochran, J.R. [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory; Boswell, R. [United States Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). National Energy Technology Lab; Kumar, P. [Pushpendra Kumar Oil and Natural Gas Corp. Ltd., Mumbai (India). Inst. of Engineering and Ocean Technology; Sathe, A.V. [Oil and Natural Gas Corp. Ltd., Uttaranchal (India). KDM Inst. of Petroleum Exploration

    2008-07-01

    The geologic occurrence of gas hydrate deposits along the continental margins of India were investigated in the first expedition of the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP). The objective was to determine the regional context and characteristics of the gas hydrate deposits through scientific ocean drilling, logging, and analytical activities. A research drill ship was the platform for the drilling operation. The geological and geophysical studies revealed 2 geologically distinct areas with inferred gas hydrate occurrences, notably the passive continental margins of the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin. The NGHP Expedition 01 focused on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these 2 diverse settings. The study established the presence of gas hydrates in Krishna-Godavari, Mahanadi and Andaman basins. Site 10 in the Krishna-Godavari Basin was discovered to be the one of the richest gas hydrate accumulations yet documented, while site 17 in the Andaman Sea had the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zone yet known. The existence of a fully-developed gas hydrate system in the Mahanadi Basin was also discovered. Most of the gas hydrate occurrences discovered during this expedition appeared to contain mostly methane which was generated by microbial processes. However, there was also evidence of a thermal origin for a portion of the gas within the hydrates of the Mahanadi Basin and the Andaman offshore area. Gas hydrate in the Krishna-Godavari Basin appeared to be closely associated with large scale structural features, in which the flux of gas through local fracture systems, generated by the regional stress regime, controlled the occurrence of gas hydrate. 3 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  5. Larvas migrans ganglionar: Presentación de un caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen Luis Álvarez

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Las larvas migrans visceral cuya causa radica en la infestación con larvas de toxocara canis o cati, ocurre más frecuentemente en niños menores de 10 años. Se presenta el caso de un niño de 8 años de edad en el cual se diagnosticó larvas migrans ganglionar. Se comentan aspectos etioepidemiológicos de la enfermedad, su cuadro clínico y evolución. Se hace énfasis en las medidas higiénicas sanitarias de control y manipulación de excretas de animales domésticos, en este caso de perros y gatos.Visceral larvae migrans caused by the infestation with larvae of toxocara canis or cati are more frequent among children under 10. The case of an 8-year-old boy who was diagnosed ganglionar larva migrans is presented. Comments are made on some etioepidemiological aspects of the disease, as well as on his clinical picture and evolution. Emphasis is made on the hygienic and sanitary measures of control and manipulation of stools from pegs as dogs and cats. Las larvas migrans visceral cuya causa radica en la infestación con larvas de toxocara canis o cati, ocurre más frecuentemente en niños menores de 10 años. Se presenta el caso de un niño de 8 años de edad en el cual se diagnosticó larvas migrans ganglionar. Se comentan aspectos etioepidemiológicos de la enfermedad, su cuadro clínico y evolución. se hace énfasis en las medidas higiénicas sanitarias de control y manipulación de excretas de animales domésticos, en este caso de perros y gatos.

  6. Tools for automating the imaging of zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulak, Rock

    2016-03-01

    The VAST BioImager system is a set of tools developed for zebrafish researchers who require the collection of images from a large number of 2-7 dpf zebrafish larvae. The VAST BioImager automates larval handling, positioning and orientation tasks. Color images at about 10 μm resolution are collected from the on-board camera of the system. If images of greater resolution and detail are required, this system is mounted on an upright microscope, such as a confocal or fluorescence microscope, to utilize their capabilities. The system loads a larvae, positions it in view of the camera, determines orientation using pattern recognition analysis, and then more precisely positions to user-defined orientation for optimal imaging of any desired tissue or organ system. Multiple images of the same larva can be collected. The specific part of each larva and the desired orientation and position is identified by the researcher and an experiment defining the settings and a series of steps can be saved and repeated for imaging of subsequent larvae. The system captures images, then ejects and loads another larva from either a bulk reservoir, a well of a 96 well plate using the LP Sampler, or individually targeted larvae from a Petri dish or other container using the VAST Pipettor. Alternative manual protocols for handling larvae for image collection are tedious and time consuming. The VAST BioImager automates these steps to allow for greater throughput of assays and screens requiring high-content image collection of zebrafish larvae such as might be used in drug discovery and toxicology studies. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Generic phytosanitary irradiation treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, Guy J.

    2012-07-01

    The history of the development of generic phytosanitary irradiation (PI) treatments is discussed beginning with its initial proposal in 1986. Generic PI treatments in use today are 150 Gy for all hosts of Tephritidae, 250 Gy for all arthropods on mango and papaya shipped from Australia to New Zealand, 300 Gy for all arthropods on mango shipped from Australia to Malaysia, 350 Gy for all arthropods on lychee shipped from Australia to New Zealand and 400 Gy for all hosts of insects other than pupae and adult Lepidoptera shipped to the United States. Efforts to develop additional generic PI treatments and reduce the dose for the 400 Gy treatment are ongoing with a broad based 5-year, 12-nation cooperative research project coordinated by the joint Food and Agricultural Organization/International Atomic Energy Agency Program on Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. Key groups identified for further development of generic PI treatments are Lepidoptera (eggs and larvae), mealybugs and scale insects. A dose of 250 Gy may suffice for these three groups plus others, such as thrips, weevils and whiteflies.

  8. Generic phytosanitary irradiation treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallman, Guy J [United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Weslaco, TX (United States)

    2013-01-15

    The history of the development of generic phytosanitary irradiation (PI) treatments is discussed beginning with its initial proposal in 1986. Generic PI treatments in use today are 150 Gy for all hosts of Tephritidae, 250 Gy for all arthropods on mango and papaya shipped from Australia to New Zealand, 300 Gy for all arthropods on mango shipped from Australia to Malaysia, 350 Gy for all arthropods on lychee shipped from Australia to New Zealand and 400 Gy for all hosts of insects other than pupae and adult Lepidoptera shipped to the United States. Efforts to develop additional generic PI treatments and reduce the dose for the 400 Gy treatment are ongoing with a broad based 5-year, 12-nation cooperative research project coordinated by the joint Food and Agricultural Organization/International Atomic Energy Agency Program on Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. Key groups identified for further development of generic PI treatments are Lepidoptera (eggs and larvae), mealybugs and scale insects. A dose of 250 Gy may suffice for these three groups plus others, such as thrips, weevils and whiteflies. (author)

  9. Focus on the Development of Natural Gas Hydrate in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongfu Tan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrate, also known as combustible ice, and mainly composed of methane, is identified as a potential clean energy for the 21st century. Due to its large reserves, gas hydrate can ease problems caused by energy resource shortage and has gained attention around the world. In this paper, we focus on the exploration and development of gas hydrate as well as discussing its status and future development trend in China and abroad. We then analyze its opportunities and challenges in China from four aspects, resource, technology, economy and policy, with five forces model and Politics Economics Society Technology method. The results show China has abundance gas hydrate resource; however, backward technologies and inadequate investment have seriously hindered the future development of gas hydrate; thus, China should establish relevant cooperation framework and intuitional arrangement to attract more investment as well as breaking through technical difficulties to commercialization gas hydrate as soon as possible.

  10. Raman studies of methane-ethane hydrate metastability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hiroshi; Strobel, Timothy A; Dec, Steven F; Sloan, E Dendy; Koh, Carolyn A

    2009-03-05

    The interconversion of methane-ethane hydrate from metastable to stable structures was studied using Raman spectroscopy. sI and sII hydrates were synthesized from methane-ethane gas mixtures of 65% or 93% methane in ethane and water, both with and without the kinetic hydrate inhibitor, poly(N-vinylcaprolactam). The observed faster structural conversion rate in the higher methane concentration atmosphere can be explained in terms of the differences in driving force (difference in chemical potential of water in sI and sII hydrates) and kinetics (mass transfer of gas and water rearrangement). The kinetic hydrate inhibitor increased the conversion rate at 65% methane in ethane (sI is thermodynamically stable) but retards the rate at 93% methane in ethane (sII is thermodynamically stable), implying there is a complex interaction between the polymer, water, and hydrate guests at crystal surfaces.

  11. Enzyme hydration, activity and flexibility : A neutron scattering approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurkal-Siebert, V.; Finney, J.L.; Daniel, R.M.; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2006-01-01

    Recent measurements have demonstrated enzyme activity at hydrations as low as 3%. The question of whether the hydration-induced enzyme flexibility is important for activity is addressed by performing picosecond dynamic neutron scattering experiments on pig liver esterase powders at various temperatures as well as solutions. At all temperatures and hydrations investigated here, significant quasielastic scattering intensity is found in the protein, indicating the presence of anharmonic, diffusive motion. As the hydration increases a temperature-dependent dynamical transition appears and strengthens involving additional diffusive motion. At low temperature, increasing hydration resulted in lower flexibility of the enzyme. At higher temperatures, systems containing sufficient number of water molecules interacting with the protein exhibit increased flexibility. The implication of these results is that, although the additional hydration-induced diffusive motion and flexibility at high temperatures in the enzyme detected here may be related to increased activity, they are not required for the enzyme to function

  12. Thermal conductivity measurements in unsaturated hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Cha, Jong-Ho; Rosenbaum, Eilis J.; Zhang, Wu; Seol, Yongkoo

    2015-08-01

    Current database on the thermal properties of hydrate-bearing sediments remains limited and has not been able to capture their consequential changes during gas production where vigorous phase changes occur in this unsaturated system. This study uses the transient plane source (TPS) technique to measure the thermal conductivity of methane hydrate-bearing sediments with various hydrate/water/gas saturations. We propose a simplified method to obtain thermal properties from single-sided TPS signatures. Results reveal that both volume fraction and distribution of the pore constituents govern the thermal conductivity of unsaturated specimens. Thermal conductivity hysteresis is observed due to water redistribution and fabric change caused by hydrate formation and dissociation. Measured thermal conductivity increases evidently when hydrate saturation Sh > 30-40%, shifting upward from the geometric mean model prediction to a Pythagorean mixing model. These observations envisage a significant drop in sediment thermal conductivity when residual hydrate/water saturation falls below ~40%, hindering further gas production.

  13. Dissolution mechanisms of CO2 hydrate droplets in deep seawaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabitto, Jorge; Tsouris, Costas

    2006-01-01

    Carbon dioxide dissolution at intermediate ocean depths was studied using physical and mass transfer models. Particle density and hydrate layer thickness were determined using existing field data. Pseudo-homogeneous and heterogeneous mass transfer models were proposed to study the dissolution process. Pseudo-homogeneous models do not seem to represent the dissolution process well. Although heterogeneous models interpret the physical behavior better, unresolved issues related to hydrate dissolution still remain. For example, solid hydrate forms on one side of the hydrate film while it dissolves on the other. Dissolution is a complex process that comprises at least two sequential steps. The global process is controlled by mass transfer inside the hydrate layer or by a dissolution reaction at the hydrate-water interface

  14. Natural gas storage in hydrates with the presence of promoters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zhigao; Wang Ruzhu; Ma Rongsheng; Guo Kaihua; Fan Shuanshi

    2003-01-01

    Hydrate technology is being developed for the storage and transport of natural gas. Micellar surfectant solutions were found to increase the gas hydrate formation rate and storage capacity. An anionic surfactant, a nonionic surfactant, their mixtures and cyclopentane were used to improve the hydrate formation of a synthetic natural gas (methane=92.05 mol%, ethane=4.96 mol%, propane=2.99 mol%) in a quiescent system in this work. The effect of an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) on natural gas storage in hydrates is more pronounced compared to the effect of a nonionic surfactant (dodecyl polysaccharide glycoside). Cyclopentane could reduce hydrate formation induction time but could not improve the hydrate formation rate and storage capacity

  15. Experimental immunization of ponies with Strongylus vulgaris radiation-attenuated larvae or crude soluble somatic extracts from larval or adult stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, C M; Taylor, H W; Chapman, M R; Klei, T R

    1994-12-01

    Protection from Strongylus vulgaris infection through immunization with radiation-attenuated third-stage larvae (L3) or crude soluble homogenates from larval or adult stages was examined. Yearling ponies raised parasite-free were divided into 3 immunization groups: radiation-attenuated L3; soluble adult somatic extracts; larval somatic extracts with excretory/secretory products (E/S) from in vitro culture; and 1 medium control group. Ponies were immunized twice; attenuated larvae were administered orally and somatic extracts or controls injected intramuscularly with adjuvant. Approximately 6 wk following the second immunization, all ponies were challenged. Necrospy examinations were performed 6 wk following challenge. Irradiated larvae recipients had the fewest postchallenge clinical signs and lesions and were 91% protected from infection determined by larval recoveries from arterial dissections. Soluble antigen recipients and controls had similar larval recoveries and thus equal susceptibility to challenge. Soluble antigen recipients had more severe clinical signs and lesions than controls, suggesting that parenteral immunization exacerbated postchallenge inflammatory responses. Protection by immunization with irradiated larvae was associated with an anamnestic eosinophilia and postimmunization antibody recognition of S. vulgaris L3 surface antigens. Histologic staining of eosinophils within tissues of this group suggested that this immunization induced a cytophilic antibody response that facilitated degranulation.

  16. Skin Erythema, Pigmentation and Hydration Kinetics after Ultraviolet Radiation-induced Photodamage in Southern Chinese Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Miaojian; Hu, Rong; Xie, Xiaoyuan; Gong, Zijian; Yi, Jinling; Chen, Haiyan; Xie, Lin; Guan, Xiaomin; Guan, Lei; Lai, Wei

    2017-10-01

    Although there have been some studies about changes of skin erythema and pigmentation following ultraviolet radiation in other races, the relevant data in Chinese have never been achieved. Thus, we evaluated the long-time course of skin erythema, pigmentation and hydration changes after different doses of solar-simulated ultraviolet (SSUV) irradiation in 26 Chinese women for 168 days. The erythema index increased abruptly and peaked during 3 days of SSUV exposure, then slowly returned to the baseline level starting at day 7 and completely recovered during 168-day course of this study only in one minimal erythema doses (MED) SSUV irradiation. The melanin index started to slowly increase at day 3 of SSUV exposure, peaking at day 14 and gradually returned to the baseline level thereafter, but did not return to the baseline level during 168-day course in all doses. Skin hydration slowly declined at day 3 of exposure, hitting the lowest point at day 7, then slowly recovered starting at day 14 and completely returned to the baseline level at day 28 only in 1.5MED. These results will serve as baseline data on Chinese skin and provide useful references for the treatment of serious skin photodamage in Chinese. © 2017 The American Society of Photobiology.

  17. Radiation-induced DNA damage as a function of DNA hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swarts, S.G.; Miao, L.; Wheeler, K.T.; Sevilla, M.D.; Becker, D.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation-induced DNA damage is produced from the sum of the radicals generated by the direct ionization of the DNA (direct effect) and by the reactions of the DNA with free radicals formed in the surrounding environment (indirect effect). The indirect effect has been believed to be the predominant contributor to radiation-induced intracellular DNA damage, mainly as the result of reactions of bulk water radicals (e.g., OH·) with DNA. However, recent evidence suggests that DNA damage, derived from the irradiation of water molecules that are tightly bound in the hydration layer, may occur as the result of the transfer of electron-loss centers (e.g. holes) and electrons from these water molecules to the DNA. Since this mechanism for damaging DNA more closely parallels that of the direct effect, the irradiation of these tightly bound water molecules may contribute to a quasi-direct effect. These water molecules comprise a large fraction of the water surrounding intracellular DNA and could account for a significant proportion of intracellular radiation-induced DNA damage. Consequently, the authors have attempted to characterize this quasi-direct effect to determine: (1) the extent of the DNA hydration layer that is involved with this effect, and (2) what influence this effect has on the types and quantities of radiation-induced DNA damage

  18. Obsidian hydration profiles measured by sputter-induced optical emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsong, I S; Houser, C A; Yusef, N A; Messier, R F; White, W B; Michels, J W

    1978-07-28

    The variation of concentrations of hydrogen, sodium, potassium, lithium, calcium, magnesium, silicon, and aluminum as a function of depth in the hydration layer of obsidian artifacts has been determined by sputter-induced optical emission. The surface hydration is accompanied by dealkalization, and there is a buildup of alkaline earths, calcium and magnesium in the outermost layers. These results have clarified the phenomena underlying the obsidian hydration dating technique.

  19. [Laser Raman Spectroscopy and Its Application in Gas Hydrate Studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Juan; Wu, Neng-you; Lu, Hai-long; Wu, Dai-dai; Su, Qiu-cheng

    2015-11-01

    Gas hydrates are important potential energy resources. Microstructural characterization of gas hydrate can provide information to study the mechanism of gas hydrate formation and to support the exploitation and application of gas hydrate technology. This article systemly introduces the basic principle of laser Raman spectroscopy and summarizes its application in gas hydrate studies. Based on Raman results, not only can the information about gas composition and structural type be deduced, but also the occupancies of large and small cages and even hydration number can be calculated from the relative intensities of Raman peaks. By using the in-situ analytical technology, laser Raman specstropy can be applied to characterize the formation and decomposition processes of gas hydrate at microscale, for example the enclathration and leaving of gas molecules into/from its cages, to monitor the changes in gas concentration and gas solubility during hydrate formation and decomposition, and to identify phase changes in the study system. Laser Raman in-situ analytical technology has also been used in determination of hydrate structure and understanding its changing process under the conditions of ultra high pressure. Deep-sea in-situ Raman spectrometer can be employed for the in-situ analysis of the structures of natural gas hydrate and their formation environment. Raman imaging technology can be applied to specify the characteristics of crystallization and gas distribution over hydrate surface. With the development of laser Raman technology and its combination with other instruments, it will become more powerful and play a more significant role in the microscopic study of gas hydrate.

  20. Characteristics of Methane Hydrate Formation in Artificial and Natural Media

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Zhang; Qingbai Wu; Yuzhong Yang

    2013-01-01

    The formation of methane hydrate in two significantly different media was investigated, using silica gel as an artificial medium and loess as a natural medium. The methane hydrate formation was observed through the depletion of water in the matrix, measured via the matrix potential and the relationship between the matrix potential and the water content was determined using established equations. The velocity of methane hydrate nucleation slowed over the course of the reaction, as it relied on...

  1. Small angle neutron scattering from hydrated cement pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabine, T.M.; Bertram, W.K.; Aldridge, L.P.

    1996-01-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the microstructure of hydrating cement made with, and without silica fume. Some significant differences were found between the SANS spectra of pastes made from OPC (ordinary Portland cement) and DSP (made with silica fume and superplasticiser). The SANS spectra are interpreted in terms of scattering from simple particles. Particle growth was monitored during hydration and it was found that the growth correlated with the heat of hydration of the cement

  2. Effects of low-level chronic irradiation on aquatic organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etoh, H. (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan))

    1980-10-01

    Effects of continual irradiation for a long term on fishes and aquatic invertebrates were outlined. Effects of low-level chronic irradiation on aquatic organisms were less than acute effects induced when the same dose was irradiated once. The radiosensitivity of the genital organ to continual irradiation was high. There was a difference in radiosensitivity of the genital organ between female and male, and the degree of the difference varied according to kinds of animals. In an experiment on continual irradiation of adult killifishes, ova recovered from radiation damage, but spermatozoa did not recover. Incubation rates of eggs obtained from aquatic organisms which lived in water where radioactive sewage flowed into decreased significantly, and the frequency of reverse position of salivary gland chromosomes which were peculiar to exposed organisms increased in larvae of Chironomus tentans.

  3. Nuclear Well Log Properties of Natural Gas Hydrate Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchwell, A.; Cook, A.

    2015-12-01

    Characterizing gas hydrate in a reservoir typically involves a full suite of geophysical well logs. The most common method involves using resistivity measurements to quantify the decrease in electrically conductive water when replaced with gas hydrate. Compressional velocity measurements are also used because the gas hydrate significantly strengthens the moduli of the sediment. At many gas hydrate sites, nuclear well logs, which include the photoelectric effect, formation sigma, carbon/oxygen ratio and neutron porosity, are also collected but often not used. In fact, the nuclear response of a gas hydrate reservoir is not known. In this research we will focus on the nuclear log response in gas hydrate reservoirs at the Mallik Field at the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada, and the Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg 2 sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Nuclear logs may add increased robustness to the investigation into the properties of gas hydrates and some types of logs may offer an opportunity to distinguish between gas hydrate and permafrost. For example, a true formation sigma log measures the thermal neutron capture cross section of a formation and pore constituents; it is especially sensitive to hydrogen and chlorine in the pore space. Chlorine has a high absorption potential, and is used to determine the amount of saline water within pore spaces. Gas hydrate offers a difference in elemental composition compared to water-saturated intervals. Thus, in permafrost areas, the carbon/oxygen ratio may vary between gas hydrate and permafrost, due to the increase of carbon in gas hydrate accumulations. At the Mallik site, we observe a hydrate-bearing sand (1085-1107 m) above a water-bearing sand (1107-1140 m), which was confirmed through core samples and mud gas analysis. We observe a decrease in the photoelectric absorption of ~0.5 barnes/e-, as well as an increase in the formation sigma readings of ~5 capture units in the water-bearing sand as

  4. Impact of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate–gypsum hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Lei; Zhao Qinglin; Yao Chukang; Zhou Mingkai

    2012-01-01

    The retarding effect of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate–gypsum hydration, as a partial system of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) hydration, was investigated with several methods. The tricalcium aluminate–gypsum hydration behavior in the presence or absence of welan gum was researched by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and zeta potential analysis. Meanwhile, we studied the surface electrochemical properties and adsorption characteristics of welan gum by utilizing a zeta potential analyzer and UV–VIS absorption spectrophotometer. By adding welan gum, the morphology change of ettringite and retardation of hydration stages in tricalcium aluminate–gypsum system was observed. Moreover, we detected the adsorption behavior and zeta potential inversion of tricalcium aluminate and ettringite, as well as a rapid decrease in the zeta potential of tricalcium aluminate–gypsum system. The reduction on nucleation rate of ettringite and hydration activity of C 3 A was also demonstrated. Thus, through the adsorption effect, welan gum induces a retarding behavior in tricalcium aluminate–gypsum hydration. Highlights: ► Adsorption characteristics of welan gum on C 3 A and ettringite have been studied. ► C 3 A–gypsum hydration behavior and the hydration products are examined in L/S = 3. ► Welan gum retards the process of C 3 A–gypsum hydration. ► The addition of welan gum changes the nucleation growth of ettringite.

  5. Geomechanical Performance of Hydrate-Bearing Sediment in Offshore Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Holditch; Tad Patzek; Jonny Rutqvist; George Moridis; Richard Plumb

    2008-03-31

    The objective of this multi-year, multi-institutional research project was to develop the knowledge base and quantitative predictive capability for the description of geomechanical performance of hydrate-bearing sediments (hereafter referred to as HBS) in oceanic environments. The focus was on the determination of the envelope of hydrate stability under conditions typical of those related to the construction and operation of offshore platforms. We have developed a robust numerical simulator of hydrate behavior in geologic media by coupling a reservoir model with a commercial geomechanical code. We also investigated the geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS using pore-scale models (conceptual and mathematical) of fluid flow, stress analysis, and damage propagation. The objective of the UC Berkeley work was to develop a grain-scale model of hydrate-bearing sediments. Hydrate dissociation alters the strength of HBS. In particular, transformation of hydrate clusters into gas and liquid water weakens the skeleton and, simultaneously, reduces the effective stress by increasing the pore pressure. The large-scale objective of the study is evaluation of geomechanical stability of offshore oil and gas production infrastructure. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we have developed the numerical model TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate how the formation and disassociation of hydrates in seafloor sediments affects seafloor stability. Several technical papers were published using results from this model. LBNL also developed laboratory equipment and methods to produce realistic laboratory samples of sediments containing gas hydrates so that mechanical properties could be measured in the laboratory. These properties are required to run TOUGH + Hydrate + FLAC3D to evaluate seafloor stability issues. At Texas A&M University we performed a detailed literature review to determine what gas hydrate formation properties had been measured and reported in the literature. We

  6. Hydration of Portoguese cements, measurement and modelling of chemical shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maia, Lino; Geiker, Mette Rica; Figueiras, Joaquim A.

    2008-01-01

    form of the dispersion model. The development of hydration varied between the investigated cements; based on the measured data the degree of hydration after 24 h hydration at 20 C varied between 40 and 50%. This should be taken into account when comparing properties of concrete made from the different......Development of cement hydration was studied by measuring the chemical shrinkage of pastes. Five types of Portuguese Portland cement were used in cement pastes with . Chemical shrinkage was measured by gravimetry and dilatometry. In gravimeters results were recorded automatically during at least...

  7. Ethylene Separation via Hydrate Formation in W/O Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Pan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An hybrid absorption-hydration method was adopted to recover C2H4 from C2H4/CH4 binary gas mixtures and the hydrate formation conditions of C2H4/CH4 mixtures was studied experimentally in diesel in water (w/o emulsions. Span 20 at a concentration of 1.0 wt% in the aqueous phase was added to form water in diesel emulsions before hydrate formation and then hydrate in diesel slurry was separated after hydrate formation. The influences of initial gas-liquid volume ratio (53–142, pressure (3.4–5.4 MPa, temperature (274.15–278.15 K, water cuts (10–30 vol%, and the mole fraction of C2H4 in feed gas (13.19–80.44 mol% upon the C2H4 separation efficiency were systematically investigated. The experimental results show that ethylene can be enriched in hydrate slurry phase with high separation factor (S and recovery ratio (R. Most hydrate formation finished in 20 min, after that, the hydrate formation rate became very slow. The conclusion is useful for determining the suitable operation conditions when adopting an absorption-hydration method to separate C2H4/CH4.

  8. Methane Production and Carbon Capture by Hydrate Swapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Liang; von Solms, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    There are essentially two different approaches to producing methane from natural gas hydrate reservoirs, either bring the hydrate out of its thermodynamic stability region or expose the hydrate to a substance that will form a more stable hydrate structure, forcing an in situ swapping of the trapped...... experimental runs were performed to examine the influence of operating conditions on methane production by CO2/(CO2 + N2) injection in the temperature range of 274.15–277.15 K and 7.039–10.107 MPa pressure. Our results show that the use of the (CO2 + N2) binary gas mixture is advantageous compared to the use...

  9. HYDRATION AND MICROSTRUCTURE OF BLENDED CEMENT WITH SODIUM POLYSTYRENE SULFONATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifeng Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Polystyrene foamed plastic wastes are a kind of environmental pollutant. It could be recycled in cement industry as a chemical agent. In this paper, the effects of sodium polystyrene sulfonate (SPS on the hydration and microstructure of blended cement were investigated by calorimetry, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP. SPS slightly delayed the hydration of alite and decreased its hydration degree. SPS did not change the phase compositions during hydration. SPS changed the morphology of ettringite (AFt and decreased the pore volumes and the sizes of pores.

  10. Effects of various vehicles on skin hydration in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedersberg, S; Leopold, C S; Guy, R H

    2009-01-01

    The stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the skin, regulates the passive loss of water to the environment. Furthermore, it is well accepted that drug penetration is influenced by skin hydration, which may be manipulated by the application of moisturizing or oleaginous vehicles. Measurements of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and of skin hydration using a corneometer, were used to assess the effect of different vehicles on stratum corneum barrier function in vivo in human volunteers. A microemulsion significantly increased skin hydration relative to a reference vehicle based on medium chain triglycerides; in contrast, Transcutol(R) lowered skin hydration. TEWL measurements confirmed these observations. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Effects of gamma irradiation on the development and reproduction of the greasy cutworm, Agrotis ipsilon (Hufn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.M. Salem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three substerilizing doses 50, 100 and 150 Gy of gamma radiation were tested against full – grown male and female pupae or against full-grown male or female pupae of Agrotis ipsilon. The results showed that fecundity of irradiated females crossed with irradiated males was decreased by increasing irradiation dose. The decrease in egg – hatchability % and increase in sterility % induced by gamma radiation were found to be positively correlated with the dose level. The parentage of larval and pupal mortality increased significantly (p ≤ 0.05 with the increase of used doses. In addition, larval and pupal durations were found to be significantly prolonged as a result of gamma- irradiation treatment. In general, the results obtained indicated that the biological action of gamma irradiation against A. ipsilon larvae was more remarkable when both crossed females and males were irradiated followed by irradiated females crossed with non-irradiated males.

  12. Automated culture of aquatic model organisms: shrimp larvae husbandry for the needs of research and aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutalipassi, M; Di Natale, M; Mazzella, V; Zupo, V

    2018-01-01

    Modern research makes frequent use of animal models, that is, organisms raised and bred experimentally in order to help the understanding of biological and chemical processes affecting organisms or whole environments. The development of flexible, reprogrammable and modular systems that may help the automatic production of 'not-easy-to-keep' species is important for scientific purposes and for such aquaculture needs as the production of alive foods, the culture of small larvae and the test of new culture procedures. For this reason, we planned and built a programmable experimental system adaptable to the culture of various aquatic organisms, at different developmental stages. The system is based on culture cylinders contained into operational tanks connected to water conditioning tanks. A programmable central processor unit controls the operations, that is, water changes, temperature, light irradiance, the opening and closure of valves for the discharge of unused foods, water circulation and filtration and disinfection systems, according to the information received by various probes. Various devices may be set to modify water circulation and water changes to fulfil the needs of given organisms, to avoid damage of delicate structures, improve feeding performances and reduce the risk of movements over the water surface. The results obtained indicate that the system is effective in the production of shrimp larvae, being able to produce Hippolyte inermis post-larvae with low mortality as compared with the standard operation procedures followed by human operators. Therefore, the patented prototype described in the present study is a possible solution to automate and simplify the rearing of small invertebrates in the laboratory and in production plants.

  13. Fish larvae at fronts: Horizontal and vertical distributions of gadoid fish larvae across a frontal zone at the Norwegian Trench

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The reproduction and early life history of many fish species are linked to the physical and biological characteristics of fronts. In order to ascertain linkages between frontal physics and fish larvae, we investigated distributional differences among gadoid fish larvae comparing these to both...... the vertical and horizontal distributions of each species. However, the three-dimensional pattern of distribution differed significantly among species of larvae and species of copepods. The study underlines the complexity of bio-physical interrelationships in the frontal zone, and indicates that the zone...

  14. Irradiation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Toshimitsu.

    1989-01-01

    In an irradiation device for irradiating radiation rays such as electron beams to pharmaceuticals, etc., since the distribution of scanned electron rays was not monitored, the electron beam intensity could be determined only indirectly and irradiation reliability was not satisfactory. In view of the above, a plurality of monitor wires emitting secondary electrons are disposed in the scanning direction near a beam take-out window of a scanning duct, signals from the monitor wires are inputted into a display device such as a cathode ray tube, as well as signals from the monitor wires at the central portion are inputted into counting rate meters to measure the radiation dose as well. Since secondary electrons are emitted when electron beams pass through the monitor wires and the intensity thereof is in proportion with the intensity of incident electron beams, the distribution of the radiation dose can be monitored by measuring the intensity of the emitted secondary electrons. Further, uneven irradiation, etc. can also be monitored to make the radiation of irradiation rays reliable. (N.H.)

  15. Effects of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids on the larvae of polyphagous Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James S; Feeny, Paul

    1983-06-01

    Six benzylisoquinoline alkaloids were fed to the larvae of three polyphagous Lepidoptera species: Hyphantria cunea, Spodoptera eridania, and Lymantria dispar. Exposure of last instar larvae to alkaloid-containing diets over a 24-h period resulted in reduced feeding rates and reduced growth efficiencies. Lymantria dispar larvae reared from eggs on alkaloid diets took longer to reach the fifth instar, attained lower larval weights, and showed reduced survivorship. The benzylisoquinolines tested were not equally effective as toxins or feeding inhibitors. Some produced dramatic effects while others produced no effects. The relative responses of the three caterpillar species to the six alkaloids were similar. Those benzylisoquinolines with a methylene-dioxyphenyl (1,3-benzodioxole) group were consistently the most toxic or repellent while laudanosine, a relatively simple benzylisoquinoline, was generally innocuous. Available host records indicate that benzylisoquinoline-containing plants are avoided by the larvae of these moth species.

  16. Starvation threshold of Balanus amphitrite larvae in relation to temperature

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Desai, D.V.

    Energy content in the non-feeding (lecithotrophic) cyprid larvae of B. amphitrite plays an important role in determining its metamorphic characteristics. In this context it is important to understand the energy transformed to this stage from...

  17. Fish larvae from the Canary region in autumn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Rodríguez

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the taxonomic composition of the fish larvae community in the Canary region in autumn 1991 is presented. In total, 8699 larvae belonging to 58 fish families were studied. 176 taxonomic groups were identified, 149 at species level and the rest were identified at a higher level. The most numerous family and the one that presented the greatest number of species was Myctophidae. The most frequently caught species was Cyclothone braueri. The taxonomic composition (at family level of the fish larvae community, dominated by four mesopelagic families, was typical of oceanic regions of warm waters. The most remarkable feature of the fish larvae community was its high specific diversity.

  18. Odour avoidance learning in the larva of Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    Recent experiments with larvae have employed appetitive ... Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bangalore 560 065, India ..... psychology: event timing turns punishment to reward; Nature.

  19. Preliminary notes on the decapod larvae of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menon, M.K.; Menon, P.G.; Paulinose, V.T.

    The note presents some general facts regarding the distribution of some of the larger groups of decapod larvae in the Arabian Sea Their relative numbers and the families and subfamilies, so far as can be recognized, represented within each group...

  20. Commercially important penaeid shrimp larvae in the estuaries of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Achuthankutty, C.T.

    Larval stages of the penaeid shrimps, Metapenaeus dobsoni (Miers), M. affinis (Milne - Edwards) and Penaeus merguiensis De Man were mostly distributed at the lower reaches of Mandovi and Zuari estuaries. While larvae of M. dobsoni and M. affinis...