WorldWideScience

Sample records for hydrated interfacial structure

  1. Structure and dynamics of interfacial water. Role of hydratation water in the globular proteins dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanotti, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    This memoir includes five chapters. In the first chapter, are given the elements of the neutrons scattering theory that is used in this study. the second chapter is devoted to a general presentation of the interaction between biological macro molecule and water. The third part is dedicated to the study of the structure and the dynamics of interfacial water in the neighbouring of model systems, the vycor and the amorphous carbon. The results presented in this part are compared with these one relative to water dynamics at the C-phycocyanin surface. This study makes the object of the fourth chapter. Then, in the fifth and last chapter are discussed the results relative to the role of hydratation on the parv-albumin dynamics for which have been combined the neutron quasi elastic incoherent scattering and the nuclear magnetic resonance of the carbon 13 solid in natural abundance

  2. Linking interfacial chemistry of CO2 to surface structures of hydrated metal oxide nanoparticles: hematite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshova, Irina V; Ponnurangam, Sathish; Somasundaran, Ponisseril

    2013-05-14

    A better understanding of interaction with dissolved CO2 is required to rationally design and model the (photo)catalytic and sorption processes on metal (hydr)oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous media. Using in situ FTIR spectroscopy, we address this problem for rhombohedral 38 nm hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanoparticles as a model. We not only resolve the structures of the adsorbed carbonate species, but also specify their adsorption sites and their location on the nanoparticle surface. The spectral relationships obtained present a basis for a new method of characterizing the microscopic structural and acid-base properties (related to individual adsorption sites) of hydrated metal (hydr)oxide NPs using atmospherically derived CO2 as a probe. Specifically, we distinguish two carbonate species suggesting two principally different adsorption mechanisms. One species, which is more weakly adsorbed, has an inner-sphere mononuclear monodentate structure which is formed by a conventional ligand-exchange mechanism. At natural levels of dissolved carbonate and pH from 3 to 11, this species is attached to the most acidic/reactive surface cations (surface states) associated with ferrihydrite-like surface defects. The second species, which is more strongly adsorbed, presents a mixed C and O coordination of bent CO2. This species uniquely recognizes the stoichiometric rhombohedral {104} facets in the NP texture. Like in gas phase, it is formed through the surface coordination of molecular CO2. We address how the adsorption sites hosting these two carbonate species are affected by the annealing and acid etching of the NPs. These results support the nanosize-induced phase transformation of hematite towards ferrihydrite under hydrous conditions, and additionally show that the process starts from the roughened areas of the facet intersections.

  3. Structure and dynamics of interfacial water. Role of hydratation water in the globular proteins dynamics; Structure et dynamique de l`eau interfaciale. Role de l`eau d`hydratation dans la dynamique des proteines globulaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanotti, J.M.

    1997-01-27

    This memoir includes five chapters. In the first chapter, are given the elements of the neutrons scattering theory that is used in this study. the second chapter is devoted to a general presentation of the interaction between biological macro molecule and water. The third part is dedicated to the study of the structure and the dynamics of interfacial water in the neighbouring of model systems, the vycor and the amorphous carbon. The results presented in this part are compared with these one relative to water dynamics at the C-phycocyanin surface. This study makes the object of the fourth chapter. Then, in the fifth and last chapter are discussed the results relative to the role of hydratation on the parv-albumin dynamics for which have been combined the neutron quasi elastic incoherent scattering and the nuclear magnetic resonance of the carbon 13 solid in natural abundance.

  4. Unexpected inhibition of CO2 gas hydrate formation in dilute TBAB solutions and the critical role of interfacial water structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ngoc N.; Nguyen, Anh V.; Nguyen, Khoi T.; Rintoul, Llew; Dang, Liem X.

    2016-12-01

    Gas hydrates formed under moderated conditions open up novel approaches to tackling issues related to energy supply, gas separation, and CO2 sequestration. Several additives like tetra-n-butylammonium bromide (TBAB) have been empirically developed and used to promote gas hydrate formation. Here we report unexpected experimental results which show that TBAB inhibits CO2 gas hydrate formation when used at minuscule concentration. We also used spectroscopic techniques and molecular dynamics simulation to gain further insights and explain the experimental results. They have revealed the critical role of water alignment at the gas-water interface induced by surface adsorption of tetra-n-butylammonium cation (TBA+) which gives rise to the unexpected inhibition of dilute TBAB solution. The water perturbation by TBA+ in the bulk is attributed to the promotion effect of high TBAB concentration on gas hydrate formation. We explain our finding using the concept of activation energy of gas hydrate formation. Our results provide a step toward to mastering the control of gas hydrate formation.

  5. Coordination variation of hydrated Cu2+/Br1− ions traversing the interfacial water in mesopores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Resolution of the atomistic and electronic details about the coordination structure variation of hydrated ions in the interfacial water is still a tough challenge, which is, however, essentially important for the understanding of ion adsorption, permeation and other similar processes in aqueous solutions. Here we report the tracing of coordination structure variation for hydrated Cu2+/Br1- ions traversing the interfacial water in Vycor mesopores (ϕ = 7.6 nm by employing both X-ray absorption near edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies. By controlled desorption/adsorption of water, the filling fraction of the mesopores, thus the water layer thickness, can be adjusted, which in turn effects the variation of coordination structure of the ions therein. It is found that both Cu2+ and Br1- ions prefer staying exclusively in the core water, and in this circumstance no ion pairs have been detected in the solution of concentrations up to 1.0 M. Following capillary decondensation occurring at a filling fraction of ∼35% which corresponds to a water layer of about three monolayers, Br1- ions begin immediately to reconstruct their first coordination shell, characterized by ionic dehydration, shrinkage of ion-water bond length, and formation of ion pairs. In contrast, Cu2+ ions can retain a bulk-like coordination structure till being driven to bond directly to the pore surface when the filling fraction is below 20%. At the final stage of dehydration via thermal vacuum treatment at 110°C, Cu2+ ions can be completely reduced to the Cu1+ state, and recover at room temperature only when the filling fraction is above 14%. These results may be inspirable for the investigation of similar problems concerning hydrated ions in water solution under different confining conditions.

  6. Protein interfacial structure and nanotoxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, John W.; Perriman, Adam W.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Lin, J.-M.

    2009-01-01

    Here we briefly recapitulate the use of X-ray and neutron reflectometry at the air-water interface to find protein structures and thermodynamics at interfaces and test a possibility for understanding those interactions between nanoparticles and proteins which lead to nanoparticle toxicology through entry into living cells. Stable monomolecular protein films have been made at the air-water interface and, with a specially designed vessel, the substrate changed from that which the air-water interfacial film was deposited. This procedure allows interactions, both chemical and physical, between introduced species and the monomolecular film to be studied by reflectometry. The method is briefly illustrated here with some new results on protein-protein interaction between β-casein and κ-casein at the air-water interface using X-rays. These two proteins are an essential component of the structure of milk. In the experiments reported, specific and directional interactions appear to cause different interfacial structures if first, a β-casein monolayer is attacked by a κ-casein solution compared to the reverse. The additional contrast associated with neutrons will be an advantage here. We then show the first results of experiments on the interaction of a β-casein monolayer with a nanoparticle titanium oxide sol, foreshadowing the study of the nanoparticle 'corona' thought to be important for nanoparticle-cell wall penetration.

  7. Protein interfacial structure and nanotoxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, John W. [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)], E-mail: jww@rsc.anu.edu.au; Perriman, Adam W.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Lin, J.-M. [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

    2009-02-21

    Here we briefly recapitulate the use of X-ray and neutron reflectometry at the air-water interface to find protein structures and thermodynamics at interfaces and test a possibility for understanding those interactions between nanoparticles and proteins which lead to nanoparticle toxicology through entry into living cells. Stable monomolecular protein films have been made at the air-water interface and, with a specially designed vessel, the substrate changed from that which the air-water interfacial film was deposited. This procedure allows interactions, both chemical and physical, between introduced species and the monomolecular film to be studied by reflectometry. The method is briefly illustrated here with some new results on protein-protein interaction between {beta}-casein and {kappa}-casein at the air-water interface using X-rays. These two proteins are an essential component of the structure of milk. In the experiments reported, specific and directional interactions appear to cause different interfacial structures if first, a {beta}-casein monolayer is attacked by a {kappa}-casein solution compared to the reverse. The additional contrast associated with neutrons will be an advantage here. We then show the first results of experiments on the interaction of a {beta}-casein monolayer with a nanoparticle titanium oxide sol, foreshadowing the study of the nanoparticle 'corona' thought to be important for nanoparticle-cell wall penetration.

  8. Computing optimal interfacial structure of modulated phases

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Jie; Wang, Chu; Shi, An-Chang; Zhang, Pingwen

    2016-01-01

    We propose a general framework of computing interfacial structures between two modulated phases. Specifically we propose to use a computational box consisting of two half spaces, each occupied by a modulated phase with given position and orientation. The boundary conditions and basis functions are chosen to be commensurate with the bulk structures. It is observed that the ordered nature of modulated structures stabilizes the interface, which enables us to obtain optimal interfacial structures...

  9. Macroscopic investigation of water volume effects on interfacial dynamic behaviors between clathrate hydrate and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Minjun; Couzis, Alexander; Lee, Jae W

    2013-05-14

    This study investigated the effects of the water volume on the interfacial dynamics between cyclopentane (CP) hydrate and water droplet in a CP/n-decane oil mixture. The adhesion force between CP hydrate and various water droplets was determined using the z-directional microbalance. Through repetition of precise measurements over several cycles from contact to detachment, we observed abnormal wetting behaviors in the capillary bridge during the retraction process when the water drop volume is larger than 100 μL. With the increase in water droplet volumes, the contact force between CP hydrate and water also increases up to 300 μL. However, there is a dramatic reduction of increasing rate in the contact forces over 300 μL of water droplet. With the addition of the surfactants of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) to the water droplet, the contact force between CP hydrate and solution droplet exhibits a lower value and a transition volume of the contact force comes with a smaller solution volume of 200 μL. The water volume effects on the liquid wetting of the probe and the size of capillary bridges provide important insight into hydrate growth and aggregation/agglomeration in the presence of free water phase inside gas/oil pipelines.

  10. Squirt flow due to interfacial water films in hydrate bearing sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sell

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Sediments containing gas hydrate dispersed in the pore space are known to show a characteristic seismic anomaly which is a high attenuation along with increasing seismic velocities. Currently, this observation cannot be fully explained albeit squirt-flow type mechanisms on the microscale have been speculated to be the cause. Recent major findings from in situ experiments, using the gas in excess and water in excess formation method, and coupled with high-resolution synchrotron-based X-ray micro-tomography, have revealed the systematic presence of thin water films between the quartz grains and the encrusting hydrate. The data obtained from these experiments underwent an image processing procedure to quantify the thicknesses and geometries of the aforementioned interfacial water films. Overall, the water films vary from sub-micrometer to a few micrometers in thickness. In addition, some of the water films interconnect through water bridges. This geometrical analysis is used to propose a new conceptual squirt flow model for hydrate bearing sediments. A series of numerical simulations is performed considering variations of the proposed model to study seismic attenuation caused by such thin water films. Our results support previous speculation that squirt flow can explain high attenuation at seismic frequencies in hydrate bearing sediments, but based on a conceptual squirt flow model which is geometrically different than those previously considered.

  11. Dynamic modeling of interfacial structures via interfacial area transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seungjin, Kim; Mamoru, Ishii

    2004-01-01

    Full text of publication follows:In the current thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes using the two-fluid model, the empirical correlations that are based on the two-phase flow regimes and regime transition criteria are being employed as closure relations for the interfacial transfer terms. Due to its inherent shortcomings, however, such static correlations are inaccurate and present serious problems in the numerical analysis. In view of this, a new dynamic approach employing the interfacial area transport equation has been studied. The interfacial area transport equation dynamically models the two-phase flow regime transitions and predicts continuous change of the interfacial area concentration along the flow field. Hence, when employed in the thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes, it eliminates artificial bifurcations stemming from the use of the static flow regime transition criteria. Therefore, the interfacial area transport equation can make a leapfrog improvement in the current capability of the two-fluid model from both scientific and practical point of view. Accounting for the substantial differences in the transport phenomena of various sizes of bubbles, the two-group interfacial area transport equations have been developed. The group 1 equation describes the transport of small-dispersed bubbles that are either distorted or spherical in shapes, and the group 2 equation describes the transport of large cap, slug or churn-turbulent bubbles. The source and sink terms in the right hand-side of the transport equations have been established by mechanistically modeling the creation and destruction of bubbles due to major bubble interaction mechanisms. The coalescence mechanisms include the random collision driven by turbulence, and the entrainment of trailing bubbles in the wake region of the preceding bubble. The disintegration mechanisms include the break-up by turbulence impact, shearing-off at the rim of large cap bubbles and the break-up of large cap

  12. Dynamic modeling of interfacial structures via interfacial area transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seungjin, Kim; Mamoru, Ishii

    2005-01-01

    The interfacial area transport equation dynamically models the two-phase flow regime transitions and predicts continuous change of the interfacial area concentration along the flow field. Hence, when employed in the numerical thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes, it eliminates artificial bifurcations stemming from the use of the static flow regime transition criteria. Accounting for the substantial differences in the transport phenomena of various sizes of bubbles, the two-group interfacial area transport equations have been developed. The group 1 equation describes the transport of small-dispersed bubbles that are either distorted or spherical in shapes, and the group 2 equation describes the transport of large cap, slug or churn-turbulent bubbles. The source and sink terms in the right-hand-side of the transport equations have been established by mechanistically modeling the creation and destruction of bubbles due to major bubble interaction mechanisms. In the present paper, the interfacial area transport equations currently available are reviewed to address the feasibility and reliability of the model along with extensive experimental results. These include the data from adiabatic upward air-water two-phase flow in round tubes of various sizes, from a rectangular duct, and from adiabatic co-current downward air-water two-phase flow in round pipes of two sizes. (authors)

  13. Interfacial structures - Thermodynamical and experimental studies of the interfacial mass transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, Jean-Emile

    1972-01-01

    In the first section, we put forward hypotheses concerning the structure of the interfacial regions between two immiscible liquid phases. It appears that the longitudinal structure is comparable with that of a crystallized solid and that the transversal structure is nearest of that of a liquid. In the second section, we present a thermodynamical treatment of the irreversible phenomena in the interfacial region. The equation of evolution of a system consisting of two immiscible liquid phases are deduced. The third part allows an experimental verification of the theoretical relations. We also make clear, in certain cases, the appearance of a great 'interfacial resistance' which slows down the interfacial mass transfer. (author) [fr

  14. The cellular environment of cancerous human tissue. Interfacial and dangling water as a "hydration fingerprint".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramczyk, Halina; Brozek-Pluska, Beata; Krzesniak, Marta; Kopec, Monika; Morawiec-Sztandera, Alina

    2014-08-14

    Despite a large number of publications, the role of water in the cellular environment of biological tissue has not been clarified. Characterizing the biological interface is a key challenge in understanding the interactions of water in the tissue. Although we often assume that the properties of the bulk water can be translated to the crowded biological environment, this approach must be considerably revised when considering the biological interface. To our knowledge, few studies have directly monitored the interactions and accumulation of water in the restricted environments of the biological tissue upon realistic crowding conditions. The present study focuses on a molecular picture of water molecules at the biological interface, or specifically, water molecules adjacent to the hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces of normal and cancerous tissues. We recorded and analyzed the IR and Raman spectra of the νs(OH) stretching modes of water at the biological interfaces of the human breast and neck tissues. The results revealed dramatic changes in the water content in the tissue and are potentially relevant to both the fundamental problems of interfacial water modeling and the molecular diagnostics of cancer as a 'hydration fingerprint'. Herein, we will discuss the origin of the vibrational substructures observed for the νs(OH) stretching modes of water, showing that the interfacial water interacting via H-bond with other water molecules and biomolecules at the biological surface and free OH vibration of the dangling water are sensitive indicators of the pathology between the normal (noncancerous) and cancerous tissue and cancer types. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of empirical hydration distribution functions around polar atoms for assessing hydration structures of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Daisuke; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Empirical distribution functions of water molecules in protein hydration are made. ► The functions measure how hydrogen-bond geometry in hydration deviate from ideal. ► The functions assess experimentally identified hydration structures of protein. - Abstract: To quantitatively characterize hydrogen-bond geometry in local hydration structures of proteins, we constructed a set of empirical hydration distribution functions (EHDFs) around polar protein atoms in the main and side chains of 11 types of hydrophilic amino acids (D. Matsuoka, M. Nakasako, Journal of Physical Chemistry B 113 (2009) 11274). The functions are the ensemble average of possible hydration patterns around the polar atoms, and describe the anisotropic deviations from ideal hydrogen bond geometry. In addition, we defined probability distribution function of hydration water molecules (PDFH) over the hydrophilic surface of a protein as the sum of EHDFs of solvent accessible polar protein atoms. The functions envelop most of hydration sites identified in crystal structures of proteins (D. Matsuoka, M. Nakasako, Journal of Physical Chemistry B 114 (2010) 4652). Here we propose the application of EHDFs and PDFHs for assessing crystallographically identified hydration structures of proteins. First, hydration water molecules are classified with respect to the geometry in hydrogen bonds in referring EHDFs. Difference Fourier electron density map weighted by PDFH of protein is proposed to identify easily density peaks as candidates of hydration water molecules. A computer program implementing those ideas was developed and used for assessing hydration structures of proteins

  16. Interfacial assembly structures and nanotribological properties of saccharic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongyu; Liu, Yuhong; Zeng, Qingdao; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen; Lu, Xinchun

    2017-01-04

    Saccharides have been recognized as potential bio-lubricants because of their good hydration ability. However, the interfacial structures of saccharides and their derivatives are rarely studied and the molecular details of interaction mechanisms have not been well understood. In this paper, the supramolecular assembly structures of saccharic acids (including galactaric acid and lactobionic acid), mediated by hydrogen bonds O-HN and O-HO, were successfully constructed on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface by introducing pyridine modulators and were explicitly revealed by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Furthermore, friction forces were measured in the saccharic acid/pyridine co-assembled system by atomic force microscopy (AFM), revealing a larger value than a pristine saccharic acid system, which could be attributed to the stronger tip-assembled molecule interactions that lead to the higher potential energy barrier needed to overcome. The effort on saccharide-related supramolecular self-assembly and nanotribological behavior could provide a novel and promising pathway to explore the interaction mechanisms underlying friction and reveal the structure-property relationship at the molecular level.

  17. Electronic structure calculations of calcium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterne, P.A.; Meike, A.

    1995-11-01

    Many phases in the calcium-silicate-hydrate system can develop in cement exposed over long periods of time to temperatures above 25 C. As a consequence, chemical reactions involving these phases can affect the relative humidity and water chemistry of a radioactive waste repository that contains significant amounts of cement. In order to predict and simulate these chemical reactions, the authors are developing an internally consistent database of crystalline Ca-Si-hydrate structures. The results of first principles electronic structure calculations on two such phases, wollastonite (CaSiO 3 ) and xonotlite (Ca 6 Si 6 O 17 (OH) 2 ), are reported here. The calculated ground state properties are in very good agreement with experiment, providing equilibrium lattice parameters within about 1--1.4% of the experimentally reported values. The roles of the different types of oxygen atoms, which are fundamental to understanding the energetics of crystalline Ca-Si-hydrates are briefly discussed in terms of their electronic state densities. The good agreement with experiment for the lattice parameters and the consistency of the electronic density of states features for the two structures demonstrate the applicability of these electronic structure methods in calculating the fundamental properties of these phases

  18. High-pressure structures of methane hydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, H; Uchihara, Y; Fujihisa, H; Sakashita, M; Katoh, E; Aoki, K; Yamamoto, Y; Nagashima, K; Yagi, T

    2002-01-01

    Three high-pressure structures of methane hydrate, a hexagonal structure (str. A) and two orthorhombic structures (str. B and str. C), were found by in situ x-ray diffractometry and Raman spectroscopy. The well-known structure I (str. I) decomposed into str. A and fluid at 0.8 GPa. Str. A transformed into str. B at 1.6 GPa, and str. B further transformed into str. C at 2.1 GPa which survived above 7.8 GPa. The fluid solidified as ice VI at 1.4 GPa, and the ice VI transformed to ice VII at 2.1 GPa. The bulk moduli, K 0 , for str. I, str. A, and str. C were calculated to be 7.4, 9.8, and 25.0 GPa, respectively

  19. The structure of hydrate bearing fine grained marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priest, J.; Kingston, E.; Clayton, C. [Southampton Univ., Highfield (United Kingdom). School of Civil Engineering and the Environment; Schultheiss, P.; Druce, M. [Geotek Ltd., Daventry (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    This paper discussed the structure of naturally occurring methane gas hydrates in fine-grained sediments from core samples recovered using in situ pressures from the eastern margin of the Indian Ocean. High resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) images were taken of gas hydrate cores. The hydrate structure was examined and comparisons were made between low resolution X-ray images obtained on the cores prior to sub-sectioning and depressurization procedures. The X-ray images showed the presence of high-angle, sub-parallel veins within the recovered sediments. The scans indicated that the hydrates occurred as fracture filing veins throughout the core. Fracture orientation was predominantly sub-vertical. Thick millimetric hydrate veins were composed of sub-millimetric veins with variations in fracture angle. The analysis indicated that hydrate formation was episodic in nature and subject to changes in the stress regime. Results of the study showed that depressurization and subsequent freezing alter the structure of the sediment even when the gas hydrate has not been altered. A large proportion of the hydrate survived when outside of its stability region. The self-preserving behaviour of the hydrate was attributed to the endothermic nature of gas hydrate dissociation. It was concluded that the accurate physical characterization of gas hydrates can only be conducted when the core section remains under in situ stress conditions. 13 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Monte Carlo studies on the interfacial properties and interfacial structures of ternary symmetric blends with gradient copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dachuan; Guo, Hongxia

    2012-08-09

    Using Monte Carlo simulation methods, the effects of the comonomer sequence distribution on the interfacial properties (including interfacial tension, interfacial thickness, saturated interfacial area per copolymer, and bending modulus) and interfacial structures (including chain conformations and comonomer distributions of the simulated copolymers at the interfaces) of a ternary symmetric blend containing two immiscible homopolymers and one gradient copolymer are investigated. We find that copolymers with a larger composition gradient width have a broader comonomer distribution along the interface normal, and hence more pronouncedly enlarge the interfacial thickness and reduce the interfacial tension. Furthermore, the counteraction effect, which arises from the tendency of heterogeneous segments in gradient copolymers to phase separate and enter their miscible phases to reduce the local enthalpy, decreases the stretching of copolymers along the interface normal direction. As a result, copolymers with a larger width of gradient composition can occupy a larger interfacial area and form softer monolayers at saturation and are more efficient in facilitating the formation of bicontinuous microemulsions. Additionally, chain length ratio, segregation strength, and interactions between homopolymers and copolymers can alter the interfacial character of gradient copolymers. There exists a strong coupling between the comonomer sequence distribution, chain conformation, and interfacial properties. Especially, bending modulus is mainly determined by the complicated interplay of interfacial copolymer density and interfacial chain conformation.

  1. Interfacial patterns in magnetorheological fluids: Azimuthal field-induced structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Eduardo O; Lira, Sérgio A; Miranda, José A

    2015-08-01

    Despite their practical and academic relevance, studies of interfacial pattern formation in confined magnetorheological (MR) fluids have been largely overlooked in the literature. In this work, we present a contribution to this soft matter research topic and investigate the emergence of interfacial instabilities when an inviscid, initially circular bubble of a Newtonian fluid is surrounded by a MR fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell apparatus. An externally applied, in-plane azimuthal magnetic field produced by a current-carrying wire induces interfacial disturbances at the two-fluid interface, and pattern-forming structures arise. Linear stability analysis, weakly nonlinear theory, and a vortex sheet approach are used to access early linear and intermediate nonlinear time regimes, as well as to determine stationary interfacial shapes at fully nonlinear stages.

  2. Interfacial structures in downward two-phase bubbly flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paranjape, S.S.; Kim, S.; Ishii, M.; Kelly, J.

    2003-01-01

    Downward two-phase flow was studied considering its significance in view of Light Water Reactor Accidents (LWR) such as Loss of Heat Sink (LOHS) by feed water loss or secondary pipe break. The flow studied, was an adiabatic, air-water, co-current, vertically downward two-phase flow. The experimental test sections had internal hydraulic diameters of 25.4 mm and 50.8 mm. Flow regime map was obtained using the characteristic signals obtained from an impedance void meter, employing neural network based identification methodology to minimize the subjective judgment in determining the flow regimes. A four sensor conductivity probe was used to measure the local two phase flow parameters, which characterize the interfacial structures. The local time averaged two-phase flow parameters measured were: void fraction (α), interfacial area concentration (a i ), bubble velocity (v g ), and Sauter mean diameter (D Sm ). The flow conditions were from the bubbly flow regime. The local profiles of these parameters as well as their axial development revealed the nature of the interfacial structures and the bubble interaction mechanisms occurring in the flow. Furthermore, this study provided a good database for the development of the interfacial area transport equation, which dynamically models the changes in the interfacial area along the flow field. An interfacial area transport equation was developed for downward flow based on that developed for the upward flow, with certain modifications in the bubble interaction terms. The area averaged values of the interfacial area concentration were compared with those predicted by the interfacial area transport model. (author)

  3. Controlling Interfacial Separation in Porous Structures by Void Patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghareeb, Ahmed; Elbanna, Ahmed

    Manipulating interfacial response for enhanced adhesion or fracture resistance is a problem of great interest to scientists and engineers. In many natural materials and engineering applications, an interface exists between a porous structure and a substrate. A question that arises is how the void distribution in the bulk may affect the interfacial response and whether it is possible to alter the interfacial toughness without changing the surface physical chemistry. In this paper, we address this question by studying the effect of patterning voids on the interfacial-to-the overall response of an elastic plate glued to a rigid substrate by bilinear cohesive material. Different patterning categories are investigated; uniform, graded, and binary voids. Each case is subjected to upward displacement at the upper edge of the plate. We show that the peak force and maximum elongation at failure depend on the voids design and by changing the void size, alignment or gradation we may control these performance measures. We relate these changes in the measured force displacement response to energy release rate as a measure of interfacial toughness. We discuss the implications of our results on design of bulk heterogeneities for enhanced interfacial behavior.

  4. Hydration Structure of the Quaternary Ammonium Cations

    KAUST Repository

    Babiaczyk, Wojtek Iwo

    2010-11-25

    Two indicators of the hydropathicity of small solutes are introduced and tested by molecular dynamics simulations. These indicators are defined as probabilities of the orientation of water molecules\\' dipoles and hydrogen bond vectors, conditional on a generalized distance from the solute suitable for arbitrarily shaped molecules. Using conditional probabilities, it is possible to distinguish features of the distributions in close proximity of the solute. These regions contain the most significant information on the hydration structure but cannot be adequately represented by using, as is usually done, joint distance-angle probability densities. Our calculations show that using our indicators a relative hydropathicity scale for the interesting test set of the quaternary ammonium cations can be roughly determined. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  5. Resolving Point Defects in the Hydration Structure of Calcite (10.4) with Three-Dimensional Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söngen, Hagen; Reischl, Bernhard; Miyata, Kazuki; Bechstein, Ralf; Raiteri, Paolo; Rohl, Andrew L.; Gale, Julian D.; Fukuma, Takeshi; Kühnle, Angelika

    2018-03-01

    It seems natural to assume that defects at mineral surfaces critically influence interfacial processes such as the dissolution and growth of minerals in water. The experimental verification of this claim, however, is challenging and requires real-space methods with utmost spatial resolution, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM). While defects at mineral-water interfaces have been resolved in 2D AFM images before, the perturbation of the surrounding hydration structure has not yet been analyzed experimentally. In this Letter, we demonstrate that point defects on the most stable and naturally abundant calcite (10.4) surface can be resolved using high-resolution 3D AFM—even within the fifth hydration layer. Our analysis of the hydration structure surrounding the point defect shows a perturbation of the hydration with a lateral extent of approximately one unit cell. These experimental results are corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations.

  6. Gas hydrate inhibition by perturbation of liquid water structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2015-06-01

    Natural gas hydrates are icy crystalline materials that contain hydrocarbons, which are the primary energy source for this civilization. The abundance of naturally occurring gas hydrates leads to a growing interest in exploitation. Despite their potential as energy resources and in industrial applications, there is insufficient understanding of hydrate kinetics, which hinders the utilization of these invaluable resources. Perturbation of liquid water structure by solutes has been proposed to be a key process in hydrate inhibition, but this hypothesis remains unproven. Here, we report the direct observation of the perturbation of the liquid water structure induced by amino acids using polarized Raman spectroscopy, and its influence on gas hydrate nucleation and growth kinetics. Amino acids with hydrophilic and/or electrically charged side chains disrupted the water structure and thus provided effective hydrate inhibition. The strong correlation between the extent of perturbation by amino acids and their inhibition performance constitutes convincing evidence for the perturbation inhibition mechanism. The present findings bring the practical applications of gas hydrates significantly closer, and provide a new perspective on the freezing and melting phenomena of naturally occurring gas hydrates.

  7. Precise structural analysis of methane hydrate by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igawa, Naoki; Hoshikawa, Akinori; Ishii, Yoshinobu

    2006-01-01

    Methane hydrate has attracted great interest as an energy resource to replace natural gas since this material is deposited in the seafloor and the deposits are estimated to exceed those of natural gas. Understanding the physical proprieties, such as the temperature dependence of the crystal structure, helps to specify the optimum environmental temperature and pressure during drilling, transport, and storage of methane hydrate. Clathrate hydrates consisted of encaging atomic and/or molecular species as a guest and host water formed by a hydrogen bonding. Although many studies on the clathrate hydrate including methane hydrate were reported, no detailed crystallographic property has yet been cleared. We focused on the motion of methane in the clathrate hydrate by the neutron diffraction. The crystal structure of the methane hydrate was analyzed by the applying the combination of the Rietveld refinement and the maximum entropy method (MEM) to neutron powder diffraction. Temperature dependence of the scattering-length density distribution maps revealed that the motion of methane molecules differs between the shapes of dodecahedron and tetrakaidecahedron. (author)

  8. Electrochemical stability of ionic clathrate hydrates and their structural consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Wonhee; Lim, Dongwook; Lee, Huen

    2013-01-01

    Although electrochemical stability is an essential factor in relation to the potential applications of ionic clathrate hydrates to solid electrolytes, most studies regarding the proton conductors have focused on their ionic conductivity and thermal stability. Solid electrolytes in various electrochemical devices have to endure the applied potentials; thus, we examined the linear sweep voltammograms of various tetraalkylammonium hydroxide hydrates in order to shed light on the trend of electrochemical stability depending on the hydrate structure. We revealed that the electrochemical stability of Me 4 NOH hydrates is mainly affected by both their ionic concentration and cage occupancy. In particular, the true clathrate structures of β-Me 4 NOH hydrates are more electrochemically stable than their α-forms that possess partially broken hydrogen bonds. We also observed that the binary THF–Pr 4 NOH and pure Bu 4 NOH clathrate hydrates exhibit greater electrochemical stability than those of pure Me 4 NOH hydrates having lower or similar ionic concentrations. These results are considered to arise from the fact that each of the Pr 4 N + and Bu 4 N + ions occupies an extended space comprising four cages, which leads to stabilization of the larger unit, whereas a Me 4 N + ion is completely included only in one cage

  9. Structural and hydration properties of amorphous tricalcium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, K.; Fukunaga, T.; Shiraishi, Y.; Iwase, K.; Xu, Q.; Oishi, K.; Yatsuyanagi, K.; Yonemura, M.; Itoh, K.; Sugiyama, M.; Ishigaki, T.; Kamiyama, T.; Kawai, M.

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical milling was carried out to synthesize amorphous tricalcium silicate (Ca 3 SiO 5 ) sample, where Ca 3 SiO 5 is the most principal component of Portland cement. The partial phase transformation from the crystalline to the amorphous state was observed by X-ray and neutron diffractions. Moreover, it was found that the structural distortion on the Ca-O correlation exists in the milled Ca 3 SiO 5 . The hydration of the milled Ca 3 SiO 5 with D 2 O proceeds as follows: the formation of hydration products such as Ca(OD) 2 rapidly occurs in the early hydration stage, and then proceeds slowly after about 15 h. The induction time for the hydration of the milled Ca 3 SiO 5 is approximately one half shorter than that for the hydration of the unmilled one. This result means that the mechanical milling brings about the chemical activity of Ca 3 SiO 5 for hydration, and may be particularly useful for increasing the reactivity in the early hydration stage

  10. Structural Interpretation of the Large Slowdown of Water Dynamics at Stacked Phospholipid Membranes for Decreasing Hydration Level: All-Atom Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles Calero

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydration water determines the stability and function of phospholipid membranes as well as the interaction of membranes with other molecules. Experiments and simulations have shown that water dynamics slows down dramatically as the hydration decreases, suggesting that the interfacial water that dominates the average dynamics at low hydration is slower than water away from the membrane. Here, based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we provide an interpretation of the slowdown of interfacial water in terms of the structure and dynamics of water–water and water–lipid hydrogen bonds (HBs. We calculate the rotational and translational slowdown of the dynamics of water confined in stacked phospholipid membranes at different levels of hydration, from completely hydrated to poorly hydrated membranes. For all hydrations, we analyze the distribution of HBs and find that water–lipids HBs last longer than water–water HBs and that at low hydration most of the water is in the interior of the membrane. We also show that water–water HBs become more persistent as the hydration is lowered. We attribute this effect (i to HBs between water molecules that form, in turn, persistent HBs with lipids; (ii to the hindering of the H-bonding switching between water molecules due to the lower water density at the interface; and (iii to the higher probability of water–lipid HBs as the hydration decreases. Our interpretation of the large dynamic slowdown in water under dehydration is potentially relevant in understanding membrane biophysics at different hydration levels.

  11. Orientation determination of interfacial beta-sheet structures in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khoi Tan; King, John Thomas; Chen, Zhan

    2010-07-01

    Structural information such as orientations of interfacial proteins and peptides is important for understanding properties and functions of such biological molecules, which play crucial roles in biological applications and processes such as antimicrobial selectivity, membrane protein activity, biocompatibility, and biosensing performance. The alpha-helical and beta-sheet structures are the most widely encountered secondary structures in peptides and proteins. In this paper, for the first time, a method to quantify the orientation of the interfacial beta-sheet structure using a combined attenuated total reflectance Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopic (ATR-FTIR) and sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopic study was developed. As an illustration of the methodology, the orientation of tachyplesin I, a 17 amino acid peptide with an antiparallel beta-sheet, adsorbed to polymer surfaces as well as associated with a lipid bilayer was determined using the regular and chiral SFG spectra, together with polarized ATR-FTIR amide I signals. Both the tilt angle (theta) and the twist angle (psi) of the beta-sheet at interfaces are determined. The developed method in this paper can be used to obtain in situ structural information of beta-sheet components in complex molecules. The combination of this method and the existing methodology that is currently used to investigate alpha-helical structures will greatly broaden the application of optical spectroscopy in physical chemistry, biochemistry, biophysics, and structural biology.

  12. Interfacial Energy and Fine Defect Structures for Incoherent Films

    OpenAIRE

    Cermelli, Paolo; Gurtin, Morton E.; Leoni, Giovanni

    1999-01-01

    This note summarizes recent results in which modern techniques of the calculus of variations are used to obtain qualitative features of film-substrate interfaces for a broad class of interfacial energies. In particular, we show that the existence of a critical thickness for incoherency and the formation of interfacial dislocations depend strongly on the convexity and smoothness of the interfacial energy function.

  13. Interfacial ionic 'liquids': connecting static and dynamic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Ahmet; Zhou, Hua; Feng, Guang; Lee, Sang Soo; Li, Song; Cummings, Peter T; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Dai, Sheng; McDonough, John K; Gogotsi, Yury; Fenter, Paul

    2015-01-28

    It is well known that room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) often adopt a charge-separated layered structure, i.e. with alternating cation- and anion-rich layers, at electrified interfaces. However, the dynamic response of the layered structure to temporal variations in applied potential is not well understood. We used in situ, real-time x-ray reflectivity to study the potential-dependent electric double layer (EDL) structure of an imidazolium-based RTIL on charged epitaxial graphene during potential cycling as a function of temperature. The results suggest that the graphene-RTIL interfacial structure is bistable in which the EDL structure at any intermediate potential can be described by the combination of two extreme-potential structures whose proportions vary depending on the polarity and magnitude of the applied potential. This picture is supported by the EDL structures obtained by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations at various static potentials. The potential-driven transition between the two structures is characterized by an increasing width but with an approximately fixed hysteresis magnitude as a function of temperature. The results are consistent with the coexistence of distinct anion- and cation-adsorbed structures separated by an energy barrier (∼0.15 eV).

  14. Interfacial structure of soft matter probed by SFG spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shen; Tong, Yujin; Ge, Aimin; Qiao, Lin; Davies, Paul B

    2014-10-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, an interface-specific technique in contrast to, for example, attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy, which is only interface sensitive, has been employed to investigate the surface and interface structure of soft matter on a molecular scale. The experimental arrangement required to carry out SFG spectroscopy, with particular reference to soft matter, and the analytical methods developed to interpret the spectra are described. The elucidation of the interfacial structure of soft matter systems is an essential prerequisite in order to understand and eventually control the surface properties of these important functional materials. Copyright © 2014 The Chemical Society of Japan and Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Interfacial structures and area transport in upward and downward two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paranjape, S. S.; Kim, S.; Ishii, M.; Kelly, J.

    2003-01-01

    An experimental study has been carried out for upward and downward two-phase flow to study local interfacial structures and interfacial area transport. The flow studied, is an adiabatic, air-water, co-current, two-phase flow, in 25.4 mm and 50.8 mm ID test sections. Flow regime map is obtained using the characteristic signals obtained from an impedance void meter, employing neural network based identification methodology. A four sensor conductivity probe is used to measure the local two phase flow parameters, in bubbly flow regime. The local profiles of these parameters as well as their axial development reveal the nature of the interfacial structures and the bubble interaction mechanisms occurring in the flow. Furthermore, this study provides a good database for the development of the interfacial area transport equation, which dynamically models the changes in the interfacial area along a flow field. An interfacial area transport equation is used for downward flow based on that developed for the upward flow, with certain modifications in the bubble interaction terms. The area averaged values of the interfacial area concentration are compared with those predicted by the interfacial area transport model. The differences in the interfacial structures and interfacial area transport in co-current downward and upward two-phase flows are studied

  16. Hydrate phase equilibrium and structure for (methane + ethane + tetrahydrofuran + water) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Changyu; Chen Guangjin; Zhang Lingwei

    2010-01-01

    The separation of methane and ethane through forming hydrate is a possible choice in natural gas, oil processing, or ethylene producing. The hydrate formation conditions of five groups of (methane + ethane) binary gas mixtures in the presence of 0.06 mole fraction tetrahydrofuran (THF) in water were obtained at temperatures ranging from (277.7 to 288.2) K. In most cases, the presence of THF in water can lower the hydrate formation pressure of (methane + ethane) remarkably. However, when the composition of ethane is as high as 0.832, it is more difficult to form hydrate than without THF system. Phase equilibrium model for hydrates containing THF was developed based on a two-step hydrate formation mechanism. The structure of hydrates formed from (methane + ethane + THF + water) system was also determined by Raman spectroscopy. When THF concentration in initial aqueous solution was only 0.06 mole fraction, the coexistence of structure I hydrate dominated by ethane and structure II hydrate dominated by THF in the hydrate sample was clearly demonstrated by Raman spectroscopic data. On the contrary, only structure II hydrate existed in the hydrate sample formed from (methane + ethane + THF + water) system when THF concentration in initial aqueous solution was increased to 0.10 mole fraction. It indicated that higher THF concentration inhibited the formation of structure I hydrate dominated by ethane and therefore lowered the trapping of ethane in hydrate. It implies a very promising method to increase the separation efficiency of methane and ethane.

  17. Changes in structure and preferential cage occupancy of ethane hydrate and ethane-methane mixed gas hydrate under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, H; Takahara, N; Kawamura, T; Yamamoto, Y; Yagi, T

    2010-01-01

    Structural changes and preferential cage occupancies were examined for ethane hydrate and ethane-methane mixed gas hydrates with five compositions in a pressure range of 0.2 to 2.8 GPa at room temperature. X-ray diffractometry and Raman spectroscopy showed the following structural changes. The initial structure, structure I (sI), of ethane hydrate was retained up to 2.1 GPa without any structural change. For the mixed hydrates, sI was widely distributed throughout the region examined except for the methane-rich and lower pressure regions, where sII and sH appeared. Above 2.1 GPa ethane hydrate and all of the mixed hydrates decomposed into ice VI and ethane fluid or methane-ethane fluid, respectively. The Raman study revealed that occupation of the small cages by ethane molecules occurred above 0.1 GPa in ethane hydrate and continued up to decomposition at 2.1 GPa, although it was thought that ethane molecules were contained only in the large cage.

  18. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermannová, Lada, E-mail: lada.biedermannova@ibt.cas.cz; Schneider, Bohdan [Institute of Biotechnology CAS, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-27

    The hydration of protein crystal structures was studied at the level of individual amino acids. The dependence of the number of water molecules and their preferred spatial localization on various parameters, such as solvent accessibility, secondary structure and side-chain conformation, was determined. Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon–donor hydrogen bonds, OH–π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations.

  19. Accurate determination of interfacial protein secondary structure by combining interfacial-sensitive amide I and amide III spectral signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shuji; Li, Hongchun; Yang, Weilai; Luo, Yi

    2014-01-29

    Accurate determination of protein structures at the interface is essential to understand the nature of interfacial protein interactions, but it can only be done with a few, very limited experimental methods. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy can unambiguously differentiate the interfacial protein secondary structures by combining surface-sensitive amide I and amide III spectral signals. This combination offers a powerful tool to directly distinguish random-coil (disordered) and α-helical structures in proteins. From a systematic study on the interactions between several antimicrobial peptides (including LKα14, mastoparan X, cecropin P1, melittin, and pardaxin) and lipid bilayers, it is found that the spectral profiles of the random-coil and α-helical structures are well separated in the amide III spectra, appearing below and above 1260 cm(-1), respectively. For the peptides with a straight backbone chain, the strength ratio for the peaks of the random-coil and α-helical structures shows a distinct linear relationship with the fraction of the disordered structure deduced from independent NMR experiments reported in the literature. It is revealed that increasing the fraction of negatively charged lipids can induce a conformational change of pardaxin from random-coil to α-helical structures. This experimental protocol can be employed for determining the interfacial protein secondary structures and dynamics in situ and in real time without extraneous labels.

  20. Inhibition of Methane Hydrate Formation by Ice-Structuring Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Ramløv, Hans; Thomsen, Kaj

    2010-01-01

    , assumed biodegradable, are capable of inhibiting the growth of methane hydrate (a structure I hydrate). The ISPs investigated were type III HPLC12 (originally identified in ocean pout) and ISP type III found in meal worm (Tenebrio molitor). These were compared to polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) a well...... of inhibitors. The profile of the nonlinear growth was concentration-dependent but also dependent on the stirring rate. ISP type III HPLC12 decreased the growth rate of methane hydrate during the linear growth period by 17−75% at concentrations of 0.01−0.1 wt % (0.014−0.14 mM) while ISP from Tenebrio molitor...... and PVP decreased the growth rate by 30% and 39% at concentrations of 0.004 wt % (0.005 mM) and 0.1 wt % (0.1 mM), respectively. Considering the low concentration of Tenebrio molitor ISP used, these results indicate that ISP from Tenebrio molitor is the most effective hydrate inhibitor among those...

  1. High-Pressure Treatment of Non-Hydrated Flour Affects Structural Characteristics and Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Jakobi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, high-pressure treatment (HPT has become an established process concerning the preservation of food. However, studies dealing with the structural, and consequently functional modification of non-hydrated starchy matrices (moisture content ≤ 15% by HPT are missing. To close this knowledge gap, pressure (0–600 MPa, 10 min and pressurization time depending (0–20 min, 450 MPa alterations of wheat flour were investigated. Pressure rise from 0 to 600 MPa or pressurization time rise from 0 to 20 min resulted in a decline of amylopectin content from 68.3 ± 2.0% to 59.7 ± 1.5% (linearly, R2 = 0.83 and 59.6 ± 0.7% (sigmoidal, respectively. Thereby, detectable total amount of starch decreased from 77.7 ± 0.8% linearly to 67.6 ± 1.7%, and sigmoidal, to 69.4 ± 0.4%, respectively. Increase in pressure caused a linear decrease in gelatinization enthalpy of 33.2 ± 5.6%, and linear increase in hydration properties by 11.0 ± 0.6%. The study revealed structural and technological relevant alterations of starch-based food matrices with low moisture content by HPT, which must be taken into consideration during processing and preservation of food.

  2. Structural changes and intermolecular interactions of filled ice Ic structure for hydrogen hydrate under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, S; Hirai, H; Kawamura, T; Yamamoto, Y; Yagi, T

    2010-01-01

    High-pressure experiments of hydrogen hydrate were performed using a diamond anvil cell under conditions of 0.1-44.2 GPa and at room temperature. Also, high pressure Raman studies of solid hydrogen were performed in the pressure range of 0.1-43.7 GPa. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) for hydrogen hydrate revealed that a known high-pressure structure, filled ice Ic structure, of hydrogen hydrate transformed to a new high-pressure structure at approximately 35-40 GPa. A comparison of the Raman spectroscopy of a vibron for hydrogen molecules between hydrogen hydrate and solid hydrogen revealed that the extraction of hydrogen molecules from hydrogen hydrate occurred above 20 GPa. Also, the Raman spectra of a roton revealed that the rotation of hydrogen molecules in hydrogen hydrate was suppressed at around 20 GPa and that the rotation recovered under higher pressure. These results indicated that remarkable intermolecular interactions in hydrogen hydrate between neighboring hydrogen molecules and between guest hydrogen molecules and host water molecules might occur. These intermolecular interactions could produce the stability of hydrogen hydrate.

  3. Uranyl oxalate hydrates: structures and IR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giesting, P.A.; Porter, N.J.; Burns, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    The novel compound (UO 2 ) 2 C 2 O 4 (OH) 2 (H 2 O) 2 (UrOx2A) and the previously studied compound UO 2 C 2 O 4 (H 2 O) 3 (UrOx3) have been synthesized by mild hydrothermal methods. Single crystal diffraction data collected at 125 K using MoK α radiation and a CCD-based area detector were used to solve and refine the crystal structures by full-matrix least-squares techniques to agreement indices (UrOx2A, UrOx3) wR 2 = 0.037, 0.049 for all data, and R1 0.015, 0.024 calculated for 1285, 2194 unique reflections respectively. The compound UrOx2A is triclinic, space group P1, Z = 1, a = 5.5353(4), b 6.0866(4), c = 7.7686(6) Aa, α = 85.6410(10) , β = 89.7740(10) , γ = 82.5090(10) , V = 258.74(3) Aa 3 . The compound UrOx3 is monoclinic, space group P2 1 /c, Z = 4, a = 5.5921(4), b = 16.9931(13), c = 9.3594(7) Aa, β = 99.5330(10) , V = 877.11(11) Aa 3 . The structures consist of chains of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids connected by oxalate groups and, in UrOx2A, hydroxyl groups; UrOx2A is also notable for its high (2:1) ratio of uranyl to oxalate groups, higher than any observed in other published structures of uranyl oxalates. The structure determined for UrOx3, previously studied by Jayadevan and Chackraburtty (1972); Mikhailov et al. (1999) is in agreement with the previous results; however, the increased precision of the present low-temperature structure refinement allows for the assignment of H atom positions based on the difference Fourier map of electron density. The infrared spectra of these two materials collected at room temperature are also presented and compared with previous work on uranyl oxalate systems. (orig.)

  4. Analysis of Decomposition for Structure I Methane Hydrate by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Na; Sun, Wan-Tong; Meng, Ying-Feng; Liu, An-Qi; Zhou, Shou-Wei; Guo, Ping; Fu, Qiang; Lv, Xin

    2018-05-01

    Under multi-nodes of temperatures and pressures, microscopic decomposition mechanisms of structure I methane hydrate in contact with bulk water molecules have been studied through LAMMPS software by molecular dynamics simulation. Simulation system consists of 482 methane molecules in hydrate and 3027 randomly distributed bulk water molecules. Through analyses of simulation results, decomposition number of hydrate cages, density of methane molecules, radial distribution function for oxygen atoms, mean square displacement and coefficient of diffusion of methane molecules have been studied. A significant result shows that structure I methane hydrate decomposes from hydrate-bulk water interface to hydrate interior. As temperature rises and pressure drops, the stabilization of hydrate will weaken, decomposition extent will go deep, and mean square displacement and coefficient of diffusion of methane molecules will increase. The studies can provide important meanings for the microscopic decomposition mechanisms analyses of methane hydrate.

  5. Interfacial compatibility of polymer-based structures in electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Turunen, Markus P. K.

    2004-01-01

    Interfacial compatibility of dissimilar materials was investigated to achieve a better understanding of interfacial adhesion in metal/polymer/metal systems. Surface modifications of polymers were applied to improve the adhesion. The modified surfaces were characterised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements accompanied by surface free energy evaluations. The pull-off test was employed to asses...

  6. Interfacial crystalline structures in injection over-molded polypropylene and bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bowen; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Genjie; Guo, Shaoyun; Huang, Jian

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes interfacial crystalline structures found in injection overmolded polypropylene components and the relationship of these structures to bond strength between the components. The combined effects of the development of hierarchical gradient structures and the particular thermomechanical environment near the interface on the interfacial crystalline structures were investigated in detail by PLM, SEM, DSC, WAXD, and infrared dichroism spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that during molding there was competitive formation of interfacial crystalline structures consisted of "shish-kebab" layer (SKL) and a transcrystalline layers (TCL). Variation in shear stress (controlled by injection pressure and injection speed) plays an important role in the formation of the SKL. The formation of TCL is influenced by the thermal environment, namely melt temperature and mold temperature. Increasing within certain limits, interfacial temperature and the thermal gradient near the interface promotes β-iPP growth. The relationship between interfacial crystalline structures and interfacial bond strength was established by lap shear measurement. The interfacial bond strength is improved by enhancing the formation of TCL, but reduced if SKL predominates.

  7. Insights into the role of protein molecule size and structure on interfacial properties using designed sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Mirjana Dimitrijev; He, Lizhong; James, Michael; Nelson, Andrew; Middelberg, Anton P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Mixtures of a large, structured protein with a smaller, unstructured component are inherently complex and hard to characterize at interfaces, leading to difficulties in understanding their interfacial behaviours and, therefore, formulation optimization. Here, we investigated interfacial properties of such a mixed system. Simplicity was achieved using designed sequences in which chemical differences had been eliminated to isolate the effect of molecular size and structure, namely a short unstructured peptide (DAMP1) and its longer structured protein concatamer (DAMP4). Interfacial tension measurements suggested that the size and bulk structuring of the larger molecule led to much slower adsorption kinetics. Neutron reflectometry at equilibrium revealed that both molecules adsorbed as a monolayer to the air–water interface (indicating unfolding of DAMP4 to give a chain of four connected DAMP1 molecules), with a concentration ratio equal to that in the bulk. This suggests the overall free energy of adsorption is equal despite differences in size and bulk structure. At small interfacial extensional strains, only molecule packing influenced the stress response. At larger strains, the effect of size became apparent, with DAMP4 registering a higher stress response and interfacial elasticity. When both components were present at the interface, most stress-dissipating movement was achieved by DAMP1. This work thus provides insights into the role of proteins' molecular size and structure on their interfacial properties, and the designed sequences introduced here can serve as effective tools for interfacial studies of proteins and polymers. PMID:23303222

  8. Effect of Concentration on the Interfacial and Bulk Structure of Ionic Liquids in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, H-W; Weiss, H; Stock, P; Chen, Y-J; Reinecke, C R; Dienemann, J-N; Mezger, M; Valtiner, M

    2018-02-27

    Bio and aqueous applications of ionic liquids (IL) such as catalysis in micelles formed in aqueous IL solutions or extraction of chemicals from biologic materials rely on surface-active and self-assembly properties of ILs. Here, we discuss qualitative relations of the interfacial and bulk structuring of a water-soluble surface-active IL ([C 8 MIm][Cl]) on chemically controlled surfaces over a wide range of water concentrations using both force probe and X-ray scattering experiments. Our data indicate that IL structuring evolves from surfactant-like surface adsorption at low IL concentrations, to micellar bulk structure adsorption above the critical micelle concentration, to planar bilayer formation in ILs with Interfacial structuring is controlled by mesoscopic bulk structuring at high water concentrations. Surface chemistry and surface charges decisively steer interfacial ordering of ions if the water concentration is low and/or the surface charge is high. We also demonstrate that controlling the interfacial forces by using self-assembled monolayer chemistry allows tuning of interfacial structures. Both the ratio of the head group size to the hydrophobic tail volume as well as the surface charging trigger the bulk structure and offer a tool for predicting interfacial structures. Based on the applied techniques and analyses, a qualitative prediction of molecular layering of ILs in aqueous systems is possible.

  9. Interpreting Interfacial Structure in Cross-Sectional STM Images of III-V Semiconductor Heterostructures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nosho, B. Z; Barvosa-Carter, W; Yang, M. J; Bennett, B. R; Whitman, L. J

    2000-01-01

    ...) can be used for the study of III-V heterostructure interfaces. The interpretation of interfacial structure in XSTM images is impeded by the fact that only every other III or V plane as grown on the (001...

  10. Water's Interfacial Hydrogen Bonding Structure Reveals the Effective Strength of Surface-Water Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sucheol; Willard, Adam P

    2018-06-05

    We combine all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with a mean field model of interfacial hydrogen bonding to analyze the effect of surface-water interactions on the structural and energetic properties of the liquid water interface. We show that the molecular structure of water at a weakly interacting ( i.e., hydrophobic) surface is resistant to change unless the strength of surface-water interactions are above a certain threshold. We find that below this threshold water's interfacial structure is homogeneous and insensitive to the details of the disordered surface, however, above this threshold water's interfacial structure is heterogeneous. Despite this heterogeneity, we demonstrate that the equilibrium distribution of molecular orientations can be used to quantify the energetic component of the surface-water interactions that contribute specifically to modifying the interfacial hydrogen bonding network. We identify this specific energetic component as a new measure of hydrophilicity, which we refer to as the intrinsic hydropathy.

  11. Interpretation of interfacial structures in X-ray multilayers by TEM Fresnel fringe effects

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Tai D.; O'Keefe, Michael A.; Kilaas, Roar; Gronsky, Ronald; Kortright, Jeffrey B.

    1991-01-01

    Assessment of interfacial structures from high-resolution TEM images of cross-sectional specimens is difficult due to Fresnel fringe effects producing different apparent structures in the images. The effects of these fringes have been commonly over-looked in efforts of making quantitative interpretation of interfacial profiles. In this report, we present the observations of the Fresnel fringes in nanometer period Mo/Si, W/C, and WC/C multilayers in through-focus-series TEM images. Calculation...

  12. Diffuse x-ray scattering study of interfacial structure of self-assembled conjugated polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jun; Park, Y.J.; Lee, K.-B.; Hong, H.; Davidov, D.

    2002-01-01

    The interfacial structures of self-assembled heterostructures through alternate deposition of conjugated and nonconjugated polymers were studied by x-ray reflectivity and nonspecular scattering. We found that the interfacial width including the effects of both interdiffusion and interfacial roughness (correlated) was mainly contributed by the latter one. The self-assembled deposition induced very small interdiffusion between layers. The lateral correlation length ξ parallel grew as a function of deposition time (or film thickness) described by a power law ξ parallel ∝t β/H and was also observed from the off-specular scattering

  13. Interfacial structure of V2AlC thin films deposited on (112-bar 0)-sapphire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigumonrong, Darwin P.; Zhang, Jie; Zhou, Yanchun; Music, Denis; Emmerlich, Jens; Mayer, Joachim; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2011-01-01

    Local epitaxy between V 2 AlC and sapphire without intentionally or spontaneously formed seed layers was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Our ab initio calculations suggest that the most stable interfacial structure is characterized by the stacking sequence ...C-V-Al-V//O-Al..., exhibiting the largest work of separation for the configurations studied and hence strong interfacial bonding. It is proposed that a small misfit accompanied by strong interfacial bonding enable the local epitaxial growth of V 2 AlC on (112-bar 0)-sapphire.

  14. Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy for Structure-II Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeya, Kei; Zhang, Caihong; Kawayama, Iwao

    2009-01-01

    For the nondestructive inspection of gas hydrates, terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) was applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate and propane hydrate. The absorption of propane hydrate monotonically increases with frequency, similar to the case of ice, while THF hydrate has...... a characteristic broad absorption peak at 0.5 THz corresponding to the dipole moment of THF molecules. The refractive indices of THF and propane hydrates are 1.725 and 1.775 at 1 THz, respectively, and show a slight but clear difference from the refractive index of ice (1.79). THz-TDS is a potentially useful...... technique for the ondestructive inspection of gas hydrates. # 2009 The Japan Society of Applied Physics...

  15. Engineering Pt/Pd Interfacial Electronic Structures for Highly Efficient Hydrogen Evolution and Alcohol Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jinchang; Qi, Kun; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Haiyan; Yu, Shansheng; Cui, Xiaoqiang

    2017-05-31

    Tailoring the interfacial structure of Pt-based catalysts has emerged as an effective strategy to improve catalytic activity. However, little attention has been focused on investigating the relationship between the interfacial facets and their catalytic activity. Here, we design and implement Pd-Pt interfaces with controlled heterostructure features by epitaxially growing Pt nanoparticles on Pd nanosheets. On the basis of both density functional theory calculation and experimental results, we demonstrate that charge transfer from Pd to Pt is highly dependent on the interfacial facets of Pd substrates. Therefore, the Pd-Pt heterostructure with Pd(100)-Pt interface exhibits excellent activity and long-term stability for hydrogen evolution and methanol/ethanol oxidation reactions in alkaline medium, much better than that with Pd (111)-Pt interface or commercial Pt/C. Interfacial crystal facet-dependent electronic structural modulation sheds a light on the design and investigation of new heterostructures for high-activity catalysts.

  16. Coupling of order parameters, chirality, and interfacial structures in multiferroic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Sergio; Müller, Stefan; Poliakovsky, Arkady; Salje, Ekhard K H

    2011-04-13

    We study optimal interfacial structures in multiferroic materials with a biquadratic coupling between two order parameters. We discover a new duality relation between the strong coupling and the weak coupling regime for the case of isotropic gradient terms. We analyze the phase diagram depending on the coupling constant and anisotropy of the gradient term, and show that in a certain regime the secondary order parameter becomes activated only in the interfacial region.

  17. The structural response of the cornea to changes in stromal hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Sally; White, Tomas; Boote, Craig; Kamma-Lorger, Christina S; Bell, James; Sorenson, Thomas; Terrill, Nick; Shebanova, Olga; Meek, Keith M

    2017-06-01

    The primary aim of this study was to quantify the relationship between corneal structure and hydration in humans and pigs. X-ray scattering data were collected from human and porcine corneas equilibrated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to varying levels of hydration, to obtain measurements of collagen fibril diameter, interfibrillar spacing (IFS) and intermolecular spacing. Both species showed a strong positive linear correlation between hydration and IFS 2 and a nonlinear, bi-phasic relationship between hydration and fibril diameter, whereby fibril diameter increased up to approximately physiological hydration, H = 3.0, with little change thereafter. Above H = 3.0, porcine corneas exhibited a larger fibril diameter than human corneas ( p < 0.001). Intermolecular spacing also varied with hydration in a bi-phasic manner but reached a maximum value at a lower hydration ( H = 1.5) than fibril diameter. Human corneas displayed a higher intermolecular spacing than porcine corneas at all hydrations ( p < 0.0001). Human and porcine corneas required a similar PEG concentration to reach physiological hydration, suggesting that the total fixed charge that gives rise to the swelling pressure is the same. The difference in their structural responses to hydration can be explained by variations in molecular cross-linking and intra/interfibrillar water partitioning. © 2017 The Authors.

  18. Chloral hydrate complexing with heteropolyanions of diverse structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimov, G.M.; Timofeeva, M.N.; Likholobov, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    Interaction between chloral hydrate and tetrabutylammonium salts of heteropolyacids (HPA) of five structural types: Keggin's (H 3 PW 12 O 40 , H 3 PMo 12 O 40 , H 4 SiW 12 O 40 ), Dowson's (α-H 6 P 2 W 18 O 62 , α-H 6 P 2 Mo 18 O 62 , α-H 4 S 2 Mo 18 O 62 ), H 6 P 2 W 21 O 71 (H 2 O) 3 , H 6 As 2 W 21 O 69 (H 2 O) and H 21 B 3 W 39 O 132 was studied by the method 1 H NMR in deuteronitrobenzene solution. It was ascertained that the surface of HPA anions is heterogeneous in reference to acid-base properties. Dependence general for all HPA was found: decrease in specific charge of anion (per one atom of W or Mo) gives rise to increase in HPA acidity [ru

  19. Interfacial Mechanism in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries: How Salts Mediate the Structure Evolution and Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Shuang-Yan; Xiao, Rui-Juan; Gu, Lin; Guo, Yu-Guo; Wen, Rui; Wan, Li-Jun

    2018-06-08

    Lithium-sulfur batteries possess favorable potential for energy-storage applications due to their high specific capacity and the low cost of sulfur. Intensive understanding of the interfacial mechanism, especially the polysulfide formation and transformation under complex electrochemical environment, is crucial for the build-up of advanced batteries. Here we report the direct visualization of interfacial evolution and dynamic transformation of the sulfides mediated by the lithium salts via real-time atomic force microscopy monitoring inside a working battery. The observations indicate that the lithium salts influence the structures and processes of sulfide deposition/decomposition during discharge/charge. Moreover, the distinct ion interaction and diffusion in electrolytes manipulate the interfacial reactions determining the kinetics of the sulfide transformation. Our findings provide deep insights into surface dynamics of lithium-sulfur reactions revealing the salt-mediated mechanisms at nanoscale, which contribute to the profound understanding of the interfacial processes for the optimized design of lithium-sulfur batteries.

  20. Molecular simulations of hydrated proton exchange membranes. The structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcharnd, Gabriel [Duisburg-Essen Univ., Essen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Chemie; Bordeaux Univ., Talence (France). Dept. of Chemistry; Bopp, Philippe A. [Bordeaux Univ., Talence (France). Dept. of Chemistry; Spohr, Eckhard [Duisburg-Essen Univ., Essen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Chemie

    2013-01-15

    The structure of two hydrated proton exchange membranes for fuel cells (PEMFC), Nafion {sup registered} (Dupont) and Hyflon {sup registered} (Solvay), is studied by all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Since the characteristic times of these systems are long compared to the times for which they can be simulated, several different, but equivalent, initial configurations with a large degree of randomness are generated for different water contents and then equilibrated and simulated in parallel. A more constrained structure, analog to the newest model proposed in the literature based on scattering experiments, is investigated in the same way. One might speculate that a limited degree of entanglement of the polymer chains is a key feature of the structures showing the best agreement with experiment. Nevertheless, the overall conclusion remains that the scattering experiments cannot distinguish between the several, in our view equally plausible, structural models. We thus find that the characteristic features of experimental scattering curves are, after equilibration, fairly well reproduced by all systems prepared with our method. We thus study in more detail some structural details. We attempt to characterize the spatial and size distribution of the water rich domains, which is where the proton diffusion mostly takes place, using several clustering algorithms. (orig.)

  1. Interfacial structures in confined cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xiaodong; Kim, Seungjin; Cheng Ling; Ishii, Mamoru; Beus, Stephen G.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to study and model the interfacial structure development of air-water two-phase flow in a confined flow passage. Experiments of a total of 13 flow conditions in cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flow regimes are carried out in a vertical air-water upward two-phase flow experimental loop with a test section of 200 mm in width and 10 mm in gap. Miniaturized four-sensor conductivity probes are used to measure local two-phase parameters at three different elevations for each flow condition. Bubble characteristics captured by the probes are categorized into two groups in view of the two-group interfacial area transport equation, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as Group 1 and cap/churn-turbulent bubbles as Group 2. The acquired local parameters are time-averaged void fraction, interfacial velocity, bubble number frequency, interfacial area concentration, and bubble Sauter mean diameter for each group of bubbles. Also, the line-averaged and area-averaged data are presented and discussed in detail. The comparisons of these parameters at different elevations demonstrate the development of interfacial structures along the flow direction due to bubble interactions and the hydrodynamic effects. Furthermore, these data can serve as one part of the experimental data for investigation of the interfacial area transport in a confined two-phase flow

  2. Structural transformations of sVI tert-butylamine hydrates to sII binary hydrates with methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Pinnelli S R; Sugahara, Takeshi; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2009-10-22

    Binary clathrate hydrates with methane (CH(4), 4.36 A) and tert-butylamine (t-BuNH(2), 6.72 A) as guest molecules were synthesized at different molar concentrations of t-BuNH(2) (1.00-9.31 mol %) with methane at 7.0 MPa and 250 K, and were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and Raman microscopy. A structural transformation from sVI to sII of t-BuNH(2) hydrate was clearly observed on pressurizing with methane. The PXRD showed sII signatures and the remnant sVI signatures were insignificant, implying the metastable nature of sVI binary hydrates. Raman spectroscopic data on these binary hydrates suggest that the methane molecules occupy the small cages and vacant large cages. The methane storage capacity in this system was nearly doubled to approximately 6.86 wt % for 5.56 mol % > t-BuNH(2) > 1.0 mol %.

  3. Manipulating interfacial polymer structures through mixed surfactant adsorption and complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattoz, Beatrice; de Vos, Wiebe M; Cosgrove, Terence; Crossman, Martin; Prescott, Stuart W

    2012-04-17

    The effects of a nonionic alcohol ethoxylate surfactant, C(13)E(7), on the interactions between PVP and SDS both in the bulk and at the silica nanoparticle interface are studied by photon correlation spectroscopy, solvent relaxation NMR, SANS, and optical reflectometry. Our results confirmed that, in the absence of SDS, C(13)E(7) and PVP are noninteracting, while SDS interacts strongly both with PVP and C(13)E(7) . Studying interfacial interactions showed that the interfacial interactions of PVP with silica can be manipulated by varying the amounts of SDS and C(13)E(7) present. Upon SDS addition, the adsorbed layer thickness of PVP on silica increases due to Coulombic repulsion between micelles in the polymer layer. When C(13)E(7) is progressively added to the system, it forms mixed micelles with the complexed SDS, reducing the total charge per micelle and thus reducing the repulsion between micelle and the silica surface that would otherwise cause the PVP to desorb. This causes the amount of adsorbed polymer to increase with C(13)E(7) addition for the systems containing SDS, demonstrating that addition of C(13)E(7) hinders the SDS-mediated desorption of an adsorbed PVP layer. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  4. Ordered patterns and structures via interfacial self-assembly: superlattices, honeycomb structures and coffee rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongmin; Hao, Jingcheng

    2011-11-01

    Self-assembly is now being intensively studied in chemistry, physics, biology, and materials engineering and has become an important "bottom-up" approach to create intriguing structures for different applications. Self-assembly is not only a practical approach for creating a variety of nanostructures, but also shows great superiority in building hierarchical structures with orders on different length scales. The early work in self-assembly focused on molecular self-assembly in bulk solution, including the resultant dye aggregates, liposomes, vesicles, liquid crystals, gels and so on. Interfacial self-assembly has been a great concern over the last two decades, largely because of the unique and ingenious roles of this method for constructing materials at interfaces, such as self-assembled monolayers, Langmuir-Blodgett films, and capsules. Nanocrystal superlattices, honeycomb films and coffee rings are intriguing structural materials with more complex features and can be prepared by interfacial self-assembly on different length scales. In this critical review, we outline the recent development in the preparation and application of colloidal nanocrystal superlattices, honeycomb-patterned macroporous structures by the breath figure method, and coffee-ring-like patterns (247 references). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  5. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Biedermannová, Lada; Schneider, Bohdan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 11 (2015), s. 2178-2202 ISSN 1399-0047 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : protein hydration * structural biology * X-ray crystallography Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.674, year: 2014

  6. Long-Range Domain Structure and Symmetry Engineering by Interfacial Oxygen Octahedral Coupling at Heterostructure Interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liao, Zhaoliang; Green, R.J.; Gauquelin, N.; Macke, S.; Li, Lin; Gonnissen, J.; Sutarto, R.; Houwman, Evert Pieter; Zhong, Z.; van Aert, S.; Verbeeck, J.; Sawatzky, G.A.; Huijben, Mark; Koster, Gertjan; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.

    2016-01-01

    In epitaxial thin film systems, the crystal structure and its symmetry deviate from the bulk counterpart due to various mechanisms such as epitaxial strain and interfacial structural coupling, which is accompanyed by a change in their properties. In perovskite materials, the crystal symmetry can be

  7. Molecular Dynamics-based Simulations of Bulk/Interfacial Structures and Diffusion Behaviors in Nuclear Waste Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Jincheng

    2018-03-16

    This NEUP Project aimed to generate accurate atomic structural models of nuclear waste glasses by using large-scale molecular dynamics-based computer simulations and to use these models to investigate self-diffusion behaviors, interfacial structures, and hydrated gel structures formed during dissolution of these glasses. The goal was to obtain realistic and accurate short and medium range structures of these complex oxide glasses, to provide a mechanistic understanding of the dissolution behaviors, and to generate reliable information with predictive power in designing nuclear waste glasses for long-term geological storage. Looking back of the research accomplishments of this project, most of the scientific goals initially proposed have been achieved through intensive research in the three and a half year period of the project. This project has also generated a wealth of scientific data and vibrant discussions with various groups through collaborations within and outside of this project. Throughout the project one book chapter and 14 peer reviewed journal publications have been generated (including one under review) and 16 presentations (including 8 invited talks) have been made to disseminate the results of this project in national and international conference. Furthermore, this project has trained several outstanding graduate students and young researchers for future workforce in nuclear related field, especially on nuclear waste immobilization. One postdoc and four PhD students have been fully or partially supported through the project with intensive training in the field material science and engineering with expertise on glass science and nuclear waste disposal

  8. Hydration characteristics and structure formation of cement pastes containing metakaolin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvorkin Leonid

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Metakaolin (MK is one of the most effective mineral admixtures for cement-based composites. The deposits of kaolin clays are wide-spread in the world. Metakaolin is comparable to silica fume as an active mineral admixture for cement-based composites. In this paper, the rheological and mechanical properties of cement paste containing metakaolin are investigated. The effect of MK is more evident at “tight” hydration conditions within mixtures with low water-cement ratio, provided by application of superplasticizers. The cement is replaced with 0 to 15% metakaolin, and superplasticizer content ranged from 0 to 1.5% by weight of cementitious materials (i.e. cement and metakaolin. An equation is derived to describe the relationship between the metakaolin and superplasticizer content and consistency of pastes. There is a linear dependence between metakalolin content and water demand. Second-degree polynomial describe the influence of superplasticizer content. The application of SP and MK may produce cement-water suspensions with water-retaining capacity at 50-70% higher than control suspensions. The investigation of initial structure forming of cement pastes with SP-MK composite admixture indicates the extension of coagulation structure forming phase comparing to the pastes without additives. Crystallization stage was characterized by more intensive strengthening of the paste with SP-MK admixture comparing to the paste without admixtures and paste with SP. Results on the porosity parameters for hardened cement paste indicate a decrease in the average diameter of pores and refinement of pore structure in the presence of metakaolin. A finer pore structure associated with an increase in strength. X-ray analysis data reveal a growing number of small-crystalline low-alkaline calcium hydrosilicates and reducing portlandite content, when MK dosage increases. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM data confirm, that hardened cement paste containing MK has

  9. Interfacial effect on physical properties of composite media: Interfacial volume fraction with non-spherical hard-core-soft-shell-structured particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenxiang; Duan, Qinglin; Ma, Huaifa; Chen, Wen; Chen, Huisu

    2015-11-02

    Interfaces are known to be crucial in a variety of fields and the interfacial volume fraction dramatically affects physical properties of composite media. However, it is an open problem with great significance how to determine the interfacial property in composite media with inclusions of complex geometry. By the stereological theory and the nearest-surface distribution functions, we first propose a theoretical framework to symmetrically present the interfacial volume fraction. In order to verify the interesting generalization, we simulate three-phase composite media by employing hard-core-soft-shell structures composed of hard mono-/polydisperse non-spherical particles, soft interfaces, and matrix. We numerically derive the interfacial volume fraction by a Monte Carlo integration scheme. With the theoretical and numerical results, we find that the interfacial volume fraction is strongly dependent on the so-called geometric size factor and sphericity characterizing the geometric shape in spite of anisotropic particle types. As a significant interfacial property, the present theoretical contribution can be further drawn into predicting the effective transport properties of composite materials.

  10. Structure from Dynamics: Vibrational Dynamics of Interfacial Water as a Probe of Aqueous Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The structural heterogeneity of water at various interfaces can be revealed by time-resolved sum-frequency generation spectroscopy. The vibrational dynamics of the O–H stretch vibration of interfacial water can reflect structural variations. Specifically, the vibrational lifetime is typically found to increase with increasing frequency of the O–H stretch vibration, which can report on the hydrogen-bonding heterogeneity of water. We compare and contrast vibrational dynamics of water in contact with various surfaces, including vapor, biomolecules, and solid interfaces. The results reveal that variations in the vibrational lifetime with vibrational frequency are very typical, and can frequently be accounted for by the bulk-like heterogeneous response of interfacial water. Specific interfaces exist, however, for which the behavior is less straightforward. These insights into the heterogeneity of interfacial water thus obtained contribute to a better understanding of complex phenomena taking place at aqueous interfaces, such as photocatalytic reactions and protein folding. PMID:29490138

  11. Internal structure and interfacial velocity development for bubbly two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocamustafaogullari, G.; Huang, W.D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental study of the internal structure of air-water flowing horizontally. The double-sensor resistivity probe technique was applied for measurements of local interfacial parameters, including void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble size distributions, bubble passing frequency and bubble interface velocity. Bubbly flow patterns at several flow conditions were examined at three axial locations, L/D=25, 148 and 253, in which the first measurement represents the entrance region where the flow develops, and the second and third may represent near fully developed bubbly flow patterns. The experimental results are presented in three-dimensional perspective plots of the interfacial parameters over the cross-section. These multi-dimensional presentations showed that the local values of the void fraction, interfacial area concentration and bubble passing frequency were nearly constant over the cross-section at L/D=25, with slight local peaking close to the channel wall. Although similar local peakings were observed at the second and third locations, the internal flow structure segregation due to buoyancy appeared to be very strong in the axial direction. A simple comparison of profiles of the interfacial parameters at the three locations indicated that the flow pattern development was a continuous process. Finally, it was shown that the so-called ''fully developed'' bubbly two-phase flow pattern cannot be established in a horizontal pipe and that there was no strong correspondence between void fraction and interface velocity profiles. ((orig.))

  12. Structure and orientation of interfacial proteins determined by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy: method and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shuji; Wei, Feng; Li, Hongchun; Tian, Kangzhen; Luo, Yi

    2013-01-01

    In situ and real-time characterization of molecular structures and orientation of proteins at interfaces is essential to understand the nature of interfacial protein interaction. Such work will undoubtedly provide important clues to control biointerface in a desired manner. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) has been demonstrated to be a powerful technique to study the interfacial structures and interactions at the molecular level. This paper first systematically introduced the methods for the calculation of the Raman polarizability tensor, infrared transition dipole moment, and SFG molecular hyperpolarizability tensor elements of proteins/peptides with the secondary structures of α-helix, 310-helix, antiparallel β-sheet, and parallel β-sheet, as well as the methodology to determine the orientation of interfacial protein secondary structures using SFG amide I spectra. After that, recent progresses on the determination of protein structure and orientation at different interfaces by SFG-VS were then reviewed, which provides a molecular-level understanding of the structures and interactions of interfacial proteins, specially understanding the nature of driving force behind such interactions. Although this review has focused on analysis of amide I spectra, it will be expected to offer a basic idea for the spectral analysis of amide III SFG signals and other complicated molecular systems such as RNA and DNA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Electronic structures of interfacial states formed at polymeric semiconductor heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Shih; Westenhoff, Sebastian; Avilov, Igor; Sreearunothai, Paiboon; Hodgkiss, Justin M.; Deleener, Caroline; Friend, Richard H.; Beljonne, David

    2008-06-01

    Heterojunctions between organic semiconductors are central to the operation of light-emitting and photovoltaic diodes, providing respectively for electron-hole capture and separation. However, relatively little is known about the character of electronic excitations stable at the heterojunction. We have developed molecular models to study such interfacial excited electronic excitations that form at the heterojunction between model polymer donor and polymer acceptor systems: poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-bis-N,N-(4-butylphenyl)-bis-N,N-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine) (PFB) with poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT), and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-N-(4-butylphenyl)diphenylamine) (TFB) with F8BT. We find that for stable ground-state geometries the excited state has a strong charge-transfer character. Furthermore, when partly covalent, modelled radiative lifetimes (~10-7s) and off-chain axis polarization (30∘) match observed `exciplex' emission. Additionally for the PFB:F8BT blend, geometries with fully ionic character are also found, thus accounting for the low electroluminescence efficiency of this system.

  14. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Vlasic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work uses density functional theory (DFT to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane, at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  15. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D., E-mail: alejandro.rey@mcgill.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal H3A 0C5 (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  16. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2016-08-01

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  17. The influence of interfacial energies and gravitational levels on the directionally solidified structures in hypermonotectic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, J. B.; Curreri, P. A.; Sandlin, A. C.

    1988-01-01

    Various Cu-Pb-Al alloys were directionally solidified under 1-g conditions and alternating high-g/low-g conditions (achieved using NSAS's KC-135 aircraft) as a means of studying the influence of interfacial energies and gravitational levels on the resulting microstructures. Directional solidification of low Al content alloys was found to result in samples with coarser more irregular microstructures than in alloys with high Al contents under all the gravity conditions considered. Structures are correlated with interfacial energies, growth rates, and gravitational levels.

  18. Superposition of two tRNASer acceptor stem crystal structures: Comparison of structure, ligands and hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichert, Andre; Fuerste, Jens P.; Ulrich, Alexander; Betzel, Christian; Erdmann, Volker A.; Foerster, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    We solved the X-ray structures of two Escherichia coli tRNA Ser acceptor stem microhelices. As both tRNAs are aminoacylated by the same seryl-tRNA-synthetase, we performed a comparative structure analysis of both duplexes to investigate the helical conformation, the hydration patterns and magnesium binding sites. It is well accepted, that the hydration of RNA plays an important role in RNA-protein interactions and that the extensive solvent content of the minor groove has a special function in RNA. The detailed comparison of both tRNA Ser microhelices provides insights into the structural arrangement of the isoacceptor tRNA aminoacyl stems with respect to the surrounding water molecules and may eventually help us to understand their biological function at atomic resolution.

  19. Interfacial structures of confined air-water two-phase bubbly flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.; Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; McCreary, D.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-08-01

    The interfacial structure of the two-phase flows is of great importance in view of theoretical modeling and practical applications. In the present study, the focus is made on obtaining detailed local two-phase parameters in the air-water bubbly flow in a rectangular vertical duct using the double-sensor conductivity probe. The characteristic wall-peak is observed in the profiles of the interracial area concentration and the void fraction. The development of the interfacial area concentration along the axial direction of the flow is studied in view of the interfacial area transport and bubble interactions. The experimental data is compared with the drift flux model with C{sub 0} = 1.35.

  20. Interfacial structures of confined air-water two-phase bubbly flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.; Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; McCreary, D.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-01-01

    The interfacial structure of the two-phase flows is of great importance in view of theoretical modeling and practical applications. In the present study, the focus is made on obtaining detailed local two-phase parameters in the air-water bubbly flow in a rectangular vertical duct using the double-sensor conductivity probe. The characteristic wall-peak is observed in the profiles of the interracial area concentration and the void fraction. The development of the interfacial area concentration along the axial direction of the flow is studied in view of the interfacial area transport and bubble interactions. The experimental data is compared with the drift flux model with C 0 = 1.35

  1. The general form of the relaxation of a purely interfacial energy for structured deformations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šilhavý, Miroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2017), s. 191-215 ISSN 2326-7186 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : structured deformations * relaxation * subadditive envelope * interfacial energy Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics http://msp.org/memocs/2017/5-2/p04.xhtml

  2. Asymmetric hydration structure around calcium ion restricted in micropores fabricated in activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkubo, Takahiro; Kusudo, Tomoko; Kuroda, Yasushige

    2016-01-01

    The adsorbed phase and hydration structure of an aqueous solution of Ca(NO 3 ) 2 restricted in micropores fabricated in activated carbons (ACs) having different average pore widths (0.63 and 1.1 nm) were investigated with the analysis of adsorption isotherms and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra on Ca K -edge. The adsorbed density of Ca 2+ per unit micropore volume in the narrower pore was higher than in the wider pore, while the adsorbed amount per unit mass of carbon with the narrower pore was half of the amount of ACs with the larger pore. On the other hand, variations in the bands assigned to double-electron ( KM I ) and 1s  →  3d excitations in XAFS spectra demonstrate the formation of a distorted hydration cluster around Ca 2+ in the micropore, although the structural parameters of hydrated Ca 2+ in the micropores were almost consistent with the bulk aqueous solution, as revealed by the analysis of extended XAFS (EXAFS) spectra. In contrast to the hydration structure of monovalent ions such as Rb + , which generally presents a dehydrated structure in smaller than 1 nm micropores in ACs, the present study clearly explains that the non-spherically-symmetric structure of hydrated Ca 2+ restricted in carbon micropores whose sizes are around 1 nm is experimentally revealed where any dehydration phenomena from the first hydration shell around Ca 2+ could not be observed. (paper)

  3. Pressure dependence of the interfacial structure of potassium chloride films on iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, Dustin; Gao, Hongyu; Tang, Chun; Tysoe, Wilfred T.; Martini, Ashlie

    2015-01-01

    Potassium chloride films on a clean iron surface are used as a model system to explore the interfacial structure of the films and the dependence of that structure on film thickness and pressure. The interfacial structure of one-, two-, three- and four-layer films is measured experimentally using low-energy electron diffraction. Those findings are then complemented by molecular dynamics simulations in which the atomic interaction between the film and substrate is tuned to match film thickness-dependent sublimation activation energy obtained from temperature-programmed desorption measurements. The resultant simulation reliably predicts the structure of thicker films and is then used to study the effect of pressure on the distribution of the lattice constant within and between each layer of the potassium chloride films. Findings indicate that both film thickness and pressure affect the structure within the films as well as the degree of registry between the film and adjacent substrate. - Highlights: • KCl films on an Fe surface are used as a model system to explore interfacial structure • Thin film structure is measured using low-energy electron diffraction • An empirical potential is tuned to match sublimation activation energy • Simulations reveal the effect of pressure on the lattice constant within the KCl films • Pressure affects the film structure and registry between film and substrate

  4. Pressure dependence of the interfacial structure of potassium chloride films on iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Dustin [Department of Chemistry and Laboratory for Surface Studies, University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Gao, Hongyu; Tang, Chun [School of Engineering, University of California Merced, Merced CA 95343 (United States); Tysoe, Wilfred T. [Department of Chemistry and Laboratory for Surface Studies, University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Martini, Ashlie [School of Engineering, University of California Merced, Merced CA 95343 (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Potassium chloride films on a clean iron surface are used as a model system to explore the interfacial structure of the films and the dependence of that structure on film thickness and pressure. The interfacial structure of one-, two-, three- and four-layer films is measured experimentally using low-energy electron diffraction. Those findings are then complemented by molecular dynamics simulations in which the atomic interaction between the film and substrate is tuned to match film thickness-dependent sublimation activation energy obtained from temperature-programmed desorption measurements. The resultant simulation reliably predicts the structure of thicker films and is then used to study the effect of pressure on the distribution of the lattice constant within and between each layer of the potassium chloride films. Findings indicate that both film thickness and pressure affect the structure within the films as well as the degree of registry between the film and adjacent substrate. - Highlights: • KCl films on an Fe surface are used as a model system to explore interfacial structure • Thin film structure is measured using low-energy electron diffraction • An empirical potential is tuned to match sublimation activation energy • Simulations reveal the effect of pressure on the lattice constant within the KCl films • Pressure affects the film structure and registry between film and substrate.

  5. Experimental and modeling investigation on structure H hydrate formation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazraeno, M. Seyfi; Varaminian, F.; Vafaie sefti, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Applying affinity model for the formation kinetics of sH hydrate and two stage kinetics. • Performing the experiments of hydrate formation of sH with MCP. • A unique path for the SH hydrate formation. - Abstract: In this work, the kinetics of crystal H hydrate and two stage kinetics formation is modeled by using the chemical affinity model for the first time. The basic idea is that there is a unique path for each experiment by which the crystallization process decays the affinity. The experiments were performed at constant temperatures of 274.15, 275.15, 275.65, 276.15 and 277.15 K. The initial pressure of each experiment is up to 25 bar above equilibrium pressure of sI. Methylcyclohexane (MCH), methylcyclopentane (MCP) and tert-butyl methyl ether (TBME) are used as sH former and methane is used as a help gas. The parameters of the affinity model (A r and t k ) are determined and the results show that the parameter of (A r )/(RT) has not a constant value when temperature changes in each group of experiments. The results indicate that this model can predict experimental data very well at several conditions

  6. Interfacial Structures of Trihexyltetradecylphosphonium-bis(mandelato)borate Ionic Liquid Confined between Gold Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Golets, Mikhail; Li, Bin; Sarman, Sten; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2017-02-08

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study microscopic the interfacial ionic structures, molecular arrangements, and orientational preferences of trihexyltetradecylphosphonium-bis(mandelato)borate ([P 6,6,6,14 ][BMB]) ionic liquid confined between neutral and charged gold electrodes. It was found that both [P 6,6,6,14 ] cations and [BMB] anions are coabsorbed onto neutral electrodes at different temperatures. The hexyl and tetradecyl chains in [P 6,6,6,14 ] cations lie preferentially flat on neutral electrodes. The oxalato and phenyl rings in [BMB] anions are characterized by alternative parallel-perpendicular orientations in the mixed innermost ionic layer adjacent to neutral electrodes. An increase in temperature has a marginal effect on the interfacial ionic structures and molecular orientations of [P 6,6,6,14 ][BMB] ionic species in a confined environment. Electrifying gold electrodes leads to peculiar changes in the interfacial ionic structures and molecular orientational arrangements of [P 6,6,6,14 ] cations and [BMB] anions in negatively and positively charged gold electrodes, respectively. As surface charge density increases (but lower than 20 μC/cm 2 ), the layer thickness of the mixed innermost interfacial layer gradually increases due to a consecutive accumulation of [P 6,6,6,14 ] cations and [BMB] anions at negatively and positively charged electrodes, respectively, before the formation of distinct cationic and anionic innermost layers. Meanwhile, the molecular orientations of two oxalato rings in the same [BMB] anions change gradually from a parallel-perpendicular feature to being partially characterized by a tilted arrangement at an angle of 45° from the electrodes and finally to a dominant parallel coordination pattern along positively charged electrodes. Distinctive interfacial distribution patterns are also observed accordingly for phenyl rings that are directly connected to neighboring oxalato rings in [BMB] anions.

  7. Thermodynamic Stability of Structure H Hydrates Based on the Molecular Properties of Large Guest Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Tezuka, Kyoichi; Taguchi, Tatsuhiko; Alavi, Saman; Sum, Amadeu K.; Ohmura, Ryo

    2012-01-01

    This paper report analyses of thermodynamic stability of structure-H clathrate hydrates formed with methane and large guest molecules in terms of their gas phase molecular sizes and molar masses for the selection of a large guest molecule providing better hydrate stability. We investigated the correlation among the gas phase molecular sizes, the molar masses of large molecule guest substances, and the equilibrium pressures. The results suggest that there exists a molecular-size value for the ...

  8. Studies on the crystal structure and arrangement of water in sitagliptin L-tartrate hydrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tieger, E.; Kiss, V.; Pokol, G.; Finta, Z.; Dušek, Michal; Rohlíček, Jan; Skořepová, E.; Brázda, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 21 (2016), s. 3819-3831 ISSN 1466-8033 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1603; GA ČR GA16-10035S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24510 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : sitagliptin tartarate * crystal structure * channel hydrates * hydration * dehydration Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.474, year: 2016

  9. Dentin-cement Interfacial Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmeh, A.R.; Chong, E.Z.; Richard, G.; Festy, F.; Watson, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    The interfacial properties of a new calcium-silicate-based coronal restorative material (Biodentine™) and a glass-ionomer cement (GIC) with dentin have been studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and two-photon auto-fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging. Results indicate the formation of tag-like structures alongside an interfacial layer called the “mineral infiltration zone”, where the alkaline caustic effect of the calcium silicate cement’s hydration products degrades the collagenous component of the interfacial dentin. This degradation leads to the formation of a porous structure which facilitates the permeation of high concentrations of Ca2+, OH-, and CO32- ions, leading to increased mineralization in this region. Comparison of the dentin-restorative interfaces shows that there is a dentin-mineral infiltration with the Biodentine, whereas polyacrylic and tartaric acids and their salts characterize the penetration of the GIC. A new type of interfacial interaction, “the mineral infiltration zone”, is suggested for these calcium-silicate-based cements. PMID:22436906

  10. Modeling Delamination of Interfacial Corner Cracks in Multilayered Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veluri, Badrinath (Badri); Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2013-01-01

    Multilayered electronic components, typically of heterogeneous materials, delaminate under thermal and mechanical loading. A phenomenological model focused on modeling the shape of such interface cracks close to corners in layered interconnect structures for calculating the critical stress...

  11. The interfacial character of antibody paratopes: analysis of antibody-antigen structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh N; Pradhan, Mohan R; Verma, Chandra; Zhong, Pingyu

    2017-10-01

    In this study, computational methods are applied to investigate the general properties of antigen engaging residues of a paratope from a non-redundant dataset of 403 antibody-antigen complexes to dissect the contribution of hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic, van der Waals contacts and ionic interactions, as well as role of water molecules in the antigen-antibody interface. Consistent with previous reports using smaller datasets, we found that Tyr, Trp, Ser, Asn, Asp, Thr, Arg, Gly, His contribute substantially to the interactions between antibody and antigen. Furthermore, antibody-antigen interactions can be mediated by interfacial waters. However, there is no reported comprehensive analysis for a large number of structured waters that engage in higher ordered structures at the antibody-antigen interface. From our dataset, we have found the presence of interfacial waters in 242 complexes. We present evidence that suggests a compelling role of these interfacial waters in interactions of antibodies with a range of antigens differing in shape complementarity. Finally, we carry out 296 835 pairwise 3D structure comparisons of 771 structures of contact residues of antibodies with their interfacial water molecules from our dataset using CLICK method. A heuristic clustering algorithm is used to obtain unique structural similarities, and found to separate into 368 different clusters. These clusters are used to identify structural motifs of contact residues of antibodies for epitope binding. This clustering database of contact residues is freely accessible at http://mspc.bii.a-star.edu.sg/minhn/pclick.html. minhn@bii.a-star.edu.sg, chandra@bii.a-star.edu.sg or zhong_pingyu@immunol.a-star.edu.sg. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Influences of interfacial properties on second-harmonic generation of Lamb waves propagating in layered planar structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Mingxi; Wang Ping; Lv Xiafu

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes influences of interfacial properties on second-harmonic generation of Lamb waves propagating in layered planar structures. The nonlinearity in the elastic wave propagation is treated as a second-order perturbation of the linear elastic response. Due to the kinematic nonlinearity and the elastic nonlinearity of materials, there are second-order bulk and surface/interface driving sources in layered planar structures through which Lamb waves propagate. These driving sources can be thought of as forcing functions of a series of double frequency lamb waves (DFLWs) in terms of the approach of modal expansion analysis for waveguide excitation. The total second-harmonic fields consist of a summation of DFLWs in the corresponding stress-free layered planar structures. The interfacial properties of layered planar structures can be described by the well-known finite interfacial stiffness technique. The normal and tangential interfacial stiffness constants can be coupled with the equation governing the expansion coefficient of each DFLW component. On the other hand, the normal and tangential interfacial stiffness constants are associated with the degree of dispersion between Lamb waves and DFLWs. Theoretical analyses and numerical simulations indicate that the efficiency of second-harmonic generation by Lamb wave propagation is closely dependent on the interfacial properties of layered structures. The potential of using the effect of second-harmonic generation by Lamb wave propagation to characterize the interfacial properties of layered structures are considered. Some experimental results are presented

  13. New modeling and experimental approaches for characterization of two-phase flow interfacial structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Mamoru; Sun, Xiaodong

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents new experimental and modeling approaches in characterizing interfacial structures in gas-liquid two-phase flow. For the experiments, two objective approaches are developed to identify flow regimes and to obtain local interfacial structure data. First, a global measurement technique using a non-intrusive ring-type impedance void-meter and a self-organizing neural network is presented to identify the one-dimensional'' flow regimes. In the application of this measurement technique, two methods are discussed, namely, one based on the probability density function of the impedance probe measurement (PDF input method) and the other based on the sorted impedance signals, which is essentially the cumulative probability distribution function of the impedance signals (instantaneous direct signal input method). In the latter method, the identification can be made close to instantaneously since the required signals can be acquired over a very short time period. In addition, a double-sensor conductivity probe can also be used to obtain ''local'' flow regimes by using the instantaneous direct signal input method with the bubble chord length information. Furthermore, a newly designed conductivity probe with multiple double-sensor heads is proposed to obtain ''two-dimensional'' flow regimes across the flow channel. Secondly, a state-of-the-art four-sensor conductivity probe technique has been developed to obtain detailed local interfacial structure information. The four-sensor conductivity probe accommodates the double-sensor probe capability and can be applied in a wide range of flow regimes spanning from bubbly to churn-turbulent flows. The signal processing scheme is developed such that it categorizes the acquired parameters into two groups based on bubble cord length information. Furthermore, for the modeling of the interfacial structure characterization, the interfacial area transport equation proposed earlier has been studied to provide a dynamic and

  14. Structural basis for the transformation pathways of the sodium naproxen anhydrate-hydrate system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bond, Andrew; Cornett, Claus; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann

    2014-01-01

    to the monohydrate (MH) and anhydrate (AH) structures, provide a basis to rationalize the observed transformation pathways in the sodium (S)-naproxen anhydrate-hydrate system. All structures contain Na(+)/carboxylate/H2O sections, alternating with sections containing the naproxen molecules. The structure of DH...

  15. Interfacial hydration, dynamics and electron transfer: multi-scale ET modeling of the transient [myoglobin, cytochrome b5] complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keinan, Shahar; Nocek, Judith M; Hoffman, Brian M; Beratan, David N

    2012-10-28

    Formation of a transient [myoglobin (Mb), cytochrome b(5) (cyt b(5))] complex is required for the reductive repair of inactive ferri-Mb to its functional ferro-Mb state. The [Mb, cyt b(5)] complex exhibits dynamic docking (DD), with its cyt b(5) partner in rapid exchange at multiple sites on the Mb surface. A triple mutant (Mb(3M)) was designed as part of efforts to shift the electron-transfer process to the simple docking (SD) regime, in which reactive binding occurs at a restricted, reactive region on the Mb surface that dominates the docked ensemble. An electrostatically-guided brownian dynamics (BD) docking protocol was used to generate an initial ensemble of reactive configurations of the complex between unrelaxed partners. This ensemble samples a broad and diverse array of heme-heme distances and orientations. These configurations seeded all-atom constrained molecular dynamics simulations (MD) to generate relaxed complexes for the calculation of electron tunneling matrix elements (T(DA)) through tunneling-pathway analysis. This procedure for generating an ensemble of relaxed complexes combines the ability of BD calculations to sample the large variety of available conformations and interprotein distances, with the ability of MD to generate the atomic level information, especially regarding the structure of water molecules at the protein-protein interface, that defines electron-tunneling pathways. We used the calculated T(DA) values to compute ET rates for the [Mb(wt), cyt b(5)] complex and for the complex with a mutant that has a binding free energy strengthened by three D/E → K charge-reversal mutations, [Mb(3M), cyt b(5)]. The calculated rate constants are in agreement with the measured values, and the mutant complex ensemble has many more geometries with higher T(DA) values than does the wild-type Mb complex. Interestingly, water plays a double role in this electron-transfer system, lowering the tunneling barrier as well as inducing protein interface

  16. Structural and Interfacial Properties of Hyperbranched-Linear Polymer Surfactant

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang, Taotao; Bu, Qiaoqiao; Huang, Zhaofeng; Wang, Xuechuan

    2014-01-01

    With oleic acid grafting modification, a series of hyperbranched-linear polymer surfactants (HLPS) were prepared by hydroxyl-terminated hyperbranched polymer (HBP), which was gained through a step synthesis method using trimethylolpropane and AB2 monomer. The AB2 monomers were obtained through the Michael addition reaction of methyl acrylate and diethanol amine. The structures of HLPS were characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), whic...

  17. Effect of short-chain branching on interfacial polymer structure and dynamics under shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sohdam; Kim, Jun Mo; Cho, Soowon; Baig, Chunggi

    2017-11-22

    We present a detailed analysis on the effect of short-chain branches on the structure and dynamics of interfacial chains using atomistic nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of confined polyethylene melts in a wide range of shear rates. The intrinsically fast random motions of the short branches constantly disturb the overall chain conformation, leading to a more compact and less deformed chain structure of the short-chain branched (SCB) polymer against the imposed flow field in comparison with the corresponding linear polymer. Moreover, such highly mobile short branches along the backbone of the SCB polymer lead to relatively weaker out-of-plane wagging dynamics of interfacial chains, with highly curvy backbone structures in the intermediate flow regime. In conjunction with the contribution of short branches (as opposed to that of the backbone) to the total interfacial friction between the chains and the wall, the SCB polymer shows a nearly constant behavior in the degree of slip (d s ) with respect to shear rate in the weak-to-intermediate flow regimes. On the contrary, in the strong flow regime where irregular chain rotation and tumbling dynamics occur via intensive dynamical collisions between interfacial chains and the wall, an enhancement effect on the chain detachment from the wall, caused by short branches, leads to a steeper increase in d s for the SCB polymer than for the linear polymer. Remarkably, the SCB chains at the interface exhibit two distinct types of rolling mechanisms along the backbone, with a half-dumbbell mesoscopic structure at strong flow fields, in addition to the typical hairpin-like tumbling behavior displayed by the linear chains.

  18. Interfacial phenomenon theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Deuk

    2000-02-01

    This book is composed of 8 chapters. It tells what interfacial phenomenon is by showing interfacial energy, characteristic of interface and system of interface from chapter 1. It also introduces interfacial energy and structure theory, molecular structure and orientation theory, and interfacial electricity phenomenon theory in the following 3 chapters. It still goes on by introducing super molecule cluster, disequilibrium dispersion, and surface and film through 3 chapters. And the last chapter is about colloid and application of interface.

  19. Can we describe graphene confined water structures as overlapping of approaching graphene-water interfacial structures?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chialvo, Ariel A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Vlcek, Lukas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-03-21

    We investigate the microscopic mechanisms of the overlap of interfacial structures in confined fluids and attempt to answer the question whether the confined structures can be predicted from the original density profiles of individual solid-fluid interfaces. For that purpose we perform (globally) isobaricisothermal (locally, grand canonical) molecular dynamics simulations to extract not only the axial distribution functions of the water-sites for the uncoupled graphene-water interfaces, but also those corresponding to the confined aqueous environments over the interplate range 8 ≤ h(Å) ≤ 28 typically at ambient conditions. We have tested two (i.e., an arithmetic and a geometric) superposition approximations for the singlet density of confined water between flat graphene plates, as well as for a combination of flat and corrugated graphene plates. The outcome of this study suggests that the answer to the title’s question is a “yes”, provided that the interplate distance h is large enough to avoid fluid geometric packing frustration.

  20. Structural and Interfacial Properties of Hyperbranched-Linear Polymer Surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Taotao; Bu, Qiaoqiao; Huang, Zhaofeng; Wang, Xuechuan

    2014-01-01

    With oleic acid grafting modification, a series of hyperbranched-linear polymer surfactants (HLPS) were prepared by hydroxyl-terminated hyperbranched polymer (HBP), which was gained through a step synthesis method using trimethylolpropane and AB 2 monomer. The AB 2 monomers were obtained through the Michael addition reaction of methyl acrylate and diethanol amine. The structures of HLPS were characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), which indicated that HBP was successfully modified by oleic acid. Furthermore, the properties of surface tension and critical micelle concentration of HLPS solution showed that HLPS can significantly reduce the surface tension of water. The morphology of the HLPS solution was characterised by dynamic light scattering, which revealed that HLPS exhibited a nonmonotonic appearance in particle size at different scattering angles owing to the different replaced linear portions. The relationships of the surface pressure to monolayer area and time were measured using the Langmuir-Blodgett instrument, which showed that the surface tension of monolayer molecules increased with the increasing of hydrophobic groups. In addition, the interface conditions of different replaced HLPS solutions were simulated.

  1. Modeling Insight into Battery Electrolyte Electrochemical Stability and Interfacial Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodin, Oleg; Ren, Xiaoming; Vatamanu, Jenel; von Wald Cresce, Arthur; Knap, Jaroslaw; Xu, Kang

    2017-12-19

    Electroactive interfaces distinguish electrochemistry from chemistry and enable electrochemical energy devices like batteries, fuel cells, and electric double layer capacitors. In batteries, electrolytes should be either thermodynamically stable at the electrode interfaces or kinetically stable by forming an electronically insulating but ionically conducting interphase. In addition to a traditional optimization of electrolytes by adding cosolvents and sacrificial additives to preferentially reduce or oxidize at the electrode surfaces, knowledge of the local electrolyte composition and structure within the double layer as a function of voltage constitutes the basis of manipulating an interphase and expanding the operating windows of electrochemical devices. In this work, we focus on how the molecular-scale insight into the solvent and ion partitioning in the electrolyte double layer as a function of applied potential could predict changes in electrolyte stability and its initial oxidation and reduction reactions. In molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, highly concentrated lithium aqueous and nonaqueous electrolytes were found to exclude the solvent molecules from directly interacting with the positive electrode surface, which provides an additional mechanism for extending the electrolyte oxidation stability in addition to the well-established simple elimination of "free" solvent at high salt concentrations. We demonstrate that depending on their chemical structures, the anions could be designed to preferentially adsorb or desorb from the positive electrode with increasing electrode potential. This provides additional leverage to dictate the order of anion oxidation and to effectively select a sacrificial anion for decomposition. The opposite electrosorption behaviors of bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide (TFSI) and trifluoromethanesulfonate (OTF) as predicted by MD simulation in highly concentrated aqueous electrolytes were confirmed by surface enhanced infrared

  2. Transient Electromagnetic Modelling and Imaging of Thin Resistive Structures: Applications for Gas Hydrate Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swidinsky, Andrei

    Gas hydrates are a solid, ice-like mixture of water and low molecular weight hydrocarbons. They are found under the permafrost and to a far greater extent under the ocean, usually at water depths greater than 300m. Hydrates are a potential energy resource, a possible factor in climate change, and a geohazard. For these reasons, it is critical that gas hydrate deposits are quantitatively assessed so that their concentrations, locations and distributions may be established. Due to their ice-like nature, hydrates are electrically insulating. Consequently, a method which remotely detects changes in seafloor electrical conductivity, such as marine controlled source electromagnetics (CSEM), is a useful geophysical tool for marine gas hydrate exploration. Hydrates are geometrically complex structures. Advanced electromagnetic modelling and imaging techniques are crucial for proper survey design and data interpretation. I develop a method to model thin resistive structures in conductive host media which may be useful in building approximate geological models of gas hydrate deposits using arrangements of multiple, bent sheets. I also investigate the possibility of interpreting diffusive electromagnetic data using seismic imaging techniques. To be processed in this way, such data must first be transformed into its non-diffusive, seismic-like counterpart. I examine such a transform from both an analytical and a numerical point of view, focusing on methods to overcome inherent numerical instabilities. This is the first step to applying seismic processing techniques to CSEM data to rapidly and efficiently image resistive gas hydrate structures. The University of Toronto marine electromagnetics group has deployed a permanent marine CSEM array offshore Vancouver Island, in the framework of the NEPTUNE Canada cabled observatory, for the purposes of monitoring gas hydrate deposits. In this thesis I also propose and examine a new CSEM survey technique for gas hydrate which would

  3. Interfacial Dirac cones from alternating topological invariant superlattice structures of Bi2Se3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jung-Hwan; Jin, Hosub; Freeman, Arthur J

    2010-08-27

    When the three-dimensional topological insulators Bi2Se3 and Bi2Te3 have an interface with vacuum, i.e., a surface, they show remarkable features such as topologically protected and spin-momentum locked surface states. However, for practical applications, one often requires multiple interfaces or channels rather than a single surface. Here, for the first time, we show that an interfacial and ideal Dirac cone is realized by alternating band and topological insulators. The multichannel Dirac fermions from the superlattice structures open a new way for applications such as thermoelectric and spintronics devices. Indeed, utilizing the interfacial Dirac fermions, we also demonstrate the possible power factor improvement for thermoelectric applications.

  4. About influence of some superplasticizers on hydration and the structure of hardened cement paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koryanova Yulia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Current construction can not be imagined without the use of high-quality mortars and concretes obtained by using high-tech and workable mixtures with lower water content. Obtaining such mixtures in current conditions is impossible without the use of superplasticizers. The use of superplasticizers in concrete technology requires an answer to the question of the influence of superplasticizers on the deformation-strength properties of cement stone. There is a well-known dependence “composition-technology-structure-properties”, from which it follows that the strength and deformation properties of cement stone directly depend on the hydration of cement stone in the early stages and structure formation. The influence of some types of superplasticizers on the hydration and structure of cement stone, namely, total, open and conditionally-closed porosity, total contraction, autogenous shrinkage, contraction porosity and hydration heat is considered in the article.

  5. Monitoring early hydration of reinforced concrete structures using structural parameters identified by piezo sensors via electromechanical impedance technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talakokula, Visalakshi; Bhalla, Suresh; Gupta, Ashok

    2018-01-01

    Concrete is the most widely used material in civil engineering construction. Its life begins when the hydration process is activated after mixing the cement granulates with water. In this paper, a non-dimensional hydration parameter, obtained from piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) patches bonded to rebars embedded inside concrete, is employed to monitor the early age hydration of concrete. The non-dimensional hydration parameter is derived from the equivalent stiffness determined from the piezo-impedance transducers using the electro-mechanical impedance (EMI) technique. The focus of the study is to monitor the hydration process of cementitious materials commencing from the early hours and continue till 28 days using single non-dimensional parameter. The experimental results show that the proposed piezo-based non-dimensional hydration parameter is very effective in monitoring the early age hydration, as it has been derived from the refined structural impedance parameters, obtained by eliminating the PZT contribution, and using both the real and imaginary components of the admittance signature.

  6. Hydration structure of Ti(III) and Cr(III): Monte Carlo simulation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Classical Monte Carlo simulations were performed to investigate the solvation structures of Ti(III) and Cr(III) ions in water with only ion-water pair interaction potential and by including three-body correction terms. The hydration structures were evaluated in terms of radial distribution functions, coordination numbers and ...

  7. Dissociation behavior of methane--ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Masato; Jin, Yusuke; Takahashi, Nobuo; Nagao, Jiro; Narita, Hideo

    2010-09-09

    Dissociation behavior of methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II at constant temperatures less than 223 K was studied with use of powder X-ray diffraction and solid-state (13)C NMR techniques. The diffraction patterns at temperatures less than 203 K showed both structures I and II simultaneously convert to Ih during the dissociation, but the diffraction pattern at temperatures greater than 208 K showed different dissociation behavior between structures I and II. Although the diffraction peaks from structure II decreased during measurement at constant temperatures greater than 208 K, those from structure I increased at the initial step of dissociation and then disappeared. This anomalous behavior of the methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II was examined by using the (13)C NMR technique. The (13)C NMR spectra revealed that the anomalous behavior results from the formation of ethane-rich structure I. The structure I hydrate formation was associated with the dissociation rate of the initial methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate.

  8. Hydration sites of unpaired RNA bases: a statistical analysis of the PDB structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carugo Oliviero

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydration is crucial for RNA structure and function. X-ray crystallography is the most commonly used method to determine RNA structures and hydration and, therefore, statistical surveys are based on crystallographic results, the number of which is quickly increasing. Results A statistical analysis of the water molecule distribution in high-resolution X-ray structures of unpaired RNA nucleotides showed that: different bases have the same penchant to be surrounded by water molecules; clusters of water molecules indicate possible hydration sites, which, in some cases, match those of the major and minor grooves of RNA and DNA double helices; complex hydrogen bond networks characterize the solvation of the nucleotides, resulting in a significant rigidity of the base and its surrounding water molecules. Interestingly, the hydration sites around unpaired RNA bases do not match, in general, the positions that are occupied by the second nucleotide when the base-pair is formed. Conclusions The hydration sites around unpaired RNA bases were found. They do not replicate the atom positions of complementary bases in the Watson-Crick pairs.

  9. Structural and spectroscopic features of proton hydrates in the crystalline state. Solid-state DFT study on HCl and triflic acid hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vener, M. V.; Chernyshov, I. Yu.; Rykounov, A. A.; Filarowski, A.

    2018-01-01

    Crystalline HCl and CF3SO3H hydrates serve as excellent model systems for protonated water and perfluorosulphonic acid membranes, respectively. They contain characteristic H3O+, H5О+2, H7О+3 and H3O+(H2O)3 (the Eigen cation) structures. The properties of these cations in the crystalline hydrates of strong monobasic acids are studied by solid-state density function theory (DFT). Simultaneous consideration of the HCl and CF3SO3H hydrates reveals the impact of the size of a counter ion and the crystalline environment on the structure and infrared active bands of the simplest proton hydrates. The H7O+3 structure is very sensitive to the size of the counter ion and symmetry of the local environment. This makes it virtually impossible to identify the specific features of H7O+3 in molecular crystals. The H3O+ ion can be treated as the Eigen-like cation in the crystalline state. Structural, infrared and electron-density features of H5О+2 and the Eigen cation are virtually insensitive to the size of the counter ion and the symmetry of the local crystalline environment. These cations can be considered as the simplest stable proton hydrates in the condensed phase. Finally, the influence of the Grimme correction on the structure and harmonic frequencies of the molecular crystals with short (strong) intermolecular O-H···O bonds is discussed.

  10. Interfacial exchange coupling and magnetization reversal in perpendicular [Co/Ni]N/TbCo composite structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, M H; Zhang, Zongzhi; Tian, S Y; Wang, J; Ma, B; Jin, Q Y

    2015-06-15

    Interfacial exchange coupling and magnetization reversal characteristics in the perpendicular heterostructures consisting of an amorphous ferrimagnetic (FI) TbxCo(100-x) alloy layer exchange-coupled with a ferromagnetic (FM) [Co/Ni]N multilayer have been investigated. As compared with pure TbxCo(100-x) alloy, the magnetization compensation composition of the heterostructures shift to a higher Tb content, implying Co/Ni also serves to compensate the Tb moment in TbCo layer. The net magnetization switching field Hc⊥ and interlayer interfacial coupling field Hex, are not only sensitive to the magnetization and thickness of the switched TbxCo(100-x) or [Co/Ni]N layer, but also to the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy strength of the pinning layer. By tuning the layer structure we achieve simultaneously both large Hc⊥ = 1.31 T and Hex = 2.19 T. These results, in addition to the fundamental interest, are important to understanding of the interfacial coupling interaction in the FM/FI heterostructures, which could offer the guiding of potential applications in heat-assisted magnetic recording or all-optical switching recording technique.

  11. Absolute Hydration Free Energy of Proton from First Principles Electronic Structure Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan, Chang-Guo; Dixon, David A.

    2001-01-01

    The absolute hydration free energy of the proton, DGhyd298(H+), is one of the fundamental quantities for the thermodynamics of aqueous systems. Its exact value remains unknown despite extensive experimental and computational efforts. We report a first-principles determination of DGhyd298(H+) by using the latest developments in electronic structure theory and massively parallel computers. DGhyd298(H+) is accurately predicted to be -262.4 kcal/mol based on high-level, first-principles solvation-included electronic structure calculations. The absolute hydration free energies of other cations can be obtained by using appropriate available thermodynamic data in combination with this value. The high accuracy of the predicted absolute hydration free energy of proton is confirmed by applying the same protocol to predict DGhyd298(Li+)

  12. Structure changes in the sol-gel systems of hydrated oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponov, Y.A.; Karakchiev, L.G.; Lyakhov, N.Z.; Tolochko, B.P.; Ito, K.; Amemiya, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Sols of hydrated aluminium oxide, hydrated zirconium oxide and their mixtures were investigated during the xerogel-amorphous-product-crystalline-product transition by SAXS using synchrotron radiation. In the different temperature regions certain changes in structure and morphology were observed. Some correlation between the characteristics of the initial sols and their mixtures (the size and shape of the pores) was observed. In the temperature region 298-1173 K the characteristics of the mixed sol are defined by the characteristics of the initial sols

  13. Two-Dimensional Layered Oxide Structures Tailored by Self-Assembled Layer Stacking via Interfacial Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenrui; Li, Mingtao; Chen, Aiping; Li, Leigang; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Xia, Zhenhai; Lu, Ping; Boullay, Philippe; Wu, Lijun; Zhu, Yimei; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L; Jia, Quanxi; Zhou, Honghui; Narayan, Jagdish; Zhang, Xinghang; Wang, Haiyan

    2016-07-06

    Study of layered complex oxides emerge as one of leading topics in fundamental materials science because of the strong interplay among intrinsic charge, spin, orbital, and lattice. As a fundamental basis of heteroepitaxial thin film growth, interfacial strain can be used to design materials that exhibit new phenomena beyond their conventional forms. Here, we report a strain-driven self-assembly of bismuth-based supercell (SC) with a two-dimensional (2D) layered structure. With combined experimental analysis and first-principles calculations, we investigated the full SC structure and elucidated the fundamental growth mechanism achieved by the strain-enabled self-assembled atomic layer stacking. The unique SC structure exhibits room-temperature ferroelectricity, enhanced magnetic responses, and a distinct optical bandgap from the conventional double perovskite structure. This study reveals the important role of interfacial strain modulation and atomic rearrangement in self-assembling a layered singe-phase multiferroic thin film, which opens up a promising avenue in the search for and design of novel 2D layered complex oxides with enormous promise.

  14. Effects of interfacial layer on characteristics of TiN/ZrO2 structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younsoo; Kang, Sang Yeol; Choi, Jae Hyoung; Lim, Jae Soon; Park, Min Young; Chung, Suk-Jin; Chung, Jaegwan; Lee, Hyung Ik; Kim, Ki Hong; Kyoung, Yong Koo; Heo, Sung; Yoo, Cha Young; Kang, Ho-Kyu

    2011-09-01

    To minimize the formation of unwanted interfacial layers, thin interfacial layer (ZrCN layer) was deposited between TiN bottom electrode and ZrO2 dielectric in TiN/ZrO2/TiN capacitor. Carbon and nitrogen were also involved in the layer because ZrCN layer was thermally deposited using TEMAZ without any reactant. Electrical characteristics of TiN/ZrO2/TiN capacitor were improved by insertion of ZrCN layer. The oxidation of TiN bottom electrode was largely inhibited at TiN/ZrCN/ZrO2 structure compared to TiN/ZrO2 structure. While the sheet resistance of TiN/ZrCN/ZrO2 structure was constantly sustained with increasing ZrO2 thickness, the large increase of sheet resistance was observed in TiN/ZrO2 structure after 6 nm ZrO2 deposition. When ZrO2 films were deposited on ZrCN layer, the deposition rate of ZrO2 also increased. It is believed that ZrCN layer acted both as a protection layer of TiN oxidation and a seed layer of ZrO2 growth.

  15. Molecular dynamics study on the structure I clathrate-hydrate of methane + ethane mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erfan-Niya, Hamid; Modarress, Hamid; Zaminpayma, Esmaeil

    2011-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to study the structure I stability of methane + ethane clathrate-hydrates at temperatures 273, 275 and 277 K. NVT- and NPT-ensembles are utilized in MD simulation, and each consists of 3 x 3 x 3 replica unit cells containing 46 water molecules which are considered as the host molecules and up to eight methane + ethane molecules considered as the guest molecules. In MD simulations for host-host interactions, the potential model used was a type of simple point charge (SPC) model, and for guest-guest and host-guest interactions the potential used was Lennard-Jones model. In the process of MD simulation, achieving equilibrium of the studied system was recognized by stability in calculated pressure for NVT-ensemble and volume for NPT-ensemble. To understand the characteristic configurations of the structure I hydrate, the radial distribution functions (RDFs) of host-host, host-guest and guest-guest molecules as well as other properties including kinetic energy, potential energy and total energy were calculated. The results show that guest molecules interaction with host molecules cannot decompose the hydrate structure, and these results are consistent with most previous experimental and theoretical investigations that methane + ethane mixtures form structure I hydrates over the entire mixture composition range.

  16. Feasibility of using phase change materials to control the heat of hydration in massive concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Chang; Khil, Bae-Soo; Chae, Young-Seok; Liang, Qi-Bo; Yun, Hyun-Do

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results that can be applied to select a possible phase change material (PCM), such as a latent heat material (LHM), to control the hydration heat in mass concrete structures. Five experimental tests (microconduction, simplified adiabatic temperature rise, heat, and compressive strength tests) were conducted to select the most desirable LHM out of seven types of inorganic PCM used in cement mortar and to determine the most suitable mix design. The results of these experimental tests were used to assess the feasibility of using PCM to reduce hydration heat in mass concrete that was examined. The experimental results show that cement mortar containing barium- [Ba(OH)2 · 8H2O] based PCM has the lowest amount of total hydration heat of the cement pastes. The barium-based PCM provides good latent heat properties that help to prevent volume change and microcracks caused by thermal stress in mass concrete.

  17. Feasibility of Using Phase Change Materials to Control the Heat of Hydration in Massive Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Chang Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental results that can be applied to select a possible phase change material (PCM, such as a latent heat material (LHM, to control the hydration heat in mass concrete structures. Five experimental tests (microconduction, simplified adiabatic temperature rise, heat, and compressive strength tests were conducted to select the most desirable LHM out of seven types of inorganic PCM used in cement mortar and to determine the most suitable mix design. The results of these experimental tests were used to assess the feasibility of using PCM to reduce hydration heat in mass concrete that was examined. The experimental results show that cement mortar containing barium- [Ba(OH2·8H2O] based PCM has the lowest amount of total hydration heat of the cement pastes. The barium-based PCM provides good latent heat properties that help to prevent volume change and microcracks caused by thermal stress in mass concrete.

  18. Description of the structural evolution of a hydrating portland cement paste by SANS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeussler, F.; Eichhorn, F.; Baumbach, H.

    1994-01-01

    On the spectrometer MURN at the pulsed reactor IBR-2 dry Portland cement, silica fume, and a hydrating Portland cement paste were studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). By using the TOF-method a momentum transfer from 0.07 nm -1 to 7 nm -1 is detectable. Every component (dry cement powder, clinker minerals, hydrating cement pastes) shows a different scattering behaviour. In the measured Q-region the hardening cement paste does not show a Porod-like behaviour of SANS-curves. In contrast the Porod's potential law holds for dry powder samples of clinker minerals and silica fume. In experiments carried out to observe the hydration progress within the first 321 days the characteristics of the scattering curves (potential behaviour, the radius of gyration, and the macroscopic scattering cross section at Q = 0 nm -1 were measured. Some evolution of the inner structure of the hardened cement paste was noted. (orig.)

  19. Defect-driven interfacial electronic structures at an organic/metal-oxide semiconductor heterojunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winget, Paul; Schirra, Laura K; Cornil, David; Li, Hong; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Ndione, Paul F; Sigdel, Ajaya K; Ginley, David S; Berry, Joseph J; Shim, Jaewon; Kim, Hyungchui; Kippelen, Bernard; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Monti, Oliver L A

    2014-07-16

    The electronic structure of the hybrid interface between ZnO and the prototypical organic semiconductor PTCDI is investigated via a combination of ultraviolet and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS/XPS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The interfacial electronic interactions lead to a large interface dipole due to substantial charge transfer from ZnO to 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylicdiimide (PTCDI), which can be properly described only when accounting for surface defects that confer ZnO its n-type properties. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Interfacial effects in multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Interfacial structure and the atomic interactions between atoms at interfaces in multilayers or nano-laminates have significant impact on the physical properties of these materials. A technique for the experimental evaluation of interfacial structure and interfacial structure effects is presented and compared to experiment. In this paper the impact of interfacial structure on the performance of x-ray, soft x-ray and extreme ultra-violet multilayer optic structures is emphasized. The paper is concluded with summary of these results and an assessment of their implications relative to multilayer development and the study of buried interfaces in solids in general

  1. Formation of interfacial network structure via photo-crosslinking in carbon fiber/epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Deng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of diblock copolymers (poly(n-butylacrylate-co-poly(2-hydroxyethyl acrylate-b-poly(glycidyl methacrylate ((PnBA-co-PHEA-b-PGMA, containing a random copolymer block PnBA-co-PHEA, were successfully synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP. After being chemically grafted onto carbon fibers, the photosensitive methacrylic groups were introduced into the random copolymer, giving a series of copolymers (poly(n-butylacrylate-co-poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl acrylate-b-poly(glycidyl methacrylate((PnBA-co-PMEA-b-PGMA. Dynamic mechanical analysis indicated that the random copolymer block after ultraviolet (UV irradiation was a lightly crosslinked polymer and acted as an elastomer, forming a photo-crosslinked network structure at the interface of carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Microbond test showed that such an interfacial network structure greatly improved the cohesive strength and effectively controlled the deformation ability of the flexible interlayer. Furthermore, three kinds of interfacial network structures, i physical crosslinking by H-bonds, ii chemical crosslinking by photopolymerization, and iii interpenetrating crosslinked network by photopolymerization and epoxy curing reaction were received in carbon fiber/epoxy composite, depending on the various preparation processes.

  2. Structural and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from alite hydration in the presence of sodium and potassium hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, Oscar, E-mail: oamendoz@unal.edu.co [Grupo del Cemento y Materiales de Construcción (CEMATCO). Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Facultad de Minas, Medellín (Colombia); Giraldo, Carolina [Cementos Argos S.A., Medellín (Colombia); Camargo, Sergio S. [Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro/COPPE, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tobón, Jorge I. [Grupo del Cemento y Materiales de Construcción (CEMATCO). Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Facultad de Minas, Medellín (Colombia)

    2015-08-15

    This research evaluates the effect of sodium and potassium hydroxide on the structure and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from the hydration of pure alite. Monoclinic (MIII) alite was synthesized and hydrated, using water-to-alite ratios of 0.5 and 0.6 and additions of 10% NaOH and KOH by weight of alite. Based on results of X-ray diffraction, isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nanoindentation, two different effects of the alkaline hydroxides on the hydration reaction of alite, both at early and later ages, can be identified: (i) a differentiated hydration process, attributed to an enhancement in calcium hydroxide (CH) precipitation and a stimulation of the C-S-H nuclei; and (ii) an increase in the elastic modulus of the C-S-H aggregations, attributed to an electrostatic attraction between positive charges from the alkaline cations and negative charges from the C-S-H structure.

  3. Structural and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from alite hydration in the presence of sodium and potassium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, Oscar; Giraldo, Carolina; Camargo, Sergio S.; Tobón, Jorge I.

    2015-01-01

    This research evaluates the effect of sodium and potassium hydroxide on the structure and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from the hydration of pure alite. Monoclinic (MIII) alite was synthesized and hydrated, using water-to-alite ratios of 0.5 and 0.6 and additions of 10% NaOH and KOH by weight of alite. Based on results of X-ray diffraction, isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nanoindentation, two different effects of the alkaline hydroxides on the hydration reaction of alite, both at early and later ages, can be identified: (i) a differentiated hydration process, attributed to an enhancement in calcium hydroxide (CH) precipitation and a stimulation of the C-S-H nuclei; and (ii) an increase in the elastic modulus of the C-S-H aggregations, attributed to an electrostatic attraction between positive charges from the alkaline cations and negative charges from the C-S-H structure

  4. A spectroscopic study of the structure and occupancies of clathrate hydrates incorporating hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, R. Gary

    -guest molecule. Finally, for all of the collective research on gas hydrates since their discovery in 1810 by Sir Humphrey Davy, the one common theme that unites them is the assumption that guest molecules are trapped at the center (or near center) of the host water cages that makes up the respective crystal structure. For the first time, this work provides evidence suggesting that this definition of clathrate hydrate guest occupancy is possibly incomplete, and should include the addition of interstitial sites within the water crystal lattice. Specifically, H2 is found within the shared heptagonal faces of the large (4 3596273) cage and in cavities formed from the disruption of smaller (445 4) water cages in structure VI hydrates. The ability of H2 to occupy these interstitial sites and fluctuate position in the crystal lattice demonstrates the dynamic behavior of H2 in solids and reveals new insight into guest-guest and guest-host interactions in clathrate hydrates with potential implications in increasing overall energy storage properties.

  5. Effect of chemisorption structure on the interfacial bonding characteristics of graphene-polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Cheng; Xue Qingzhong; Xia Dan; Ma Ming

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the chemical functionalization of graphene on the interfacial bonding characteristics between graphene and polymer was investigated using molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations. In this study, three chemical functionalization, (a) phenyl groups, (b) -C 6 H 13 and(c) -C 2 H 4 (C 2 H 5 ) 2 , which have the same number of carbon atoms, were chosen to investigate the influence of the structure of functionalized groups on the bonding energy and shear stress in the graphene-polyethylene (PE) composites. Our simulations indicated that, the interfacial bonding energy between the graphene modified by -C 6 H 13 groups and PE matrix has the strongest enhancement, but the shear force between the graphene modified by -C 2 H 4 (C 2 H 5 ) 2 groups and PE matrix is the strongest in the graphene-polymer composites. Therefore, the suitable structure of chemical groups to the graphene surface may be an effective way to significantly improve the load transfer between the graphene and polymer when graphene is used to produce nanocomposites.

  6. Engineering High-Energy Interfacial Structures for High-Performance Oxygen-Involving Electrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chunxian; Zheng, Yao; Ran, Jingrun; Xie, Fangxi; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2017-07-10

    Engineering high-energy interfacial structures for high-performance electrocatalysis is achieved by chemical coupling of active CoO nanoclusters and high-index facet Mn 3 O 4 nano-octahedrons (hi-Mn 3 O 4 ). A thorough characterization, including synchrotron-based near edge X-ray absorption fine structure, reveals that strong interactions between both components promote the formation of high-energy interfacial Mn-O-Co species and high oxidation state CoO, from which electrons are drawn by Mn III -O present in hi-Mn 3 O 4 . The CoO/hi-Mn 3 O 4 demonstrates an excellent catalytic performance over the conventional metal oxide-based electrocatalysts, which is reflected by 1.2 times higher oxygen evolution reaction (OER) activity than that of Ru/C and a comparable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity to that of Pt/C as well as a better stability than that of Ru/C (95 % vs. 81 % retained OER activity) and Pt/C (92 % vs. 78 % retained ORR activity after 10 h running) in alkaline electrolyte. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Evaluation of interlayer interfacial stiffness and layer wave velocity of multilayered structures by ultrasonic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Yosuke; Biwa, Shiro

    2014-07-01

    An ultrasonic evaluation procedure for the interlayer interfacial normal stiffness and the intralayer longitudinal wave velocity of multilayered plate-like structures is proposed. Based on the characteristics of the amplitude reflection spectrum of ultrasonic wave at normal incidence to a layered structure with spring-type interlayer interfaces, it is shown that the interfacial normal stiffness and the longitudinal wave velocity in the layers can be simultaneously evaluated from the frequencies of local maxima and minima of the spectrum provided that all interfaces and layers have the same properties. The effectiveness of the proposed procedure is investigated from the perspective of the sensitivity of local extremal frequencies of the reflection spectrum. The feasibility of the proposed procedure is also investigated when the stiffness of each interface is subjected to small random fluctuations about a certain average value. The proposed procedure is applied to a 16-layered cross-ply carbon-fiber-reinforced composite laminate. The normal stiffness of resin-rich interfaces and the longitudinal wave velocity of plies in the thickness direction evaluated from the experimental reflection spectrum are shown to be consistent with simple theoretical estimations.

  8. Formation, structure, and evolution of boiling nucleus and interfacial tension between bulk liquid phase and nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Peng, Xiao-Feng; Tian, Yong; Wang, Bu-Xuan

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, the concept of the molecular free path is introduced to derive a criterion distinguishing active molecules from inactive molecules in liquid phase. A concept of the critical aggregation concentration (CAC) of active molecules is proposed to describe the physical configuration before the formation of a nucleus during vapor-liquid phase transition. All active molecules exist as monomers when the concentration of active molecules is lower than CAC, while the active molecules will generate aggregation once the concentration of the active molecules reaches CAC. However, these aggregates with aggregation number, N, smaller than five can steadily exist in bulk phase. The other excess active molecules can only produce infinite aggregation and form a critical nucleus of vapor-liquid phase transition. Without any outer perturbation the state point of CAC corresponds to the critical superheated or supercooled state. Meanwhile, a model of two-region structure of a nucleus is proposed to describe nucleus evolution. The interfacial tension between bulk liquid phase and nucleus is dependent of the density gradient in the transition region and varies with the structure change of the transition region. With the interfacial tension calculated using this model, the predicted nucleation rate is very close to the experimental measurement. Furthermore, this model and associated analysis provides solid theoretical evidences to clarify the definition of nucleation rate and understand nucleation phenomenon with the insight into the physical nature.

  9. Changes in protein structure and dynamics as a function of hydration from 1H second moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diakova, Galina; Goddard, Yanina A.; Korb, Jean-Pierre; Bryant, Robert G.

    2007-12-01

    We report the proton second moment obtained directly from the Free Induction Decay (FID) of the NMR signal of variously hydrated bovine serum albumin (BSA) and hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and from the width of the NMR Z-spectrum of the cross-linked protein gels of different concentrations. The second moment of the proteins decreases in a continuous stepwise way as a function of increasing water content, which suggests that the structural and dynamical changes occur in small incremental steps. Although the second moment is dominated by the short range distances of nearest neighbors, the changes in the second moment show that the protein structure becomes more open with increasing hydration level. A difference between the apparent liquid content of the sample as found from decomposition of the FID and the analytically determined water content demonstrates that water absorbed in the early stages of hydration is motionally immobilized and magnetically indistinguishable from rigid protein protons while at high hydration levels some protein side-chain protons move rapidly contributing to liquid-like component of the NMR signal.

  10. Investigation of interfacial wave structure using time-series analysis techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayanti, S.; Hewitt, G.F.; Cliffe, K.A.

    1990-09-01

    The report presents an investigation into the interfacial structure in horizontal annular flow using spectral and time-series analysis techniques. Film thickness measured using conductance probes shows an interesting transition in wave pattern from a continuous low-frequency wave pattern to an intermittent, high-frequency one. From the autospectral density function of the film thickness, it appears that this transition is caused by the breaking up of long waves into smaller ones. To investigate the possibility of the wave structure being represented as a low order chaotic system, phase portraits of the time series were constructed using the technique developed by Broomhead and co-workers (1986, 1987 and 1989). These showed a banded structure when waves of relatively high frequency were filtered out. Although these results are encouraging, further work is needed to characterise the attractor. (Author)

  11. A Ligand Structure-Activity Study of DNA-Based Catalytic Asymmetric Hydration and Diels-Alder Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosati, F.; Roelfes, J.G.

    A structure-activity relationship study of the first generation ligands for the DNA-based asymmetric hydration of enones and Diels-Alder reaction in water is reported. The design of the ligand was optimized resulting in a maximum ee of 83% in the hydration reaction and 75% in the Diels-Alder

  12. Impact of Interfacial Characteristics on Foam Structure: Study on Model Fluids and at Pilot Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezdour Samir

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Foams represent an important area of research because of their relevance to many industrial processes. In continuous foaming operations, foaming ability depends on the process parameters and the characteristics of the raw materials used for foamed products. The effects of fluid viscosity and equilibrium surface tension on foam structure have been studied extensively. Furthermore, as surface active agents diffuse to the interface, they can modify other interface properties through their adsorption, such as interfacial rheology and surface tension kinetics. In order to better understand how these two interfacial properties influence foam structuring, we formulated model foaming solutions with different interface viscoelasticity levels and adsorption rates, but all with the same equilibrium surface tension and viscosity. The solutions were made up of a surface active agent and glucose syrup, so as to maintain a Newtonian behaviour. Five surface active agents were used: Whey Protein Isolate (WPI, sodium caseinate, saponin, cetyl phosphate and Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate (SDS, at concentrations ranging from 0.1% to 1%. Their molecular characteristics, and their interaction with the glucose syrup, made it possible to obtain a range of interface viscoelasticities and surface tension kinetics for these model solutions. The solutions were whipped in a continuously-operating industrial foaming device in order to control process parameters such as shearing and overrun, and to ensure that the experiment was representative of industrial production. The structure of the foams thus obtained foams was then determined by characterising bubble size using image analysis. For all the model solutions, both the viscoelastic moduli and apparent diffusion coefficient were linked to foam structure. The results showed that both high interface viscoelasticity and rapid diffusion kinetics induced a foam structure containing small bubbles. Both effects, as well as the impact of

  13. Interfacial self-organization of bolaamphiphiles bearing mesogenic groups: relationships between the molecular structures and their self-organized morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bo; Liu, Guanqing; Xu, Rui; Yin, Shouchun; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Xi

    2008-04-15

    This article discusses the relationship between the molecular structure of bolaamphiphiles bearing mesogenic groups and their interfacial self-organized morphology. On the basis of the molecular structures of bolaamphiphiles, we designed and synthesized a series of molecules with different hydrophobic alkyl chain lengths, hydrophilic headgroups, mesogenic groups, and connectors between the alkyl chains and the mesogenic group. Through investigating their interfacial self-organization behavior, some experiential rules are summarized: (1) An appropriate alkyl chain length is necessary to form stable surface micelles; (2) different categories of headgroups have a great effect on the interfacial self-organized morphology; (3) different types of mesogenic groups have little effect on the structure of the interfacial assembly when it is changed from biphenyl to azobenzene or stilbene; (4) the orientation of the ester linker between the mesogenic group and alkyl chain can greatly influence the interfacial self-organization behavior. It is anticipated that this line of research may be helpful for the molecular engineering of bolaamphiphiles to form tailor-made morphologies.

  14. Discrete Self-Similarity in Interfacial Hydrodynamics and the Formation of Iterated Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallaston, Michael C; Fontelos, Marco A; Tseluiko, Dmitri; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2018-01-19

    The formation of iterated structures, such as satellite and subsatellite drops, filaments, and bubbles, is a common feature in interfacial hydrodynamics. Here we undertake a computational and theoretical study of their origin in the case of thin films of viscous fluids that are destabilized by long-range molecular or other forces. We demonstrate that iterated structures appear as a consequence of discrete self-similarity, where certain patterns repeat themselves, subject to rescaling, periodically in a logarithmic time scale. The result is an infinite sequence of ridges and filaments with similarity properties. The character of these discretely self-similar solutions as the result of a Hopf bifurcation from ordinarily self-similar solutions is also described.

  15. Surface and interfacial structural characterization of MBE grown Si/Ge multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Biswajit; Sharma, Manjula; Sarma, Abhisakh; Rath, Ashutosh; Satyam, P.V.; Chakraborty, Purushottam; Sanyal, Milan K.

    2009-01-01

    Si/Ge multilayer structures have been grown by solid source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on Si (1 1 1) and (1 0 0) substrates and were characterized by high-resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), high-depth-resolution secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and cross-section high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A reasonably good agreement has been obtained for layer thickness, interfacial structure and diffusion between SIMS and HRTEM measurements. Epitaxial growth and crystalline nature of the individual layer have been probed using cross-sectional HRTEM and XRD measurements. Surface and interface morphological studies by AFM and HRTEM show island-like growth of both Si and Ge nanostructures.

  16. Skin hydration: interplay between molecular dynamics, structure and water uptake in the stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojumdar, Enamul Haque; Pham, Quoc Dat; Topgaard, Daniel; Sparr, Emma

    2017-11-16

    Hydration is a key aspect of the skin that influences its physical and mechanical properties. Here, we investigate the interplay between molecular and macroscopic properties of the outer skin layer - the stratum corneum (SC) and how this varies with hydration. It is shown that hydration leads to changes in the molecular arrangement of the peptides in the keratin filaments as well as dynamics of C-H bond reorientation of amino acids in the protruding terminals of keratin protein within the SC. The changes in molecular structure and dynamics occur at a threshold hydration corresponding to ca. 85% relative humidity (RH). The abrupt changes in SC molecular properties coincide with changes in SC macroscopic swelling properties as well as mechanical properties in the SC. The flexible terminals at the solid keratin filaments can be compared to flexible polymer brushes in colloidal systems, creating long-range repulsion and extensive swelling in water. We further show that the addition of urea to the SC at reduced RH leads to similar molecular and macroscopic responses as the increase in RH for SC without urea. The findings provide new molecular insights to deepen the understanding of how intermediate filament organization responds to changes in the surrounding environment.

  17. Development of Interfacial Structure in a Confined Air-Water Cap-Turbulent and Churn-Turbulent Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, X.; Kim, S.; Cheng, L.; Ishii, M.; Beus, S.G.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to study and model the interfacial structure development of air-water two-phase flow in a confined test section. Experiments of a total of 9 flow conditions in a cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flow regimes are carried out in a vertical air-water upward two-phase flow experimental loop with a test section of 20-cm in width and 1-cm in gap. The miniaturized four-sensor conductivity probes are used to measure local two-phase parameters at three different elevations for each flow condition. The bubbles captured by the probes are categorized into two groups in view of the two-group interfacial area transport equation, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as Group 1 and cap/churn-turbulent bubbles as Group 2. The acquired parameters are time-averaged local void fraction, interfacial velocity, bubble number frequency, interfacial area concentration, and bubble Sauter mean diameter for both groups of bubbles. Also, the line-averaged and area-averaged data are presented and discussed. The comparisons of these parameters at different elevations demonstrate the development of interfacial structure along the flow direction due to bubble interactions

  18. Development of Interfacial Structure in a Confined Air-Water Cap-Turbulent and Churn-Turbulent Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiaodong Sun; Seungjin Kim; Ling Cheng; Mamoru Ishii; Beus, Stephen G.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to study and model the interfacial structure development of air-water two-phase flow in a confined test section. Experiments of a total of 9 flow conditions in cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flow regimes are carried out in a vertical air-water upward two-phase flow experimental loop with a test section of 200-mm in width and 10-mm in gap. Miniaturized four-sensor conductivity probes are used to measure local two-phase parameters at three different elevations for each flow condition. The bubbles captured by the probes are categorized into two groups in view of the two-group interfacial area transport equation, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as Group 1 and cap/churn-turbulent bubbles as Group 2. The acquired parameters are time-averaged local void fraction, interfacial velocity, bubble number frequency, interfacial area concentration, and bubble Sauter mean diameter for both groups of bubbles. Also, the line-averaged and area-averaged data are presented and discussed. The comparisons of these parameters at different elevations demonstrate the development of interfacial structure along the flow direction due to bubble interactions. (authors)

  19. Interfacial bonding and electronic structure of GaN/GaAs interface: A first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Ruyue; Zhang, Zhaofu; Wang, Changhong; Li, Haobo; Dong, Hong; Liu, Hui; Wang, Weichao; Xie, Xinjian

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of GaN interfacing with GaAs is crucial for GaN to be an effective interfacial layer between high-k oxides and III-V materials with the application in high-mobility metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) devices. Utilizing first principles calculations, here, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of the GaN/GaAs interface with respect to the interfacial nitrogen contents. The decrease of interfacial N contents leads to more Ga dangling bonds and As-As dimers. At the N-rich limit, the interface with N concentration of 87.5% shows the most stability. Furthermore, a strong band offsets dependence on the interfacial N concentration is also observed. The valance band offset of N7 with hybrid functional calculation is 0.51 eV. The electronic structure analysis shows that significant interface states exist in all the GaN/GaAs models with various N contents, which originate from the interfacial dangling bonds and some unsaturated Ga and N atoms. These large amounts of gap states result in Fermi level pinning and essentially degrade the device performance

  20. Structural Transformation of Diblock Copolymer/Homopolymer Assemblies by Tuning Cylindrical Confinement and Interfacial Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiangping; Wang, Ke; Liang, Ruijing; Yang, Yi; Zhou, Huamin; Xie, Xiaolin; Zhu, Jintao

    2015-11-17

    In this study, we report the controllable structural transformation of block copolymer/homopolymer binary blends in cylindrical nanopores. Polystyrene-b-poly(4-vinylpyridine)/homopolystyrene (SVP/hPS) nanorods (NRs) can be fabricated by pouring the polymers into an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) channel and isolated by selective removal of the AAO membrane. In this two-dimensional (2D) confinement, SVP self-assembles into NRs with concentric lamellar structure, and the internal structure can be tailored with the addition of hPS. We show that the weight fraction and molecular weight of hPS and the diameter of the channels can significantly affect the internal structure of the NRs. Moreover, mesoporous materials with tunable pore shape, size, and packing style can be prepared by selective solvent swelling of the structured NRs. In addition, these NRs can transform into spherical structures through solvent-absorption annealing, triggering the conversion from 2D to 3D confinement. More importantly, the transformation dynamics can be tuned by varying the preference property of surfactant to the polymers. It is proven that the shape and internal structure of the polymer particles are dominated by the interfacial interactions governed by the surfactants.

  1. A systematic method for analysing the protein hydration structure of T4 lysozyme

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kysilka, Jiří; Vondrášek, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 10 (2013), s. 479-487 ISSN 0952-3499 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/0725; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11020 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0427 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : protein hydration structure * water * X-ray crystallography * cluster algorithm * interaction enthalpy Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.337, year: 2013

  2. Bulk and interfacial structures of reline deep eutectic solvent: A molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Supreet; Sharma, Shobha; Kashyap, Hemant K

    2017-11-21

    We apply all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to describe the bulk morphology and interfacial structure of reline, a deep eutectic solvent comprising choline chloride and urea in 1:2 molar ratio, near neutral and charged graphene electrodes. For the bulk phase structural investigation, we analyze the simulated real-space radial distribution functions, X-ray/neutron scattering structure functions, and their partial components. Our study shows that both hydrogen-bonding and long-range correlations between different constituents of reline play a crucial role to lay out the bulk structure of reline. Further, we examine the variation of number density profiles, orientational order parameters, and electrostatic potentials near the neutral and charged graphene electrodes with varying electrode charge density. The present study reveals the presence of profound structural layering of not only the ionic components of reline but also urea near the electrodes. In addition, depending on the electrode charge density, the choline ions and urea molecules render different orientations near the electrodes. The simulated number density and electrostatic potential profiles for reline clearly show the presence of multilayer structures up to a distance of 1.2 nm from the respective electrodes. The observation of positive values of the surface potential at zero charge indicates the presence of significant nonelectrostatic attraction between the choline cation and graphene electrode. The computed differential capacitance (C d ) for reline exhibits an asymmetric bell-shaped curve, signifying different variation of C d with positive and negative surface potentials.

  3. XPS characterization of surface and interfacial structure of sputtered TiNi films on Si substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Yongqing; Du Hejun; Zhang, Sam; Huang Weimin

    2005-01-01

    TiNi films were prepared by co-sputtering TiNi and Ti targets. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to study surface chemistry of the films and interfacial structure of Si/TiNi system. Exposure of the TiNi film to the ambient atmosphere (23 deg. C and 80% relatively humidity) facilitated quick adsorption of oxygen and carbon on the surface. With time, carbon and oxygen content increased drastically at the surface, while oxygen diffused further into the layer. After a year, carbon content at the surface became as high as 65.57% and Ni dropped below the detection limit of XPS. Depth profiling revealed that significant inter-diffusion occurred between TiNi film and Si substrate with a layer of 90-100 nm. The detailed bond changes of different elements with depth were obtained using XPS and the formation of titanium silicides at the interface were identified

  4. Schottky barrier and band edge engineering via the interfacial structure and strain for the Pt/TiO2 heterostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiangchao; Wu, Xin; Wang, Yucheng; Dai, Ying

    2017-07-19

    Charge transfer across the Pt/TiO 2 interface, which is mainly determined by the interface Schottky barrier height (SBH), is an important process in the (photo)catalytic and electronic applications of the Pt/TiO 2 composite. Therefore, systematic investigation of the factors that affect the interface SBH is indispensable for understanding and optimizing its performance. In this work, a systematic study of the effects of the interfacial structure and strain on the SBH of the Pt/TiO 2 (001) interface has been carried out based on the first-principles calculations. The results of interface adhesion energy show that two different interfacial structures for the Pt/TiO 2 (001) heterointerface may exist experimentally, namely, O-Pt bonding and Ti-Pt bonding. Moreover, the interfacial structures result in not only different values for the SBH, but also different dependences of the SBH on strain. Detailed investigations show that these versatile modulations of the SBH with the structure and strain are mainly attributed to the strong dependence of the band edges of TiO 2 and the interfacial potential alignments on the strain and structure, suggesting that these results are general and may be applicable to other metal/TiO 2 heterostructures.

  5. Reactive wetting of amorphous silica by molten Al–Mg alloys and their interfacial structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Laixin [Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Ministry of Education), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, No. 5988 Renmin Street, Changchun 130025 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Shen, Ping, E-mail: shenping@jlu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Ministry of Education), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, No. 5988 Renmin Street, Changchun 130025 (China); Zhang, Dan [Editorial Office, Journal of Bionic Engineering, Jilin University, No. 5988 Renmin Street, Changchun 130025 (China); Jiang, Qichuan [Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Ministry of Education), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, No. 5988 Renmin Street, Changchun 130025 (China)

    2016-07-30

    Highlights: • The wettability improves with increasing Mg concentration and temperature. • Reaction product zone consists of layered structures relating with Mg concentration. • Formation of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and MgO at the interface does not promote the wettability. • Formation of Mg{sub 2}Si plays a dominant role in promoting the wettability. • Anomalous recession of the triple line was mainly due to diminishing Mg in the alloy. - Abstract: The reactive wetting of amorphous silica substrates by molten Al–Mg alloys over a wide composition range was studied using a dispensed sessile drop method in a flowing Ar atmosphere. The effects of the nominal Mg concentration and temperature on the wetting and interfacial microstructures were discussed. The initial contact angle for pure Al on the SiO{sub 2} surface was 115° while that for pure Mg was 35° at 1073 K. For the Al–Mg alloy drop, it decreased with increasing nominal Mg concentration. The reaction zone was characterized by layered structures, whose formation was primarily controlled by the variation in the alloy concentration due to the evaporation of Mg and the interfacial reaction from the viewpoint of thermodynamics as well as by the penetration or diffusion of Mg, Al and Si from the viewpoint of kinetics. In addition, the effects of the reaction and the evaporation of Mg on the movement of the triple line were examined. The spreading of the Al–Mg alloy on the SiO{sub 2} surface was mainly attributed to the formation of Mg{sub 2}Si at the interface and the recession of the triple line to the diminishing Mg concentration in the alloy.

  6. Multiscale structure, interfacial cohesion, adsorbed layers, miscibility and properties in dense polymer-particle mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Ken

    2012-02-01

    A major goal in polymer nanocomposite research is to understand and predict how the chemical and physical nature of individual polymers and nanoparticles, and thermodynamic state (temperature, composition, solvent dilution, filler loading), determine bulk assembly, miscibility and properties. Microscopic PRISM theory provides a route to this goal for equilibrium disordered mixtures. A major prediction is that by manipulating the net polymer-particle interfacial attraction, miscibility is realizable via the formation of thin thermodynamically stable adsorbed layers, which, however, are destroyed by entropic depletion and bridging attraction effects if interface cohesion is too weak or strong, respectively. This and related issues are quantitatively explored for miscible mixtures of hydrocarbon polymers, silica nanospheres, and solvent using x-ray scattering, neutron scattering and rheology. Under melt conditions, quantitative agreement between theory and silica scattering experiments is achieved under both steric stabilization and weak depletion conditions. Using contrast matching neutron scattering to characterize the collective structure factors of polymers, particles and their interface, the existence and size of adsorbed polymer layers, and their consequences on microstructure, is determined. Failure of the incompressible RPA, accuracy of PRISM theory, the nm thickness of adsorbed layers, and qualitative sensitivity of the bulk modulus to interfacial cohesion and particle size are demonstrated for concentrated PEO-silica-ethanol nanocomposites. Temperature-dependent complexity is discovered when water is the solvent, and nonequilibrium effects emerge for adsorbing entangled polymers that strongly impact structure. By varying polymer chemistry, the effect of polymer-particle attraction on the intrinsic viscosity is explored with striking non-classical effects observed. This work was performed in collaboration with S.Y.Kim, L.M.Hall, C.Zukoski and B.Anderson.

  7. Interfacial symmetry of Co–Alq_3–Co hybrid structures for effective spin filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, Tu-Ngoc; Lai, Yu-Ling; Chen, Chih-Han; Chen, Po-Hung; Wei, Der-Hsin; Lin, Hong-Ji; Chen, C.T.; Sheu, Jeng-Tzong; Hsu, Yao-Jane

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The spin interface at Alq_3/Co and Co/Alq_3 contacts was examined. • An interfacial symmetry was determined at Co–Alq_3–Co interfaces. • Spin-polarized N orbitals are induced within the Co atop Alq_3 hybridized interface. • The spin-filter role at the top contact interface of Alq_3/Co is proved. • Effective spin-filtering at Co–Alq_3–Co contacts was elucidated. - Abstract: Understanding the interfacial behavior at FM-OSC-FM hybrid structures for both the bottom contact (Alq_3 adsorption on Co, Co/Alq_3) and the top contact (Co atop Alq_3, Alq_3/Co) is crucial for efficient spin filtering with transport of spin-polarized charge carriers through these interfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra indicate a symmetry of charge transfer from Co to Alq_3 and the corresponding orbital hybridization to a certain extent at both contacts. The alignment of energy levels at both Alq_3/Co and Co/Alq_3 heterostructures is depicted with ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). Through magnetic images acquired with a X-ray photoemission electron microscope (XPEEM), the strong hybridization of the top contact presents no micromagnetic domain but still shows magnetic coupling, to some extent, to the bottom contact in the Co–Alq_3–Co trilayer structure. Measurements of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) demonstrate the induced spin-polarization of non-magnetic Alq_3 at both contacts, proving Alq_3 a unique and promising organic material for spin filtering in OSV.

  8. Structures and energetics of hydrated deprotonated cis-pinonic acid anion clusters and their atmospheric relevance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Gao-Lei; Zhang, Jun; Valiev, Marat; Wang, Xue-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Pinonic acid, a C10-monocarboxylic acid with a hydrophilic –CO2H group and a hydrophobic hydrocarbon backbone, is a key intermediate oxidation product of α-pinene – an important monoterpene compound in biogenic emission processes that influences the atmosphere. Molecular interaction between cis-pinonic acid and water is essential for understanding its role in the formation and growth of pinene-derived secondary organic aerosols. In this work, we studied the structures, energetics, and optical properties of hydrated clusters of cis-pinonate anion (cPA–), the deprotonated form of cis-pinonic acid, by negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio theoretical calculations. Our results show that cPA– can adopt two different structural configurations – open and folded. In the absence of waters, the open configuration has the lowest energy and provides the best agreement with the experiment. The addition waters, which mainly interact with the negatively charged -CO2– group, gradually stabilize the folded configuration and lower its energy difference relative to the most stable open-configured structure. Thermochemical and equilibrium hydrate distribution analysis suggests that the mono- and di- hydrates are likely to exist in humid atmospheric environment with high populations. The detailed molecular description of cPA– hydrated clusters unraveled in this study provides a valuable reference for understanding the initial nucleation process and aerosol formation involving organics containing both hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, as well as for analyzing the optical properties of those organic aerosols.

  9. Structural determinants of hydration, mechanics and fluid flow in freeze-dried collagen scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offeddu, G S; Ashworth, J C; Cameron, R E; Oyen, M L

    2016-09-01

    Freeze-dried scaffolds provide regeneration templates for a wide range of tissues, due to their flexibility in physical and biological properties. Control of structure is crucial for tuning such properties, and therefore scaffold functionality. However, the common approach of modeling these scaffolds as open-cell foams does not fully account for their structural complexity. Here, the validity of the open-cell model is examined across a range of physical characteristics, rigorously linking morphology to hydration and mechanical properties. Collagen scaffolds with systematic changes in relative density were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Micro-Computed Tomography and spherical indentation analyzed in a time-dependent poroelastic framework. Morphologically, all scaffolds were mid-way between the open- and closed-cell models, approaching the closed-cell model as relative density increased. Although pore size remained constant, transport pathway diameter decreased. Larger collagen fractions also produced greater volume swelling on hydration, although the change in pore diameter was constant, and relatively small at ∼6%. Mechanically, the dry and hydrated scaffold moduli varied quadratically with relative density, as expected of open-cell materials. However, the increasing pore wall closure was found to determine the time-dependent nature of the hydrated scaffold response, with a decrease in permeability producing increasingly elastic rather than viscoelastic behavior. These results demonstrate that characterizing the deviation from the open-cell model is vital to gain a full understanding of scaffold biophysical properties, and provide a template for structural studies of other freeze-dried biomaterials. Freeze-dried collagen sponges are three-dimensional microporous scaffolds that have been used for a number of exploratory tissue engineering applications. The characterization of the structure-properties relationships of these scaffolds is

  10. Authigenic rhodochrosite from a gas hydrate-bearing structure in Lake Baikal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, Alexey A.; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Minami, Hirotsugu; Pogodaeva, Tatyana V.; Zemskaya, Tamara I.; Krzhizhanovskaya, Mariya G.; Poort, Jeffrey; Khlystov, Oleg M.

    2018-02-01

    Early diagenetic carbonates are rare in Lake Baikal. Siderite (Fe carbonate) concretions in the sediments were discovered only recently. Here, we discuss the first finding of rhodochrosite concretions (Mn carbonate) discovered in the near-bottom sediments of the gas hydrate-bearing seepage structure St. Petersburg-2 in the deep water environment of the Central Baikal Basin. The crystal lattice of rhodochrosite contains iron and calcium substituting to manganese. Based on pore water geochemistry and of δ 13C values of rhodochrosite (- 23.3 and - 29.4‰), carbon dioxide (+ 3.8 to - 16.1‰) and methane (- 63.2 to - 67.8‰), we show that carbonate crystallization most likely occurred during microbial anaerobic oxidation of organic matter, and that part of the oxygen making up the rhodochrosite seems to be derived from the 18O-rich water released from dissociating gas hydrates.

  11. Effect of high pressure homogenization on the structure and the interfacial and emulsifying properties of β-lactoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ali; Le Potier, Isabelle; Huang, Nicolas; Rosilio, Véronique; Cheron, Monique; Faivre, Vincent; Turbica, Isabelle; Agnely, Florence; Mekhloufi, Ghozlene

    2018-02-15

    The effect of high pressure homogenization (HPH) on the structure of β-lactoglobulin (β-lg) was studied by combining spectroscopic, chromatographic, and electrophoretic methods. The consequences of the resulting structure modifications on oil/water (O/W) interfacial properties were also assessed. Moderated HPH treatment (100 MPa/4 cycles) showed no significant modification of protein structure and interfacial properties. However, a harsher HPH treatment (300 MPa/5 cycles) induced structural transformation, mainly from β-sheets to random coils, wide loss in lipocalin core, and protein aggregation via intermolecular disulfide bridges. HPH-modified β-lg displayed higher surface hydrophobicity leading to a faster adsorption rate at the interface and an earlier formation of an elastic interfacial film at C β-lg  = 0.1 wt%. However, no modification of the interfacial properties was observed at C β-lg  = 1 wt%. At this protein concentration, the prior denaturation of β-lg by HPH did not modify the droplet size of nanoemulsions prepared with these β-lg solutions as the aqueous phases. A slightly increased creaming rate was however observed. The effects of HPH and heat denaturations appeared qualitatively similar, but with differences in their extent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Modelling of AlAs/GaAs interfacial structures using high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) image simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Paul D; Finnie, Michael; Craven, Alan J

    2012-07-01

    High angle annular dark field (HAADF) image simulations were performed on a series of AlAs/GaAs interfacial models using the frozen-phonon multislice method. Three general types of models were considered-perfect, vicinal/sawtooth and diffusion. These were chosen to demonstrate how HAADF image measurements are influenced by different interfacial structures in the technologically important III-V semiconductor system. For each model, interfacial sharpness was calculated as a function of depth and compared to aberration-corrected HAADF experiments of two types of AlAs/GaAs interfaces. The results show that the sharpness measured from HAADF imaging changes in a complicated manner with thickness for complex interfacial structures. For vicinal structures, it was revealed that the type of material that the probe projects through first of all has a significant effect on the measured sharpness. An increase in the vicinal angle was also shown to generate a wider interface in the random step model. The Moison diffusion model produced an increase in the interface width with depth which closely matched the experimental results of the AlAs-on-GaAs interface. In contrast, the interface width decreased as a function of depth in the linear diffusion model. Only in the case of the perfect model was it possible to ascertain the underlying structure directly from HAADF image analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Structural analysis on mutation residues and interfacial water molecules for human TIM disease understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Human triosephosphate isomerase (HsTIM) deficiency is a genetic disease caused often by the pathogenic mutation E104D. This mutation, located at the side of an abnormally large cluster of water in the inter-subunit interface, reduces the thermostability of the enzyme. Why and how these water molecules are directly related to the excessive thermolability of the mutant have not been investigated in structural biology. Results This work compares the structure of the E104D mutant with its wild type counterparts. It is found that the water topology in the dimer interface of HsTIM is atypical, having a "wet-core-dry-rim" distribution with 16 water molecules tightly packed in a small deep region surrounded by 22 residues including GLU104. These water molecules are co-conserved with their surrounding residues in non-archaeal TIMs (dimers) but not conserved across archaeal TIMs (tetramers), indicating their importance in preserving the overall quaternary structure. As the structural permutation induced by the mutation is not significant, we hypothesize that the excessive thermolability of the E104D mutant is attributed to the easy propagation of atoms' flexibility from the surface into the core via the large cluster of water. It is indeed found that the B factor increment in the wet region is higher than other regions, and, more importantly, the B factor increment in the wet region is maintained in the deeply buried core. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that for the mutant structure at normal temperature, a clear increase of the root-mean-square deviation is observed for the wet region contacting with the large cluster of interfacial water. Such increase is not observed for other interfacial regions or the whole protein. This clearly suggests that, in the E104D mutant, the large water cluster is responsible for the subunit interface flexibility and overall thermolability, and it ultimately leads to the deficiency of this enzyme. Conclusions Our study

  14. Structure of hydrated calcium carbonates: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demichelis, Raffaella; Raiteri, Paolo; Gale, Julian D.

    2014-09-01

    The structures of both ikaite (CaCO3 · 6H2 O) and monohydrocalcite (CaCO3 ·H2 O) were computed at the PBE0 level of theory, using all electron Gaussian type basis sets. Correction for the long-range dispersion contribution was included for the oxygen-oxygen interactions by using an additive pairwise term with the atomic coefficients fitted against the calcite vs aragonite enthalpy difference. The potential chirality of monohydrocalcite is discussed, as well as the helical motifs created by the three-fold rototranslational axes parallel to the [001] direction. These elements represent a significant link between monohydrocalcite and vaterite, both appearing as intermediate species during CaCO3 crystallization from amorphous calcium carbonate. The hydrogen bond pattern, never fully discussed for monohydrocalcite, is here described and compared to the available experimental data. Both phases are characterized by the presence of hydrogen bonds of moderate to high strength. Water molecules in monohydrocalcite interact quite strongly with 2 CO32- units through such hydrogen bonds, whereas their interaction with each other is minor. On the contrary, water molecules in ikaite create a complex network of hydrogen bonds, where each water molecule is strongly hydrogen bonded to one CO32- anion and to one or two other water molecules.

  15. Structural Investigations of Portland Cement Components, Hydration, and Effects of Admixtures by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Jørgen Bengaard; Andersen, Morten D.; Jakobsen, Hans Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    for the C-S-H phase formed during hydration. It will be demonstrated that Al3+ and flouride guest-ions in the anhydrous and hydrated calcium silicates can be studied in detail by 27Al and 19F MAS NMR, thereby providing information on the local structure and the mechanisms for incorporation of these ions......Solid-state, magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy represents a valuable tool for structural investigations on the nanoscale of the most important phases in anhydrous and hydrated Portland cements and of various admixtures. This is primarily due to the fact that the method reflects the first......- and second-coordination spheres of the spin nucleus under investigation while it is less sensitive to long-range order. Thus, crystalline as well as amorphous phases can be detected in a quantitative manner by solid-state NMR. In particular the structure of the calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) phase have...

  16. On the interfacial fracture of porcelain/zirconia and graded zirconia dental structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Herzl; Lee, James J-W; Mieleszko, Adam J; Chu, Stephen J; Zhang, Yu

    2014-08-01

    Porcelain fused to zirconia (PFZ) restorations are widely used in prosthetic dentistry. However, their susceptibility to fracture remains a practical problem. The failure of PFZ prostheses often involves crack initiation and growth in the porcelain, which may be followed by fracture along the porcelain/zirconia (P/Z) interface. In this work, we characterized the process of fracture in two PFZ systems, as well as a newly developed graded glass-zirconia structure with emphases placed on resistance to interfacial cracking. Thin porcelain layers were fused onto Y-TZP plates with or without the presence of a glass binder. The specimens were loaded in a four-point-bending fixture with the thin porcelain veneer in tension, simulating the lower portion of the connectors and marginal areas of a fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) during occlusal loading. The evolution of damage was observed by a video camera. The fracture was characterized by unstable growth of cracks perpendicular to the P/Z interface (channel cracks) in the porcelain layer, which was followed by stable cracking along the P/Z interface. The interfacial fracture energy GC was determined by a finite-element analysis taking into account stress-shielding effects due to the presence of adjacent channel cracks. The resulting GC was considerably less than commonly reported values for similar systems. Fracture in the graded Y-TZP samples occurred via a single channel crack at a much greater stress than for PFZ. No delamination between the residual glass layer and graded zirconia occurred in any of the tests. Combined with its enhanced resistance to edge chipping and good esthetic quality, graded Y-TZP emerges as a viable material concept for dental restorations. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Research on the nanolevel influence of surfactants on structure formation of the hydrated Portland cement compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guryanov Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The research of the structure formation process on a nanolevel of the samples of hydrated Portland cement compositions containing the modifying additives has been conducted with the help of small angle neutron scattering method. Carbonate and aluminum alkaline slimes as well as the complex additives containing surfactants were used as additives. The influence of slimes and surfactants on structural parameters change of Portland cement compositions of the average size of the disseminating objects, fractal dimension samples is considered. These Portland cement compositions are shown to be fractal clusters.

  18. Aqueous turbulence structure immediately adjacent to the air - water interface and interfacial gas exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Binbin

    Air-sea interaction and the interfacial exchange of gas across the air-water interface are of great importance in coupled atmospheric-oceanic environmental systems. Aqueous turbulence structure immediately adjacent to the air-water interface is the combined result of wind, surface waves, currents and other environmental forces and plays a key role in energy budgets, gas fluxes and hence the global climate system. However, the quantification of turbulence structure sufficiently close to the air-water interface is extremely difficult. The physical relationship between interfacial gas exchange and near surface turbulence remains insufficiently investigated. This dissertation aims to measure turbulence in situ in a complex environmental forcing system on Lake Michigan and to reveal the relationship between turbulent statistics and the CO2 flux across the air-water interface. The major objective of this dissertation is to investigate the physical control of the interfacial gas exchange and to provide a universal parameterization of gas transfer velocity from environmental factors, as well as to propose a mechanistic model for the global CO2 flux that can be applied in three dimensional climate-ocean models. Firstly, this dissertation presents an advanced measurement instrument, an in situ free floating Particle Image Velocimetry (FPIV) system, designed and developed to investigate the small scale turbulence structure immediately below the air-water interface. Description of hardware components, design of the system, measurement theory, data analysis procedure and estimation of measurement error were provided. Secondly, with the FPIV system, statistics of small scale turbulence immediately below the air-water interface were investigated under a variety of environmental conditions. One dimensional wave-number spectrum and structure function sufficiently close to the water surface were examined. The vertical profiles of turbulent dissipation rate were intensively studied

  19. Structure, viscoelasticity, and interfacial dynamics of a model polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, Robert J.; Gillard, Timothy M.; Irwin, Matthew T.; Lodge, Timothy P.; Bates, Frank S. (UMM)

    2016-01-01

    We have systematically studied the equilibrium structure and dynamics of a polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion (BμE) composed of poly(cyclohexylethylene) (PCHE), poly(ethylene) (PE), and a volumetrically symmetric PCHE–PE diblock copolymer, using dynamic mechanical spectroscopy, small angle X-ray and neutron scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. The BμE was investigated over an 80 °C temperature range, revealing a structural evolution and a rheological response not previously recognized in such systems. As the temperature is reduced below the point associated with the lamellar-disorder transition at compositions adjacent to the microemulsion channel, the interfacial area per chain of the BμE approaches that of the neat (undiluted) lamellar diblock copolymer. With increasing temperature, the diblock-rich interface swells through homopolymer infiltration. Time–temperature-superposed linear dynamic data obtained as a function of frequency show that the viscoelastic response of the BμE is strikingly similar to that of the fluctuating pure diblock copolymer in the disordered state, which we associate with membrane undulations and the breaking and reforming of interfaces. This work provides new insights into the structure and dynamics that characterize thermodynamically stable BμEs in the limits of relatively weak and strong segregation.

  20. Nanoscale assembly of lanthanum silica with dense and porous interfacial structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinger, Benjamin; Motuzas, Julius; Miller, Christopher R; Smart, Simon; Diniz da Costa, João C

    2015-02-03

    This work reports on the nanoscale assembly of hybrid lanthanum oxide and silica structures, which form patterns of interfacial dense and porous networks. It was found that increasing the molar ratio of lanthanum nitrate to tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) in an acid catalysed sol-gel process alters the expected microporous metal oxide silica structure to a predominantly mesoporous structure above a critical lanthanum concentration. This change manifests itself by the formation of a lanthanum silicate phase, which results from the reaction of lanthanum oxide nanoparticles with the silica matrix. This process converts the microporous silica into the denser silicate phase. Above a lanthanum to silica ratio of 0.15, the combination of growth and microporous silica consumption results in the formation of nanoscale hybrid lanthanum oxides, with the inter-nano-domain spacing forming mesoporous volume. As the size of these nano-domains increases with concentration, so does the mesoporous volume. The absence of lanthanum hydroxide (La(OH)3) suggests the formation of La2O3 surrounded by lanthanum silicate.

  1. Electronic band structures and optical properties of type-II superlattice photodetectors with interfacial effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Peng-Fei; Mou, Shin; Chuang, Shun Lien

    2012-01-30

    The electronic band structures and optical properties of type-II superlattice (T2SL) photodetectors in the mid-infrared (IR) range are investigated. We formulate a rigorous band structure model using the 8-band k · p method to include the conduction and valence band mixing. After solving the 8 × 8 Hamiltonian and deriving explicitly the new momentum matrix elements in terms of envelope functions, optical transition rates are obtained through the Fermi's golden rule under various doping and injection conditions. Optical measurements on T2SL photodetectors are compared with our model and show good agreement. Our modeling results of quantum structures connect directly to the device-level design and simulation. The predicted doping effect is readily applicable to the optimization of photodetectors. We further include interfacial (IF) layers to study the significance of their effect. Optical properties of T2SLs are expected to have a large tunable range by controlling the thickness and material composition of the IF layers. Our model provides an efficient tool for the designs of novel photodetectors.

  2. Unravelling surface and interfacial structures of a metal-organic framework by transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yihan; Ciston, Jim; Zheng, Bin; Miao, Xiaohe; Czarnik, Cory; Pan, Yichang; Sougrat, Rachid; Lai, Zhiping; Hsiung, Chia-En; Yao, Kexin; Pinnau, Ingo; Pan, Ming; Han, Yu

    2017-05-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are crystalline porous materials with designable topology, porosity and functionality, having promising applications in gas storage and separation, ion conduction and catalysis. It is challenging to observe MOFs with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) due to the extreme instability of MOFs upon electron beam irradiation. Here, we use a direct-detection electron-counting camera to acquire TEM images of the MOF ZIF-8 with an ultralow dose of 4.1 electrons per square ångström to retain the structural integrity. The obtained image involves structural information transferred up to 2.1 Å, allowing the resolution of individual atomic columns of Zn and organic linkers in the framework. Furthermore, TEM reveals important local structural features of ZIF-8 crystals that cannot be identified by diffraction techniques, including armchair-type surface terminations and coherent interfaces between assembled crystals. These observations allow us to understand how ZIF-8 crystals self-assemble and the subsequent influence of interfacial cavities on mass transport of guest molecules.

  3. Unravelling surface and interfacial structures of a metal–organic framework by transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Yihan

    2017-02-21

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are crystalline porous materials with designable topology, porosity and functionality, having promising applications in gas storage and separation, ion conduction and catalysis1, 2, 3. It is challenging to observe MOFs with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) due to the extreme instability of MOFs upon electron beam irradiation4, 5, 6, 7. Here, we use a direct-detection electron-counting camera to acquire TEM images of the MOF ZIF-8 with an ultralow dose of 4.1 electrons per square ångström to retain the structural integrity. The obtained image involves structural information transferred up to 2.1 Å, allowing the resolution of individual atomic columns of Zn and organic linkers in the framework. Furthermore, TEM reveals important local structural features of ZIF-8 crystals that cannot be identified by diffraction techniques, including armchair-type surface terminations and coherent interfaces between assembled crystals. These observations allow us to understand how ZIF-8 crystals self-assemble and the subsequent influence of interfacial cavities on mass transport of guest molecules.

  4. P-wave Velocity Structure Across the Mariana Trench and Implications for Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eimer, M. O.; Wiens, D.; Lizarralde, D.; Cai, C.

    2017-12-01

    Estimates of the water flux at subduction zones remain uncertain, particularly the amount of water brought into the trench by the subducting plate. Normal faulting related to the bending of the incoming plate has been proposed to provide pathways for water to hydrate the crust and upper mantle. A passive and active source seismic experiment spanning both the incoming plate and forearc was conducted in 2012 in central Mariana to examine the role of hydration at subduction zones. The active-source component of the survey used the R/V M.G. Langsethairgun array and 68 short period sensors, including suspended hydrophones, deployed on 4 transects. This study at the Mariana trench offers a comparison to related studies of incoming plate hydration in Middle America, where differing thermal structures related to plate age predict different stability fields for hydrous minerals. The forearc structure is also of interest, since Mariana is characterized by large serpentine seamounts and may have a serpentinized mantle wedge. The velocity structure will also be important for the relocation of earthquakes in the incoming plate, since the seismicity can offer a constraint for the depth extent of these bending faults. We examine the P-wave velocity structure along a 400-km long wide-angle refraction transect perpendicular to the trench and spanning both the forearc and incoming plate. Preliminary results indicate a velocity reduction in the crust and uppermost mantle at the bending region of the incoming plate, relative to the plate's structure away from the trench. This reduction suggests that outer-rise faults extend into the upper mantle and may have promoted serpentinization of that material. Mantle Pn refraction phases are not observed in the forearc, consistent with the ambient noise tomography results that show upper-mantle velocities similar to that of the lower crust. The lack of contrast between the upper mantle and crustal velocities from the ambient noise has been

  5. A Reusable PZT Transducer for Monitoring Initial Hydration and Structural Health of Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaowen; Divsholi, Bahador Sabet; Soh, Chee Kiong

    2010-01-01

    During the construction of a concrete structure, strength monitoring is important to ensure the safety of both personnel and the structure. Furthermore, to increase the efficiency of in situ casting or precast of concrete, determining the optimal time of demolding is important for concrete suppliers. Surface bonded lead zirconate titanate (PZT) transducers have been used for damage detection and parameter identification for various engineering structures over the last two decades. In this work, a reusable PZT transducer setup for monitoring initial hydration of concrete and structural health is developed, where a piece of PZT is bonded to an enclosure with two bolts tightened inside the holes drilled in the enclosure. An impedance analyzer is used to acquire the admittance signatures of the PZT. Root mean square deviation (RMSD) is employed to associate the change in concrete strength with changes in the PZT admittance signatures. The results show that the reusable setup is able to effectively monitor the initial hydration of concrete and the structural health. It can also be detached from the concrete for future re-use. PMID:22399929

  6. A Reusable PZT Transducer for Monitoring Initial Hydration and Structural Health of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaowen Yang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available During the construction of a concrete structure, strength monitoring is important to ensure the safety of both personnel and the structure. Furthermore, to increase the efficiency of in situ casting or precast of concrete, determining the optimal time of demolding is important for concrete suppliers. Surface bonded lead zirconate titanate (PZT transducers have been used for damage detection and parameter identification for various engineering structures over the last two decades. In this work, a reusable PZT transducer setup for monitoring initial hydration of concrete and structural health is developed, where a piece of PZT is bonded to an enclosure with two bolts tightened inside the holes drilled in the enclosure. An impedance analyzer is used to acquire the admittance signatures of the PZT. Root mean square deviation (RMSD is employed to associate the change in concrete strength with changes in the PZT admittance signatures. The results show that the reusable setup is able to effectively monitor the initial hydration of concrete and the structural health. It can also be detached from the concrete for future re-use.

  7. Structure and hydration of membranes embedded with voltage-sensing domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Mihailescu, Mihaela; Freites, J Alfredo; Schow, Eric V; Worcester, David L; Gawrisch, Klaus; Tobias, Douglas J; White, Stephen H; Swartz, Kenton J

    2009-11-26

    Despite the growing number of atomic-resolution membrane protein structures, direct structural information about proteins in their native membrane environment is scarce. This problem is particularly relevant in the case of the highly charged S1-S4 voltage-sensing domains responsible for nerve impulses, where interactions with the lipid bilayer are critical for the function of voltage-activated ion channels. Here we use neutron diffraction, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structure and hydration of bilayer membranes containing S1-S4 voltage-sensing domains. Our results show that voltage sensors adopt transmembrane orientations and cause a modest reshaping of the surrounding lipid bilayer, and that water molecules intimately interact with the protein within the membrane. These structural findings indicate that voltage sensors have evolved to interact with the lipid membrane while keeping energetic and structural perturbations to a minimum, and that water penetrates the membrane, to hydrate charged residues and shape the transmembrane electric field.

  8. A reusable PZT transducer for monitoring initial hydration and structural health of concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaowen; Divsholi, Bahador Sabet; Soh, Chee Kiong

    2010-01-01

    During the construction of a concrete structure, strength monitoring is important to ensure the safety of both personnel and the structure. Furthermore, to increase the efficiency of in situ casting or precast of concrete, determining the optimal time of demolding is important for concrete suppliers. Surface bonded lead zirconate titanate (PZT) transducers have been used for damage detection and parameter identification for various engineering structures over the last two decades. In this work, a reusable PZT transducer setup for monitoring initial hydration of concrete and structural health is developed, where a piece of PZT is bonded to an enclosure with two bolts tightened inside the holes drilled in the enclosure. An impedance analyzer is used to acquire the admittance signatures of the PZT. Root mean square deviation (RMSD) is employed to associate the change in concrete strength with changes in the PZT admittance signatures. The results show that the reusable setup is able to effectively monitor the initial hydration of concrete and the structural health. It can also be detached from the concrete for future re-use.

  9. Surface and buried interfacial structures of epoxy resins used as underfills studied by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Anne V; Holden, Brad; Kristalyn, Cornelius; Fuller, Mike; Wilkerson, Brett; Chen, Zhan

    2011-05-01

    Flip chip technology has greatly improved the performance of semiconductor devices, but relies heavily on the performance of epoxy underfill adhesives. Because epoxy underfills are cured in situ in flip chip semiconductor devices, understanding their surface and interfacial structures is critical for understanding their adhesion to various substrates. Here, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to study surface and buried interfacial structures of two model epoxy resins used as underfills in flip chip devices, bisphenol A digylcidyl ether (BADGE) and 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDGE). The surface structures of these epoxies were compared before and after cure, and the orientations of their surface functional groups were deduced to understand how surface structural changes during cure may affect adhesion properties. Further, the effect of moisture exposure, a known cause of adhesion failure, on surface structures was studied. It was found that the BADGE surface significantly restructured upon moisture exposure while the BDDGE surface did not, showing that BADGE adhesives may be more prone to moisture-induced delamination. Lastly, although surface structure can give some insight into adhesion, buried interfacial structures more directly correspond to adhesion properties of polymers. SFG was used to study buried interfaces between deuterated polystyrene (d-PS) and the epoxies before and after moisture exposure. It was shown that moisture exposure acted to disorder the buried interfaces, most likely due to swelling. These results correlated with lap shear adhesion testing showing a decrease in adhesion strength after moisture exposure. The presented work showed that surface and interfacial structures can be correlated to adhesive strength and may be helpful in understanding and designing optimized epoxy underfill adhesives.

  10. Origin of interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in MgO/CoFe/metallic capping layer structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shouzhong; Wang, Mengxing; Yang, Hongxin; Zeng, Lang; Nan, Jiang; Zhou, Jiaqi; Zhang, Youguang; Hallal, Ali; Chshiev, Mairbek; Wang, Kang L; Zhang, Qianfan; Zhao, Weisheng

    2015-12-11

    Spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM) attracts extensive attentions due to its non-volatility, high density and low power consumption. The core device in STT-MRAM is CoFeB/MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), which possesses a high tunnel magnetoresistance ratio as well as a large value of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). It has been experimentally proven that a capping layer coating on CoFeB layer is essential to obtain a strong PMA. However, the physical mechanism of such effect remains unclear. In this paper, we investigate the origin of the PMA in MgO/CoFe/metallic capping layer structures by using a first-principles computation scheme. The trend of PMA variation with different capping materials agrees well with experimental results. We find that interfacial PMA in the three-layer structures comes from both the MgO/CoFe and CoFe/capping layer interfaces, which can be analyzed separately. Furthermore, the PMAs in the CoFe/capping layer interfaces are analyzed through resolving the magnetic anisotropy energy by layer and orbital. The variation of PMA with different capping materials is attributed to the different hybridizations of both d and p orbitals via spin-orbit coupling. This work can significantly benefit the research and development of nanoscale STT-MRAM.

  11. New faces of porous Prussian blue: interfacial assembly of integrated hetero-structures for sensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Biao; Selomulya, Cordelia; Zheng, Gengfeng; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2015-11-21

    Prussian blue (PB), the oldest synthetic coordination compound, is a classic and fascinating transition metal coordination material. Prussian blue is based on a three-dimensional (3-D) cubic polymeric porous network consisting of alternating ferric and ferrous ions, which provides facile assembly as well as precise interaction with active sites at functional interfaces. A fundamental understanding of the assembly mechanism of PB hetero-interfaces is essential to enable the full potential applications of PB crystals, including chemical sensing, catalysis, gas storage, drug delivery and electronic displays. Developing controlled assembly methods towards functionally integrated hetero-interfaces with adjustable sizes and morphology of PB crystals is necessary. A key point in the functional interface and device integration of PB nanocrystals is the fabrication of hetero-interfaces in a well-defined and oriented fashion on given substrates. This review will bring together these key aspects of the hetero-interfaces of PB nanocrystals, ranging from structure and properties, interfacial assembly strategies, to integrated hetero-structures for diverse sensing.

  12. Enzymatically structured emulsions in simulated gastrointestinal environment: impact on interfacial proteolysis and diffusion in intestinal mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macierzanka, Adam; Böttger, Franziska; Rigby, Neil M; Lille, Martina; Poutanen, Kaisa; Mills, E N Clare; Mackie, Alan R

    2012-12-18

    Fundamental knowledge of physicochemical interactions in the gastrointestinal environment is required in order to support rational designing of protein-stabilized colloidal food and pharmaceutical delivery systems with controlled behavior. In this paper, we report on the colloidal behavior of emulsions stabilized with the milk protein sodium caseinate (Na-Cas), and exposed to conditions simulating the human upper gastrointestinal tract. In particular, we looked at how the kinetics of proteolysis was affected by adsorption to an oil-water interface in emulsion and whether the proteolysis and the emulsion stability could be manipulated by enzymatic structuring of the interface. After cross-linking with the enzyme transglutaminase, the protein was digested with use of an in vitro model of gastro-duodenal proteolysis in the presence or absence of physiologically relevant surfactants (phosphatidylcholine, PC; bile salts, BS). Significant differences were found between the rates of digestion of Na-Cas cross-linked in emulsion (adsorbed protein) and in solution. In emulsion, the digestion of a population of polypeptides of M(r) ca. 50-100 kDa was significantly retarded through the gastric digestion. The persistent interfacial polypeptides maintained the original emulsion droplet size and prevented the system from phase separating. Rapid pepsinolysis of adsorbed, non-cross-linked Na-Cas and its displacement by PC led to emulsion destabilization. These results suggest that structuring of emulsions by enzymatic cross-linking of the interfacial protein may affect the phase behavior of emulsion in the stomach and the gastric digestion rate in vivo. Measurements of ζ-potential revealed that BS displaced the remaining protein from the oil droplets during the simulated duodenal phase of digestion. Diffusion of the postdigestion emulsion droplets through ex vivo porcine intestinal mucus was only significant in the presence of BS due to the high negative charge these

  13. The Structure and Transport of Water and Hydrated Ions Within Hydrophobic, Nanoscale Channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, J.K.; Herberg, J.L.; Wu, Y.; Schwegler, E.; Mehta, A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project includes an experimental and modeling investigation into water and hydrated ion structure and transport at nanomaterials interfaces. This is a topic relevant to understanding the function of many biological systems such as aquaporins that efficiently shuttle water and ion channels that permit selective transport of specific ions across cell membranes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are model nanoscale, hydrophobic channels that can be functionalized, making them artificial analogs for these biological channels. This project investigates the microscopic properties of water such as water density distributions and dynamics within CNTs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and the structure of hydrated ions at CNT interfaces via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Another component of this work is molecular simulation, which can predict experimental measurables such as the proton relaxation times, chemical shifts, and can compute the electronic structure of CNTs. Some of the fundamental questions this work is addressing are: (1) what is the length scale below which nanoscale effects such as molecular ordering become important, (2) is there a relationship between molecular ordering and transport?, and (3) how do ions interact with CNT interfaces? These are questions of interest to the scientific community, but they also impact the future generation of sensors, filters, and other devices that operate on the nanometer length scale. To enable some of the proposed applications of CNTs as ion filtration media and electrolytic supercapacitors, a detailed knowledge of water and ion structure at CNT interfaces is critical.

  14. Interfacial Reaction and IMC Growth of an Ultrasonically Soldered Cu/SAC305/Cu Structure during Isothermal Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulong Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to accelerate the growth of interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC layers in a soldering structure, Cu/SAC305/Cu was first ultrasonically spot soldered and then subjected to isothermal aging. Relatively short vibration times, i.e., 400 ms and 800 ms, were used for the ultrasonic soldering. The isothermal aging was conducted at 150 °C for 0, 120, 240, and 360 h. The evolution of microstructure, the IMC layer growth mechanism during aging, and the shear strength of the joints after aging were systemically investigated. Results showed the following. (i Formation of intermetallic compounds was accelerated by ultrasonic cavitation and streaming effects, the thickness of the interfacial Cu6Sn5 layer increased with aging time, and a thin Cu3Sn layer was identified after aging for 360 h. (ii The growth of the interfacial IMC layer of the ultrasonically soldered Cu/SAC305/Cu joints followed a linear function of the square root of the aging time, revealing a diffusion-controlled mechanism. (iii The tensile shear strength of the joint decreased to a small extent with increasing aging time, owing to the combined effects of IMC grain coarsening and the increase of the interfacial IMC. (iv Finally, although the fracture surfaces and failure locations of the joint soldered with 400 ms and 800 ms vibration times show similar characteristics, they are influenced by the aging time.

  15. Cooperative Effects of Zwitterionic-Ionic Surfactant Mixtures on the Interfacial Water Structure Revealed by Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xuecong; Yang, Fangyuan; Chen, Shunli; Zhu, Xuefeng; Wang, Chuanyi

    2018-05-08

    Cooperative effects of a series of equimolar binary zwitterionic-ionic surfactant mixtures on the interfacial water structure at the air-water interfaces have been studied by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS). For zwitterionic surfactant palmityl sulfobetaine (SNC 16 ), anionic surfactant sodium hexadecyl sulfate (SHS), and cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) with the same length of alkyl chain, significantly enhanced ordering of interfacial water molecules was observed for the zwitterionic-anionic surfactant mixtures SNC 16 -SHS, indicating that SNC 16 interacts more strongly with SHS than with CTAB because of the strong headgroup-headgroup electrostatic attraction for SNC 16 -SHS. Meanwhile, the SFG amplitude ratio of methyl and methylene symmetric stretching modes was used to verify the stronger interaction between SNC 16 and SHS. The conformational order indicator increased from 0.64 for SNC 16 to 7.17 for SNC 16 -SHS but only 0.94 for SNC 16 -CTAB. In addition, another anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was introduced to study the influence of chain-chain interaction. Decreased SFG amplitude of interfacial water molecules for SNC 16 -SDS was observed. Therefore, both the headgroup-headgroup electrostatic interaction and chain-chain van der Waals attractive interaction of the surfactants play an important role in enhancing the ordering of interfacial water molecules. The results provided experimental and theoretical bases for practical applications of the surfactants.

  16. The USANS technique for the investigation of structure from hydrated gels to porous rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crompton, Kylie; Forsythe, John; Bertram, Willem; Knott, R.B.; Barker, John

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The Ultra Small Angle Neutron Scattering (USANS) technique extends the range of the Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) technique into the tens of micron size range. This is extremely useful for many systems particularly those where sample preparation for optical or electron microscopy can cause major changes to the microstructure under investigation. Two examples will be presented to highlight different aspects of the technique. Firstly, the structure was investigated of a full hydrated polymer scaffold for stem cells constructed from chitosan. Stem cells interact with the scaffold on the micron scale however information on the nanoscale (i e individual chitosan polymer chains) is also required in order the tailor the scaffold structure. The soft, hydrated gel is unsuitable for optical or electron microscopy. Secondly, the structure was investigated of natural oil-bearing and synthetic rock. The scattering data from different thickness of rock was analysed using a Fourier Transform method to remove multiple scattering effects and to simulate scattering from a thin rock. In this case bulk properties such as porosity are of interest. (authors)

  17. Lutetium(III) aqua ion: On the dynamical structure of the heaviest lanthanoid hydration complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessa, Francesco; D’Angelo, Paola, E-mail: p.dangelo@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza,” P. le A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); Spezia, Riccardo [CNRS, UMR 8587, Laboratoire Analyse et Modelisation Pour la Biologie et l’Environnement, Université d’Evry Val d’Essonne, Blvd. F. Mitterrand, 91025 Evry Cedex (France)

    2016-05-28

    The structure and dynamics of the lutetium(III) ion in aqueous solution have been investigated by means of a polarizable force field molecular dynamics (MD). An 8-fold square antiprism (SAP) geometry has been found to be the dominant configuration of the lutetium(III) aqua ion. Nevertheless, a low percentage of 9-fold complexes arranged in a tricapped trigonal prism (TTP) geometry has been also detected. Dynamic properties have been explored by carrying out six independent MD simulations for each of four different temperatures: 277 K, 298 K, 423 K, 632 K. The mean residence time of water molecules in the first hydration shell at room temperature has been found to increase as compared to the central elements of the lanthanoid series in agreement with previous experimental findings. Water exchange kinetic rate constants at each temperature and activation parameters of the process have been determined from the MD simulations. The obtained structural and dynamical results suggest that the water exchange process for the lutetium(III) aqua ion proceeds with an associative mechanism, in which the SAP hydration complex undergoes temporary structural changes passing through a 9-fold TTP intermediate. Such results are consistent with the water exchange mechanism proposed for heavy lanthanoid atoms.

  18. Interfacial stability of CoSi2/Si structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, T.; Fathauer, R. W.

    1992-01-01

    The stability of CoSi2/Si interfaces was examined in this study using columnar silicide structures grown on (111) Si substrates. In the first set of experiments, Co and Si were codeposited using MBE at 800 C and the resulting columnar silicide layer was capped by epitaxial Si. Deposition of Co on the surface of the Si capping layer at 800 C results in the growth of the buried silicide columns. The buried columns grow by subsurface diffusion of the deposited Co, suppressing the formation of surface islands of CoSi2. The column sidewalls appear to be less stable than the top and bottom interfaces, resulting in preferential lateral growth and ultimately in the coalescence of the columns to form a continuous buried CoSi2 layer. In the second set of experiments, annealing of a 250 nm-thick buried columnar layer at 1000 C under a 100 nm-thick Si capping layer results in the formation of a surface layer of CoSi2 with a reduction in the sizes of the CoSi2 columns. For a sample having a thicker Si capping layer the annealing leads to Ostwald ripening producing buried equiaxed columns. The high CoSi2/Si interfacial strain could provide the driving force for the observed behavior of the buried columns under high-temperature annealing.

  19. The control of stoichiometry in Epitaxial semiconductor structures. Interfacial Chemistry: Property relations. A workshop review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Klaus J.

    1995-01-01

    A workshop on the control of stoichiometry in epitaxial semiconductor structures was held on August 21-26, 1995 in the hotel Stutenhaus at Vesser in Germany. The secluded location of the workshop in the forest of Thuringia and its informal style stimulated extensive private discussions among the participants and promoted new contacts between young scientists from Eastern and Western Europe and the USA. Topics addressed by the presentations were interactions of precursors to heteroepitaxy and doping with the substrate surface, the control of interfacial properties under the conditions of heteroepitaxy for selected materials systems, methods of characterization of interfaces and native point defects in semiconductor heterostructures and an in depth evaluation of the present status of the control and characterization of the point defect chemistry for one specific semiconductor (ZnGeP2), including studies of both heterostructures and bulk single crystals. The selected examples of presentations and comments given here represent individual choices - made by the author to highlight major points of the discussions.

  20. Structure and Interfacial Tension of a Hard-Rod Fluid in Planar Confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumby, Paul E; Wensink, Henricus H; Haslam, Andrew J; Jackson, George

    2017-10-24

    The structural properties and interfacial tension of a fluid of rodlike hard-spherocylinder particles in contact with hard structureless flat walls are studied by means of Monte Carlo simulation. The calculated surface tension between the rod fluid and the substrate is characterized by a nonmonotonic trend as a function of the bulk concentration (density) over the range of isotropic bulk concentrations. As suggested by earlier theoretical studies, a surface-ordering scenario is confirmed by our simulations: the local orientational order close to the wall changes from uniaxial to biaxial nematic when the bulk concentration reaches about 85% of the value at the onset of the isotropic-nematic phase transition. The surface ordering coincides with a wetting transition whereby the hard wall is wetted by a nematic film. Accurate values of the fluid-solid surface tension, the adsorption, and the average particle-wall contact distance are reported (over a broad range of densities into the dense nematic region for the first time), which can serve as a useful benchmark for future theoretical and experimental studies on confined rod fluids. The simulation data are supplemented with predictions from second-virial density functional theory, which are in good qualitative agreement with the simulation results.

  1. Fabricating small-scale, curved, polymeric structures with convex and concave menisci through interfacial free energy equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chao-Min; Matsuura, Koji; Wang, I-Jan; Kuroda, Yuka; LeDuc, Philip R; Naruse, Keiji

    2009-11-21

    Polymeric curved structures are widely used in imaging systems including optical fibers and microfluidic channels. Here, we demonstrate that small-scale, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based, curved structures can be fabricated through controlling interfacial free energy equilibrium. Resultant structures have a smooth, symmetric, curved surface, and may be convex or concave in form based on surface tension balance. Their curvatures are controlled by surface characteristics (i.e., hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity) of the molds and semi-liquid PDMS. In addition, these structures are shown to be biocompatible for cell culture. Our system provides a simple, efficient and economical method for generating integrateable optical components without costly fabrication facilities.

  2. Structural studies of aqueous solutions at high temperatures. Critical opalescence and hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, D.M.

    2000-09-01

    Neutron scattering techniques were used to study aspects of the static, or equilibrium, structure at microscopic scales in a number of aqueous solutions at non ambient conditions (Temperature, T > 300 K, and pressure, P > 1 bar). Critical opalescence was observed in both pure D 2 O and a NaCI-D 2 O mixture by means of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), as described in Part I. The dependence of the correlation length, ξ, and the long wavelength limit, S(0), was measured at a number of state points on the critical isochore. The results are interpreted in terms of theories of critical phenomena; in particular the expected power law behaviour of ξ and S(0) with respect to reduced temperature, t, on the critical isochore. In the case of D 2 O, we observe the expected 3d-Ising behaviour with exponents (ν = 0.623 ± 0.030, γ = 1.14 ± 0.05) and amplitudes in agreement with theoretical and semi-empirical predictions. We performed measurements on aqueous sodium chloride, equivalent to those on pure 020, with the intention of classifying the critical behaviour. Although strong power-law divergence of the quantities ξ and S(0) was not observed, we find that the value of S(0) for a given ξ is strongly reduced in the ionic solution with respect to the pure solvent. Such behaviour is inconsistent with a thermodynamic model of aqueous sodium chloride, based on experimental thermodynamic data and the expected asymptotic 3d-Ising behaviour. Short-range structural correlations between solute and solvent atoms in aqueous solutions were studied by the technique of neutron diffraction and isotopic substitution (NDIS), as described in Part II. The anion hydration structure in 1.5 molal aqueous NaCl, was investigated at (T = 580 K, P = 800 bar) and (T = 380 K, P = 200 bar). Isotopic substitution was performed on the chloride ion, enabling the difference between scattering functions to be interpreted in terms of CI-H and CI-O correlation functions. The results show the chloride

  3. Structural studies of aqueous solutions at high temperatures. Critical opalescence and hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, D.M

    2000-09-01

    Neutron scattering techniques were used to study aspects of the static, or equilibrium, structure at microscopic scales in a number of aqueous solutions at non ambient conditions (Temperature, T > 300 K, and pressure, P > 1 bar). Critical opalescence was observed in both pure D{sub 2}O and a NaCI-D{sub 2}O mixture by means of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), as described in Part I. The dependence of the correlation length, {xi}, and the long wavelength limit, S(0), was measured at a number of state points on the critical isochore. The results are interpreted in terms of theories of critical phenomena; in particular the expected power law behaviour of {xi} and S(0) with respect to reduced temperature, t, on the critical isochore. In the case of D{sub 2}O, we observe the expected 3d-Ising behaviour with exponents ({nu} = 0.623 {+-} 0.030, {gamma} = 1.14 {+-} 0.05) and amplitudes in agreement with theoretical and semi-empirical predictions. We performed measurements on aqueous sodium chloride, equivalent to those on pure 020, with the intention of classifying the critical behaviour. Although strong power-law divergence of the quantities {xi} and S(0) was not observed, we find that the value of S(0) for a given {xi} is strongly reduced in the ionic solution with respect to the pure solvent. Such behaviour is inconsistent with a thermodynamic model of aqueous sodium chloride, based on experimental thermodynamic data and the expected asymptotic 3d-Ising behaviour. Short-range structural correlations between solute and solvent atoms in aqueous solutions were studied by the technique of neutron diffraction and isotopic substitution (NDIS), as described in Part II. The anion hydration structure in 1.5 molal aqueous NaCl, was investigated at (T = 580 K, P = 800 bar) and (T = 380 K, P = 200 bar). Isotopic substitution was performed on the chloride ion, enabling the difference between scattering functions to be interpreted in terms of CI-H and CI-O correlation functions

  4. Interfacial recombination at /AlGa/As/GaAs heterojunction structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettenberg, M.; Kressel, H.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the interfacial recombination velocity at Al0.25Ga0.75As/GaAs and Al0.5Ga0.5As/GaAs heterojunctions. The recombination velocity was derived from a study of the injected minority-carrier lifetime as a function of the junction spacing. It is found that for heterojunction spacings in excess of about 1 micron, the interfacial recombination can be characterized by a surface recombination velocity of 4,000 and 8,000 cm/sec for the two types of heterojunctions, respectively. For double-heterojunction spacings below 1 micron, the constancy of the minority-carrier lifetime suggests that the interfacial recombination velocity decreases effectively. This effect is technologically very important since it makes it possible to construct very low-threshold injection lasers. No such effect is observed in single-heterojunction diodes.

  5. Self-healing sandwich structures incorporating an interfacial layer with vascular network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chunlin; Peters, Kara; Li, Yulong

    2013-01-01

    A self-healing capability specifically targeted for sandwich composite laminates based on interfacial layers with built-in vascular networks is presented. The self-healing occurs at the facesheet–core interface through an additional interfacial layer to seal facesheet cracks and rebond facesheet–core regions. The efficacy of introducing the self-healing system at the facesheet–core interface is evaluated through four-point bend and edgewise compression testing of representative foam core sandwich composite specimens with impact induced damage. The self-healing interfacial layer partially restored the specific initial stiffness, doubling the residual initial stiffness as compared to the control specimen after the impact event. The restoration of the ultimate specific skin strength was less successful. The results also highlight the critical challenge in self-healing of sandwich composites, which is to rebond facesheets which have separated from the core material. (paper)

  6. Application of a new concept for multi-scale interfacial structures to the dam-break case with an obstacle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hänsch, Susann, E-mail: s.haensch@hzdr.de; Lucas, Dirk; Höhne, Thomas; Krepper, Eckhard

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • A concept for modeling transitions between different gaseous morphologies is presented. • The Eulerian multi-field model includes dispersed and continuous gas phases. • Interfacial transfer models are found considering free surfaces within MUSIG framework. • A new source term for sub-grid waves and instabilities is introduced. - Abstract: New results of a generalized concept developed for the simulation of two-phase flows with multi-scale interfacial structures are presented in this paper. By extending the inhomogeneus Multiple Size Group-model, the concept enables transitions between dispersed and continuous gas morphologies, including the appearance and evanescence of one of these particular gas phases. Adequate interfacial transfer formulations, which are consistent with such an approach, are introduced for interfacial area density and drag. A new drag-formulation considers shear stresses occurring within the free surface area. The application of the concept to a collapsing water column demonstrates the breakup of continuous gas into a polydispersed phase forming different bubble sizes underneath the free surface. Thus, both resolved free surface structures as well as the entrainment of bubbles and their coalescence and breakup underneath the surface can be described in the same time. The simulations have been performed with the CFD-code CFX 14.0 and will be compared with experimental images. The paper will further investigate the possible improvement of such free surface simulations by including sub-grid information about small waves and instabilities at the free surface. A comparison of the results will be used for a discussion of possible new mass transfer models between filtered free surface areas and dispersed bubble size groups as part of the future work.

  7. Enclathration of CO2 as a co-guest of structure H hydrates and its implications for CO2 capture and sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yohan; Lee, Dongyoung; Lee, Jong-Won; Seo, Yongwon

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We examine sH hydrates with CO 2 + N 2 + neohexane for CO 2 capture and sequestration. • The structural transition occurs in the CO 2 (40%) + N 2 (60%) + neohexane system. • CO 2 molecules are enclathrated into sH hydrates in the N 2 -rich systems. • CO 2 selectivity in sH hydrates is slightly lower than that in sI hydrates. • ΔH d values provide information on the structural transition of sH to sI hydrates. - Abstract: In this study, the thermodynamic behaviors, cage-specific guest distributions, structural transition, and dissociation enthalpies of sH hydrates with CO 2 + N 2 gas mixtures were investigated for their potential applications to hydrate-based CO 2 capture and sequestration. The stability conditions of the CO 2 + N 2 + water systems and the CO 2 + N 2 + neohexane (2,2-dimethylbutane, NH) + water systems indicated that the gas mixtures in the range of flue gas compositions could form sH hydrates, thereby mitigating the pressure and temperature required for gas hydrate formation. Structure identification using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) revealed the coexistence of sI and sH hydrates in the CO 2 (40%) + N 2 (60%) + NH system and the hydrate structure transformed from sH into sI as the CO 2 concentration increased. In addition, the Raman analysis clearly demonstrated that CO 2 molecules were enclathrated into the cages of sH hydrates in the N 2 -rich systems. It was found from direct CO 2 composition measurements that CO 2 selectivity in the sH hydrate phase was slightly lower than that in the corresponding sI hydrate phase. Dissociation enthalpy (ΔH d ) measurements using a high-pressure micro-differential scanning calorimeter (HP μ-DSC) indicated that the ΔH d values could also provide valuable information on the structural transition of sH to sI hydrates with respect to the CO 2 concentration in the feed gas. This study provides a better understanding of the thermodynamic and physicochemical background for CO 2

  8. Effect of Surface Hydration on Antifouling Properties of Mixed Charged Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Chuan; Huang, Hao; Zhang, Kexin; Hung, Hsiang-Chieh; Xu, Yao; Li, Yaoxin; Jiang, Shaoyi; Chen, Zhan

    2018-05-07

    Interfacial water structure on a polymer surface in water (or surface hydration) is related to the antifouling activity of the polymer. Zwitterionic polymer materials exhibit excellent antifouling activity due to their strong surface hydration. It was proposed to replace zwitterionic polymers using mixed charged polymers because it is much easier to prepare mixed charged polymer samples with much lower costs. In this study, using sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, we investigated interfacial water structures on mixed charged polymer surfaces in water, and how such structures change while exposing to salt solutions and protein solutions. The 1:1 mixed charged polymer exhibits excellent antifouling property while other mixed charged polymers with different ratios of the positive/negative charges do not. It was found that on the 1:1 mixed charged polymer surface, SFG water signal is dominated by the contribution of the strongly hydrogen bonded water molecules, indicating strong hydration of the polymer surface. The responses of the 1:1 mixed charged polymer surface to salt solutions are similar to those of zwitterionic polymers. Interestingly, exposure to high concentrations of salt solutions leads to stronger hydration of the 1:1 mixed charged polymer surface after replacing the salt solution with water. Protein molecules do not substantially perturb the interfacial water structure on the 1:1 mixed charged polymer surface and do not adsorb to the surface, showing that this mixed charged polymer is an excellent antifouling material.

  9. Structural basis for the transformation pathways of the sodium naproxen anhydrate–hydrate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Andrew D.; Cornett, Claus; Larsen, Flemming H.; Qu, Haiyan; Raijada, Dhara; Rantanen, Jukka

    2014-01-01

    Crystal structures are presented for two dihydrate polymorphs (DH-I and DH-II) of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug sodium (S)-naproxen. The structure of DH-I is determined from twinned single crystals obtained by solution crystallization. DH-II is obtained by solid-state routes, and its structure is derived using powder X-ray diffraction, solid-state 13C and 23Na MAS NMR, and molecular modelling. The validity of both structures is supported by dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) calculations. The structures of DH-I and DH-II, and in particular their relationships to the monohydrate (MH) and anhydrate (AH) structures, provide a basis to rationalize the observed transformation pathways in the sodium (S)-naproxen anhydrate–hydrate system. All structures contain Na+/carboxylate/H2O sections, alternating with sections containing the naproxen molecules. The structure of DH-I is essentially identical to MH in the naproxen region, containing face-to-face arrangements of the naphthalene rings, whereas the structure of DH-II is comparable to AH in the naproxen region, containing edge-to-face arrangements of the naphthalene rings. This structural similarity permits topotactic transformation between AH and DH-II, and between MH and DH-I, but requires re-organization of the naproxen molecules for transformation between any other pair of structures. The topotactic pathways dominate at room temperature or below, while the non-topotactic pathways become active at higher temperatures. Thermochemical data for the dehydration processes are rationalized in the light of this new structural information. PMID:25295174

  10. Structural basis for the transformation pathways of the sodium naproxen anhydrate–hydrate system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Bond

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Crystal structures are presented for two dihydrate polymorphs (DH-I and DH-II of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug sodium (S-naproxen. The structure of DH-I is determined from twinned single crystals obtained by solution crystallization. DH-II is obtained by solid-state routes, and its structure is derived using powder X-ray diffraction, solid-state 13C and 23Na MAS NMR, and molecular modelling. The validity of both structures is supported by dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D calculations. The structures of DH-I and DH-II, and in particular their relationships to the monohydrate (MH and anhydrate (AH structures, provide a basis to rationalize the observed transformation pathways in the sodium (S-naproxen anhydrate–hydrate system. All structures contain Na+/carboxylate/H2O sections, alternating with sections containing the naproxen molecules. The structure of DH-I is essentially identical to MH in the naproxen region, containing face-to-face arrangements of the naphthalene rings, whereas the structure of DH-II is comparable to AH in the naproxen region, containing edge-to-face arrangements of the naphthalene rings. This structural similarity permits topotactic transformation between AH and DH-II, and between MH and DH-I, but requires re-organization of the naproxen molecules for transformation between any other pair of structures. The topotactic pathways dominate at room temperature or below, while the non-topotactic pathways become active at higher temperatures. Thermochemical data for the dehydration processes are rationalized in the light of this new structural information.

  11. Structural basis for the transformation pathways of the sodium naproxen anhydrate-hydrate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Andrew D; Cornett, Claus; Larsen, Flemming H; Qu, Haiyan; Raijada, Dhara; Rantanen, Jukka

    2014-09-01

    Crystal structures are presented for two dihydrate polymorphs (DH-I and DH-II) of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug sodium (S)-naproxen. The structure of DH-I is determined from twinned single crystals obtained by solution crystallization. DH-II is obtained by solid-state routes, and its structure is derived using powder X-ray diffraction, solid-state (13)C and (23)Na MAS NMR, and molecular modelling. The validity of both structures is supported by dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) calculations. The structures of DH-I and DH-II, and in particular their relationships to the monohydrate (MH) and anhydrate (AH) structures, provide a basis to rationalize the observed transformation pathways in the sodium (S)-naproxen anhydrate-hydrate system. All structures contain Na(+)/carboxylate/H2O sections, alternating with sections containing the naproxen molecules. The structure of DH-I is essentially identical to MH in the naproxen region, containing face-to-face arrangements of the naphthalene rings, whereas the structure of DH-II is comparable to AH in the naproxen region, containing edge-to-face arrangements of the naphthalene rings. This structural similarity permits topotactic transformation between AH and DH-II, and between MH and DH-I, but requires re-organization of the naproxen molecules for transformation between any other pair of structures. The topotactic pathways dominate at room temperature or below, while the non-topotactic pathways become active at higher temperatures. Thermochemical data for the dehydration processes are rationalized in the light of this new structural information.

  12. Influence of the side chain and substrate on polythiophene thin film surface, bulk, and buried interfacial structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Minyu; Jasensky, Joshua; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Li, Yaoxin; Pichan, Cayla; Lu, Xiaolin; Chen, Zhan

    2016-08-10

    The molecular structures of organic semiconducting thin films mediate the performance of various devices composed of such materials. To fully understand how the structures of organic semiconductors alter on substrates due to different polymer side chains and different interfacial interactions, thin films of two kinds of polythiophene derivatives with different side-chains, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and poly(3-potassium-6-hexanoate thiophene) (P3KHT), were deposited and compared on various surfaces. A combination of analytical tools was applied in this research: contact angle goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize substrate dielectric surfaces with varied hydrophobicity for polymer film deposition; X-ray diffraction and UV-vis spectroscopy were used to examine the polythiophene film bulk structure; sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was utilized to probe the molecular structures of polymer film surfaces in air and buried solid/solid interfaces. Both side-chain hydrophobicity and substrate hydrophobicity were found to mediate the crystallinity of the polythiophene film, as well as the orientation of the thiophene ring within the polymer backbone at the buried polymer/substrate interface and the polymer thin film surface in air. For the same type of polythiophene film deposited on different substrates, a more hydrophobic substrate surface induced thiophene ring alignment with the surface normal at both the buried interface and on the surface in air. For different films (P3HT vs. P3KHT) deposited on the same dielectric substrate, a more hydrophobic polythiophene side chain caused the thiophene ring to align more towards the surface at the buried polymer/substrate interface and on the surface in air. We believe that the polythiophene surface, bulk, and buried interfacial molecular structures all influence the hole mobility within the polythiophene film. Successful characterization of an organic conducting

  13. Effect of Aging Process in Different Solutions on Kenaf Fibre Structure and Its Interfacial Adhesion in Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shalwan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Interfacial adhesion of kenaf fibres in epoxy composites was investigated using single fibre pull-out test. Several aged kenaf fibres were tested in this work. Two types of kenaf fibres were used in the work, those treated with 6% NaOH and those untreated kenaf fibres. Kenaf fibres were aged in engine oil, water, salt water, and diesel. The pull-out tests were performed using microtensile tests. The tests were performed at 1 mm/min loading rate. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the damage on the fibres and the effect of the treatment. The general results revealed that aging of the fibres reduced their strength and interfacial adhesion. Salt water showed the least effect on the strength of the fibres. At most cases, the breakage in the fibres is the main failure. In other words, there is no remarkable effect of aging on the interfacial adhesion since the most impact was on the structure of the fibres.

  14. Influence of Superplasticizer-Microsilica Complex on Cement Hydration, Structure and Properties of Cement Stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, I. M.; Kramar, L. Ya; Orlov, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    According to the study results, the influence of complex additives based on microsilica and superplasticizers on the processes of the heat release, hydration, hardening, formation of the structure and properties of cement stone was determined. Calorimetry, derivatography, X-ray phase analysis, electronic microscopy and physical-mechanical methods for analyzing the properties of cement stone were used for the studies. It was established that plasticizing additives, in addition to the main water-reducing and rheological functions, regulate cement solidification and hardening while polycarboxylate superplasticizers even contribute to the formation of a special, amorphized microstructure of cement stone. In a complex containing microsilica and a polycarboxylate superplasticizer the strength increases sharply with a sharp drop in the capillary porosity responsible for the density, permeability, durability, and hence, the longevity of concrete. All this is a weighty argument in favor of the use of microsilica jointly with a polycarboxylate superplasticizer in road concretes operated under aggressive conditions.

  15. Direct measurements of 3d structure, chemistry and mass density during the induction period of C3s hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Qinang; Aboustait, Mohammed; Kim, Taehwan; Ley, M. Tyler; Bullard, Jeffrey W.; Scherer, George; Hanan, Jay C.; Rose, Volker; Winarski, Robert; Gelb, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The reasons for the start and end of the induction period of cement hydration remain a topic of controversy. One long-standing hypothesis is that a thin metastable hydrate forming on the surface of cement grains significantly reduces the particle dissolution rate; the eventual disappearance of this layer re-establishes higher dissolution rates at the beginning of the acceleration period. However, the importance, or even the existence, of this metastable layer has been questioned because it cannot be directly detected in most experiments. In this work, a combined analysis using nano-tomography and nano-X-ray fluorescence makes the direct imaging of early hydration products possible. These novel X-ray imaging techniques provide quantitative measurements of 3D structure, chemical composition, and mass density of the hydration products during the induction period. This work does not observe a low density product on the surface of the particle, but does provide insights into the formation of etch pits and the subsequent hydration products that fill them.

  16. Model of interfacial melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Zuckermann, Martin J.

    1987-01-01

    A two-dimensional model is proposed to describe systems with phase transitions which take place in terms of crystalline as well as internal degrees of freedom. Computer simulation of the model shows that the interplay between the two sets of degrees of freedom permits observation of grain-boundar......-boundary formation and interfacial melting, a nonequilibrium process by which the system melts at the boundaries of a polycrystalline domain structure. Lipid membranes are candidates for systems with pronounced interfacial melting behavior....

  17. The influence of raw material, added emulsifying salt and spray drying on cheese powder structure and hydration properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felix da Silva, Denise; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Hougaard, Anni Bygvrå

    2017-01-01

    The present work has evaluated how raw material, addition of emulsifying salts (ES) and drying technology affect particle characteristics, structure, and hydration of cheese powders. In this context the spray drying technology induced the strongest effect on morphology and swelling of cheese powder...

  18. Grid inhomogeneous solvation theory: hydration structure and thermodynamics of the miniature receptor cucurbit[7]uril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Crystal N; Young, Tom Kurtzman; Gilson, Michael K

    2012-07-28

    The displacement of perturbed water upon binding is believed to play a critical role in the thermodynamics of biomolecular recognition, but it is nontrivial to unambiguously define and answer questions about this process. We address this issue by introducing grid inhomogeneous solvation theory (GIST), which discretizes the equations of inhomogeneous solvation theory (IST) onto a three-dimensional grid situated in the region of interest around a solute molecule or complex. Snapshots from explicit solvent simulations are used to estimate localized solvation entropies, energies, and free energies associated with the grid boxes, or voxels, and properly summing these thermodynamic quantities over voxels yields information about hydration thermodynamics. GIST thus provides a smoothly varying representation of water properties as a function of position, rather than focusing on hydration sites where solvent is present at high density. It therefore accounts for full or partial displacement of water from sites that are highly occupied by water, as well as for partly occupied and water-depleted regions around the solute. GIST can also provide a well-defined estimate of the solvation free energy and therefore enables a rigorous end-states analysis of binding. For example, one may not only use a first GIST calculation to project the thermodynamic consequences of displacing water from the surface of a receptor by a ligand, but also account, in a second GIST calculation, for the thermodynamics of subsequent solvent reorganization around the bound complex. In the present study, a first GIST analysis of the molecular host cucurbit[7]uril is found to yield a rich picture of hydration structure and thermodynamics in and around this miniature receptor. One of the most striking results is the observation of a toroidal region of high water density at the center of the host's nonpolar cavity. Despite its high density, the water in this toroidal region is disfavored energetically and

  19. The crystal chemistry and structural analysis of uranium oxide hydrates. Final report, May 15, 1995--December 31, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.L.; Ewing, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this research program was to develop a thorough understanding of the crystal-chemical and crystal-structural systematics of uranyl oxide hydrates which are the initial corrosion products of the UO 2 in spent nuclear fuel and the principal phases in which actinides occur in the near surface environment. The scope of this program has been expanded to include all inorganic phases in which U 6+ plays a significant structural role; currently 183 phases with known crystal structures

  20. Quantification of Protein Hydration, Glass Transitions, and Structural Relaxations of Aqueous Protein and Carbohydrate-Protein Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Yrjö H; Potes, Naritchaya

    2015-06-11

    Water distribution and miscibility of carbohydrate and protein components in biological materials and their structural contributions in concentrated solids are poorly understood. In the present study, structural relaxations and a glass transition of protein hydration water and antiplasticization of the hydration water at low temperatures were measured using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) for bovine whey protein (BWP), aqueous glucose-fructose (GF), and their mixture. Thermal transitions of α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin components of BWP included water-content-dependent endothermic but reversible dehydration and denaturation, and exothermic and irreversible aggregation. An α-relaxation assigned to hydration water in BWP appeared at water-content-dependent temperatures and increased to over the range of 150-200 K at decreasing water content and in the presence of GF. Two separate glass transitions and individual fractions of unfrozen water of ternary GF-BWP-water systems contributed to uncoupled α-relaxations, suggesting different roles of protein hydration water and carbohydrate vitrification in concentrated solids during freezing and dehydration. Hydration water in the BWP fraction of GF-BWP systems was derived from equilibrium water sorption and glass transition data of the GF fraction, which gave a significant universal method to quantify (i) protein hydration water and (ii) the unfrozen water in protein-carbohydrate systems for such applications as cryopreservation, freezing, lyophilization, and dehydration of biological materials. A ternary supplemented phase diagram (state diagram) established for the GF-BWP-water system can be used for the analysis of the water distribution across carbohydrate and protein components in such applications.

  1. Infrared Spectroscopic Study on Structural Change and Interfacial Interaction in Rubber Composites Filled with Silica-Kaolin Hybrid Fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Guan, J.; Hu, H.; Gao, H.; Zhang, L.

    2016-07-01

    A series of natural rubber/styrene butadiene rubber/polybutadiene rubber composites was prepared with nanometer silica and micron kaolin by a dry modification process, mechanical compounding, and mold vulcanization. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and a scanning electron microscope were used to investigate the structural changes and interfacial interactions in composites. The results showed that the "seesaw" structure was formed particularly with the incorporation of silica particles in the preparation process, which would be beneficial to the dispersibility of fillers in the rubber matrix. The kaolinite platelets were generally arranged in directional alignment. Kaolinite with smaller particle size and low-defect structure was more stable in preparation, but kaolinite with larger particle size and high defect structure tended to change the crystal structure. The composite prepared in this research exhibited excellent mechanical and thermal properties.

  2. Hydration structures of U(III) and U(IV) ions from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, Kevin; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2012-01-01

    We apply DFT+U-based ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to study the hydration structures of U(III) and U(IV) ions, pertinent to redox reactions associated with uranium salts in aqueous media. U(III) is predicted to be coordinated to 8 water molecules, while U(IV) has a hydration number between 7 and 8. At least one of the innershell water molecules of the hydrated U(IV) complex becomes spontaneously deprotonated. As a result, the U(IV)–O pair correlation function exhibits a satellite peak at 2.15 Å associated with the shorter U(IV)–(OH − ) bond. This feature is not accounted for in analysis of extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray adsorption near edge structure measurements, which yield higher estimates of U(IV) hydration numbers. This suggests that it may be useful to include the effect of possible hydrolysis in future interpretation of experiments, especially when the experimental pH is close to the reported hydrolysis equilibrium constant value.

  3. Quantum chemical analysis of the structures of MgSO4 hydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iype, E.; Ozen, C.; Nedea, S.V.; Rindt, C.C.M.; Zondag, H.A.

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium sulfate salts can form hydrated compounds with up to seven degree of hydration with an energy exchange of the order of 2.8GJ/m3 [1]. In addition, this salt is abundant in nature and thus this material is a potential candidate for storing energy in seasonal heat storage systems. One of the

  4. Raman and infrared spectroscopic studies of the structure of water (H2O, HOD, D2O) in stoichiometric crystalline hydrates and in electrolyte solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buanam-Om, C.

    1981-01-01

    The chapter of reviews presents in particular the Badger-Bauer-rule, distance and angle dependence of O-H...Y hydrogen bond and the structure of aqueous electrolyte solutions. A chapter of vibrational spectroscopic investigations of crystalline hydrates - metal perchlorate hydrates follows. Two further chapters just so investigate metal halide hydrates and some sulfate hydrates and related systems. The following chapter describes near infrared spectroscopic investigations of HOD(D 2 O) and its electrolyte solutions. The concluding chapter contains thermodynamic consequences and some properties of electrolyte solutions from vibrational spectroscopic investigations. (SPI) [de

  5. A structural study of nepheline hydrate I, an inorganic ion exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, S.

    1985-01-01

    The crystal structures of nepheline hydrates I, Na 3 Al 3 Si 3 O 12 x 2H 2 O, and three compounds produced by ion exchange with aqueous KCl, RbCl and CsCl at 80 degrees C, have been studied using X-ray diffraction methods. This synthetic silicate has a tetrahedral framework with a two-dimensional pore system consisting of perpendicular 8-ring and 6-ring channels. The long-range ordering of Si and Al into adjacent tetrahedra is well developed. Some aspects of the topology, geometry and bonding of the tetrahedral frame are discussed. Related framework types are derived by unit cell twinning of the idealized cristobalite structure. A limit in the ion exchange is observed when about 1/3 of the Na + ions have been replaced. This behaviour is explained by the restricted volume of two Na sites situated in the 6-ring channel. The readily exchangeable ions and water molecules in the 8-ring channels an arrangement which gradually changes when the size of the alkali metal-ion increases. Most K + -exchanged crystals have a unit cell which is determined by the translational symmetry of the framework, while the original Na form has a two-fold superstructure and the Rb + -exchanged form has a five-fold superstructure. Caesium-ion-exchanged crystals have incommensurate structures. The occurrence of superstructures is related to long-range ordering of the species in the 8-ring channels. (author)

  6. Application of Neutron imaging in pore structure of hydrated wellbore cement: comparison of hydration of H20 with D2O based Portland cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussenova, D.; Bilheux, H.; Radonjic, M.

    2012-12-01

    Wellbore Cement studies have been ongoing for decades. The studies vary from efforts to reduce permeability and resistance to corrosive environment to issues with gas migration also known as Sustained Casing Pressure (SCP). These practical issues often lead to health and safety problems as well as huge economic loss in oil and gas industry. Several techniques have been employed to reduce the impact of gas leakage. In this study we purely focus on expandable liners, which are introduced as part of oil well reconstruction and work-overs and as well abandonment procedures that help in prevention of SCP. Expandable liner is a tube that after application of a certain tool can increase its diameter. The increase in diameter creates extra force on hydrated cement that results in reducing width of interface fractures and cement-tube de-bonding. Moreover, this also causes cement to change its microstructure and other porous medium properties, primarily hydraulic conductivity. In order to examine changes before and after operations, cement pore structure must be well characterized and correlated to cement slurry design as well as chemical and physical environmental conditions. As modern oil well pipes and tubes contain iron, it is difficult to perform X-ray tomography of a bulk measurement of the cement in its wellbore conditions, which are tube wall-cement-tube wall. Neutron imaging is a complementary technique to x-ray imaging and is well suited for detection of light elements imbedded in metallic containers. Thus, Neutron Imaging (NI) is investigated as a tool for the detection of pore structure of hydrated wellbore cement. Recent measurements were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) neutron imaging facility. NI is is highly sensitive to light elements such as Hydrogen (H). Oil well cements that have undergone a full hydration contain on average 30%-40% of free water in its pore structure. The unreacted water is the main

  7. Achieving the interfacial polarization on C/Fe3C heterojunction structures for highly efficient lightweight microwave absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanan; Liu, Wei; Quan, Bin; Ji, Guangbin; Ma, Jianna; Li, Daoran; Meng, Wei

    2017-12-15

    Design of dielectric/magnetic heterostructure and multiple interfaces is a challenge for the microwave absorption. Thus, in this study, a novel C/Fe 3 C nanocomposites have been fabricated by annealing the precursors obtained by the facile chemical blowing of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and Fe(NO 3 ) 3 ·9H 2 O. By changing the content of Fe(NO 3 ) 3 ·9H 2 O, the honeycomb-like structure with scads of pores and electromagnetic parameters could be successfully tailored. When the addition of Fe(NO 3 ) 3 ·9H 2 O is ranging from 1 to 2g, honeycomb-structured nanocomposites possess high performance microwave absorption when mixed with 90wt% paraffin. The minimal reflection loss is -37.4dB at 13.6GHz and effective bandwidth can reach to 5.6GHz when the thickness is 2.0mm, indicating its great potential in microwave absorbing field. Its outstanding microwave performance is tightly related to the porous structure and substantial interface such as carbon/air and carbon/Fe 3 C, which are in favor of the impedance matching and interfacial polarization. Thus, our study may provide a good reference for the facile synthesis of light-weight carbon-based nanocomposites with effective interfacial polarization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Monopeptide versus Monopeptoid: Insights on Structure and Hydration of Aqueous Alanine and Sarcosine via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uejio, Janel S.; Schwartz, Craig P.; Duffin, Andrew M.; England, Alice; Prendergast, David; Saykally, Richard J.

    2009-11-19

    Despite the obvious significance, the aqueous interactions of peptides remain incompletely understood. Their synthetic analogues called peptoids (poly-N-substituted glycines), have recently emerged as a promising biomimetic material, particularly due to their robust secondary structure and resistance to denaturation. We describe comparative near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy studies of aqueous sarcosine, the simplest peptoid, and alanine, its peptide isomer, interpreted by density functional theory calculations. The sarcosine nitrogen K-edge spectrum is blue-shifted with respect to that of alanine, in agreement with our calculations; we conclude that this shift results primarily from the methyl group substitution on the nitrogen of sarcosine. Our calculations indicate that the nitrogen K-edge spectrum of alanine differs significantly between dehydrated and hydrated scenarios, while that of the sarcosine zwitterion is less affected by hydration. In contrast, the computed sarcosine spectrum is greatly impacted by conformational variations, while the alanine spectrum is not. This relates to a predicted solvent dependence for alanine, as compared to sarcosine. Additionally, we show the theoretical nitrogen K-edge spectra to be sensitive to the degree of hydration, indicating that experimental X-ray spectroscopy may be able to distinguish between bulk and partial hydration, such as found in confined environments near proteins and in reverse micelles.

  9. Effect of conditioners upon the thermodynamics and kinetics of methane hydrate formation. A preliminary structure-properties relationship study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Profio, Pietro; Arca, Simone; Germani, Raimondo; Savelli, Gianfranco

    2005-07-01

    The synthesis and stability of gas hydrates was found to be heavily affected by the presence of small quantities of additives, or conditioners, particularly surfactants. In a recent work, we showed that the enhancement of hydrate formation, both from previously described and newly synthesized surfactants, is probably due to surfactant monomers, rather than micelles, and that the features of hydrate induction time should not be used as a measure of critical micelle concentration. In the present paper, we discuss the results of a structure-properties relationship study in which a preliminary attempt to relate the structural features of several amphiphilic additives to some kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of methane hydrate formation - e.g., induction times, rate of formation, occupancy, etc. - is conducted. According to the present study, it is found that, for a particular conditioner, a reduction of induction time does not correlate to an increase of the formation rate and occupancy, and vice versa. This may be related to the nature of chemical moieties forming a particular amphiphile (e.g., the hydrophobic tail, head group, counterion, etc.). The understanding of the mechanisms by which those moieties play their differential role may be the key tool to the design and synthesis of tailored conditioners. (Author)

  10. Hydration effects on the molecular structure of silica-supported vanadium oxide catalysts: A combined IR, Raman, UV–vis and EXAFS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, D.E.; Visser, T.; Soulimani, F.; Koningsberger, D.C.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of hydration on the molecular structure of silica-supported vanadium oxide catalysts with loadings of 1–16 wt.% V has been systematically investigated by infrared, Raman, UV–vis and EXAFS spectroscopy. IR and Raman spectra recorded during hydration revealed the formation of V–OH groups,

  11. NMR study of hydrated calcium silicates; Etude par RMN de la structure des silicates de calcium hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klur, I

    1996-02-26

    Radioactive wastes storage methods are developed by the CEA. As cements are important materials as well for hours living radioisotopes than for years living radioisotopes, a better knowledge of this material will allow to anticipate its behaviour and to obtain safer storage methods. The structure of calcium silicates (C-S-H) (main constituent of cements) have then been determined in this thesis by nuclear magnetic resonance. This method has allow to explain in structural terms, the different calcium rates that can be measured in the C-S-H too. (O.M.) 101 refs.

  12. Gas hydrate in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2018-01-17

    Gas hydrate is a naturally occurring, ice-like substance that forms when water and gas combine under high pressure and at moderate temperatures. Methane is the most common gas present in gas hydrate, although other gases may also be included in hydrate structures, particularly in areas close to conventional oil and gas reservoirs. Gas hydrate is widespread in ocean-bottom sediments at water depths greater than 300–500 meters (m; 984–1,640 feet [ft]) and is also present in areas with permanently frozen ground (permafrost). Several countries are evaluating gas hydrate as a possible energy resource in deepwater or permafrost settings. Gas hydrate is also under investigation to determine how environmental change may affect these deposits.

  13. Mechanochemical Synthesis and Crystal Structure of the Lidocaine-Phloroglucinol Hydrate 1:1:1 Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Evelyn Magaña-Vergara

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular complexation is a strategy used to modify the physicochemical or biopharmaceutical properties of an active pharmaceutical ingredient. Solvent assisted grinding is a common method used to obtain solid complexes in the form of cocrystals. Lidocaine is a drug used as an anesthetic and for the treatment of chronic pain, which bears in its chemical structure an amide functional group able to form hydrogen bonds. Polyphenols are used as cocrystal coformers due to their ability to form O–H···X (X = O, N hydrogen bond interactions. The objective of this study was to exploit the ability of phloroglucinol to form molecular complexes with lidocaine by liquid assisted grinding. The formation of the complex was confirmed by the shift of the O–H and C=O stretching bands in the IR spectra of the polycrystalline ground powders, suggesting the formation of O–H···O=C hydrogen bonds. Hydration of the complexes also was confirmed by IR spectroscopy and by powder X-ray diffraction. The molecular structure was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction.

  14. Adaptive resolution simulation of a biomolecule and its hydration shell: Structural and dynamical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogarty, Aoife C.; Potestio, Raffaello; Kremer, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    A fully atomistic modelling of many biophysical and biochemical processes at biologically relevant length- and time scales is beyond our reach with current computational resources, and one approach to overcome this difficulty is the use of multiscale simulation techniques. In such simulations, when system properties necessitate a boundary between resolutions that falls within the solvent region, one can use an approach such as the Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS), in which solvent particles change their resolution on the fly during the simulation. Here, we apply the existing AdResS methodology to biomolecular systems, simulating a fully atomistic protein with an atomistic hydration shell, solvated in a coarse-grained particle reservoir and heat bath. Using as a test case an aqueous solution of the regulatory protein ubiquitin, we first confirm the validity of the AdResS approach for such systems, via an examination of protein and solvent structural and dynamical properties. We then demonstrate how, in addition to providing a computational speedup, such a multiscale AdResS approach can yield otherwise inaccessible physical insights into biomolecular function. We use our methodology to show that protein structure and dynamics can still be correctly modelled using only a few shells of atomistic water molecules. We also discuss aspects of the AdResS methodology peculiar to biomolecular simulations

  15. Characterization of internal structure of hydrated agar and gelatin matrices by cryo-SEM

    KAUST Repository

    Rahbani, Janane; Behzad, Ali Reza; Khashab, Niveen M.; Al-Ghoul, Mazen

    2012-01-01

    There has been a considerable interest in recent years in developing polymer gel matrices for many important applications such as 2DE for quantization and separation of a variety of proteins and drug delivery system to control the release of active agents. However, a well-defined knowledge of the ultrastructures of the gels has been elusive. In this study, we report the characterization of two different polymers used in 2DE: Gelatin, a naturally occurring polymer derived from collagen (protein) and agar, a polymer of polysaccharide (sugar) origin. Low-temperature SEM is used to examine the internal structure of these gels in their frozen natural hydrated states. Results of this study show that both polymers have an array of hollow cells that resembles honeycomb structures. While agar pores are almost circular, the corresponding Gaussian curve is very broad exhibiting a range of radii from nearly 370 to 700 nm. Gelatin pores are smaller and more homogeneous reflecting a narrower distribution from nearly 320 to 650 nm. Overall, these ultrastructural findings could be used to correlate with functions of the polymers. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Computational characterization of 13C NMR lineshapes of carbon dioxide in structure 1 clathrate hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dornan, P.; Woo, T.K. [Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

    2008-07-01

    Nonspherical large cages in structure one clathrates impose non-uniform motion of nonspherical guest molecules and anisotropic lineshapes in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of the guest. This paper presented a general method for calculating the chemical shift lineshape anisotropy of guest molecules in clathrate hydrate compounds from molecular dynamics simulations for the case of weak host, guest dipolar coupling. In order to calculate the cage chemical shielding tensors and the NMR lineshape produced by each guest molecule, the study involved the use of orientational distributions from molecular dynamics simulation along with time and powder angle averaging. The total predicted lineshape anisotropy was calculated from the superposition of the lineshapes of all guests. The approach was applied to calculate the temperature dependent 13C NMR lineshape anisotropy of carbon dioxide in structure 1 clathrates. The paper presented the computational methodology and results and discussion. It was concluded that the resulting lineshapes were in good agreement with the experimental 13C NMR spectrum at each temperature. The method provided a uniform procedure to calculate the lineshapes at different temperatures and no prior assumptions about the nature of the motion of the guest in cages was required. 37 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  17. Characterization of internal structure of hydrated agar and gelatin matrices by cryo-SEM

    KAUST Repository

    Rahbani, Janane

    2012-12-26

    There has been a considerable interest in recent years in developing polymer gel matrices for many important applications such as 2DE for quantization and separation of a variety of proteins and drug delivery system to control the release of active agents. However, a well-defined knowledge of the ultrastructures of the gels has been elusive. In this study, we report the characterization of two different polymers used in 2DE: Gelatin, a naturally occurring polymer derived from collagen (protein) and agar, a polymer of polysaccharide (sugar) origin. Low-temperature SEM is used to examine the internal structure of these gels in their frozen natural hydrated states. Results of this study show that both polymers have an array of hollow cells that resembles honeycomb structures. While agar pores are almost circular, the corresponding Gaussian curve is very broad exhibiting a range of radii from nearly 370 to 700 nm. Gelatin pores are smaller and more homogeneous reflecting a narrower distribution from nearly 320 to 650 nm. Overall, these ultrastructural findings could be used to correlate with functions of the polymers. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Adaptive resolution simulation of a biomolecule and its hydration shell: Structural and dynamical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogarty, Aoife C., E-mail: fogarty@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Potestio, Raffaello, E-mail: potestio@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Kremer, Kurt, E-mail: kremer@mpip-mainz.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-05-21

    A fully atomistic modelling of many biophysical and biochemical processes at biologically relevant length- and time scales is beyond our reach with current computational resources, and one approach to overcome this difficulty is the use of multiscale simulation techniques. In such simulations, when system properties necessitate a boundary between resolutions that falls within the solvent region, one can use an approach such as the Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS), in which solvent particles change their resolution on the fly during the simulation. Here, we apply the existing AdResS methodology to biomolecular systems, simulating a fully atomistic protein with an atomistic hydration shell, solvated in a coarse-grained particle reservoir and heat bath. Using as a test case an aqueous solution of the regulatory protein ubiquitin, we first confirm the validity of the AdResS approach for such systems, via an examination of protein and solvent structural and dynamical properties. We then demonstrate how, in addition to providing a computational speedup, such a multiscale AdResS approach can yield otherwise inaccessible physical insights into biomolecular function. We use our methodology to show that protein structure and dynamics can still be correctly modelled using only a few shells of atomistic water molecules. We also discuss aspects of the AdResS methodology peculiar to biomolecular simulations.

  19. Characterization of internal structure of hydrated agar and gelatin matrices by cryo-SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbani, Janane; Behzad, Ali R; Khashab, Niveen M; Al-Ghoul, Mazen

    2013-02-01

    There has been a considerable interest in recent years in developing polymer gel matrices for many important applications such as 2DE for quantization and separation of a variety of proteins and drug delivery system to control the release of active agents. However, a well-defined knowledge of the ultrastructures of the gels has been elusive. In this study, we report the characterization of two different polymers used in 2DE: Gelatin, a naturally occurring polymer derived from collagen (protein) and agar, a polymer of polysaccharide (sugar) origin. Low-temperature SEM is used to examine the internal structure of these gels in their frozen natural hydrated states. Results of this study show that both polymers have an array of hollow cells that resembles honeycomb structures. While agar pores are almost circular, the corresponding Gaussian curve is very broad exhibiting a range of radii from nearly 370 to 700 nm. Gelatin pores are smaller and more homogeneous reflecting a narrower distribution from nearly 320 to 650 nm. Overall, these ultrastructural findings could be used to correlate with functions of the polymers. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Interfacial stresses analysis of FGM porous structures bonded with FRP plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chedad A.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for determining the interfacial stresses in an adhesive joint between a strengthening plate and a functionally graded beam. The beam is assumed to be isotropic with a constant poisson’s ratio. The present method is based on the deformation compatibility principle taking into account the neutral axis position of the FG beam. A power law for the distribution of the mechanical characteristic with a uniform and non-uniform porosity distribution is presented. A parametric study is presented to show the effect of some parameters on the distribution of stresses in the adhesive joint between the plat and the beam.

  1. Effects of interfacial Fe electronic structures on magnetic and electronic transport properties in oxide/NiFe/oxide heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qianqian; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Jing-Yan; Yang, Meiyin; Li, Xu-Jing; Jiang, Shao-Long; Liu, Yi-Wei; Cao, Yi; Wu, Zheng-Long; Feng, Chun; Ding, Lei; Yu, Guang-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The magnetic and transport properties of oxide/NiFe/oxide films were studied. • The oxide (SiO 2 , MgO and HfO 2 ) has different elemental electronegativity. • Redox reaction at different NiFe/oxide interface is dependent on the oxide layer. • Different interfacial electronic structures shown by XPS influence the properties. - Abstract: We report that the magnetic and electronic transport properties in oxide/NiFe(2 nm)/oxide film (oxide = SiO 2 , MgO or HfO 2 ) are strongly influenced by the electronic structure of NiFe/oxide interface. Magnetic measurements show that there exist magnetic dead layers in the SiO 2 sandwiched film and MgO sandwiched film, whereas there is no magnetic dead layer in the HfO 2 sandwiched film. Furthermore, in the ultrathin SiO 2 sandwiched film no magnetoresistance (MR) is detected, while in the ultrathin MgO sandwiched film and HfO 2 sandwiched film the MR ratios reach 0.35% and 0.88%, respectively. The investigation by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the distinct interfacial redox reactions, which are dependent on the oxide layers, lead to the variation of magnetic and transport properties in different oxide/NiFe/oxide heterostructures

  2. Effect of microscopic structure on deformation in nano-sized copper and Cu/Si interfacial cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumigawa, Takashi, E-mail: sumigawa@cyber.kues.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Nakano, Takuya; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to examine the effect of microscopic structure on the mechanical properties of nano-sized components (nano-components). We developed a bending specimen with a substructure that can be observed by means of a transmission electron microscope (TEM). We examined the plastic behavior of a Cu bi-crystal and the Cu/Si interfacial cracking in a nano-component. TEM images indicated that an initial plastic deformation takes place near the interface edge (the junction between the Cu/Si interface and the surface) in the Cu film with a high critical resolved shear stress (400–420 MPa). The deformation developed preferentially in a single grain. Interfacial cracking took place at the intersection between the grain boundary and the Cu/Si interface, where a high stress concentration existed due to deformation mismatch. These results indicate that the characteristic mechanical behavior of a nano-component is governed by the microscopic stress field, which takes into account the crystallographic structure. - Highlights: ► A nano-component specimen including a bi-crystal copper layer was prepared. ► A loading test with in-situ transmission electron microscopy was conducted. ► The plastic and cracking behaviors were governed by microscopic stress. ► Stress defined under continuum assumption was still present in nano-components.

  3. Local hydrated structure of an Fe2+/Fe3+ aqueous solution: an investigation using a combination of molecular dynamics and X-ray absorption fine structure methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Qing; Zhou Jing; Zhao Haifeng; Chen Xing; Chu Wangsheng; Zheng Xusheng; Marcelli, Augusto; Wu Ziyu

    2013-01-01

    The hydrated shell of both Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ aqueous solutions are investigated by using the molecular dynamics (MD) and X-ray absorption structure (XAS) methods. The MD simulations show that the first hydrated shells of both Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ are characterized by a regular octahedron with an Fe-O distance of 2.08Å for Fe 2+ and 1.96Å for Fe 3+ , and rule out the occurrence of a Jahn-Teller distortion in the hydrated shell of an Fe 2+ aqueous solution. The corresponding X-ray absorption near edge fine structure (XANES) calculation successfully reproduces all features in the XANES spectra in Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ aqueous solution. A feature that is located at energy 1 eV higher than the white line (WL) in an Fe 3+ aqueous solution may be assigned to the contribution of the charge transfer. (authors)

  4. Local interfacial structure of subcooled boiling flow in a heated annulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Seong-O; Yun, Byong-Jo; Park, Goon-Cherl; Hibiki, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Local measurements of flow parameters were performed for vertical upward subcooled boiling flows in an internally heated annulus. The annulus channel consisted of an inner heater rod with a diameter of 19.0 mm and an outer round tube with an inner diameter of 37.5 mm, and the hydraulic equivalent diameter was 18.5 mm. The double-sensor conductivity probe method was used for measuring the local void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble Sauter mean diameter and gas velocity, whereas the miniature Pitot tube was used for measuring the local liquid velocity. A total of 32 data sets were acquired consisting of various combinations of heat flux, 88.1-350.9 kW/m 2 , mass flux, 469.7-1061.4kg(m 2 s) and inlet liquid temperature, 83.8-100.5degC. Six existing drift-flux models, six exiting correlations of the interfacial area concentration and bubble layer thickness model were evaluated using the data obtained in the experiment. (author)

  5. Structure and dynamics of H{sub 2}O vis-á-vis phenylalanine recognition at a DPPC lipid membrane via interfacial H-bond types: Insights from polarized FT-IRRAS and ADMP simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarangi, Nirod Kumar; Ramesh, Nivarthi; Patnaik, Archita [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2015-01-14

    Preferential and enantioselective interactions of L-/D-Phenylalanine (L-Phe and D-Phe) and butoxycarbonyl-protected L-/D-Phenylalanine (LPA and DPA) as guest with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (L-DPPC) as host were tapped by using real time Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS). Polarization-modulated FT-IRRAS of DPPC monolayers above the phenylalanine modified subphases depicted fine structure/conformation differences under considerations of controlled 2D surface pressure. Selective molecular recognition of D-enantiomer over L-enantiomer driven by the DPPC head group via H-bonding and electrostatic interactions was evident spectroscopically. Accordingly, binding constants (K) of 145, 346, 28, and 56 M{sup −1} for LPA, DPA, L-Phe, and D-Phe, respectively, were estimated. The real time FT-IRRAS water bands were strictly conformation sensitive. The effect of micro-solvation on the structure and stability of the 1:1 diastereomeric L-lipid⋯, LPA/DPA and L-lipid⋯, (L/D)-Phe adducts was investigated with the aid of Atom-centered Density Matrix Propagation (ADMP), a first principle quantum mechanical molecular dynamics approach. The phosphodiester fragment was the primary site of hydration where specific solvent interactions were simulated through single- and triple- “water-phosphate” interactions, as water cluster’s “tetrahedral dice” to a “trimeric motif” transformation as a partial de-clusterization was evident. Under all the hydration patterns considered in both static and dynamic descriptions of density functional theory, L-lipid/D-amino acid enantiomer adducts continued to be stable structures while in dynamic systems, water rearranged without getting “squeezed-out” in the process of recognition. In spite of the challenging computational realm of this multiscale problem, the ADMP simulated molecular interactions complying with polarized vibrational spectroscopy unraveled a novel route to chiral

  6. Crystal structure of ethylenedioxytetrathiafulvalene-4,5-bis(thiolbenzoic acid 0.25-hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound (systematic name: 4,4′-{[2-(5,6-dihydro-[1,3]dithiolo[4,5-b][1,4]dioxin-2-ylidene-1,3-dithiole-4,5-diyl]bis(sulfanediyl}dibenzoic acid 0.25-hydrate, C22H14O6S6·0.25H2O, the tetrathiafulvalene (TTF core adopts a boat conformation, where the central S2C=CS2 plane makes dihedral angles of 31.34 (4 and 26.83 (6°, respectively, with the peripheral S2C=CS2 and S2C2O2 planes. In the crystal, the benzoic acid molecules are linked via O—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers with R22(8 motifs. The dimers are linked through weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds into a chain structure along [-101]. The chains stack along the a axis through S...S and S...C short contacts, forming layers parallel to the ac plane.

  7. Localization of fluorescently labeled structures in frozen-hydrated samples using integrated light electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faas, F G A; Bárcena, M; Agronskaia, A V; Gerritsen, H C; Moscicka, K B; Diebolder, C A; van Driel, L F; Limpens, R W A L; Bos, E; Ravelli, R B G; Koning, R I; Koster, A J

    2013-03-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy is an increasingly popular technique to study complex biological systems at various levels of resolution. Fluorescence microscopy can be employed to scan large areas to localize regions of interest which are then analyzed by electron microscopy to obtain morphological and structural information from a selected field of view at nm-scale resolution. Previously, an integrated approach to room temperature correlative microscopy was described. Combined use of light and electron microscopy within one instrument greatly simplifies sample handling, avoids cumbersome experimental overheads, simplifies navigation between the two modalities, and improves the success rate of image correlation. Here, an integrated approach for correlative microscopy under cryogenic conditions is presented. Its advantages over the room temperature approach include safeguarding the native hydrated state of the biological specimen, preservation of the fluorescence signal without risk of quenching due to heavy atom stains, and reduced photo bleaching. The potential of cryo integrated light and electron microscopy is demonstrated for the detection of viable bacteria, the study of in vitro polymerized microtubules, the localization of mitochondria in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, and for a search into virus-induced intracellular membrane modifications within mammalian cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular structure of self-assembled chiral nanoribbons and nanotubules revealed in the hydrated state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Reiko; Artzner, Franck; Laguerre, Michel; Huc, Ivan

    2008-11-05

    A detailed molecular organization of racemic 16-2-16 tartrate self-assembled multi-bilayer ribbons in the hydrated state is proposed where 16-2-16 amphiphiles, tartrate ions, and water molecules are all accurately positioned by comparing experimental X-ray powder diffraction and diffraction patterns derived from modeling studies. X-ray diffuse scattering studies show that molecular organization is not fundamentally altered when comparing the flat ribbons of the racemate to chirally twisted or helical ribbons of the pure tartrate enantiomer. Essential features of the three-dimensional molecular organizations of these structures include interdigitation of alkyl chains within each bilayer and well-defined networks of ionic and hydrogen bonds between cations, anions, and water molecules between bilayers. The detailed study of diffraction patterns also indicated that the gemini headgroups are oriented parallel to the long edge of the ribbons. The structure thus possesses a high cohesion and good crystallinity, and for the first time, we could relate the packing of the chiral molecules to the expression of the chirality at a mesoscopic scale. The organization of the ribbons at the molecular level sheds light on a number of their macroscopic features. Among these are the reason why enantiomerically pure 16-2-16 tartrate forms ribbons that consist of exactly two bilayers, and a plausible mechanism by which a chirally twisted or helical shape may emerge from the packing of chiral tartrate ions. Importantly, the distinction between commonly observed helical and twisted morphologies could be related to a subtle symmetry breaking. These results demonstrate that accurately solving the molecular structure of self-assembled soft materials--a process rarely achieved--is within reach, that it is a valid approach to correlate molecular parameters to macroscopic properties, and thus that it offers opportunities to modulate properties through molecular design.

  9. Dramatic Enhancement of Graphene Oxide/Silk Nanocomposite Membranes: Increasing Toughness, Strength, and Young's modulus via Annealing of Interfacial Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaxian; Ma, Ruilong; Hu, Kesong; Kim, Sunghan; Fang, Guangqiang; Shao, Zhengzhong; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2016-09-21

    We demonstrate that stronger and more robust nacre-like laminated GO (graphene oxide)/SF (silk fibroin) nanocomposite membranes can be obtained by selectively tailoring the interfacial interactions between "bricks"-GO sheets and "mortar"-silk interlayers via controlled water vapor annealing. This facial annealing process relaxes the secondary structure of silk backbones confined between flexible GO sheets. The increased mobility leads to a significant increase in ultimate strength (by up to 41%), Young's modulus (up to 75%) and toughness (up to 45%). We suggest that local silk recrystallization is initiated in the proximity to GO surface by the hydrophobic surface regions serving as nucleation sites for β-sheet domains formation and followed by SF assembly into nanofibrils. Strong hydrophobic-hydrophobic interactions between GO layers with SF nanofibrils result in enhanced shear strength of layered packing. This work presented here not only gives a better understanding of SF and GO interfacial interactions, but also provides insight on how to enhance the mechanical properties for the nacre-mimic nanocomposites by focusing on adjusting the delicate interactions between heterogeneous "brick" and adaptive "mortar" components with water/temperature annealing routines.

  10. Interfacial structures and energetics of the strengthening precipitate phase in creep-resistant Mg-Nd-based alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, D; Banerjee, R; Srinivasan, S G

    2017-01-17

    The extraordinary creep-resistance of Mg-Nd-based alloys can be correlated to the formation of nanoscale-platelets of β 1 -Mg 3 Nd precipitates, that grow along 〈110〉 Mg in bulk hcp-Mg and on dislocation lines. The growth kinetics of β 1 is sluggish even at high temperatures, and presumably occurs via vacancy migration. However, the rationale for the high-temperature stability of precipitate-matrix interfaces and observed growth direction is unknown, and may likely be related to the interfacial structure and excess energy. Therefore, we study two interfaces- {112} β1 /{100} Mg and {111} β1 /{110} Mg - that are commensurate with β 1 /hcp-Mg orientation relationship via first principles calculations. We find that β 1 acquires plate-like morphology to reduce small lattice strain via the formation of energetically favorable {112} β1 /{100} Mg interfaces, and predict that β 1 grows along 〈110〉 Mg on dislocation lines due to the migration of metastable {111} β1 /{110} Mg . Furthermore, electronic charge distribution of the two interfaces studied here indicated that interfacial-energy of coherent precipitates is sensitive to the population of distorted lattice sites, and their spatial extent in the vicinity of interfaces. Our results have implications for alloy design as they suggest that formation of β 1 -like precipitates in the hcp-Mg matrix will require well-bonded coherent interface along precipitate broad-faces, while simultaneously destabilizing other interfaces.

  11. Strong cooperative effect of oppositely charged surfactant mixtures on their adsorption and packing at the air-water interface and interfacial water structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khoi T; Nguyen, Tuan D; Nguyen, Anh V

    2014-06-24

    Remarkable adsorption enhancement and packing of dilute mixtures of water-soluble oppositely-charged surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dodecyl amine hydrochloride (DAH), at the air-water interface were observed by using sum frequency generation spectroscopy and tensiometry. The interfacial water structure was also observed to be significantly influenced by the SDS-DAH mixtures, differently from the synergy of the single surfactants. Most strikingly, the obtained spectroscopic evidence suggests that the interfacial hydrophobic alkyl chains of the binary mixtures assemble differently from those of single surfactants. This study highlights the significance of the cooperative interaction between the headgroups of oppositely charged binary surfactant systems and subsequently provides some insightful observations about the molecular structure of the air-aqueous interfacial water molecules and, more importantly, about the packing nature of the surfactant hydrophobic chains of dilute SDS-DAH mixtures of concentration below 1% of the CMC.

  12. Interplay between Interfacial Structures and Device Performance in Organic Solar Cells: A Case Study with the Low Work Function Metal, Calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Huanxin; Knesting, Kristina M; Zhang, Wei; Pan, Xiao; Wang, Chia-Hsin; Yang, Yaw-Wen; Ginger, David S; Zhu, Junfa

    2016-01-27

    A better understanding of how interfacial structure affects charge carrier recombination would benefit the development of highly efficient organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. In this paper, transient photovoltage (TPV) and charge extraction (CE) measurements are used in combination with synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (SRPES) to gain insight into the correlation between interfacial properties and device performance. OPV devices based on PCDTBT/PC71BM with a Ca interlayer were studied as a reference system to investigate the interfacial effects on device performance. Devices with a Ca interlayer exhibit a lower recombination than devices with only an Al cathode at a given charge carrier density (n). In addition, the interfacial band structures indicate that the strong dipole moment produced by the Ca interlayer can facilitate the extraction of electrons and drive holes away from the cathode/polymer interface, resulting in beneficial reduction in interfacial recombination losses. These results help explain the higher efficiencies of devices made with Ca interlayers compared to that without the Ca interlayer.

  13. Fibrillar structure and elasticity of hydrating collagen: a quantitative multiscale approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Claire; Hellmich, Christian; Henits, Peter

    2013-01-21

    It is well known that hydration of collagenous tissues leads to their swelling, as well as to softening of their elastic behavior. However, it is much less clear which microstructural and micromechanical "rules" are involved in this process. Here, we develop a theoretical approach cast in analytical mathematical formulations, which is experimentally validated by a wealth of independent tests on collagenous tissues, such as X-ray diffraction, vacuum drying, mass measurements, and Brillouin light scattering. The overall emerging picture is the following: air-drying leaves water only in the gap zones between the triple-helical collagen molecules; upon re-hydration, the extrafibrillar space is established at volumes directly proportional to the hydration-induced swelling of the (micro) fibrils, until the maximum equatorial distance between the long collagen molecules is reached. Thereafter, the volume of the fibrils stays constant, and only the extrafibrillar volume continues to grow. At all these hydration stages, the elastic behavior is governed by the same, hydration-invariant mechanical interaction pattern of only two, interpenetrating mechanical phases: transversely isotropic molecular collagen and isotropic water (or empty pores in the vacuum-dried case). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Electron density analysis of the effects of sugars on the structure of lipid bilayers at low hydration - a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenné, T.; Kent, B.; Koster, K.L.; Garvey, C.J.; Bryant, G. (ANSTO); (USD); (ANU); (RMIT)

    2012-02-06

    Small angle X-ray scattering is used to study the effects of sugars on membranes during dehydration. Previous work has shown that the bilayer and chain-chain repeat spacings of DPPC bilayers are relatively unaffected by the presence of sugars. In this work we present a preliminary analysis of the electron density profiles of DPPC in the presence of sugars at low hydration. The difficulties of determining the correct phasing are discussed. Sugars and other small solutes have been shown to have an important role in improving the tolerance of a range of species to desiccation and freezing. In particular it has been shown that sugars can stabilize membranes in the fluid membrane phase during dehydration, and in the fully dehydrated state. Equivalently, at a particular hydration, the presence of sugars lowers the transition temperature between the fluid and gel phases. There are two competing models for explaining the effects of sugars on membrane phase transition temperatures. One, designated the water replacement hypothesis (WRH) states that sugars hydrogen bond to phospholipid headgroups, thus hindering the fluid-gel phase transition. One version of this model suggests that certain sugars (such as trehalose) achieve the measured effects by inserting between the phospholipid head groups. An alternative model explains the observed effects of sugars in terms of the sugars effect on the hydration repulsion that develops between opposing membranes during dehydration. The hydration repulsion leads to a lateral compressive stress in the bilayer which squeezes adjacent lipids more closely together, resulting in a transition to the gel phase. When sugars are present, their osmotic and volumetric effects reduce the hydration repulsion, reduce the compressive stress in the membranes, and therefore tend to maintain the average lateral separation between lipids. This model is called the hydration forces explanation (HFE). We recently showed that neither mono- nor di

  15. Cofiring behavior and interfacial structure of NiCuZn ferrite/PMN ferroelectrics composites for multilayer LC filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Chunlin; Zhou Ji; Cui Xuemin; Wang Xiaohui; Yue Zhenxing; Li Longtu

    2006-01-01

    The cofiring behavior, interfacial structure and cofiring migration between NiCuZn ferrite and lead magnesium niobate (PMN)-based relaxor ferroelectric materials were investigated via thermomechanical analyzer (TMA), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Mismatched sintering shrinkage between NiCuZn ferrite and PMN was modified by adding an appropriate amount of sintering aids, Bi 2 O 3 , into NiCuZn ferrite. Pyrochlore phase appeared in the mixture of NiCuZn ferrite and PMN, which is detrimental to the final electric properties of LC filters. EDS results indicated that the interdiffusion at the heterogeneous interfaces in the composites, such as Fe, Pb, Zn, existed which can strengthen combinations between ferrite layers and ferroelectrics layers

  16. Interfacial symmetry of Co–Alq{sub 3}–Co hybrid structures for effective spin filtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Tu-Ngoc [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lai, Yu-Ling; Chen, Chih-Han [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Po-Hung [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wei, Der-Hsin; Lin, Hong-Ji; Chen, C.T. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan, ROC (China); Sheu, Jeng-Tzong, E-mail: jtsheu@faculty.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan, ROC (China); Hsu, Yao-Jane, E-mail: yjhsu@nsrrc.org.tw [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan, ROC (China); Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2015-11-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The spin interface at Alq{sub 3}/Co and Co/Alq{sub 3} contacts was examined. • An interfacial symmetry was determined at Co–Alq{sub 3}–Co interfaces. • Spin-polarized N orbitals are induced within the Co atop Alq{sub 3} hybridized interface. • The spin-filter role at the top contact interface of Alq{sub 3}/Co is proved. • Effective spin-filtering at Co–Alq{sub 3}–Co contacts was elucidated. - Abstract: Understanding the interfacial behavior at FM-OSC-FM hybrid structures for both the bottom contact (Alq{sub 3} adsorption on Co, Co/Alq{sub 3}) and the top contact (Co atop Alq{sub 3}, Alq{sub 3}/Co) is crucial for efficient spin filtering with transport of spin-polarized charge carriers through these interfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra indicate a symmetry of charge transfer from Co to Alq{sub 3} and the corresponding orbital hybridization to a certain extent at both contacts. The alignment of energy levels at both Alq{sub 3}/Co and Co/Alq{sub 3} heterostructures is depicted with ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). Through magnetic images acquired with a X-ray photoemission electron microscope (XPEEM), the strong hybridization of the top contact presents no micromagnetic domain but still shows magnetic coupling, to some extent, to the bottom contact in the Co–Alq{sub 3}–Co trilayer structure. Measurements of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) demonstrate the induced spin-polarization of non-magnetic Alq{sub 3} at both contacts, proving Alq{sub 3} a unique and promising organic material for spin filtering in OSV.

  17. The inhibition of methane hydrate formation by water alignment underneath surface adsorption of surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ngoc N.; Nguyen, Anh V.; Dang, Liem X.

    2017-06-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been widely shown to strongly promote the formation of methane hydrate. Here we show that SDS displays an extraordinary inhibition effect on methane hydrate formation when the surfactant is used in sub-millimolar concentration (around 0.3 mM). We have also employed Sum Frequency Generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) to elucidate the molecular mechanism of this inhibition. The SFG and MDS results revealed a strong alignment of water molecules underneath surface adsorption of SDS in its sub-millimolar solution. Interestingly, both the alignment of water and the inhibition effect (in 0.3 mM SDS solution) went vanishing when an oppositely-charged surfactant (tetra-n-butylammonium bromide, TBAB) was suitably added to produce a mixed solution of 0.3 mM SDS and 3.6 mM TBAB. Combining structural and kinetic results, we pointed out that the alignment of water underneath surface adsorption of dodecyl sulfate (DS-) anions gave rise to the unexpected inhibition of methane hydration formation in sub-millimolar solution of SDS. The adoption of TBAB mitigated the SDS-induced electrostatic field at the solution’s surface and, therefore, weakened the alignment of interfacial water which, in turn, erased the inhibition effect. We discussed this finding using the concept of activation energy of the interfacial formation of gas hydrate. The main finding of this work is to reveal the interplay of interfacial water in governing gas hydrate formation which sheds light on a universal molecular-scale understanding of the influence of surfactants on gas hydrate formation. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  18. Amorphous oxide alloys as interfacial layers with broadly tunable electronic structures for organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nanjia; Kim, Myung-Gil; Loser, Stephen; Smith, Jeremy; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Guo, Xugang; Song, Charles; Jin, Hosub; Chen, Zhihua; Yoon, Seok Min; Freeman, Arthur J; Chang, Robert P H; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J

    2015-06-30

    In diverse classes of organic optoelectronic devices, controlling charge injection, extraction, and blocking across organic semiconductor-inorganic electrode interfaces is crucial for enhancing quantum efficiency and output voltage. To this end, the strategy of inserting engineered interfacial layers (IFLs) between electrical contacts and organic semiconductors has significantly advanced organic light-emitting diode and organic thin film transistor performance. For organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, an electronically flexible IFL design strategy to incrementally tune energy level matching between the inorganic electrode system and the organic photoactive components without varying the surface chemistry would permit OPV cells to adapt to ever-changing generations of photoactive materials. Here we report the implementation of chemically/environmentally robust, low-temperature solution-processed amorphous transparent semiconducting oxide alloys, In-Ga-O and Ga-Zn-Sn-O, as IFLs for inverted OPVs. Continuous variation of the IFL compositions tunes the conduction band minima over a broad range, affording optimized OPV power conversion efficiencies for multiple classes of organic active layer materials and establishing clear correlations between IFL/photoactive layer energetics and device performance.

  19. Interfacial wave theory for dendritic structure of a growing needle crystal. I - Local instability mechanism. II - Wave-emission mechanism at the turning point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian-Jun

    1989-01-01

    The complicated dendritic structure of a growing needle crystal is studied on the basis of global interfacial wave theory. The local dispersion relation for normal modes is derived in a paraboloidal coordinate system using the multiple-variable-expansion method. It is shown that the global solution in a dendrite growth process incorporates the morphological instability factor and the traveling wave factor.

  20. Mixed sodium nickel-manganese sulfates: Crystal structure relationships between hydrates and anhydrous salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinova, Delyana M.; Zhecheva, Ekaterina N.; Kukeva, Rositsa R.; Markov, Pavel V. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Nihtianova, Diana D. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Institute of Mineralogy and Crystallography, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Stoyanova, Radostina K., E-mail: radstoy@svr.igic.bas.bg [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2017-06-15

    The present contribution provides new structural and spectroscopic data on the formation of solid solutions between hydrated and dehydrated sulfate salts of sodium-nickel and sodium-manganese in a whole concentration range: Na{sub 2}Ni{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}·yH{sub 2}O, 0≤ x≤1.0. Using powder XRD, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR), IR and Raman spectroscopy it has been found that double sodium-nickel and sodium-manganese salts form solid solutions Na{sub 2}Ni{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O with a blödite-type of structure within a broad concentration range of 0≤x≤0.49, while the manganese rich compositions Na{sub 2}Ni{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O (0.97≤x≤1.0) crystallize in the kröhnkite-type of structure. The Ni-based blödites Na{sub 2}Ni{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O dehydrate between 140 and 260 °C into anhydrous salts Na{sub 2}Ni{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}, 0≤ x≤0.44, with a structure where Ni{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 6} octahedra are bridged into pairs by edge- and corner sharing SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} groups. Both TEM and EPR methods show that the Ni{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+} ions are homogenously distributed over three crystallographic positions of the large monoclinic cell. The dehydration of the kröhnkite phase Na{sub 2}Ni{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O yields the alluaudite phase Na{sub 2+δ}Mn{sub 2-δ/2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}, where the Na-to-Mn ratio decreases and all Ni{sup 2+} dopants are released from the structure. The process of the dehydration is discussed in terms of structural aspects taking into account the distortion degree of the Ni,MnO{sub 6} and SO{sub 4} polyhedra. - Graphical abstract: Thermal dehydration of the blödite phase Na{sub 2}Ni{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O (0≤ x≤0.49) yields nickel-manganese sulfates Na{sub 2}Ni{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} (0≤ x≤0.44) with

  1. Self-preservation and structural transition of gas hydrates during dissociation below the ice point: an in situ study using Raman spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Jin-Rong Zhong; Xin-Yang Zeng; Feng-He Zhou; Qi-Dong Ran; Chang-Yu Sun; Rui-Qin Zhong; Lan-Ying Yang; Guang-Jin Chen; Carolyn A. Koh

    2016-01-01

    The hydrate structure type and dissociation behavior for pure methane and methane-ethane hydrates at temperatures below the ice point and atmospheric pressure were investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopic analysis. The self-preservation effect of sI methane hydrate is significant at lower temperatures (268.15 to 270.15?K), as determined by the stable C-H region Raman peaks and A L/A S value (Ratio of total peak area corresponding to occupancies of guest molecules in large cavities to sm...

  2. Phase equilibrium measurements of structure II clathrate hydrates of hydrogen with various promoters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres Trueba, A.; Rovetto, L.J.; Florusse, L.J.; Kroon, M.C.; Peters, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Phase equilibrium measurements of single and mixed organic clathrate hydrates with hydrogen were determined within a pressure range of 2.0–14.0 MPa. The organic compounds studied were furan, 2,5-dihydrofuran, tetrahydropyran, 1,3-dioxolane and cyclopentane. These organic compounds are known to form

  3. Requirement of lid2 for interfacial activation of a family I.3 lipase with unique two lid structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Maria; Angkawidjaja, Clement; Koga, Yuichi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2012-10-01

    A family I.3 lipase from Pseudomonas sp. MIS38 (PML) is characterized by the presence of two lids (lid1 and lid2) that greatly change conformation upon substrate binding. While lid1 represents the commonly known lid in lipases, lid2 is unique to PML and other family I.3 lipases. To clarify the role of lid2 in PML, a lid2 deletion mutant (ΔL2-PML) was constructed by deleting residues 35-64 of PML. ΔL2-PML requires calcium ions for both lipase and esterase activities as does PML, suggesting that it exhibits activity only when lid1 is fully open and anchored by the catalytically essential calcium ion, as does PML. However, when the enzymatic activity was determined using triacetin, the activity of PML exponentially increased as the substrate concentration reached and increased beyond the critical micellar concentration, while that of ΔL2-PML did not. These results indicate that PML undergoes interfacial activation, while ΔL2-PML does not. The activities of ΔL2-PML for long-chain triglycerides significantly decreased while its activity for fatty acid ethyl esters increased, compared with those of PML. Comparison of the tertiary models of ΔL2-PML in a closed and open conformation, which are optimized by molecular dynamics simulation, with the crystal structures of PML suggests that the hydrophobic surface area provided by lid1 and lid2 in an open conformation is considerably decreased by the deletion of lid2. We propose that the hydrophobic surface area provided by these lids is necessary to hold the micellar substrates firmly to the active site and therefore lid2 is required for interfacial activation of PML. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  4. Pore solution in alkali-activated slag cement pastes. Relation to the composition and structure of calcium silicate hydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puertas, F.; Fernandez-Jimenez, A.; Blanco-Varela, M.T.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, the relationship between the composition of pore solution in alkali-activated slag cement (AAS) pastes activated with different alkaline activator, and the composition and structure of the main reaction products, has been studied. Pore solution was extracted from hardened AAS pastes. The analysis of the liquids was performed through different techniques: Na, Mg and Al by atomic absorption (AA), Ca ions by ionic chromatography (IC) and Si by colorimetry; pH was also determined. The solid phases were analysed by XRD, FTIR, solid-state 29 Si and 27 Al NMR and BSE/EDX. The most significant changes in the ionic composition of the pore solution of the AAS pastes activated with waterglass take place between 3 and 24 h of reaction. These changes are due to the decrease of the Na content and mainly to the Si content. Results of 29 Si MAS NMR and FTIR confirm that the activation process takes place with more intensity after 3 h (although at this age, Q 2 units already exist). The pore solution of the AAS pastes activated with NaOH shows a different evolution to this of pastes activated with waterglass. The decrease of Na and Si contents progresses with time. The nature of the alkaline activator influences the structure and composition of the calcium silicate hydrate formed as a consequence of the alkaline activation of the slag. The characteristic of calcium silicate hydrate in AAS pastes activated with waterglass is characterised by a low structural order with a low Ca/Si ratio. Besides, in this paste, Q 3 units are detected. The calcium silicate hydrate formed in the pastes activated with NaOH has a higher structural order (higher crystallinity) and contains more Al in its structure and a higher Ca/Si ratio than those obtained with waterglass

  5. Absolute Molecular Orientation of Isopropanol at Ceria (100) Surfaces: Insight into Catalytic Selectivity from the Interfacial Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doughty, Benjamin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Goverapet Srinivasan, Sriram [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Indian Inst. of Technology (IIT), Rajasthan (India); Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lee, Dongkyu [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lee, Ho Nyung [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ma, Ying-Zhong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lutterman, Daniel A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-06-12

    The initial mechanistic steps underlying heterogeneous chemical catalysis can be described in a framework where the composition, structure, and orientation of molecules adsorbed to reactive interfaces are known. However, extracting this vital information is the limiting step in most cases due in part to challenges in probing the interfacial monolayer with enough chemical specificity to characterize the surface molecular constituents. These challenges are exacerbated at complex or spatially heterogeneous interfaces where competing processes and a distribution of local environments can uniquely drive chemistry. To address these limitations, this work presents a distinctive combination of materials synthesis, surface specific optical experiments, and theory to probe and understand molecular structure at catalytic interfaces. Specifically, isopropanol was adsorbed to surfaces of the model CeO2 catalyst that were synthesized with only the (100) facet exposed. Vibrational sum-frequency generation was used to probe the molecular monolayer, and with the guidance of density functional theory calculations, was used to extract the structure and absolute molecular orientation of isopropanol at the CeO2 (100) surface. Our results show that isopropanol is readily deprotonated at the surface, and through the measured absolute molecular orientation of isopropanol, we obtain new insight into the selectivity of the (100) surface to form propylene. Our findings reveal key insight into the chemical and physical phenomena taking place at pristine interfaces thereby pointing to intuitive structural arguments to describe catalytic selectivity in more complex systems.

  6. Structure and dynamics of hydrated Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions. Quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remsungnen, T.

    2002-11-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) and combined em ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical molecular dynamics (QM/MM-MD) simulations have been performed to investigate structural, dynamical and energetical properties of Fe(II), and Fe(III) transition metal ions in aqueous solution. In the QM/MM-MD simulations the ion and its first hydration sphere were treated at the Hartree-Fock ab initio quantum mechanical level, while ab initio generated pair plus three-body potentials were employed for the remaining system. For the classical MD simulation the pair plus three-body potential were employed for all ion-water interactions. The coordination number of the first hydration shell is 100 % of 6 in both cases. The number of waters in the second hydration shell obtained from classical simulations are 13.4 and 15.1 for Fe(II) and Fe(III), respectively, while QM/MM-MD gives the values of 12.4 and 13.4 for Fe(II) and Fe(III). The energies of hydration obtained from MD and QM/MM-MD for Fe(II) are 520 and 500 kcal/mol, and for Fe(III) 1160 and 1100 kcal/mol respectively. The mean residence times of water in the second shell obtained from QM/MM-MD are 24 and 48 ps for Fe(II) and Fe(III), respectively. In contrast to the data obtained from classical MD simulation, the QM/MM-MD values are all in good agreement with the experimental data available. These investigations and results clearly indicate that many-body effects are essential for the proper description of all properties of the aqueous solution of both Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions. (author)

  7. Detection of Interfacial Debonding in a Rubber-Steel-Layered Structure Using Active Sensing Enabled by Embedded Piezoceramic Transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qian; Kong, Qingzhao; Jiang, Jian; Liang, Yabin; Song, Gangbing

    2017-09-01

    Rubber-steel-layered structures are used in many engineering applications. Laminated rubber-steel bearing, as a type of seismic isolation device, is one of the most important applications of the rubber-steel-layered structures. Interfacial debonding in rubber-steel-layered structures is a typical failure mode, which can severely reduce their load-bearing capacity. In this paper, the authors developed a simple but effective active sensing approach using embedded piezoceramic transducers to provide an in-situ detection of the interfacial debonding between the rubber layers and steel plates. A sandwiched rubber-steel-layered specimen, consisting of one rubber layer and two steel plates, was fabricated as the test specimen. A novel installation technique, which allows the piezoceramic transducers to be fully embedded into the steel plates without changing the geometry and the surface conditions of the plates, was also developed in this research. The active sensing approach, in which designed stress waves can propagate between a pair of the embedded piezoceramic transducers (one as an actuator and the other one as a sensor), was employed to detect the steel-rubber debonding. When the rubber-steel debonding occurs, the debonded interfaces will attenuate the propagating stress wave, so that the amplitude of the received signal will decrease. The rubber-steel debonding was generated by pulling the two steel plates in opposite directions in a material-testing machine. The changes of the received signal before and after the debonding were characterized in a time domain and further quantified by using a wavelet packet-based energy index. Experiments on the healthy rubber-steel-layered specimen reveal that the piezoceramic-induced stress wave can propagate through the rubber layer. The destructive test on the specimen demonstrates that the piezoceramic-based active sensing approach can effectively detect the rubber-steel debonding failure in real time. The active sensing

  8. Spectral phasor analysis of LAURDAN fluorescence in live A549 lung cells to study the hydration and time evolution of intracellular lamellar body-like structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malacrida, Leonel; Astrada, Soledad; Briva, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Using LAURDAN spectral imaging and spectral phasor analysis we concurrently studied the growth and hydration state of subcellular organelles (lamellar body-like, LB-like) from live A549 lung cancer cells at different post-confluence days. Our results reveal a time dependent two-step process...... governing the size and hydration of these intracellular LB-like structures. Specifically, a first step (days 1 to 7) is characterized by an increase in their size, followed by a second one (days 7 to 14) where the organelles display a decrease in their global hydration properties. Interestingly, our results...... also show that their hydration properties significantly differ from those observed in well-characterized artificial lamellar model membranes, challenging the notion that a pure lamellar membrane organization is present in these organelles at intracellular conditions. Finally, these LB-like structures...

  9. A series of sheet-structured alkali metal uranyl oxalate hydrates: structures and IR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giesting, P.A.; Porter, N.J.; Burns, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    The novel compounds K[(UO 2 ) 2 (C 2 O 4 ) 2 OH] . 2 H 2 O (KUrO x ), Rb[(UO 2 ) 2 (C 2 O 4 ) 2 OH] . 2 H 2 O (RbUrO x ), and Cs[(UO 2 ) 2 (C 2 O 4 ) 2 OH] . H 2 O (CsUrO x ) have been synthesized by mild hydrothermal methods. Single crystal diffraction data collected at 125 K using MoK α radiation and a CCD-based area detector were used to solve and refine the crystal structures by full-matrix least-squares techniques to agreement indices (KUrO x , RbUrO x , CsUrO x ) wR 2 = 0.045, 0.062, 0.042 for all data, and R1 = 0.023, 0.030, 0.022 calculated for 1834, 1863, 1821 unique reflections respectively. The compounds KUrO x , RbUrO x , and CsUrO x are all monoclinic, space group P2 1 /m, Z = 2. The unit cell of KUrO x has the dimensions a = 5.6427(4), b = 13.7123(9), c = 9.2669(6) Aa, β = 98.7490(10) , V = 708.68(8) Aa 3 . The unit cell of RbUrO x has the dimensions a = 5.6225(4), b = 13.8339(9), c = 9.3308(6) Aa, β = 98.1590(10) , V = 718.41(8) Aa 3 . The unit cell of CsUrO x has the dimensions a = 5.4688(3), b = 13.5710(8), c = 9.5408(5) Aa, β = 97.5830(10) , V = 701.90(7) Aa 3 . The structures consist of chains of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids connected by oxalate groups and hydroxyl groups, and are isotypic with the compound NR 4 [(UO 2 ) 2 (C 2 O 4 ) 2 OH] . 2 H 2 O studied by Artem'eva et al. (2003); all four of these compounds are structurally composed of sheets made by polymerizing the chains of UO 2 C 2 O 4 (H 2 O) . 2 H 2 O (Jayadevan and Chackraburtty, 1972; Mikhailov et al., (1999)), this being achieved by removing a H atom from an H 2 O group in the coordination sphere of the uranyl ion to form a hydroxyl vertex that is shared by two uranyl ions. Compensating positive charges are provided by the inclusion of large monovalent cations in channels that run through the sheets; these channels also contain hydrogen-bound H 2 O groups. The positions of the cations and H 2 O groups change in relation to the uranyl oxalate sheets and to each other through the

  10. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    , not all of them are white like snow. Some hydrates from the deep Gulf of Mexico are richly colored in shades of yellow, orange, or even red. The ice-like masses are beautiful, and contrast with the dull gray of deep sea muds. Hydrates from the Blake... volcanoes and associated gas hydrates: Marine Geology, v. 167, p. 29-42. Milkov, A.V. and R. Sassen, 2001a, Estimate of gas hydrate resource, northwestern Gulf of Mexico continental slope: Marine Geology, v. 179, pp. 71-83. Milkov, A.V., Sassen, R...

  11. Diabetic neuropathy: structural analysis of nerve hydration by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffey, R.H.; Eaton, P.; Sibbitt, R.R.; Sibbitt, W.L. Jr.; Bicknell, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The water content of the sural nerve of diabetic patients was quantitatively defined by magnetic resonance proton imaging as a putative reflection of activity of the aldose-reductase pathway. Thirty-nine patients were evaluated, comparing group A, symptomatic diabetic men with sensory neuropathy; group B, similarly symptomatic diabetic men treated aldose-reductase inhibition; group C, neurologically asymptomatic diabetic men; and group D, control nondiabetic men. Marked increase in hydration of the sural nerve was seen in more than half of the symptomatic diabetic patients. Two of 11 neurologically asymptomatic diabetics had increased nerve hydration, suggesting a presymptomatic alteration of the nerve. Symptomatic diabetics treated with aldose-reductase inhibitors had normal nerve water levels. Increased level of peripheral nerve water represents a new finding in diabetes mellitus. It seems to be related to aldose-reductase activity, involved in the development of neuropathy, and similar to events that occur in other target tissue in human diabetes

  12. Reaction of hydrazine hydrate with oxalic acid: synthesis and crystal structure of dihydrazinium oxalate

    OpenAIRE

    Selvakumar, Rajendran; Premkumar, Thathan; Manivannan, Vadivelu; Saravanan, Kaliannan; Govindarajan, Subbiah

    2014-01-01

    The reaction of oxalic acid with hydrazine hydrate (in appropriate mole ratio) forms the dihydrazinium oxalate under specific experimental condition. The title compound is a molecular salt containing two discrete hydrazinium cations and an oxalate anion. The oxalate anion is perfectly planar and there is a crystallographic centre of symmetry in the middle of the C-C bond. The C-O bond distances are almost equal indicating the presence of resonance in the oxalate ion. The crystal packing is st...

  13. Interfacial electronic structure of C{sub 60}/ZnPc/AZO on photoemission spectroscopy for organic photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Nari; Kim, Yoonsu; Jung, Yunwoo; Cheon, Suyoung; Cho, Soohaeng [Department of Physics, Yonsei University, Wonju 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sang Wan, E-mail: dio8027@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Yonsei University, Wonju 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soohyung; Yi, Yeonjin [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Smith, Kevin E. [Department of Physics, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Ave, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2016-10-20

    Highlights: • The electronic structure of a bilayer on AZO has been evaluated by UPS and XPS. • The energy difference between the ZnPc HOMO and the C{sub 60} LUMO was determined. • The result is discussed in terms of the work function and resistivity of each TCO. - Abstract: The interfacial electronic structure of a bilayer of fullerene (C{sub 60}) and zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) grown on aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) substrates has been evaluated by X-ray and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy. The energy difference between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level of the ZnPc layer and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of the C{sub 60} layer (E{sup D}{sub HOMO} − E{sup A}{sub LUMO}) was determined and compared to that grown on an indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate. The E{sup D}{sub HOMO} − E{sup A}{sub LUMO} value of the heterojunction on AZO was 1.4 eV, while that on ITO was 1.1 eV. This result is discussed in terms of the differences of the work function and resistivity of each transparent conductive oxide. We also obtained complete energy level diagrams of C{sub 60}/ZnPc/AZO and C{sub 60}/ZnPc/ITO.

  14. Effect of intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions on interfacial supramolecular structures of C3-symmetric hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Zhongcheng; Shao, Qi; Ye, Jun; Zeng, Zebing; Zhao, Yang; Hng, Huey Hoon; Boey, Freddy Yin Chiang; Wu, Jishan; Chen, Xiaodong

    2011-02-15

    Two-dimensional (2D) supramolecular assemblies of a series of novel C(3)-symmetric hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HBC) derivatives bearing different substituents adsorbed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite were studied by using scanning tunneling microscopy at a solid-liquid interface. It was found that the intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions play a critical role in controlling the interfacial supramolecular assembly of these C(3)-symmetric HBC derivatives at the solid-liquid interface. The HBC molecule bearing three -CF(3) groups could form 2D honeycomb structures because of antiparallel dipole-dipole interactions, whereas HBC molecules bearing three -CN or -NO(2) groups could form hexagonal superstructures because of a special trimeric arrangement induced by dipole-dipole interactions and weak hydrogen bonding interactions ([C-H···NC-] or [C-H···O(2)N-]). Molecular mechanics and dynamics simulations were performed to reveal the physics behind the 2D structures as well as detailed functional group interactions. This work provides an example of how intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions could enable fine control over the self-assembly of disklike π-conjugated molecules.

  15. Interfacial Structure and Photocatalytic Activity of Magnetron Sputtered TiO2 on Conducting Metal Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daviðsdóttir, Svava; Petit, Jean-Pierre; Mermoux, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The photocatalytic behavior of magnetron sputtered anatase TiO2 coatings on copper, nickel, and gold was investigated with the aim of understanding the effect of the metallic substrate and coating-substrate interface structure. Stoichiometry and nanoscale structure of the coating were investigated...

  16. Unravelling surface and interfacial structures of a metal–organic framework by transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Yihan; Ciston, Jim; Zheng, Bin; Miao, Xiaohe; Czarnik, Cory; Pan, Yichang; Sougrat, Rachid; Lai, Zhiping; Hsiung, Chia-En; Yao, Kexin; Pinnau, Ingo; Pan, Ming; Han, Yu

    2017-01-01

    .1 electrons per square ångström to retain the structural integrity. The obtained image involves structural information transferred up to 2.1 Å, allowing the resolution of individual atomic columns of Zn and organic linkers in the framework. Furthermore, TEM

  17. Time-Dependent Thermally-Driven Interfacial Flows in Multilayered Fluid Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Hariri, Hossein; Borhan, A.

    1996-01-01

    A computational study of thermally-driven convection in multilayered fluid structures will be performed to examine the effect of interactions among deformable fluid-fluid interfaces on the structure of time-dependent flow in these systems. Multilayered fluid structures in two models configurations will be considered: the differentially heated rectangular cavity with a free surface, and the encapsulated cylindrical liquid bridge. An extension of a numerical method developed as part of our recent NASA Fluid Physics grant will be used to account for finite deformations of fluid-fluid interfaces.

  18. Interfacial Instabilities in Evaporating Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Ross; Sefiane, Khellil; Matar, Omar

    2007-11-01

    We study the effect of substrate thermal properties on the evaporation of sessile drops of various liquids. An infra-red imaging technique was used to record the interfacial temperature. This technique illustrates the non-uniformity in interfacial temperature distribution that characterises the evaporation process. Our results also demonstrate that the evaporation of methanol droplets is accompanied by the formation of wave-trains in the interfacial temperature field; similar patterns, however, were not observed in the case of water droplets. More complex patterns are observed for FC-72 refrigerant drops. The effect of substrate thermal conductivity on the structure of the complex pattern formation is also elucidated.

  19. Bulk and interfacial molecular structure near liquid-liquid critical points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzanares-Papayanopoulos, Emilio

    2000-09-01

    behaviour, and aqueous surfactant solutions.The classical techniques have included capillary viscometry yielding the shear viscosities. The modern techniques have fallen into two groups. The first, aimed at investigating adsorption and wetting layers at vapour-liquid and liquid-solid interfaces, comprise determinations of neutron reflection. In the second, fluorescence depolarization decay and muon spin relaxation rates have been directed towards a better understanding of the rotational behaviour in liquids of a large probe molecule BTBP, with the ultimate goal of exploring the nano rheology of near-critical systems. These modern measurements were made in Large Scale Central Laboratories at different centers in Europe, for example, the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) and Daresbury Laboratory (DL) in England, the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in France, and the Hahn-Meitner Institut (HMI) in Germany. The results of this kind of studies can be applied to interfacial problems across a wide range of industries such as the petroleum, paints, surfactants and refrigerants among others. [Spanish] Un comportamiento critico ocurre cuando dos fases coexistentes fusionan su identidad sin un cambio abrupto de las propiedades fisicas. El detalle de este comportamiento es considerado actualmente universal, siendo dominado por divergencia de la longitud de la correlacion {xi}. Siguiendo esta universalidad, el comportamiento detallado puede estudiarse experimentalmente usando cualquier sistema conveniente. Por esa razon, el estudio de fluidos y en particular de mezclas de fluidos ofrece una util plataforma puesto que el comportamiento critico en tales sistemas a menudo puede ser estudiado a temperaturas y presiones convenientes. A pesar de que la criticidad es una consecuencia de la divergencia de {xi}, y de esta manera, en cierto sentido, es un fenomeno a gran escala, a pesar de todo tiene influencia sobre los eventos a nivel molecular. A este aspecto de criticidad se le ha dedicado

  20. IMPACT OF LIQUID NITROGEN EXPOSURE ON SELECTED BIOCHEMICAL AND STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS OF HYDRATED Phaseolus vulgaris L. SEEDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejas, Inaudis; Rivas, Maribel; Nápoles, Lelurlys; Marrero, Pedro; Yabor, Lourdes; Aragón, Carlos; Pérez, Aurora; Engelmann, Florent; Martínez-Montero, Marcos Edel; Lorenzo, José Carlos

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that cryopreserving seeds with high water content is detrimental to survival, but biochemical and structural parameters of cryostored hydrated common bean seeds have not been published. The objective of this work was to study the effect of liquid nitrogen exposure on selected biochemical and structural parameters of hydrated Phaseolus vulgaris seeds. We cryopreserved seeds at various moisture contents and evaluated: germination; electrolyte leakage; fresh seed weight; levels of chlorophyll pigments, malondialdehyde, other aldehydes, phenolics and proteins; thickness of cotyledon epidermis, parenchyma, and starch storage parenchyma; and radicle and plumule lengths. Germination was totally inhibited when seeds were immersed in water for 50 min (moisture content of 38%, FW basis) before cryopreservation. The combined effects of seed water imbibition and cryostorage decreased phenolics (free, cell wall-linked, total), chlorophyll a and protein content. By contrast, electrolyte leakage and levels of chlorophyll b and other aldehydes increased as a result of the combination of these two experimental factors. These were the most significant effects observed during exposure of humid seed to liquid nitrogen. Further studies are still required to clarify the molecular events taking place in plant cells during cryostorage.

  1. Toward Dendrite-Free Lithium Deposition via Structural and Interfacial Synergistic Effects of 3D Graphene@Ni Scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Keyu; Wei, Wenfei; Yuan, Kai; Lu, Wei; Guo, Min; Li, Zhihua; Song, Qiang; Liu, Xingrui; Wang, Jian-Gan; Shen, Chao

    2016-10-05

    Owing to its ultrahigh specific capacity and low electrochemical potential, lithium (Li) metal is regarded as one of the most attractive anode materials for next-generation lithium batteries. Nevertheless, the commercialization of Li-metal-based rechargeable batteries (LiMBs) has been retarded by the uncontrollable growth of Li dendrites, as well as the resulting poor cycle stability and safety hazards. In this work, a 3D graphene@Ni scaffold has been proposed to accomplish dendrite-free Li deposition via structural and interfacial synergistic effects. Due to the intrinsic high surface area used to reduce the effective electrode current density and the surface-coated graphene working as an artificial protection layer to provide high cycle stability as well as suppress the growth of Li dendrites, the Coulombic efficiencies of Li deposition on 3D graphene@Ni foam after 100 cycles can be sustained as high as 96, 98, and 92% at the current densities of 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 mA cm -2 , respectively, which shows more excellent cycle stability than that of its planar Cu foil and bare Ni foam counterparts. The results obtained here demonstrate that the comprehensive consideration of multiaspect factors could be more help to enhance the performance of Li metal anode so as to achieve its real application in next-generation LiMBs.

  2. Interfacial exciplex electroluminescence between diamine derivatives with starburst molecular structure and tris(acetylacetonato)-(mono-phenothroline) thulium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Hong [Key Laboratory of Excited State Processes, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Li Wenlian [Key Laboratory of Excited State Processes, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China)], E-mail: wllioel@yahoo.com.cn; Su Zisheng; Chu Bei; Bi Defeng; Chen Yiren; Wang Dan; Su Wenming; Li Bin [Key Laboratory of Excited State Processes, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China)

    2009-02-20

    The authors demonstrate the interfacial exciplex electroluminescence (EL) between tris(acetylacetonato)-(mono-phenothroline) thulium [Tm(AcA){sub 3}phen] and two diamine derivatives with starburst molecular structure- 4,4',4''-tris[2-naphthyl(phenyl)amino]triphenylamine (2-TNATA) and 4,4',4''-tris[3-methyl-pheny(phenyl)-amino]triphenyl-amine (m-MTDATA), both of which have the same ionization potential (IP) (approximately 5.1 eV). When the Tm-complex and the two diamine derivatives are respectively used as the electron accepter and donors, the two EL devices exhibit different exciplex emissions, which verifies our previously reported opinion regarding the effect of the different substitutes on exciplex emission [W.M. Su, W.L. Li, Q. Xin, Z.S. Su, B. Chu, D.F. Bi, H. He, J.H. Niu, Appl. Phys. Lett. 91 (2007) 043508]. When the mixture of the two diamine derivatives is used as a donor, a white EL device with the Commission International de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.277, 0.323) is achieved. The exciplex formation mechanisms of the devices with the two different donors are discussed.

  3. Interfacial exciplex electroluminescence between diamine derivatives with starburst molecular structure and tris(acetylacetonato)-(mono-phenothroline) thulium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Hong; Li Wenlian; Su Zisheng; Chu Bei; Bi Defeng; Chen Yiren; Wang Dan; Su Wenming; Li Bin

    2009-01-01

    The authors demonstrate the interfacial exciplex electroluminescence (EL) between tris(acetylacetonato)-(mono-phenothroline) thulium [Tm(AcA) 3 phen] and two diamine derivatives with starburst molecular structure- 4,4',4''-tris[2-naphthyl(phenyl)amino]triphenylamine (2-TNATA) and 4,4',4''-tris[3-methyl-pheny(phenyl)-amino]triphenyl-amine (m-MTDATA), both of which have the same ionization potential (IP) (approximately 5.1 eV). When the Tm-complex and the two diamine derivatives are respectively used as the electron accepter and donors, the two EL devices exhibit different exciplex emissions, which verifies our previously reported opinion regarding the effect of the different substitutes on exciplex emission [W.M. Su, W.L. Li, Q. Xin, Z.S. Su, B. Chu, D.F. Bi, H. He, J.H. Niu, Appl. Phys. Lett. 91 (2007) 043508]. When the mixture of the two diamine derivatives is used as a donor, a white EL device with the Commission International de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.277, 0.323) is achieved. The exciplex formation mechanisms of the devices with the two different donors are discussed

  4. Follicular dermal papilla structures by organization of epithelial and mesenchymal cells in interfacial polyelectrolyte complex fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Tze Chiun; Leong, Meng Fatt; Lu, Hongfang; Du, Chan; Gao, Shujun; Wan, Andrew C A; Ying, Jackie Y

    2013-09-01

    The hair follicle is a regenerating organ that produces a new hair shaft during each growth cycle. Development and cycling of the hair follicle is governed by interactions between the epithelial and mesenchymal components. Therefore, development of an engineered 3D hair follicle would be useful for studying these interactions to identify strategies for treatment of hair loss. We have developed a technique suitable for assembly of different cell types in close proximity in fibrous hydrogel scaffolds with resolutions of ∼50 μm. By assembly of dermal papilla (DP) and keratinocytes, structures similar to the native hair bulb arrangement are formed. Gene expression of these constructs showed up-regulation of molecules involved in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions of the hair follicle. Implantation of the follicular structures in SCID mice led to the formation of hair follicle-like structures, thus demonstrating their hair inductive ability. The transparency of the fiber matrix and the small dimensions of the follicular structures allowed the direct quantitation of DP cell proliferation by confocal microscopy, clearly illustrating the promoting or inhibitory effects of hair growth regulating agents. Collectively, our results suggested a promising application of these 3D engineered follicular structures for in vitro screening and testing of drugs for hair growth therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of High Frequency Pulsing on the Interfacial Structure of Anodised Aluminium-TiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Jensen, Flemming; Bordo, Kirill

    2015-01-01

    High frequency anodizing of friction stir processed Al-TiO2 surface composites was investigated. The effect of anodizing parameters on the structure and morphology of the anodic layer including the incorporation of the TiO2 particles into the anodic layer is studied. Anodizing process was carried...... out using a high frequency pulse and pulse reverse pulse technique at a fixed frequency in a sulfuric acid bath. The structure of the composites and the anodized layer was studied using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The pulse reverse pulse anodizing technique, using a negative...

  6. Interfacial ordering of thermotropic liquid crystals triggered by the secondary structures of oligopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Yang, Pei; Mondiot, Frederic; Li, Yaoxin; Miller, Daniel S; Chen, Zhan; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2015-12-07

    We report that assemblies formed by eight oligopeptides at phospholipid-decorated interfaces of thermotropic liquid crystals (LCs) trigger changes in ordering of the LCs that are dependent on the secondary structures of the oligopeptides (as characterized in situ using infrared-visible sum-frequency spectroscopy).

  7. Structural incorporation of Neptunyl(V) into Calcite: Interfacial Reactions and Kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Heberling, Frank

    2010-01-01

    In this experimental work the calcite-water interface is characterized by means of zetapotential and surface diffraction measurements. Based on the experimental results a new Basic Stern Surface Complexation model for calcite is developed. Neptunyl(V) adsorption at the calcite surface and incorporation into the calcite structure is studied by batch type adsorption- and mixed flow reactor experiments. Adsorption and incorporation species of Neptunyl are investigated by EXAFS spectroscopy.

  8. Effect of magnetic field on ablatively driven Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced by interfacial nonlinear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labakanta Mandal; Banerjee, R.; Roy, S.; Khan, M.; Gupta, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. In an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) situation, laser driven ablation front of an imploding capsule is subjected to the fluid instabilities like Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. In this case dense core is compressed and accelerated by low density ablating plasma. During this process laser driven shocks interact the interface and hence it becomes unstable due to the formation of nonlinear structure like bubble and spike. The nonlinear structure is called bubble if the lighter fluid pushes inside the heavier fluid and spike, if opposite takes place. R-M instability causes non-uniform compression of ICF fuel pellets and needs to be mitigated. Scientists and researchers are much more interested on RM instability both from theoretical and experimental points of view. In this article, we have presented the analytical expression for the growth rate and velocity for the nonlinear structures due to the effect of magnetic field of fluid using potential flow model. The magnetic field is assumed to be parallel to the plane of two fluid interfaces. If the magnetic field is restricted only to either side of interface the R-M instability can be stabilized or destabilized depending on whether the magnetic pressure on the interface opposes the instability driving shock pressure or acts in the same direction. An interesting result is that if both the fluids are magnetized, interface as well as velocity of bubble and spike will show oscillating stabilization and R-M instability is mitigated. All analytical results are also supported by numerical results. Numerically it is seen that magnetic field above certain minimum value reduces the instability for compression the target in ICF.

  9. Structural study of hydrogen and hydration by the IBARAKI biological crystal diffractometer (iBIX)/industrial use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Ichiro; Hosoya, Takaaki; Kusaka, Katsuhiro; Niimura, Nobuo; Yamada, Taro; Tomoyori, Katsuaki; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Ohhara, Takashi; Kurihara, Kazuo; Ohnishi, Yuki; Yoshimura, Masashi; Kawamura, Takahiro; Oosumi, Takashi; Uchida, Hirohisa; Suzuki, Eiichiro; Kashiwagi, Tatsuki; Miyamoto, Akio; Furukawa, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    IBARAKI Biological Crystal Diffractometer (iBIX), a new neutron diffractometer for protein crystallography, was constructed as a next generation neutron source in J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex) and it has begun operation since December 2008. During a fiscal year of 2009, 14 detector units, the basic part of data reduction software and an equipment of cryostream cooler to 20K became available, and measurements and structural analysis of an organic standard crystal were succeeded. Since 120kW accelerator operation in December 2009, neutron measurements for structural analysis of several crystals of inorganic, organic compounds and proteins including industrial users' have been carried out and some of these data sets have been analyzed to the degree that positions of the hydrogen and the hydrated water could be identified. (author)

  10. Ionic Liquids with Symmetric Diether Tails: Bulk and Vacuum-Liquid Interfacial Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettige, Jeevapani J; Amith, Weththasinghage D; Castner, Edward W; Margulis, Claudio J

    2017-01-12

    The behavior in the bulk and at interfaces of biphilic ionic liquids in which either the cation or anion possesses moderately long alkyl tails is to a significant degree well understood. Less clear is what happens when both the cation and anion possess tails that are not apolar, such as in the case of ether functionalities. The current article discusses the structural characteristics of C2OC2OC2-mim + /C2OC2OC2-OSO 3 - in the bulk and at the vacuum interface. We find that the vacuum interface affects only the nanometer length scale. This is in contrast to what we have recently found in ( J. Phys. Chem. Lett. , 2016 , 7 ( 19 ), 3785 - -3790 ) for isoelectronic C[8]-mim + /C[8]-OSO 3 - , where the interface effect is long ranged. Interestingly, ions with the diether tail functionality still favor the tail-outward orientation at the vacuum interface and the bulk phase preserves the alternation between charged networks and tails that is commonly observed for biphilic ionic liquids. However, such alternation is less well-defined and results in a significantly diminished first sharp diffraction peak in the bulk liquid structure function.

  11. A study on the electronic and interfacial structures of monolayer ReS2-metal contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Yang, Guofeng; Sun, Rui; Yan, Pengfei; Lu, Yanan; Xue, Junjun; Chen, Guoqing

    2017-10-11

    In this paper, we perform a systematic and rigorous study to evaluate the Ohmic nature of the top-contact formed by the monolayer ReS 2 (mReS 2 ) and metals (gold, silver, platinum, nickel, titanium, and scandium) by means of first-principles density functional theory calculations. We investigate the potential barrier, charge transfer and atomic orbital overlap at the mReS 2 -metal interface in consideration of van der Waals forces to understand how efficiently carriers could be injected from the metal contact to the mReS 2 channel. ReS 2 is physisorbed on Au and Ag, which leads to little perturbation of its electronic structures and forms a larger Schottky contact and a higher tunnel barrier at the interface. ReS 2 is chemisorbed on Ti and Sc, where the bonding strongly perturbs the electronic structures and is found to be purely Ohmic. The bonding of ReS 2 on Pt and Ni lies between these two extreme cases, demonstrating an intermediate behavior. These findings not only provide an insight into the mReS 2 -metal interfaces but may also prove to be instrumental in the future design of ReS 2 -based devices with good performance.

  12. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C Mark; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-12-07

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  13. Formation of submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soloviev, V.; Ginsburg, G.D. (Reserch Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources of the Ocean ' ' VNII Okeangeologia' ' , St. Petersburg (Russian Federation))

    1994-03-01

    Submarine gas hydrates have been discoverd in the course of deep-sea drilling (DSDP and ODP) and bottom sampling in many offshore regions. This paper reports on expeditions carried out in the Black, Caspian and Okhotsk Seas. Gas hydrate accumulations were discovered and investigated in all these areas. The data and an analysis of the results of the deep-sea drilling programme suggest that the infiltration of gas-bearing fluids is a necessary condition for gas hydrate accumulation. This is confirmed by geological observations at three scale levels. Firstly, hydrates in cores are usually associated with comparatively coarse-grained, permeable sediments as well as voids and fractures. Secondly, hydrate accumulations are controlled by permeable geological structures, i.e. faults, diapirs, mud volcanos as well as layered sequences. Thirdly, in the worldwide scale, hydrate accumulations are characteristic of continental slopes and rises and intra-continental seas where submarine seepages also are widespread. Both biogenic and catagenic gas may occur, and the gas sources may be located at various distances from the accumulation. Gas hydrates presumably originate from water-dissolved gas. The possibility of a transition from dissolved gas into hydrate is confirmed by experimental data. Shallow gas hydrate accumulations associated with gas-bearing fluid plumes are the most convenient features for the study of submarine hydrate formation in general. These accumulations are known from the Black, Caspian and Okhotsk Seas, the Gulf of Mexico and off northern California. (au) (24 refs.)

  14. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  15. Surface and interfacial interactions of multilayer graphitic structures with local environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzocco, R.; Robinson, B.J.; Rabot, C.; Delamoreanu, A.; Zenasni, A.; Dickinson, J.W.; Boxall, C.; Kolosov, O.V.

    2015-01-01

    In order to exploit the potential of graphene in next-generation devices, such as supercapacitors, rechargeable batteries, displays and ultrathin sensors, it is crucial to understand the solvent interactions with the graphene surface and interlayers, especially where the latter may be in competition with the former, in the medium of application deployment. In this report, we combine quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and ultrasonic force microscopy methods to investigate the changes in the film–substrate and film–environment interfaces of graphene and graphene oxide films, produced by diverse scalable routes, in both polar (deionised water) and non-polar (dodecane) liquid and vapour environments. In polar liquid environments, we observe nanobubble adsorption/desorption on the graphene film corresponding to a surface coverage of up to 20%. As no comparable behaviour is observed for non-polar environment, we conclude that nanobubble formation is directly due to the hydrophobic nature of graphene with direct consequences for electrode structures immersed in electrolyte solutions. The amount of water adsorbed by the graphene films was found to vary considerably from 0.012 monolayers of water per monolayer of reduced graphene oxide to 0.231 monolayers of water per monolayer of carbon diffusion growth graphene. This is supported by direct nanomechanical mapping of the films immersed in water where an increased variation of local stiffness suggests water propagation within the film and/or between the film and substrate. Transferred film thickness calculations performed for QCM, atomic force microscopy topography and optical transmission measurements, returns results an order of magnitude larger (46 ± 1 layers) than Raman spectroscopy (1 - 2 graphene layers) on pristine pre-transferred films due to contamination during transfer and possible turbostratic structures of large areas. - Highlights: • Exploring interaction of graphene films with polar and nonpolar liquids

  16. Chloral Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if you are allergic to chloral hydrate, aspirin, tartrazine (a yellow dye in some processed foods and ... in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature, away from excess ...

  17. Interfacial electronic structure of Na deposited on rubrene thin film studied by synchrotron radiation photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Ching-Hsuan; Cheng, Chiu-Ping; Lin, Hong-Cheu; Pi, Tun-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Na deposited on rubrene had undergone three-stage development process via (1) atomic diffusion, (2) atomic incorporation in the surface region, (3) formation of a metallic film. • High resolution core-level photoemission was used to determine the location of the doped Na atoms, which is affiliated at the end position of the tetracene-like backbone. • Na metal was formed on the rubrene thin film. • Ionization potential of the organic molecule regulated with different Na doping concentration could be controllable and favorable in practical applications. - Abstract: The electronic structure of rubrene doped with various concentrations of Na was studied by synchrotron-radiation photoemission. Three stages of development were found with increasing Na concentration; Na penetrating deep into the organic film, followed by development of gap states, and ended with a metallic Na film. The charge transfer from Na to rubrene resulted in a vacuum-level shift. By doping Na into rubrene, we could control the IP of the organic molecule, which is favorable for application in organic semiconductor devices.

  18. Co-assembly in chitosan-surfactant mixtures: thermodynamics, structures, interfacial properties and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappisi, Leonardo; Gradzielski, Michael

    2015-06-01

    In this review, different aspects characterizing chitosan-surfactant mixtures are summarized and compared. Chitosan is a bioderived cationic polysaccharide that finds wide-ranged applications in various field, e.g., medical or food industry, in which synergistic effects with surfactant can play a fundamental role. In particular, the behavior of chitosan interacting with strong and weak anionic, nonionic as well as cationic surfactants is reviewed. We put a focus on oppositely charged systems, as they exhibit the most interesting features. In that context, we discuss the thermodynamic description of the interaction and in particular the structural changes as they occur as a function of the mixed systems and external parameters. Moreover, peculiar properties of chitosan coated phospholipid vesicles are summarized. Finally, their co-assembly at interfaces is briefly reviewed. Despite the behavior of the mentioned systems might strongly differ, resulting in a high variety of properties, few general rules can be pointed out which improve the understanding of such complex systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Interfacial engineering of two-dimensional nano-structured materials by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuiykov, Serge, E-mail: serge.zhuiykov@ugent.be [Ghent University Global Campus, Department of Applied Analytical & Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, 119 Songdomunhwa-ro, Yeonsu-Gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Kawaguchi, Toshikazu [Global Station for Food, Land and Water Resources, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education, Hokkaido University, N10W5 Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Graduate School of Environmental Science, Hokkaido University, N10W5 Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Hai, Zhenyin; Karbalaei Akbari, Mohammad; Heynderickx, Philippe M. [Ghent University Global Campus, Department of Applied Analytical & Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, 119 Songdomunhwa-ro, Yeonsu-Gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Advantages of atomic layer deposition technology (ALD) for two-dimensional nano-crystals. • Conformation of ALD technique and chemistry of precursors. • ALD of semiconductor oxide thin films. • Ultra-thin (∼1.47 nm thick) ALD-developed tungsten oxide nano-crystals on large area. - Abstract: Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is an enabling technology which provides coating and material features with significant advantages compared to other existing techniques for depositing precise nanometer-thin two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures. It is a cyclic process which relies on sequential self-terminating reactions between gas phase precursor molecules and a solid surface. ALD is especially advantageous when the film quality or thickness is critical, offering ultra-high aspect ratios. ALD provides digital thickness control to the atomic level by depositing film one atomic layer at a time, as well as pinhole-free films even over a very large and complex areas. Digital control extends to sandwiches, hetero-structures, nano-laminates, metal oxides, graded index layers and doping, and it is perfect for conformal coating and challenging 2D electrodes for various functional devices. The technique’s capabilities are presented on the example of ALD-developed ultra-thin 2D tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) over the large area of standard 4” Si substrates. The discussed advantages of ALD enable and endorse the employment of this technique for the development of hetero-nanostructure 2D semiconductors with unique properties.

  20. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of the interfacial structure of a galvanized dual-phase steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslam, I., E-mail: ia31@msstate.edu [Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems, Mississippi State University, MS 39759 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mississippi State University, MS 39762 (United States); Li, B. [Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems, Mississippi State University, MS 39759 (United States); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Martens, R.L.; Goodwin, J.R. [Central Analytical Facility, the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Rhee, H.J. [Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems, Mississippi State University, MS 39759 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mississippi State University, MS 39762 (United States); Goodwin, F. [International Zinc Association, Durham, NC 27713 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Site-specific studies were carried out to characterize the interface of a galvanized dual-phase (DP) steel. Focused ion beam (FIB) was used to prepare specimens in the interface region (~ 100 nm thick) between the coating and the substrate. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning TEM (STEM), and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) were performed to resolve the phases and the structures at the interface between the zinc (Zn) coating and the steel substrate. The STEM and TEM results showed that a continuous manganese oxide (MnO) film with a thickness of ~ 20 nm was present on the surface of the substrate while no silicon (Si) oxides were resolved. Internal oxide particles were observed as well in the sub-surface region. Despite the presence of the continuous oxide film, a well-developed inhibition layer was observed right on top of the oxide film. The inhibition layer has a thickness of ~ 100 nm. Possible mechanisms for the growth of the inhibition layer were discussed. - Highlights: •Site-specific examinations were performed on the Zn/steel interface. •Continuous external MnO oxides (20 nm) were observed at the interface. •No Si oxides were observed at the interface. •Internal oxide particles were distributed in the subsurface. •A continuous inhibition layer grew on top of the external oxides.

  1. Structural, morphological and interfacial characterization of Al-Mg/TiC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras, A.; Angeles-Chavez, C.; Flores, O.; Perez, R.

    2007-01-01

    Morphological and structural characterization of Al-Mg/TiC composites obtained by infiltration process and wetting by the sessile drop technique were studied. Focusing at the interface, wetting of TiC substrates by molten Al-Mg-alloys at 900 deg. C was investigated. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) indicated that aluminum carbide (Al 4 C 3 ) is formed at the interface and traces of TiAl 3 in the wetting assemblies were detected. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations show that TiC particles do not appear to be uniformly attacked to produce a continuous layer of Al 4 C 3 at the interface. Molten Al-Mg-alloys were infiltrated into TiC preforms with flowing argon at a temperature of 900 deg. C. In the composites no reaction phase was observed by SEM. Quantification of the Al phase in the composite was carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rietveld analysis. Chemical mapping analyzed by SEM shows that the Al-Mg alloy surrounds TiC particles. In the composites with 20 wt.% of Mg the Al-Mg-β phase was detected through XRD

  2. Synthesis, electronic structure, elastic properties, and interfacial behavior of icosahedral boron-rich solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunold, Oliver

    2017-08-01

    Boron-rich solids are commonly characterized by icosahedral clusters, where 12 B atoms form an icosahedron, giving rise to outstanding mechanical and transport properties. However, broader applications are limited due to the high synthesis temperature required to obtain the icosahedra-based crystalline structure. Utilizing high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS), the deposition temperature may be lowered as compared to direct current magnetron sputtering by enhanced surface diffusion. Therefore, HPPMS was utilized to investigate the influence of the substrate temperature on the structural evolution of B-rich Al-Y-B thin films. The formation of the intended AlYB{sub 14} phase together with the (Y,Al)B{sub 6} impurity phase, containing 1.8 at.% less B than AlYB{sub 14}, was observed at a growth temperature of 800 C and hence 600 C below the bulk synthesis temperature. Based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations it is inferred that minute compositional variations may lead to formation of competing phases, such as (Y,Al)B{sub 6}. Furthermore, 800 C still limits the usage significantly. Therefore, quantum mechanical material design was applied to identify phases with even higher phase stabilities compared to AlYB{sub 14}. Phase stability of T{sub 0.75}Y{sub 0.75}B{sub 14} (T= Sc, Ti, V, Y, Zr, Nb, Si) critically depends on the exact magnitude of charge transferred by T and Y to the B icosahedra. The highest phase stabilities have been identified for Sc{sub 0.75}Y{sub 0.75}B{sub 14}, Ti{sub 0.75}Y{sub 0.75}B{sub 14}, and Zr{sub 0.75}Y{sub 0.75}B{sub 14}. ln combination with Young's modulus values up to 517 GPa these phases are very interesting from a wear-resistance point of view. Still high synthesis temperatures limit the use of such systems onto technologically relevant substrate materials. However, amorphous B-rich solids, which can be synthesized without additional heating, exhibit attractive mechanical and electrical properties. Within these

  3. Historical methane hydrate project review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Frye, Matt; Goldberg, Dave; Husebo, Jarle; Koh, Carolyn; Malone, Mitch; Shipp, Craig; Torres, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In 1995, U.S. Geological Survey made the first systematic assessment of the volume of natural gas stored in the hydrate accumulations of the United States. That study, along with numerous other studies, has shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world greatly exceeds the volume of known conventional gas resources. However, gas hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of gas hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various gas hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural gas hydrates, and (5) analyzing the effects of methane hydrate on drilling safety.Methane hydrates are naturally occurring crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid water-­‐lattice holds gas molecules in a cage-­‐like structure. The gas and water becomes a solid under specific temperature and pressure conditions within the Earth, called the hydrate stability zone. Other factors that control the presence of methane hydrate in nature include the source of the gas included within the hydrates, the physical and chemical controls on the migration of gas with a sedimentary basin containing methane hydrates, the availability of the water also included in the hydrate structure, and the presence of a suitable host sediment or “reservoir”. The geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrates have become collectively known as the “methane hydrate petroleum system”, which has become the focus of numerous hydrate research programs.Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated

  4. Interfacial sharpness and intermixing in a Ge-SiGe multiple quantum well structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, A.; Gallacher, K.; Millar, R. W.; Paul, D. J.; Ballabio, A.; Frigerio, J.; Isella, G.; Kriegner, D.; Ortolani, M.; Barthel, J.; MacLaren, I.

    2018-01-01

    A Ge-SiGe multiple quantum well structure created by low energy plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition, with nominal well thickness of 5.4 nm separated by 3.6 nm SiGe spacers, is analysed quantitatively using scanning transmission electron microscopy. Both high angle annular dark field imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy show that the interfaces are not completely sharp, suggesting that there is some intermixing of Si and Ge at each interface. Two methods are compared for the quantification of the spectroscopy datasets: a self-consistent approach that calculates binary substitutional trends without requiring experimental or computational k-factors from elsewhere and a standards-based cross sectional calculation. Whilst the cross section approach is shown to be ultimately more reliable, the self-consistent approach provides surprisingly good results. It is found that the Ge quantum wells are actually about 95% Ge and that the spacers, whilst apparently peaking at about 35% Si, contain significant interdiffused Ge at each side. This result is shown to be not just an artefact of electron beam spreading in the sample, but mostly arising from a real chemical interdiffusion resulting from the growth. Similar results are found by use of X-ray diffraction from a similar area of the sample. Putting the results together suggests a real interdiffusion with a standard deviation of about 0.87 nm, or put another way—a true width defined from 10%-90% of the compositional gradient of about 2.9 nm. This suggests an intrinsic limit on how sharp such interfaces can be grown by this method and, whilst 95% Ge quantum wells (QWs) still behave well enough to have good properties, any attempt to grow thinner QWs would require modifications to the growth procedure to reduce this interdiffusion, in order to maintain a composition of ≥95% Ge.

  5. Establishing the interfacial nano-structure and elemental composition of homeopathic medicines based on inorganic salts: a scientific approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temgire, Mayur Kiran; Suresh, Akkihebbal Krishnamurthy; Kane, Shantaram Govind; Bellare, Jayesh Ramesh

    2016-05-01

    Extremely dilute systems arise in homeopathy, which uses dilution factors 10(60), 10(400) and also higher. These amounts to potencies of 30c, 200c or more, those are far beyond Avogadro's number. There is extreme skepticism among scientists about the possibility of presence of starting materials due to these high dilutions. This has led modern scientists to believe homeopathy may be at its best a placebo effect. However, our recent studies on 30c and 200c metal based homeopathic medicines clearly revealed the presence of nanoparticles of starting metals, which were found to be retained due to the manufacturing processes involved, as published earlier.(9,10) Here, we use HR-TEM and STEM techniques to study medicines arising from inorganic salts as starting materials. We show that the inorganic starting materials are present as nano-scale particles in the medicines even at 1 M potency (having a large dilution factor of 10(2000)). Thus this study has extended our physicochemical studies of metal based medicines to inorganic based medicines, and also to higher dilution. Further, we show that the particles develop a coat of silica: these particles were seen embedded in a meso-microporous silicate layer through interfacial encapsulation. Similar silicate coatings were also seen in metal based medicines. Thus, metal and inorganic salt based homeopathic medicines retain the starting material as nanoparticles encapsulated within a silicate coating. On the basis of these studies, we propose a universal microstructural hypothesis that all types of homeopathic medicines consist of silicate coated nano-structures dispersed in the solvent. Copyright © 2015 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Probing the temperature-dependent changes of the interfacial hydration and viscosity of Tween20 : cholesterol (1 : 1) niosome membrane using fisetin as a fluorescent molecular probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Jhili; Swain, Jitendriya; Mishra, Ashok Kumar

    2018-05-16

    A detailed photophysical study of fisetin in a Tween20 : cholesterol (1 : 1) niosome membrane has been carried out. Fisetin is found to partition well into the Tween20 : cholesterol (1 : 1) niosome membrane at low temperature (Kp = 2.7 × 104 M-1 at 10 °C). Cetylpyridinium chloride quenching study confirms the location of fisetin molecules in the interfacial domain of Tween20 : cholesterol (1 : 1) niosome membrane. The emission from the prototropic forms of fisetin (neutral form, excited state anion, ground state anion and phototautomer form) is found to sensitively reflect the local heterogeneities in Tween20 : cholesterol (1 : 1) niosome membrane. The shift in anionic emission maximum with variation in temperature shows the sensitivity of fisetin towards water accessibility at the interfacial domain of Tween20 : cholesterol (1 : 1) niosome membrane. Zeta potential value confirms that there is no role of surface charge in the multiple prototropism of fisetin in Tween20 : cholesterol (1 : 1) niosome membrane. The microviscosity changes with temperature, as reflected in fluorescence anisotropy values of fisetin phototautomeric species FT*, give information about the temperature-induced changes in the motional resistance offered by the interfacial domain of the niosomal membrane to small molecules. A temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetime study confirms the distribution of FT* in the two different sites of niosomal interfacial domain, i.e. water-deficient inner site and water-accessible outer site. This heterogeneity in distribution of FT* is further confirmed through time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay resulting in two different rotational time constants (faster component of ∼1.04 ns originates from water-accessible outer site and slower component of ∼16.50 ns originates from water-deficient inner site). The interfacial location of fisetin in Tween20 : cholesterol (1 : 1) niosome membrane has

  7. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lina; Yamauchi, Kazuo; Li, Zongjin; Zhang, Xixiang; Ma, Hongyan; Ge, Shenguang

    2017-01-01

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10

  8. Micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoming [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy, School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Na [Green Construction Materials and Circulation Economy Center, Architectural Design and Research Institute of Tsinghua University Co., Ltd., Beijing 100084 (China); Yao, Yuan, E-mail: yuanyaocas@163.com [School of Engineering and Computer Science, University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA 95211 (United States); Sun, Henghu; Feng, Huan [School of Engineering and Computer Science, University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA 95211 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Al{sup IV} and Al{sup VI} both exist in the hydration products. • Increase of Ca/Si ratio promotes the conversion from [AlO{sub 4}] to [AlO{sub 6}]. • Polymerization degree of [SiO{sub 4}] in the hydration products declines. -- Abstract: In this research, the micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials has been investigated through SEM-EDS, {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR techniques, in which the used red mud was derived from the bauxite calcination method. The results show that the red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials mainly form fibrous C-A-S-H gel, needle-shaped/rod-like AFt in the early hydration period. With increasing of the hydration period, densification of the pastes were promoted resulting in the development of strength. EDS analysis shows that with the Ca/Si of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials increases, the average Ca/Si and Ca/(Si + Al) atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel increases, while the average Al/Si atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel decreases. MAS NMR analysis reveals that Al in the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials exists in the forms of Al{sup IV} and Al{sup VI}, but mainly in the form of Al{sup VI}. Increasing the Ca/Si ratio of raw material promotes the conversion of [AlO{sub 4}] to [AlO{sub 6}] and inhibits the combination between [AlO{sub 4}] and [SiO{sub 4}] to form C-A-S-H gel. Meanwhile, the polymerization degree of [SiO{sub 4}] in the hydration products declines.

  9. Micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Na; Yao, Yuan; Sun, Henghu; Feng, Huan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Al IV and Al VI both exist in the hydration products. • Increase of Ca/Si ratio promotes the conversion from [AlO 4 ] to [AlO 6 ]. • Polymerization degree of [SiO 4 ] in the hydration products declines. -- Abstract: In this research, the micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials has been investigated through SEM-EDS, 27 Al MAS NMR and 29 Si MAS NMR techniques, in which the used red mud was derived from the bauxite calcination method. The results show that the red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials mainly form fibrous C-A-S-H gel, needle-shaped/rod-like AFt in the early hydration period. With increasing of the hydration period, densification of the pastes were promoted resulting in the development of strength. EDS analysis shows that with the Ca/Si of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials increases, the average Ca/Si and Ca/(Si + Al) atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel increases, while the average Al/Si atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel decreases. MAS NMR analysis reveals that Al in the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials exists in the forms of Al IV and Al VI , but mainly in the form of Al VI . Increasing the Ca/Si ratio of raw material promotes the conversion of [AlO 4 ] to [AlO 6 ] and inhibits the combination between [AlO 4 ] and [SiO 4 ] to form C-A-S-H gel. Meanwhile, the polymerization degree of [SiO 4 ] in the hydration products declines

  10. Storage capacity of hydrogen in gas hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, Takaaki; Ogata, Kyohei; Hashimoto, Shunsuke; Sugahara, Takeshi; Sato, Hiroshi; Ohgaki, Kazunari

    2010-01-01

    The storage capacity of H 2 in the THF, THT, and furan hydrates was studied by p-V-T measurements. We confirmed that the storage and release processes of H 2 in all hydrates could be performed reversibly by pressure swing without destroying of hydrate cages. H 2 absorption in both THT and furan hydrates is much faster than THF hydrate in spite of same unit-cell structure. On the other hand, the storage amounts of H 2 are coincident in the all additive hydrates and would reach at about 1.0 mass% asymptotically.

  11. Effect of rotary cutting instruments on the resin-tooth interfacial ultra structure: An in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherawat, Sudhir; Tewari, Sanjay; Duhan, Jigyasa; Gupta, Alpa; Singla, Rakesh

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of cutting teeth with different types of burs at various speeds on surface topography of tooth surface and interfacial gap formation at resin-tooth interface. The human molars were divided into seven groups: Diamond bur in airrotor (DA) & micromotor (DM), crosscut carbide bur in airrotor (CCA) & micromotor (CCM), plain carbide bur in airrotor (CA) & micromotor (CM) and #600-grit silicon carbide paper (SiC). In five samples from each group Class II box-only cavities were restored. The occlusal surface of four teeth per group was flattened. Two out of four teeth were acid etched. Teeth were subjected for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Interfacial gap was observed in all groups with no significant difference. SEM observations revealed CA, CCA & DA were coarser than CM, CCM, DM and SiC. SEM of etched tooth surfaces revealed complete removal of amorphous smear layer in CA & CM, partial removal in CCA, CCM, DA & DM and no removal in SiC. Selecting an appropriate bur and its speed may not play an important role in bonding in terms of interfacial gap formation. Variable changes were observed in surface topography with different burs before and after acid etching. Key words:Surface topography, resin-tooth interface, interfacial gap, bonding.

  12. Effects of mannose, fructose, and fucose on the structure, stability, and hydration of lysozyme in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahim, Abdoul; Peters, Günther H.J.; Jalkanen, Karl J.

    2013-01-01

    The bio-protective properties of monosaccharaides, namely mannose, fructose and fucose, on the stability and dynamical properties of the NMR determined hen egg-white lysozyme structure have been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature in aqueous solution and in...... of the solvent and sugar distributions around lysozyme was used to investigate the interfacial solvent and sugar structure near the protein surface.......The bio-protective properties of monosaccharaides, namely mannose, fructose and fucose, on the stability and dynamical properties of the NMR determined hen egg-white lysozyme structure have been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature in aqueous solution and in 7...... and 13 wt % concentrations of the three sugars. Results are discussed in the framework of the bio-protective phenomena. The three sugars show similar bio-protective behaviours at room temperature (300 K) in the concentration range studied as shown by the small RMSDs of the resulting MD structures from...

  13. Effects of the c-Si/a-SiO2 interfacial atomic structure on its band alignment: an ab initio study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fan; Pham, Hieu H; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2017-12-13

    The crystalline-Si/amorphous-SiO 2 (c-Si/a-SiO 2 ) interface is an important system used in many applications, ranging from transistors to solar cells. The transition region of the c-Si/a-SiO 2 interface plays a critical role in determining the band alignment between the two regions. However, the question of how this interface band offset is affected by the transition region thickness and its local atomic arrangement is yet to be fully investigated. Here, by controlling the parameters of the classical Monte Carlo bond switching algorithm, we have generated the atomic structures of the interfaces with various thicknesses, as well as containing Si at different oxidation states. A hybrid functional method, as shown by our calculations to reproduce the GW and experimental results for bulk Si and SiO 2 , was used to calculate the electronic structure of the heterojunction. This allowed us to study the correlation between the interface band characterization and its atomic structures. We found that although the systems with different thicknesses showed quite different atomic structures near the transition region, the calculated band offset tended to be the same, unaffected by the details of the interfacial structure. Our band offset calculation agrees well with the experimental measurements. This robustness of the interfacial electronic structure to its interfacial atomic details could be another reason for the success of the c-Si/a-SiO 2 interface in Si-based electronic applications. Nevertheless, when a reactive force field is used to generate the a-SiO 2 and c-Si/a-SiO 2 interfaces, the band offset significantly deviates from the experimental values by about 1 eV.

  14. On the nature of structural disorder in calcium silicate hydrates with a calcium/silicon ratio similar to tobermorite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grangeon, Sylvain, E-mail: S.Grangeon@brgm.fr [BRGM, 3, Avenue Claude Guillemin, 45060 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Claret, Francis; Lerouge, Catherine [BRGM, 3, Avenue Claude Guillemin, 45060 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Warmont, Fabienne [CRMD, UMR 6619 – CNRS, 1b rue de la férollerie, 45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Sato, Tsutomu; Anraku, Sohtaro [Laboratory of Environmental Geology, Research Group of Geoenvironmental/Engineering Division of Solid Waste, Resources and Geoenvironmental/Engineering Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Numako, Chiya [Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokushima, 1-1, Minami-Josanjima, Tokushima, 770-8502 (Japan); Linard, Yannick [ANDRA, Centre de Meuse/Haute Marne, 55290 Bure (France); Lanson, Bruno [ISTerre, Grenoble University, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble (France)

    2013-10-15

    Four calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) with structural calcium/silicon (Ca/Si) ratios ranging from 0.82 ± 0.02 to 0.87 ± 0.02 were synthesized at room temperature, 50, 80, and 110 °C. Their structure was elucidated by collating information from electron probe micro-analysis, transmission electron microscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). A modeling approach specific to defective minerals was used because sample turbostratism prevented analysis using usual XRD refinement techniques (e.g. Rietveld analysis). It is shown that C-S-H with Ca/Si ratio of ∼ 0.8 are structurally similar to nano-crystalline turbostratic tobermorite, a naturally occurring mineral. Their structure thus consists of sheets of calcium atoms in 7-fold coordination, covered by ribbons of silicon tetrahedra with a dreierketten (wollastonite-like) organization. In these silicate ribbons, 0.42 Si per bridging tetrahedron are missing. Random stacking faults occur systematically between successive layers (turbostratic stacking). Layer-to-layer distance is equal to 11.34 Å. Crystallites have a mean size of 10 nm in the a–b plane, and a mean number of 2.6–2.9 layers stacked coherently along the c* axis.

  15. Interfacial tension in systems involving TBP in dodecane, nitric acid, uranyl nitrate and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolarik, Z.; Pipkin, N.

    1982-08-01

    The interfacial tension was measured at 25 0 C in the systems TBP - n-dodecane/nitric acid - water and TBP - n-dodecane/nitric acid - uranyl nitrate - water. Empirical equations describing the interfacial tension as a function of the concentration of TBP in the starting organic phase and of uranium-(VI) and nitric acid in the equilibrium aqueous phase were suggested. In the absence of uranium (VI), the interfacial tension can also be correlated with the concentration of water in the equilibrium organic phase. Free TBP, hydrated or nonhydrated, and hydrated TBP solvates of nitric acid are interfacially active. Anhydrous TBP solvates of nitric acid and the TBP solvate of uranyl nitrate, which neither is hydrated, do not exhibit any visible interfacial activity. (orig.) [de

  16. Deoxyribonucleoprotein structure and radiation injury - Cellular radiosensitivity is determined by LET-infinity-dependent DNA damage in hydrated deoxyribonucleoproteins and the extent of its repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lett, J. T.; Peters, E. L.

    1992-01-01

    Until recently, OH radicals formed in bulk nuclear water were believed to be the major causes of DNA damage that results in cell death, especially for sparsely ionizing radiations. That hypothesis has now been challenged, if not refuted. Lethal genomic DNA damage is determined mainly by energy deposition in deoxyribonucleoproteins, and their hydration shells, and charge (energy) transfer processes within those structures.

  17. Crystal structures of hydrates of simple inorganic salts. III. Water-rich aluminium halide hydrates: AlCl3 · 15H2O, AlBr3 · 15H2O, AlI3 · 15H2O, AlI3 · 17H2O and AlBr3 · 9H2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Horst; Hennings, Erik; Voigt, Wolfgang

    2014-09-01

    Water-rich aluminium halide hydrate structures are not known in the literature. The highest known water content per Al atom is nine for the perchlorate and fluoride. The nonahydrate of aluminium bromide, stable pentadecahydrates of aluminium chloride, bromide and iodide, and a metastable heptadecahydrate of the iodide have now been crystallized from low-temperature solutions. The structures of these hydrates were determined and are discussed in terms of the development of cation hydration spheres. The pentadecahydrate of the chloride and bromide are isostructural. In AlI(3) · 15H2O, half of the Al(3+) cations are surrounded by two complete hydration spheres, with six H2O in the primary and 12 in the secondary. For the heptadecahydrate of aluminium iodide, this hydration was found for every Al(3+).

  18. Band alignment and interfacial chemical structure of the HfLaO/InGaZnO4 heterojunction investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Ling-Xuan; Wu, Ze-Han; Zhang, Yi-Yu; Liu, Xing-Zhao; Li, Yan-Rong; Liu, Yuan; Song, Jia-Qi

    2017-01-01

    Amorphous InGaZnO 4 thin film transistors (a-IGZO TFTs) with HfLaO gate dielectrics have been widely demonstrated to possess extremely excellent electrical characteristics, and thus show great potential for applications in various next-generation electronic products. Nevertheless, the in-depth understanding of HfLaO/IGZO interfacial features is still lacking, which makes further device optimization lack clear guidance. In this work, the band alignment and interfacial chemical structure of a sputtering-prepared HfLaO/IGZO heterojunction was investigated through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The valence and conduction band offsets (Δ E v and Δ E c ) at the interface were determined to be 0.57 eV and 1.48 eV, respectively. The relatively large Δ E v is mainly attributed to the formation of the interfacial layer (IL) and thus the upward band bending from IGZO to the surface of HfLaO. Furthermore, it was found that the oxygen vacancies on the surface of IGZO were significantly suppressed upon the deposition of HfLaO, which not only explained the previously reported ultrahigh performance of a-IGZO/HfLaO TFTs to some extent, but also additionally validated the formation of the IL. Our findings have successfully revealed the importance of ILs in modifying the band alignment and interfacial trap states of HfLaO/IGZO heterojunctions, thus suggesting a potential route to further optimizing a-IGZO/HfLaO TFTs so as to satisfy the requirements of next-generation technologies. (paper)

  19. P-Wave and S-Wave Velocity Structure of Submarine Landslide Associated With Gas Hydrate Layer on Frontal Ridge of Northern Cascadia Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, T.; Lu, H.; Yelisetti, S.; Spence, G.

    2015-12-01

    The submarine landslide associated with gas hydrate is a potential risk for environment and engineering projects, and thus from long time ago it has been a hot topic of hydrate research. The study target is Slipstream submarine landslide, one of the slope failures observed on the frontal ridges of the Northern Cascadia accretionary margin off Vancouver Island. The previous studies indicated a possible connection between this submarine landslide feature and gas hydrate, whose occurrence is indicated by a prominent bottom-simulating reflector (BSR), at a depth of ~265-275 m beneath the seafloor (mbsf). The OBS (Ocean Bottom Seismometer) data collected during SeaJade (Seafloor Earthquake Array - Japan Canada Cascadia Experiment) project were used to derive the subseafloor velocity structure for both P- and S-wave using travel times picked from refraction and reflection events. The P-wave velocity structure above the BSR showed anomalous high velocities of about 2.0 km/s at shallow depths of 100 mbsf, closely matching the estimated depth of the glide plane (100 ± 10 m). Forward modelling of S-waves was carried out using the data from the OBS horizontal components. The S-wave velocities, interpreted in conjunction with the P-wave results, provide the key constraints on the gas hydrate distribution within the pores. The hydrate distribution in the pores is important for determining concentrations, and also for determining the frame strength which is critical for controlling slope stability of steep frontal ridges. The increase in S-wave velocity suggests that the hydrate is distributed as part of the load-bearing matrix to increase the rigidity of the sediment.

  20. Quantitative estimation of massive gas hydrate in gas chimney structures, the eastern margin of Japan Sea, from the physical property anomalies obtained by LWD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, M.; Morita, S.; Matsumoto, R.

    2017-12-01

    Two dedicated LWD (Logging While Drilling) cruises, GR14 and HR15, were conducted in summers of 2014 and 2015, respectively, by Meiji University and Geological Survey of Japan, AIST to explore the gas chimney structures, which are characterized by the columnar acoustic blanking below the topographic mound and/or pockmarks in eastern margin of Japan Sea. Shallow (33 to 172m-bsf, average 136m-bsf) 33 LWD drillings were carried out generally in and around gas chimney structures which are in Oki Trough, Off-Joetsu, and Mogami Trough areas, eastern margin of Japan Sea, during two cruises. Schlumberger LWD tools, GeoVISION (resistivity), TeleScope, ProVISION (NMR) and SonicVISION (sonic) were applied during GR14. NeoScope (neutron) was added and SonicScope was replaced for SonicVISION during HR15. The presence of thick highly-anomalous intervals within the LWD data at site J24L suggests the development of massive gas hydrate within Off-Joetsu, by very high resistivity ( 10,000 Ωm), high Vp ( 3,700 m/s) and Vs (370-1,839 m/s), high neutron porosity ( 1.2), low natural gamma ray intensity ( 0 API), low neutron gamma density ( 0.8 g/cm3), low NMR porosity ( 0.0), low permeability (10-2-10-4 mD), low formation neutron sigma (26-28). The extreme physical properties intervals suggest the development of the almost pure hydrate. Because of the clear contrast between pure hydrate and seawater saturated fine sediments, the hydrate amount can be estimated quantitatively based on the assumptions as the two component system of pure hydrate and the monotonous seawater saturated fine sediments. This study was conducted as a part of the methane hydrate research project funded by METI (the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, Japan).

  1. Structural and Stratigraphic Controls on Methane Hydrate occurrence and distribution: Gulf of Mexico, Walker Ridge 313 and Green Canyon 955: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaiswal, Priyank [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The goal of this project was to determine structural and stratigraphic controls on hydrate occurrence and distribution in Green Canyon (GC) 955 and Walker Ridge (WR) 313 blocks using seismic and well data. Gas hydrate was discovered in these blocks in coarse- and fine-grained sediments during the 2009 Joint Industrial project (JIP) Leg 11 drilling expedition. Although the immediate interest of the exploration community is exclusively hydrate which is present in coarse–grained sediments, factors that control hydrate and free gas distribution in the two blocks and whether coarse and fine-grained hydrate-bearing units are related in any manner, formed the core of this research. The project spanned from 10/01/2012 to 07/31/2016. In the project, in both the leased blocks, the interval spanning the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) was characterized using a joint analysis of sparse Ocean Bottom Seismic (OBS) and dense, surface–towed multichannel seismic (MCS) data. The project team had the luxury of calibrating their results with two well logs. Advance processing methods such as depth migration and full-waveform inversion (FWI) were used for seismic data analysis. Hydrate quantification was achieved through interpretation of the FWI velocity field using appropriate rock physics models at both blocks. The seismic modeling/inversion methodology (common to both GC955 and WR313 blocks) was as follows. First, the MCS data were depth migrated using a P-wave velocity (VP) model constructed using inversion of reflection arrival times of a few (four in both cases) key horizons carefully picked in the OBS data to farthest possible offsets. Then, the resolution of the traveltime VP model was improved to wavelength scale by inverting OBS gathers up to the highest frequency possible (21.75 Hz for GC955 and 17.5 for WR313) using FWI. Finally, the hydrate saturation (or the volume fraction) was estimated at the well location assuming one of the other hydrate morphology (filling the

  2. Modeling thermodynamic properties of propane or tetrahydrofuran mixed with carbon dioxide or methane in structure-II clathrate hydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, Bin; Ning, Fulong; Cao, Pinqiang; Peng, Li; Wu, Jianyang; Zhang, Zhun; Vlugt, T.J.H.; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2017-01-01

    A sound knowledge of thermodynamic properties of sII hydrates is of great importance to understand the stability of sII gas hydrates in petroleum pipelines and in natural settings. Here, we report direct molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the thermal expansion coefficient, the

  3. The Temperature Dependence of the Partition of CH4 and C2H6 in Structure I Hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, H.; Lu, W.

    2017-12-01

    At present, we mainly use hydrocarbon gas and carbon isotope composition to determine the gas source of natural gas hydrate. Judging the type of gas source plays a key role in the evaluation of hydrate reservoirs, but there is still controversy over this approach. Considering the crystal properties of hydrate, the process of aggregation and decomposition of natural gas hydrates may have an important effect on the gas composition. We used CH4 (C1), C2H6 (C2) and their mixture as gas sources to synthesize hydrates from aqueous solution in high-pressure capillary tubes. Gas concentration in hydrates grew at different temperatures was measured with quantitative Raman spectroscopy. The results show that concentrations of gas in pure methane and pure ethane hydrates increase with temperature. The results of the mixture are similar to pure gas below 288.15 K, the concentration of C1 in small cages (SC, 512) slowly increased, but the competitive relationship between methane and ethane in large cages (LC, 51262) become obvious after 288.15 K. From 278.15 K to 294.15 K, the value of C1/C2 decreased from 26.38 to 6.61, gradually closing to the original gas composition of 4. We find that gas hydrates are more likely to gather C1 when they accumulate. The lower the temperature is, the more obvious it will be, and the closer the value of C1/C2 is to the microbial gases.

  4. FY1995 molecular control technology for mining of methane-gas-hydrate; 1995 nendo methane hydrate no bunshi seigyo mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The objectives of the investigation are as follows: 1) developing a method to control formation/dissociation of methane-gas-hydrate, 2) developing a technology to displace methane gas by CO{sub 2} in methane-gas-hydrate deposit, 3) developing a technology to produce methane gas from the deposit efficiently. The final purpose of the project is to create new mining industry that solves both the problems of energy and global environment. 1) Clustering of water molecules is found to play the key role in the methane gas hydrate formation. 2) Equilibrium properties and kinetics of gas hydrates formation and dissociation in bulk-scale gas-hydrate are clarified in the practical environmental conditions. 3) Particle size of hydrate deposit influences the formation and dissociation of bulk-scale gas-hydrate crystal. 4) Mass transfer between gas and liquid phase in turbulent bubbly flow is a function of bubble diameter. The mass transfer depends on interfacial dynamics. (NEDO)

  5. Interfacial free energy governs single polystyrene chain collapse in water and aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Isaac T S; Walker, Gilbert C

    2010-05-12

    The hydrophobic interaction is significantly responsible for driving protein folding and self-assembly. To understand it, the thermodynamics, the role of water structure, the dewetting process surrounding hydrophobes, and related aspects have undergone extensive investigations. Here, we examine the hypothesis that polymer-solvent interfacial free energy is adequate to describe the energetics of the collapse of a hydrophobic homopolymer chain at fixed temperature, which serves as a much simplified model for studying the hydrophobic collapse of a protein. This implies that changes in polymer-solvent interfacial free energy should be directly proportional to the force to extend a collapsed polymer into a bad solvent. To test this hypothesis, we undertook single-molecule force spectroscopy on a collapsed, single, polystyrene chain in water-ethanol and water-salt mixtures where we measured the monomer solvation free energy from an ensemble average conformations. Different proportions within the binary mixture were used to create solvents with different interfacial free energies with polystyrene. In these mixed solvents, we observed a linear correlation between the interfacial free energy and the force required to extend the chain into solution, which is a direct measure of the solvation free energy per monomer on a single chain at room temperature. A simple analytical model compares favorably with the experimental results. This knowledge supports a common assumption that explicit water solvent may not be necessary for cases whose primary concerns are hydrophobic interactions and hydrophobic hydration.

  6. Gas hydrates forming and decomposition conditions analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Павленко

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of gas hydrates has been defined; their brief description has been given; factors that affect the formation and decomposition of the hydrates have been reported; their distribution, structure and thermodynamic conditions determining the gas hydrates formation disposition in gas pipelines have been considered. Advantages and disadvantages of the known methods for removing gas hydrate plugs in the pipeline have been analyzed, the necessity of their further studies has been proved. In addition to the negative impact on the process of gas extraction, the hydrates properties make it possible to outline the following possible fields of their industrial use: obtaining ultrahigh pressures in confined spaces at the hydrate decomposition; separating hydrocarbon mixtures by successive transfer of individual components through the hydrate given the mode; obtaining cold due to heat absorption at the hydrate decomposition; elimination of the open gas fountain by means of hydrate plugs in the bore hole of the gushing gasser; seawater desalination, based on the hydrate ability to only bind water molecules into the solid state; wastewater purification; gas storage in the hydrate state; dispersion of high temperature fog and clouds by means of hydrates; water-hydrates emulsion injection into the productive strata to raise the oil recovery factor; obtaining cold in the gas processing to cool the gas, etc.

  7. Development of hydrate risk quantification in oil and gas production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Piyush N.

    Subsea flowlines that transport hydrocarbons from wellhead to the processing facility face issues from solid deposits such as hydrates, waxes, asphaltenes, etc. The solid deposits not only affect the production but also pose a safety concern; thus, flow assurance is significantly important in designing and operating subsea oil and gas production. In most subsea oil and gas operations, gas hydrates form at high pressure and low temperature conditions, causing the risk of plugging flowlines, with a undesirable impact on production. Over the years, the oil and gas industry has shifted their perspective from hydrate avoidance to hydrate management given several parameters such as production facility, production chemistry, economic and environmental concerns. Thus, understanding the level of hydrate risk associated with subsea flowlines is an important in developing efficient hydrate management techniques. In the past, hydrate formation models were developed for various flow-systems (e.g., oil dominated, water dominated, and gas dominated) present in the oil and gas production. The objective of this research is to extend the application of the present hydrate prediction models for assessing the hydrate risk associated with subsea flowlines that are prone to hydrate formation. It involves a novel approach for developing quantitative hydrate risk models based on the conceptual models built from the qualitative knowledge obtained from experimental studies. A comprehensive hydrate risk model, that ranks the hydrate risk associated with the subsea production system as a function of time, hydrates, and several other parameters, which account for inertial, viscous, interfacial forces acting on the flow-system, is developed for oil dominated and condensate systems. The hydrate plugging risk for water dominated systems is successfully modeled using The Colorado School of Mines Hydrate Flow Assurance Tool (CSMHyFAST). It is found that CSMHyFAST can be used as a screening tool in

  8. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  9. Relating the variation of secondary structure of gelatin at fish oil-water interface to adsorption kinetics, dynamic interfacial tension and emulsion stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huihua; Wang, Bo; Barrow, Colin J; Adhikari, Benu

    2014-01-15

    The objectives of this study were to quantify the relationship between secondary structure of gelatin and its adsorption at the fish-oil/water interface and to quantify the implication of the adsorption on the dynamic interfacial tension (DST) and emulsion stability. The surface hydrophobicity of the gelatin solutions decreased when the pH increased from 4.0 to 6.0, while opposite tend was observed in the viscosity of the solution. The DST values decreased as the pH increased from 4.0 to 6.0, indicating that higher positive charges (measured trough zeta potential) in the gelatin solution tended to result in higher DST values. The adsorption kinetics of the gelatin solution was examined through the calculated diffusion coefficients (Deff). The addition of acid promoted the random coil and β-turn structures at the expense of α-helical structure. The addition of NaOH decreased the β-turn and increased the α-helix and random coil. The decrease in the random coil and triple helix structures in the gelatin solution resulted into increased Deff values. The highest diffusion coefficients, the highest emulsion stability and the lowest amount of random coil and triple helix structures were observed at pH=4.8. The lowest amount of random coil and triple helix structures in the interfacial protein layer correlated with the highest stability of the emulsion (highest ESI value). The lower amount of random coil and triple helix structures allowed higher coverage of the oil-water interface by relatively highly ordered secondary structure of gelatin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. DFT study on the interfacial properties of vertical and in-plane BiOI/BiOIO3 hetero-structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wen-Wu; Zhao, Zong-Yan

    2017-04-12

    Composite photocatalysts with hetero-structures usually favor the effective separation of photo-generated carriers. In this study, BiOIO 3 was chosen to form a hetero-structure with BiOI, due to its internal polar field and good lattice matching with BiOI. The interfacial properties and band offsets were focused on and analyzed in detail by DFT calculations. The results show that the charge depletion and accumulation mainly occur in the region near the interface. This effect leads to an interfacial electric field and thus, the photo-generated electron-hole pairs can be easily separated and transferred along opposite directions at the interface, which is significant for the enhancement of the photocatalytic activity. Moreover, according to the analysis of band offsets, the vertical BiOI/BiOIO 3 belongs to the type-II hetero-structure, while the in-plane BiOI/BiOIO 3 belongs to the type-I hetero-structure. The former type of hetero-structure has more favorable effects to enhance the photocatalytic activity of BiOI than that of the latter type of hetero-structure. In the case of the vertical BiOI/BiOIO 3 hetero-structure, photo-generated electrons can move from the conduction band of BiOI to that of BiOIO 3 , while holes can move from the valence band of BiOIO 3 to that of BiOI under solar radiation. In addition, the introduced internal electric field functions as a selector that can promote the separation of photo-generated carriers, resulting in the higher photocatalytic quantum efficiency. These findings illustrate the underlying mechanism for the reported experiments, and can be used as a basis for the design of novel highly efficient composite photocatalysts with hetero-structures.

  11. Particulate structure and microstructure evolution of concrete investigated by DEM : Part 2: Porosimetry in hydrating binders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huan He, H.; Le, N.L.B.; Stroeven, P.

    2012-01-01

    Durability of concrete in engineering structures is becoming more and more of a major problem. Research into such problems is complicated and expensive, however. Developments in computer technology make it possible nowadays realistically simulating cementitious materials and studying its pore

  12. Simulations of molecular self-assembled monolayers on surfaces: packing structures, formation processes and functions tuned by intermolecular and interfacial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jin; Li, Wei; Chen, Shuang; Ma, Jing

    2016-08-17

    Surfaces modified with a functional molecular monolayer are essential for the fabrication of nano-scale electronics or machines with novel physical, chemical, and/or biological properties. Theoretical simulation based on advanced quantum chemical and classical models is at present a necessary tool in the development, design, and understanding of the interfacial nanostructure. The nanoscale surface morphology, growth processes, and functions are controlled by not only the electronic structures (molecular energy levels, dipole moments, polarizabilities, and optical properties) of building units but also the subtle balance between intermolecular and interfacial interactions. The switchable surfaces are also constructed by introducing stimuli-responsive units like azobenzene derivatives. To bridge the gap between experiments and theoretical models, opportunities and challenges for future development of modelling of ferroelectricity, entropy, and chemical reactions of surface-supported monolayers are also addressed. Theoretical simulations will allow us to obtain important and detailed information about the structure and dynamics of monolayer modified interfaces, which will guide the rational design and optimization of dynamic interfaces to meet challenges of controlling optical, electrical, and biological functions.

  13. Determination of three-dimensional interfacial strain - A novel method of probing interface structure with X-ray Bragg-surface diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, W.-C.; Chu, C.-H.; Chang, H.-C.; Wu, B.-K.; Chen, Y.-R.; Cheng, C.-W.; Chiu, M.-S.; Shen, Y.-C.; Wu, H.-H.; Hung, Y.-S.; Chang, S.-L.; Hong, M.-H.; Tang, M.-T.; Stetsko, Yu.P.

    2007-01-01

    A new X-ray diffraction technique is developed to probe structural variations at the interfaces between epitaxy thin films and single-crystal substrates. The technique utilizes three-wave Bragg-surface diffraction, where a symmetric Bragg reflection and an asymmetric surface reflection are involved. The propagation of the latter along the interfaces conveys structural information about the interfacial region between the substrate and epi-layers. The sample systems of Au/GaAs(001) are subject to the three-wave diffraction investigation using synchrotron radiation. The GaAs three-wave Bragg-surface diffractions (006)/(11-bar3) and (006)/(1-bar1-bar3), are employed. The images of the surface diffracted waves are recorded with an image plate. The obtained images show relative positions of diffraction spots near the image of the interfacial boundary, which give the variation of lattice constant along the surface normal and in-plane directions. With the aid of grazing-incidence diffraction, three-dimensional mapping of strain field at the interfaces is possible. Details about this diffraction technique and the analysis procedures are discussed

  14. Inter-cage dynamics in structure I, II, and H fluoromethane hydrates as studied by NMR and molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueba, Alondra Torres; Kroon, Maaike C.; Peters, Cor J.; Moudrakovski, Igor L.; Ratcliffe, Christopher I.; Ripmeester, John A.; Alavi, Saman

    2014-01-01

    Prospective industrial applications of clathrate hydrates as materials for gas separation require further knowledge of cavity distortion, cavity selectivity, and defects induction by guest-host interactions. The results presented in this contribution show that under certain temperature conditions the guest combination of CH 3 F and a large polar molecule induces defects on the clathrate hydrate framework that allow intercage guest dynamics. 13 C NMR chemical shifts of a CH 3 F/CH 4 /TBME sH hydrate and a temperature analysis of the 2 H NMR powder lineshapes of a CD 3 F/THF sII and CD 3 F/TBME sH hydrate, displayed evidence that the populations of CH 4 and CH 3 F in the D and D ′ cages were in a state of rapid exchange. A hydrogen bonding analysis using molecular dynamics simulations on the TBME/CH 3 F and TBME/CH 4 sH hydrates showed that the presence of CH 3 F enhances the hydrogen bonding probability of the TBME molecule with the water molecules of the cavity. Similar results were obtained for THF/CH 3 F and THF/CH 4 sII hydrates. The enhanced hydrogen bond formation leads to the formation of defects in the water hydrogen bonding lattice and this can enhance the migration of CH 3 F molecules between adjacent small cages

  15. Application of the independent molecule model to elucidate the dynamics of structure I methane hydrate: a third report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioki, Shuzo

    2009-01-01

    Two new model systems of methane hydrate, larger than the previous systems, are constructed. One consists of 63 small and large cages with a small cage at the centre. The other has 65 small and large cages with a large cage at the centre. Three different H-bonding network patterns between water are formed, and three random orientations of methane in each cage are chosen. Using the surface water fixed method, we obtained the energy minimum conformations, fitted to the X-ray crystallographic structure. With normal mode analysis, we calculated frequencies of 2915.1 cm(-1) for a small cage, and 2911.0 cm(-1) for a large cage. These frequencies are a little nearer to the Raman spectra than were previous model systems. Treating three force constants of anharmonic potential energy and the strength of H-bonding between methane and water as four parameters, we obtained frequencies of 2913.6 cm(-1) for a small cage, a little lower than the Raman, and 2906.6 cm(-1) for a large cage, a little higher than the Raman. The calculations thus almost reach the Raman spectra.

  16. Quantum chemical studies on molecular structural conformations and hydrated forms of salicylamide and O-hydroxybenzoyl cyanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandan, K.; Kolandaivel, P.; Kumaresan, R.

    Ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) methods have been employed to study the molecular structural conformations and hydrated forms of both salicylamide (SAM) and O-hydroxybenzoyl cyanide (OHBC). Molecular geometries and energetics have been obtained in the gaseous phase by employing the Møller-Plesset type 2 MP2/6-311G(2d,2p) and B3LYP/6-311G(2d,2p) levels of theory. The presence of an electron-releasing group (SAM) leads to an increase in the energy of the molecular system, while the presence of an electron-withdrawing group (OHBC) drastically decreases the energy. Chemical reactivity parameters (η and μ) have been calculated using the energy values of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) obtained at the Hartree-Fock (HF)/6-311G(2d,2p) level of theory for all the conformers and the principle of maximum hardness (MHP) has been tested. The condensed Fukui functions have been calculated using the atomic charges obtained through the natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis scheme for all the optimized structures at the B3LYP/6-311G(2d,2p) level of theory, and the most reactive sites of the molecules have been identified. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies have been carried out at the B3LYP/6-311G(2d,2p) level of theory for all the conformers in the gaseous phase on the basis of the method of Cheeseman and coworkers. The calculated chemical shift values have been used to discuss the delocalization activity of the electron clouds. The dimeric structures of the most stable conformers of both SAM and OHBC in the gaseous phase have been optimized at the B3LYP/6-311G(2d,2p) level of theory, and the interaction energies have been calculated. The most stable conformers of both compounds bear an intramolecular hydrogen bond, which gives rise to the formation of a pseudo-aromatic ring. These conformers have been allowed to interact with the water molecule. Special emphasis has been given to analysis of the

  17. Micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Na; Yao, Yuan; Sun, Henghu; Feng, Huan

    2013-11-15

    In this research, the micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials has been investigated through SEM-EDS, (27)Al MAS NMR and (29)Si MAS NMR techniques, in which the used red mud was derived from the bauxite calcination method. The results show that the red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials mainly form fibrous C-A-S-H gel, needle-shaped/rod-like AFt in the early hydration period. With increasing of the hydration period, densification of the pastes were promoted resulting in the development of strength. EDS analysis shows that with the Ca/Si of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials increases, the average Ca/Si and Ca/(Si+Al) atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel increases, while the average Al/Si atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel decreases. MAS NMR analysis reveals that Al in the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials exists in the forms of Al(IV) and Al(VI), but mainly in the form of Al(VI). Increasing the Ca/Si ratio of raw material promotes the conversion of [AlO4] to [AlO6] and inhibits the combination between [AlO4] and [SiO4] to form C-A-S-H gel. Meanwhile, the polymerization degree of [SiO4] in the hydration products declines. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Local Structures around Si, Al and Na in Hydrated Silicate Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farges, Francois; Wispelaere, Sidoine de; Rossano, Stephanie; Munos, Manuel; Wilke, Max; Flank, Anne-Marie; Lagarde, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    XANES spectra were collected at the Si-, Al-, and Na K-edge in hydrous silicate glasses to understand the effect of water on the local structure around these cations. Around network forming Si and Al, no drastic changes are observed. Around Na, the dissolution of water creates more ordered environments in Al-bearing glasses and less ordered environment in Al-free glasses. Ab-initio XANES calculations were undertaken to understand the structural origins for these features. Based on these results, a bond valence model was refined that considers not only the present XANES experiments and models but also NMR information. The double percolation model refined explains, among others, the explosive properties of water-bearing hydrous melts, at the origin of a number of cataclysmic eruptions in subduction zones

  19. Structure and properties of dichloro(L-proline)cadmium(II) hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukawa, Yasuhiko; Inomata, Yoshie; Takeuchi, Toshio [Jochi Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology

    1983-07-01

    An X-ray diffraction study of the title complex has been carried out. The crystal is orthorhombic, with the space group P2/sub 1/2/sub 1/2/sub 1/; Z=4, a=10.021(3), b=13.562(4), c=7.298(3) A. Block-diagonal least-squares refinements have led to the final R value of 0.035. The structure is very similar to that of dichloro(4-hydroxy-L-proline) cadmium(II), which has a one-dimensional polymer bridged by chlorine atoms and a carboxyl group like an infinite folding screen. The thermal behavior is, however, different from that of dichloro(4-hydroxy-L-proline) cadmium(II). The difference is likely to be due to a difference of the crystal structure, whether it contains intermolecular hydrogen bonds or not.

  20. Mechanochemical Synthesis and Crystal Structure of the Lidocaine-Phloroglucinol Hydrate 1:1:1 Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Nancy Evelyn Magaña-Vergara; Porfirio de la Cruz-Cruz; Ana Lilia Peraza-Campos; Francisco Javier Martínez-Martínez; Juan Saulo González-González

    2018-01-01

    Molecular complexation is a strategy used to modify the physicochemical or biopharmaceutical properties of an active pharmaceutical ingredient. Solvent assisted grinding is a common method used to obtain solid complexes in the form of cocrystals. Lidocaine is a drug used as an anesthetic and for the treatment of chronic pain, which bears in its chemical structure an amide functional group able to form hydrogen bonds. Polyphenols are used as cocrystal coformers due to their ability to form O–H...

  1. Retinal Ligand Mobility Explains Internal Hydration and Reconciles Active Rhodopsin Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leioatts, Nicholas; Mertz, Blake; Martínez-Mayorga, Karina; Romo, Tod D.; Pitman, Michael C.; Feller, Scott E.; Grossfield, Alan; Brown, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Rhodopsin, the mammalian dim-light receptor, is one of the best-characterized G-protein-coupled receptors, a pharmaceutically important class of membrane proteins that has garnered a great deal of attention because of the recent availability of structural information. Yet the mechanism of rhodopsin activation is not fully understood. Here, we use microsecond-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, validated by solid-state 2H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, to understand the transition between the dark and metarhodopsin I (Meta I) states. Our analysis of these simulations reveals striking differences in ligand flexibility between the two states. Retinal is much more dynamic in Meta I, adopting an elongated conformation similar to that seen in the recent activelike crystal structures. Surprisingly, this elongation corresponds to both a dramatic influx of bulk water into the hydrophobic core of the protein and a concerted transition in the highly conserved Trp2656.48 residue. In addition, enhanced ligand flexibility upon light activation provides an explanation for the different retinal orientations observed in X-ray crystal structures of active rhodopsin. PMID:24328554

  2. [Skin hydration and hydrating products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplan, H; Nocera, T

    2018-05-01

    One of the skin's principal functions is to protect the body against its environment by maintaining an effective epidermal barrier, not only against external factors, but also to prevent water loss from the body. Indeed, water homeostasis is vital for the normal physiological functioning of skin. Hydration levels affect not only visible microscopic parameters such as the suppleness and softness of skin, but also molecular parameters, enzyme activities and cellular signalling within the epidermis. The body is continually losing some of its water, but this phenomenon is limited and the optimal hydration gradient in skin is ensured via a set of sophisticated regulatory processes that rely on the functional and dynamic properties of the uppermost level of the skin consisting of the stratum corneum. The present article brings together data recently acquired in the fields of skin hydration and the characterisation of dehydrated or dry skin, whether through study of the regulatory processes involved or as a result of changes in the techniques used for in situ measurement, and thus in optimisation of management. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Interfacial chemical and electronic structure of cobalt deposition on 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Menglong; Lyu, Lu; Niu, Dongmei; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yuhe; Liu, Peng; Gao, Yongli

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Chemical reaction and band bending at the interface are confirmed by the UPS and XPS. • Co atoms mostly accumulate at or near the interface and penetration into sublayer is weak. • The electron and hole barriers are too high and interfacial buffer layer is needed for device design. - Abstract: Interfacial chemical and electronic structure of Co deposition on 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene(C8-BTBT) was investigated by ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Chemical reaction of cobalt with C8-BTBT at the interface is confirmed by a new component of S 2s peak which is electron-rich compared to the original one of C8-BTBT molecules. Intensity evolution of the core level in XPS indicates that the adsorption of Co atoms is mainly at the surface without deeper diffusion into C8-BTBT layer. Initial deposition of Co atoms downward shifts the core levels of C8-BTBT by electron transfer from isolated Co atoms or clusters to the C8-BTBT. Further deposition of Co upward shifts the core levels of C8-BTBT because of the neutralization of the thicker metal Co film. Our investigation suggests an inert buffer layer inserted to protect organic layer from reaction or decomposition and to lower the carrier barriers for both the electron and hole to improve the performance of Co/C8-BTBT-based OFETs.

  4. Tunable magnetic properties by interfacial manipulation of L1(0)-FePt perpendicular ultrathin film with island-like structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, C; Wang, S G; Yang, M Y; Zhang, E; Zhan, Q; Jiang, Y; Li, B H; Yu, G H

    2012-02-01

    Based on interfacial manipulation of the MgO single crystal substrate and non-magnetic AIN compound, a L1(0)-FePt perpendicular ultrathin film with the structure of MgO/FePt-AIN/Ta was designed, prepared, and investigated. The film is comprised of L1(0)-FePt "magnetic islands," which exhibits a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), tunable coercivity (Hc), and interparticle exchange coupling (IEC). The MgO substrate promotes PMA of the film because of interfacial control of the FePt lattice orientation. The AIN compound is doped to increase the difference of surface energy between FePt layer and MgO substrate and to suppress the growth of FePt grains, which takes control of island growth mode of FePt atoms. The AIN compound also acts as isolator of L1(0)-FePt islands to pin the sites of FePt domains, resulting in the tunability of Hc and IEC of the films.

  5. Interfacial chemical and electronic structure of cobalt deposition on 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Menglong; Lyu, Lu [Institute of Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Hunan Key Laboratory for Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Niu, Dongmei, E-mail: mayee@csu.edu.cn [Institute of Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Hunan Key Laboratory for Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yuhe; Liu, Peng [Institute of Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Hunan Key Laboratory for Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Gao, Yongli, E-mail: ygao@pas.rochester.edu [Institute of Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process in Advanced Materials, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Hunan Key Laboratory for Super-Microstructure and Ultrafast Process, School of Physics and Electronics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester NY14627 (United States)

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Chemical reaction and band bending at the interface are confirmed by the UPS and XPS. • Co atoms mostly accumulate at or near the interface and penetration into sublayer is weak. • The electron and hole barriers are too high and interfacial buffer layer is needed for device design. - Abstract: Interfacial chemical and electronic structure of Co deposition on 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene(C8-BTBT) was investigated by ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Chemical reaction of cobalt with C8-BTBT at the interface is confirmed by a new component of S 2s peak which is electron-rich compared to the original one of C8-BTBT molecules. Intensity evolution of the core level in XPS indicates that the adsorption of Co atoms is mainly at the surface without deeper diffusion into C8-BTBT layer. Initial deposition of Co atoms downward shifts the core levels of C8-BTBT by electron transfer from isolated Co atoms or clusters to the C8-BTBT. Further deposition of Co upward shifts the core levels of C8-BTBT because of the neutralization of the thicker metal Co film. Our investigation suggests an inert buffer layer inserted to protect organic layer from reaction or decomposition and to lower the carrier barriers for both the electron and hole to improve the performance of Co/C8-BTBT-based OFETs.

  6. Insights into the role of hydration in protein structure and stability obtained through hydrostatic pressure studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Royer

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available A thorough understanding of protein structure and stability requires that we elucidate the molecular basis for the effects of both temperature and pressure on protein conformational transitions. While temperature effects are relatively well understood and the change in heat capacity upon unfolding has been reasonably well parameterized, the state of understanding of pressure effects is much less advanced. Ultimately, a quantitative parameterization of the volume changes (at the basis of pressure effects accompanying protein conformational transitions will be required. The present report introduces a qualitative hypothesis based on available model compound data for the molecular basis of volume change upon protein unfolding and its dependence on temperature.

  7. Crystal structure and magnetic properties of hydrated and dehydrated nickel(II)-pyromellitate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakakuma, M. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 804-8550 (Japan)]. E-mail: e346427m@tobata.isc.kyutech.ac.jp; Yamamoto, J. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 804-8550 (Japan); Takagi, S. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 804-8550 (Japan); Mito, M. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 804-8550 (Japan); Deguchi, H. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 804-8550 (Japan); Yoshihiro, M. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 804-8550 (Japan); Kyritsakas, N. [Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination Organique, UMR 7140-CNRS, Universite Louis Pasteur, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Kurmoo, M. [Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination Organique, UMR 7140-CNRS, Universite Louis Pasteur, 67000 Strasbourg (France)

    2007-03-15

    Ni{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}PM.2H{sub 2}O, where PM is benzene-1,2,4,5-tetracarboxylate, forms square-grid layers with Ni-OCO-Ni bridges that are connected to one another by the benzene moiety. It consists of ferromagnetic layers coupled antiferromagnetically to their neighbors with a long-range Neel ordering at 3 K. A critical field of 1300 Oe suffices to reverse all the moments to a ferromagnetic state. On dehydration to Ni{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}PM the structure is transformed irreversibly to chains connected by benzene and the magnetic behavior is that of a paramagnet with very weak coupling. By the rehydration of the latter to Ni{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}PM.2H{sub 2}O, the structure hardly changes but the magnetism recovers showing T {sub N} at 3 K.

  8. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  9. Prediction and analysis of the structure of hydrated Mn2+, V2+, Ti3 and Cr3 ions by means of the MD simulation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, Y.J.

    2002-01-01

    Classical Molecular dynamics (MD) and hybrid Quantum/Molecular Mechanics-Molecular Dynamics (QM/MM-MD) simulations have been performed to investigate structural properties of Mn(II), V(II), Cr(III) and Ti(III) cations in aqueous solution. The first hydration sphere in QM/MM-MD simulations is treated quantum mechanically, while the rest of the system is described by classical analytical two- and three-body potentials. The results obtained for the first hydration shell from this method are in agreement with experimental data, showing 100 % of 6 fold coordination around the ion in all cases. The results prove that non/additive contributions are mandatory for an accurate description of ion hydration. Within the QM/MM method, the inclusion of a perturbation field describing the remaining system was shown to be an accurate tool for evaluating the first shell structure, and thus to be a good alternative for systems, where the construction of a three-body correction function is difficult or too time-consuming. (author)

  10. Transformation of meta-stable calcium silicate hydrates to tobermorite: reaction kinetics and molecular structure from XRD and NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the integrity of well-bore systems that are lined with Portland-based cements is critical to the successful storage of sequestered CO2 in gas and oil reservoirs. As a first step, we investigate reaction rates and mechanistic pathways for cement mineral growth in the absence of CO2 by coupling water chemistry with XRD and NMR spectroscopic data. We find that semi-crystalline calcium (alumino-)silicate hydrate (Al-CSH) forms as a precursor solid to the cement mineral tobermorite. Rate constants for tobermorite growth were found to be k = 0.6 (± 0.1) × 10-5 s-1 for a solution:solid of 10:1 and 1.6 (± 0.8) × 10-4 s-1 for a solution:solid of 5:1 (batch mode; T = 150°C). This data indicates that reaction rates for tobermorite growth are faster when the solution volume is reduced by half, suggesting that rates are dependent on solution saturation and that the Gibbs free energy is the reaction driver. However, calculated solution saturation indexes for Al-CSH and tobermorite differ by less than one log unit, which is within the measured uncertainty. Based on this data, we consider both heterogeneous nucleation as the thermodynamic driver and internal restructuring as possible mechanistic pathways for growth. We also use NMR spectroscopy to characterize the site symmetry and bonding environment of Al and Si in a reacted tobermorite sample. We find two [4]Al coordination structures at δiso = 59.9 ppm and 66.3 ppm with quadrupolar product parameters (PQ) of 0.21 MHz and 0.10 MHz (± 0.08) from 27Al 3Q-MAS NMR and speculate on the Al occupancy of framework sites by probing the protonation environment of Al metal centers using 27Al{1H}CP-MAS NMR. PMID:19144195

  11. Predictive Mechanical Characterization of Macro-Molecular Material Chemistry Structures of Cement Paste at Nano Scale - Two-phase Macro-Molecular Structures of Calcium Silicate Hydrate, Tri-Calcium Silicate, Di-Calcium Silicate and Calcium Hydroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla Espinosa, Ingrid Marcela

    Concrete is a hierarchical composite material with a random structure over a wide range of length scales. At submicron length scale the main component of concrete is cement paste, formed by the reaction of Portland cement clinkers and water. Cement paste acts as a binding matrix for the other components and is responsible for the strength of concrete. Cement paste microstructure contains voids, hydrated and unhydrated cement phases. The main crystalline phases of unhydrated cement are tri-calcium silicate (C3S) and di-calcium silicate (C2S), and of hydrated cement are calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide (CH). Although efforts have been made to comprehend the chemical and physical nature of cement paste, studies at molecular level have primarily been focused on individual components. Present research focuses on the development of a method to model, at molecular level, and analysis of the two-phase combination of hydrated and unhydrated phases of cement paste as macromolecular systems. Computational molecular modeling could help in understanding the influence of the phase interactions on the material properties, and mechanical performance of cement paste. Present work also strives to create a framework for molecular level models suitable for potential better comparisons with low length scale experimental methods, in which the sizes of the samples involve the mixture of different hydrated and unhydrated crystalline phases of cement paste. Two approaches based on two-phase cement paste macromolecular structures, one involving admixed molecular phases, and the second involving cluster of two molecular phases are investigated. The mechanical properties of two-phase macromolecular systems of cement paste consisting of key hydrated phase CSH and unhydrated phases C3S or C2S, as well as CSH with the second hydrated phase CH were calculated. It was found that these cement paste two-phase macromolecular systems predicted an isotropic material behavior. Also

  12. Velocity Structure and 3D Finite Element Modeling for Critical Instability of Gas Hydrate-related Slipstream Submarine Slide, offshore Vancouver Island, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    LONG, S.; He, T.; Lan, K.; Spence, G.; Yelisetti, S.

    2016-12-01

    The previous study indicated that Slipstream submarine landslide is one of a gas hydrate-related slope failures on the frontal ridges of the Northern Cascadia accretionary margin, off Vancouver Island, Canada. The OBS data collected during SeaJade project were used to derive the subseafloor Vp & Vs structures. The anomalous high Vp of about 2.0 km/s at shallow depths of 100 (± 10) mbsf closely matches the estimated depth of the glide plane. The modelled Vs above the BSR at a depth of 265-275 mbsf is about 100-150 m/s higher than a theoretical 100% water saturated background value, indicating that the hydrate acts as part of the load-bearing matrix to increase the rigidity of the sediment. Also, the Vp & Vs above BSR both indicate a consistent 40% saturation of gas hydrate. On the basis of high accurate submarine bathymetry obtained by multibeam sounding system, the submarine landform before slump is reconstructed by comparing the slump headwall geometry with surrounding ridges. Using the elastic moduli determined from Vp & Vs, the stress status was calculated by the finite element method for different conditions and confirmed that the undersea sliding process related with gas hydrate starts from the toe of the slope and then progressively retreats to the place of current headwall, in a series of triangular blocks or wedges. The shear stress are then compared with the frame shear strength of geological model, which is critical for controlling slope stability of steep frontal ridges The simulation results found that the ridge was stable under its own weight, but gas hydrate saturation decrease and pore-water pressure increase will greatly reduce shear strength of sediments and may cause a landslide. Since the study area is in the earthquake belt, the large seismic acceleration will greatly affect pore pressure distribution within the ridge. The simulation results indicated that the shallow high-velocity gas hydrate layer coincident with glide plane depth is more

  13. Contribution to the study of low-energy X-ray-induced degradations on the oxide-silicon interfacial transition layer of MOS structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boukabache, Ali

    1983-01-01

    The Si-SiO_2 interface is considered as a transition layer. Its thickness is typically about 10 A. It contains traps which exchange charges with silicon by a tunneling mechanism. Its influence on MOS capacitor, gate-controlled diode and MOS transistor is analyzed. Long channel MOST's (P-Substrate) are irradiated with low energy X-ray (between 0 and 240 Krads) in order to validate the model. Capacitance, recombination velocity and 1/f noise measurements indicate that the X- ray induce traps distributed in space and in energy. These traps provoke a decrease in mobility. Additionally, X-rays create a fixed oxide charge which induce a shift in the characteristics of MOS structures. Finally, under irradiation the behaviour of the gate-controlled diode and the MOS capacitor are in accordance with theoretical model of the interfacial layer. The overall noise behaviour cannot be explained by existing theoretical models. (author) [fr

  14. Centrosome structure and function is altered by chloral hydrate and diazepam during the first reproductive cell cycles in sea urchin eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, H.; Chakrabarti, A.

    1998-01-01

    ability to reform normal mitotic figures. These results indicate that chloral hydrate and diazepam affect centrosome structure which results in the inability to reform normal microtubule formations and causes abnormal fertilization and mitosis.

  15. Structural and interfacial characteristics of thin (2 films grown by electron cyclotron resonance plasma oxidation on [100] Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.D.; Carl, D.A.; Hess, D.W.; Lieberman, M.A.; Gronsky, R.

    1991-04-01

    The feasibility of fabricating ultra-thin SiO 2 films on the order of a few nanometer thickness has been demonstrated. SiO 2 thin films of approximately 7 nm thickness have been produced by ion flux-controlled Electron Cyclotron Resonance plasma oxidation at low temperature on [100] Si substrates, in reproducible fashion. Electrical measurements of these films indicate that they have characteristics comparable to those of thermally grown oxides. The thickness of the films was determined by ellipsometry, and further confirmed by cross-sectional High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. Comparison between the ECR and the thermal oxide films shows that the ECR films are uniform and continuous over at least a few microns in lateral direction, similar to the thermal oxide films grown at comparable thickness. In addition, HRTEM images reveal a thin (1--1.5 nm) crystalline interfacial layer between the ECR film and the [100] substrate. Thinner oxide films of approximately 5 nm thickness have also been attempted, but so far have resulted in nonuniform coverage. Reproducibility at this thickness is difficult to achieve

  16. Irradiation Effect of Argon Ion on Interfacial Structure Fe(2nm/Si(tsi=0.5-2 nm Multilayer thin Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Purwanto

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigation includes formation of interfacial structure of Fe(2nm/Si(tSi= 0.5-2 nm multilayer thin film and the behavior of antiferromagnetic coupling between Fe layers due to Argon ion irradiation was investigated. [Fe(2nm/Si]30 multilayers (MLs with a thickness of Si spacer 0.5 - 2 nanometer were prepared on n-type (100 Si substrate by the helicon plasma sputtering method. Irradiation were performed using 400keV Ar ion to investigate the behavior of magnetic properties of the Fe/Si MLs. The magnetization measurements of Fe/Si MLs after 400keV Ar ion irradiation show the degradation of antiferromagnetic behavior of Fe layers depend on the ion doses. The Magnetoresistance (MR measurements using by Four Point Probe (FPP method also confirm that MR ratio decrease after ion irradiation. X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns indicate that the intensity of a satellite peak induced by a superlattice structure does not change within the range of ion dose. These results imply that the surface of interface structures after ion irradiation become rough although the layer structures are maintained. Therefore, it is considered that the MR properties of Fe/Si MLs also are due to the metallic superlattice structures such as Fe/Cr and Co/Cu MLs.

  17. Experimental Determination of Refractive Index of Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bylov, Martin; Rasmussen, Peter

    1997-01-01

    . For methane hydrate (structure I) the refractive index was found to be 1.346 and for natural gas hydrate (structure II) it was found to be 1.350. The measurements further suggest that the gas hydrate growth rate increases if the water has formed hydrates before. The induction time, on the other hand, seems......The refractive indexes of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate have been experimentally determined. The refractive indexes were determined in an indirect manner making use of the fact that two non-absorbing materials will have the same refractive index if they cannot be distinguished visually...

  18. CaTiO.sub.3 Interfacial template structure on semiconductor-based material and the growth of electroceramic thin-films in the perovskite class

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Rodney Allen; Walker, Frederick Joseph

    1998-01-01

    A structure including a film of a desired perovskite oxide which overlies and is fully commensurate with the material surface of a semiconductor-based substrate and an associated process for constructing the structure involves the build up of an interfacial template film of perovskite between the material surface and the desired perovskite film. The lattice parameters of the material surface and the perovskite of the template film are taken into account so that during the growth of the perovskite template film upon the material surface, the orientation of the perovskite of the template is rotated 45.degree. with respect to the orientation of the underlying material surface and thereby effects a transition in the lattice structure from fcc (of the semiconductor-based material) to the simple cubic lattice structure of perovskite while the fully commensurate periodicity between the perovskite template film and the underlying material surface is maintained. The film-growth techniques of the invention can be used to fabricate solid state electrical components wherein a perovskite film is built up upon a semiconductor-based material and the perovskite film is adapted to exhibit ferroelectric, piezoelectric, pyroelectric, electro-optic or large dielectric properties during use of the component.

  19. A modulated differential scanning calorimetry and small-angle x-ray scattering study of the interfacial region in structured latices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hourston Douglas J.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The interfacial structure of poly(styrene (PS-poly(methyl acrylate (PMA structured latices has been investigated by means of modulated-temperature differential scanning calorimetry (M-TDSC and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS. The differential of heat capacity, dCp/dT, signal from M-TDSC was used to quantify the weight fraction of interface in these latices. For PS-PMA (50:50 by weight structured latices in which the PS component had different crosslink densities (0, 1, 3, 5 and 10 mol% of crosslinking agent, the weight fraction of interface was about 13%. With increasing crosslink density, the fraction of interface increased only slightly. A core-shell model has been used to analyse SAXS data for these PS-PMA latices. M-TDSC can only provide information about the weight fraction of interface, but the combination of M-TDSC and SAXS can provide much more information on the morphology of such structured latices.

  20. Hydration dependent dynamics in RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Greg L.; Bardaro, Michael F.; Echodu, Dorothy C.; Drobny, Gary P.; Varani, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    The essential role played by local and collective motions in RNA function has led to a growing interest in the characterization of RNA dynamics. Recent investigations have revealed that even relatively simple RNAs experience complex motions over multiple time scales covering the entire ms-ps motional range. In this work, we use deuterium solid-state NMR to systematically investigate motions in HIV-1 TAR RNA as a function of hydration. We probe dynamics at three uridine residues in different structural environments ranging from helical to completely unrestrained. We observe distinct and substantial changes in 2 H solid-state relaxation times and lineshapes at each site as hydration levels increase. By comparing solid-state and solution state 13 C relaxation measurements, we establish that ns-μs motions that may be indicative of collective dynamics suddenly arise in the RNA as hydration reaches a critical point coincident with the onset of bulk hydration. Beyond that point, we observe smaller changes in relaxation rates and lineshapes in these highly hydrated solid samples, compared to the dramatic activation of motion occurring at moderate hydration

  1. Dehydration behaviour of hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dette, S.S.; Stelzer, T.; Jones, M.J.; Ulrich, J. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Zentrum fuer Ingenieurwissenschaften, Verfahrenstechnik/TVT, 06099 Halle (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Immersing a crystalline solvate in a suitable anti-solvent can induce phase transformation to solvent-free solid phase. In certain cases the solvent-mediated phase transition results in the generation of hollow, tubular structures. Both the tube dimensions of sodium-2-keto-L-gulonate anhydrate (skga) and the dehydration kinetics of sodium-2-keto-L-gulonate monohydrate (skgm) can be modified by the antisolvent employed. An explanation for the variable dehydration behaviour of skgm in the antisolvents is presented here. Furthermore, other crystalline hydrates were dehydrated in dry methanol. Providing an operational window can be found, any hydrate material could possibly find use in the production of tubes (micro- or nanotubes for different applications). The experimental conditions selected (dry methanol as antisolvent, dehydration temperature at 25 C) for the dehydration did not lead to the anhydrate tube growth for all hydrates investigated. Based upon the results presented here a first hypothesis is presented to explain this effect. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Quantum dynamics of small H2 and D2 clusters in the large cage of structure II clathrate hydrate: Energetics, occupancy, and vibrationally averaged cluster structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastianelli, Francesco; Xu, Minzhong; Bačić, Zlatko

    2008-12-01

    We report diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) calculations of the quantum translation-rotation (T-R) dynamics of one to five para-H2 (p-H2) and ortho-D2 (o-D2) molecules inside the large hexakaidecahedral (51264) cage of the structure II clathrate hydrate, which was taken to be rigid. These calculations provide a quantitative description of the size evolution of the ground-state properties, energetics, and the vibrationally averaged geometries, of small (p-H2)n and (o-D2)n clusters, n=1-5, in nanoconfinement. The zero-point energy (ZPE) of the T-R motions rises steeply with the cluster size, reaching 74% of the potential well depth for the caged (p-H2)4. At low temperatures, the rapid increase of the cluster ZPE as a function of n is the main factor that limits the occupancy of the large cage to at most four H2 or D2 molecules, in agreement with experiments. Our DMC results concerning the vibrationally averaged spatial distribution of four D2 molecules, their mean distance from the cage center, the D2-D2 separation, and the specific orientation and localization of the tetrahedral (D2)4 cluster relative to the framework of the large cage, agree very well with the low-temperature neutron diffraction experiments involving the large cage with the quadruple D2 occupancy.

  3. Hydration water and microstructure in calcium silicate and aluminate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fratini, Emiliano; Ridi, Francesca; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Baglioni, Piero

    2006-01-01

    angle x-ray scattering (WAXD) that characterize how additives affect both the hydrated microstructure development and the original grain size. In particular, SPs alter the morphology of the hydrated phases, which no longer grow with the classic fibrillar structure on the grain surface, but nucleate in solution as globular structures. All this information converges in a quantitative, and at molecular level, description of the mechanisms involved in the setting process of one of the materials most widely used by human beings

  4. Ultrafast phosphate hydration dynamics in bulk H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costard, Rene; Tyborski, Tobias; Fingerhut, Benjamin P.; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate vibrations serve as local probes of hydrogen bonding and structural fluctuations of hydration shells around ions. Interactions of H 2 PO 4 − ions and their aqueous environment are studied combining femtosecond 2D infrared spectroscopy, ab-initio calculations, and hybrid quantum-classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Two-dimensional infrared spectra of the symmetric (ν S (PO 2 − )) and asymmetric (ν AS (PO 2 − )) PO 2 − stretching vibrations display nearly homogeneous lineshapes and pronounced anharmonic couplings between the two modes and with the δ(P-(OH) 2 ) bending modes. The frequency-time correlation function derived from the 2D spectra consists of a predominant 50 fs decay and a weak constant component accounting for a residual inhomogeneous broadening. MD simulations show that the fluctuating electric field of the aqueous environment induces strong fluctuations of the ν S (PO 2 − ) and ν AS (PO 2 − ) transition frequencies with larger frequency excursions for ν AS (PO 2 − ). The calculated frequency-time correlation function is in good agreement with the experiment. The ν(PO 2 − ) frequencies are mainly determined by polarization contributions induced by electrostatic phosphate-water interactions. H 2 PO 4 − /H 2 O cluster calculations reveal substantial frequency shifts and mode mixing with increasing hydration. Predicted phosphate-water hydrogen bond (HB) lifetimes have values on the order of 10 ps, substantially longer than water-water HB lifetimes. The ultrafast phosphate-water interactions observed here are in marked contrast to hydration dynamics of phospholipids where a quasi-static inhomogeneous broadening of phosphate vibrations suggests minor structural fluctuations of interfacial water

  5. Ultrafast phosphate hydration dynamics in bulk H2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costard, Rene; Tyborski, Tobias; Fingerhut, Benjamin P.; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Phosphate vibrations serve as local probes of hydrogen bonding and structural fluctuations of hydration shells around ions. Interactions of H2PO4- ions and their aqueous environment are studied combining femtosecond 2D infrared spectroscopy, ab-initio calculations, and hybrid quantum-classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Two-dimensional infrared spectra of the symmetric ( ν S ( PO2 - ) ) and asymmetric ( ν A S ( PO2 - ) ) PO 2- stretching vibrations display nearly homogeneous lineshapes and pronounced anharmonic couplings between the two modes and with the δ(P-(OH)2) bending modes. The frequency-time correlation function derived from the 2D spectra consists of a predominant 50 fs decay and a weak constant component accounting for a residual inhomogeneous broadening. MD simulations show that the fluctuating electric field of the aqueous environment induces strong fluctuations of the ν S ( PO2 - ) and ν A S ( PO2 - ) transition frequencies with larger frequency excursions for ν A S ( PO2 - ) . The calculated frequency-time correlation function is in good agreement with the experiment. The ν ( PO2 - ) frequencies are mainly determined by polarization contributions induced by electrostatic phosphate-water interactions. H2PO4-/H2O cluster calculations reveal substantial frequency shifts and mode mixing with increasing hydration. Predicted phosphate-water hydrogen bond (HB) lifetimes have values on the order of 10 ps, substantially longer than water-water HB lifetimes. The ultrafast phosphate-water interactions observed here are in marked contrast to hydration dynamics of phospholipids where a quasi-static inhomogeneous broadening of phosphate vibrations suggests minor structural fluctuations of interfacial water.

  6. Collagen tissue treated with chitosan solution in H2O/CO2 mixtures: Influence of clathrates hydrates on the structure and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaschin, Ivan S; Bakuleva, Natalia P; Grigoriev, Timofei E; Krasheninnikov, Sergey V; Nikitin, Lev N

    2017-03-01

    A mixture of water/carbon dioxide is a "green" perspective solvent from the viewpoint of biomedical applications. Clathrate hydrates are formed this solvent under certain conditions and a very interesting question is the impact of clathrates hydrates on the structure and properties of bovine pericardium, which is used in biomedicine, in particular as a main part of biological heart valve prostheses. The aim of the present work is to investigate the influence of clathrates on the structure and mechanical properties of the collagen tissue treated with chitosan in H 2 O/CO 2 mixtures under pressure 3.0-3.5MPa and temperatures 2-4°C. It was first found that the clathrate hydrates in this media due to the strong fluctuations "bomb" collagen tissue of bovine pericardium, which is manifested in the appearance of numerous small gaps (pores) with mean size of 225±25nm and large pores with size of 1-3μ on the surface and within collagen matrices. High porosity leads to averaging characteristics of the organization structure in tissues with different orientation of the collagen fibers. As a result, the mechanical properties of the collagen tissue with a different orientation of the collagen fibrils become similar, which is quite different from their original properties. The structural changes caused by the influence of the environment clathrate hydrates led to a significant decrease of the tensile strength (30-47% in total, p<0.05) and initial elastic moduli (74-83%, p<0.05). However, the final elastic moduli and the maximum tensile virtually unchanged compared to the control. Nevertheless, it was found that the direct deposition of chitosan from the H 2 O/CO 2 mixtures with clathrate improve the mechanical-strength properties of the porous matrices. We believe that these improved mechanical properties are achieved due to particularly deep and uniform impregnation of the collagen matrix with chitosan from its pressurized solutions in H 2 O/CO 2 mixtures. Copyright © 2016

  7. Reconsideration on Hydration of Sodium Ion: From Micro-Hydration to Bulk Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongquan, Zhou; Chunhui, Fang; Yan, Fang; Fayan, Zhu; Haiwen, Ge; Hongyan, Liu

    2017-12-01

    Micro hydration structures of the sodium ion, [Na(H2O) n ]+, n = 1-12, were probed by density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level in both gaseous and aqueous phase. The predicted equilibrium sodium-oxygen distance of 0.240 nm at the present level of theory. The four-, five- and six-coordinated cluster can transform from each other at the ambient condition. The analysis of the successive water binding energy and natural charge population (NBO) on Na+ clearly shows that the influence of Na+ on the surrounding water molecules goes beyond the first hydration shell with the hydration number of 6. The Car-Parrinello molecular dynamic simulation shows that only the first hydration sphere can be found, and the hydration number of Na+ is 5.2 and the hydration distance ( r Na-O) is 0.235 nm. All our simulations mentioned in the present paper show an excellent agreement with the diffraction result from X-ray scattering study.

  8. Experimental investigation of methane release from hydrate formation in sandstone through both hydrate dissociation and CO{sub 2} sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husebo, J.; Graue, A.; Kvamme, B. [Bergen Univ., Bergen (Norway). Dept. of Physics and Technology; Stevens, J.; Howard, J.J. [ConocoPhillips, Ponca City, OK (United States); Baldwin, B.A. [Green Country Petrophysics LLC, Dewey, OK (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Large amounts of natural gas trapped in hydrate reservoirs are found in Arctic regions and in deep offshore locations around the world. Natural gas production from hydrate deposits offer significant potential for future energy needs. However, research is needed in order to propose potential production schemes for natural gas hydrates. Natural gas molecules can be freed from hydrate structured cages by depressurization, by heating and by exposing the hydrate to a substance that will form a thermodynamically more stable hydrate structure. This paper provided a comparison of two approaches for releasing methane from methane hydrate in porous sandstone. The study scope covered the dissociation rate of methane hydrate in porous media through depressurization, and also referred to previous work done on producing methane from hydrates in sandstone while sequestering carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The study was conducted in a laboratory setting. The paper discussed the experimental design which included the placing of a pressure- and temperature-controlled sample holder inside the bore of a magnetic resonance imager. The experimental procedures were then outlined, with reference to hydrate formation; carbon dioxide sequestration; hydrate dissociation experiments with constant volume; and hydrate dissociation experiments at constant pressure. The constant volume experiments demonstrated that in order to dissociate a large amount of hydrate, the initial depressurization had to be significantly lower than the hydrate stability pressure. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Experimental Characterisation of the Interfacial Structure during Counter-Current Flow Limitation in a Model of the Hot Leg of a PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Vallée

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the two-phase flow behaviour during counter-current flow limitation in the hot leg of a pressurised water reactor, dedicated experiments were performed in a scaled down model of Kobe University. The experiments were performed with air and water at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. At high flow rates, CCFL occurs and the discharge of water to the reactor pressure vessel simulator is limited by the formation of slugs carrying liquid back to the steam generator. The structure of the interface was observed from the side of the channel test section using a high-speed video camera. An algorithm was developed to recognise the stratified interface in the camera frames after background subtraction. This method allows extracting the water level at any position in the image as well as performing further statistical treatments. The evolution of the interfacial structure along the horizontal part of the hot leg is shown by the visualisation of the probability distribution of the water level and analysed in function of the liquid and gas flow rates. The data achieved are useful for the analysis of the flow conditions as well as for the validation of modelling approaches like computational fluid dynamics.

  10. An alkyl polyglucoside-mixed emulsifier as stabilizer of emulsion systems: the influence of colloidal structure on emulsions skin hydration potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Snezana; Lukic, Milica; Jaksic, Ivana; Reichl, Stephan; Tamburic, Slobodanka; Müller-Goymann, Christel

    2011-06-01

    To be considered as a suitable vehicle for drugs/cosmetic actives, an emulsion system should have a number of desirable properties mainly dependent on surfactant used for its stabilization. In the current study, C(12-14) alkyl polyglucoside (APG)-mixed emulsifier of natural origin has been investigated in a series of binary (emulsifier concentration 10-25% (w/w)) and ternary systems with fixed emulsifier content (15% (w/w)) with or without glycerol. To elucidate the systems' colloidal structure the following physicochemical techniques were employed: polarization and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (WAXD and SAXD), thermal analysis (DSC and TGA), complex rheological, pH, and conductivity measurements. Additionally, the emulsion vehicles' skin hydration potential was tested in vivo, on human skin under occlusion. In a series of binary systems with fixed emulsifier/water ratios ranging from 10/90 to 25/75 the predominance of a lamellar mesophase was found, changing its character from a liquid crystalline to a gel crystalline type. The same was observed in gel emulsions containing equal amounts of emulsifier and oil (15% (w/w)), but varying in glycerol content (0-25%). Different emulsion samples exhibited different water distribution modes in the structure, reflecting their rheological behavior and also their skin hydration capacity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular structure, dynamics and hydration studies of soybean storage proteins and model systems by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakalis, L.T.

    1989-01-01

    The potential of high-resolution 13 C NMR for the characterization of soybean storage proteins was explored. The spectra of a commercial soy protein isolate as well as those of alkali-denatured 7S and 11S soybean globulins were well resolved and tentatively assigned. Relaxation measurements indicated fast motion for several side chains and the protein backbone. Protein fractions (11S and 7S) were also investigated at various states of molecular association. The large size of the multisubunit soybean storage proteins affected adversely both the resolution and the sensitivity of their 13 C NMR spectra. A comparison of 17 O and 2 H NMR relaxation rates of water in solutions of lysozyme (a model system) as a function of concentration, pH and magnetic field suggested that only 17 O monitors directly the hydration of lysozyme. Analysis of 17 O NMR lysozyme hydration data in terms of a two-state, fast-exchange, anisotropic model resulted in hydration parameters which are consistent with the protein's physico-chemical properties. The same model was applied to the calculation of the amount and mobility of bound water in soy protein dispersions by means of 17 O NMR relaxation measurements as a function of protein concentration. The protein concentration dependences of 1 H transverse NMR relaxation measurements at various pH and ionic strength values were fitted by a viral expansion. The interpretation of the data was based on the effects of protein aggregation, salt binding and protein group ionization on the NMR measurements. In all cases, relaxation rates showed a linear dependence on protein activity

  12. On the hydration of subnanometric antifouling organosilane adlayers: a molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Sonia; Blaszykowski, Christophe; Nolan, Robert; Thompson, Damien; Thompson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The connection between antifouling and surface hydration is a fascinating but daunting question to answer. Herein, we use molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations to gain further insight into the role of surface functionalities in the molecular-level structuration of water (surface kosmotropicity)--within and atop subnanometric organosilane adlayers that were shown in previous experimental work to display varied antifouling behavior. Our simulations support the hypothesized intimate link between surface hydration and antifouling, in particular the importance of both internal and interfacial hydrophilicity and kosmotropicity. The antifouling mechanism is also discussed in terms of surface dehydration energy and water dynamicity (lability and mobility), notably the crucial requirement for clustered water molecules to remain tightly bound for extensive periods of time--i.e. exhibit slow exchange dynamics. A substrate effect on surface hydration, which would also participate in endowing antifouling adlayers with hydrogel-like characteristics, is also proposed. In contrast, the role of adlayer flexibility, if any, is assigned a secondary role in these ultrathin structures made of short building blocks. The conclusions from this work are well in line with those previously drawn in the literature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Microstructure of natural hydrate host sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.; Kerkar, P.B.; Mahajan, D.; Lindquist, W.B.; Feng, H.

    2007-01-01

    There is worldwide interest in the study of natural gas hydrate because of its potential impact on world energy resources, control on seafloor stability, significance as a drilling hazard and probable impact on climate as a reservoir of a major greenhouse gas. Gas hydrates can (a) be free floating in the sediment matrix (b) contact, but do not cement, existing sediment grains, or (c) actually cement and stiffen the bulk sediment. Seismic surveys, often used to prospect for hydrates over a large area, can provide knowledge of the location of large hydrate concentrations because the hydrates within the sediment pores modify seismic properties. The ability to image a sample at the grain scale and to determine the porosity, permeability and seismic profile is of great interest since these parameters can help in determining the location of hydrates with certainty. We report here on an investigation of the structure of methane hydrate sediments at the grain-size scale using the synchrotron radiation-based computed microtomography (CMT) technique. Work has started on the measurements of the changes occurring as tetrahydrofuran hydrate, a surrogate for methane hydrate, is formed in the sediment

  14. Structural systematics of rare earth complexes. III. Structural characterization of lanthanoid (III) picrate hydrates: gadolinium picrate dodecahydrate - an x-ray-induced phase modifications? - and some general aspects of structural chemistry of lanthanoid picrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrowfield, J.M.; Weimin, Lu; Brian, W.S.; White, A.H.

    1994-01-01

    In the course of the previous studies (Parts I and II), an unusual result was observed in the case of the structure determination of hydrated gadolinium(III) picrate. Midway through data collection, the monoclinic P2 1 /c phase modification (X-ray-induced?) to a similar cell more nearly resembling that of the La→Pr structure type recorded previously, with no loss of crystal integrity, and with useful data sets being obtained on both forms. Redetermination of the structure with a fresh sample yielded no reproduction of the anomaly. These results are recorded and discussed, together with an overview of the consequences of the data of Parts I-III in relation to those of other literature in the field. 13 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig

  15. Is Br2 hydration hydrophobic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Torres, A; Gamboa-Suárez, A; Bernal-Uruchurtu, M I

    2017-02-28

    The spectroscopic properties of bromine in aqueous systems suggest it can behave as either hydrophilic or hydrophobic solute. In small water clusters, the halogen bond and the hydrogen-halogen interaction are responsible for its specific way of binding. In water hydrates, it is efficiently hosted by two different cages forming the crystal structure and it has been frequently assumed that there is little or no interaction between the guest and the host. Bromine in liquid solution poses a challenging question due to its non-negligible solubility and the large blue shift measured in its absorption spectra. Using a refined semi-empirical force field, PM3-PIF, we performed a Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics study of bromine in liquid water. Here we present a detailed study in which we retrieved the most representative hydration structures in terms of the most frequent positions around bromine and the most common water orientations. Albeit being an approximate description of the total hydration phenomenon, it captures the contribution of the leading molecular interactions in form of the recurrent structures. Our findings confirm that the spectroscopic signature is mainly caused by the closest neighbors. The dynamics of the whole first hydration shell strongly suggests that the external molecules in that structure effectively isolate the bulk from the presence of bromine. The solvation structure fluctuates from a hydrophilic to a hydrophobic-like environment along the studied trajectory.

  16. Interfacial Water-Transport Effects in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienitz, Brian; Yamada, Haruhiko; Nonoyama, Nobuaki; Weber, Adam

    2009-11-19

    It is well known that the proton-exchange membrane is perhaps the most critical component of a polymer-electrolyte fuel cell. Typical membranes, such as Nafion(R), require hydration to conduct efficiently and are instrumental in cell water management. Recently, evidence has been shown that these membranes might have different interfacial morphology and transport properties than in the bulk. In this paper, experimental data combined with theoretical simulations will be presented that explore the existence and impact of interfacial resistance on water transport for Nafion(R) 21x membranes. A mass-transfer coefficient for the interfacial resistance is calculated from experimental data using different permeation cells. This coefficient is shown to depend exponentially on relative humidity or water activity. The interfacial resistance does not seem to exist for liquid/membrane or membrane/membrane interfaces. The effect of the interfacial resistance is to flatten the water-content profiles within the membrane during operation. Under typical operating conditions, the resistance is on par with the water-transport resistance of the bulk membrane. Thus, the interfacial resistance can be dominant especially in thin, dry membranes and can affect overall fuel-cell performance.

  17. Small angle X-ray scattering from hydrating tricalcium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollet, D.

    1983-01-01

    The small-angle X-ray scattering technique was used to study the structural evolution of hydrated tricalcium silicate at room temperature. The changes in specific area of the associated porosity and the evolution of density fluctuations in the solid hydrated phase were deduced from the scattering data. A correlation of these variations with the hydration mechanism is tried. (Author) [pt

  18. Effect of Atmospheric Ions on Interfacial Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chang Kurt Kung

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of atmospheric positivity on the electrical properties of interfacial water was explored. Interfacial, or exclusion zone (EZ water was created in the standard way, next to a sheet of Nafion placed horizontally at the bottom of a water-filled chamber. Positive atmospheric ions were created from a high voltage source placed above the chamber. Electrical potential distribution in the interfacial water was measured using microelectrodes. We found that beyond a threshold, the positive ions diminished the magnitude of the negative electrical potential in the interfacial water, sometimes even turning it to positive. Additionally, positive ions produced by an air conditioner were observed to generate similar effects; i.e., the electrical potential shifted in the positive direction but returned to negative when the air conditioner stopped blowing. Sometimes, the effect of the positive ions from the air conditioner was strong enough to destroy the structure of interfacial water by turning the potential decidedly positive. Thus, positive air ions can compromise interfacial water negativity and may explain the known negative impact of positive ions on health.

  19. Molar volumes of LiI in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O solutions; Structural hydration interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakli, Gy. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)], E-mail: jakli@aeki.kfki.hu

    2009-01-15

    According to a recent study of the H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O molar volume isotope effect (MVIE) of the alkali metal chloride solutions, neither the standard nor the excess MVIE of the LiCl corresponds to the usual hydrophilic hydration characteristics of the inorganic ions above room temperatures. This phenomenon can not be rationalized by electrostriction, with the collapse of the 'loose' tetrahedral ('ice-like') water structure due to the electrostatic (ion + dipole) interaction. It seemed possible that this unique hydration behaviour of the Li{sup +} would be stronger and could reveal further structural information with a less hydrophilic anion than the chloride. Therefore we have determined the MVIE of the LiI as a function of temperature and concentration. The densities of normal and heavy water solutions of LiI have been measured with six-figure precision at T = (288.15, 298.15, and 308.15) K from (0.03 to 4) molal, m, using a vibrating-tube densitometer. The solvent isotope effect on the apparent molar volume, as well as on the solute and solvent partial molar volumes, was evaluated. As expected, with the rationalization of the MVIE of LiI instead of the geometric structural differences of the isotopic solvents, the energetic contributions have to be considered at all the temperatures investigated. At infinite dilution, a high degree of compensation between the reversed influences of the Li{sup +} and I{sup -} on the activities of the isotopic solvents determines the MVIE. By increasing concentration, the highly asymmetric energetic interactions of the Li{sup +} and the I{sup -} with the solvent apparently result in a 'mutual salting-out' effect. At a concentration {approx}0.7m, a uniquely abrupt structural rearrangement results in a 'solvent-separated ion-pair' solution structure.

  20. Artificial Hydration and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ... Your Health Resources Healthcare Management Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Share Print Patients who ...

  1. Interfacial potential approach for Ag/ZnO (0001) interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Hong-Quan; Shen Jiang; Qian Ping; Chen Nan-Xian

    2014-01-01

    Systematic approaches are presented to extract the interfacial potentials from the ab initio adhesive energy of the interface system by using the Chen—Möbius inversion method. We focus on the interface structure of the metal (111)/ZnO (0001) in this work. The interfacial potentials of Ag—Zn and Ag—O are obtained. These potentials can be used to solve some problems about Ag/ZnO interfacial structure. Three metastable interfacial structures are investigated in order to check these potentials. Using the interfacial potentials we study the procedure of interface fracture in the Ag/ZnO (0001) interface and discuss the change of the energy, stress, and atomic structures in tensile process. The result indicates that the exact misfit dislocation reduces the total energy and softens the fracture process. Meanwhile, the formation and mobility of the vacancy near the interface are observed. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  2. Interfacial chemical and electronic structure of cobalt deposition on 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Menglong; Lyu, Lu; Niu, Dongmei; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yuhe; Liu, Peng; Gao, Yongli

    2017-04-01

    Interfacial chemical and electronic structure of Co deposition on 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b]benzothiophene(C8-BTBT) was investigated by ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Chemical reaction of cobalt with C8-BTBT at the interface is confirmed by a new component of S 2s peak which is electron-rich compared to the original one of C8-BTBT molecules. Intensity evolution of the core level in XPS indicates that the adsorption of Co atoms is mainly at the surface without deeper diffusion into C8-BTBT layer. Initial deposition of Co atoms downward shifts the core levels of C8-BTBT by electron transfer from isolated Co atoms or clusters to the C8-BTBT. Further deposition of Co upward shifts the core levels of C8-BTBT because of the neutralization of the thicker metal Co film. Our investigation suggests an inert buffer layer inserted to protect organic layer from reaction or decomposition and to lower the carrier barriers for both the electron and hole to improve the performance of Co/C8-BTBT-based OFETs.

  3. Large enhancement of Blocking temperature by control of interfacial structures in Pt/NiFe/IrMn/MgO/Pt multilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Blocking temperature (TB of Pt/NiFe/IrMn/MgO/Pt multilayers was greatly enhanced from far below room temperature (RT to above RT by inserting 1 nm thick Mg layer at IrMn/MgO interface. Furthermore, the exchange bias field (Heb was increased as well by the control of interfacial structures. The evidence for a significant fraction of Mn-O bonding at IrMn/MgO interface without Mg insertion layer was provided by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The bonding between Mn and O can decrease the antiferromagnetism of IrMn film, leading to lower value of TB in Pt/NiFe/IrMn/MgO/Pt multilayers. Ultrathin Mg film inserted at IrMn/MgO interface acting as an oxygen sinking layer can suppress the oxidation reactions between Mn and O and reduce the formation of Mn-O bonding greatly. The oxidation suppression results in the recovery of the antiferromagnetism of IrMn film, which can enhance TB and Heb. Furthermore, the high resolution transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that the Mg insertion layer can efficiently promote a high-quality MgO (200 texture. This study will enhance the understanding of physics in antiferromagnet-based spintronic devices.

  4. Measurement of local interfacial area concentration in boiling loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoung, Ho Kang; Byong, Jo Yun; Goon, Cherl Park

    1995-01-01

    An accurate prediction of two-phase flow is essential to many energy systems, including nuclear reactors. To model the two-phase flow, detailed information on the internal flow structure is required. The void fraction and interfacial area concentration are important fundamental parameters characterizing the internal structure of two-phase flow. The interfacial area concentration is defined as the available interfacial area per unit volume of the two-phase mixture in calculations of the interfacial transport of mass, momentum, and energy. Although a number of studies have been made in this area, the interfacial area concentration in two-phase flow has not been sufficiently investigated either experimentally or analytically. Most existing models for interfacial area concentration are limited to area-averaged interfacial area concentration in a flow channel. And the studies on local interfacial area concentration are limited to the case of air-water two-phase flow. However, the internal flow structure of steam-water two-phase flow having various bubble sizes could be quite different from that of air-water two-phase flow, the reliability of which weak in practical applications. In this study, the local interfacial area concentration steam-water two-phase flow has been investigated experimentally in a circular boiling tube having a heating rod in the center, and for the low flow with liquid superficial velocity <1 m/s

  5. Use of vibrational spectroscopy to study protein and DNA structure, hydration, and binding of biomolecules: A combined theoretical and experimental approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalkanen, Karl J.; Jürgensen, Vibeke Würtz; Claussen, Anetta

    2006-01-01

    and experimental approach. The systems we have studied systematically are the amino acids (L-alanine, L-tryptophan, and L-histidine), peptides (N-acetyl L-alanine N'-methyl amide, N-acetyl L-tryptophan N'-methyl amide, N-acetyl L-histidine N'-methyl amide, L-alanyl L-alanine, tri-L-serine, N-acetyl L-alanine L......+disp, RHF, MP2, and DFT methodologies for the modeling studies with the goal of interpreting the experimentally measured vibrational spectra for these molecules to the greatest extent possible and to use this combined approach to understand the structure, function, and electronic properties......We report on our work with vibrational absorption, vibrational circular dichroism, Raman scattering, Raman optical activity, and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to study protein and DNA structure, hydration, and the binding of ligands, drugs, pesticides, or herbicides via a combined theoretical...

  6. Structure of the Hydrated Platinum(II) Ion And the Cis-Diammine-Platinum(II) Complex in Acidic Aqueous Solution: An EXAFS Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalilehvand, F.; Laffin, L.J.

    2009-05-18

    Careful analysis of Pt L{sub 3}-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra shows that the hydrated platinum(II) ion in acidic (HClO{sub 4}) aqueous solution binds four water molecules with the Pt-O bond distance 2.01(2) {angstrom} and one (or two) in the axial position at 2.39(2) {angstrom}. The weak axial water coordination is in accordance with the unexpectedly small activation volume previously reported for water exchange in an interchange mechanism with associative character. The hydrated cis-diammineplatinum(II) complex has a similar coordination environment with two ammine and two aqua ligands strongly bound with Pt-O/N bond distances of 2.01(2) {angstrom} and, in addition, one (or two) axial water molecule at 2.37(2) {angstrom}. This result provides a new basis for theoretical computational studies aiming to connect the function of the anticancer drug cis-platin to its ligand exchange reactions, where usually four-coordinated square planar platinum(II) species are considered as the reactant and product. {sup 195}Pt NMR spectroscopy has been used to characterize the Pt(II) complexes.

  7. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lina

    2017-05-13

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10 was conducted for tricalcium silicate (C3S) to interpret long-term hydration process and investigate the formation, structure and properties of C-S-H. Based on results from XRD, IR, SEM, NMR and so forth, loose and dense clusters of C-S-H with analogous C/S ratio were obtained along with the corresponding chemical formulae proposed as Ca5Si4O13∙6.2H2O. Crystalline structure inside C-S-H was observed by TEM, which was allocated at the foil-like proportion as well as the edge of wrinkles of the product. The long-term hydration process of C3S in dilute suspension could be sketchily described as migration of calcium hydroxide and in-situ growth of C-S-H with equilibrium silicon in aqueous solution relatively constant and calcium varied.

  8. Bioaccessibility of nutrients and micronutrients from dispersed food systems: impact of the multiscale bulk and interfacial structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marze, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    Many food systems are dispersed systems, that is, they possess at least two immiscible phases. This is generally due to the coexistence of domains with different physicochemical properties separated by many interfaces which control the apparent thermodynamic equilibrium. This feature was and is still largely studied to design pharmaceutical delivery systems. In food science, the recent intensification of in vitro digestion tests to complement the in vivo ones holds promises in the identification of the key parameters controlling the bioaccessibility of nutrients and micronutrients. In this review, we present the developments of in vitro digestion tests for dispersed food systems (mainly emulsions, dispersions and gels). We especially highlight the evidences detailing the roles of the constituting multiscale structures. In a perspective section, we show the potential of structured interfaces to allow controlled bioaccessibility.

  9. Comparison of polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se2 device efficiency with junction depth and interfacial structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, A.J.; Gabor, A.M.; Contreras, M.A.; Tuttle, J.R.; Noufi, R.; Sobol, P.E.; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Lynn, K.G.

    1995-01-01

    X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) have been used to characterize the surface versus bulk composition, electronic, and physical structure of polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 thin-film interfaces. Angle-resolved high-resolution photoemission measurements on the valence-band electronic structure and Cu 2p, In 3d, Ga 2p, and Se 3d core lines were used to evaluate the surface and near surface chemistry of CuInSe 2 and Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 device grade thin films. XPS compositional depth profiles were also acquired from the near surface region. PAS was used as a nondestructive, depth-sensitive probe for open-volume-type defects. Results of these measurements are related to device efficiencies to show the effects of compositional variations and defect concentrations in the near surface region on device performance. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  10. Coarsening behaviour and interfacial structure of γ′ precipitates in Co-Al-W based superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorontsov, V.A.; Barnard, J.S.; Rahman, K.M.; Yan, H.-Y.; Midgley, P.A.; Dye, D.

    2016-01-01

    This work discusses the effects of alloying on the coarsening behaviour of the L1 2 ordered γ ′ phase and the structure of the γ/γ ′ interfaces in three Co-Al-W base superalloys aged at ∼90 °C below the respective solvus temperatures: Co-7Al-7W, Co-10Al-5W-2Ta and Co-7Al-7W-20Ni (at.%). The coarsening kinetics are adequately characterised by the classical Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner model for Ostwald ripening. Co-7Al-7W exhibited much slower coarsening than its quaternary derivatives. Alloying can be exploited to modify the coarsening kinetics either by increasing the solvus temperature by adding tantalum, or by adding nickel to shift the rate controlling mechanism towards dependence on the diffusion of aluminium rather than tungsten. Lattice resolution STEM imaging was used to measure the widths of the order-disorder (structural) and Z-contrast (compositional) gradients across the γ/γ ′ interfaces. Similarly to nickel base superalloys, the compositional gradient was found to be wider than the structural. Co-7Al-7W-20Ni had much wider interface gradients than Co-7Al-7W and Co-10Al-5W-2Ta, which suggests that its γ ′ phase stoichiometry is less constrained. A possible correlation between temperature and misfit normalised r vs. t 1/3 coarsening rate coefficients and the structural gradient width has also been identified, whereby alloys with wider interfaces exhibit faster coarsening rates.

  11. Largely improved the low temperature toughness of acrylonitrile-styrene-acrylate (ASA) resin: Fabricated a core-shell structure of two elastomers through the differences of interfacial tensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zepeng; Zhang, Jun

    2018-06-01

    The phase morphology of two elastomers (i.e., chlorinated polyethylene (CPE) and polybutadiene rubber (BR)) were devised to be a core-shell structure in acrylonitrile-styrene-acrylate (ASA) resin matrix, via the interfacial tension differences of polymer pairs. Selective extraction test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were utilized to verify this special phase morphology. The results demonstrated that the core-shell structure, BR core and CPE shell, significantly contributed to improve the low temperature toughness of ASA/CPE/BR ternary blends, which may be because the nonpolar BR core was segregated from polar ASA by the CPE shell. The CPE shell served dual functions: Not only did it play compatibilizing effect in the interface between BR and ASA matrix, but it also toughened the blends at 25 and 0 °C. The blends of ASA/CPE/BR (100/27/3, w/w/w) and ASA/CPE/BR (100/22/8, w/w/w) showed the peak impact strengths at about 28 and 9 kJ/m2 at 0 and -30 °C, respectively, which were higher than both that of ASA/CPE/BR (100/30/0, w/w/w) and ASA/CPE/BR (100/0/30, w/w/w). Moreover, the impact strength of ternary blends at room temperature kept at 40 kJ/m2 when BR content was lower than 10 phr. Other characterizations including contact angle measurement, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA), morphology of impact-fractured surfaces, tensile properties, flexural properties, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were measured as well.

  12. Supramolecular Organization of Nonstoichiometric Drug Hydrates: Dapsone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Doris E.; Griesser, Ulrich J.

    2018-01-01

    The observed moisture- and temperature dependent transformations of the dapsone (4,4′-diaminodiphenyl sulfone, DDS) 0. 33-hydrate were correlated to its structure and the number and strength of the water-DDS intermolecular interactions. A combination of characterization techniques was used, including thermal analysis (hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis), gravimetric moisture sorption/desorption studies and variable humidity powder X-ray diffraction, along with computational modeling (crystal structure prediction and pair-wise intermolecular energy calculations). Depending on the relative humidity the hydrate contains between 0 and 0.33 molecules of water per molecule DDS. The crystal structure is retained upon dehydration indicating that DDS hydrate shows a non-stoichiometric (de)hydration behavior. Unexpectedly, the water molecules are not located in structural channels but at isolated-sites of the host framework, which is counterintuitively for a hydrate with non-stoichiometric behavior. The water-DDS interactions were estimated to be weaker than water-host interactions that are commonly observed in stoichiometric hydrates and the lattice energies of the isomorphic dehydration product (hydrate structure without water molecules) and (form III) differ only by ~1 kJ mol−1. The computational generation of hypothetical monohydrates confirms that the hydrate with the unusual DDS:water ratio of 3:1 is more stable than a feasible monohydrate structure. Overall, this study highlights that a deeper understanding of the formation of hydrates with non-stoichiometric behavior requires a multidisciplinary approach including suitable experimental and computational methods providing a firm basis for the development and manufacturing of high quality drug products. PMID:29520359

  13. Relation between interfacial structure and mechanical properties in AlN/TiN bilayers investigated by EXAFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersen, O.; Tuilier, M.-H.; Thobor-Keck, A.; Rousselot, C.; Cortes, R.

    2005-01-01

    The relation between the mechanical properties and the structure of AlN/TiN bilayers prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering in the 600 nm range is investigated. Al and Ti K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure is used in order to determine the local order around Al and Ti by comparison with 300 nm thick AlN and TiN single layers. The use of this powerful local probe allows the evidence of intermixing between AlN and TiN deposited layers, which is suggested by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy experiments. The effect of ionic bombardment applied at various steps of the deposition process is studied. The ionic bombardment applied during the deposit induces substantial changes in the absorption spectra that are assigned to a decrease of intermixing and an improvement of local order. Simulations of (Al, Ti)N ternary alloys Al and Ti K-edge absorption spectra for increasing mean occupation factors C Ti (C Al ) of Ti(Al) substituting Al(Ti) in hexagonal AlN (cubic TiN) lattice are performed in order to determine the initial parameters for the fit of the experimental data. The refinements performed by using FEFFIT software demonstrate that an ionic bombardment applied during the deposition phase results in a significant reduction of the number of Al-Ti pairs within the bilayer and an improvement of the local order around Ti and Al, which is quantified by a decrease of the Debye-Waller parameters. This structural evolution is tentatively correlated with the improvement of mechanical properties of the bilayers

  14. Relation between interfacial structure and mechanical properties in AlN/TiN bilayers investigated by EXAFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersen, O. [Equipe de Recherche Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes de Fabrication, 61, rue Albert Camus, F-68093 Mulhouse (France)]. E-mail: ovidiu.ersen@ipcms.u-strasbg.fr; Tuilier, M.-H. [Equipe de Recherche Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes de Fabrication, 61, rue Albert Camus, F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Thobor-Keck, A. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ecoulements les Surfaces et les Transferts (UMR CNRS 6000), ITSFC, 4, place Tharradin, BP 71427, F-25211 Montbeliard (France); Rousselot, C. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ecoulements les Surfaces et les Transferts (UMR CNRS 6000), ITSFC, 4, place Tharradin, BP 71427, F-25211 Montbeliard (France); Cortes, R. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee (UMR CNRS 7643), Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau cedex (France)

    2005-06-01

    The relation between the mechanical properties and the structure of AlN/TiN bilayers prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering in the 600 nm range is investigated. Al and Ti K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure is used in order to determine the local order around Al and Ti by comparison with 300 nm thick AlN and TiN single layers. The use of this powerful local probe allows the evidence of intermixing between AlN and TiN deposited layers, which is suggested by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy experiments. The effect of ionic bombardment applied at various steps of the deposition process is studied. The ionic bombardment applied during the deposit induces substantial changes in the absorption spectra that are assigned to a decrease of intermixing and an improvement of local order. Simulations of (Al, Ti)N ternary alloys Al and Ti K-edge absorption spectra for increasing mean occupation factors C {sub Ti} (C {sub Al}) of Ti(Al) substituting Al(Ti) in hexagonal AlN (cubic TiN) lattice are performed in order to determine the initial parameters for the fit of the experimental data. The refinements performed by using FEFFIT software demonstrate that an ionic bombardment applied during the deposition phase results in a significant reduction of the number of Al-Ti pairs within the bilayer and an improvement of the local order around Ti and Al, which is quantified by a decrease of the Debye-Waller parameters. This structural evolution is tentatively correlated with the improvement of mechanical properties of the bilayers.

  15. Interfacial Interactions and Nano structure Changes in DPPG/HD Monolayer at the Air/Water Interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, H.; Zhang, P.; Sun, R.; Hao, Ch.; Wang, J.; Zhu, H.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, P.; Li, Sh.

    2015-01-01

    Lung surfactant (LS) plays a crucial role in regulating surface tension during normal respiration cycles by decreasing the work associated with lung expansion and therefore decreases the metabolic energy consumed. Monolayer surfactant films composed of a mixture of phospholipids and spreading additives are of optional utility for applications in lung surfactant-based therapies. A simple, minimal model of such a lung surfactant system, composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phosphor-rac-(1-glycerol)] (DPPG) and hexadecanol (HD), was prepared, and the surface pressure-area π-A) isotherms and nano structure characteristics of the binary mixture were investigated at the air/water interface using a combination of Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Based on the regular solution theory, the miscibility and stability of the two components in the monolayer were analyzed in terms of compression modulusC_s"-1) , excess Gibbs free energy (δG"π_exc) , activity coefficients (γ), and interaction parameterζ. The results of this paper provide valuable insight into basic thermodynamics and nano structure of mixed DPPG/HD monolayers; it is helpful to understand the thermodynamic behavior of HD as spreading additive in LS monolayer with a view toward characterizing potential improvements to LS performance brought about by addition of HD to lung phospholipids

  16. Impact of interfacial imperfection on transverse wave in a functionally graded piezoelectric material structure with corrugated boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Singh, Abhishek; Kumar, Santan; Kumari, Richa

    2018-03-01

    The propagation behavior of Love-type wave in a corrugated functionally graded piezoelectric material layered structure has been taken into account. Concretely, the layered structure incorporates a corrugated functionally graded piezoelectric material layer imperfectly bonded to a functionally graded piezoelectric material half-space. An analytical treatment has been employed to determine the dispersion relation for both cases of electrically open condition and electrically short condition. The phase velocity of the Love-type wave has been computed numerically and its dependence on the wave number has been depicted graphically for a specific type of corrugated boundary surfaces for both said conditions. The crux of the study lies in the fact that the imperfect bonding of the interface, the corrugated boundaries present in the layer, and the material properties of the layer and the half-space strongly influence the phase velocity of the Love-type wave. It can be remarkably noted that the imperfect bonding of the interface reduces the phase velocity of the Love-type wave significantly. As a special case of the problem, it is noticed that the procured dispersion relation for both cases of electrically open and electrically short conditions is in accordance with the classical Love wave equation.

  17. In vivo digestion of bovine milk fat globules: effect of processing and interfacial structural changes. II. Upper digestive tract digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallier, Sophie; Zhu, Xiang Q; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Ye, Aiqian; Moughan, Paul J; Singh, Harjinder

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this research was to study the effect of milk processing on the in vivo upper digestive tract digestion of milk fat globules. Fasted rats were serially gavaged over a 5h period with cream from raw, pasteurised, or pasteurised and homogenised milk. Only a few intact dietary proteins and peptides were present in the small intestinal digesta. Significantly (Praw (448 mg g(-1) digesta dry matter (DDM)) and homogenised creams (528 mg g(-1) DDM), as compared to pasteurised and homogenised cream (249 mg g(-1) DDM). Microscopy techniques were used to investigate the structural changes during digestion. Liquid-crystalline lamellar phases surrounding the fat globules, fatty acid soap crystals and lipid-mucin interactions were evident in all small intestinal digesta. Overall, the pasteurised and homogenised cream appeared to be digested to a greater extent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Interfacial effects in ZnO nanotubes/needle-structured graphitic diamond nanohybrid for detecting dissolved acetone at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiravan, Deepa; Huang, Bohr-Ran; Saravanan, Adhimoorthy; Yeh, Chien-Jui; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I.-Nan

    2017-12-01

    A high-performance ZnO nanotubes (ZNTs)/needle-structured graphitic diamond (NGD) nanohybrid material was prepared and observed the electrochemical sensing properties of liquid acetone in water. Initially, we synthesized NGD film using bias-enhanced growth (BEG) process. Afterwards, a well-etched ZNTs were spatially grown on the NGD film using simple hydrothermal method, and utilized as sensing material for assemble an electrochemical sensor (via EGFET configuration) operating at room temperature. The systematic investigations depict the ultra-high sensing properties attained from ZNTs grown on NGD film. The NGD film mostly have needle or wire shaped diamond grains, which contributes extremely high electrical conductivity. Furthermore, needle shaped diamond grains cover with multi-layer graphitic material generates conduction channels for ZNTs and leads to enhance the oxygen residuals and species. The material stability and conductivity of NGD as well the defects exist with oxygen vacancies in ZNTs offers superior sensing properties. Thus, the interesting combination of these wide band gap semiconductor materials exhibit high sensor response (89 mV/mL), high stability and long-term reliability (tested after 60 days).

  19. Sharpness and intensity modulation of the metal-insulator transition in ultrathin VO2 films by interfacial structure manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Ryan; Goswami, Ankur; Pal, Soupitak; Schofield, Kalvin; Bukhari, Syed Asad Manzoor; Thundat, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) undergoes a structural transformation from monoclinic (insulator) to tetragonal (metallic) upon heating above 340 K, accompanied by abrupt changes to its electronic, optical, and mechanical properties. Not only is this transition scientifically intriguing, but there are also numerous applications in sensing, memory, and optoelectronics. Here we investigate the effect different substrates and the processing conditions have on the characteristics metal-insulator transition (MIT), and how the properties can be tuned for specific applications. VO2 thin films were grown on c -plane sapphire (0001) and p-type silicon by pulsed laser deposition. High-resolution x-ray diffraction along with transmission electron microscopy reveals textured epitaxial growth on sapphire by domain-matching epitaxy, while the presence of a native oxide layer on silicon prevented any preferential growth resulting in a polycrystalline film. An orientation relationship of (010)VO2|| (0001)Al 2O3 was established for VO2 grown on sapphire, while no such relationship was found for VO2 grown on silicon. Surface-energy minimization is the driving force behind grain growth, as the lowest energy VO2 plane grew on silicon, while on sapphire the desire for epitaxial growth was dominant. Polycrystallinity of films grown on silicon caused a weaker and less prominent MIT than observed on sapphire, whose MIT was higher in magnitude and steeper in slope. The position of the MIT was shown to depend on the competing effects of misfit strain and grain growth. Higher deposition temperatures caused an increase in the MIT, while compressive strain resulted in a decreased MIT.

  20. Interfacial electronic structures revealed at the rubrene/CH3NH3PbI3 interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Gengwu; Zheng, Guanhaojie; Zhao, Bin; Song, Fei; Zhang, Xiaonan; Shen, Kongchao; Yang, Yingguo; Xiong, Yimin; Gao, Xingyu; Cao, Liang; Qi, Dong-Chen

    2017-03-01

    The electronic structures of rubrene films deposited on CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 perovskite have been investigated using in situ ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that rubrene molecules interacted weakly with the perovskite substrate. Due to charge redistribution at their interface, a downward 'band bending'-like energy shift of ∼0.3 eV and an upward band bending of ∼0.1 eV were identified at the upper rubrene side and the CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 substrate side, respectively. After the energy level alignment was established at the rubrene/CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 interface, its highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-valence band maximum (VBM) offset was found to be as low as ∼0.1 eV favoring the hole extraction with its lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO)-conduction band minimum (CBM) offset as large as ∼1.4 eV effectively blocking the undesired electron transfer from perovskite to rubrene. As a demonstration, simple inverted planar solar cell devices incorporating rubrene and rubrene/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) hole transport layers (HTLs) were fabricated in this work and yielded a champion power conversion efficiency of 8.76% and 13.52%, respectively. Thus, the present work suggests that a rubrene thin film could serve as a promising hole transport layer for efficient perovskite-based solar cells.

  1. Influence of the nature of the components of extraction systems used for the extraction of radionuclides on the interfacial tension. II. Influence of the structure of neutral organophosphorus reagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shmidt, V.S.; Nikitin, S.D.

    1984-01-01

    Isotherms of the interfacial tension were obtained on the interfaces between water or 3 M HNO 3 and solutions of various neutral organophosphorus compounds (NOPC). The values of the work of adsorption W and the standard free energy of adsorption Δμ/sup theta/ of these compounds on the interface from the organic phase were calculated. It was shown that linear dependence of W and Δμ/sup theta/ on the sum of the Kabachnik parameters sigmaΣ/sub Phi/ of the substituents at the phosphorus atom in the molecules of these extraction reagents are observed; this is an indication of the possibility of using the principle of linear free energy ratios (LFE) for predicting the interfacial activity of NOPC of various structures

  2. Hydraulic and Mechanical Effects from Gas Hydrate Conversion and Secondary Gas Hydrate Formation during Injection of CO2 into CH4-Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, N.; Deusner, C.; Kossel, E.; Schicks, J. M.; Spangenberg, E.; Priegnitz, M.; Heeschen, K. U.; Abendroth, S.; Thaler, J.; Haeckel, M.

    2014-12-01

    The injection of CO2 into CH4-hydrate-bearing sediments has the potential to drive natural gas production and simultaneously sequester CO2 by hydrate conversion. The process aims at maintaining the in situ hydrate saturation and structure and causing limited impact on soil hydraulic properties and geomechanical stability. However, to increase hydrate conversion yields and rates it must potentially be assisted by thermal stimulation or depressurization. Further, secondary formation of CO2-rich hydrates from pore water and injected CO2 enhances hydrate conversion and CH4 production yields [1]. Technical stimulation and secondary hydrate formation add significant complexity to the bulk conversion process resulting in spatial and temporal effects on hydraulic and geomechanical properties that cannot be predicted by current reservoir simulation codes. In a combined experimental and numerical approach, it is our objective to elucidate both hydraulic and mechanical effects of CO2 injection and CH4-CO2-hydrate conversion in CH4-hydrate bearing soils. For the experimental approach we used various high-pressure flow-through systems equipped with different online and in situ monitoring tools (e.g. Raman microscopy, MRI and ERT). One particular focus was the design of triaxial cell experimental systems, which enable us to study sample behavior even during large deformations and particle flow. We present results from various flow-through high-pressure experimental studies on different scales, which indicate that hydraulic and geomechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments are drastically altered during and after injection of CO2. We discuss the results in light of the competing processes of hydrate dissociation, hydrate conversion and secondary hydrate formation. Our results will also contribute to the understanding of effects of temperature and pressure changes leading to dissociation of gas hydrates in ocean and permafrost systems. [1] Deusner C, Bigalke N, Kossel E

  3. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  4. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na 2 SO 4 –H 2 O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions

  5. Crystal structure of N,N,N′,N′,N′′,N′′-hexamethylguanidinium cyanate 1.5-hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Tiritiris

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The title hydrated salt, C7H18N3+·OCN−.1.5H2O, was synthesized starting from N,N,N′,N′,N′′,N′′-hexamethylguanidinium chloride by a twofold anion-exchange reaction. The asymmetric unit contains two cations, two cyanate anions and three water molecules. One cation shows orientational disorder and two sets of N-atom positions were found related by a 60° rotation, with an occupancy ratio of 0.852 (6:0.148 (6. The C—N bond lengths in both guanidinium ions range from 1.329 (2 to 1.358 (10 Å, indicating double-bond character, pointing towards charge delocalization within the NCN planes. Strong O—H...N hydrogen bonds between the crystal water molecules and the cyanate ions and strong O—H...O hydrogen bonds between the water molecules are present, resulting in a two-dimensional hydrogen bonded network running parallel to the (001 plane. The hexamethylguanidinium ions are packed in between the layers built up by water molecules and cyanate ions.

  6. Standardization and software infrastructure for gas hydrate data communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroenlein, K.; Chirico, R.D.; Kazakov, A.; Frenkel, M. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States). Physical and Chemical Properties Div.; Lowner, R. [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (Germany); Wang, W. [Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing (China). Computer Network Information Center; Smith, T. [MIT Systems, Flushing, NY (United States); Sloan, E.D. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Centre for Hydrate Research

    2008-07-01

    The perceived value of gas hydrates as an energy resource for the future has led to extensive hydrate research studies and experiments. The hydrate deposits are widely dispersed throughout the world, and many countries are now investigating methods of extracting gas hydrate resources. This paper described a gas hydrates markup language (GHML) developed as an international standard for data transfer and storage within the gas hydrates community. The language is related to a hydrates database developed to facilitate a greater understanding of naturally occurring hydrate interactions with geophysical processes, and aid in the development of hydrate technologies for resource recovery and storage. Recent updates to the GHML included the addition of ThermoML, a communication standard for thermodynamic data into the GHML schema. The standard will be used to represent all gas hydrates thermodynamic data. A new element for the description of crystal structures has also been developed, as well as a guided data capture tool. The tool is available free of charge and is publicly licensed for use by gas hydrate data producers. A web service has also been provided to ensure that access to GHML files for gas hydrates and data files are available for users. It was concluded that the tool will help to ensure data quality assurance for the conversion of data and meta-data within the database. 28 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Interfacial (o/w) properties of naphthetic acids and metal naphthenates, naphtenic acid characterization and metal naphthenate inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandal, Oeystein

    2005-07-01

    Deposition of metal naphthenates in process facilities is becoming a huge problem for petroleum companies producing highly acidic crudes. In this thesis, the main focus has been towards the oil-water (o/w) interfacial properties of naphthenic acids and their ability to react with different divalent cations across the interface to form metal naphthenates. The pendant drop technique was utilized to determine dynamic interfacial tensions (IFT) between model oil containing naphthenic acid, synthetic as well as indigenous acid mixtures, and pH adjusted water upon addition of different divalent cations. Changes in IFT caused by the divalent cations were correlated to reaction mechanisms by considering two reaction steps with subsequent binding of acid monomers to the divalent cation. The results were discussed in light of degree of cation hydration and naphthenic acid conformation, which affect the interfacial conditions and thus the rate of formation of 2:1 complexes of acid and cations. Moreover, addition of non-ionic oil-soluble surfactants used as basis compounds in naphthenate inhibitors was found to hinder a completion of the reaction through interfacial dilution of the acid monomers. Formation and stability of metal naphthenate films at o/w interfaces were studied by means of Langmuir technique with a trough designed for liquid-liquid systems. The effects of different naphthenic acids, divalent cations, and pH of the subphase were investigated. The results were correlated to acid structure, cation hydration, and degree of dissociation, which all affect the film stability against compression. Naphthenic acids acquired from a metal naphthenate deposit were characterized by different spectroscopic techniques. The sample was found to consist of a narrow family of 4-protic naphthenic acids with molecular weights around 1230 g/mol. These acids were found to be very o/w interfacially active compared to normal crude acids, and to form Langmuir monolayers with stability

  8. Supramolecular Organization of Nonstoichiometric Drug Hydrates: Dapsone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris E. Braun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The observed moisture- and temperature dependent transformations of the dapsone (4,4′-diaminodiphenyl sulfone, DDS 0. 33-hydrate were correlated to its structure and the number and strength of the water-DDS intermolecular interactions. A combination of characterization techniques was used, including thermal analysis (hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis, gravimetric moisture sorption/desorption studies and variable humidity powder X-ray diffraction, along with computational modeling (crystal structure prediction and pair-wise intermolecular energy calculations. Depending on the relative humidity the hydrate contains between 0 and 0.33 molecules of water per molecule DDS. The crystal structure is retained upon dehydration indicating that DDS hydrate shows a non-stoichiometric (dehydration behavior. Unexpectedly, the water molecules are not located in structural channels but at isolated-sites of the host framework, which is counterintuitively for a hydrate with non-stoichiometric behavior. The water-DDS interactions were estimated to be weaker than water-host interactions that are commonly observed in stoichiometric hydrates and the lattice energies of the isomorphic dehydration product (hydrate structure without water molecules and (form III differ only by ~1 kJ mol−1. The computational generation of hypothetical monohydrates confirms that the hydrate with the unusual DDS:water ratio of 3:1 is more stable than a feasible monohydrate structure. Overall, this study highlights that a deeper understanding of the formation of hydrates with non-stoichiometric behavior requires a multidisciplinary approach including suitable experimental and computational methods providing a firm basis for the development and manufacturing of high quality drug products.

  9. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  10. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  11. IFACEwat: the interfacial water-implemented re-ranking algorithm to improve the discrimination of near native structures for protein rigid docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chinh; Nguyen, Thuy-Diem; Zheng, Jie; Kwoh, Chee-Keong

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein docking is an in silico method to predict the formation of protein complexes. Due to limited computational resources, the protein-protein docking approach has been developed under the assumption of rigid docking, in which one of the two protein partners remains rigid during the protein associations and water contribution is ignored or implicitly presented. Despite obtaining a number of acceptable complex predictions, it seems to-date that most initial rigid docking algorithms still find it difficult or even fail to discriminate successfully the correct predictions from the other incorrect or false positive ones. To improve the rigid docking results, re-ranking is one of the effective methods that help re-locate the correct predictions in top high ranks, discriminating them from the other incorrect ones. Our results showed that the IFACEwat increased both the numbers of the near-native structures and improved their ranks as compared to the initial rigid docking ZDOCK3.0.2. In fact, the IFACEwat achieved a success rate of 83.8% for Antigen/Antibody complexes, which is 10% better than ZDOCK3.0.2. As compared to another re-ranking technique ZRANK, the IFACEwat obtains success rates of 92.3% (8% better) and 90% (5% better) respectively for medium and difficult cases. When comparing with the latest published re-ranking method F2Dock, the IFACEwat performed equivalently well or even better for several Antigen/Antibody complexes. With the inclusion of interfacial water, the IFACEwat improves mostly results of the initial rigid docking, especially for Antigen/Antibody complexes. The improvement is achieved by explicitly taking into account the contribution of water during the protein interactions, which was ignored or not fully presented by the initial rigid docking and other re-ranking techniques. In addition, the IFACEwat maintains sufficient computational efficiency of the initial docking algorithm, yet improves the ranks as well as the number of the near

  12. LABORATORY STRATEGIES FOR HYDRATE FORMATION IN FINE-GRAINED SEDIMENTS

    KAUST Repository

    Lei, L.; Santamarina, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Fine‐grained sediments limit hydrate nucleation, shift the phase boundary and hinder gas supply. Laboratory experiments in this study explore different strategies to overcome these challenges, including the use of a more soluble guest molecule rather than methane, grain‐scale gas‐storage within porous diatoms, ice‐to‐hydrate transformation to grow lenses at predefined locations, forced gas injection into water saturated sediments, and long‐term guest molecule transport. Tomographic images, thermal and pressure data provide rich information on hydrate formation and morphology. Results show that hydrate formation is inherently displacive in fine‐grained sediments; lenses are thicker and closer to each other in compressible, high specific surface area sediments subjected to low effective stress. Temperature and pressure trajectories follow a shifted phase boundary that is consistent with capillary effects. Exo‐pore growth results in freshly formed hydrate with a striped and porous structure; this open structure becomes an effective pathway for gas transport to the growing hydrate front. Ice‐to‐hydrate transformation goes through a liquid stage at pre‐melt temperatures; then, capillarity and cryogenic suction compete, and some water becomes imbibed into the sediment faster than hydrate reformation. The geometry of hydrate lenses and the internal hydrate structure continue evolving long after the exothermal response to hydrate formation has completely decayed. Multiple time‐dependent processes occur during hydrate formation, including gas, water and heat transport, sediment compressibility, reaction rate and the stochastic nucleation process. Hydrate formation strategies conceived for this study highlight the inherent difficulties in emulating hydrate formation in fine‐grained sediments within the relatively short time‐scale available for laboratory experiments.

  13. LABORATORY STRATEGIES FOR HYDRATE FORMATION IN FINE-GRAINED SEDIMENTS

    KAUST Repository

    Lei, L.

    2018-04-02

    Fine‐grained sediments limit hydrate nucleation, shift the phase boundary and hinder gas supply. Laboratory experiments in this study explore different strategies to overcome these challenges, including the use of a more soluble guest molecule rather than methane, grain‐scale gas‐storage within porous diatoms, ice‐to‐hydrate transformation to grow lenses at predefined locations, forced gas injection into water saturated sediments, and long‐term guest molecule transport. Tomographic images, thermal and pressure data provide rich information on hydrate formation and morphology. Results show that hydrate formation is inherently displacive in fine‐grained sediments; lenses are thicker and closer to each other in compressible, high specific surface area sediments subjected to low effective stress. Temperature and pressure trajectories follow a shifted phase boundary that is consistent with capillary effects. Exo‐pore growth results in freshly formed hydrate with a striped and porous structure; this open structure becomes an effective pathway for gas transport to the growing hydrate front. Ice‐to‐hydrate transformation goes through a liquid stage at pre‐melt temperatures; then, capillarity and cryogenic suction compete, and some water becomes imbibed into the sediment faster than hydrate reformation. The geometry of hydrate lenses and the internal hydrate structure continue evolving long after the exothermal response to hydrate formation has completely decayed. Multiple time‐dependent processes occur during hydrate formation, including gas, water and heat transport, sediment compressibility, reaction rate and the stochastic nucleation process. Hydrate formation strategies conceived for this study highlight the inherent difficulties in emulating hydrate formation in fine‐grained sediments within the relatively short time‐scale available for laboratory experiments.

  14. Vibrational dynamics of hydration water in amylose

    CERN Document Server

    Cavatorta, F; Albanese, G; Angelini, N

    2002-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamical properties of hydration water associated with amylose helices, based on low-temperature vibrational spectra collected using the TOSCA inelastic spectrometer at ISIS. The structural constraints of the polysaccharidic chains favour the formation of a high-density structure for water, which has been suggested by Imberty and Perez on the basis of conformational analysis. According to this model, hydration water can only enter the pores formed by six adjacent helices and completely fills the pores at a hydration level of about 0.27-g water/g dry amylose. Our measurements show that the dynamical behaviour of hydration water is similar to that observed in high-density amorphous ice. (orig.)

  15. Gas hydrate exploration activities in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keun-Pil Park, K.P. [Korea Inst. of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Gas Hydrate R and D Organization, Ministry of Knowledge Economy, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Korea's first gas hydrate research project was launched in 1996 to study the gas hydrate potential in the Ulleung Basin of the East Sea. It involved a series of laboratory experiments followed by a preliminary offshore seismic survey and regional reconnaissance geophysical and marine geological surveys. The bottom simulating reflector (BSR) was interpreted to show wide area distribution in the southern part of the Ulleung Basin, and its average burial depth was 187 m below the sea floor in the East Sea. A three-phase 10-year National Gas Hydrate Development Program was launched in 2004 to estimate the potential reserves in the East Sea. It will involve drilling to identify natural gas hydrates and to determine the most optimized production methods. Drilling sites were proposed based on five indicators that imply gas hydrate occurrence, notably BSR, gas vent, enhanced seismic reflection, acoustic blanking and gas seeping structure. The UBGH-X-01 gas hydrate expedition in the East Sea Ulleung Basin involved 5 logging while drilling (LWD) surveys at three high priority sites. One wire line logging was implemented at the site of the UBGH09. A total 334 m of non-pressurized conventional cores and 16 pressure cores were obtained in late 2007. The UBGH-X-01 was successfully completed, recovering many natural samples of gas hydrate from 3 coring sites in the East Sea. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  16. Hydration structure and dynamics of a hydroxide ion in water clusters of varying size and temperature: Quantum chemical and ab initio molecular dynamics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankura, Arindam; Chandra, Amalendu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A theoretical study of hydroxide ion-water clusters is carried for varying cluster size and temperature. ► The structures of OH − (H 2 O) n are found out through quantum chemical calculations for n = 4, 8, 16 and 20. ► The finite temperature behavior of the clusters is studied through ab initio dynamical simulations. ► The spectral features of OH modes (deuterated) and their dependence on hydrogen bonding states of water are discussed. ► The mechanism and kinetics of proton transfer processes in these anionic clusters are also investigated. - Abstract: We have investigated the hydration structure and dynamics of OH − (H 2 O) n clusters (n = 4, 8, 16 and 20) by means of quantum chemical and ab initio molecular dynamics calculations. Quantum chemical calculations reveal that the solvation structure of the hydroxide ion transforms from three and four-coordinated surface states to five-coordinated interior state with increase in cluster size. Several other isomeric structures with energies not very different from the most stable isomer are also found. Ab initio simulations show that the most probable configurations at higher temperatures need not be the lowest energy isomeric structure. The rates of proton transfer in these clusters are found to be slower than that in bulk water. The vibrational spectral calculations reveal distinct features for free OH (deuterated) stretch modes of water in different hydrogen bonding states. Effects of temperature on the structural and dynamical properties are also investigated for the largest cluster considered here.

  17. Iridium Interfacial Stack (IRIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spry, David James (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An iridium interfacial stack ("IrIS") and a method for producing the same are provided. The IrIS may include ordered layers of TaSi.sub.2, platinum, iridium, and platinum, and may be placed on top of a titanium layer and a silicon carbide layer. The IrIS may prevent, reduce, or mitigate against diffusion of elements such as oxygen, platinum, and gold through at least some of its layers.

  18. Role of interfacial rheological properties in oil field chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakatos-Szabo, J.; Lakatos, I.; Kosztin, B.

    1996-12-31

    Interfacial rheological properties of different Hungarian crude oil/water systems were determined in wide temperature and shear rate range and in presence of inorganic electrolytes, tensides, alkaline materials and polymers. The detailed laboratory study definitely proved that the interfacial rheological properties are extremely sensitive parameters towards the chemical composition of inmiscible formation liquids. Comparison and interpretation of the interfacial rheological properties may contribute significantly to extension of the weaponry of the reservoir characterization, better understanding of the displacement mechanism, development of the more profitable EOR/IOR methods, intensification of the surface technologies, optimization of the pipeline transportation and improvement of the refinery operations. It was evidenced that the interfacial rheology is an efficient and powerful detection technique, which may enhance the knowledge on formation, structure, properties and behaviour of interfacial layers. 17 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory) and Mitosis and Replication Hydrate Theory (MRH-Theory): three-dimensional PC validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadyshevich, E. A.; Dzyabchenko, A. V.; Ostrovskii, V. E.

    2014-04-01

    Size compatibility of the CH4-hydrate structure II and multi-component DNA fragments is confirmed by three-dimensional simulation; it is validation of the Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory).

  20. Experimental solid state NMR of gas hydrates : problems and solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moudrakovski, I.; Lu, H.; Ripmeester, J. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Steacie Inst. for Molecular Sciences; Kumar, R.; Susilo, R. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Luzi, M. [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Solid State NMR is a suitable spectroscopic technique for hydrate research for several reasons, including its capability to distinguish between different structural types of hydrates, its quantitative nature and potential for both in-situ and time resolved experiments. This study illustrated the applications of solid state NMR for compositional and structural studies of clathrate hydrates, with particular emphasis on experimental techniques and potential ways to overcome technical difficulties. In order to use the method to its full capacity, some instrumental developments are needed to adapt it to the specific experimental requirements of hydrate studies, such as very low temperatures and high pressures. This presentation discussed the quantification of the Carbon-13 spectra with examples from natural and synthetic hydrates prepared from multi-component mixtures of hydrocarbons. The main approach used for the first two examples was Carbon-13 NMR with Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) at -100 degrees C. The detailed characterization of mixed hydrogen hydrates required low temperature hydrogen MAS. The quantification problems encountered during these experiments were also discussed. The purpose of these recent experimental developments was to prompt wider application of Solid State NMR in hydrate research. NMR proved to be a viable method for analyzing the composition and structure of multi-component mixed gas hydrates; characterizing natural gas hydrates; and, evaluating the formation conditions and properties of mixed hydrogen hydrates. The limitations of the method were highlighted and sensible choices of experimental conditions and techniques that ensure accurate results were discussed. 34 refs., 10 figs.

  1. In Situ Raman Analyses of Natural Gas and Gas Hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, E. T.; White, S. N.; Dunk, R. M.; Brewer, P. G.; Sherman, A. D.; Schmidt, K.; Hester, K. C.; Sloan, E. D.

    2004-12-01

    concentrations too low to be detected by the current DORISS instrument. In situ analyses of the hydrates show them to be structure I hydrates with methane as the primary guest molecule; the data compare well to laboratory data.

  2. Modeling and measurement of interfacial area concentration in two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paranjape, Sidharth; Ishii, Mamoru; Hibiki, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents experimental and modeling approaches in characterizing interfacial structures in gas-liquid two-phase flow. For the modeling of the interfacial structure characterization, the interfacial area transport equation proposed earlier has been studied to provide a dynamic and mechanistic prediction tool for two-phase flow analysis. A state-of-the-art four-sensor conductivity probe technique has been developed to obtain detailed local interfacial structure information in a wide range of flow regimes spanning from bubbly to churn-turbulent flows. Newly obtained interfacial area data in 8 x 8 rod-bundle test section are also presented. This paper also reviews available models of the interfacial area sink and source terms and existing databases. The interfacial area transport equation has been benchmarked using condensation bubbly flow data.

  3. Hydrate-Bearing Clayey Sediments: Morphology, Physical Properties, Production and Engineering/Geological Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Sheng [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States); Santamarina, J. Carlos [King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-12-30

    Fine-grained sediments host more than 90 percent of global gas hydrate accumulation. However, hydrate formation in clay-dominated sediments is less understood and characterized than other types of hydrate occurrence. There is an inadequate understanding of hydrate formation mechanisms, segregation structures, hydrate lens topology, system connectivity, and physical macro-scale properties of clay-dominated hydrate-bearing sediments. This situation hinders further analyses of the global carbon budget as well as engineering challenges/solutions related to hydrate instability and production. This project studies hydrate-bearing clay-dominated sediments with emphasis on the enhanced fundamental understanding of hydrate formation and resulting morphology, the development laboratory techniques to emulate natural hydrate formations, the assessment of analytical tools to predict physical properties, the evaluation of engineering and geological implications, and the advanced understanding of gas production potential from finegrained sediments.

  4. Charles J. McMahon Interfacial Segregation and Embrittlement Symposium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vitek, Vaclav

    2003-01-01

    .... McMahon Interfacial Segregation and Embrittlement Symposium: Grain Boundary Segregation and Fracture in Steels was sponsored by ASM International, Materials Science Critical Technology Sector, Structural Materials Division, Materials Processing...

  5. Dissolution of Hydrocarbon Gas Hydrates in Seawater at 1030-m; Effects of Porosity, Structure, and Compositional Variation as Determined by High-Definition Video and SEM Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L. A.; Peltzer, E. T.; Durham, W. B.; Kirby, S. H.; Brewer, P. G.; Circone, S.; Rehder, G.

    2002-12-01

    We compare dissolution rates of pure, porous, compacted, and oil-contaminated sI methane hydrate and sII methane-ethane hydrate to rates measured previously on pure, compacted, sI methane hydrate and sI carbon dioxide hydrate (Rehder et al., Fall AGU 2001). Laboratory-synthesized test specimens were used in both studies, allowing characterization of test materials prior to their transport and exposure to seawater at 1030-meter depth on the Monterey Canyon seafloor, off coastal Moss Landing, CA. Although pressure and temperature (P-T) conditions at this site are within the nominal P-T equilibrium fields of all gas hydrates tested here, the seawater is undersaturated with respect to the hydrate-forming gas species. Hence, samples dissolve with time, at a rate dependent on water current flow. Four samples were deployed in this second experiment: (1) pure, 30% porous methane hydrate; (2) pure, compacted methane hydrate; (3) pure methane hydrate compacted and then contaminated with a low-T mineral oil; and (4) pure, compacted sII methane-ethane hydrate with methane:ethane molar ratio 0.72. Samples were transferred by pressure vessel at 0 ° C and 15 MPa to the seafloor observatory via the MBARI remotely operated vehicle Ventana. Samples were then exposed to the deep ocean environment and monitored by HDTV camera for several hours at the beginning and end of a 25-hour period. Local current speed and direction were also measured throughout the experiment. Those samples that did not undergo complete dissolution after 25 h were successfully recovered to the laboratory for subsequent analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Previously, video analysis showed dissolution rates corresponding to 4.0 +/- 0.5 mmole CO2/m2 s for compacted CO2 hydrate samples, and 0.37 +/- 0.03 mmole CH4/m2s for compacted methane hydrate samples (Rehder et al, AGU 2001). The ratio of dissolution rates fits a simple diffusive boundary layer model that incorporates relative gas solubilities

  6. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H. Peter [Bowling Green State Univ., Bowling Green, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Center for Photochemical Sciences

    2017-11-28

    This project is focused on the use of single-molecule high spatial and temporal resolved techniques to study molecular dynamics in condensed phase and at interfaces, especially, the complex reaction dynamics associated with electron and energy transfer rate processes. The complexity and inhomogeneity of the interfacial ET dynamics often present a major challenge for a molecular level comprehension of the intrinsically complex systems, which calls for both higher spatial and temporal resolutions at ultimate single-molecule and single-particle sensitivities. Combined single-molecule spectroscopy and electrochemical atomic force microscopy approaches are unique for heterogeneous and complex interfacial electron transfer systems because the static and dynamic inhomogeneities can be identified and characterized by studying one molecule at a specific nanoscale surface site at a time. The goal of our project is to integrate and apply these spectroscopic imaging and topographic scanning techniques to measure the energy flow and electron flow between molecules and substrate surfaces as a function of surface site geometry and molecular structure. We have been primarily focusing on studying interfacial electron transfer under ambient condition and electrolyte solution involving both single crystal and colloidal TiO2 and related substrates. The resulting molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes will be important for developing efficient light harvesting systems and broadly applicable to problems in fundamental chemistry and physics. We have made significant advancement on deciphering the underlying mechanism of the complex and inhomogeneous interfacial electron transfer dynamics in dyesensitized TiO2 nanoparticle systems that strongly involves with and regulated by molecule-surface interactions. We have studied interfacial electron transfer on TiO2 nanoparticle surfaces by using ultrafast single

  7. Fine surface structure of unfixed and hydrated macrophages observed by laser-plasma x-ray contact microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshimasa; Friedman, Herman; Yoshimura, Hideyuki; Kinjo, Yasuhito; Shioda, Seiji; Debari, Kazuhiro; Shinohara, Kunio; Rajyaguru, Jayshree; Richardson, Martin

    2000-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution, laser-plasma, x-ray contact microscope using a table-top Nd:glass laser system has been developed and utilized for the analysis of the surface structure of live macrophages. Fine fluffy surface structures of murine peritoneal macrophages, which were live, hydrolyzed and not sliced and stained, were observed by the x-ray microscope followed by analysis using an atomic force microscopy. In order to compare with other techniques, a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to observe the surface structure of the macrophages. The SEM offered a fine whole cell image of the same macrophages, which were fixed and dehydrated, but the surfaces were ruffled and different from that of x-ray images. A standard light microscope was also utilized to observe the shape of live whole macrophages. Light microscopy showed some fluffy surface structures of the macrophages, but the resolution was too low to observe the fine structures. Thus, the findings of fine fluffy surface structures of macrophages by x-ray microscopy provide valuable information for studies of phagocytosis, cell spreading and adherence, which are dependent on the surface structure of macrophages. Furthermore, the present study also demonstrates the usefulness of x-ray microscopy for analysis of structures of living cells

  8. CCDC 970790: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : catena-[bis(mu~2~-Pyrazine)-(mu~2~-hexafluorosilicate)-copper(ii) hydrate

    KAUST Repository

    Shekhah, Osama; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Chen, Zhijie; Guillerm, Vincent; Cairns, Amy; Adil, Karim; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  9. Thermal Stability and Proton Conductivity of Rare Earth Orthophosphate Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anfimova, Tatiana; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2014-01-01

    as the rhabdophane structure is preserved. The bound hydrate water is accommodated in the rhabdophane structure and is stable at temperatures of up to 650 oC. The thermal stability of the hydrate water and the phosphate structure are of significance for the proton conductivity. The LaPO4·0.6H2O and NdPO4•0.5H2O......Hydrated orthophosphate powders of three rare earth metals, lanthanum, neodymium and gadolinium, were prepared and studied as potential proton conducting materials for intermediate temperature electrochemical applications. The phosphates undergo a transformation from the rhabdophane structure...... to the monazite structure upon dehydration. The thermal stability of the hydrate is studied and found to contain water of two types, physically adsorbed and structurally bound hydrate water. The adsorbed water is correlated to the specific surface area and can be reversibly recovered when dehydrated as long...

  10. Modeling dissociation behaviour of methane hydrate in porous soil media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayasinghe, A.G.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates, or clathrates, exist in the form of crystalline solid structures of hydrogen bonded water molecules where the lattice cages are occupied by guest gas molecules. Methane gas hydrates are the most common. As such, hydrate bearing sediments are considered to be a potential future energy resource. Gas hydrates also function as a source or sink for atmospheric methane, which may influence global warming. The authors emphasized that an understanding of the behaviour of soils containing gas hydrates is necessary in order to develop ways of recovering the vast gas resources that exist in the form of hydrates, particularly since hydrates are also suspected to be a potential factor in the initiation and propagation of submarine slope failures. Gas hydrate dissociation occurs when water and gas are released, resulting in an increase in pore fluid pressure, thereby causing significant reductions in effective stress leading to sediment failure. Dissociation may occur as a result of pressure reductions or increases in temperature. This study focused on the strength and deformation behaviour of hydrate bearing soils associated with temperature induced dissociation. Modeling the dissociation behavior of hydrates in porous soil media involves an understanding of the geomechanics of hydrate dissociation. This paper addressed the issue of coupling the hydrate dissociation problem with the soil deformation problem. A mathematical framework was constructed in which the thermally stimulated hydrate dissociation process in porous soil media under undrained conditions was considered with conduction heat transfer. It was concluded that a knowledge of geomechanical response of hydrate bearing sediments will enable better estimates of benefits and risks associated with the recovery process, thereby ensuring safe and economical exploration. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 appendix.

  11. Energy storage in ferroelectric polymer nanocomposites filled with core-shell structured polymer@BaTiO3 nanoparticles: understanding the role of polymer shells in the interfacial regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Huang, Xingyi; Yang, Ke; Zhai, Xing; Zhang, Jun; He, Jinliang; Jiang, Pingkai

    2014-11-26

    The interfacial region plays a critical role in determining the electrical properties and energy storage density of dielectric polymer nanocomposites. However, we still know a little about the effects of electrical properties of the interfacial regions on the electrical properties and energy storage of dielectric polymer nanocomposites. In this work, three types of core-shell structured polymer@BaTiO3 nanoparticles with polymer shells having different electrical properties were used as fillers to prepare ferroelectric polymer nanocomposites. All the polymer@BaTiO3 nanoparticles were prepared by surface-initiated reversible-addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, and the polymer shells were controlled to have the same thickness. The morphology, crystal structure, frequency-dependent dielectric properties, breakdown strength, leakage currents, energy storage capability, and energy storage efficiency of the polymer nanocomposites were investigated. On the other hand, the pure polymers having the same molecular structure as the shells of polymer@BaTiO3 nanoparticles were also prepared by RAFT polymerization, and their electrical properties were provided. Our results show that, to achieve nanocomposites with high discharged energy density, the core-shell nanoparticle filler should simultaneously have high dielectric constant and low electrical conductivity. On the other hand, the breakdown strength of the polymer@BaTiO3-based nanocomposites is highly affected by the electrical properties of the polymer shells. It is believed that the electrical conductivity of the polymer shells should be as low as possible to achieve nanocomposites with high breakdown strength.

  12. Trimethylamine-N-oxide: its hydration structure, surface activity, and biological function, viewed by vibrational spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Hunger, Johannes; Backus, Ellen H G; Mizukami, Wataru; Bonn, Mischa; Nagata, Yuki

    2017-03-08

    The osmolyte molecule trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) stabilizes the structure of proteins. As functional proteins are generally found in aqueous solutions, an important aspect of this stabilization is the interaction of TMAO with water. Here, we review, using vibrational spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations, recent studies on the structure and dynamics of TMAO with its surrounding water molecules. This article ends with an outlook on the open questions on TMAO-protein and TMAO-urea interactions in aqueous environments.

  13. Raman studies of methane-ethane hydrate metastability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hiroshi; Strobel, Timothy A; Dec, Steven F; Sloan, E Dendy; Koh, Carolyn A

    2009-03-05

    The interconversion of methane-ethane hydrate from metastable to stable structures was studied using Raman spectroscopy. sI and sII hydrates were synthesized from methane-ethane gas mixtures of 65% or 93% methane in ethane and water, both with and without the kinetic hydrate inhibitor, poly(N-vinylcaprolactam). The observed faster structural conversion rate in the higher methane concentration atmosphere can be explained in terms of the differences in driving force (difference in chemical potential of water in sI and sII hydrates) and kinetics (mass transfer of gas and water rearrangement). The kinetic hydrate inhibitor increased the conversion rate at 65% methane in ethane (sI is thermodynamically stable) but retards the rate at 93% methane in ethane (sII is thermodynamically stable), implying there is a complex interaction between the polymer, water, and hydrate guests at crystal surfaces.

  14. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years.

  15. Molecular dynamics of interfacial water and cations associated with clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cygan, Randall T.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie L.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Daemen, Luke L.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Clay mineral interfaces, including interlayer and external surfaces, play an essential role in many geochemical processes. Adsorption, dissolution, precipitation, nucleation, and growth mechanisms, in particular, are controlled by the interplay of structure, thermodynamics, kinetics, and transport at clay mineral-water interfaces. Molecular details of these geochemical processes are especially important in evaluating the fate of radionuclide waste in the environment. Such details are typically beyond the sensitivity of experimental and analytical methods and therefore require accurate models and simulations. Also, the basal surfaces and interlayers of clay minerals offer structurally constrained interfacial environments to better evaluate the local molecular chemistry. We have developed and used classical and quantum methods to examine the complex behavior of clay mineral-water interfaces and dynamics of interlayer species. Bulk structures, swelling behavior, diffusion, and adsorption processes are evaluated and compared to experimental and spectroscopic findings. In particular, inelastic neutron scattering methods provide a successful probe of vibrational behavior of interlayer species to help guide the simulations. Librations involving rock, wag, and twist motions of water molecules are particularly sensitive to the interlayer environment of smectite minerals such as montmorillonite and beidellite. Trends in librational modes for interlayer water as a function of clay structure and cation hydration energy are readily explained using structural and vibrational analysis derived from molecular simulation. Molecular dynamics simulations of virtual phases, including hydrated pyrophyllite, help to explain the behavior of interlayer water that is not associated with cation species. Additionally, we use large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of other layered minerals, such as muscovite, to evaluate adsorption

  16. Compositional Evolution of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) Structures by Total X-Ray Scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Soyer-Uzun, Sezen

    2011-12-09

    High-energy X-ray diffraction was employed to study the structural characteristics of a set of C-S-H samples with 0.6 ≤ C/S a;circ 1.75. It has been observed that Si is tetrahedrally coordinated to O for all samples irrespective of chemical composition and the Ca-O coordination number gradually decreases from ∼7 to ∼6 with increasing C/S ratio. This suggests that the C-S-H structure evolves from a tobermorite-like structure into a jennite-like structure as a function of increasing C/S ratio as the interlayer space decreases from ∼1.3 to ∼1 nm. Evolution of these short- and medium-range order structural characteristics in the C-S-H system is associated with the alteration of the Ca-O layers and silicate depolymerization with increasing C/S. © 2011 The American Ceramic Society.

  17. Compositional Evolution of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) Structures by Total X-Ray Scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Soyer-Uzun, Sezen; Chae, Sejung Rosie; Benmore, Chris J.; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2011-01-01

    High-energy X-ray diffraction was employed to study the structural characteristics of a set of C-S-H samples with 0.6 ≤ C/S a;circ 1.75. It has been observed that Si is tetrahedrally coordinated to O for all samples irrespective of chemical composition and the Ca-O coordination number gradually decreases from ∼7 to ∼6 with increasing C/S ratio. This suggests that the C-S-H structure evolves from a tobermorite-like structure into a jennite-like structure as a function of increasing C/S ratio as the interlayer space decreases from ∼1.3 to ∼1 nm. Evolution of these short- and medium-range order structural characteristics in the C-S-H system is associated with the alteration of the Ca-O layers and silicate depolymerization with increasing C/S. © 2011 The American Ceramic Society.

  18. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Wilson [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2018-02-03

    Interfacial electron transfer (ET) plays an important role in many chemical and biological processes. Specifically, interfacial ET in TiO2-based systems is important to solar energy technology, catalysis, and environmental remediation technology. However, the microscopic mechanism of interfacial ET is not well understood with regard to atomic surface structure, molecular structure, bonding, orientation, and motion. In this project, we used two complementary methodologies; single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, and scanning-tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS) to address this scientific need. The goal of this project was to integrate these techniques and measure the molecular dependence of ET between adsorbed molecules and TiO2 semiconductor surfaces and the ET induced reactions such as the splitting of water. The scanning probe techniques, STM and STS, are capable of providing the highest spatial resolution but not easily time-resolved data. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is capable of good time resolution but requires further development to match the spatial resolution of the STM. The integrated approach involving Peter Lu at Bowling Green State University (BGSU) and Wilson Ho at the University of California, Irvine (UC Irvine) produced methods for time and spatially resolved chemical imaging of interfacial electron transfer dynamics and photocatalytic reactions. An integral aspect of the joint research was a significant exchange of graduate students to work at the two institutions. This project bridged complementary approaches to investigate a set of common problems by working with the same molecules on a variety of solid surfaces, but using appropriate techniques to probe under ambient (BGSU) and ultrahigh vacuum (UCI) conditions. The molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes obtained in this joint project will be important for developing efficient light harvesting

  19. Interfacial solvation thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reached conflicting conclusions regarding the interplay of cavity formation, polarizability, desolvation, and surface capillary waves in driving the interfacial adsorptions of ions and molecules at air–water interfaces. Here we revisit these questions by combining exact potential distribution results with linear response theory and other physically motivated approximations. The results highlight both exact and approximate compensation relations pertaining to direct (solute–solvent) and indirect (solvent–solvent) contributions to adsorption thermodynamics, of relevance to solvation at air–water interfaces, as well as a broader class of processes linked to the mean force potential between ions, molecules, nanoparticles, proteins, and biological assemblies. (paper)

  20. Development of interfacial area transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Jin; Ishii, Mamoru; Kelly, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The interfacial area transport equation dynamically models the changes in interfacial structures along the flow field by mechanistically modeling the creation and destruction of dispersed phase. Hence, when employed in the numerical thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes, it eliminates artificial bifurcations stemming from the use of the static flow regime transition criteria. Accounting for the substantial differences in the transport mechanism for various sizes of bubbles, the transport equation is formulated for two characteristic groups of bubbles. The group 1 equation describes the transport of small-dispersed bubbles, whereas the group 2 equation describes the transport of large cap, slug or churn-turbulent bubbles. To evaluate the feasibility and reliability of interfacial area transport equation available at present, it is benchmarked by an extensive database established in various two-phase flow configurations spanning from bubbly to churn-turbulent flow regimes. The geometrical effect in interfacial area transport is examined by the data acquired in vertical air-water two-phase flow through round pipes of various sizes and a confined flow duct, and by those acquired in vertical co-current downward air-water two-phase flow through round pipes of two different sizes

  1. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  2. Probing Interfacial Water on Nanodiamonds in Colloidal Dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Tristan; Yuzawa, Hayato; Nagasaka, Masanari; Yamanoi, Ryoko; Osawa, Eiji; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Aziz, Emad F

    2015-08-06

    The structure of interfacial water layers around nanoparticles dispersed in an aqueous environment may have a significant impact on their reactivity and on their interaction with biological species. Using transmission soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy in liquid, we demonstrate that the unoccupied electronic states of oxygen atoms from water molecules in aqueous colloidal dispersions of nanodiamonds have a different signature than bulk water. X-ray absorption spectroscopy can thus probe interfacial water molecules in colloidal dispersions. The impacts of nanodiamond surface chemistry and concentration on interfacial water electronic signature are discussed.

  3. A constitutive mechanical model for gas hydrate bearing sediments incorporating inelastic mechanisms

    KAUST Repository

    Sá nchez, Marcelo; Gai, Xuerui; Santamarina, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    , hydrates dissociate and move from the solid to the gas phase. Hydrate dissociation is accompanied by significant changes in sediment structure and strongly affects its mechanical behavior (e.g., sediment stiffenss, strength and dilatancy). The mechanical

  4. [Laser Raman Spectroscopy and Its Application in Gas Hydrate Studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Juan; Wu, Neng-you; Lu, Hai-long; Wu, Dai-dai; Su, Qiu-cheng

    2015-11-01

    Gas hydrates are important potential energy resources. Microstructural characterization of gas hydrate can provide information to study the mechanism of gas hydrate formation and to support the exploitation and application of gas hydrate technology. This article systemly introduces the basic principle of laser Raman spectroscopy and summarizes its application in gas hydrate studies. Based on Raman results, not only can the information about gas composition and structural type be deduced, but also the occupancies of large and small cages and even hydration number can be calculated from the relative intensities of Raman peaks. By using the in-situ analytical technology, laser Raman specstropy can be applied to characterize the formation and decomposition processes of gas hydrate at microscale, for example the enclathration and leaving of gas molecules into/from its cages, to monitor the changes in gas concentration and gas solubility during hydrate formation and decomposition, and to identify phase changes in the study system. Laser Raman in-situ analytical technology has also been used in determination of hydrate structure and understanding its changing process under the conditions of ultra high pressure. Deep-sea in-situ Raman spectrometer can be employed for the in-situ analysis of the structures of natural gas hydrate and their formation environment. Raman imaging technology can be applied to specify the characteristics of crystallization and gas distribution over hydrate surface. With the development of laser Raman technology and its combination with other instruments, it will become more powerful and play a more significant role in the microscopic study of gas hydrate.

  5. Nanoscale interfacial defect shedding in a growing nematic droplet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Sebastian; Provatas, Nikolas; Rey, Alejandro

    2017-08-01

    Interfacial defect shedding is the most recent known mechanism for defect formation in a thermally driven isotropic-to-nematic phase transition. It manifests in nematic-isotropic interfaces going through an anchoring switch. Numerical computations in planar geometry established that a growing nematic droplet can undergo interfacial defect shedding, nucleating interfacial defect structures that shed into the bulk as +1/2 point defects. By extending the study of interfacial defect shedding in a growing nematic droplet to larger length and time scales, and to three dimensions, we unveil an oscillatory growth mode involving shape and anchoring transitions that results in a controllable regular distributions of point defects in planar geometry, and complex structures of disclination lines in three dimensions.

  6. Interfacial Fluid Mechanics A Mathematical Modeling Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ajaev, Vladimir S

    2012-01-01

    Interfacial Fluid Mechanics: A Mathematical Modeling Approach provides an introduction to mathematical models of viscous flow used in rapidly developing fields of microfluidics and microscale heat transfer. The basic physical effects are first introduced in the context of simple configurations and their relative importance in typical microscale applications is discussed. Then,several configurations of importance to microfluidics, most notably thin films/droplets on substrates and confined bubbles, are discussed in detail.  Topics from current research on electrokinetic phenomena, liquid flow near structured solid surfaces, evaporation/condensation, and surfactant phenomena are discussed in the later chapters. This book also:  Discusses mathematical models in the context of actual applications such as electrowetting Includes unique material on fluid flow near structured surfaces and phase change phenomena Shows readers how to solve modeling problems related to microscale multiphase flows Interfacial Fluid Me...

  7. Molecular dynamics study on interfacial thermal conductance of unirradiated and irradiated SiC/C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qingyu; Wang, Chenglong; Zhang, Yue; Li, Taosheng

    2014-01-01

    SiC f /SiC composite materials have been considered as candidate structural materials for several types of advanced nuclear reactors. Both experimental and computer simulations studies have revealed the degradation of thermal conductivity for this material after irradiation. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of SiC/graphite interface structure and irradiation on the interfacial thermal conductance by using molecular dynamics simulation. Five SiC/graphite composite models were created with different interface structures, and irradiation was introduced near the interfaces. Thermal conductance was calculated by means of reverse-NEMD method. Results show that there is a positive correlation between the interfacial energy and interfacial C–Si bond quantity, and irradiated models showed higher interfacial energy compared with their unirradiated counterparts. Except the model with graphite atom plane parallel to the interface, the interfacial thermal conductance of unirradiated and irradiated (1000 eV) models, increases as the increase of interfacial energy, respectively. For all irradiated models, lattice defects are of importance in impacting the interfacial thermal conductance depending on the interface structure. For the model with graphite layer parallel to the interface, the interfacial thermal conductance increased after irradiation, for the other models the interfacial thermal conductance decreased. The vibrational density of states of atoms in the interfacial region was calculated to analyze the phonon mismatch at the interface

  8. Methane Production and Carbon Capture by Hydrate Swapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Liang; von Solms, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    There are essentially two different approaches to producing methane from natural gas hydrate reservoirs, either bring the hydrate out of its thermodynamic stability region or expose the hydrate to a substance that will form a more stable hydrate structure, forcing an in situ swapping of the trapped...... experimental runs were performed to examine the influence of operating conditions on methane production by CO2/(CO2 + N2) injection in the temperature range of 274.15–277.15 K and 7.039–10.107 MPa pressure. Our results show that the use of the (CO2 + N2) binary gas mixture is advantageous compared to the use...

  9. Indian continental margin gas hydrate prospects : results of the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) expedition 01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collett, T [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Riedel, M. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences; Cochran, J.R. [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory; Boswell, R. [United States Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). National Energy Technology Lab; Kumar, P. [Pushpendra Kumar Oil and Natural Gas Corp. Ltd., Mumbai (India). Inst. of Engineering and Ocean Technology; Sathe, A.V. [Oil and Natural Gas Corp. Ltd., Uttaranchal (India). KDM Inst. of Petroleum Exploration

    2008-07-01

    The geologic occurrence of gas hydrate deposits along the continental margins of India were investigated in the first expedition of the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP). The objective was to determine the regional context and characteristics of the gas hydrate deposits through scientific ocean drilling, logging, and analytical activities. A research drill ship was the platform for the drilling operation. The geological and geophysical studies revealed 2 geologically distinct areas with inferred gas hydrate occurrences, notably the passive continental margins of the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin. The NGHP Expedition 01 focused on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these 2 diverse settings. The study established the presence of gas hydrates in Krishna-Godavari, Mahanadi and Andaman basins. Site 10 in the Krishna-Godavari Basin was discovered to be the one of the richest gas hydrate accumulations yet documented, while site 17 in the Andaman Sea had the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zone yet known. The existence of a fully-developed gas hydrate system in the Mahanadi Basin was also discovered. Most of the gas hydrate occurrences discovered during this expedition appeared to contain mostly methane which was generated by microbial processes. However, there was also evidence of a thermal origin for a portion of the gas within the hydrates of the Mahanadi Basin and the Andaman offshore area. Gas hydrate in the Krishna-Godavari Basin appeared to be closely associated with large scale structural features, in which the flux of gas through local fracture systems, generated by the regional stress regime, controlled the occurrence of gas hydrate. 3 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  10. Investigating the Metastability of Clathrate Hydrates for Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Carolyn Ann [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-11-18

    Important breakthrough discoveries have been achieved from the DOE award on the key processes controlling the synthesis and structure-property relations of clathrate hydrates, which are critical to the development of clathrate hydrates as energy storage materials. Key achievements include: (i) the discovery of key clathrate hydrate building blocks (stable and metastable) leading to clathrate hydrate nucleation and growth; (ii) development of a rapid clathrate hydrate synthesis route via a seeding mechanism; (iii) synthesis-structure relations of H2 + CH4/CO2 binary hydrates to control thermodynamic requirements for energy storage and sequestration applications; (iv) discovery of a new metastable phase present during clathrate hydrate structural transitions. The success of our research to-date is demonstrated by the significant papers we have published in high impact journals, including Science, Angewandte Chemie, J. Am. Chem. Soc. Intellectual Merits of Project Accomplishments: The intellectual merits of the project accomplishments are significant and transformative, in which the fundamental coupled computational and experimental program has provided new and critical understanding on the key processes controlling the nucleation, growth, and thermodynamics of clathrate hydrates containing hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide, and other guest molecules for energy storage. Key examples of the intellectual merits of the accomplishments include: the first discovery of the nucleation pathways and dominant stable and metastable structures leading to clathrate hydrate formation; the discovery and experimental confirmation of new metastable clathrate hydrate structures; the development of new synthesis methods for controlling clathrate hydrate formation and enclathration of molecular hydrogen. Broader Impacts of Project Accomplishments: The molecular investigations performed in this project on the synthesis (nucleation & growth)-structure-stability relations of clathrate

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis and characteristics of 3-D hydrated bismuth oxalate coordination polymers with open-channel structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xinxiang; Cao Yanning; Zhang Hanhui; Chen Yiping; Chen Xuehuan; Chai Xiaochuan

    2008-01-01

    Two new 3-D porous bismuth coordination polymers, (C 5 NH 6 ) 2 [Bi 2 (H 2 O) 2 (C 2 O 4 ) 4 ].2H 2 O 1 and (NH 4 )[Bi(C 2 O 4 ) 2 ].3H 2 O 2, have been hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic symmetry, P2 1 /c space group with a=10.378(2) A, b=17.285(3) A, c=16.563(5) A, α=90 deg., β=119.66(2) deg., γ=90 deg., V=2581.8(10) A 3 , Z=4, R 1 =0.0355 and wR 2 =0.0658 for unique 4713 reflections I >2σ(I). Compound 2 crystallizes in the tetragonal symmetry, I4 1 /amd space group with a=11.7026(17) A, b=11.7026(17) A, c=9.2233(18) A, α=90 deg., β=90 deg., γ=90 deg., V=1263.1(4) A 3 , Z=32, R 1 =0.0208 and wR 2 =0.0518 for unique 359 reflections I> 2σ(I). Compounds 1 and 2 are 3-D open-framework structures with a 6 6 uniform net, which consist of honeycomb-like layers connected to each other by oxalate units. While different guest molecules fill in their cavities of honeycomb-like layers, study of ultrasonic treatment on 2 indicates the replacement of NH 4 + by K + on potassium ion exchange. Thermogravimetric analysis indicates that the open-channel frameworks are thermally stable up to 200 deg. C, and other characterizations are also described by elemental analysis, IR and ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectionintegral spectrum (UV-Vis DRIS). - Graphical abstract: Two novel 3-D extended porous coordination polymers have been synthesized by hydrothermal method. Both compounds are 3-D open-framework structures with a 6 6 uniform net, which consist of honeycomb-like layers connected to each other by oxalate units. While different guest molecules fill in their cavities of honeycomb-like layers. Study of ultrasonic treatment on 2 indicates the replacement of NH 4 + by K + on potassium ion exchange

  12. Ferroelectric Polarization-Modulated Interfacial Fine Structures Involving Two-Dimensional Electron Gases in Pb(Zr,Ti)O3/LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuangbao; Bai, Yuhang; Xie, Lin; Li, Chen; Key, Julian D; Wu, Di; Wang, Peng; Pan, Xiaoqing

    2018-01-10

    Interfacial fine structures of bare LaAlO 3 /SrTiO 3 (LAO/STO) heterostructures are compared with those of LAO/STO heterostructures capped with upward-polarized Pb(Zr 0.1 ,Ti 0.9 )O 3 (PZT up ) or downward-polarized Pb(Zr 0.5 ,Ti 0.5 )O 3 (PZT down ) overlayers by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy experiments. By combining the acquired electron energy-loss spectroscopy mapping, we are able to directly observe electron transfer from Ti 4+ to Ti 3+ and ionic displacements at the interface of bare LAO/STO and PZT down /LAO/STO heterostructure unit cell by unit cell. No evidence of Ti 3+ is observed at the interface of the PZT up /LAO/STO samples. Furthermore, the confinement of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the interface is determined by atomic-column spatial resolution. Compared with the bare LAO/STO interface, the 2DEG density at the LAO/STO interface is enhanced or depressed by the PZT down or PZT up overlayer, respectively. Our microscopy studies shed light on the mechanism of ferroelectric modulation of interfacial transport at polar/nonpolar oxide heterointerfaces, which may facilitate applications of these materials as nonvolatile memory.

  13. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.; Chae, S. R.; Benmore, C. J.; Wenk, H. R.; Monteiro, P. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  14. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  15. Molecular structure of hydrated complex of 1,4-dimethylpiperazine di-betaine with L-tartaric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dega-Szafran, Z.; Katrusiak, A.; Szafran, M.

    2008-12-01

    1,4-Dimethylpiperazine di-betaine (DBPZ) forms a crystalline complex with L-tartaric acid (TA) and two and a half water molecules. The crystals are monoclinic, space group P2 1. The piperazine has a chair conformation with the methyl groups in the equatorial positions and the axial CH 2COO substituents. One of the CH 2COO group is protonated and forms with the neighboring DBPZ molecule the COO sbnd H⋯OOC hydrogen bond of the length 2.476(3) Å, which links them into a chain. The semi-tartrate anions, form a chain through the symmetrical, short COO⋯H⋯OOC hydrogen bond of 2.464(3) Å. The crystals have a layer structure, where hydrogen-bonded sheets of TA and water molecules are separated by the chains of DBPZ; no H-bonds between water and DBPZ are present. In the optimized molecules in the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) approach, the tartaric acid interacts with the tartrate di-anions through the COO sbnd H⋯OOC hydrogen bonds of 2.506 Å, while the DBPZ has the same conformation as in the crystals. The FTIR spectrum of the solid complex is consistent with the X-ray results.

  16. Hydration of Watson-Crick base pairs and dehydration of Hoogsteen base pairs inducing structural polymorphism under molecular crowding conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Daisuke; Nakamura, Kaori; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Ohmichi, Tatsuo; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2009-03-18

    It has been revealed recently that molecular crowding, which is one of the largest differences between in vivo and in vitro conditions, is a critical factor determining the structure, stability, and function of nucleic acids. However, the effects of molecular crowding on Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base pairs remain unclear. In order to investigate directly and quantitatively the molecular crowding effects on base pair types in nucleic acids, we designed intramolecular parallel- and antiparallel-stranded DNA duplexes consisting of Hoogsteen and Watson-Crick base pairs, respectively, as well as an intramolecular parallel-stranded triplex containing both types of base pairs. Thermodynamic analyses demonstrated that the values of free energy change at 25 degrees C for Hoogsteen base-pair formations decreased from +1.45 +/- 0.15 to +1.09 +/- 0.13 kcal mol(-1), and from -1.89 +/- 0.13 to -2.71 +/- 0.11 kcal mol(-1) in the intramolecular duplex and triplex, respectively, when the concentration of PEG 200 (polyethylene glycol with average molecular weight 200) increased from 0 to 20 wt %. However, corresponding values for Watson-Crick formation in the duplex and triplex increased from -10.2 +/- 0.2 to -8.7 +/- 0.1 kcal mol(-1), and from -10.8 +/- 0.2 to -9.2 +/- 0.2 kcal mol(-1), respectively. Furthermore, it was revealed that the opposing effects of molecular crowding on the Hoogsteen and Watson-Crick base pairs were due to different behaviors of water molecules binding to the DNA strands.

  17. Water Dynamics in the Hydration Shells of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The structure and function of biomolecules are strongly influenced by their hydration shells. Structural fluctuations and molecular excitations of hydrating water molecules cover a broad range in space and time, from individual water molecules to larger pools and from femtosecond to microsecond time scales. Recent progress in theory and molecular dynamics simulations as well as in ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy has led to new and detailed insight into fluctuations of water structure, elementary water motions, electric fields at hydrated biointerfaces, and processes of vibrational relaxation and energy dissipation. Here, we review recent advances in both theory and experiment, focusing on hydrated DNA, proteins, and phospholipids, and compare dynamics in the hydration shells to bulk water. PMID:28248491

  18. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.

    2014-07-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  19. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.; Yoon, S.; Wentzcovitch, R. M.; Monteiro, P. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  20. Experimental and theoretical investigations on the carbon dioxide gas hydrate formation kinetics at the onset of turbidity regarding CO2 capture and sequestration processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZareNezhad, Bahman; Mottahedin, Mona; Varaminian, Farshad

    2013-01-01

    The carbon dioxide gas hydrate formation kinetics at the onset of turbidity is experimentally and theoretically investigated. It is shown that the time-dependent heterogeneous nucleation and growth kinetics are simultaneously governing the hydrate formation process at the onset of turbidity. A new approach is also presented for determination of gas hydrate-liquid interfacial tension. The CO 2 hydrate-liquid interfacial tension according to the suggested heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is found to be about 12.7 mJ/m 2 . The overall average absolute deviation between predicted and measured CO 2 molar consumption is about 0.61%, indicating the excellent accuracy of the proposed model for studying the hydrate-based CO 2 capture and sequestration processes over wide ranges of pressures and temperatures

  1. An improved interfacial bonding model for material interface modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liqiang; Wang, Xiaodu; Zeng, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    An improved interfacial bonding model was proposed from potential function point of view to investigate interfacial interactions in polycrystalline materials. It characterizes both attractive and repulsive interfacial interactions and can be applied to model different material interfaces. The path dependence of work-of-separation study indicates that the transformation of separation work is smooth in normal and tangential direction and the proposed model guarantees the consistency of the cohesive constitutive model. The improved interfacial bonding model was verified through a simple compression test in a standard hexagonal structure. The error between analytical solutions and numerical results from the proposed model is reasonable in linear elastic region. Ultimately, we investigated the mechanical behavior of extrafibrillar matrix in bone and the simulation results agreed well with experimental observations of bone fracture. PMID:28584343

  2. Interfacial forces in aqueous media

    CERN Document Server

    van Oss, Carel J

    2006-01-01

    Thoroughly revised and reorganized, the second edition of Interfacial Forces in Aqueous Media examines the role of polar interfacial and noncovalent interactions among biological and nonbiological macromolecules as well as biopolymers, particles, surfaces, cells, and both polar and apolar polymers. The book encompasses Lifshitz-van der Waals and electrical double layer interactions, as well as Lewis acid-base interactions between colloidal entities in polar liquids such as water. New in this Edition: Four previously unpublished chapters comprising a new section on interfacial propertie

  3. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate

  4. Phase equilibria and thermodynamic modeling of ethane and propane hydrates in porous silica gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yongwon; Lee, Seungmin; Cha, Inuk; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Huen

    2009-04-23

    In the present study, we examined the active role of porous silica gels when used as natural gas storage and transportation media. We adopted the dispersed water in silica gel pores to substantially enhance active surface for contacting and encaging gas molecules. We measured the three-phase hydrate (H)-water-rich liquid (L(W))-vapor (V) equilibria of C(2)H(6) and C(3)H(8) hydrates in 6.0, 15.0, 30.0, and 100.0 nm silica gel pores to investigate the effect of geometrical constraints on gas hydrate phase equilibria. At specified temperatures, the hydrate stability region is shifted to a higher pressure region depending on pore size when compared with those of bulk hydrates. Through application of the Gibbs-Thomson relationship to the experimental data, we determined the values for the C(2)H(6) hydrate-water and C(3)H(8) hydrate-water interfacial tensions to be 39 +/- 2 and 45 +/- 1 mJ/m(2), respectively. By using these values, the calculation values were in good agreement with the experimental ones. The overall results given in this study could also be quite useful in various fields, such as exploitation of natural gas hydrate in marine sediments and sequestration of carbon dioxide into the deep ocean.

  5. Free energy landscape and molecular pathways of gas hydrate nucleation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Yuanfei; Porras, Anna; Li, Tianshu

    2016-01-01

    Despite the significance of gas hydrates in diverse areas, a quantitative knowledge of hydrate formation at a molecular level is missing. The impediment to acquiring this understanding is primarily attributed to the stochastic nature and ultra-fine scales of nucleation events, posing a great challenge for both experiment and simulation to explore hydrate nucleation. Here we employ advanced molecular simulation methods, including forward flux sampling (FFS), p B histogram analysis, and backward flux sampling, to overcome the limit of direct molecular simulation for exploring both the free energy landscape and molecular pathways of hydrate nucleation. First we test the half-cage order parameter (H-COP) which we developed for driving FFS, through conducting the p B histogram analysis. Our results indeed show that H-COP describes well the reaction coordinates of hydrate nucleation. Through the verified order parameter, we then directly compute the free energy landscape for hydrate nucleation by combining both forward and backward flux sampling. The calculated stationary distribution density, which is obtained independently of nucleation theory, is found to fit well against the classical nucleation theory (CNT). Subsequent analysis of the obtained large ensemble of hydrate nucleation trajectories show that although on average, hydrate formation is facilitated by a two-step like mechanism involving a gradual transition from an amorphous to a crystalline structure, there also exist nucleation pathways where hydrate crystallizes directly, without going through the amorphous stage. The CNT-like free energy profile and the structural diversity suggest the existence of multiple active transition pathways for hydrate nucleation, and possibly also imply the near degeneracy in their free energy profiles among different pathways. Our results thus bring a new perspective to the long standing question of how hydrates crystallize.

  6. Free energy landscape and molecular pathways of gas hydrate nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yuanfei; Porras, Anna; Li, Tianshu

    2016-12-07

    Despite the significance of gas hydrates in diverse areas, a quantitative knowledge of hydrate formation at a molecular level is missing. The impediment to acquiring this understanding is primarily attributed to the stochastic nature and ultra-fine scales of nucleation events, posing a great challenge for both experiment and simulation to explore hydrate nucleation. Here we employ advanced molecular simulation methods, including forward flux sampling (FFS), p B histogram analysis, and backward flux sampling, to overcome the limit of direct molecular simulation for exploring both the free energy landscape and molecular pathways of hydrate nucleation. First we test the half-cage order parameter (H-COP) which we developed for driving FFS, through conducting the p B histogram analysis. Our results indeed show that H-COP describes well the reaction coordinates of hydrate nucleation. Through the verified order parameter, we then directly compute the free energy landscape for hydrate nucleation by combining both forward and backward flux sampling. The calculated stationary distribution density, which is obtained independently of nucleation theory, is found to fit well against the classical nucleation theory (CNT). Subsequent analysis of the obtained large ensemble of hydrate nucleation trajectories show that although on average, hydrate formation is facilitated by a two-step like mechanism involving a gradual transition from an amorphous to a crystalline structure, there also exist nucleation pathways where hydrate crystallizes directly, without going through the amorphous stage. The CNT-like free energy profile and the structural diversity suggest the existence of multiple active transition pathways for hydrate nucleation, and possibly also imply the near degeneracy in their free energy profiles among different pathways. Our results thus bring a new perspective to the long standing question of how hydrates crystallize.

  7. Free energy landscape and molecular pathways of gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, Yuanfei; Porras, Anna; Li, Tianshu, E-mail: tsli@gwu.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States)

    2016-12-07

    Despite the significance of gas hydrates in diverse areas, a quantitative knowledge of hydrate formation at a molecular level is missing. The impediment to acquiring this understanding is primarily attributed to the stochastic nature and ultra-fine scales of nucleation events, posing a great challenge for both experiment and simulation to explore hydrate nucleation. Here we employ advanced molecular simulation methods, including forward flux sampling (FFS), p{sub B} histogram analysis, and backward flux sampling, to overcome the limit of direct molecular simulation for exploring both the free energy landscape and molecular pathways of hydrate nucleation. First we test the half-cage order parameter (H-COP) which we developed for driving FFS, through conducting the p{sub B} histogram analysis. Our results indeed show that H-COP describes well the reaction coordinates of hydrate nucleation. Through the verified order parameter, we then directly compute the free energy landscape for hydrate nucleation by combining both forward and backward flux sampling. The calculated stationary distribution density, which is obtained independently of nucleation theory, is found to fit well against the classical nucleation theory (CNT). Subsequent analysis of the obtained large ensemble of hydrate nucleation trajectories show that although on average, hydrate formation is facilitated by a two-step like mechanism involving a gradual transition from an amorphous to a crystalline structure, there also exist nucleation pathways where hydrate crystallizes directly, without going through the amorphous stage. The CNT-like free energy profile and the structural diversity suggest the existence of multiple active transition pathways for hydrate nucleation, and possibly also imply the near degeneracy in their free energy profiles among different pathways. Our results thus bring a new perspective to the long standing question of how hydrates crystallize.

  8. Pentagonal dodecahedron methane hydrate cage and methanol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    methane hydrate in sea bed near continental margin and underneath of permafrost ... clathrate structure,6,7 IR spectroscopy analysis of vibra- tional form of guest .... Hydrogen (H71) of the hydroxyl group of methanol is found to have formed ...

  9. Hydration dynamics of hyaluronan and dextran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Johannes; Bernecker, Anja; Bakker, Huib J; Bonn, Mischa; Richter, Ralf P

    2012-07-03

    Hyaluronan is a polysaccharide, which is ubiquitous in vertebrates and has been reported to be strongly hydrated in a biological environment. We study the hydration of hyaluronan in solution using the rotational dynamics of water as a probe. We measure these dynamics with polarization-resolved femtosecond-infrared and terahertz time-domain spectroscopies. Both experiments reveal that a subensemble of water molecules is slowed down in aqueous solutions of hyaluronan amounting to ∼15 water molecules per disaccharide unit. This quantity is consistent with what would be expected for the first hydration shell. Comparison of these results to the water dynamics in aqueous dextran solution, a structurally similar polysaccharide, yields remarkably similar results. This suggests that the observed interaction with water is a common feature for hydrophilic polysaccharides and is not specific to hyaluronan. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. THz characterization of hydrated and anhydrous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolnikov, Andre

    2011-06-01

    The characterization of anhydrous and hydrated forms of materials is of great importance to science and industry. Water content poses difficulties for successful identification of the material structure by THz radiation. However, biological tissues and hydrated forms of nonorganic substances still may be investigated by THz radiation. This paper outlines the range of possibilities of the above characterization, as well as provides analysis of the physical mechanism that allows or prevents penetration of THz waves through the substance. THz-TDS is used to measure the parameters of the characterization of anhydrous and hydrated forms of organic and nonorganic samples. Mathematical methods (such as prediction models of time-series analysis) are used to help identifying the absorption coefficient and other parameters of interest. The discovered dependencies allow designing techniques for material identification/characterization (e.g. of drugs, explosives, etc. that may have water content). The results are provided.

  11. Supertoughened Biobased Poly(lactic acid)-Epoxidized Natural Rubber Thermoplastic Vulcanizates: Fabrication, Co-continuous Phase Structure, Interfacial in Situ Compatibilization, and Toughening Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youhong; Chen, Kunling; Xu, Chuanhui; Chen, Yukun

    2015-09-10

    In the presence of dicumyl peroxide (DCP), biobased thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs) composed of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and epoxidized natural rubber (ENR) were prepared through dynamic vulcanization. Interfacial in situ compatibilization between PLA and ENR phases was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). A novel "sea-sea" co-continuous phase in the PLA/ENR TPVs was observed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differed from the typical "sea-island" morphology that cross-linked rubber particles dispersed in plastic matrix. A sharp, brittle-ductile transition occurred with 40 wt % of ENR, showing a significantly improved impact strength of 47 kJ/m(2), nearly 15 times that of the neat PLA and 2.6 times that of the simple blend with the same PLA/ENR ratio. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results suggested that a certain amount of DCP was consumed in the PLA phase, causing a slight cross-linking or branching of PLA molecules. the effects of various DCP contents on the impact property were investigated. The toughening mechanism under impact testing was researched, and the influence factors for toughening were discussed.

  12. CH3NH3PbI3 grain growth and interfacial properties in meso-structured perovskite solar cells fabricated by two-step deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhibo; Wang, Wenli; Shen, Heping; Zhang, Ye; Luo, Qiang; Yin, Xuewen; Dai, Xuezeng; Li, Jianbao; Lin, Hong

    2017-12-01

    Although the two-step deposition (TSD) method is widely adopted for the high performance perovskite solar cells (PSCs), the CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite crystal growth mechanism during the TSD process and the photo-generated charge recombination dynamics in the mesoporous-TiO2 (mp-TiO2)/CH3NH3PbI3/hole transporting material (HTM) system remains unexploited. Herein, we modified the concentration of PbI2 (C(PbI2)) solution to control the perovskite crystal properties, and observed an abnormal CH3NH3PbI3 grain growth phenomenon atop mesoporous TiO2 film. To illustrate this abnormal grain growth mechanism, we propose that a grain ripening process is taking place during the transformation from PbI2 to CH3NH3PbI3, and discuss the PbI2 nuclei morphology, perovskite grain growing stage, as well as Pb:I atomic ratio difference among CH3NH3PbI3 grains with different morphology. These C(PbI2)-dependent perovskite morphologies resulted in varied charge carrier transfer properties throughout the mp-TiO2/CH3NH3PbI3/HTM hybrid, as illustrated by photoluminescence measurement. Furthermore, the effect of CH3NH3PbI3 morphology on light absorption and interfacial properties is investigated and correlated with the photovoltaic performance of PSCs.

  13. Application of CTLM method combining interfacial structure characterization to investigate contact formation of silver paste metallization on crystalline silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Shenghu; Yuan, Xiao; Tong, Hua; Yang, Yunxia; Liu, Cui; Ye, Xiaojun; Li, Yongsheng; Wang, Xianhao; Luo, Lan

    2018-04-01

    Circular transmission line model (CTLM) measurements were applied to study the contact formation mechanism of the silver paste metallization on n-type emitter of crystalline silicon solar cells. The electrical performance parameters ρc,Rsk , and Lt , which are related to the physical and chemical states of the multiphase materials at the interface, were extracted from the CTLM measurements, and were found to be sensitive to sintering temperature. As the temperature increased from 585 °C to 780 °C, initially the ρc value decreased rapidly, then flattened out and increased slightly. The order of resistivity magnitude was restricted by the SiNx passivation layer in the early sintering stages, and relied on the carrier tunneling probability affected by the precipitated silver crystallites or colloids, emitter doping concentration and molten glass layer. Based on the calculations that the sheet resistance underneath the electrode was reduced form 110 Ω / □ to 0.186 Ω / □ , it could be inferred that there was formation of a highly conductive layer of silver crystallites and colloids contained glass on the emitter. The transfer length Lt exhibited a U-shaped variation along with the temperature, reflecting the variation of the interfacial electrical properties. Overall, this article shows that the CTLM method can become a new powerful tool for researchers to meet the challenges of silver paste metallization innovation for manufacturing high-efficiency silicon solar cells.

  14. Curvature Dependence of Interfacial Properties for Associating Lennard—Jones Fluids: A Density Functional Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zong-Li; Kang Yan-Shuang

    2011-01-01

    Classical density functional theory is used to study the associating Lennard—Jones fluids in contact with spherical hard wall of different curvature radii. The interfacial properties including contact density and fluid-solid interfacial tension are investigated. The influences of associating energy, curvature of hard wall and the bulk density of fluids on these properties are analyzed in detail. The results may provide helpful clues to understand the interfacial properties of other complex fluids. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  15. Molecular analysis of petroleum derived compounds that adsorb onto gas hydrate surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgund, Anna E.; Hoiland, Sylvi; Barth, Tanja; Fotland, Per; Askvik, Kjell M.

    2009-01-01

    Field observations have shown that some streams of water, gas and crude oil do not form gas hydrate plugs during petroleum production even when operating within thermodynamic conditions for hydrate formation. Also, when studied under controlled laboratory conditions, some oils are found to form hydrate dispersed systems whereas others form plugs. Oils with low tendency to form hydrate plugs are believed to contain natural hydrate plug inhibiting components (NICs) that adsorb onto the hydrate surface, making them less water-wet and preventing the particles from agglomerating into large hydrate clusters. The molecular structure of the NICs is currently unknown. In this work, hydrate adsorbing components were extracted from crude oils using freon hydrates as an extraction phase. The fractions were found to be enriched in polar material, and more polar material is associated with hydrates generated in biodegraded crude oils than in non-biodegraded oils. Various fractionation schemes and analytical techniques have been applied in the search for molecular characterisation. The average molecular weights were found to be approximately 500 g/mole. GC-MS chromatograms show a large UCM (Unresolved Complex Mixture). Thus, GC-MS has a limited potential for identification of compounds. A commercial biosurfactant was used as a model compound in the search for similar structures in the extracts. The results from analysis of the hydrate adsorbing components suggest that the type and structure are more important for hydrate morphology than the amount of material adsorbed.

  16. Clathrate Hydrates for Thermal Energy Storage in Buildings: Overview of Proper Hydrate-Forming Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Castellani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing energy costs are at the origin of the great progress in the field of phase change materials (PCMs. The present work aims at studying the application of clathrate hydrates as PCMs in buildings. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline structures in which guest molecules are enclosed in the crystal lattice of water molecules. Clathrate hydrates can form also at ambient pressure and present a high latent heat, and for this reason, they are good candidates for being used as PCMs. The parameter that makes a PCM suitable to be used in buildings is, first of all, a melting temperature at about 25 °C. The paper provides an overview of groups of clathrate hydrates, whose physical and chemical characteristics could meet the requirements needed for their application in buildings. Simulations with a dynamic building simulation tool are carried out to evaluate the performance of clathrate hydrates in enhancing thermal comfort through the moderation of summer temperature swings and, therefore, in reducing energy consumption. Simulations suggest that clathrate hydrates have a potential in terms of improvement of indoor thermal comfort and a reduction of energy consumption for cooling. Cooling effects of 0.5 °C and reduced overheating hours of up to 1.1% are predicted.

  17. Interfacial Shear Strength and Adhesive Behavior of Silk Ionomer Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghan; Geryak, Ren D; Zhang, Shuaidi; Ma, Ruilong; Calabrese, Rossella; Kaplan, David L; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2017-09-11

    The interfacial shear strength between different layers in multilayered structures of layer-by-layer (LbL) microcapsules is a crucial mechanical property to ensure their robustness. In this work, we investigated the interfacial shear strength of modified silk fibroin ionomers utilized in LbL shells, an ionic-cationic pair with complementary ionic pairing, (SF)-poly-l-glutamic acid (Glu) and SF-poly-l-lysine (Lys), and a complementary pair with partially screened Coulombic interactions due to the presence of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) segments and SF-Glu/SF-Lys[PEG] pair. Shearing and adhesive behavior between these silk ionomer surfaces in the swollen state were probed at different spatial scales and pressure ranges by using functionalized atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips as well as functionalized colloidal probes. The results show that both approaches were consistent in analyzing the interfacial shear strength of LbL silk ionomers at different spatial scales from a nanoscale to a fraction of a micron. Surprisingly, the interfacial shear strength between SF-Glu and SF-Lys[PEG] pair with partially screened ionic pairing was greater than the interfacial shear strength of the SF-Glu and SF-Lys pair with a high density of complementary ionic groups. The difference in interfacial shear strength and adhesive strength is suggested to be predominantly facilitated by the interlayer hydrogen bonding of complementary amino acids and overlap of highly swollen PEG segments.

  18. Interfacial Thermal Transport via One-Dimensional Atomic Junction Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohuan Xiong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In modern information technology, as integration density increases rapidly and the dimension of materials reduces to nanoscale, interfacial thermal transport (ITT has attracted widespread attention of scientists. This review introduces the latest theoretical development in ITT through one-dimensional (1D atomic junction model to address the thermal transport across an interface. With full consideration of the atomic structures in interfaces, people can apply the 1D atomic junction model to investigate many properties of ITT, such as interfacial (Kapitza resistance, nonlinear interface, interfacial rectification, and phonon interference, and so on. For the ballistic ITT, both the scattering boundary method (SBM and the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF method can be applied, which are exact since atomic details of actual interfaces are considered. For interfacial coupling case, explicit analytical expression of transmission coefficient can be obtained and it is found that the thermal conductance maximizes at certain interfacial coupling (harmonic mean of the spring constants of the two leads and the transmission coefficient is not a monotonic decreasing function of phonon frequency. With nonlinear interaction—phonon–phonon interaction or electron–phonon interaction at interface, the NEGF method provides an efficient way to study the ITT. It is found that at weak linear interfacial coupling, the nonlinearity can improve the ITT, but it depresses the ITT in the case of strong-linear coupling. In addition, the nonlinear interfacial coupling can induce thermal rectification effect. For interfacial materials case which can be simulated by a two-junction atomic chain, phonons show interference effect, and an optimized thermal coupler can be obtained by tuning its spring constant and atomic mass.

  19. Experimental Equipment Validation for Methane (CH4) and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad Khan, Muhammad; Yaqub, Sana; Manner, Naathiya; Ani Karthwathi, Nur; Qasim, Ali; Mellon, Nurhayati Binti; Lal, Bhajan

    2018-04-01

    Clathrate hydrates are eminent structures regard as a threat to the gas and oil industry in light of their irritating propensity to subsea pipelines. For natural gas transmission and processing, the formation of gas hydrate is one of the main flow assurance delinquent has led researchers toward conducting fresh and meticulous studies on various aspects of gas hydrates. This paper highlighted the thermodynamic analysis on pure CH4 and CO2 gas hydrates on the custom fabricated equipment (Sapphire cell hydrate reactor) for experimental validation. CO2 gas hydrate formed at lower pressure (41 bar) as compared to CH4 gas hydrate (70 bar) while comparison of thermodynamic properties between CH4 and CO2 also presented in this study. This preliminary study could provide pathways for the quest of potent hydrate inhibitors.

  20. Theoretical description of biomolecular hydration - Application to A-DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.E.; Hummer, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Soumpasis, D.M. [Max Planck Inst. for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    The local density of water molecules around a biomolecule is constructed from calculated two- and three-points correlation functions of polar solvents in water using a Potential-of-Mean-Force (PMF) expansion. As a simple approximation, the hydration of all polar (including charged) groups in a biomolecule is represented by the hydration of water oxygen in bulk water, and the effect of non-polar groups on hydration are neglected, except for excluded volume effects. Pair and triplet correlation functions are calculated by molecular dynamics simulations. We present calculations of the structural hydration for ideal A-DNA molecules with sequences [d(CG){sub 5}]{sub 2} and [d(C{sub 5}G{sub 5})]{sub 2}. We find that this method can accurately reproduce the hydration patterns of A-DNA observed in neutron diffraction experiments on oriented DNA fibers.

  1. Theoretical description of biomolecular hydration - Application to A-DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, A.E.; Hummer, G.; Soumpasis, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    The local density of water molecules around a biomolecule is constructed from calculated two- and three-points correlation functions of polar solvents in water using a Potential-of-Mean-Force (PMF) expansion. As a simple approximation, the hydration of all polar (including charged) groups in a biomolecule is represented by the hydration of water oxygen in bulk water, and the effect of non-polar groups on hydration are neglected, except for excluded volume effects. Pair and triplet correlation functions are calculated by molecular dynamics simulations. We present calculations of the structural hydration for ideal A-DNA molecules with sequences [d(CG) 5 ] 2 and [d(C 5 G 5 )] 2 . We find that this method can accurately reproduce the hydration patterns of A-DNA observed in neutron diffraction experiments on oriented DNA fibers

  2. Probing the hydration water diffusion of macromolecular surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortony, Julia H; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Franck, John M; Pavlova, Anna; Hunt, Jasmine; Han, Songi; Kausik, Ravinath

    2011-01-01

    We probe the translational dynamics of the hydration water surrounding the macromolecular surfaces of selected polyelectrolytes, lipid vesicles and intrinsically disordered proteins with site specificity in aqueous solutions. These measurements are made possible by the recent development of a new instrumental and methodological approach based on Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This technique selectively amplifies 1 H NMR signals of hydration water around a spin label that is attached to a molecular site of interest. The selective 1 H NMR amplification within molecular length scales of a spin label is achieved by utilizing short-distance range (∼r -3 ) magnetic dipolar interactions between the 1 H spin of water and the electron spin of a nitroxide radical-based label. Key features include the fact that only minute quantities (<10 μl) and dilute (≥100 μM) sample concentrations are needed. There is no size limit on the macromolecule or molecular assembly to be analyzed. Hydration water with translational correlation times between 10 and 800 ps is measured within ∼10 A distance of the spin label, encompassing the typical thickness of a hydration layer with three water molecules across. The hydration water moving within this time scale has significant implications, as this is what is modulated whenever macromolecules or molecular assemblies undergo interactions, binding or conformational changes. We demonstrate, with the examples of polymer complexation, protein aggregation and lipid-polymer interaction, that the measurements of interfacial hydration dynamics can sensitively and site specifically probe macromolecular interactions.

  3. Replacement of CH4 in the hydrate by use of liquid CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Masaki; Morohashi, Kenji; Abe, Yuki; Watanabe, Masaru; Smith, Richard Lee Jr.; Inomata, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of CH 4 replacement in the CH 4 hydrate with saturated liquid CO 2 at 273.2 K was measured with a high pressure optical cell. The results showed that CH 4 in the hydrate gradually moved to the liquid CO 2 phase while CO 2 in the liquid phase penetrated into the hydrate from the quantitative analysis. The decomposing process of the CH 4 hydrate during the replacement was analyzed with in situ Raman spectroscopy, which allowed us to distinguish the cage structure of the CH 4 hydrate and discuss the microscopic view of the replacement in the hydrate. It was found that the decomposition of the medium cage (M-cage) in the CH 4 hydrate proceeded faster than that of the small cage (S-cage). The observed rate difference could be related to the stability of the S-cage in the CH 4 hydrate or the re-formation tendency of CH 4 and water molecules in the S-cage after decomposing the hydrate structure, whereas the guest molecule exchange of CH 4 with CO 2 could occur in the M-cage. Based on the experimental data, we developed a kinetic model for calculation of the CH 4 remaining in the hydrate considering the decomposition rate difference between the M-cage and S-cage in the CH 4 hydrate. The results indicate that the driving force could be the fugacity difference between the fluid phase and the hydrate phase for the replacement process

  4. Polymorphism in Br2 clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschleger, I U; Kerenskaya, G; Janda, K C; Apkarian, V A

    2008-02-07

    The structure and composition of bromine clathrate hydrate has been controversial for more than 170 years due to the large variation of its observed stoichiometries. Several different crystal structures were proposed before 1997 when Udachin et al. (Udachin, K. A.; Enright, G. D.; Ratcliffe, C. I.; Ripmeester, J. A. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1997, 119, 11481) concluded that Br2 forms only the tetragonal structure (TS-I). We show polymorphism in Br2 clathrate hydrates by identifying two distinct crystal structures through optical microscopy and resonant Raman spectroscopy on single crystals. After growing TS-I crystals from a liquid bromine-water solution, upon dropping the temperature slightly below -7 degrees C, new crystals of cubic morphology form. The new crystals, which have a limited thermal stability range, are assigned to the CS-II structure. The two structures are clearly distinguished by the resonant Raman spectra of the enclathrated Br2, which show long overtone progressions and allow the extraction of accurate vibrational parameters: omega(e) = 321.2 +/- 0.1 cm(-1) and omega(e)x(e) = 0.82 +/- 0.05 cm(-1) in TS-I and omega(e) = 317.5 +/- 0.1 cm(-1) and omega(e)x(e) = 0.70 +/- 0.1 cm(-1) in CS-II. On the basis of structural analysis, the discovery of the CS-II crystals implies stability of a large class of bromine hydrate structures and, therefore, polymorphism.

  5. Spectroscopic determination of optimal hydration time of zircon surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez R, E. [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Garcia R, G. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Division de Estudios del Posgrado, Av. Tecnologico s/n, Ex-Rancho La Virgen, 52140 Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Garcia G, N., E-mail: eduardo.ordonez@inin.gob.m [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Av. Colon y Av. Tollocan, 50180 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    When a mineral surface is immersed in an aqueous solution, it develops and electric charge produced by the amphoteric dissociation of hydroxyl groups created by the hydration of the solid surface. This is one influential surface property. The complete hydration process takes a time which is specific for each mineral species. The knowledge of the aqueous solution contact time for complete surface hydration is mandatory for further surface phenomena studies. This study deals with the optimal hydration time of the raw zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) surface comparing the classical potentiometric titrations with a fluorescence spectroscopy technique. The latter is easy and rea liable as it demands only one sample batch to determine the optimal time to ensure a total hydration of the zircon surface. The analytical results of neutron activation analysis showed the presence of trace quantities of Dy{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3} in the bulk of zircon. The Dy{sup 3+} is structured in the zircon crystalline lattice and undergoes the same chemical reactions as zircon. Furthermore, the Dy{sup 3+} has a good fluorescent response whose intensity is enhanced by hydration molecules. The results show that, according to the potentiometric analysis, the hydration process for each batch (at least 8 sample batches) takes around 2 h, while the spectrometric method indicates only 5 minutes from only one batch. Both methods showed that the zircon surface have a 16 h optimal hydration time. (Author)

  6. Spectroscopic determination of optimal hydration time of zircon surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez R, E.; Garcia R, G.; Garcia G, N.

    2010-01-01

    When a mineral surface is immersed in an aqueous solution, it develops and electric charge produced by the amphoteric dissociation of hydroxyl groups created by the hydration of the solid surface. This is one influential surface property. The complete hydration process takes a time which is specific for each mineral species. The knowledge of the aqueous solution contact time for complete surface hydration is mandatory for further surface phenomena studies. This study deals with the optimal hydration time of the raw zircon (ZrSiO 4 ) surface comparing the classical potentiometric titrations with a fluorescence spectroscopy technique. The latter is easy and rea liable as it demands only one sample batch to determine the optimal time to ensure a total hydration of the zircon surface. The analytical results of neutron activation analysis showed the presence of trace quantities of Dy 3+ , Eu 3+ and Er 3 in the bulk of zircon. The Dy 3+ is structured in the zircon crystalline lattice and undergoes the same chemical reactions as zircon. Furthermore, the Dy 3+ has a good fluorescent response whose intensity is enhanced by hydration molecules. The results show that, according to the potentiometric analysis, the hydration process for each batch (at least 8 sample batches) takes around 2 h, while the spectrometric method indicates only 5 minutes from only one batch. Both methods showed that the zircon surface have a 16 h optimal hydration time. (Author)

  7. Calcium and magnesium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lothenbach, B.; L'Hopital, E.; Nied, D.; Achiedo, G.; Dauzeres, A.

    2015-01-01

    Deep geological disposals are planed to discard long-lived intermediate-level and high-level radioactive wastes. Clay-based geological barriers are expected to limit the ingress of groundwater and to reduce the mobility of radioelements. In the interaction zone between the cement and the clay based material alteration can occur. Magnesium silicate hydrates (M-S-H) have been observed due to the reaction of magnesium sulfate containing groundwater with cements or in the interaction zone between low-pH type cement and clays. M-S-H samples synthesized in the laboratory showed that M-S-H has a variable composition within 0.7 ≤ Mg/Si ≤ 1.5. TEM/EDS analyses show an homogeneous gel with no defined structure. IR and 29 Si NMR data reveal a higher polymerization degree of the silica network in M-S-H compared to calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H). The presence of mainly Q 3 silicate tetrahedrons in M-S-H indicates a sheet like or a triple-chain silica structure while C-S-H is characterised by single chain-structure. The clear difference in the silica structure and the larger ionic radius of Ca 2+ (1.1 Angstrom) compared to Mg 2+ (0.8 Angstrom) make the formation of an extended solid solution between M-S-H and C-S-H gel improbable. In fact, the analyses of synthetic samples containing both magnesium and calcium in various ratios indicate the formation of separate M-S-H and C-S-H gels with no or very little uptake of magnesium in CS-H or calcium in M-S-H

  8. A new aluminium-hydrate species in hydrated Portland cements characterized by 27Al and 29Si MAS NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Morten Daugaard; Jakobsen, Hans J.; Skibsted, Jorgen

    2006-01-01

    Recent 27 Al MAS NMR studies of hydrated Portland cements and calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) phases have shown a resonance from Al in octahedral coordination, which cannot be assigned to the well-known aluminate species in hydrated Portland cements. This resonance, which exhibits the isotropic chemical shift δ iso = 5.0 ppm and the quadrupole product parameter P Q = 1.2 MHz, has been characterized in detail by 27 Al MAS and 27 Al{ 1 H} CP/MAS NMR for different hydrated white Portland cements and C-S-H phases. These experiments demonstrate that the resonance originates from an amorphous or disordered aluminate hydrate which contains Al(OH) 6 3- or O x Al(OH) 6-x (3+x)- units. The formation of the new aluminate hydrate is related to the formation of C-S-H at ambient temperatures, however, it decomposes by thermal treatment at temperatures of 70-90 o C. From the experiments in this work it is proposed that the new aluminate hydrate is either an amorphous/disordered aluminate hydroxide or a calcium aluminate hydrate, produced as a separate phase or as a nanostructured surface precipitate on the C-S-H phase. Finally, the possibilities of Al 3+ for Ca 2+ substitution in the principal layers and interlayers of the C-S-H structure are discussed

  9. An effective medium inversion algorithm for gas hydrate quantification and its application to laboratory and borehole measurements of gas hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, S.; Minshull, T.A.; Priest, J.A.; Best, A.I.; Clayton, C.R.I.; Waite, W.F.

    2006-01-01

    The presence of gas hydrate in marine sediments alters their physical properties. In some circumstances, gas hydrate may cement sediment grains together and dramatically increase the seismic P- and S-wave velocities of the composite medium. Hydrate may also form a load-bearing structure within the sediment microstructure, but with different seismic wave attenuation characteristics, changing the attenuation behaviour of the composite. Here we introduce an inversion algorithm based on effective medium modelling to infer hydrate saturations from velocity and attenuation measurements on hydrate-bearing sediments. The velocity increase is modelled as extra binding developed by gas hydrate that strengthens the sediment microstructure. The attenuation increase is modelled through a difference in fluid flow properties caused by different permeabilities in the sediment and hydrate microstructures. We relate velocity and attenuation increases in hydrate-bearing sediments to their hydrate content, using an effective medium inversion algorithm based on the self-consistent approximation (SCA), differential effective medium (DEM) theory, and Biot and squirt flow mechanisms of fluid flow. The inversion algorithm is able to convert observations in compressional and shear wave velocities and attenuations to hydrate saturation in the sediment pore space. We applied our algorithm to a data set from the Mallik 2L–38 well, Mackenzie delta, Canada, and to data from laboratory measurements on gas-rich and water-saturated sand samples. Predictions using our algorithm match the borehole data and water-saturated laboratory data if the proportion of hydrate contributing to the load-bearing structure increases with hydrate saturation. The predictions match the gas-rich laboratory data if that proportion decreases with hydrate saturation. We attribute this difference to differences in hydrate formation mechanisms between the two environments.

  10. Interfacial effects in organic semiconductor heterojunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadler, P.

    2011-01-01

    The field of organic electronics has systematically gained interest in recent years, technologically and scientifically advances have been made leading to practical applications such as organic light emitting diodes, organic field-effect transistors and organic photo-voltaic cells. In this thesis a fundamental study on organic molecules is presented targeting on interfacial effects at organic heterojunctions. Generally in organic electronic devices interfaces are considered as key parameters for achieving high performance applications. Therefore in this work the emphasis is to investigate layer-by-layer heterojunctions of organic molecules. Defined heterojunctions at inorganic III-V semiconductors form superlattices and quantum-wells, which lead to interfacial effects summarized as quantum confinement and two-dimensional electron gases. Although organic molecules differ in many aspects from their inorganic counterparts, similar effects can be theoretically expected at organic heterojunctions as well. Organic molecules form van-der-Waals type crystals and domains which are macroscopically anisotropic and polycrystalline or amorphous. Organic molecules are intrinsic semiconductors and at interfaces dipoles are formed, which control the energy level alignment. In order to characterize such structures and compare them to inorganic superlattices and quantum-wells it is necessary to induce charge carriers. In this work this is established either by interfacial doping using high-performance dielectrics in a field-effect transistor structure or by photo-doping by exciting a donor-acceptor bilayer. In both cases C 60 was chosen as organic semiconductor exhibiting good acceptor properties and an electron mobility in the range of 0.5 cm 2 V -1 s -1 . The fabrication of well-defined few-molecular layers allows probing directly at the interface. Spectroscopic methods and transport measurements are applied for characterization: Photoemission spectroscopy, absorption and photo

  11. Gas composition and isotopic geochemistry of cuttings, core, and gas hydrate from the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenson, T.D.

    1999-01-01

    Molecular and isotopic composition of gases from the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well demonstrate that the in situ gases can be divided into three zones composed of mixtures of microbial and thermogenic gases. Sediments penetrated by the well are thermally immature; thus the sediments are probably not a source of thermogenic gas. Thermogenic gas likely migrated from depths below 5000 m. Higher concentrations of gas within and beneath the gas hydrate zone suggest that gas hydrate is a partial barrier to gas migration. Gas hydrate accumulations occur wholly within zone 3, below the base of permafrost. The gas in gas hydrate resembles, in part, the thermogenic gas in surrounding sediments and gas desorbed from lignite. Gas hydrate composition implies that the primary gas hydrate form is Structure I. However, Structure II stabilizing gases are more concentrated and isotopically partitioned in gas hydrate relative to the sediment hosting the gas hydrate, implying that Structure II gas hydrate may be present in small quantities.

  12. Impact of electrically formed interfacial layer and improved memory characteristics of IrOx/high-κx/W structures containing AlOx, GdOx, HfOx, and TaOx switching materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Amit; Maikap, Siddheswar; Banerjee, Writam; Jana, Debanjan; Lai, Chao-Sung

    2013-09-06

    Improved switching characteristics were obtained from high-κ oxides AlOx, GdOx, HfOx, and TaOx in IrOx/high-κx/W structures because of a layer that formed at the IrOx/high-κx interface under external positive bias. The surface roughness and morphology of the bottom electrode in these devices were observed by atomic force microscopy. Device size was investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. More than 100 repeatable consecutive switching cycles were observed for positive-formatted memory devices compared with that of the negative-formatted devices (only five unstable cycles) because it contained an electrically formed interfacial layer that controlled 'SET/RE