WorldWideScience

Sample records for hydrated interfacial structure

  1. Interfacial phenomena in gas hydrate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Zachary M; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-03-21

    Gas hydrates are crystalline inclusion compounds, where molecular cages of water trap lighter species under specific thermodynamic conditions. Hydrates play an essential role in global energy systems, as both a hinderance when formed in traditional fuel production and a substantial resource when formed by nature. In both traditional and unconventional fuel production, hydrates share interfaces with a tremendous diversity of materials, including hydrocarbons, aqueous solutions, and inorganic solids. This article presents a state-of-the-art understanding of hydrate interfacial thermodynamics and growth kinetics, and the physiochemical controls that may be exerted on both. Specific attention is paid to the molecular structure and interactions of water, guest molecules, and hetero-molecules (e.g., surfactants) near the interface. Gas hydrate nucleation and growth mechanics are also presented, based on studies using a combination of molecular modeling, vibrational spectroscopy, and X-ray and neutron diffraction. The fundamental physical and chemical knowledge and methods presented in this review may be of value in probing parallel systems of crystal growth in solid inclusion compounds, crystal growth modifiers, emulsion stabilization, and reactive particle flow in solid slurries.

  2. The dependence of phase change enthalpy on the pore structure and interfacial groups in hydrated salts/silica composites via sol-gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuping; Wang, Tao

    2015-06-15

    It was found that the procedures for incorporating hydrated salts into silica, including mixing with sol in an instant (S1 procedure), mixing with sol via drop by drop (S2 procedure) and mixing until the sol forming the gel (S3 procedure), had pronounced effects on the phase change enthalpy of hydrated salts/silica composite via sol-gel process. The discrepancy of phase change enthalpies of the composites with the same content of hydrated salts can be as high as 40 kJ/kg. To unveil the mechanism behind, the pore structure of silica matrix and interfacial functional groups were investigated extensively. It was revealed that different incorporation procedures resulted in distinct pore structure of silica matrix and different intensities of interfacial Si-OH groups. The S3 procedure was beneficial to induce the silica matrix with bigger pore size and fewer Si-OH groups. Consequently, the phase change enthalpy of the hydrated salts/silica composite prepared by this procedure was the highest because of its lower size confinement effects and weaker adsorption by Si-OH groups. This study will provide insight into the preparation of shape-stabilized phase change materials for thermal energy storage applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Structure and dynamics of interfacial water. Role of hydratation water in the globular proteins dynamics; Structure et dynamique de l`eau interfaciale. Role de l`eau d`hydratation dans la dynamique des proteines globulaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanotti, J.M.

    1997-01-27

    This memoir includes five chapters. In the first chapter, are given the elements of the neutrons scattering theory that is used in this study. the second chapter is devoted to a general presentation of the interaction between biological macro molecule and water. The third part is dedicated to the study of the structure and the dynamics of interfacial water in the neighbouring of model systems, the vycor and the amorphous carbon. The results presented in this part are compared with these one relative to water dynamics at the C-phycocyanin surface. This study makes the object of the fourth chapter. Then, in the fifth and last chapter are discussed the results relative to the role of hydratation on the parv-albumin dynamics for which have been combined the neutron quasi elastic incoherent scattering and the nuclear magnetic resonance of the carbon 13 solid in natural abundance.

  4. Coordination variation of hydrated Cu2+/Br1- ions traversing the interfacial water in mesopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Huang, X. F.; Li, C. X.; Pan, L. Q.; Wu, Z. H.; Hu, T. D.; Jiang, Z.; Huang, Y. Y.; Cao, Z. X.; Sun, G.; Lu, K. Q.

    2012-06-01

    Resolution of the atomistic and electronic details about the coordination structure variation of hydrated ions in the interfacial water is still a tough challenge, which is, however, essentially important for the understanding of ion adsorption, permeation and other similar processes in aqueous solutions. Here we report the tracing of coordination structure variation for hydrated Cu2+/Br1- ions traversing the interfacial water in Vycor mesopores (ϕ = 7.6 nm) by employing both X-ray absorption near edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies. By controlled desorption/adsorption of water, the filling fraction of the mesopores, thus the water layer thickness, can be adjusted, which in turn effects the variation of coordination structure of the ions therein. It is found that both Cu2+ and Br1- ions prefer staying exclusively in the core water, and in this circumstance no ion pairs have been detected in the solution of concentrations up to 1.0 M. Following capillary decondensation occurring at a filling fraction of ˜35% which corresponds to a water layer of about three monolayers, Br1- ions begin immediately to reconstruct their first coordination shell, characterized by ionic dehydration, shrinkage of ion-water bond length, and formation of ion pairs. In contrast, Cu2+ ions can retain a bulk-like coordination structure till being driven to bond directly to the pore surface when the filling fraction is below 20%. At the final stage of dehydration via thermal vacuum treatment at 110°C, Cu2+ ions can be completely reduced to the Cu1+ state, and recover at room temperature only when the filling fraction is above 14%. These results may be inspirable for the investigation of similar problems concerning hydrated ions in water solution under different confining conditions.

  5. Coordination variation of hydrated Cu2+/Br1− ions traversing the interfacial water in mesopores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Resolution of the atomistic and electronic details about the coordination structure variation of hydrated ions in the interfacial water is still a tough challenge, which is, however, essentially important for the understanding of ion adsorption, permeation and other similar processes in aqueous solutions. Here we report the tracing of coordination structure variation for hydrated Cu2+/Br1- ions traversing the interfacial water in Vycor mesopores (ϕ = 7.6 nm by employing both X-ray absorption near edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies. By controlled desorption/adsorption of water, the filling fraction of the mesopores, thus the water layer thickness, can be adjusted, which in turn effects the variation of coordination structure of the ions therein. It is found that both Cu2+ and Br1- ions prefer staying exclusively in the core water, and in this circumstance no ion pairs have been detected in the solution of concentrations up to 1.0 M. Following capillary decondensation occurring at a filling fraction of ∼35% which corresponds to a water layer of about three monolayers, Br1- ions begin immediately to reconstruct their first coordination shell, characterized by ionic dehydration, shrinkage of ion-water bond length, and formation of ion pairs. In contrast, Cu2+ ions can retain a bulk-like coordination structure till being driven to bond directly to the pore surface when the filling fraction is below 20%. At the final stage of dehydration via thermal vacuum treatment at 110°C, Cu2+ ions can be completely reduced to the Cu1+ state, and recover at room temperature only when the filling fraction is above 14%. These results may be inspirable for the investigation of similar problems concerning hydrated ions in water solution under different confining conditions.

  6. Unexpected inhibition of CO2 gas hydrate formation in dilute TBAB solutions and the critical role of interfacial water structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ngoc N.; Nguyen, Anh V.; Nguyen, Khoi T.; Rintoul, Llew; Dang, Liem X.

    2016-12-01

    Gas hydrates formed under moderated conditions open up novel approaches to tackling issues related to energy supply, gas separation, and CO2 sequestration. Several additives like tetra-n-butylammonium bromide (TBAB) have been empirically developed and used to promote gas hydrate formation. Here we report unexpected experimental results which show that TBAB inhibits CO2 gas hydrate formation when used at minuscule concentration. We also used spectroscopic techniques and molecular dynamics simulation to gain further insights and explain the experimental results. They have revealed the critical role of water alignment at the gas-water interface induced by surface adsorption of tetra-n-butylammonium cation (TBA+) which gives rise to the unexpected inhibition of dilute TBAB solution. The water perturbation by TBA+ in the bulk is attributed to the promotion effect of high TBAB concentration on gas hydrate formation. We explain our finding using the concept of activation energy of gas hydrate formation. Our results provide a step toward to mastering the control of gas hydrate formation.

  7. Distinct Roles for Interfacial Hydration in Site-Specific DNA Recognition by ETS-Family Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xhani, Suela; Esaki, Shingo; Huang, Kenneth; Erlitzki, Noa; Poon, Gregory M K

    2017-04-06

    The ETS family of transcription factors is a functionally heterogeneous group of gene regulators that share a structurally conserved, eponymous DNA-binding domain. Unlike other ETS homologues, such as Ets-1, DNA recognition by PU.1 is highly sensitive to its osmotic environment due to excess interfacial hydration in the complex. To investigate interfacial hydration in the two homologues, we mutated a conserved tyrosine residue, which is exclusively engaged in coordinating a well-defined water contact between the protein and DNA among ETS proteins, to phenylalanine. The loss of this water-mediated contact blunted the osmotic sensitivity of PU.1/DNA binding, but did not alter binding under normo-osmotic conditions, suggesting that PU.1 has evolved to maximize osmotic sensitivity. The homologous mutation in Ets-1, which was minimally sensitive to osmotic stress due to a sparsely hydrated interface, reduced DNA-binding affinity at normal osmolality but the complex became stabilized by osmotic stress. Molecular dynamics simulations of wildtype and mutant PU.1 and Ets-1 in their free and DNA-bound states, which recapitulated experimental features of the proteins, showed that abrogation of this tyrosine-mediated water contact perturbed the Ets-1/DNA complex not through disruption of interfacial hydration, but by inhibiting local dynamics induced specifically in the bound state. Thus, a configurationally identical water-mediated contact plays mechanistically distinct roles in mediating DNA recognition by structurally homologous ETS transcription factors.

  8. Protein interfacial structure and nanotoxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, John W. [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)], E-mail: jww@rsc.anu.edu.au; Perriman, Adam W.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Lin, J.-M. [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

    2009-02-21

    Here we briefly recapitulate the use of X-ray and neutron reflectometry at the air-water interface to find protein structures and thermodynamics at interfaces and test a possibility for understanding those interactions between nanoparticles and proteins which lead to nanoparticle toxicology through entry into living cells. Stable monomolecular protein films have been made at the air-water interface and, with a specially designed vessel, the substrate changed from that which the air-water interfacial film was deposited. This procedure allows interactions, both chemical and physical, between introduced species and the monomolecular film to be studied by reflectometry. The method is briefly illustrated here with some new results on protein-protein interaction between {beta}-casein and {kappa}-casein at the air-water interface using X-rays. These two proteins are an essential component of the structure of milk. In the experiments reported, specific and directional interactions appear to cause different interfacial structures if first, a {beta}-casein monolayer is attacked by a {kappa}-casein solution compared to the reverse. The additional contrast associated with neutrons will be an advantage here. We then show the first results of experiments on the interaction of a {beta}-casein monolayer with a nanoparticle titanium oxide sol, foreshadowing the study of the nanoparticle 'corona' thought to be important for nanoparticle-cell wall penetration.

  9. Extended propagation model for interfacial crack in composite material structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫相桥; 冯希金

    2002-01-01

    An interfacial crack is a common damage in a composite material structure . An extended propaga-tion model has been established for an interfacial crack to study the dependence of crack growth on the relativesizes of energy release rates at left and right crack tips and the properties of interfacial material characterize thegrowth of interfacial crack better.

  10. Molecular structure and interfacial behaviour of polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lent, van B.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the molecular structure on the interfacial behaviour of polymers. Theoretical models were developed for three different systems. All these models are based on the self-consistent field theory of Scheutjens and Fleer for the

  11. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-30

    properties of key hydrated cement constituent calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) at the molecular, nanometer scale level. Due to complexity, still unknown...public release; distribution is unlimited. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate- Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure The views... Cement Molecular Structure Report Title Multi-scale modeling of complex material systems requires starting from fundamental building blocks to

  12. Gas hydrate dissociation structures in submarine slopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidley, I.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Studies have suggested that gas hydrates may play a role in submarine slope failures. However, the mechanics surrounding such failures are poorly understood. This paper discussed experimental tests conducted on a small-scale physical model of submarine soils with hydrate inclusions. The laboratory tests investigated the effects of slope angle and depth of burial of the hydrate on gas escape structures and slope stability. Laponite was used to model the soils due to its ability to swell and produce a clear, colorless thixotropic gel when dispersed in water. An R-11 refrigerant was used to form hydrate layers and nodules. The aim of the experiment was to investigate the path of the fluid escape structures and the development of a subsequent slip plane caused by the dissociation of the R-11 hydrates. Slope angles of 5, 10, and 15 degrees were examined. Slopes were examined using high-resolution, high-speed imaging techniques. Hydrate placement and slope inclinations were varied in order to obtain stability data. Results of the study showed that slope angle influenced the direction of travel of the escaping gas, and that the depth of burial affected sensitivity to slope angle. Theoretical models developed from the experimental data have accurately mapped deformations and stress states during testing. Further research is being conducted to investigate the influence of the size, shape, and placement of the hydrates. 30 refs., 15 figs.

  13. Interfacial chemistry and structure in ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.H.; Saenz, N.T.; Schilling, C.H.

    1990-09-01

    The interfacial chemistry and structure of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) play a major role in the properties of these materials. Fiber-matrix interfaces chemistries are vitally important in the fracture strength, fracture toughness, and fracture resistance of ceramic composites because they influence fiber loading and fiber pullout. Elevated-temperature properties are also linked to the interfacial characteristics through the chemical stability of the interface in corrosive environments and the creep/pullout behavior of the interface. Physical properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity are also dependent on the interface. Fiber-matrix interfaces containing a 1-{mu}m-thick multilayered interface with amorphous and graphitic C to a 1-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layer can result from sintering operations for some composite systems. Fibers coated with C, BN, C/BC/BN, and Si are also used to produce controlled interface chemistries and structures. Growth interfaces within the matrix resulting from processing of CMCs can also be crucial to the behavior of these materials. Evaluation of the interfacial chemistry and structure of CMCs requires the use of a variety of analytical tools, including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. A review of the interfacial chemistry and structure of SiC whisker- and fiber-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC/SiC materials is presented. Where possible, correlations with fracture properties and high-temperature stability are made. 94 refs., 10 figs.

  14. The structure of the hydrated electron in bulk and at interfaces: Does the hydrated electron occupy a cavity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Jennifer Ryan

    experimental temperature dependence in the optical absorption spectrum and show the wrong trends in the resonance Raman spectrum. We also explore the differences between non-cavity and cavity models by quantifying the electron-water overlap, referring to the non-cavity model as an 'inverse plum pudding,' where the water molecules are embedded within the electron density. Finally, we examine hydrated electrons in the presence of an air/water interface. Experiments indicate that most likely electrons do not reside at the surface, and if they do, they have structural and dynamical properties reminiscent of the bulk. Our calculated Potentials of Mean Force indicate that both cavity and non-cavity electrons prefer to be solvated by the bulk, but that the cavity electron has a local free energy minimum near the surface. These calculated interfacial cavity electrons behave very differently than cavity electrons in the bulk, in direct contrast to experimental evidence. From the work presented in this thesis, it is clear that the non-cavity electron is the most appropriate one-electron model we have for the structure of the hydrated electron.

  15. High-pressure structures of methane hydrate

    CERN Document Server

    Hirai, H; Fujihisa, H; Sakashita, M; Katoh, E; Aoki, K; Yamamoto, Y; Nagashima, K; Yagi, T

    2002-01-01

    Three high-pressure structures of methane hydrate, a hexagonal structure (str. A) and two orthorhombic structures (str. B and str. C), were found by in situ x-ray diffractometry and Raman spectroscopy. The well-known structure I (str. I) decomposed into str. A and fluid at 0.8 GPa. Str. A transformed into str. B at 1.6 GPa, and str. B further transformed into str. C at 2.1 GPa which survived above 7.8 GPa. The fluid solidified as ice VI at 1.4 GPa, and the ice VI transformed to ice VII at 2.1 GPa. The bulk moduli, K sub 0 , for str. I, str. A, and str. C were calculated to be 7.4, 9.8, and 25.0 GPa, respectively.

  16. Hydration Structure of the Quaternary Ammonium Cations

    KAUST Repository

    Babiaczyk, Wojtek Iwo

    2010-11-25

    Two indicators of the hydropathicity of small solutes are introduced and tested by molecular dynamics simulations. These indicators are defined as probabilities of the orientation of water molecules\\' dipoles and hydrogen bond vectors, conditional on a generalized distance from the solute suitable for arbitrarily shaped molecules. Using conditional probabilities, it is possible to distinguish features of the distributions in close proximity of the solute. These regions contain the most significant information on the hydration structure but cannot be adequately represented by using, as is usually done, joint distance-angle probability densities. Our calculations show that using our indicators a relative hydropathicity scale for the interesting test set of the quaternary ammonium cations can be roughly determined. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  17. Interfacial structure in an air-water planar bubble jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X.; Vasavada, S.; Choi, S. W.; Kim, S.; Ishii, M.; Beus, S. G.

    2005-04-01

    The objective of the current study is to better understand the interfacial structure and its development in an air-water planar bubble jet, as well as to provide a unique benchmark data set for a 3D thermal-hydraulic analysis code. Both flow visualization and local measurements were performed in three characteristic flow conditions at four elevations along a test section with a cross section of 200 mm in width and 10 mm in gap. A high-speed digital video camera was applied in the flow visualization study to capture the flow structures and bubble interaction phenomena, while a miniaturized four-sensor conductivity probe was used to acquire the time-averaged local void fraction, interfacial velocity, and bubble number frequency. Also, the interfacial area concentration and the averaged bubble Sauter mean diameter were obtained from the local measurements. The lateral bubble transport and bubble interaction mechanisms were clearly demonstrated in the acquired data.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Atomic Force Microscopy at the Water-Muscovite Interface: Hydration Layer Structure and Force Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liang, Yunfeng; Amano, Ken-ichi; Murata, Sumihiko; Matsuoka, Toshifumi; Takahashi, Satoru; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2016-04-19

    With the development of atomic force microscopy (AFM), it is now possible to detect the buried liquid-solid interfacial structure in three dimensions at the atomic scale. One of the model surfaces used for AFM is the muscovite surface because it is atomically flat after cleavage along the basal plane. Although it is considered that force profiles obtained by AFM reflect the interfacial structures (e.g., muscovite surface and water structure), the force profiles are not straightforward because of the lack of a quantitative relationship between the force and the interfacial structure. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the relationship between the muscovite-water interfacial structure and the measured AFM force using a capped carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM tip. We provide divided force profiles, where the force contributions from each water layer at the interface are shown. They reveal that the first hydration layer is dominant in the total force from water even after destruction of the layer. Moreover, the lateral structure of the first hydration layer transcribes the muscovite surface structure. It resembles the experimentally resolved surface structure of muscovite in previous AFM studies. The local density profile of water between the tip and the surface provides further insight into the relationship between the water structure and the detected force structure. The detected force structure reflects the basic features of the atomic structure for the local hydration layers. However, details including the peak-peak distance in the force profile (force-distance curve) differ from those in the density profile (density-distance curve) because of disturbance by the tip.

  19. The Pore Structure and Hydration Performance of Sulphoaluminate MDF Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Cong-yun; YUAN Run-zhang; LONG Shi-zong

    2004-01-01

    The hydration and pore structure of sulphoaluminate MDF cement were studied by X-ray diffractometer ( XRD ), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimeter ( MIP ) etc. The ex-perimental results indicate that hydration products of the materials are entringites ( Aft ), aluminium hydroxide andCSH (Ⅰ) gel etc. Due to its very low water-cement ratio, hydration function is only confined to the surfaces of ce-ment grains, and there is a lot of sulphoaluminate cement in the hardenite which is unhydrated yet. Hydration re-action was rapidly carried under the condition of the heat-pressing. Therefore cement hydrates Aft, CSH (Ⅰ) andaluminium hydroxide gel fill in pores. The expansibility of Aft makes the porosity of MDF cement lower ( less than1 percent ) and the size of pore smaller (80 percent pore was less than 250A), and enhances its strength.

  20. Perspective: Structure and ultrafast dynamics of biomolecular hydration shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Laage

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The structure and function of biomolecules can be strongly influenced by their hydration shells. A key challenge is thus to determine the extent to which these shells differ from bulk water, since the structural fluctuations and molecular excitations of hydrating water molecules within these shells can cover a broad range in both space and time. Recent progress in theory, molecular dynamics simulations, and ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy has led to new and detailed insight into the fluctuations of water structure, elementary water motions, and electric fields at hydrated biointerfaces. Here, we discuss some central aspects of these advances, focusing on elementary molecular mechanisms and processes of hydration on a femto- to picosecond time scale, with some special attention given to several issues subject to debate.

  1. CO2 hydrate: Synthesis, composition, structure, dissociation behavior, and a comparison to structure I CH4 hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.; Chakoumakos, B.C.; Rawn, C.J.; Rondinone, A.J.; Ishii, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Structure I (sI) carbon dioxide (CO2) hydrate exhibits markedly different dissociation behavior from sI methane (CH4) hydrate in experiments in which equilibrated samples at 0.1 MPa are heated isobarically at 13 K/h from 210 K through the H2O melting point (273.15 K). The CO2 hydrate samples release only about 3% of their gas content up to temperatures of 240 K, which is 22 K above the hydrate phase boundary. Up to 20% is released by 270 K, and the remaining CO2 is released at 271.0 plusmn; 0.5 K, where the sample temperature is buffered until hydrate dissociation ceases. This reproducible buffering temperature for the dissociation reaction CO2??nH2O = CO2(g) + nH2O(1 to s) is measurably distinct from the pure H2O melting point at 273.15 K, which is reached as gas evolution ceases. In contrast, when si CH4 hydrate is heated at the same rate at 0.1 MPa, >95% of the gas is released within 25 K of the equilibrium temperature (193 K at 0.1 MPa). In conjunction with the dissociation study, a method for efficient and reproducible synthesis of pure polycrystalline CO2 hydrate with suitable characteristics for material properties testing was developed, and the material was characterized. CO2 hydrate was synthesized from CO2 liquid and H2O solid and liquid reactants at pressures between 5 and 25 MPa and temperatures between 250 and 281 K. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination indicates that the samples consist of dense crystalline hydrate and 50-300 ??m diameter pores that are lined with euhedral cubic hydrate crystals. Deuterated hydrate samples made by this same procedure were analyzed by neutron diffraction at temperatures between 4 and 215 K; results confirm that complete conversion of water to hydrate has occurred and that the measured unit cell parameter and thermal expansion are consistent with previously reported values. On the basis of measured weight gain after synthesis and gas yields from the dissociation experiments, approximately all cages in the

  2. Infrared light-induced protein crystallization. Structuring of protein interfacial water and periodic self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowacz, Magdalena; Marchel, Mateusz; Juknaité, Lina; Esperança, José M. S. S.; Romão, Maria João; Carvalho, Ana Luísa; Rebelo, Luís Paulo N.

    2017-01-01

    We show that a physical trigger, a non-ionizing infrared (IR) radiation at wavelengths strongly absorbed by liquid water, can be used to induce and kinetically control protein (periodic) self-assembly in solution. This phenomenon is explained by considering the effect of IR light on the structuring of protein interfacial water. Our results indicate that the IR radiation can promote enhanced mutual correlations of water molecules in the protein hydration shell. We report on the radiation-induced increase in both the strength and cooperativeness of H-bonds. The presence of a structured dipolar hydration layer can lead to attractive interactions between like-charged biomacromolecules in solution (and crystal nucleation events). Furthermore, our study suggests that enveloping the protein within a layer of structured solvent (an effect enhanced by IR light) can prevent the protein non-specific aggregation favoring periodic self-assembly. Recognizing the ability to affect protein-water interactions by means of IR radiation may have important implications for biological and bio-inspired systems.

  3. Structural stability of methane hydrate at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, J.; Chen, X.; Chou, I.-Ming; Yang, W.; Hu, Jiawen; Hemley, R.J.; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2011-01-01

    The structural stability of methane hydrate under pressure at room temperature was examined by both in-situ single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction techniques on samples with structure types I, II, and H in diamond-anvil cells. The diffraction data for types II (sII) and H (sH) were refined to the known structures with space groups Fd3m and P63/mmc, respectively. Upon compression, sI methane hydrate transforms to the sII phase at 120 MPa, and then to the sH phase at 600 MPa. The sII methane hydrate was found to coexist locally with sI phase up to 500 MPa and with sH phase up to 600 MPa. The pure sH structure was found to be stable between 600 and 900 MPa. Methane hydrate decomposes at pressures above 3 GPa to form methane with the orientationally disordered Fm3m structure and ice VII (Pn3m). The results highlight the role of guest (CH4)-host (H2O) interactions in the stabilization of the hydrate structures under pressure. ?? 2011, China University of Geosciences (Beijing) and Peking University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Structural Interpretation of the Large Slowdown of Water Dynamics at Stacked Phospholipid Membranes for Decreasing Hydration Level: All-Atom Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles Calero

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydration water determines the stability and function of phospholipid membranes as well as the interaction of membranes with other molecules. Experiments and simulations have shown that water dynamics slows down dramatically as the hydration decreases, suggesting that the interfacial water that dominates the average dynamics at low hydration is slower than water away from the membrane. Here, based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we provide an interpretation of the slowdown of interfacial water in terms of the structure and dynamics of water–water and water–lipid hydrogen bonds (HBs. We calculate the rotational and translational slowdown of the dynamics of water confined in stacked phospholipid membranes at different levels of hydration, from completely hydrated to poorly hydrated membranes. For all hydrations, we analyze the distribution of HBs and find that water–lipids HBs last longer than water–water HBs and that at low hydration most of the water is in the interior of the membrane. We also show that water–water HBs become more persistent as the hydration is lowered. We attribute this effect (i to HBs between water molecules that form, in turn, persistent HBs with lipids; (ii to the hindering of the H-bonding switching between water molecules due to the lower water density at the interface; and (iii to the higher probability of water–lipid HBs as the hydration decreases. Our interpretation of the large dynamic slowdown in water under dehydration is potentially relevant in understanding membrane biophysics at different hydration levels.

  5. Interfacial structure of soft matter probed by SFG spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shen; Tong, Yujin; Ge, Aimin; Qiao, Lin; Davies, Paul B

    2014-10-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, an interface-specific technique in contrast to, for example, attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy, which is only interface sensitive, has been employed to investigate the surface and interface structure of soft matter on a molecular scale. The experimental arrangement required to carry out SFG spectroscopy, with particular reference to soft matter, and the analytical methods developed to interpret the spectra are described. The elucidation of the interfacial structure of soft matter systems is an essential prerequisite in order to understand and eventually control the surface properties of these important functional materials.

  6. Structure and Hydration of Highly Branched, Monodisperse Phytoglycogen Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, John; Nickels, Jonathan; Stanley, Christopher; Diallo, Souleymane; Katsaras, John; Dutcher, John

    Monodisperse phytoglycogen nanoparticles are a promising, new soft colloidal nanomaterial with many applications in the personal care, food, nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries. These applications rely on exceptional properties that emerge from the highly branched structure of phytoglycogen and its interaction with water, such as extraordinarily high water retention, and low viscosity and exceptional stability in water. The structure and hydration of the nanoparticles was characterized using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). SANS allowed us to determine the size of the nanoparticles, evaluate their radial density profile, quantify the particle-to-particle spacing, and determine their water content. The results show clearly that the nanoparticles are highly hydrated, with each nanoparticle containing 250% of its mass in water, and that aqueous dispersions approach a jamming transition at ~ 25% (w/w). QENS experiments provided an independent and consistent measure of the high level of hydration of the particles.

  7. Correlation Between Chain Architecture and Hydration Water Structure in Polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossutti, Michael; Dutcher, John R

    2016-03-14

    The physical properties of confined water can differ dramatically from those of bulk water. Hydration water associated with polysaccharides provides a particularly interesting example of confined water, because differences in polysaccharide structure provide different spatially confined environments for water sorption. We have used attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy to investigate the structure of hydration water in films of three different polysaccharides under controlled relative humidity (RH) conditions. We compare the results obtained for films of highly branched, dendrimer-like phytoglycogen nanoparticles to those obtained for two unbranched polysaccharides, hyaluronic acid (HA), and chitosan. We find similarities between the water structuring in the two linear polysaccharides and significant differences for phytoglycogen. In particular, the results suggest that the high degree of branching in phytoglycogen leads to a much more well-ordered water structure (low density, high connectivity network water), indicating the strong influence of chain architecture on the structuring of water. These measurements provide unique insight into the relationship between the structure and hydration of polysaccharides, which is important for understanding and exploiting these sustainable nanomaterials in a wide range of applications.

  8. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermannová, Lada, E-mail: lada.biedermannova@ibt.cas.cz; Schneider, Bohdan [Institute of Biotechnology CAS, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-27

    The hydration of protein crystal structures was studied at the level of individual amino acids. The dependence of the number of water molecules and their preferred spatial localization on various parameters, such as solvent accessibility, secondary structure and side-chain conformation, was determined. Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon–donor hydrogen bonds, OH–π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations.

  9. Vibrational and structural relaxation of hydrated protons in Nafion membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liyuan; Lotze, Stephan; Bakker, Huib J.

    2017-02-01

    We study the vibrational dynamics of the bending mode at 1730 cm-1 of proton hydration structures in Nafion membranes with polarization-resolved infrared (IR) pump-probe spectroscopy. The bending mode relaxes to an intermediate state with a time constant T1 of 170 ± 30 fs. Subsequently, the dissipated energy equilibrates with Teq of 1.5 ± 0.2 ps. The transient absorption signals show a long-living anisotropy, which indicates that for part of the excited proton hydration clusters the vibrational energy dissipation results in a local structural change, e.g. the breaking of a local hydrogen bond. This structural relaxation relaxes with a time constant of 38 ± 4 ps.

  10. Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy for Structure-II Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeya, Kei; Zhang, Caihong; Kawayama, Iwao

    2009-01-01

    For the nondestructive inspection of gas hydrates, terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) was applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate and propane hydrate. The absorption of propane hydrate monotonically increases with frequency, similar to the case of ice, while THF hydrate has a charact...

  11. Inhibition of Methane Hydrate Formation by Ice-Structuring Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Ramløv, Hans; Thomsen, Kaj

    2010-01-01

    , assumed biodegradable, are capable of inhibiting the growth of methane hydrate (a structure I hydrate). The ISPs investigated were type III HPLC12 (originally identified in ocean pout) and ISP type III found in meal worm (Tenebrio molitor). These were compared to polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) a well...... of inhibitors. The profile of the nonlinear growth was concentration-dependent but also dependent on the stirring rate. ISP type III HPLC12 decreased the growth rate of methane hydrate during the linear growth period by 17−75% at concentrations of 0.01−0.1 wt % (0.014−0.14 mM) while ISP from Tenebrio molitor...... and PVP decreased the growth rate by 30% and 39% at concentrations of 0.004 wt % (0.005 mM) and 0.1 wt % (0.1 mM), respectively. Considering the low concentration of Tenebrio molitor ISP used, these results indicate that ISP from Tenebrio molitor is the most effective hydrate inhibitor among those...

  12. TEM and HREM study on the fine structure and the interfacial structure of bainite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李凤照; 敖青; 顾英妮; 姜江; 孙东升; 戴吉岩; 彭红樱

    1996-01-01

    The fine structure of bainite,the morphology and distribution of carbide in steels and the morphology of bainite in Cu-Zn-Al alloys have been investigated with TEM.The interfacial structure ledges and interfacial crystal lattice images of Cu-Zn-Al alloys have also been investigated with HREM.The addition of alloying microelements can fine the structure of bainitic ferrite markedly.The bainitic ferrite is composed of subunits or subchunks.The carbides differ in morphologies and are distributed in between laths,inside the plates and on the boundaries of subunits.There are abundant fine structures in bainitic ferrite.In the primary bainite of Cu-Zn-Al alloy there are interfacial structure ledges,the height of which is about 3 -40 nm,equal to 15-200 atomic layers.The phase transformation mechanism of bainite is discussed.

  13. Interfacial chemistry of zinc anodes for reinforced concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covino, B.S. Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Cramer, S.D.; Holcomb, G.R. [Dept. of Energy, Albany, OR (United States). Albany Research Center; McGill, G.E.; Cryer, C.B. [Oregon Dept. of Transportation, Salem, OR (United States); Stoneman, A. [International Lead Zinc Research Organization, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Carter, R.R. [California Dept. of Transportation, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Thermally-sprayed zinc anodes are used in both galvanic and impressed current cathodic protection systems for reinforced concrete structures. The Albany Research Center, in collaboration with the Oregon Department of Transportation, has been studying the effect of electrochemical aging on the bond strength of zinc anodes for bridge cathodic protection systems. Changes in anode bond strength and other anode properties can be explained by the chemistry of the zinc-concrete interface. The chemistry of the zinc-concrete interface in laboratory electrochemical aging studies is compared with that of several bridges with thermal-sprayed zinc anodes and which have been in service for 5 to 10 years using both galvanic and impressed current cathodic protection systems. The bridges are the Cape Creek Bridge on the Oregon coast and the East Camino Undercrossing near Placerville, CA. Also reported are interfacial chemistry results for galvanized steel rebar from the 48 year old Longbird Bridge in Bermuda.

  14. Effects of carbon dioxide hydration kinetics and evaporative convection on pH profile development during interfacial mass transfer of ammonia and carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Sommer, Sven G.; Petersen, Valdemar; Markfoged, Rikke

    2016-09-01

    Interfacial mass transfer of NH_3 and CO_2 are important in processes as diverse as NH_3 emission from animal manure and gas scrubbing for removal of carbon dioxide. Predicting transfer rates is complicated by bidirectional interactions between solution pH and emission rates, which may be affected by physical, chemical, and biological processes. We studied the effects of CO_2 hydration kinetics and evaporative convection on the development of pH profiles in solutions undergoing simultaneous emission of NH_3 and CO_2 . Profiles of pH were measured at a 0.1 mm resolution over 15 h, and interpreted using a reaction-transport model. Under high humidity, surface pH increased quickly (>0.2 units in 8 min) and an increase gradually extended to deeper depths. An increase in CO_2 hydration and carbonic acid dehydration rates by addition of carbonic anhydrase increased the elevation of surface pH and the depth to which an increase extended, due to an increase in CO_2 emission. Results show that unless carbonic anhydrase is present, the equilibrium approach typically used for modeling interfacial transport of CO_2 and NH_3 will be inaccurate. Evaporation and resulting convection greatly increased mass transfer rates below an apparent surface film about 1 mm thick. Emission or absorption of CO_2 can produce steep gradients in pH over small distances (20 mm) in systems with and without convective mixing, and the resulting surface pH, in turn, strongly affects NH_3 transfer. Both convection and the rate of hydration/dehydration reactions are likely to affect pH profile development and rates of NH_3 and CO_2 transfer in many systems. Accurately predicting mass transfer rates for these systems will require an understanding of these processes in the systems.

  15. Cross-nucleation between clathrate hydrate polymorphs: assessing the role of stability, growth rate, and structure matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Andrew H; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-02-28

    Cross-nucleation is a phenomenon where a new crystal nucleates and grows upon the surface of a different polymorph. Previous studies indicate that faster growth rate of the new crystal is a necessary but not sufficient condition for cross-nucleation. The thermodynamic stability of the different polymorphs can also affect cross-nucleation by modulating the rates of crystal growth. The interplay between thermodynamic stability of the polymorphs involved, the growth rate of the crystals, and the need for creation of an interfacial transition layer that seamlessly connects the two structures has not yet been fully elucidated. Predicting cross-nucleation is particularly challenging for clathrate hydrates, for which there are sometimes several polymorphs with similar stability and for which growth rates are not known. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate which factor (stability, growth rate, or formation of interfacial transition layer) controls cross-nucleation between the four known Frank-Kasper clathrate hydrate polymorphs: sI, sII, TS, and HS-I. We investigate the growth and cross-nucleation of these four hydrates filled with a set of guest molecules that produce different order of stabilities for the four crystal structures. We determine that the growth rate of sII clathrate is the fastest, followed by TS, HS-I, and sI. We find that cross-nucleation into or from sII clathrates is preceded by the formation of an interfacial transition layer at the seed crystal/liquid interface because sII does not share a crystal plane with sI, HS-I, or TS. Cross-nucleation between the latter three can occur seamlessly and is determined only by their growth rates. Our results indicate that nucleation of an interfacial transition layer between non-matching polymorphs can control cross-nucleation or lack thereof under conditions of small driving force. Under conditions of sufficient supercooling clathrate hydrate polymorphs cross-nucleate into the fastest

  16. Molecular dynamics study on the structure I helium hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Wei; WU Hucai; YE Xiaoqin; HOU Hongyu

    2004-01-01

    A 368- water molecule structure I gas hydrate, encased by the number of helium (He) molecules ranging from two to twenty-two, are calculated by molecular dynamical simulations. The potential TIP4P (transferable intermolecular potentical with four sites) is used for water interactions and Lennard-Jones for He-He and He-water interactions. He molecules do not affect the water lattice and can stabilize the hydrate when their concentration is small. A trough signature of He encased is found at 80~90 meV in the phonon density of states. He molecules prefer to be more off-center in 51262 cages. Heavier isotope He are energetically favorable to be filled in cages.

  17. Focus: Structure and dynamics of the interfacial layer in polymer nanocomposites with attractive interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shiwang; Carroll, Bobby; Bocharova, Vera; Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2017-05-01

    In recent years it has become clear that the interfacial layer formed around nanoparticles in polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) is critical for controlling their macroscopic properties. The interfacial layer occupies a significant volume fraction of the polymer matrix in PNCs and creates strong intrinsic heterogeneity in their structure and dynamics. Here, we focus on analysis of the structure and dynamics of the interfacial region in model PNCs with well-dispersed, spherical nanoparticles with attractive interactions. First, we discuss several experimental techniques that provide structural and dynamic information on the interfacial region in PNCs. Then, we discuss the role of various microscopic parameters in controlling structure and dynamics of the interfacial layer. The analysis presented emphasizes the importance of the polymer-nanoparticle interactions for the slowing down dynamics in the interfacial region, while the thickness of the interfacial layer appears to be dependent on chain rigidity, and has been shown to increase with cooling upon approaching the glass transition. Aside from chain rigidity and polymer-nanoparticle interactions, the interfacial layer properties are also affected by the molecular weight of the polymer and the size of the nanoparticles. In the final part of this focus article, we emphasize the important challenges in the field of polymer nanocomposites and a potential analogy with the behavior observed in thin films.

  18. Structure II gas hydrates found below the bottom-simulating reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganoni, M.; Cartwright, J. A.; Foschi, M.; Shipp, R. C.; Van Rensbergen, P.

    2016-06-01

    Gas hydrates are a major component in the organic carbon cycle. Their stability is controlled by temperature, pressure, water chemistry, and gas composition. The bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) is the primary seismic indicator of the base of hydrate stability in continental margins. Here we use seismic, well log, and core data from the convergent margin offshore NW Borneo to demonstrate that the BSR does not always represent the base of hydrate stability and can instead approximate the boundary between structure I hydrates above and structure II hydrates below. At this location, gas hydrate saturation below the BSR is higher than above and a process of chemical fractionation of the migrating free gas is responsible for the structure I-II transition. This research shows that in geological settings dominated by thermogenic gas migration, the hydrate stability zone may extend much deeper than suggested by the BSR.

  19. Effects of sintering temperature on interfacial structure and interfacial resistance for all-solid-state rechargeable lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Takehisa; Yoshida, Ryuji; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Hirayama, Tsukasa; Motoyama, Munekazu; West, William C.; Iriyama, Yasutoshi

    2016-09-01

    Sintering processes yield a mutual diffusion region at the electrode/solid electrolyte interface, which is considered as a crucial problem for developing large-sized all-solid-state rechargeable lithium batteries with high power density. This work focuses on the interface between LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NMC) and NASICON-structured Li+ conductive glass ceramics solid electrolyte (Li2Osbnd Al2O3sbnd SiO2sbnd P2O5sbnd TiO2sbnd GeO2: LATP sheet (AG-01)), and investigates the effects of sintering temperature on interfacial structure and interfacial resistance at the NMC/LATP sheet. Thin films of NMC were fabricated on the LATP sheets at 700 °C or 900 °C as a model system. We found that the thickness of the mutual diffusion region was almost the same, ca. 30 nm, in these two samples, but the NMC film prepared at 900 °C had three orders of magnitude larger interfacial resistance than the NMC film prepared at 700 °C. Around the interface between the NMC film prepared at 900 °C and the LATP sheet, Co in the NMC accumulates as a reduced valence and lithium-free impurity crystalline phase will be also formed. These two problems must contribute to drastic increasing of interfacial resistance. Formation of de-lithiated NMC around the interface and its thermal instability at higher temperature may be considerable reason to induce these problems.

  20. Structural alterations of fully hydrated human stratum corneum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charalambopoulou, G.Ch.; Steriotis, Th.A.; Hauss, Th.; Stubos, A.K.; Kanellopoulos, N.K

    2004-07-15

    The diffusional barrier function of skin is associated with the superficial epidermal layer, the stratum corneum, a highly complex biomembrane consisting of a staggered corneocyte arrangement in a lipid lamellar continuum. One of the key elements for stratum corneum barrier function is its hydration state. In the present work, the membrane neutron diffraction method is employed to reveal important stratum corneum structural changes that emanate upon water uptake. Increasing stratum corneum water content was observed to lead reversibly to the progressive disruption of the highly ordered lipid configuration and the distortion of the system's barrier functio000.

  1. Interfacial crystalline structures in injection over-molded polypropylene and bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bowen; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Genjie; Guo, Shaoyun; Huang, Jian

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes interfacial crystalline structures found in injection overmolded polypropylene components and the relationship of these structures to bond strength between the components. The combined effects of the development of hierarchical gradient structures and the particular thermomechanical environment near the interface on the interfacial crystalline structures were investigated in detail by PLM, SEM, DSC, WAXD, and infrared dichroism spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that during molding there was competitive formation of interfacial crystalline structures consisted of "shish-kebab" layer (SKL) and a transcrystalline layers (TCL). Variation in shear stress (controlled by injection pressure and injection speed) plays an important role in the formation of the SKL. The formation of TCL is influenced by the thermal environment, namely melt temperature and mold temperature. Increasing within certain limits, interfacial temperature and the thermal gradient near the interface promotes β-iPP growth. The relationship between interfacial crystalline structures and interfacial bond strength was established by lap shear measurement. The interfacial bond strength is improved by enhancing the formation of TCL, but reduced if SKL predominates.

  2. Interfacial structures of acidic and basic aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, C.; Ji, N.; Waychunas, G.; Shen, Y.R.

    2008-10-20

    Phase-sensitive sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy was used to study water/vapor interfaces of HCl, HI, and NaOH solutions. The measured imaginary part of the surface spectral responses provided direct characterization of OH stretch vibrations and information about net polar orientations of water species contributing to different regions of the spectrum. We found clear evidence that hydronium ions prefer to emerge at interfaces. Their OH stretches contribute to the 'ice-like' band in the spectrum. Their charges create a positive surface field that tends to reorient water molecules more loosely bonded to the topmost water layer with oxygen toward the interface, and thus enhances significantly the 'liquid-like' band in the spectrum. Iodine ions in solution also like to appear at the interface and alter the positive surface field by forming a narrow double-charge layer with hydronium ions. In NaOH solution, the observed weak change of the 'liquid-like' band and disappearance of the 'ice-like' band in the spectrum indicates that OH{sup -} ions must also have excess at the interface. How they are incorporated in the interfacial water structure is however not clear.

  3. Albumin-mediated deposition of bone-like apatite onto nano-sized surfaces: Effect of surface reactivity and interfacial hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Elia, Noelia L; Gravina, Noel; Ruso, Juan M; Marco-Brown, Jose L; Sieben, Juan M; Messina, Paula V

    2017-05-15

    The bioactivity of an implant is displayed on its ability to induce heterogeneous nucleation of biogenic apatite onto its surface upon immersion in body fluids; forming, through this layer, a stable bond with the host tissue. The present article evaluates the bioactivity of different nanostructured substrates based on synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA) and titania (TiO2) nanoparticles, where we extend the debate regarding the selective roles played by the presence of albumin on the biogenic apatite coating evolution. The substrates bone-bonding potential was evaluated by keeping the materials in contact with Simulated Body Fluid, while the influence of the presence of Bovine Serum Albumin in bioactivity was analyzed by a spectrophotometric technique. Our results show that materials' surface reactivity and their interfacial hydration are responsible for the bonding-site alteration and surface charge density distribution, which in turn, regulate the protein adsorption process. As a matter of fact, variations on the protein adsorbed density have a directly proportional impact on calcium binding sites, which should be responsible for the initiation of the mineralization process, disturbing the deposition of the interfacial calcium phosphate (Ca-P) mineralized coating. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Formation process of structure 1 and 2 gas hydrates discovered in Kukuy, Lake Baikal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachikubo, A.; Sakagami, H.; Minami, H.; Nunokawa, Y.; Yamashita, S.; Takahashi, N.; Shoji, H. [Kitami Inst. of Technology, Kitami (Japan); Kida, M. [Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Toyohira-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Krylov, A. [All-Russia Research Inst. for Geology and Mineral Resources of the Ocean, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Khlystov, O.; Zemskaya, T. [Limnological Inst., Irkutsk (Russian Federation); Manakov, A. [Nikolaev Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kalmychkov, G. [Vinogradov Inst. of Geochemistry, Irkutsk (Russian Federation); Poort, J. [Ghent Univ., Krijgslaan (Belgium). Renard Centre of Marine Geology

    2008-07-01

    This study investigated the formation process of different crystal structures of gas hydrates found in Kukuy K-2, Lake Baikal, Russia. Gas compositions and isotopic ratios were taken from hydrate-bound gas and from dissolved gas in sediments by a headspace gas method. Structure 1 and 2 gas hydrates were observed in the same sediment cores of a mud volcano in the Kukuy Canyon, Lake Baikal. This paper discussed the results of the observations. The structure 2 gas hydrate contained about 13-15 per cent ethane, whereas the structure 1 gas hydrate contained about 1-5 per cent ethane and was placed beneath the structure 2 gas hydrate. The paper discussed the measurement of isotopic composition of dissociation gas from both type gas hydrates and dissolved gas in pore water. The paper also reported on these results. It was concluded that the current gas dissolved in pore water was not the source of these gas hydrates of both crystal structures in Kukuy K-2 mud volcano in Lake Baikal. In addition, isotopic data also provided useful information on how the double structure gas hydrates formed. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Structure-activity relationships in carbohydrates revealed by their hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugeri, Laura; Busch, Sebastian; McLain, Sylvia E; Pardo, Luis Carlos; Bruni, Fabio; Ricci, Maria Antonietta

    2016-12-21

    One of the more intriguing aspects of carbohydrate chemistry is that despite having very similar molecular structures, sugars have very different properties. For instance, there is a sensible difference in sweet taste between glucose and trehalose, even though trehalose is a disaccharide that comprised two glucose units, suggesting a different ability of these two carbohydrates to bind to sweet receptors. Here we have looked at the hydration of specific sites and at the three-dimensional configuration of water molecules around three carbohydrates (glucose, cellobiose, and trehalose), combining neutron diffraction data with computer modelling. Results indicate that identical chemical groups can have radically different hydration patterns depending on their location on a given molecule. These differences can be linked with the specific activity of glucose, cellobiose, and trehalose as a sweet substance, as building block of cellulose fiber, and as a bioprotective agent, respectively. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Recent Advances in Bionanomaterials" Guest Editors: Dr. Marie-Louise Saboungi and Dr. Samuel D. Bader.

  6. Spectral and structural studies of dimethylphenyl betaine hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szafran, M.; Ostrowska, K.; Katrusiak, A.; Dega-Szafran, Z.

    2014-07-01

    Hydrates of betaines can be divided into four groups depending on the interactions of their water molecules with the carboxylate group. Dimethylphenyl betaine crystallizes as monohydrate (1), in which water molecules mediate in hydrogen bonds between the carboxylate groups. The water molecules are H-bonded only to one oxygen atom of the dimethylphenyl betaine molecules and link them into a chain via two O(1 W)sbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds of the lengths 2.779(2) and 2.846(2) Å. The structures of monomer (2) and dimer (4) hydrates in vacuum, and the structure of monomer (3) in an aqueous environment have been optimized by the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) approach and the geometrical results have been compared with the X-ray diffraction data of 1. The calculated IR frequencies for the optimized structure have been used for the assignments of FTIR bands, the broad absorption band in the range 3415-3230 cm-1 has been assigned to the O(1w)sbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The correlations between the experimental 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts (δexp) of 1 in D2O and the magnetic isotropic shielding constants (σcalc) calculated by the GIAO/B3LYP/6-311G++(d,p) approach, using the screening solvation model (COSMO), δexp = a + b σcalc, for optimized molecule 3 in water solution are linear and well reproduce the experimental chemical shifts.

  7. Morphology, crystal structure and hydration of calcined and modified anhydrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-qing Niu; Ji-chun Chen

    2014-01-01

    The effects of calcination and modification on the morphology (shapes and textures) and crystal structure of anhydrite powders were studied. The results show that, calcination at 100°C causes anhydrite to disintegrate into smaller crystals, accompanied by a slight in-crease in d-spacing. Without calcination and modification, the solidification time and curing time of anhydrite are 15 and 77 h, respectively. After the treatment, however, the solidification time and curing time are shortened significantly to 9.5 and 14 min, respectively. The com-pressive and flexural strengths of hydration products made from the treated anhydrite reach 10.2 and 2.0 MPa, respectively. The much shorter solidification and curing time make it possible to use anhydrite as a building and construction material.

  8. Structural and functional properties of hydration and confined water in membrane interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disalvo, E A; Lairion, F; Martini, F; Tymczyszyn, E; Frías, M; Almaleck, H; Gordillo, G J

    2008-12-01

    The scope of the present review focuses on the interfacial properties of cell membranes that may establish a link between the membrane and the cytosolic components. We present evidences that the current view of the membrane as a barrier of permeability that contains an aqueous solution of macromolecules may be replaced by one in which the membrane plays a structural and functional role. Although this idea has been previously suggested, the present is the first systematic work that puts into relevance the relation water-membrane in terms of thermodynamic and structural properties of the interphases that cannot be ignored in the understanding of cell function. To pursue this aim, we introduce a new definition of interphase, in which the water is organized in different levels on the surface with different binding energies. Altogether determines the surface free energy necessary for the structural response to changes in the surrounding media. The physical chemical properties of this region are interpreted in terms of hydration water and confined water, which explain the interaction with proteins and could affect the modulation of enzyme activity. Information provided by several methodologies indicates that the organization of the hydration states is not restricted to the membrane plane albeit to a region extending into the cytoplasm, in which polar head groups play a relevant role. In addition, dynamic properties studied by cyclic voltammetry allow one to deduce the energetics of the conformational changes of the lipid head group in relation to the head-head interactions due to the presence of carbonyls and phosphates at the interphase. These groups are, apparently, surrounded by more than one layer of water molecules: a tightly bound shell, that mostly contributes to the dipole potential, and a second one that may be displaced by proteins and osmotic stress. Hydration water around carbonyl and phosphate groups may change by the presence of polyhydroxylated compounds

  9. Hydration and hydrolysis of thorium(IV) in aqueous solution and the structures of two crystalline thorium(IV) hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torapava, Natallia; Persson, Ingmar; Eriksson, Lars; Lundberg, Daniel

    2009-12-21

    Solid octaaqua(kappa(2)O-perchlorato)thorium(IV) perchlorate hydrate, [Th(H(2)O)(8)(ClO(4))](ClO(4))(3).H(2)O, 1, and aquaoxonium hexaaquatris(kappaO-trifluoromethanesulfonato)thorium(IV) trisaquahexakis(kappaO-trifluoromethanesulfonato)thorinate(IV), H(5)O(2)[Th(H(2)O)(6)(OSO(2)CF(3))(3)][Th(H(2)O)(3)(OSO(2)CF(3))(6)], 2, were crystallized from concentrated perchloric and trifluoromethanesulfonic acid solutions, respectively. 1 adopts a severely distorted tricapped trigonal prismatic configuration with an additional oxygen from the perchlorate ion at a longer distance. 2 consists of individual hexaaquatris(kappaO-trifluoromethanesulfonato)thorium(IV) and trisaquahexakis(kappaO-trifluoromethanesulfonato)thorinate(IV) ions and an aquaoxonium ion bridging these two ions through hydrogen bonding. The hydrated thorium(IV) ion is nine-coordinated in aqueous solution as determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS). The LAXS studies also showed a second hydration sphere of about 18 water molecules, and traces of a 3rd hydration sphere. Structural studies in aqueous solution of the hydrolysis products of thorium(IV) have identified three different types of hydrolysis species: a mu(2)O-hydroxo dimer, [Th(2)(OH)(2)(H(2)O)(12)](6+), a mu(2)O-hydroxo tetramer, [Th(4)(OH)(8)(H(2)O)(16)](8+), and a mu(3)O-oxo hexamer, [Th(6)O(8)(H(2)O)(n)](8+). Detailed structures of these three hydrolysis species are given. A compilation of reported solid state structures of actinoid(IV) compounds with oxygen donor ligands show a strong correlation between the An-O bond distance and the coordination number. The earlier reported U-O bond distance in the hydrated uranium(IV) ion in aqueous solution, confirmed in this study, is related to nine-coordination. The hydrated tri- and tetravalent actinoid ions in aqueous solution all seem to be nine-coordinated. The trivalent ions show a significant difference in bond distance to prismatic and

  10. Phase Behaviour and Structural Aspects of Ternary Clathrate Hydrate Systems. The Role of Additives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooijer-Van den Heuvel, M.M.

    2004-01-01

    In this study an experimental and modelling approach is applied to obtain fundamental insight into the phase behaviour of ternary systems, in which clathrate hydrates are formed. Proper interpretation of the phase behaviour requires knowledge on the clathrate hydrate structure in these systems, whic

  11. Effects of cyclic structure inhibitors on the morphology and growth of tetrahydrofuran hydrate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sijia; Wang, Yanhong; Lang, Xuemei; Fan, Shuanshi

    2013-08-01

    Morphology and growth of hydrate crystals with cyclic structure inhibitors at a hydrate-liquid interface were directly observed through a microscopic manipulating apparatus. Tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate was employed as an objective. The effects of four kind of cyclic structure inhibitors, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone-co-2-vinyl pyridine) (PVPP), poly(2-vinyl pyridine-co-N-vinylcaprolactam) (PVPC) and poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) (PVCap), were investigated. Morphological patterns between each hydrate crystal growth from hydrate-liquid interface into droplet were found differ significantly. Lamellar structure growth of hydrate crystal was observed without inhibitor, while with PVP was featheriness-like, PVPP was like long dendritic crystal, PVPC was Mimosa pudica leaf-like and PVCap was like weeds. The growth rate of hydrate crystal without inhibitor was 0.00498 mm3/s, while with PVPP, PVPC and PVCap, were 0.00339 mm3/s, 0.00350 mm3/s, 0.00386 mm3/s and 0.00426 mm3/s, respectively. Cyclic structure inhibitors can decrease the growth rate, degree of reduction in growth rate of hydrate crystals decrease with the increase of cylinder number.

  12. Structures and ultrafast dynamics of interfacial water assemblies on smooth hydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ding-Shyue; He, Xing

    2017-09-01

    Using time-averaged and ultrafast electron diffraction, structures and ultrafast dynamics of interfacial water assemblies on smooth hydrophobic surfaces are reported. The lack of hydrophilic interaction and topographical template effect from the support surface leads to the formation of small, mostly randomly-oriented, ice crystallites with the cubic structure. Dynamically, following the substrate photoexcitation, interfacial water assemblies undergo four stages of changes-ultrafast melting, nonequilibrium isotropic phase transformation, annealing, and restructuring-which are closely correlated with the substrate dynamics. The connectivity and cooperative nature of the hydrogen-bonded network is considered crucial for water assemblies to withstand large structural motions without sublimation on ultrashort times.

  13. Two-phase flow interfacial structures in a rod bundle geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjape, Sidharth S.

    Interfacial structure of air-water two-phase flow in a scaled nuclear reactor rod bundle geometry was studied in this research. Global and local flow regimes were obtained for the rod bundle geometry. Local two-phase flow parameters were measured at various axial locations in order to understand the transport of interfacial structures. A one-dimensional two-group interfacial area transport model was evaluated using the local parameter database. Air-water two-phase flow experiments were performed in an 8 X 8 rod bundle test section to obtain flow regime maps at various axial locations. Area averaged void fraction was measured using parallel plate type impedance void meters. The cumulative probability distribution functions of the signals from the impedance void meters were used along with a self organizing neural network to identify flow regimes. Local flow regime maps revealed the cross-sectional distribution of flow regimes in the bundle. Local parameters that characterize interfacial structure, that is, void fraction alpha, interfacial area concentration, ai, bubble Sauter mean diameter, DSm and bubble velocity, vg were measured using four sensor conductivity probe technique. The local data revealed the distribution of the interfacial structure in the radial direction, as well as its development in the axial direction. In addition to this, the effect of spacer grid on the flow structure at different gas and liquid velocities was revealed by local parameter measurements across the spacer grids. A two-group interfacial area transport equation (IATE) specific to rod bundle geometry was derived. The derivation of two-group IATE required certain assumption on the bubble shapes in the subchannels and the bubbles spanning more than a subchannel. It was found that the geometrical relationship between the volume and the area of a cap bubble distorted by rods was similar to the one derived for a confined channel under a specific geometrical transformation. The one

  14. Long-Range Domain Structure and Symmetry Engineering by Interfacial Oxygen Octahedral Coupling at Heterostructure Interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liao, Z.; Green, R.J.; Gauquelin, N.; Macke, S.; Li, L.; Gonnissen, J.; Sutarto, R.; Houwman, E.P.; Zhong, Z.; Aert, van S.; Verbeeck, J.; Sawatzky, G.A.; Huijben, M.; Koster, G.; Rijnders, A.J.H.M.

    2016-01-01

    In epitaxial thin film systems, the crystal structure and its symmetry deviate from the bulk counterpart due to various mechanisms such as epitaxial strain and interfacial structural coupling, which is accompanyed by a change in their properties. In perovskite materials, the crystal symmetry can be

  15. The Hydration Structure of Carbon Monoxide by Ab Initio Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Awoonor-Williams, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    The solvation of carbon monoxide (CO) in liquid water is important for understanding its toxicological effects and biochemical roles. In this paper, we use ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and CCSD(T)-F12 calculations to assess the accuracy of the Straub and Karplus molecular mechanical (MM) model for CO(aq). The CCSD(T)-F12 CO--H2O potential energy surfaces show that the most stable structure corresponds to water donating a hydrogen bond to the C center. The MM-calculated surface it incorrectly predicts that the O atom is a stronger hydrogen bond acceptor than the C atom. The AIMD simulations indicate that CO is solvated like a hydrophobic solute, with very limited hydrogen bonding with water. The MM model tends to overestimate the degree of hydrogen bonding and overestimates the atomic radius of the C atom. The calculated Gibbs energy of hydration is in good agreement with experiment (9.3 kJ/mol calc. vs 10.7 kJ/mol exptl.). The calculated diffusivity of CO(aq) in TIP3P-model water was 5.19 x 10-5 cm2/s ...

  16. Relation between the Rheology Characteristic and Initial Hydration Structure of Portland Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on the rheology characteristic and the resistivity variation under alternating electric-field of Portland cement hydration by means of AR2000 advanced rheometer and non-contacting electrical resistivity device, the influence of cement kinds and the chemical admixtures on the initial rheology characteristic and structure forming and developing of cement hydration was studied. The relationship between the rheology characteristic, the initial hydration structure forming and the hydration process at very early ages was analyzed by macro properties and microstructure tests. The results showed that, the storage modulus, acted as S, could be described more subtle distinction accompanying with hydration of fresh paste model at very early period. Combining the resistivity alterations, a sudden change on structure forming emerged when the hydration of cement becoming inducing age. The rheology characteristic was interrelated to the hydration structure forming, development and the physical mechanics properties. The sudden change on storage modulus moved up due to the addition of retarder, but the structure forming and developing was retarded to a certain extent.

  17. Inner Structure of Boiling Nucleus and Interfacial Energy Between Nucleus and Bulk Liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Dong; TIAN Yong; PENG Xiao-Feng; WANG Bu-Xuan

    2004-01-01

    @@ A model of two-region structure of a nucleus is proposed to describe nucleus evolution. The interfacial tension between bulk liquid phase and nucleus is dependent on the density gradient in the transition region and varies with the structure change of the transition region. With the interfacial tension calculated using this model, the predicted nucleation rate is very close to the experimental measurement. Furthermore, this model and associated analysis provide solid theoretical evidence to clarify the definition of nucleation rate and understand the nucleation phenomenon with insight into the physical nature.

  18. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Vlasic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work uses density functional theory (DFT to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane, at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  19. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2016-08-01

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  20. Structures and energetics of hydrated oxygen anion clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipman, Daniel M; Bentley, John

    2005-08-25

    Hydration of the atomic oxygen radical anion is studied with computational electronic structure methods, considering (O(-))(H(2)O)(n) clusters and related proton-transferred (OH(-))(OH)(H(2)O)(n)(-)(1) clusters having n = 1-5. A total of 67 distinct local-minimum structures having various interesting hydrogen bonding motifs are obtained and analyzed. On the basis of the most stable form of each type, (O(-))(H(2)O)(n)) clusters are energetically favored, although for n > or = 3, there is considerable overlap in energy between other members of the (O(-))(H(2)O)(n) family and various members of the (OH(-))(OH)(H(2)O)(n)(-)(1) family. In the lower-energy (O(-))(H(2)O)(n) clusters, the hydrogen bonding arrangement about the oxygen anion center tends to be planar, leaving the oxygen anion p-like orbital containing the unpaired electron uninvolved in hydrogen bonding with any water molecule. In (OH(-))(OH)(H(2)O)(n)(-)(1) clusters, on the other hand, nonplanar arrangements are the rule about the anionic oxygen center that accepts hydrogen bonds. No instances are found of OH(-) acting as a hydrogen bond donor. Those OH bonds that form hydrogen bonds to an anionic O(-) or OH(-) center are significantly stretched from their equilibrium value in isolated water or hydroxyl. A quantitative inverse correlation is established for all hydrogen bonds between the amount of the OH bond stretch and the distance to the other oxygen involved in the hydrogen bond.

  1. Structure and orientation of interfacial proteins determined by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy: method and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shuji; Wei, Feng; Li, Hongchun; Tian, Kangzhen; Luo, Yi

    2013-01-01

    In situ and real-time characterization of molecular structures and orientation of proteins at interfaces is essential to understand the nature of interfacial protein interaction. Such work will undoubtedly provide important clues to control biointerface in a desired manner. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) has been demonstrated to be a powerful technique to study the interfacial structures and interactions at the molecular level. This paper first systematically introduced the methods for the calculation of the Raman polarizability tensor, infrared transition dipole moment, and SFG molecular hyperpolarizability tensor elements of proteins/peptides with the secondary structures of α-helix, 310-helix, antiparallel β-sheet, and parallel β-sheet, as well as the methodology to determine the orientation of interfacial protein secondary structures using SFG amide I spectra. After that, recent progresses on the determination of protein structure and orientation at different interfaces by SFG-VS were then reviewed, which provides a molecular-level understanding of the structures and interactions of interfacial proteins, specially understanding the nature of driving force behind such interactions. Although this review has focused on analysis of amide I spectra, it will be expected to offer a basic idea for the spectral analysis of amide III SFG signals and other complicated molecular systems such as RNA and DNA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Asymmetric hydration structure around calcium ion restricted in micropores fabricated in activated carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, Takahiro; Kusudo, Tomoko; Kuroda, Yasushige

    2016-11-01

    The adsorbed phase and hydration structure of an aqueous solution of Ca(NO3)2 restricted in micropores fabricated in activated carbons (ACs) having different average pore widths (0.63 and 1.1 nm) were investigated with the analysis of adsorption isotherms and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra on Ca K-edge. The adsorbed density of Ca2+ per unit micropore volume in the narrower pore was higher than in the wider pore, while the adsorbed amount per unit mass of carbon with the narrower pore was half of the amount of ACs with the larger pore. On the other hand, variations in the bands assigned to double-electron (KM I) and 1s  →  3d excitations in XAFS spectra demonstrate the formation of a distorted hydration cluster around Ca2+ in the micropore, although the structural parameters of hydrated Ca2+ in the micropores were almost consistent with the bulk aqueous solution, as revealed by the analysis of extended XAFS (EXAFS) spectra. In contrast to the hydration structure of monovalent ions such as Rb+, which generally presents a dehydrated structure in smaller than 1 nm micropores in ACs, the present study clearly explains that the non-spherically-symmetric structure of hydrated Ca2+ restricted in carbon micropores whose sizes are around 1 nm is experimentally revealed where any dehydration phenomena from the first hydration shell around Ca2+ could not be observed.

  3. Correlation Between Interfacial Structure and Toughness in SiC-Al Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yaru; Guo, Qiang; Guo, Xiaolei; Fan, Genlian; Li, Zhiqiang; Xiong, Ding-Bang; Su, Yishi; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Di

    2016-10-01

    Reinforcement surface modification is often used to improve the mechanical properties of particle-reinforced metal matrix composites, however, the extent to which such modifications affect the interfacial properties is yet to be revealed. In this study, we fabricated SiC-Al composite bilayers where the SiC underwent different surface treatments before Al deposition. Four-point bending tests showed that the samples made from acid-pickled and thermally oxidized SiC possessed substantially higher interfacial toughness than their untreated counterpart, a presumption inferred from mechanical tests on bulk SiCp-Al composites but never justified quantitatively. These findings were rationalized by the different interfacial constituents and structure in these samples.

  4. Interfacial structures of confined air-water two-phase bubbly flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.; Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; McCreary, D.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-08-01

    The interfacial structure of the two-phase flows is of great importance in view of theoretical modeling and practical applications. In the present study, the focus is made on obtaining detailed local two-phase parameters in the air-water bubbly flow in a rectangular vertical duct using the double-sensor conductivity probe. The characteristic wall-peak is observed in the profiles of the interracial area concentration and the void fraction. The development of the interfacial area concentration along the axial direction of the flow is studied in view of the interfacial area transport and bubble interactions. The experimental data is compared with the drift flux model with C{sub 0} = 1.35.

  5. Phase transitions, interfacial fluctuations and hidden symmetries for fluids near structured walls

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A O Parry; J M Romero-Enrique

    2005-05-01

    Fluids adsorbed at micro-patterned and geometrically structured substrates can exhibit novel phase transitions and interfacial fluctuation effects distinct from those characteristic of wetting at planar, homogeneous walls. We review recent theoretical progress in this area paying particular attention to filling transitions pertinent to fluid adsorption near wedges, which have highlighted a deep connection between geometrical and contact angles. We show that filling transitions are not only characterized by large scale interfacial fluctuations leading to universal critical singularities but also reveal hidden symmetries with short-ranged critical wetting transitions and properties of dimensional reduction. We propose a non-local interfacial model which fulfills all these properties and throws light on long-standing problems regarding the order of the 3D short-range critical wetting transition.

  6. Crystal structure and encapsulation dynamics of ice II-structured neon hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaohui; Zhu, Jinlong; Du, Shiyu; Xu, Hongwu; Vogel, Sven C; Han, Jiantao; Germann, Timothy C; Zhang, Jianzhong; Jin, Changqing; Francisco, Joseph S; Zhao, Yusheng

    2014-07-22

    Neon hydrate was synthesized and studied by in situ neutron diffraction at 480 MPa and temperatures ranging from 260 to 70 K. For the first time to our knowledge, we demonstrate that neon atoms can be enclathrated in water molecules to form ice II-structured hydrates. The guest Ne atoms occupy the centers of D2O channels and have substantial freedom of movement owing to the lack of direct bonding between guest molecules and host lattices. Molecular dynamics simulation confirms that the resolved structure where Ne dissolved in ice II is thermodynamically stable at 480 MPa and 260 K. The density distributions indicate that the vibration of Ne atoms is mainly in planes perpendicular to D2O channels, whereas their distributions along the channels are further constrained by interactions between adjacent Ne atoms.

  7. Hydrates of natural gases and small molecules: structures, properties, and exploitation perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Guido; Chianese, Elena

    2009-01-01

    Starting from the discovery, in the mid-1930s, that petroleum pipelines in the colder regions of the Northern hemisphere contained crusts of some crystals, and were often blocked by them, a short history of the development of research on the structures, properties, and possible exploitation of the class of inclusion compounds known as gas hydrates is given. The state of the assessment of the natural reservoirs and their perspectives for exploitation are presented, together with an analysis of the hypotheses on the origins of the hydrates. Finally, the phase diagrams are shown in relation to environmental problems arising from the instability of the hydrate fields due to global warming or geological activity.

  8. Polymer electrolyte membranes from fluorinated polyisoprene-block-sulfonated polystyrene: Structural evolution with hydration and heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sodeye, Akinbode [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts; Huang, Tianzi [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Gido, Samuel [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) have been used to study the structural changes in fluorinated polyisoprene/sulfonated polystyrene (FISS) diblock copolymers as they evolved from the dry state to the water swollen state. A dilation of the nanometer-scale hydrophilic domains has been observed as hydration increased, with greater dilation occurring in the more highly sulfonated samples or upon hydration at higher temperatures. Furthermore, a decrease in the order in these phase separated structures is observed upon swelling. The glass transition temperatures of the fluorinated blocks have been observed to decrease upon hydration of these materials, and at the highest hydration levels, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has shown the presence of tightly bound water. A precipitous drop in the mechanical integrity of the 50% sulfonated materials is also observed upon exceeding the glass transition temperature (Tg), as measured by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA).

  9. Model Analysis of Initial Hydration and Structure Forming of Portland Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The auto efficiently hydration heat arrangement and the non-contacting electrical resistivity device were used to test the thermology effect and the resistivity variation of Portland cement hydration.The structure forming model of Portland cement initial hydration was established through the systematical experiments with different cements, the amount of mixing water and the chemical admixture. The experimental results show that, the structure forming model of cement could be divided into three stages, i e, solution-solution equilibrium period, structure forming period and structure stabilizing period. Along with the increase of mixing water, the time of inflexion appeared is in advance for thermal process of cement hydration and worsened for the structure forming process. Comparison with the control specimen, adding Na2SO4 makes the minimum critical point lower, the flattening period shorter and the growing slope after stage one steeper. So the hydration and structure forming process of Portland cement could be described more exactly by applying the thermal model and the structure-forming model.

  10. Dentin-cement Interfacial Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmeh, A.R.; Chong, E.Z.; Richard, G.; Festy, F.; Watson, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    The interfacial properties of a new calcium-silicate-based coronal restorative material (Biodentine™) and a glass-ionomer cement (GIC) with dentin have been studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and two-photon auto-fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging. Results indicate the formation of tag-like structures alongside an interfacial layer called the “mineral infiltration zone”, where the alkaline caustic effect of the calcium silicate cement’s hydration products degrades the collagenous component of the interfacial dentin. This degradation leads to the formation of a porous structure which facilitates the permeation of high concentrations of Ca2+, OH-, and CO32- ions, leading to increased mineralization in this region. Comparison of the dentin-restorative interfaces shows that there is a dentin-mineral infiltration with the Biodentine, whereas polyacrylic and tartaric acids and their salts characterize the penetration of the GIC. A new type of interfacial interaction, “the mineral infiltration zone”, is suggested for these calcium-silicate-based cements. PMID:22436906

  11. Interfacial stress balances in structured continua and free surface flows in ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaves, Arlex [School of Chemical Engineering, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Calle 9 Cra. 27, Edificio 24, Bucaramanga, Santander (Colombia); Rinaldi, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA and Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Interfacial linear and internal angular momentum balances are obtained for a structured continuum and for the special case of a ferrofluid, a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles in a Newtonian fluid. The interfacial balance equations account for the effects of surface tension and surface tension gradient, magnetic surface excess forces, antisymmetric stresses, and couple stresses in driving interfacial flows in ferrofluids. Application of the interfacial balance equations is illustrated by obtaining analytical expressions for the translational and spin velocity profiles in a thin film of ferrofluid on an infinite flat plate when a rotating magnetic field is applied with axis of rotation parallel to the ferrofluid/air interface. The cases of zero and non-zero spin viscosity are considered for small applied magnetic field amplitude. Expressions for the maximum translational velocity, slope of the translational velocity profile at the ferrofluid/air interface, and volumetric flow rate are obtained and their use to test the relevance of spin viscosity and couple stresses in the flow situation under consideration is discussed.

  12. Interfacial design and structure of protein/polymer films on oxidized AlGaN surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Samit K; Casal, Patricia; Nicholson III, Theodore R; Lee, Stephen Craig [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Wu, Hao-Hsuan; Wen Xuejin; Anisha, R; Berger, Paul R; Lu, Wu; Brillson, Leonard J [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Kwak, Kwang J; Bhushan, Bharat, E-mail: lee.1996@osu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2011-01-26

    Protein detection using biologically or immunologically modified field-effect transistors (bio/immunoFETs) depends on the nanoscale structure of the polymer/protein film at sensor interfaces (Bhushan 2010 Springer Handbook of Nanotechnology 3rd edn (Heidelberg: Springer); Gupta et al 2010 The effect of interface modification on bioFET sensitivity, submitted). AlGaN-based HFETs (heterojunction FETs) are attractive platforms for many protein sensing applications due to their electrical stability in high osmolarity aqueous environments and favourable current drive capabilities. However, interfacial polymer/protein films on AlGaN, though critical to HFET protein sensor function, have not yet been fully characterized. These interfacial films are typically comprised of protein-polymer films, in which analyte-specific receptors are tethered to the sensing surface with a heterobifunctional linker molecule (often a silane molecule). Here we provide insight into the structure and tribology of silane interfaces composed of one of two different silane monomers deposited on oxidized AlGaN, and other metal oxide surfaces. We demonstrate distinct morphologies and wear properties for the interfacial films, attributable to the specific chemistries of the silane monomers used in the films. For each specific silane monomer, film morphologies and wear are broadly consistent on multiple oxide surfaces. Differences in interfacial film morphology also drive improvements in sensitivity of the underlying HFET (coincident with, though not necessarily caused by, differences in interfacial film thickness). We present a testable model of the hypothetical differential interfacial depth distribution of protein analytes on FET sensor interfaces with distinct morphologies. Empirical validation of this model may rationalize the actual behaviour of planar immunoFETs, which has been shown to be contrary to expectations of bio/immunoFET behaviour prevalent in the literature for the last 20 years

  13. Influences of interfacial properties on second-harmonic generation of Lamb waves propagating in layered planar structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Mingxi [College of Automation, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China); Wang Ping [College of Automation, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China); Lv Xiafu [College of Automation, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China)

    2006-07-21

    This paper describes influences of interfacial properties on second-harmonic generation of Lamb waves propagating in layered planar structures. The nonlinearity in the elastic wave propagation is treated as a second-order perturbation of the linear elastic response. Due to the kinematic nonlinearity and the elastic nonlinearity of materials, there are second-order bulk and surface/interface driving sources in layered planar structures through which Lamb waves propagate. These driving sources can be thought of as forcing functions of a series of double frequency lamb waves (DFLWs) in terms of the approach of modal expansion analysis for waveguide excitation. The total second-harmonic fields consist of a summation of DFLWs in the corresponding stress-free layered planar structures. The interfacial properties of layered planar structures can be described by the well-known finite interfacial stiffness technique. The normal and tangential interfacial stiffness constants can be coupled with the equation governing the expansion coefficient of each DFLW component. On the other hand, the normal and tangential interfacial stiffness constants are associated with the degree of dispersion between Lamb waves and DFLWs. Theoretical analyses and numerical simulations indicate that the efficiency of second-harmonic generation by Lamb wave propagation is closely dependent on the interfacial properties of layered structures. The potential of using the effect of second-harmonic generation by Lamb wave propagation to characterize the interfacial properties of layered structures are considered. Some experimental results are presented.

  14. Influence of a Neighboring Charged Group on Hydrophobic Hydration Shell Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Joel G; Zukowski, Samual R; Rankin, Blake M; Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2015-07-23

    Raman multivariate curve resolution (Raman-MCR), as well as quantum and classical calculations, are used to probe water structural changes in the hydration shells of carboxylic acids and tetraalkyl ammonium ions with various aliphatic chain lengths. The results reveal that water molecules in the hydration shell around the hydrophobic chains undergo a temperature and chain length dependent structural transformation resembling that previously observed in aqueous solutions of n-alcohols. Deprotonation of the carboxylic acid headgroup (at pH ∼ 7) is found to suppress the onset of the hydration-shell structural transformation around the nearest aliphatic methylene group. Tetraalkyl ammonium cations are found to more strongly suppress the water structural transformation, perhaps reflecting the greater intramolecular charge delocalization and suppression of dangling OH defects in water's tetrahedral H-bond network. The observed coupling between ionic and hydrophobic groups, as well as the associated charge asymmetry, may influence the hydrophobicity of proteins and other materials.

  15. Neutron powder diffraction studies as a function of temperature of structure II hydrate formed from propane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawn, C.J.; Rondinone, A.J.; Chakoumakos, B.C.; Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Ishii, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction data confirm that hydrate samples synthesized with propane crystallize as structure type II hydrate. The structure has been modeled using rigid-body constraints to describe C3H8 molecules located in the eight larger polyhedral cavities of a deuterated host lattice. Data were collected at 12, 40, 100, 130, 160, 190, 220, and 250 K and used to calculate the thermal expansivity from the temperature dependence of the lattice parameters. The data collected allowed for full structural refinement of atomic coordinates and the atomic-displacement parameters.

  16. Interfacial Atomic Structure of Twisted Few-Layer Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Lugg, Nathan R; Inoue, Kazutoshi; Sawada, Hidetaka; Taniguchi, Takashi; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-02-18

    A twist in bi- or few-layer graphene breaks the local symmetry, introducing a number of intriguing physical properties such as opening new bandgaps. Therefore, determining the twisted atomic structure is critical to understanding and controlling the functional properties of graphene. Combining low-angle annular dark-field electron microscopy with image simulations, we directly determine the atomic structure of twisted few-layer graphene in terms of a moiré superstructure which is parameterized by a single twist angle and lattice constant. This method is shown to be a powerful tool for accurately determining the atomic structure of two-dimensional materials such as graphene, even in the presence of experimental errors. Using coincidence-site-lattice and displacement-shift-complete theories, we show that the in-plane translation state between layers is not a significant structure parameter, explaining why the present method is adequate not only for bilayer graphene but also a few-layered twisted graphene.

  17. Interfacial Atomic Structure of Twisted Few-Layer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Lugg, Nathan R.; Inoue, Kazutoshi; Sawada, Hidetaka; Taniguchi, Takashi; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    A twist in bi- or few-layer graphene breaks the local symmetry, introducing a number of intriguing physical properties such as opening new bandgaps. Therefore, determining the twisted atomic structure is critical to understanding and controlling the functional properties of graphene. Combining low-angle annular dark-field electron microscopy with image simulations, we directly determine the atomic structure of twisted few-layer graphene in terms of a moiré superstructure which is parameterized by a single twist angle and lattice constant. This method is shown to be a powerful tool for accurately determining the atomic structure of two-dimensional materials such as graphene, even in the presence of experimental errors. Using coincidence-site-lattice and displacement-shift-complete theories, we show that the in-plane translation state between layers is not a significant structure parameter, explaining why the present method is adequate not only for bilayer graphene but also a few-layered twisted graphene.

  18. Identification of a mechanism of transformation of clathrate hydrate structures I to II or H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioki, Shuzo

    2012-07-01

    Binary mixed-gas hydrates including methane and other guest gases demonstrate a structural transition between the sI and sII phases. Under increasing pressure pure methane hydrate exhibits a phase transition first from sI to sII and then to sH. But the mechanism of the transformation from sI to sII or sH has not yet been identified. Recently, molecular dynamics simulations of methane hydrates suggest there may exist uncommon 15-hedral cages (5¹²6³), linking the sI and sII cages. In addition, xenon hydrate involving 15-hedral cages has been synthesized and named an hsI hydrate. Based on the hsI cages, we propose a mechanism for the transition of sI to sII or sH at atomic level resolution. The sI hydrate is first transformed to hsI, and hsI is further transformed to sII. Upon compression, hsI is transformed to sH owing to depletion of atomic layers. The mechanism of transformation speculated here calls for experimental verification.

  19. Dissociation behavior of methane--ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Masato; Jin, Yusuke; Takahashi, Nobuo; Nagao, Jiro; Narita, Hideo

    2010-09-09

    Dissociation behavior of methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II at constant temperatures less than 223 K was studied with use of powder X-ray diffraction and solid-state (13)C NMR techniques. The diffraction patterns at temperatures less than 203 K showed both structures I and II simultaneously convert to Ih during the dissociation, but the diffraction pattern at temperatures greater than 208 K showed different dissociation behavior between structures I and II. Although the diffraction peaks from structure II decreased during measurement at constant temperatures greater than 208 K, those from structure I increased at the initial step of dissociation and then disappeared. This anomalous behavior of the methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II was examined by using the (13)C NMR technique. The (13)C NMR spectra revealed that the anomalous behavior results from the formation of ethane-rich structure I. The structure I hydrate formation was associated with the dissociation rate of the initial methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate.

  20. First Principles Insight into the α-Glucan Structures of Starch: Their Synthesis, Conformation, and Hydration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damager, Iben; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Blennow, Per Gunnar Andreas

    2010-01-01

    A study was conducted to demonstrate the synthesis, conformation, and hydration of the α-glucan structures of starch. Starch and glycogen were synthesized by sets of specific enzyme activities that directly determined their molecular structures and physical properties. It was demonstrated that th...

  1. Hydration sites of unpaired RNA bases: a statistical analysis of the PDB structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carugo Oliviero

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydration is crucial for RNA structure and function. X-ray crystallography is the most commonly used method to determine RNA structures and hydration and, therefore, statistical surveys are based on crystallographic results, the number of which is quickly increasing. Results A statistical analysis of the water molecule distribution in high-resolution X-ray structures of unpaired RNA nucleotides showed that: different bases have the same penchant to be surrounded by water molecules; clusters of water molecules indicate possible hydration sites, which, in some cases, match those of the major and minor grooves of RNA and DNA double helices; complex hydrogen bond networks characterize the solvation of the nucleotides, resulting in a significant rigidity of the base and its surrounding water molecules. Interestingly, the hydration sites around unpaired RNA bases do not match, in general, the positions that are occupied by the second nucleotide when the base-pair is formed. Conclusions The hydration sites around unpaired RNA bases were found. They do not replicate the atom positions of complementary bases in the Watson-Crick pairs.

  2. The influence of porosity and structural parameters on different kinds of gas hydrate dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misyura, S Y

    2016-07-22

    Methane hydrate dissociation at negative temperatures was studied experimentally for different artificial and natural samples, differing by macro- and micro-structural parameters. Four characteristic dissociation types are discussed in the paper. The internal kinetics of artificial granule gas hydrates and clathrate hydrates in coal is dependent on the porosity, defectiveness and gas filtration rate. The density of pores distribution in the crust of formed ice decreases by the several orders of magnitude and this change significantly the rate of decay. Existing models for describing dissociation at negative temperatures do not take into account the structural parameters of samples. The dissociation is regulated by internal physical processes that must be considered in the simulation. Non-isothermal dissociation with constant external heat flux was simulated numerically. The dissociation is simulated with consideration of heat and mass transfer, kinetics of phase transformation and gas filtering through a porous medium of granules for the negative temperatures. It is shown that the gas hydrate dissociation in the presence of mainly microporous structures is fundamentally different from the disintegration of gas hydrates containing meso and macropores.

  3. Design of the Interfacial Chemistry and Structure of Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Zhi

    Carbon nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes and graphene have stiffness, strength, and toughness that are orders of magnitude greater than any currently used structural material, but these properties are limited to the nanoscale, and attempts to assemble these nanostructures into macroscopic composites only yield materials with relatively mediocre properties. This thesis reports an investigation into the design-mechanical property relationships of composite materials using graphene oxide nanosheets and graphene oxide composite films as a model carbon nanostructure and composite, respectively. The effects of chemical interactions on the mechanical behavior of the sheet-to-sheet interfaces in graphene oxide composites were investigated by introducing dense covalent cross-links between adjacent graphene oxide nanosheets using borate anions. These strong bonding interactions dramatically improve the strength of the interfaces within the graphene oxide composite films, increasing the stiffness of our films by over 300% to 127 GPa, which is only a factor of 2 less than that of the graphene oxide nanosheet itself. The effects of composite structure on the fracture behavior and strength of graphene oxide films were studied in multilayer laminate composite films fabricated by introducing thin layers of poly(methyl methacrylate) into the graphene oxide films via spin-assisted layer-by-layer deposition. The thin polymer layers are shown experimentally and computationally to impart defect tolerance by arresting cracks from propagate through the film. As a result, the measured strength of the films doubles and becomes independent of sample volume. A quantitative model for predicting the fracture of a multilayer laminate composite film based on its structure and the properties of its component layers was proposed and tested. A critical polymer layer thickness for enabling crack deflection was predicted and quantitatively established. While this critical thickness was verified

  4. Substituent effect on the thermodynamic solubility of structural analogs: relative contribution of crystal packing and hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Shunsuke; Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Shirai, Osamu; Kano, Kenji

    2014-11-01

    Thermodynamic analysis of the solubility of benzoylphenylurea (BPU) derivatives was conducted to investigate the relative importance of crystal packing and hydration for improving solubility with minor structural modification. The contribution of crystal packing to solubility was evaluated from the change in Gibbs energy on the transition from the crystalline to liquid state. Hydration Gibbs energy was estimated using a linear free-energy relationship between octanol-water partition coefficients and gas-water partition coefficients. The established solubility model satisfactorily explained the relative thermodynamic solubility of the model compounds and revealed that crystal packing and hydration equally controlled solubility of the structural analogs. All hydrophobic substituents were undesirable for solubility in terms of hydration, as expected. On the other hand, some of these hydrophobic substituents destabilized crystal packing and improved the solubility of the BPU derivatives when their impact on crystal packing exceeded their negative influence on hydration. The replacement of a single substituent could cause more than a 10-fold enhancement in thermodynamic solubility; this degree of improvement was comparable to that generally achieved by amorphous formulations. Detailed analysis of thermodynamic solubility will allow us to better understand the true substituent effect and design drug-like candidates efficiently.

  5. Clathrate structure-type recognition: Application to hydrate nucleation and crystallisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauricella, Marco; Meloni, Simone; Liang, Shuai; English, Niall J; Kusalik, Peter G; Ciccotti, Giovanni

    2015-06-28

    For clathrate-hydrate polymorphic structure-type (sI versus sII), geometric recognition criteria have been developed and validated. These are applied to the study of the rich interplay and development of both sI and sII motifs in a variety of hydrate-nucleation events for methane and H2S hydrate studied by direct and enhanced-sampling molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In the case of nucleation of methane hydrate from enhanced-sampling simulation, we notice that already at the transition state, ∼80% of the enclathrated CH4 molecules are contained in a well-structured (sII) clathrate-like crystallite. For direct MD simulation of nucleation of H2S hydrate, some sI/sII polymorphic diversity was encountered, and it was found that a realistic dissipation of the nucleation energy (in view of non-equilibrium relaxation to either microcanonical (NVE) or isothermal-isobaric (NPT) distributions) is important to determine the relative propensity to form sI versus sII motifs.

  6. In-situ Micro-structural Studies of Gas Hydrate Formation in Sedimentary Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhs, Werner F.; Chaouachi, Marwen; Falenty, Andrzej; Sell, Kathleen; Schwarz, Jens-Oliver; Wolf, Martin; Enzmann, Frieder; Kersten, Michael; Haberthür, David

    2015-04-01

    The formation process of gas hydrates in sedimentary matrices is of crucial importance for the physical and transport properties of the resulting aggregates. This process has never been observed in-situ with sub-micron resolution. Here, we report on synchrotron-based micro-tomographic studies by which the nucleation and growth processes of gas hydrate were observed in different sedimentary matrices (natural quartz, glass beds with different surface properties, with and without admixtures of kaolinite and montmorillonite) at varying water saturation. The nucleation sites can be easily identified and the growth pattern is clearly established. In under-saturated sediments the nucleation starts at the water-gas interface and proceeds from there to form predominantly isometric single crystals of 10-20μm size. Using a newly developed synchrotron-based method we have determined the crystallite size distributions (CSD) of the gas hydrate in the sedimentary matrix confirming in a quantitative and statistically relevant manner the impressions from the tomographic reconstructions. It is noteworthy that the CSDs from synthetic hydrates are distinctly smaller than those of natural gas hydrates [1], which suggest that coarsening processes take place in the sedimentary matrix after the initial hydrate formation. Understanding the processes of formation and coarsening may eventually permit the determination of the age of gas hydrates in sedimentary matrices [2], which are largely unknown at present. Furthermore, the full micro-structural picture and its evolution will enable quantitative digital rock physics modeling to reveal poroelastic properties and in this way to support the exploration and exploitation of gas hydrate resources in the future. [1] Klapp S.A., Hemes S., Klein H., Bohrmann G., McDonald I., Kuhs W.F. Grain size measurements of natural gas hydrates. Marine Geology 2010; 274(1-4):85-94. [2] Klapp S.A., Klein H, Kuhs W.F. First determination of gas hydrate

  7. Thermodynamic Stability of Structure H Hydrates Based on the Molecular Properties of Large Guest Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Ohmura

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper report analyses of thermodynamic stability of structure-H clathrate hydrates formed with methane and large guest molecules in terms of their gas phase molecular sizes and molar masses for the selection of a large guest molecule providing better hydrate stability. We investigated the correlation among the gas phase molecular sizes, the molar masses of large molecule guest substances, and the equilibrium pressures. The results suggest that there exists a molecular-size value for the best stability. Also, at a given molecule size, better stability may be available when the large molecule guest substance has a larger molar mass.

  8. Influence of protein crowder size on hydration structure and dynamics in macromolecular crowding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Po-hung; Yu, Isseki; Feig, Michael; Sugita, Yuji

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the effects of protein crowder sizes on hydration structure and dynamics in macromolecular crowded systems by all-atom MD simulations. The crowded systems consisting of only small proteins showed larger total surface areas than those of large proteins at the same volume fractions. As a result, more water molecules were trapped within the hydration shells, slowing down water diffusion. The simulation results suggest that the protein crowder size is another factor to determine the effect of macromolecular crowding and to explain the experimental kinetic data of proteins and DNAs in the presence of crowding agents.

  9. Feasibility of using phase change materials to control the heat of hydration in massive concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Chang; Khil, Bae-Soo; Chae, Young-Seok; Liang, Qi-Bo; Yun, Hyun-Do

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results that can be applied to select a possible phase change material (PCM), such as a latent heat material (LHM), to control the hydration heat in mass concrete structures. Five experimental tests (microconduction, simplified adiabatic temperature rise, heat, and compressive strength tests) were conducted to select the most desirable LHM out of seven types of inorganic PCM used in cement mortar and to determine the most suitable mix design. The results of these experimental tests were used to assess the feasibility of using PCM to reduce hydration heat in mass concrete that was examined. The experimental results show that cement mortar containing barium- [Ba(OH)2 · 8H2O] based PCM has the lowest amount of total hydration heat of the cement pastes. The barium-based PCM provides good latent heat properties that help to prevent volume change and microcracks caused by thermal stress in mass concrete.

  10. A composite phase diagram of structure H hydrates using Schreinemakers' geometric approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, A.P.; Makogon, T.Y.; Burruss, R.C.; Wendlandt, R.F.; Sloan, E.D.

    1996-01-01

    A composite phase diagram is presented for Structure H (sH) clathrate hydrates. In this work, we derived the reactions occurring among the various phases along each four-phase (Ice/Liquid water, liquid hydrocarbon, vapor, and hydrate) equilibrium line. A powerful method (though seldom used in chemical engineering) for multicomponent equilibria developed by Schreinemakers is applied to determine the relative location of all quadruple (four-phase) lines emanating from three quintuple (five-phase) points. Experimental evidence validating the approximate phase diagram is also provided. The use of Schreinemakers' rules for the development of the phase diagram is novel for hydrates, but these rules may be extended to resolve the phase space of other more complex systems commonly encountered in chemical engineering.

  11. Feasibility of Using Phase Change Materials to Control the Heat of Hydration in Massive Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Chang Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental results that can be applied to select a possible phase change material (PCM, such as a latent heat material (LHM, to control the hydration heat in mass concrete structures. Five experimental tests (microconduction, simplified adiabatic temperature rise, heat, and compressive strength tests were conducted to select the most desirable LHM out of seven types of inorganic PCM used in cement mortar and to determine the most suitable mix design. The results of these experimental tests were used to assess the feasibility of using PCM to reduce hydration heat in mass concrete that was examined. The experimental results show that cement mortar containing barium- [Ba(OH2·8H2O] based PCM has the lowest amount of total hydration heat of the cement pastes. The barium-based PCM provides good latent heat properties that help to prevent volume change and microcracks caused by thermal stress in mass concrete.

  12. Ultrafast structural and vibrational dynamics of the hydration shell around DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szyc Ł

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy in the frequency range of OH- and NH stretch excitations serves for a direct mapping of hydration dynamics around DNA. A moderate slowing down of structural dynamics and resonant OH stretch energy transfer is observed in the DNA water shell compared to bulk water.

  13. Separation and Structure of Chiral S-Malic Acid Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIE,Jing-Jing(聂晶晶); XU,Duan-Jun(徐端钧); WU,Jing-Yun(吴景云); CHIANG,Michael Y.(蒋燕南)

    2002-01-01

    Crystals of the chiral malic acid hydrate ( C4H6O5@H2O ) were unexpectedly obtained from an ethanol ethanol/water solution containing racemic D,L-malic acid and L-asparagine. The crystal belongs to orthorhombic space group P21 21 21 with cell dimensions of a=0.5576(1), b=0.9818(2), c=1.1793(2) nm, V=0.9455(2) nm3, Z=4, μ(Mo Kα) =0.152 mm-1, F(000) =320, Dc= 1.565 g@cm-3, R =0.051, wR =0.136 for 657 observed reflections [I>2σ(I)]. The significant difference in bond distances for carboxyl groups suggests that the crystal consist of malate anion and protonized crystalline water. This is a report for direct separation of racemic mixture, i.e., without the formation of a molecular complex of raceme with a chiral separating reagent.

  14. Structural and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from alite hydration in the presence of sodium and potassium hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, Oscar, E-mail: oamendoz@unal.edu.co [Grupo del Cemento y Materiales de Construcción (CEMATCO). Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Facultad de Minas, Medellín (Colombia); Giraldo, Carolina [Cementos Argos S.A., Medellín (Colombia); Camargo, Sergio S. [Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro/COPPE, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tobón, Jorge I. [Grupo del Cemento y Materiales de Construcción (CEMATCO). Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Facultad de Minas, Medellín (Colombia)

    2015-08-15

    This research evaluates the effect of sodium and potassium hydroxide on the structure and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from the hydration of pure alite. Monoclinic (MIII) alite was synthesized and hydrated, using water-to-alite ratios of 0.5 and 0.6 and additions of 10% NaOH and KOH by weight of alite. Based on results of X-ray diffraction, isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nanoindentation, two different effects of the alkaline hydroxides on the hydration reaction of alite, both at early and later ages, can be identified: (i) a differentiated hydration process, attributed to an enhancement in calcium hydroxide (CH) precipitation and a stimulation of the C-S-H nuclei; and (ii) an increase in the elastic modulus of the C-S-H aggregations, attributed to an electrostatic attraction between positive charges from the alkaline cations and negative charges from the C-S-H structure.

  15. Computer simulations of aqua metal ions for accurate reproduction of hydration free energies and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Tu, Yaoquan; Tian, He; Ågren, Hans

    2010-03-01

    Metal ions play essential roles in biological processes and have attracted much attention in both experimental and theoretical fields. By using the molecular dynamics simulation technology, we here present a fitting-refining procedure for deriving Lennard-Jones parameters of aqua metal ions toward the ultimate goal of accurately reproducing the experimentally observed hydration free energies and structures. The polarizable SWM4-DP water model {proposed by Lamoureux et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 5185 (2003)]} is used to properly describe the polarization effects of water molecules that interact with the ions. The Lennard-Jones parameters of the metal ions are first obtained by fitting the quantum mechanical potential energies of the hexahydrated complex and are subsequently refined through comparison between the calculated and experimentally measured hydration free energies and structures. In general, the derived Lennard-Jones parameters for the metal ions are found to reproduce hydration free energies accurately and to predict hydration structures that are in good agreement with experimental observations. Dynamical properties are also well reproduced by the derived Lennard-Jones parameters.

  16. Interfacial effects in multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbee, T.W. Jr. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Chemistry and Materials Science Dept.

    1998-12-31

    Interfacial structure and the atomic interactions between atoms at interfaces in multilayers or nano-laminates have significant impact on the physical properties of these materials. A technique for the experimental evaluation of interfacial structure and interfacial structure effects is presented and compared to experiment. In this paper the impact of interfacial structure on the performance of x-ray, soft x-ray and extreme ultra-violet multilayer optic structures is emphasized. The paper is concluded with summary of these results and an assessment of their implications relative to multilayer development and the study of buried interfaces in solids in general.

  17. Structure and conformation of peptides at air/aqueous interface and their impact on interfacial water structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra Jena, Kailash; Tomar, Deepak

    Process of protein folding is very essential for the proper functioning of the protein molecules at membrane surface and other organelles. Understanding the process of protein folding at various biological relevant aqueous interfaces are very important to understand various complicated chemical and physical processes relevant to chemistry, physics, and medicine. The building blocks of proteins molecules are amino acids and the chemistry of each amino acid is very different; as a consequence their sequence plays an important role for various conformations upon adsorption for the protein molecules. In the present study, we have investigated the interfacial structure and conformation of two amino acids (L-Proline and L-Tyrosine) and peptide molecules formed from these two amino acids (L-Tyr-Pro). We have used sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy to probe the air/aqueous interface. We have studied the impact of adsorption of the amino acids and the peptide molecules on the interfacial water structure by slowly varying concentration and ionic strength of the solutions. Our preliminary result shows a huge impact of the adsorption process of peptide molecules on the hydrogen bonding environment of interfacial structure of water. Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Nangal Road, Rupnagar, Punjab-140001.

  18. Interfacial Structure, Dynamics, and Transport of Polyelectrolyte Membrane Materials for Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soles, Christopher; Page, K.; Eastman, S.; Kim, S.; Kang, S.; Dura, J.; National Institute of Standards; Technology; Polymers Divison Team; NIST Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEM) fuel cells show promise for a wide range of applications both in the transportation sector and for stationary power production due to their high charge density and low operating temperatures. While the structure and transport of bulk PEMs have been studied extensively, little is known about these materials at interfaces and under confinement, as they exist within the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). Using neutron/ x-ray reflectivity and polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, we have studied the polymer-substrate interfacial structure, swelling, and water transport as function of humidity, surface chemistry, and film thickness. The interfacial structure is highly dependent upon the substrate surface chemistry and the swelling/water diffusivity are suppressed when the PEM is confined to a thin film. This new information will enable researchers to more accurately model the performance of the MEA as current simulations typically rely on bulk property values to predict water and proton transport under these conditions.

  19. Formation of interfacial network structure via photo-crosslinking in carbon fiber/epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Deng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of diblock copolymers (poly(n-butylacrylate-co-poly(2-hydroxyethyl acrylate-b-poly(glycidyl methacrylate ((PnBA-co-PHEA-b-PGMA, containing a random copolymer block PnBA-co-PHEA, were successfully synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP. After being chemically grafted onto carbon fibers, the photosensitive methacrylic groups were introduced into the random copolymer, giving a series of copolymers (poly(n-butylacrylate-co-poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl acrylate-b-poly(glycidyl methacrylate((PnBA-co-PMEA-b-PGMA. Dynamic mechanical analysis indicated that the random copolymer block after ultraviolet (UV irradiation was a lightly crosslinked polymer and acted as an elastomer, forming a photo-crosslinked network structure at the interface of carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Microbond test showed that such an interfacial network structure greatly improved the cohesive strength and effectively controlled the deformation ability of the flexible interlayer. Furthermore, three kinds of interfacial network structures, i physical crosslinking by H-bonds, ii chemical crosslinking by photopolymerization, and iii interpenetrating crosslinked network by photopolymerization and epoxy curing reaction were received in carbon fiber/epoxy composite, depending on the various preparation processes.

  20. Controlled-source electromagnetic and seismic delineation of subseafloor fluid flow structures in a gas hydrate province, offshore Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attias, Eric; Weitemeyer, Karen; Minshull, Tim A.; Best, Angus I.; Sinha, Martin; Jegen-Kulcsar, Marion; Hölz, Sebastian; Berndt, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Deep sea pockmarks underlain by chimney-like or pipe structures that contain methane hydrate are abundant along the Norwegian continental margin. In such hydrate provinces the interaction between hydrate formation and fluid flow has significance for benthic ecosystems and possibly climate change. The Nyegga region, situated on the western Norwegian continental slope, is characterized by an extensive pockmark field known to accommodate substantial methane gas hydrate deposits. The aim of this study is to detect and delineate both the gas hydrate and free gas reservoirs at one of Nyegga's pockmarks. In 2012, a marine controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) survey was performed at a pockmark in this region, where high-resolution 3-D seismic data were previously collected in 2006. 2-D CSEM inversions were computed using the data acquired by ocean bottom electrical field receivers. Our results, derived from unconstrained and seismically constrained CSEM inversions, suggest the presence of two distinctive resistivity anomalies beneath the pockmark: a shallow vertical anomaly at the underlying pipe structure, likely due to gas hydrate accumulation, and a laterally extensive anomaly attributed to a free gas zone below the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. This work contributes to a robust characterization of gas hydrate deposits within subseafloor fluid flow pipe structures.

  1. Strength development, hydration reaction and pore structure of autoclaved slag cement with added silica fume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Y. [China Building Materials Academy, Beijing (China); Siemer, D.D. [LITCO, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Scheetz, B.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Materials Research Lab.

    1997-01-01

    Under continuous hydrothermal treatment the strength of portland cement paste decreases with curing time and the pore structure coarsens. It was found in this study that the compressive strength of slag cement paste containing 67.5 wt.% ggbfs also decreases with time after 24 hour hydrothermal processing, but with a small addition of silica fume to the slag cement, the cement strength increases and the pore structure densifies when processed under comparable conditions. Based on observations XRD and SEM, these changes are attributed to: (1) changes in the hydration reactions and products by highly reactive silica fume, such that amorphous products dominate and the strength reducing phase {alpha}-C{sub 2}SH does not form; (2) slower hydration of slag, partially caused by the decreased pH of the pore solution, favors the formation of a dense pore structure; and (3) the space filling properties of the micro particles of silica fume.

  2. SPATIAL HIERARCHY AND INTERFACIAL STRUCTURE IN INJECTION-MOLDED BARS OF POLYPROPYLENE-BASED BLENDS AND COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Wang; Min Guo; Si Liang; Ping Zhao; Hong Yang; Qin Zhang; Rong-ni Du; Qiang Fu

    2007-01-01

    The hierarchical structure and interfacial morphology of injection-molded bars of polypropylene (PP) based blends and composites have been investigated in detail from the skin to the core. For preparation of injection-molded bars with high-level orientation and good interfacial adhesion, a dynamic packing injection molding technology was applied to exert oscillatory shear on the melts during solidification stage. Depending on incorporated component, interfacial adhesion and processing conditions, various oriented structure and morphology could be obtained. First, we will elucidate the epitaxial behavior between PP and high-density polyethylene occurring in practical molded processing. Then, the shear-induced transcrystalline structure will be the main focus for PP/fiber composites. At last, various oriented clay structures have been ascertained unambiguously in PP/organoclay nanocomposites along the thickness of molded bars.

  3. Interfacial structure of tungsten layers formed by selective low pressure chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacy, W.T.; Broadbent, E.K.; Norcott, M.H.

    1985-02-01

    We have analyzed the interfacial structure of selectively deposited LPCVD tungsten on monocrystalline silicon, polycrystalline silicon, and polycrystalline aluminum substrates. Cross-sectional specimens were examined by transmission electron microscopy to determine the amount of substrate consumed by the selective deposition process and to assess the degree of lateral encroachment under masking SiO/sub 2/ layers for different conditions of deposition and surface preparation. The tungsten-silicon interfacial structure was found to depend strongly on the initia surface preparation. Immersion in a dilute HF solution resulted in a smooth interface, while a glow-discharge treatment (CF/sub 4/ + O/sub 2/) led to highly irregular interfaces, which, in extreme cases, contained tunnels extending 1 ..mu..m or more into the silicon substrate. Layers formed in WF/sub 6/ plus H/sub 2/ were found to consist of two layers, of which the lower layer i formed by the substrate reduction of WF/sub 6/.

  4. Enhanced CH₄ Recovery Induced via Structural Transformation in the CH₄/CO₂ Replacement That Occurs in sH Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yohan; Kim, Yunju; Seo, Yongwon

    2015-07-21

    The CH4/CO2 replacement that occurs in sH hydrates is investigated, with a primary focus on the enhanced CH4 recovery induced via structural transformation with a CO2 injection. In this study, neohexane (NH) is used as a liquid hydrocarbon guest in the sH hydrates. Direct thermodynamic measurements and spectroscopic identification are investigated to reveal the replacement process for recovering CH4 and simultaneously sequestering CO2 in the sH (CH4 + NH) hydrate. The hydrate phase behavior and the (13)C NMR and Raman spectroscopy results of the CH4 + CO2 + NH systems demonstrate that CO2 functions as a coguest of sH hydrates in CH4-rich conditions, and that the structural transition of sH to sI hydrates occurs in CO2-rich conditions. CO2 molecules are found to preferentially occupy the medium 4(3)5(6)6(3) cages of sH hydrates or the large 5(12)6(2) cages of sI hydrates during the replacement. Due to the favorable structural transition and resulting re-establishment of guest distributions, approximately 88% of the CH4 is recoverable from sH (CH4 + NH) hydrates with a CO2 injection. The hydrate dissociation and subsequent reformation caused by the structural transformation of sH to sI is also confirmed using a high-pressure microdifferential scanning calorimeter through the detection of the significant heat flows generated during the replacement.

  5. A hydrated ion model of [UO2] 2 + in water: Structure, dynamics, and spectroscopy from classical molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Conesa, Sergio; Torrico, Francisco; Martínez, José M.; Pappalardo, Rafael R.; Sánchez Marcos, Enrique

    2016-12-01

    A new ab initio interaction potential based on the hydrated ion concept has been developed to obtain the structure, energetics, and dynamics of the hydration of uranyl in aqueous solution. It is the first force field that explicitly parameterizes the interaction of the uranyl hydrate with bulk water molecules to accurately define the second-shell behavior. The [UO2(H2O)5 ] 2 + presents a first hydration shell U-O average distance of 2.46 Å and a second hydration shell peak at 4.61 Å corresponding to 22 molecules using a coordination number definition based on a multisite solute cavity. The second shell solvent molecules have longer mean residence times than those corresponding to the divalent monatomic cations. The axial regions are relatively de-populated, lacking direct hydrogen bonding to apical oxygens. Angle-solved radial distribution functions as well as the spatial distribution functions show a strong anisotropy in the ion hydration. The [UO2(H2O)5 ] 2 + solvent structure may be regarded as a combination of a conventional second hydration shell in the equatorial and bridge regions, and a clathrate-like low density region in the axial region. Translational diffusion coefficient, hydration enthalpy, power spectra of the main vibrational modes, and the EXAFS spectrum simulated from molecular dynamics trajectories agree fairly well with the experiment.

  6. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-08-16

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes.

  7. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes.

  8. Potential-of-mean-force description of ionic interactions and structural hydration in biomolecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummer, G.; Garcia, A.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Biology and Biophysics Group; Soumpasis, D.M. [Max-Planck-Inst for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany). Biocomputation Group

    1994-10-01

    To understand the functioning of living organisms on a molecular level, it is crucial to dissect the intricate interplay of the immense number of biological molecules. Most of the biochemical processes in cells occur in a liquid environment formed mainly by water and ions. This solvent environment plays an important role in biological systems. The potential-of-mean-force (PMF) formalism attempts to describe quantitatively the interactions of the solvent with biological macromolecules on the basis of an approximate statistical-mechanical representation. At its current status of development, it deals with ionic effects on the biomolecular structure and with the structural hydration of biomolecules. The underlying idea of the PMF formalism is to identify the dominant sources of interactions and incorporate these interactions into the theoretical formalism using PMF`s (or particle correlation functions) extracted from bulk-liquid systems. In the following, the authors shall briefly outline the statistical-mechanical foundation of the PMF formalism and introduce the PMF expansion formalism, which is intimately linked to superposition approximations for higher-order particle correlation functions. The authors shall then sketch applications, which describe the effects of the ionic environment on nucleic-acid structure. Finally, the authors shall present the more recent extension of the PMF idea to describe quantitatively the structural hydration of biomolecules. Results for the interface of ice and water and for the hydration of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) will be discussed.

  9. Impact of Interfacial Characteristics on Foam Structure: Study on Model Fluids and at Pilot Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezdour Samir

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Foams represent an important area of research because of their relevance to many industrial processes. In continuous foaming operations, foaming ability depends on the process parameters and the characteristics of the raw materials used for foamed products. The effects of fluid viscosity and equilibrium surface tension on foam structure have been studied extensively. Furthermore, as surface active agents diffuse to the interface, they can modify other interface properties through their adsorption, such as interfacial rheology and surface tension kinetics. In order to better understand how these two interfacial properties influence foam structuring, we formulated model foaming solutions with different interface viscoelasticity levels and adsorption rates, but all with the same equilibrium surface tension and viscosity. The solutions were made up of a surface active agent and glucose syrup, so as to maintain a Newtonian behaviour. Five surface active agents were used: Whey Protein Isolate (WPI, sodium caseinate, saponin, cetyl phosphate and Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate (SDS, at concentrations ranging from 0.1% to 1%. Their molecular characteristics, and their interaction with the glucose syrup, made it possible to obtain a range of interface viscoelasticities and surface tension kinetics for these model solutions. The solutions were whipped in a continuously-operating industrial foaming device in order to control process parameters such as shearing and overrun, and to ensure that the experiment was representative of industrial production. The structure of the foams thus obtained foams was then determined by characterising bubble size using image analysis. For all the model solutions, both the viscoelastic moduli and apparent diffusion coefficient were linked to foam structure. The results showed that both high interface viscoelasticity and rapid diffusion kinetics induced a foam structure containing small bubbles. Both effects, as well as the impact of

  10. Crystal structures of highly simplified BPTIs provide insights into hydration-driven increase of unfolding enthalpy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Monirul; Yohda, Masafumi; Kidokoro, Shun-Ichi; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2017-03-07

    We report a thermodynamic and structural analysis of six extensively simplified bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) variants containing 19-24 alanines out of 58 residues. Differential scanning calorimetry indicated a two-state thermal unfolding, typical of a native protein with densely packed interior. Surprisingly, increasing the number of alanines induced enthalpy stabilization, which was however over-compensated by entropy destabilization. X-ray crystallography indicated that the alanine substitutions caused the recruitment of novel water molecules facilitating the formation of protein-water hydrogen bonds and improving the hydration shells around the alanine's methyl groups, both of which presumably contributed to enthalpy stabilization. There was a strong correlation between the number of water molecules and the thermodynamic parameters. Overall, our results demonstrate that, in contrast to our initial expectation, a protein sequence in which over 40% of the residues are alanines can retain a densely packed structure and undergo thermal denaturation with a large enthalpy change, mainly contributed by hydration.

  11. Adhesion force interactions between cyclopentane hydrate and physically and chemically modified surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Zachary M; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2014-12-07

    Interfacial interactions between liquid-solid and solid-solid phases/surfaces are of fundamental importance to the formation of hydrate deposits in oil and gas pipelines. This work establishes the effect of five categories of physical and chemical modification to steel on clathrate hydrate adhesive force: oleamide, graphite, citric acid ester, nonanedithiol, and Rain-X anti-wetting agent. Hydrate adhesive forces were measured using a micromechanical force apparatus, under both dry and water-wet surface conditions. The results show that the graphite coating reduced hydrate-steel adhesion force by 79%, due to an increase in the water wetting angle from 42 ± 8° to 154 ± 7°. Two chemical surface coatings (nonanedithiol and the citric acid ester) induced rapid hydrate growth in the hydrate particles; nonanedithiol increased hydrate adhesive force by 49% from the baseline, while the citric acid ester coating reduced hydrate adhesion force by 98%. This result suggests that crystal growth may enable a strong adhesive pathway between hydrate and other crystalline structures, however this effect may be negated in cases where water-hydrocarbon interfacial tension is minimised. When a liquid water droplet was placed on the modified steel surfaces, the graphite and citric acid ester became less effective at reducing adhesive force. In pipelines containing a free water phase wetting the steel surface, chemical or physical surface modifications alone may be insufficient to eliminate hydrate deposition risk. In further tests, the citric acid ester reduced hydrate cohesive forces by 50%, suggesting mild activity as a hybrid anti-agglomerant suppressing both hydrate deposition and particle agglomeration. These results demonstrate a new capability to develop polyfunctional surfactants, which simultaneously limit the capability for hydrate particles to aggregate and deposit on the pipeline wall.

  12. Reactive wetting of amorphous silica by molten Al-Mg alloys and their interfacial structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Laixin; Shen, Ping; Zhang, Dan; Jiang, Qichuan

    2016-07-01

    The reactive wetting of amorphous silica substrates by molten Al-Mg alloys over a wide composition range was studied using a dispensed sessile drop method in a flowing Ar atmosphere. The effects of the nominal Mg concentration and temperature on the wetting and interfacial microstructures were discussed. The initial contact angle for pure Al on the SiO2 surface was 115° while that for pure Mg was 35° at 1073 K. For the Al-Mg alloy drop, it decreased with increasing nominal Mg concentration. The reaction zone was characterized by layered structures, whose formation was primarily controlled by the variation in the alloy concentration due to the evaporation of Mg and the interfacial reaction from the viewpoint of thermodynamics as well as by the penetration or diffusion of Mg, Al and Si from the viewpoint of kinetics. In addition, the effects of the reaction and the evaporation of Mg on the movement of the triple line were examined. The spreading of the Al-Mg alloy on the SiO2 surface was mainly attributed to the formation of Mg2Si at the interface and the recession of the triple line to the diminishing Mg concentration in the alloy.

  13. Magnetic properties and interfacial characteristics of all-epitaxial Heusler-compound stacking structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, S.; Honda, S.; Hirayama, J.; Kawano, M.; Santo, K.; Tanikawa, K.; Kanashima, T.; Itoh, H.; Hamaya, K.

    2016-09-01

    We study magnetic properties and interfacial characteristics of all-epitaxial D 03-Fe3Si /L 21 - Fe3 -xMnxSi /L 21-Co2FeSi Heusler-compound trilayers grown on Ge(111) by room-temperature molecular beam epitaxy. We find that the magnetization reversal processes can be intentionally designed by changing the chemical composition of the intermediate Fe3 -xMnxSi layers because of their tunable ferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase-transition temperature. From first-principles calculations, interfacial half metallicity in the Co2FeSi layer is nearly expected when the sequence of stacking layers along of the Fe2MnSi /Co2FeSi interface includes the atomic row of L 21 - or B 2 -ordered structures. We believe that Co2FeSi /Fe2MnSi /Co2FeSi trilayer systems stacked along will open a new avenue for high-performance current-perpendicular-to-plane giant magnetoresistive devices with Heusler compounds.

  14. Disclosing the distinct interfacial behaviors of structurally and configurationally diverse triazologlycolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Peng; Xu, Xiaolian; Zhang, Hai-Lin; Chen, Guo-Rong; Xu, Shouhong; Liu, Honglai

    2011-08-16

    1- or 6-Triazologluco- and galactolipid derivatives bearing a lipid chain length of 16 carbons were efficiently constructed via click chemistry. The differentiation in their surface pressure-molecular area (π-A) isotherms first implies that these structurally and configurationally diverse amphiphiles adopt different distribution manner at air-water interfaces. The Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of the synthesized glycoconjugates on mica surface were subsequently prepared and visualized via atomic force microscopy (AFM), which exhibited diverse topographies and possess different contact angles with water. These data further suggest that the structural variation as well as epimeric identity of triazologlycolipids may result in their distinct interfacial behaviors at the air-solid interface. Furthermore, the addition of increasing amounts of 1-triazologalactolipid 2 to poly-diacetylene (PDA) was determined to impact the π-A isotherm of the latter, prompting us to further fabricate new colorimetrically detectable mixed-type vesicles containing triazologlycolipids for biochemical studies.

  15. Using crystal structure prediction to rationalize the hydration propensities of substituted adamantane hydrochloride salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Sharmarke; Karothu, Durga Prasad; Naumov, Panče

    2016-08-01

    The crystal energy landscapes of the salts of two rigid pharmaceutically active molecules reveal that the experimental structure of amantadine hydrochloride is the most stable structure with the majority of low-energy structures adopting a chain hydrogen-bond motif and packings that do not have solvent accessible voids. By contrast, memantine hydrochloride which differs in the substitution of two methyl groups on the adamantane ring has a crystal energy landscape where all structures within 10 kJ mol(-1) of the global minimum have solvent-accessible voids ranging from 3 to 14% of the unit-cell volume including the lattice energy minimum that was calculated after removing water from the hydrated memantine hydrochloride salt structure. The success in using crystal structure prediction (CSP) to rationalize the different hydration propensities of these substituted adamantane hydrochloride salts allowed us to extend the model to predict under blind test conditions the experimental crystal structures of the previously uncharacterized 1-(methylamino)adamantane base and its corresponding hydrochloride salt. Although the crystal structure of 1-(methylamino)adamantane was correctly predicted as the second ranked structure on the static lattice energy landscape, the crystallization of a Z' = 3 structure of 1-(methylamino)adamantane hydrochloride reveals the limits of applying CSP when the contents of the crystallographic asymmetric unit are unknown.

  16. Interfacial bonding and electronic structure of GaN/GaAs interface: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Ruyue; Zhang, Zhaofu; Wang, Changhong; Li, Haobo; Dong, Hong; Liu, Hui; Wang, Weichao, E-mail: weichaowang@nankai.edu.cn [College of Electronic Information and Optical Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Xie, Xinjian [College of Materials Science, Hebei Technology University, Tianjin 300401 (China)

    2015-04-07

    Understanding of GaN interfacing with GaAs is crucial for GaN to be an effective interfacial layer between high-k oxides and III-V materials with the application in high-mobility metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) devices. Utilizing first principles calculations, here, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of the GaN/GaAs interface with respect to the interfacial nitrogen contents. The decrease of interfacial N contents leads to more Ga dangling bonds and As-As dimers. At the N-rich limit, the interface with N concentration of 87.5% shows the most stability. Furthermore, a strong band offsets dependence on the interfacial N concentration is also observed. The valance band offset of N7 with hybrid functional calculation is 0.51 eV. The electronic structure analysis shows that significant interface states exist in all the GaN/GaAs models with various N contents, which originate from the interfacial dangling bonds and some unsaturated Ga and N atoms. These large amounts of gap states result in Fermi level pinning and essentially degrade the device performance.

  17. Structural characterization of interfacial n-octanol and 3-octanol using molecular dynamic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoleon, Raeanne L; Moore, Preston B

    2006-03-01

    Structurally isomeric octanol interfacial systems, water/vapor, 3-octanol/vapor, n-octanol/vapor, 3-octanol/water, and n-octanol/water are investigated at 298 K using molecular dynamics simulation techniques. The present study is intended to investigate strongly associated liquid/liquid interfaces and probe the atomistic structure of these interfaces. The octanol and water molecules were initially placed randomly into a box and were equilibrated using constant pressure techniques to minimize bias within the initial conditions as well as to fully sample the structural conformations of the interface. An interface formed via phase separation during equilibration and resulted in a slab geometry with a molecularly sharp interface. However, some water molecules remained within the octanol phase with a mole fraction of 0.12 after equilibration. The resulting "wet" octanol interfaces were analyzed using density profiles and orientational order parameters. Our results support the hypothesis of an ordered interface only 1 or 2 molecular layers deep before bulk properties are reached for both the 3-octanol and water systems. However, in contrast to most other interfacial systems studied by molecular dynamics simulations, the n-octanol interface extends for several molecular layers. The octanol hydroxyl groups form a hydrogen-bonding network with water which orders the surface molecules toward a preferred direction and produces a hydrophilic/hydrophobic layering. The ordered n-octanol produces an oscillating low-high density of oxygen atoms out of phase with a high-low density of carbon atoms, consistent with an oscillating dielectric. In contrast, the isomeric 3-octanol has only a single carbon-rich layer directly proximal to the interface, which is a result of the different molecular topology. Both 3-octanol and n-octanol roughen the water interface with respect to the water/vapor interface. The "wet" octanol phases, in the octanol/water systems reach bulk properties in a

  18. Structural determinants of hydration, mechanics and fluid flow in freeze-dried collagen scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offeddu, G S; Ashworth, J C; Cameron, R E; Oyen, M L

    2016-09-01

    Freeze-dried scaffolds provide regeneration templates for a wide range of tissues, due to their flexibility in physical and biological properties. Control of structure is crucial for tuning such properties, and therefore scaffold functionality. However, the common approach of modeling these scaffolds as open-cell foams does not fully account for their structural complexity. Here, the validity of the open-cell model is examined across a range of physical characteristics, rigorously linking morphology to hydration and mechanical properties. Collagen scaffolds with systematic changes in relative density were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Micro-Computed Tomography and spherical indentation analyzed in a time-dependent poroelastic framework. Morphologically, all scaffolds were mid-way between the open- and closed-cell models, approaching the closed-cell model as relative density increased. Although pore size remained constant, transport pathway diameter decreased. Larger collagen fractions also produced greater volume swelling on hydration, although the change in pore diameter was constant, and relatively small at ∼6%. Mechanically, the dry and hydrated scaffold moduli varied quadratically with relative density, as expected of open-cell materials. However, the increasing pore wall closure was found to determine the time-dependent nature of the hydrated scaffold response, with a decrease in permeability producing increasingly elastic rather than viscoelastic behavior. These results demonstrate that characterizing the deviation from the open-cell model is vital to gain a full understanding of scaffold biophysical properties, and provide a template for structural studies of other freeze-dried biomaterials. Freeze-dried collagen sponges are three-dimensional microporous scaffolds that have been used for a number of exploratory tissue engineering applications. The characterization of the structure-properties relationships of these scaffolds is

  19. Structural basis for the transformation pathways of the sodium naproxen anhydrate-hydrate system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bond, Andrew; Cornett, Claus; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann

    2014-01-01

    Crystal structures are presented for two dihydrate polymorphs (DH-I and DH-II) of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug sodium (S)-naproxen. The structure of DH-I is determined from twinned single crystals obtained by solution crystallization. DH-II is obtained by solid-state routes, and its...... structure is derived using powder X-ray diffraction, solid-state (13)C and (23)Na MAS NMR, and molecular modelling. The validity of both structures is supported by dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) calculations. The structures of DH-I and DH-II, and in particular their relationships...... to the monohydrate (MH) and anhydrate (AH) structures, provide a basis to rationalize the observed transformation pathways in the sodium (S)-naproxen anhydrate-hydrate system. All structures contain Na(+)/carboxylate/H2O sections, alternating with sections containing the naproxen molecules. The structure of DH...

  20. Water proton configurations in structures I, II, and H clathrate hydrate unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Fumihito; Hiratsuka, Masaki; Ohmura, Ryo; Alavi, Saman; Sum, Amadeu K; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2013-03-28

    Position and orientation of water protons need to be specified when the molecular simulation studies are performed for clathrate hydrates. Positions of oxygen atoms in water are experimentally determined by X-ray diffraction analysis of clathrate hydrate structures, but positions of water hydrogen atoms in the lattice are disordered. This study reports a determination of the water proton coordinates in unit cell of structure I (sI), II (sII), and H (sH) clathrate hydrates that satisfy the ice rules, have the lowest potential energy configuration for the protons, and give a net zero dipole moment. Possible proton coordinates in the unit cell were chosen by analyzing the symmetry of protons on the hexagonal or pentagonal faces in the hydrate cages and generating all possible proton distributions which satisfy the ice rules. We found that in the sI and sII unit cells, proton distributions with small net dipole moments have fairly narrow potential energy spreads of about 1 kJ∕mol. The total Coulomb potential on a test unit charge placed in the cage center for the minimum energy∕minimum dipole unit cell configurations was calculated. In the sI small cages, the Coulomb potential energy spread in each class of cage is less than 0.1 kJ∕mol, while the potential energy spread increases to values up to 6 kJ∕mol in sH and 15 kJ∕mol in the sII cages. The guest environments inside the cages can therefore be substantially different in the sII case. Cartesian coordinates for oxygen and hydrogen atoms in the sI, sII, and sH unit cells are reported for reference.

  1. Interfacial Structure of Composites of Poly(m-xylylen adipamide) and Silica Nano-Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achiwa, Osamu; Kyogoku, Yoshitaka; Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Tasaka, Shigeru

    2012-10-01

    Interfacial structure of composites of poly(m-xylylen adipamide) (MXD6) and silica nano-particles (SNPs) was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. In the DSC curves of the composites, changes in specific heat similar to a glass transition behavior (sub-Tg) were detected at 0-40 °C, and sub-Tg decreased with the increase in the weight fraction of SNPs. Crystallization temperature (Tc) decreased, and XRD peaks became sharper with the increase in the weight fraction of SNPs. The IR spectra suggest that the hydrogen bonds between MXD6 chains were weakened by the addition of SNPs.

  2. Effect of Cross-Linking on the Structure and Growth of Polymer Films Prepared by Interfacial Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezkin, Anatoly V; Kudryavtsev, Yaroslav V

    2015-11-10

    Interfacial polymerization of tri- and bifunctional monomers (A3B2 polymerization) is investigated by dissipative particle dynamics to reveal an effect of cross-linking on the reaction kinetics and structure of the growing polymer film. Regardless of the comonomer reactivity and miscibility, the kinetics in an initially bilayer melt passes from the reaction to diffusion control. Within the crossover period, branched macromolecules undergo gelation, which drastically changes the scenario of the polymerization process. Comparison with the previously studied linear interfacial polymerization (Berezkin, A. V.; Kudryavtsev, Y. V. Linear Interfacial Polymerization: Theory and Simulations with Dissipative Particle Dynamics J. Chem. Phys. 2014, 141, 194906) shows similar conversion rates but very different product characteristics. Cross-linked polymer films are markedly heterogeneous in density, their average polymerization degree grows with the comonomer miscibility, and end groups are mostly trapped deeply in the film core. Products of linear interfacial polymerization demonstrate opposite trends as they are spontaneously homogenized by a convective flow of macromolecules expelled from the reactive zone to the film periphery, which we call the reactive extrusion effect and which is hampered in branched polymerization. Influence of the comonomer architecture on the polymer film characteristics could be used in various practical applications of interfacial polymerization, such as fabrication of membranes, micro- and nanocapsules and 3D printing.

  3. Giant interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in MgO/CoFe/capping layer structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shouzhong; Zhao, Weisheng; Qiao, Junfeng; Su, Li; Zhou, Jiaqi; Yang, Hongxin; Zhang, Qianfan; Zhang, Youguang; Grezes, Cecile; Amiri, Pedram Khalili; Wang, Kang L.

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic tunnel junction based on the CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB structures is of great interest due to its application in the spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM). Large interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) is required to achieve high thermal stability. Here, we use the first-principles calculations to investigate the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) of the MgO/CoFe/capping layer structures, where the capping materials include 5d metals Hf, Ta, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, and Au and 6p metals Tl, Pb, and Bi. We demonstrate that it is feasible to enhance PMA by using proper capping materials. Relatively large PMA is found in the structures with the capping materials of Hf, Ta, Os, Ir, and Pb. More importantly, the MgO/CoFe/Bi structure gives rise to giant PMA (6.09 mJ/m2), which is about three times larger than that of the MgO/CoFe/Ta structure. The origin of the MAE is elucidated by examining the contributions to MAE from each atomic layer and orbital. These findings provide a comprehensive understanding of the PMA and point towards the possibility to achieve the advanced-node STT-MRAM with high thermal stability.

  4. Research on the nanolevel influence of surfactants on structure formation of the hydrated Portland cement compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guryanov Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The research of the structure formation process on a nanolevel of the samples of hydrated Portland cement compositions containing the modifying additives has been conducted with the help of small angle neutron scattering method. Carbonate and aluminum alkaline slimes as well as the complex additives containing surfactants were used as additives. The influence of slimes and surfactants on structural parameters change of Portland cement compositions of the average size of the disseminating objects, fractal dimension samples is considered. These Portland cement compositions are shown to be fractal clusters.

  5. Modelling of AlAs/GaAs interfacial structures using high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) image simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Paul D; Finnie, Michael; Craven, Alan J

    2012-07-01

    High angle annular dark field (HAADF) image simulations were performed on a series of AlAs/GaAs interfacial models using the frozen-phonon multislice method. Three general types of models were considered-perfect, vicinal/sawtooth and diffusion. These were chosen to demonstrate how HAADF image measurements are influenced by different interfacial structures in the technologically important III-V semiconductor system. For each model, interfacial sharpness was calculated as a function of depth and compared to aberration-corrected HAADF experiments of two types of AlAs/GaAs interfaces. The results show that the sharpness measured from HAADF imaging changes in a complicated manner with thickness for complex interfacial structures. For vicinal structures, it was revealed that the type of material that the probe projects through first of all has a significant effect on the measured sharpness. An increase in the vicinal angle was also shown to generate a wider interface in the random step model. The Moison diffusion model produced an increase in the interface width with depth which closely matched the experimental results of the AlAs-on-GaAs interface. In contrast, the interface width decreased as a function of depth in the linear diffusion model. Only in the case of the perfect model was it possible to ascertain the underlying structure directly from HAADF image analysis.

  6. On the interfacial fracture of porcelain/zirconia and graded zirconia dental structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Herzl; Lee, James J-W; Mieleszko, Adam J; Chu, Stephen J; Zhang, Yu

    2014-08-01

    Porcelain fused to zirconia (PFZ) restorations are widely used in prosthetic dentistry. However, their susceptibility to fracture remains a practical problem. The failure of PFZ prostheses often involves crack initiation and growth in the porcelain, which may be followed by fracture along the porcelain/zirconia (P/Z) interface. In this work, we characterized the process of fracture in two PFZ systems, as well as a newly developed graded glass-zirconia structure with emphases placed on resistance to interfacial cracking. Thin porcelain layers were fused onto Y-TZP plates with or without the presence of a glass binder. The specimens were loaded in a four-point-bending fixture with the thin porcelain veneer in tension, simulating the lower portion of the connectors and marginal areas of a fixed dental prosthesis (FDP) during occlusal loading. The evolution of damage was observed by a video camera. The fracture was characterized by unstable growth of cracks perpendicular to the P/Z interface (channel cracks) in the porcelain layer, which was followed by stable cracking along the P/Z interface. The interfacial fracture energy GC was determined by a finite-element analysis taking into account stress-shielding effects due to the presence of adjacent channel cracks. The resulting GC was considerably less than commonly reported values for similar systems. Fracture in the graded Y-TZP samples occurred via a single channel crack at a much greater stress than for PFZ. No delamination between the residual glass layer and graded zirconia occurred in any of the tests. Combined with its enhanced resistance to edge chipping and good esthetic quality, graded Y-TZP emerges as a viable material concept for dental restorations.

  7. Temperature dependence of the structure of protein hydration water and the liquid-liquid transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accordino, S R; Malaspina, D C; Rodriguez Fris, J A; Alarcón, L M; Appignanesi, G A

    2012-03-01

    We study the temperature dependence of the structure and orientation of the first hydration layers of the protein lysozyme and compare it with the situation for a model homogeneous hydrophobic surface, a graphene sheet. We show that in both cases these layers are significantly better structured than bulk water. The geometrical constraint of the interface makes the water molecules adjacent to the surface lose one water-water hydrogen bond and expel the fourth neighbors away from the surface, lowering local density. We show that a decrease in temperature improves the ordering of the hydration water molecules, preserving such a geometrical effect. For the case of graphene, this favors an ice Ih-like local structuring, similar to the water-air interface but in the opposite way along the c axis of the basal plane (while the vicinal water molecules of the air interface orient a hydrogen atom toward the surface, the oxygens of the water molecules close to the graphene plane orient a lone pair in such a direction). In turn, the case of the first hydration layers of the lysozyme molecule is shown to be more complicated, but still displaying signs of both kinds of behavior, together with a tendency of the proximal water molecules to hydrogen bond to the protein both as donors and as acceptors. Additionally, we make evident the existence of signatures of a liquid-liquid transition (Widom line crossing) in different structural parameters at the temperature corresponding to the dynamic transition incorrectly referred to as "the protein glass transition."

  8. Unravelling surface and interfacial structures of a metal–organic framework by transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Yihan

    2017-02-21

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are crystalline porous materials with designable topology, porosity and functionality, having promising applications in gas storage and separation, ion conduction and catalysis1, 2, 3. It is challenging to observe MOFs with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) due to the extreme instability of MOFs upon electron beam irradiation4, 5, 6, 7. Here, we use a direct-detection electron-counting camera to acquire TEM images of the MOF ZIF-8 with an ultralow dose of 4.1 electrons per square ångström to retain the structural integrity. The obtained image involves structural information transferred up to 2.1 Å, allowing the resolution of individual atomic columns of Zn and organic linkers in the framework. Furthermore, TEM reveals important local structural features of ZIF-8 crystals that cannot be identified by diffraction techniques, including armchair-type surface terminations and coherent interfaces between assembled crystals. These observations allow us to understand how ZIF-8 crystals self-assemble and the subsequent influence of interfacial cavities on mass transport of guest molecules.

  9. Growth and interfacial structure of methylammonium lead iodide thin films on Au(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Limin; Liu, Meizhuang; Li, Xiaoli; Cai, Zeying; Zhong, Dingyong

    2017-02-01

    Due to the promising optoelectronic properties, organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have been intensively studied as the active layers in perovskite solar cells. However, the structural information about their interface, one of the key factors determining device performances, is so far very rare. Herein, we report on the growth of CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3, MA=CH3NH3) thin films by means of vapor deposition under ultrahigh vacuum. The surface morphology and interfacial structure have been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy. At the initial growth stage, a complicated transient phase consisting of three atomic layers, i.e., iodine, MA-PbI4 and MA-I, was formed on the Au(111) substrate. With the coverage increasing, atomically smooth MAPbI3 films with orthorhombic structure have been obtained after annealing to 373 K. The films followed a self-organized twofold-layer by twofold-layer growth mode with the formation of complete PbI6 octahedrons and the exposure of MA-I terminated (001) surface.

  10. Structure, viscoelasticity, and interfacial dynamics of a model polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, Robert J.; Gillard, Timothy M.; Irwin, Matthew T.; Lodge, Timothy P.; Bates, Frank S.

    2016-01-01

    We have systematically studied the equilibrium structure and dynamics of a polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion (BμE) composed of poly(cyclohexylethylene) (PCHE), poly(ethylene) (PE), and a volumetrically symmetric PCHE–PE diblock copolymer, using dynamic mechanical spectroscopy, small angle X-ray and neutron scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. The BμE was investigated over an 80 °C temperature range, revealing a structural evolution and a rheological response not previously recognized in such systems. As the temperature is reduced below the point associated with the lamellar-disorder transition at compositions adjacent to the microemulsion channel, the interfacial area per chain of the BμE approaches that of the neat (undiluted) lamellar diblock copolymer. With increasing temperature, the diblock-rich interface swells through homopolymer infiltration. Time–temperature-superposed linear dynamic data obtained as a function of frequency show that the viscoelastic response of the BμE is strikingly similar to that of the fluctuating pure diblock copolymer in the disordered state, which we associate with membrane undulations and the breaking and reforming of interfaces. This work provides new insights into the structure and dynamics that characterize thermodynamically stable BμEs in the limits of relatively weak and strong segregation.

  11. Unravelling surface and interfacial structures of a metal-organic framework by transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yihan; Ciston, Jim; Zheng, Bin; Miao, Xiaohe; Czarnik, Cory; Pan, Yichang; Sougrat, Rachid; Lai, Zhiping; Hsiung, Chia-En; Yao, Kexin; Pinnau, Ingo; Pan, Ming; Han, Yu

    2017-05-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are crystalline porous materials with designable topology, porosity and functionality, having promising applications in gas storage and separation, ion conduction and catalysis. It is challenging to observe MOFs with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) due to the extreme instability of MOFs upon electron beam irradiation. Here, we use a direct-detection electron-counting camera to acquire TEM images of the MOF ZIF-8 with an ultralow dose of 4.1 electrons per square ångström to retain the structural integrity. The obtained image involves structural information transferred up to 2.1 Å, allowing the resolution of individual atomic columns of Zn and organic linkers in the framework. Furthermore, TEM reveals important local structural features of ZIF-8 crystals that cannot be identified by diffraction techniques, including armchair-type surface terminations and coherent interfaces between assembled crystals. These observations allow us to understand how ZIF-8 crystals self-assemble and the subsequent influence of interfacial cavities on mass transport of guest molecules.

  12. Structural features of a potential gas hydrate area in the Pointer Ridge off southwest Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsueh-Fen; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Chen, Song-Chuen; Liu, Char-Shine; Lin, Hsiao-Shan

    2015-04-01

    The offshore area of the southwest Taiwan is located in the oblique convergence zone between the northern continental margin of South China Sea and the Manila accretionary wedge. To the west of the deformation front offshore southwestern Taiwan, the Pointer Ridge is located in the passive South China Sea continental margin. The continental margin is compose of extensional horst-and-graben structures. There are numerous submarine channels and linear ridge, formed due to the submarine erosion across the continental slope region. According to geophysical research off SW Taiwan, abundant gas hydrate may exist. In this study, our purpose is to understand the relationship between the near-seafloor structures of the Pointer Ridge and the gas hydrate formation off SW Taiwan. The data we used include multi-beam echo sounder (MBES), side-scan sonar (SSS), sub-bottom profiler (SBP) and the multi-channel reflection seismic (MCS) data. Our results show the pockmark and gas seepage structures mainly appear in the place where the gradient of the BSR thickness is maximum. Those sites contain authigenic carbonate signature shown in the sub-bottom profiler. We also observe several folds and faults structures in this extensional background; however, these compressional features need further studies.

  13. Structural characterization of magnesium silicate hydrate: towards the design of eco-sustainable cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, M; Martini, F; Calucci, L; Fratini, E; Geppi, M; Ridi, F; Borsacchi, S; Baglioni, P

    2016-02-28

    Magnesium-based cement is one of the most interesting eco-sustainable alternatives to standard cementitious binders. The reasons for the interest towards this material are twofold: (i) its production process, using magnesium silicates, brine or seawater, dramatically reduces CO2 emissions with respect to Portland cement production, and (ii) it is very well suited to applications in radioactive waste encapsulation. In spite of its potential, assessment of the structural properties of its binder phase (magnesium silicate hydrate or M-S-H) is far from complete, especially because of its amorphous character. In this work, a comprehensive structural characterization of M-S-H was obtained using a multi-technique approach, including a detailed solid-state NMR investigation and, in particular, for the first time, quantitative (29)Si solid-state NMR data. M-S-H was prepared through room-temperature hydration of highly reactive MgO and silica fume and was monitored for 28 days. The results clearly evidenced the presence in M-S-H of "chrysotile-like" and "talc-like" sub-nanometric domains, which are approximately in a 1 : 1 molar ratio after long-time hydration. Both these kinds of domains have a high degree of condensation, corresponding to the presence of a small amount of silanols in the tetrahedral sheets. The decisive improvement obtained in the knowledge of M-S-H structure paves the way for tailoring the macroscopic properties of eco-sustainable cements by means of a bottom-up approach.

  14. A neutron-diffraction study of the effect of hydration on stratum corneum structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charalambopoulou, G.C.; Steriotis, T.A.; Stefanopoulos, K.L.; Stubos, A.K. [NCSR ' Demokritos' , 15310 Agia Paraskevi Attikis (Greece); Hauss, T. [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Glienicker Strasse 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    The primary barrier to transdermal diffusion resides in the stratum corneum (SC), the thin outermost layer of the skin. The SC hydration state is one of the most important factors that determine the rate of percutaneous permeability. Despite its great importance, the actual mechanism of water-SC interaction is yet unresolved. In the present work we employ the membrane neutron diffraction method, aiming to reveal structural details of porcine SC and ultimately enable the localization of water molecules in the two phases of the tissue. (orig.)

  15. Hydration structure of Ti(III and Cr(III: Monte Carlo simulation including three-body corrections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Mohammed

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Classical Monte Carlo simulations were performed to investigate the solvation structures of Ti(III and Cr(III ions in water with only ion-water pair interaction potential and by including three-body correction terms. The hydration structures were evaluated in terms of radial distribution functions, coordination numbers and angular distributions. The structural parameters obtained by including three-body correction terms are in good agreement with experimental values proving that many-body effects play a crucial role in the description of the hydration structure of highly charged ions.

  16. Structure of a carbonate/hydrate mound in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, T.; Woolsey, J.; Macelloni, L. [Mississippi Univ., Oxford, MI (United States). Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology; Lapham, L. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Kleinberg, R. [Schlumberger-Doll Research, Cambridge, MA (United States); Battista, B.; Knapp, C. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States); Caruso, S. [Univ. of Rome La Sapienza, Rome, (Italy). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Goebel, V. [Lookout Geophysical Co., Palisade, CO (United States); Chapman, R. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada). School of Earth and Ocean Sciences; Gerstoft, P. [California Univ., San Diego, CA (United States). Marine Physical Laboratory

    2008-07-01

    A one-kilometer-diameter carbonate/hydrate mound located in the south-central portion of Mississippi Canyon block 118 in the Gulf of Mexico was the site of a multi-sensor, multi-discipline sea-floor observatory. In preparation for installing the observatory, several surveys were conducted. The resulting data provided detailed information about the mound's structure. This paper discussed the structure of the carbonate/hydrate mound in the Gulf of Mexico. The paper described the surface morphology of the mound, which was imaged by multi-beam bathymetric sonar from an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) 40 metres above the sea floor as well as by cameras at or a few meters above the sea floor deployed from drifting surface vessels or tethered submersibles. Visual observations were also made from manned submersibles. The paper also discussed the collection of gravity and box cores for lithologic and bio-geochemical studies. Gas sampling, venting activity, and seismo-acoustic studies were also presented. The internal structure of the mound was described as well. It was concluded that pore-fluid analyses conducted on the cores revealed that microbial sulfate reduction, anaerobic methane oxidation, and methanogenesis were important processes in the upper sediment as they controlled the diffusive flux of methane into the overlying water column. The activity of microbes was also focused within patches near active vents. 10 refs., 10 figs.

  17. Surface and buried interfacial structures of epoxy resins used as underfills studied by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Anne V; Holden, Brad; Kristalyn, Cornelius; Fuller, Mike; Wilkerson, Brett; Chen, Zhan

    2011-05-01

    Flip chip technology has greatly improved the performance of semiconductor devices, but relies heavily on the performance of epoxy underfill adhesives. Because epoxy underfills are cured in situ in flip chip semiconductor devices, understanding their surface and interfacial structures is critical for understanding their adhesion to various substrates. Here, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to study surface and buried interfacial structures of two model epoxy resins used as underfills in flip chip devices, bisphenol A digylcidyl ether (BADGE) and 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDGE). The surface structures of these epoxies were compared before and after cure, and the orientations of their surface functional groups were deduced to understand how surface structural changes during cure may affect adhesion properties. Further, the effect of moisture exposure, a known cause of adhesion failure, on surface structures was studied. It was found that the BADGE surface significantly restructured upon moisture exposure while the BDDGE surface did not, showing that BADGE adhesives may be more prone to moisture-induced delamination. Lastly, although surface structure can give some insight into adhesion, buried interfacial structures more directly correspond to adhesion properties of polymers. SFG was used to study buried interfaces between deuterated polystyrene (d-PS) and the epoxies before and after moisture exposure. It was shown that moisture exposure acted to disorder the buried interfaces, most likely due to swelling. These results correlated with lap shear adhesion testing showing a decrease in adhesion strength after moisture exposure. The presented work showed that surface and interfacial structures can be correlated to adhesive strength and may be helpful in understanding and designing optimized epoxy underfill adhesives.

  18. Origin of interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in MgO/CoFe/metallic capping layer structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shouzhong; Wang, Mengxing; Yang, Hongxin; Zeng, Lang; Nan, Jiang; Zhou, Jiaqi; Zhang, Youguang; Hallal, Ali; Chshiev, Mairbek; Wang, Kang L; Zhang, Qianfan; Zhao, Weisheng

    2015-12-11

    Spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM) attracts extensive attentions due to its non-volatility, high density and low power consumption. The core device in STT-MRAM is CoFeB/MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), which possesses a high tunnel magnetoresistance ratio as well as a large value of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). It has been experimentally proven that a capping layer coating on CoFeB layer is essential to obtain a strong PMA. However, the physical mechanism of such effect remains unclear. In this paper, we investigate the origin of the PMA in MgO/CoFe/metallic capping layer structures by using a first-principles computation scheme. The trend of PMA variation with different capping materials agrees well with experimental results. We find that interfacial PMA in the three-layer structures comes from both the MgO/CoFe and CoFe/capping layer interfaces, which can be analyzed separately. Furthermore, the PMAs in the CoFe/capping layer interfaces are analyzed through resolving the magnetic anisotropy energy by layer and orbital. The variation of PMA with different capping materials is attributed to the different hybridizations of both d and p orbitals via spin-orbit coupling. This work can significantly benefit the research and development of nanoscale STT-MRAM.

  19. Origin of interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in MgO/CoFe/metallic capping layer structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shouzhong; Wang, Mengxing; Yang, Hongxin; Zeng, Lang; Nan, Jiang; Zhou, Jiaqi; Zhang, Youguang; Hallal, Ali; Chshiev, Mairbek; Wang, Kang L.; Zhang, Qianfan; Zhao, Weisheng

    2015-12-01

    Spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM) attracts extensive attentions due to its non-volatility, high density and low power consumption. The core device in STT-MRAM is CoFeB/MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), which possesses a high tunnel magnetoresistance ratio as well as a large value of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). It has been experimentally proven that a capping layer coating on CoFeB layer is essential to obtain a strong PMA. However, the physical mechanism of such effect remains unclear. In this paper, we investigate the origin of the PMA in MgO/CoFe/metallic capping layer structures by using a first-principles computation scheme. The trend of PMA variation with different capping materials agrees well with experimental results. We find that interfacial PMA in the three-layer structures comes from both the MgO/CoFe and CoFe/capping layer interfaces, which can be analyzed separately. Furthermore, the PMAs in the CoFe/capping layer interfaces are analyzed through resolving the magnetic anisotropy energy by layer and orbital. The variation of PMA with different capping materials is attributed to the different hybridizations of both d and p orbitals via spin-orbit coupling. This work can significantly benefit the research and development of nanoscale STT-MRAM.

  20. Effect of hydration on the structure of non aqueous ethyl cellulose/propylene glycol dicaprylate gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Lilia; Kasapis, Stefan; Heng, Paul W S

    2012-03-01

    Changes in the structural properties of ethyl cellulose/propylene glycol dicaprylate systems (EC/PGD), intended for topical drug delivery, upon addition of water were investigated. Although designed to be a non-aqueous vehicle for moisture sensitive drugs, these systems are expected to experience an aqueous environment during production, storage and application on the skin. Hence, the interaction of water molecules with the non aqueous gel system and their distribution within the gel network is of interest and critical to its application. Experimental techniques of this study were small-deformation dynamic oscillation in shear, modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC), (2)H NMR spectroscopy, ATR-infrared spectroscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction patterns and light microscopy. Rheological profiles of the gels containing moisture from 0.1 to 40.0% (w/w) deviated considerably from that of the non aqueous system at levels of water above 10.0% in preparations. Gradual replacement of the EC/PGD dipole interactions with stronger hydrogen bonding between ethyl cellulose chains, as the level of hydration increased, contributed to these observations. Formation of clusters of ethyl cellulose, observed under a light microscope, was thus ensued. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the rearrangement of the polymer chains led to the loss of liquid crystal structures found in the anhydrous gel. MDSC and (2)H NMR were used to further shed light on the thermodynamic state of added water molecules in the gels. Plots of enthalpy obtained calorimetrically and a good correlation between MDSC and (2)H NMR data indicate that gels with less than two percent hydration contain water in a non-freezable bound state, whereas freezable moieties are obtained at levels of hydration above five percent in composite (EC/PGD/water) gels.

  1. 油藏流体中H型水合物生成条件的计算%Prediction of Structure-H Gas Hydrate Formation Conditions for Reservoir Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马庆兰; 陈光进; 郭天民; 张坤; Julian Y.Zuo; Dan Zhang; Heng-Joo Ng

    2005-01-01

    In this work, a thermodynamic model is developed for prediction of structure H hydrate formation. The model combines the Peng-Robinson equation of state for the vapor, liquid and aqueous phases with the extended Ng-Robinson hydrate model for gas hydrate formation of all three structures. The parameters of 14 structureH hydrate formers are determined based on the experimental data of structure-H hydrates in the literature. The expression of fugacity of water in the empty hydrate phase is correlated for calculating structure-H hydrate formation conditions in the absence of free water. The model is tested by predicting hydrate formation conditions of a number of structure-H hydrate forming systems which are in good agreement with the experimental data. The proposed model is also applied to the prediction of hydrate formation conditions for various reservoir fluids such as natural gas and gas condensate.

  2. Gas-Liquid Interfacial Non-Equilibrium Plasmas for Structure Controlled Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Toshiro

    2013-10-01

    Plasmas generated in liquid or in contact with liquid have attracted much attention as a novel reactive field in the nano-bio material creation because the brand-new chemical and biological reactions are yielded at the gas-liquid interface, which are induced by the physical actions of the non-equilibrium plasmas. In this study, first, size- and structure-controlled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) covered with DNA are synthesized using a pulse-driven gas-liquid interfacial discharge plasma (GLIDP) for the application to next-generation drug delivery systems. The size and assembly of the AuNPs are found to be easily controlled by changing the plasma parameters and DNA concentration in the liquid. On the other hand, the mono-dispersed, small-sized, and interval-controlled AuNPs are synthesized by using the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a template, where the CNTs are functionalized by the ion and radical irradiation in non-equilibrium plasmas. These new materials are now widely applied to the solar cell, optical devices, and so on. Second, highly-ordered periodic structures of the AuNPs are formed by transcribing the periodic plasma structure to the surface of the liquid, where the spatially selective synthesis of the AuNPs is realized. This phenomenon is well explained by the reduction and oxidation effects of the radicals which are generated by the non-equilibrium plasma irradiation to the liquid and resultant dissociation of the liquid. In addition, it is attempted to form nano- or micro-scale periodic structures of the AuNPs based on the self-organizing behavior of turbulent plasmas generated by the nonlinear development of plasma fluctuations at the gas-liquid interface.

  3. Structure of naturally hydrated ferrihydrite revealed through neutron diffraction and first-principles modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Helen F.; Thom, William; Bowron, Daniel T.; Faria, Nuno; Hasnip, Philip J.; Powell, Jonathan J.

    2017-08-01

    Ferrihydrite, with a ``two-line'' x-ray diffraction pattern (2L-Fh), is the most amorphous of the iron oxides and is ubiquitous in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. It also plays a central role in the regulation and metabolism of iron in bacteria, algae, higher plants, and animals, including humans. In this study, we present a single-phase model for ferrihydrite that unifies existing analytical data while adhering to fundamental chemical principles. The primary particle is small (20-50 Å) and has a dynamic and variably hydrated surface, which negates long-range order; collectively, these features have hampered complete characterization and frustrated our understanding of the mineral's reactivity and chemical/biochemical function. Near and intermediate range neutron diffraction (NIMROD) and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) were employed in this study to generate and interpret high-resolution data of naturally hydrated, synthetic 2L-Fh at standard temperature. The structural optimization overcomes transgressions of coordination chemistry inherent within previously proposed structures, to produce a robust and unambiguous single-phase model.

  4. Crystal structures of highly simplified BPTIs provide insights into hydration-driven increase of unfolding enthalpy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Monirul; Yohda, Masafumi; Kidokoro, Shun-ichi; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    We report a thermodynamic and structural analysis of six extensively simplified bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) variants containing 19–24 alanines out of 58 residues. Differential scanning calorimetry indicated a two-state thermal unfolding, typical of a native protein with densely packed interior. Surprisingly, increasing the number of alanines induced enthalpy stabilization, which was however over-compensated by entropy destabilization. X-ray crystallography indicated that the alanine substitutions caused the recruitment of novel water molecules facilitating the formation of protein–water hydrogen bonds and improving the hydration shells around the alanine’s methyl groups, both of which presumably contributed to enthalpy stabilization. There was a strong correlation between the number of water molecules and the thermodynamic parameters. Overall, our results demonstrate that, in contrast to our initial expectation, a protein sequence in which over 40% of the residues are alanines can retain a densely packed structure and undergo thermal denaturation with a large enthalpy change, mainly contributed by hydration. PMID:28266637

  5. Electrical and Structural Characteristics of High-k Gate Dielectrics with Epitaxial Si3N4 Interfacial Layer on Si(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Hyunjun; Samantaray, Chandan B.; Lee, Taeho; Yeom, Hanwoong; Hwang, Hyunsang

    2004-12-01

    In this study, the electrical and structural characteristics of Gd2O3 gate dielectrics with an epitaxial Si3N4 interfacial layer grown on Si(111) were investigated. Compared with control Gd2O3 gate dielectrics deposited on HF-last treated Si (111), the Gd2O3 gate dielectrics with an epitaxial Si3N4 interfacial layer exhibited excellent electrical characteristics such as low leakage current density and low interface state density. These characteristics are due to a high-quality interfacial layer formation on Si. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were employed to analyze the structures of the gate dielectrics and interfacial layer. High-k gate dielectrics with an epitaxial Si3N4 interfacial layer have considerable potential for future use in sub-0.1 μm metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs).

  6. The control of stoichiometry in Epitaxial semiconductor structures. Interfacial Chemistry: Property relations. A workshop review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Klaus J.

    1995-01-01

    A workshop on the control of stoichiometry in epitaxial semiconductor structures was held on August 21-26, 1995 in the hotel Stutenhaus at Vesser in Germany. The secluded location of the workshop in the forest of Thuringia and its informal style stimulated extensive private discussions among the participants and promoted new contacts between young scientists from Eastern and Western Europe and the USA. Topics addressed by the presentations were interactions of precursors to heteroepitaxy and doping with the substrate surface, the control of interfacial properties under the conditions of heteroepitaxy for selected materials systems, methods of characterization of interfaces and native point defects in semiconductor heterostructures and an in depth evaluation of the present status of the control and characterization of the point defect chemistry for one specific semiconductor (ZnGeP2), including studies of both heterostructures and bulk single crystals. The selected examples of presentations and comments given here represent individual choices - made by the author to highlight major points of the discussions.

  7. Interfacial stability of CoSi2/Si structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, T.; Fathauer, R. W.

    1992-01-01

    The stability of CoSi2/Si interfaces was examined in this study using columnar silicide structures grown on (111) Si substrates. In the first set of experiments, Co and Si were codeposited using MBE at 800 C and the resulting columnar silicide layer was capped by epitaxial Si. Deposition of Co on the surface of the Si capping layer at 800 C results in the growth of the buried silicide columns. The buried columns grow by subsurface diffusion of the deposited Co, suppressing the formation of surface islands of CoSi2. The column sidewalls appear to be less stable than the top and bottom interfaces, resulting in preferential lateral growth and ultimately in the coalescence of the columns to form a continuous buried CoSi2 layer. In the second set of experiments, annealing of a 250 nm-thick buried columnar layer at 1000 C under a 100 nm-thick Si capping layer results in the formation of a surface layer of CoSi2 with a reduction in the sizes of the CoSi2 columns. For a sample having a thicker Si capping layer the annealing leads to Ostwald ripening producing buried equiaxed columns. The high CoSi2/Si interfacial strain could provide the driving force for the observed behavior of the buried columns under high-temperature annealing.

  8. Structure and vibrational dynamics of interfacial Sn layers in Sn/Si multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenya, B. Roldan; Keune, W.; Sturhahn, W.; Toellner, T. S.; Hu, M. Y.

    2001-12-01

    The structure and vibrational dynamics of room-temperature-grown nanoscale Sn/amorphous (a-)Si multilayers have been studied by x-ray diffraction, Raman scattering, 119Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy, and 119Sn nuclear-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) of synchrotron radiation. With increasing Sn-layer thickness, the formation of β-Sn was observed, except at the Sn/Si interfaces, where a 10-Å-thick metastable pure amorphous-α-Sn-like layer remains stabilized. By means of NRIXS we have measured the Sn-projected vibrational density of states (VDOS) in these multilayers (in particular, at the interfaces), and in 500-Å-thick epitaxial α-Sn films on InSb(001) as a reference. Further, the Sn-specific Lamb-Mössbauer factor (f factor), mean kinetic energy per atom, mean atomic force constant, and vibrational entropy per atom were obtained. The VDOS of the amorphous-α-Sn-like interface layer is observed to be distinctly different from that of (bulk) α-Sn and β-Sn, and its prominent vibrational energies are found to scale with those of amorphous Ge and Si. The observed small difference in vibrational entropy (ΔS/kB=+0.17+/-0.05 per atom) between α-Sn and interfacial amorphous-α-like Sn does not account for the stability of the latter phase.

  9. Structural characteristics of hydrated protons in the conductive channels: effects of confinement and fluorination studied by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Song, Yuechun; Ruan, Xuehua; Yan, Xiaoming; Liu, Zhao; Shen, Zhuanglin; Wu, Xuemei; He, Gaohong

    2016-09-21

    The relationship between the proton conductive channel and the hydrated proton structure is of significant importance for understanding the deformed hydrogen bonding network of the confined protons which matches the nanochannel. In general, the structure of hydrated protons in the nanochannel of the proton exchange membrane is affected by several factors. To investigate the independent effect of each factor, it is necessary to eliminate the interference of other factors. In this paper, a one-dimensional carbon nanotube decorated with fluorine was built to investigate the independent effects of nanoscale confinement and fluorination on the structural properties of hydrated protons in the nanochannel using classical molecular dynamics simulation. In order to characterize the structure of hydrated protons confined in the channel, the hydrogen bonding interaction between water and the hydrated protons has been studied according to suitable hydrogen bond criteria. The hydrogen bond criteria were proposed based on the radial distribution function, angle distribution and pair-potential energy distribution. It was found that fluorination leads to an ordered hydrogen bonding structure of the hydrated protons near the channel surface, and confinement weakens the formation of the bifurcated hydrogen bonds in the radial direction. Besides, fluorination lowers the free energy barrier of hydronium along the nanochannel, but slightly increases the barrier for water. This leads to disintegration of the sequential hydrogen bond network in the fluorinated CNTs with small size. In the fluorinated CNTs with large diameter, the lower degree of confinement produces a spiral-like sequential hydrogen bond network with few bifurcated hydrogen bonds in the central region. This structure might promote unidirectional proton transfer along the channel without random movement. This study provides the cooperative effect of confinement dimension and fluorination on the structure and hydrogen

  10. Fourier transform IR spectroscopic study of hydration-induced structure changes in the solid state of omega-gliadins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellner, N; Belton, P S; Tatham, A S

    1996-11-01

    The hydration of omega-gliadins and party deamidated and esterified omega-gliadins has been studied by Fourier transform IR spectroscopy. The secondary structure of the fully hydrated proteins was a mixture of beta-turns and extended chains, with a small amount of intermolecular beta-sheets. The absorption of the glutamine side chain amide groups contributed considerably to the amide I band with two well-defined peaks at 1658 and 1610 cm-1. the amide I band of the dry native sample could not be resolved into single component bands. There the backbone structure seemed to be distorted by extensive hydrogen bonding involving glutamine side chains. With increasing water content, these hydrogen bonds were broken successively by water molecules, resulting in an increase in extended, hydrated structures, which gave rise to the formation of intermolecular beta-sheet structures. Above 35% (w/w) water the beta-sheet content fell sharply and was replaced by extensively hydrated extended structures. An amide I band similar to dissolved poly-L-proline proved that parts of the polymer were in a solution-like state. The replacement of many glutamine side chains in the esterified protein produced more resolved secondary structures even in the dry sample. The beta-sheet content of the dry sample was higher than in the native omega-gliadins, but hydration generally caused very similar changes. At all hydration levels the spectra indicated a more ordered structure than in the native sample. Overall, the modification caused changes that go beyond the simple presence or absence of glutamine bands.

  11. Interfacial-strain-induced structural and polarization evolutions in epitaxial multiferroic BiFeO3 (001) thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Haizhong; Zhao, Ruiqiang; Jin, Kui-Juan; Gu, Lin; Xiao, Dongdong; Yang, Zhenzhong; Li, Xiaolong; Wang, Le; He, Xu; Gu, Junxing; Wan, Qian; Wang, Can; Lu, Huibin; Ge, Chen; He, Meng; Yang, Guozhen

    2015-02-04

    Varying the film thickness is a precise route to tune the interfacial strain to manipulate the properties of the multiferroic materials. Here, to explore the effects of the interfacial strain on the properties of the multiferroic BiFeO3 films, we investigated thickness-dependent structural and polarization evolutions of the BiFeO3 films. The epitaxial growth with an atomic stacking sequence of BiO/TiO2 at the interface was confirmed by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Combining X-ray diffraction experiments and first-principles calculations, a thickness-dependent structural evolution was observed from a fully strained tetragonality to a partially relaxed one without any structural phase transition or rotated twins. The tetragonality (c/a) of the BiFeO3 films increases as the film thickness decreases, while the polarization is in contrast with this trend, and the size effect including the depolarization field plays a crucial role in this contradiction in thinner films. These findings offer an alternative strategy to manipulate structural and polarization properties by tuning the interfacial strain in epitaxial multiferroic thin films.

  12. Molecular Dynamics Study on Interfacial Energy and Atomic Structure of Ag/Ni and Cu/Ni Heterophase System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haijiang LIU; Shaoqing WANG; An DU; Caibei ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    The results of molecular dynamics calculations on the interfacial energies and atomic structures of Ag/Ni and Cu/Ni interaces are presented. Calculation on Ag/Ni interfaces with low-index planes shows that those containing the (111) plane have the lowest energies, which is in agreement with the experiments. Comparing surface energy with interracial energy, it is found the order of the interfacial energies of Ag/Ni and Cu/Ni containing the planes fall in the same order as solid-vapor surface energies of Ag, Cu and Ni. In this MD simulation, the relaxed atomic structure and dislocation network of (110)Ag||(110)Ni interface are coincident to HREM observations.

  13. Verification and recovery of thick deposits of massive gas hydrate from chimney structures, eastern margin of Japan Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, R.; Kakuwa, Y.; Snyder, G. T.; Tanahashi, M.; Yanagimoto, Y.; Morita, S.

    2016-12-01

    The initial scientific research that was carried out between 2004 and 2013 has provided us with invaluable evidence that gas hydrates occur widely on and below the sea floor down to approximately 30 mbsf within gas chimney structures in Japan Sea (Matsumoto, 2005; 2009). In 2013, METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry) launched a 3-year exploration project to assess the resource potential of shallow gas hydrates in Japan Sea. During the course of the project, Meiji University and AIST conducted: sea-going geophysical surveys with AUV, and high resolution 3D seismic and CSEM. These were followed by LWD and coring down to BSR depths, and coupled with a number of analyses and experiments. Regional mapping by MBES and SBP has confirmed 1742 gas chimneys in an area of 64,000km2 along the eastern margin of Japan Sea and around Hokkaido. Multiple LWD operations have revealed anomalous profiles such as extremely low natural gamma ray, high velocity Vp, and high resistivity Ro down to BSR depths, providing a strong indication that thick and massive gas hydrates exist throughout gas chimneys above the BSR. In several cases, conventional coring using 6-m long core liners recovered nearly 6 m long massive gas hydrates in several horizons adjacent to the anomalous LWD sites.The PCTB pressure coring system (Geotek Ltd) successfully cored 2-m long intervals of undisturbed, pressurized hydrate-bearing cores, providing valuable information about the in-situ occurrence and textural relations of hydrate and surrounding sediments. Full dissociation and slow degassing experiments of pressurized cores were conducted using onboard PCATS (Pressure core analysis and transfer system) to measure the amount of gases from hydrates. The mean volume fraction of gas hydrates in well-developed gas chimney structures is estimated to be 30 to 86 vol.% based on coupled PCATS and chloride anomaly profiles. Such an unusually high accumulation of gas hydrates in gas chimneys is assumed to have

  14. Characterization of interfacially electronic structures of gold-magnetite heterostructures using X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fang-hsin; Doong, Ruey-an

    2014-03-01

    Gold-magnetite heterostructures are novel nanomaterials which can rapidly catalyze the reduction reaction of nitroaromatics. In this study, the interfacially structural and electronic properties of various morphologies of Au-Fe3O4 heterostructures were systematically investigated using X-ray absorbance spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effect of change in electronic structure and charge transfer on electrochemically catalytic activity of Au-Fe3O4 heterostructures was further evaluated by oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The shifts in binding energy of Au4f and Fe2p peaks in XPS spectra indicate the charge transfer between the Au and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The increase in d-hole population of Au seeds after the conjugation with iron oxides follows the order flower-like Au-Fe3O4 (FLNPs)>dumbbell-like Au-Fe3O4 (DBNPs)>Au seeds. In addition, the Fe(2+) valence state increases in Au-Fe3O4 heterostructures, which provides evidence to support the hypothesis of charge transfer between Au and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The theoretical simulation of Au L3-edge XAS further confirms the production of Au-Fe and Au-O bonds at the interface of Au/Fe3O4 and the epitaxial linkage relationship between Au and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. In addition, the electron deficient of Au seeds increases upon increasing Fe3O4 nanoparticles on a single Au seed, and subsequently decreases the catalytic activity of Au in the Au-Fe3O4 heterostructures. The catalytic activity of Au-Fe3O4 toward ORR follows the order Au seeds>Au-Fe3O4 DBNPs>Au-Fe3O4 FLNPs, which is positively correlated to the extent of electronic deficiency of Au in Au-Fe3O4 heterostructures.

  15. Study on molecular structure and hydration mechanism of Domyoji-ko starch by IR and NIR hetero 2D analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Norihisa; Kondo, Miyuki; Miyazawa, Mitsuhiro

    2010-06-01

    The hydration structure of starch molecule in Domyoji-ko, which is made from gluey rice, was investigated by hetero 2D correlation analysis of IR and NIR spectroscopy. The feature near 1020 cm -1 in the IR spectra of Domyoji-ko is changed by rehydration process, indicating that the molecular structure of amylopectin in the starch has been varied by the hydration without heating. The intensity of a band at 4770 cm -1 in NIR spectra is decreasing with the increasing of either the heating time with water or rehydration time without heating. These results suggest that the hydration of Domyoji-ko has proceeded in similar mechanisms on these processes. The generalized hetero 2D IR-NIR correlation analysis for rehydration of Domyoji-ko has supported the assignments for NIR bands concerning the gelatinization of starch.

  16. Quil A-lipid powder formulations releasing ISCOMs and related colloidal structures upon hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demana, Patrick H; Davies, Nigel M; Hook, Sarah; Rades, Thomas

    2005-03-02

    The aim of the present study was to prepare solid Quil A-cholesterol-phospholipid formulations (as powder mixtures or compressed to pellets) by physical mixing or by freeze-drying of aqueous dispersions of these components in ratios that allow spontaneous formation of ISCOMs and other colloidal structures upon hydration. The effect of addition of excess cholesterol to the lipid mixtures on the release of a model antigen (PE-FITC-OVA) from the pellets was also investigated. Physical properties were evaluated by X-ray powder diffractometry (XPRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and polarized light microscopy (PLM). Characterization of aqueous colloidal dispersions was performed by negative staining transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Physically mixed powders (with or without PE-FITC-OVA) and pellets prepared from the same powders did not spontaneously form ISCOM matrices and related colloidal structures such as worm-like micelles, ring-like micelles, lipidic/layered structures and lamellae (hexagonal array of ring-like micelles) upon hydration as expected from the pseudo-ternary diagram for aqueous mixtures of Quil A, cholesterol and phospholipid. In contrast, spontaneous formation of the expected colloids was demonstrated for the freeze-dried lipid mixtures. Pellets prepared by compression of freeze-dried powders released PE-FITC-OVA slower than those prepared from physically mixed powders. TEM investigations revealed that the antigen was released in the form of colloidal particles (ISCOMs) from pellets prepared by compression of freeze-dried powders. The addition of excess cholesterol slowed down the release of antigen. The findings obtained in this study are important for the formulation of solid Quil A-containing lipid articles as controlled particulate adjuvant containing antigen delivery systems.

  17. Self-healing sandwich structures incorporating an interfacial layer with vascular network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlin; Peters, Kara; Li, Yulong

    2013-02-01

    A self-healing capability specifically targeted for sandwich composite laminates based on interfacial layers with built-in vascular networks is presented. The self-healing occurs at the facesheet-core interface through an additional interfacial layer to seal facesheet cracks and rebond facesheet-core regions. The efficacy of introducing the self-healing system at the facesheet-core interface is evaluated through four-point bend and edgewise compression testing of representative foam core sandwich composite specimens with impact induced damage. The self-healing interfacial layer partially restored the specific initial stiffness, doubling the residual initial stiffness as compared to the control specimen after the impact event. The restoration of the ultimate specific skin strength was less successful. The results also highlight the critical challenge in self-healing of sandwich composites, which is to rebond facesheets which have separated from the core material.

  18. Interfacial structure of steel-Al-28Pb bonding plate with semisolid rolling-casting method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 杜云慧; 刘汉武; 曾大本; 崔建忠; 巴立民

    2004-01-01

    Fe-Al compound at the interface of steel-mushy Al-28Pb bonding plate was studied quantitatively. The relationship between ratio of Fe-Al compound at interface and bonding parameters such as preheating temperature of steel plate, solid volume fraction of Al-28Pb slurry and rolling speed, was established by artificial neural networks perfectly. The results show that when the bonding parameters are 546 ℃ for preheating temperature of steel plate,43.5% for solid volume fraction of Al-28Pb slurry and 8.6 mm/s for rolling speed, the reasonable ratio of Fe-Al compound corresponding to the largest interfacial shear strength of bonding plate is obtained as 71.5%. This reasonable ratio of Fe-Al compound is a quantitative criterion of interfacial embrittlement, that is, when the ratio of FeAl compound at interface is larger than 71.5%, interfacial embrittlement will occur.

  19. Structural basis for the transformation pathways of the sodium naproxen anhydrate–hydrate system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Bond

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Crystal structures are presented for two dihydrate polymorphs (DH-I and DH-II of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug sodium (S-naproxen. The structure of DH-I is determined from twinned single crystals obtained by solution crystallization. DH-II is obtained by solid-state routes, and its structure is derived using powder X-ray diffraction, solid-state 13C and 23Na MAS NMR, and molecular modelling. The validity of both structures is supported by dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D calculations. The structures of DH-I and DH-II, and in particular their relationships to the monohydrate (MH and anhydrate (AH structures, provide a basis to rationalize the observed transformation pathways in the sodium (S-naproxen anhydrate–hydrate system. All structures contain Na+/carboxylate/H2O sections, alternating with sections containing the naproxen molecules. The structure of DH-I is essentially identical to MH in the naproxen region, containing face-to-face arrangements of the naphthalene rings, whereas the structure of DH-II is comparable to AH in the naproxen region, containing edge-to-face arrangements of the naphthalene rings. This structural similarity permits topotactic transformation between AH and DH-II, and between MH and DH-I, but requires re-organization of the naproxen molecules for transformation between any other pair of structures. The topotactic pathways dominate at room temperature or below, while the non-topotactic pathways become active at higher temperatures. Thermochemical data for the dehydration processes are rationalized in the light of this new structural information.

  20. A simple atomic-level hydrophobicity scale reveals protein interfacial structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapcha, Lauren H; Rossky, Peter J

    2014-01-23

    Many amino acid residue hydrophobicity scales have been created in an effort to better understand and rapidly characterize water-protein interactions based only on protein structure and sequence. There is surprisingly low consistency in the ranking of residue hydrophobicity between scales, and their ability to provide insightful characterization varies substantially across subject proteins. All current scales characterize hydrophobicity based on entire amino acid residue units. We introduce a simple binary but atomic-level hydrophobicity scale that allows for the classification of polar and non-polar moieties within single residues, including backbone atoms. This simple scale is first shown to capture the anticipated hydrophobic character for those whole residues that align in classification among most scales. Examination of a set of protein binding interfaces establishes good agreement between residue-based and atomic-level descriptions of hydrophobicity for five residues, while the remaining residues produce discrepancies. We then show that the atomistic scale properly classifies the hydrophobicity of functionally important regions where residue-based scales fail. To illustrate the utility of the new approach, we show that the atomic-level scale rationalizes the hydration of two hydrophobic pockets and the presence of a void in a third pocket within a single protein and that it appropriately classifies all of the functionally important hydrophilic sites within two otherwise hydrophobic pores. We suggest that an atomic level of detail is, in general, necessary for the reliable depiction of hydrophobicity for all protein surfaces. The present formulation can be implemented simply in a manner no more complex than current residue-based approaches.

  1. Structures, Hydration, and Electrical Mobilities of Bisulfate Ion-Sulfuric Acid-Ammonia/Dimethylamine Clusters: A Computational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsona, Narcisse T; Henschel, Henning; Bork, Nicolai; Loukonen, Ville; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2015-09-17

    Despite the well-established role of small molecular clusters in the very first steps of atmospheric particle formation, their thermochemical data are still not completely available due to limitation of the experimental techniques to treat such small clusters. We have investigated the structures and the thermochemistry of stepwise hydration of clusters containing one bisulfate ion, sulfuric acid, base (ammonia or dimethylamine), and water molecules using quantum chemical methods. We found that water facilitates proton transfer from sulfuric acid or the bisulfate ion to the base or water molecules, and depending on the hydration level, the sulfate ion was formed in most of the base-containing clusters. The calculated hydration energies indicate that water binds more strongly to ammonia-containing clusters than to dimethylamine-containing and base-free clusters, which results in a wider hydrate distribution for ammonia-containing clusters. The electrical mobilities of all clusters were calculated using a particle dynamics model. The results indicate that the effect of humidity is negligible on the electrical mobilities of molecular clusters formed in the very first steps of atmospheric particle formation. The combination of the results of this study with those previously published on the hydration of neutral clusters by our group provides a comprehensive set of thermochemical data on neutral and negatively charged clusters containing sulfuric acid, ammonia, or dimethylamine.

  2. Structural Investigations of Portland Cement Components, Hydration, and Effects of Admixtures by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Jørgen Bengaard; Andersen, Morten D.; Jakobsen, Hans Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    Solid-state, magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy represents a valuable tool for structural investigations on the nanoscale of the most important phases in anhydrous and hydrated Portland cements and of various admixtures. This is primarily due to the fact that the method reflects the first...... in the cement phases. The role of flouride ions is of special interest for mineralized Portland cements and it demonstrated that the location of these anions in anhydrous and hydrated Portland cements can be clarified using 19F MAS or 29Si{19F} CP/MAS NMR despite these cements contain only about 0.2 wt...

  3. Similarities and peculiarities between the crystal structures of the hydrates of sodium sulfate and selenate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamburov, Stoyan; Schmidt, Horst; Voigt, Wolfgang; Balarew, Christo

    2014-08-01

    The crystal structures of the two hydrates Na2SeO4·10H2O and Na2SeO4·7.5H2O are studied for the first time. The structures of Na2SO4·10H2O and Na2SO4·7H2O are reinvestigated as a function of temperature with respect to the degree of disorder of the O atoms of SO4(2-) in the decahydrate and the O atom of water in the heptahydrate. For Na2SO4·10H2O, the unit site occupancy factor (SOF) of O atoms of SO4(2-) was determined at 120 K. After the temperature dependence of the lattice parameters was studied from 120 to 260 K, it was shown that SOF decreased from 1.0 at 120 K to 0.247 at room temperature. The interesting fact that two salts with different chemical compositions and different crystal structures (Na2SO4·7H2O, tetragonal, space group P4(1)2(1)2 and Na2SeO4·7.5H2O, monoclinic, space group C2/c) can act mutually as a crystal nucleus is accounted for by similarities in certain fragments of their crystal structures. This phenomenon is attributed to similarities between particular elements of their structures.

  4. Impact of hydration on the micromechanical properties of the polymer composite structure of wood investigated with atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulasinski, Karol; Derome, Dominique; Carmeliet, Jan

    2017-06-01

    A model of the secondary layer of wood cell wall consisting of crystalline cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin is constructed and investigated with molecular dynamics simulations in the full range of hydration: from dry to saturated state. The model is considered a composite with the cellulose fibrils embedded in hemicellulose and lignin, forming a soft amorphous matrix. Its complex structure leads to nonlinear and anisotropic swelling and mechanical weakening. The water diffusivity through the pores is affected by an interplay between stiff cellulose fibers and weakening amorphous polymers. The formation and breaking of hydrogen bonds within the polymers and at the interfaces is found to be the underlying mechanism of adsorption-induced mechanical softening. The model is tested for adsorption isotherm, mechanical moduli, hydrogen bonds, and water diffusivity that all undergo a substantial change as the hydration increases. The determined physical and mechanical properties, changing with hydration, agree qualitatively with experimental measurements.

  5. The influence of raw material, added emulsifying salt and spray drying on cheese powder structure and hydration properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felix da Silva, Denise; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Hougaard, Anni Bygvrå

    2017-01-01

    The present work has evaluated how raw material, addition of emulsifying salts (ES) and drying technology affect particle characteristics, structure, and hydration of cheese powders. In this context the spray drying technology induced the strongest effect on morphology and swelling of cheese powder...

  6. Grid inhomogeneous solvation theory: hydration structure and thermodynamics of the miniature receptor cucurbit[7]uril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Crystal N; Young, Tom Kurtzman; Gilson, Michael K

    2012-07-28

    The displacement of perturbed water upon binding is believed to play a critical role in the thermodynamics of biomolecular recognition, but it is nontrivial to unambiguously define and answer questions about this process. We address this issue by introducing grid inhomogeneous solvation theory (GIST), which discretizes the equations of inhomogeneous solvation theory (IST) onto a three-dimensional grid situated in the region of interest around a solute molecule or complex. Snapshots from explicit solvent simulations are used to estimate localized solvation entropies, energies, and free energies associated with the grid boxes, or voxels, and properly summing these thermodynamic quantities over voxels yields information about hydration thermodynamics. GIST thus provides a smoothly varying representation of water properties as a function of position, rather than focusing on hydration sites where solvent is present at high density. It therefore accounts for full or partial displacement of water from sites that are highly occupied by water, as well as for partly occupied and water-depleted regions around the solute. GIST can also provide a well-defined estimate of the solvation free energy and therefore enables a rigorous end-states analysis of binding. For example, one may not only use a first GIST calculation to project the thermodynamic consequences of displacing water from the surface of a receptor by a ligand, but also account, in a second GIST calculation, for the thermodynamics of subsequent solvent reorganization around the bound complex. In the present study, a first GIST analysis of the molecular host cucurbit[7]uril is found to yield a rich picture of hydration structure and thermodynamics in and around this miniature receptor. One of the most striking results is the observation of a toroidal region of high water density at the center of the host's nonpolar cavity. Despite its high density, the water in this toroidal region is disfavored energetically and

  7. Application of Neutron imaging in pore structure of hydrated wellbore cement: comparison of hydration of H20 with D2O based Portland cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussenova, D.; Bilheux, H.; Radonjic, M.

    2012-12-01

    Wellbore Cement studies have been ongoing for decades. The studies vary from efforts to reduce permeability and resistance to corrosive environment to issues with gas migration also known as Sustained Casing Pressure (SCP). These practical issues often lead to health and safety problems as well as huge economic loss in oil and gas industry. Several techniques have been employed to reduce the impact of gas leakage. In this study we purely focus on expandable liners, which are introduced as part of oil well reconstruction and work-overs and as well abandonment procedures that help in prevention of SCP. Expandable liner is a tube that after application of a certain tool can increase its diameter. The increase in diameter creates extra force on hydrated cement that results in reducing width of interface fractures and cement-tube de-bonding. Moreover, this also causes cement to change its microstructure and other porous medium properties, primarily hydraulic conductivity. In order to examine changes before and after operations, cement pore structure must be well characterized and correlated to cement slurry design as well as chemical and physical environmental conditions. As modern oil well pipes and tubes contain iron, it is difficult to perform X-ray tomography of a bulk measurement of the cement in its wellbore conditions, which are tube wall-cement-tube wall. Neutron imaging is a complementary technique to x-ray imaging and is well suited for detection of light elements imbedded in metallic containers. Thus, Neutron Imaging (NI) is investigated as a tool for the detection of pore structure of hydrated wellbore cement. Recent measurements were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) neutron imaging facility. NI is is highly sensitive to light elements such as Hydrogen (H). Oil well cements that have undergone a full hydration contain on average 30%-40% of free water in its pore structure. The unreacted water is the main

  8. Niclosamide methanol solvate and niclosamide hydrate: structure, solvent inclusion mode and implications for properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriss, Bethany I; Wilson, Claire; Radosavljevic Evans, Ivana

    2014-08-01

    Structural studies have been carried out of two solid forms of niclosamide [5-chloro-N-(2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl)-2-hydroxybenzamide, NCL], a widely used anthelmintic drug, namely niclosamide methanol monosolvate, C13H8Cl2N2O4·CH3OH or NCL·MeOH, and niclosamide monohydrate, denoted HA. The structure of the methanol solvate obtained from single-crystal X-ray diffraction is reported for the first time, elucidating the key host-guest hydrogen-bonding interactions which lead to solvate formation. The essentially planar NCL host molecules interact via π-stacking and pack in a herringbone-type arrangement, giving rise to channels along the crystallographic a axis in which the methanol guest molecules are located. The methanol and NCL molecules interact via short O-H...O hydrogen bonds. Laboratory powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) measurements reveal that the initially phase-pure NCL·MeOH solvate readily transforms into NCL monohydrate within hours under ambient conditions. PXRD further suggests that the NCL monohydrate, HA, is isostructural with the NCL·MeOH solvate. This is consistent with the facile transformation of the methanol solvate into the hydrate when stored in air. The crystal packing and the topology of guest-molecule inclusion are compared with those of other NCL solvates for which the crystal structures are known, giving a consistent picture which correlates well with known experimentally observed desolvation properties.

  9. MOLECULE DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF THERMAL CONDUCTIVITIES OF STRUCTURE H HYDRATE%H型气体水合物导热系数的分子动力学模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王璐琨; 陈光进; 等

    2001-01-01

    Molecule dynamic simulation was carried out to predict the thermal conductivity of structure H hydrate at 100?K,180?K and 260?K. In order to get a reliable potential model and stable simulation method the simulations of thermal conductivities of ice and empty hydrate were performed firstly at 100K, 180K and 260K. The simulation results of ice, empty hydrate and structure H hydrate show that thermal conductivities of ice and hydrates have different temperature dependence: for structure H hydrate it is not so distinct while that of ice is inversely proportional to temperature.

  10. Molecularly controlled interfacial layer strategy toward highly efficient simple-structured organic light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tae-Hee; Choi, Mi-Ri; Woo, Seong-Hoon; Min, Sung-Yong; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2012-03-15

    A highly efficient simplified organic light-emitting diode (OLED) with a molecularly controlled strategy to form near-perfect interfacial layer on top of the anode is demonstrated. A self-organized polymeric hole injection layer (HIL) is exploited increasing hole injection, electron blocking, and reducing exciton quenching near the electrode or conducting polymers; this HIL allows simplified OLED comprised a single small-molecule fluorescent layer to exhibits a high current efficiency (∼20 cd/A).

  11. Hydration effects on the molecular structure of silica-supported vanadium oxide catalysts: A combined IR, Raman, UV–vis and EXAFS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, D.E.; Visser, T.; Soulimani, F.; Koningsberger, D.C.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of hydration on the molecular structure of silica-supported vanadium oxide catalysts with loadings of 1–16 wt.% V has been systematically investigated by infrared, Raman, UV–vis and EXAFS spectroscopy. IR and Raman spectra recorded during hydration revealed the formation of V–OH groups, c

  12. NMR study of hydrated calcium silicates; Etude par RMN de la structure des silicates de calcium hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klur, I

    1996-02-26

    Radioactive wastes storage methods are developed by the CEA. As cements are important materials as well for hours living radioisotopes than for years living radioisotopes, a better knowledge of this material will allow to anticipate its behaviour and to obtain safer storage methods. The structure of calcium silicates (C-S-H) (main constituent of cements) have then been determined in this thesis by nuclear magnetic resonance. This method has allow to explain in structural terms, the different calcium rates that can be measured in the C-S-H too. (O.M.) 101 refs.

  13. Infrared Spectroscopic Study on Structural Change and Interfacial Interaction in Rubber Composites Filled with Silica-Kaolin Hybrid Fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Guan, J.; Hu, H.; Gao, H.; Zhang, L.

    2016-07-01

    A series of natural rubber/styrene butadiene rubber/polybutadiene rubber composites was prepared with nanometer silica and micron kaolin by a dry modification process, mechanical compounding, and mold vulcanization. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and a scanning electron microscope were used to investigate the structural changes and interfacial interactions in composites. The results showed that the "seesaw" structure was formed particularly with the incorporation of silica particles in the preparation process, which would be beneficial to the dispersibility of fillers in the rubber matrix. The kaolinite platelets were generally arranged in directional alignment. Kaolinite with smaller particle size and low-defect structure was more stable in preparation, but kaolinite with larger particle size and high defect structure tended to change the crystal structure. The composite prepared in this research exhibited excellent mechanical and thermal properties.

  14. Investigation of optical and interfacial properties of Ag/Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} metal dielectric multilayer structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, P., E-mail: piyali.sarkar4@gmail.com; Jena, S.; Tokas, R. B.; Thakur, S.; Sahoo, N. K. [Atomic & Molecular Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Rao, K. D.; Misal, J. S.; Prathap, C. [Optics and Thin Film Laboratory, BARC-Vizag, Autonagar, Visakhapatnam-530012 (India)

    2015-06-24

    One-dimensional periodic metal-dielectric multilayer thin film structures consisting of Ag and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} alternating layers are deposited on glass substrate using RF magnetron sputtering technique. The spectral property of the multilayers has been investigated using spectrophotometry technique. The optical parameters such as refractive index, extinction coefficient, band gap etc., along with film thickness as well as the interfacial layer properties which influence these properties have been probed with spectroscopic ellipsometry technique. Atomic force microscopy has been employed to characterize morphological properties of this metal-dielectric multilayer.

  15. Characterization of internal structure of hydrated agar and gelatin matrices by cryo-SEM

    KAUST Repository

    Rahbani, Janane

    2012-12-26

    There has been a considerable interest in recent years in developing polymer gel matrices for many important applications such as 2DE for quantization and separation of a variety of proteins and drug delivery system to control the release of active agents. However, a well-defined knowledge of the ultrastructures of the gels has been elusive. In this study, we report the characterization of two different polymers used in 2DE: Gelatin, a naturally occurring polymer derived from collagen (protein) and agar, a polymer of polysaccharide (sugar) origin. Low-temperature SEM is used to examine the internal structure of these gels in their frozen natural hydrated states. Results of this study show that both polymers have an array of hollow cells that resembles honeycomb structures. While agar pores are almost circular, the corresponding Gaussian curve is very broad exhibiting a range of radii from nearly 370 to 700 nm. Gelatin pores are smaller and more homogeneous reflecting a narrower distribution from nearly 320 to 650 nm. Overall, these ultrastructural findings could be used to correlate with functions of the polymers. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Characterization of internal structure of hydrated agar and gelatin matrices by cryo-SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbani, Janane; Behzad, Ali R; Khashab, Niveen M; Al-Ghoul, Mazen

    2013-02-01

    There has been a considerable interest in recent years in developing polymer gel matrices for many important applications such as 2DE for quantization and separation of a variety of proteins and drug delivery system to control the release of active agents. However, a well-defined knowledge of the ultrastructures of the gels has been elusive. In this study, we report the characterization of two different polymers used in 2DE: Gelatin, a naturally occurring polymer derived from collagen (protein) and agar, a polymer of polysaccharide (sugar) origin. Low-temperature SEM is used to examine the internal structure of these gels in their frozen natural hydrated states. Results of this study show that both polymers have an array of hollow cells that resembles honeycomb structures. While agar pores are almost circular, the corresponding Gaussian curve is very broad exhibiting a range of radii from nearly 370 to 700 nm. Gelatin pores are smaller and more homogeneous reflecting a narrower distribution from nearly 320 to 650 nm. Overall, these ultrastructural findings could be used to correlate with functions of the polymers.

  17. Adaptive resolution simulation of a biomolecule and its hydration shell: Structural and dynamical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Aoife C.; Potestio, Raffaello; Kremer, Kurt

    2015-05-01

    A fully atomistic modelling of many biophysical and biochemical processes at biologically relevant length- and time scales is beyond our reach with current computational resources, and one approach to overcome this difficulty is the use of multiscale simulation techniques. In such simulations, when system properties necessitate a boundary between resolutions that falls within the solvent region, one can use an approach such as the Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS), in which solvent particles change their resolution on the fly during the simulation. Here, we apply the existing AdResS methodology to biomolecular systems, simulating a fully atomistic protein with an atomistic hydration shell, solvated in a coarse-grained particle reservoir and heat bath. Using as a test case an aqueous solution of the regulatory protein ubiquitin, we first confirm the validity of the AdResS approach for such systems, via an examination of protein and solvent structural and dynamical properties. We then demonstrate how, in addition to providing a computational speedup, such a multiscale AdResS approach can yield otherwise inaccessible physical insights into biomolecular function. We use our methodology to show that protein structure and dynamics can still be correctly modelled using only a few shells of atomistic water molecules. We also discuss aspects of the AdResS methodology peculiar to biomolecular simulations.

  18. Adaptive resolution simulation of a biomolecule and its hydration shell: Structural and dynamical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogarty, Aoife C., E-mail: fogarty@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Potestio, Raffaello, E-mail: potestio@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Kremer, Kurt, E-mail: kremer@mpip-mainz.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-05-21

    A fully atomistic modelling of many biophysical and biochemical processes at biologically relevant length- and time scales is beyond our reach with current computational resources, and one approach to overcome this difficulty is the use of multiscale simulation techniques. In such simulations, when system properties necessitate a boundary between resolutions that falls within the solvent region, one can use an approach such as the Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS), in which solvent particles change their resolution on the fly during the simulation. Here, we apply the existing AdResS methodology to biomolecular systems, simulating a fully atomistic protein with an atomistic hydration shell, solvated in a coarse-grained particle reservoir and heat bath. Using as a test case an aqueous solution of the regulatory protein ubiquitin, we first confirm the validity of the AdResS approach for such systems, via an examination of protein and solvent structural and dynamical properties. We then demonstrate how, in addition to providing a computational speedup, such a multiscale AdResS approach can yield otherwise inaccessible physical insights into biomolecular function. We use our methodology to show that protein structure and dynamics can still be correctly modelled using only a few shells of atomistic water molecules. We also discuss aspects of the AdResS methodology peculiar to biomolecular simulations.

  19. Sorption mechanisms of zinc to calcium silicate hydrate: X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, F; Scheidegger, A M; Johnson, C A; Dähn, R; Wieland, E

    2001-04-01

    In this study, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy has been used to further elucidate the binding mechanisms of Zn(II) to calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), the quantitatively most important cement mineral. Such knowledge is essential for the assessment of the longterm behavior of cement-stabilized waste materials. XAFS spectra of the Zn(II) equilibrated with C-S-H(I) for up to 28 days are best modeled by tetrahedral coordination of Zn(II) by four O atoms in the first atomic shell. Beyond the first coordination shell, data analysis of more highly concentrated samples suggests the presence of two distinct Zn distances and possibly the presence of an Si shell. On the basis of the comparison with a set of reference compounds, this coordination environment can be reasonably related to the structure of hemimorphite, a naturally occurring zinc silicate, and/or the presence of gamma-Zn(OH)2. At the lowest Zn uptake, the above fitting approach failed and data could be described best with a Zn-Si and a Zn-Ca shell. Previous work has been able to show that Zn(II) diffuses into the C-S-H(I) particles and does not form discrete precipitates, so the findings appear to confirm the incorporation of Zn(II) in the interlayer of C-S-H(I).

  20. Ultrafast Hydration Dynamics Probed by Tryptophan at Protein Surface and Protein-DNA Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yangzhong

    As we all live in a special water planet Earth, the significance of water to life has been universally recognized. The reason why water is so important to life has intrigued many researchers. This dissertation will focus on the ultrafast dynamics of protein surface water and protein-DNA interfacial water which have direct importance to the protein structure and function. Using tryptophan as an intrinsic fluorescence probe, combined with site-directed mutagenesis and ultrafast fluorescence up-conversion spectroscopy, we can achieve single residue spatial resolution and femtosecond temporal resolution. We can also precisely determine the local hydration water dynamics by monitoring the Stokes shift of tryptophan one at a time. Previously, the protein surface hydration has been extensively studied by our group. In this thesis, we will provide more details on the methods we are using to extract the hydration dynamics, and also validate our methods from both experimental and theoretical perspectives. To further interrogate the interfacial water hydration dynamics relative to the protein surface hydration, we studied two DNA polymerases: DNA Polymerase IV (Dpo4) and DNA Polymerase Beta (Pol beta). Both proteins show typical surface hydration pattern with three distinct time components including: (i) the ultrafast sub-picosecond component reflects the bulk type water motion; (ii) a few picoseconds component shows the inner water relaxation mainly corresponding to the local libration and reorientation; (iii) the tens to hundred picoseconds component represents the water-protein coupled motion involving the whole water network reorganization. Dpo4, a loosely DNA binding protein, exhibits very flexible interfacial water which resembles its surface water yet with a significantly reduced ultrafast component. Such dynamic interfacial water not only maintains interfacial flexibility, but also contributes to the low fidelity of the protein. In contrast to the Dpo4, pol beta

  1. Molecular Modeling of Interfacial Proton Transport in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The proton conductivity of polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) plays a crucial role for the performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). High hydration of Nafion-like membranes is crucial to high proton conduction across the PEM, which limits the operation temperature of PEFCs to <100o C. At elevated temperatures (>100o C) and minimal hydration, interfacial proton transport becomes vital for membrane operation. Along with fuel cell systems, interfacial proton conduction is of...

  2. Crystal structure of ethylenedioxytetrathiafulvalene-4,5-bis(thiolbenzoic acid 0.25-hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound (systematic name: 4,4′-{[2-(5,6-dihydro-[1,3]dithiolo[4,5-b][1,4]dioxin-2-ylidene-1,3-dithiole-4,5-diyl]bis(sulfanediyl}dibenzoic acid 0.25-hydrate, C22H14O6S6·0.25H2O, the tetrathiafulvalene (TTF core adopts a boat conformation, where the central S2C=CS2 plane makes dihedral angles of 31.34 (4 and 26.83 (6°, respectively, with the peripheral S2C=CS2 and S2C2O2 planes. In the crystal, the benzoic acid molecules are linked via O—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers with R22(8 motifs. The dimers are linked through weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds into a chain structure along [-101]. The chains stack along the a axis through S...S and S...C short contacts, forming layers parallel to the ac plane.

  3. Effects of interfacial Fe electronic structures on magnetic and electronic transport properties in oxide/NiFe/oxide heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qianqian; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Jing-Yan [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Yang, Meiyin [SKLSM, Institute of Semiconductors, CAS, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Xu-Jing; Jiang, Shao-Long; Liu, Yi-Wei; Cao, Yi [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Wu, Zheng-Long [Analytical and Testing Center, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Feng, Chun [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Ding, Lei [School of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Hainan University, Haikou 570228 (China); Yu, Guang-Hua, E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The magnetic and transport properties of oxide/NiFe/oxide films were studied. • The oxide (SiO{sub 2}, MgO and HfO{sub 2}) has different elemental electronegativity. • Redox reaction at different NiFe/oxide interface is dependent on the oxide layer. • Different interfacial electronic structures shown by XPS influence the properties. - Abstract: We report that the magnetic and electronic transport properties in oxide/NiFe(2 nm)/oxide film (oxide = SiO{sub 2}, MgO or HfO{sub 2}) are strongly influenced by the electronic structure of NiFe/oxide interface. Magnetic measurements show that there exist magnetic dead layers in the SiO{sub 2} sandwiched film and MgO sandwiched film, whereas there is no magnetic dead layer in the HfO{sub 2} sandwiched film. Furthermore, in the ultrathin SiO{sub 2} sandwiched film no magnetoresistance (MR) is detected, while in the ultrathin MgO sandwiched film and HfO{sub 2} sandwiched film the MR ratios reach 0.35% and 0.88%, respectively. The investigation by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the distinct interfacial redox reactions, which are dependent on the oxide layers, lead to the variation of magnetic and transport properties in different oxide/NiFe/oxide heterostructures.

  4. Direct spontaneous growth and interfacial structural properties of inclined GaN nanopillars on r-plane sapphire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adikimenakis, A.; Lotsari, A.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Kehagias, Th.; Aretouli, K. E.; Tsagaraki, K.; Androulidaki, M.; Komninou, Ph.; Georgakilas, A.

    2015-06-01

    The spontaneous growth of GaN nanopillars (NPs) by direct plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on nitridated r-plane sapphire substrates has been studied. The emanation of metal-polarity NPs from inside an a-plane nonpolar GaN film was found to depend on both the substrate nitridation and the growth conditions. The density of NPs increased with increasing the duration of the nitridation process and the power applied on the radio-frequency plasma source, as well as the III/V flux ratio, while variation of the first two parameters enhanced the roughness of the substrate's surface. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were employed to reveal the structural characteristics of the NPs and their nucleation mechanism from steps on the sapphire surface and/or interfacial semipolar GaN nanocrystals. Lattice strain measurements showed a possible Al enrichment of the first 5-6 monolayers of the NPs. By combining cross-sectional and plan-view TEM observations, the three-dimensional model of the NPs was constructed. The orientation relationship and interfacial accommodation between the NPs and the nonpolar a-plane GaN film were also elucidated. The NPs exhibited strong and narrow excitonic emission, suggesting an excellent structural quality.

  5. Structure and dynamics of H{sub 2}O vis-á-vis phenylalanine recognition at a DPPC lipid membrane via interfacial H-bond types: Insights from polarized FT-IRRAS and ADMP simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarangi, Nirod Kumar; Ramesh, Nivarthi; Patnaik, Archita [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2015-01-14

    Preferential and enantioselective interactions of L-/D-Phenylalanine (L-Phe and D-Phe) and butoxycarbonyl-protected L-/D-Phenylalanine (LPA and DPA) as guest with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (L-DPPC) as host were tapped by using real time Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS). Polarization-modulated FT-IRRAS of DPPC monolayers above the phenylalanine modified subphases depicted fine structure/conformation differences under considerations of controlled 2D surface pressure. Selective molecular recognition of D-enantiomer over L-enantiomer driven by the DPPC head group via H-bonding and electrostatic interactions was evident spectroscopically. Accordingly, binding constants (K) of 145, 346, 28, and 56 M{sup −1} for LPA, DPA, L-Phe, and D-Phe, respectively, were estimated. The real time FT-IRRAS water bands were strictly conformation sensitive. The effect of micro-solvation on the structure and stability of the 1:1 diastereomeric L-lipid⋯, LPA/DPA and L-lipid⋯, (L/D)-Phe adducts was investigated with the aid of Atom-centered Density Matrix Propagation (ADMP), a first principle quantum mechanical molecular dynamics approach. The phosphodiester fragment was the primary site of hydration where specific solvent interactions were simulated through single- and triple- “water-phosphate” interactions, as water cluster’s “tetrahedral dice” to a “trimeric motif” transformation as a partial de-clusterization was evident. Under all the hydration patterns considered in both static and dynamic descriptions of density functional theory, L-lipid/D-amino acid enantiomer adducts continued to be stable structures while in dynamic systems, water rearranged without getting “squeezed-out” in the process of recognition. In spite of the challenging computational realm of this multiscale problem, the ADMP simulated molecular interactions complying with polarized vibrational spectroscopy unraveled a novel route to chiral

  6. Structure and dynamics of H2O vis-á-vis phenylalanine recognition at a DPPC lipid membrane via interfacial H-bond types: Insights from polarized FT-IRRAS and ADMP simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Nirod Kumar; Ramesh, Nivarthi; Patnaik, Archita

    2015-01-01

    Preferential and enantioselective interactions of l-/d-Phenylalanine (l-Phe and d-Phe) and butoxycarbonyl-protected l-/d-Phenylalanine (LPA and DPA) as guest with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (l-DPPC) as host were tapped by using real time Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS). Polarization-modulated FT-IRRAS of DPPC monolayers above the phenylalanine modified subphases depicted fine structure/conformation differences under considerations of controlled 2D surface pressure. Selective molecular recognition of d-enantiomer over l-enantiomer driven by the DPPC head group via H-bonding and electrostatic interactions was evident spectroscopically. Accordingly, binding constants (K) of 145, 346, 28, and 56 M-1 for LPA, DPA, l-Phe, and d-Phe, respectively, were estimated. The real time FT-IRRAS water bands were strictly conformation sensitive. The effect of micro-solvation on the structure and stability of the 1:1 diastereomeric l-lipid⋯, LPA/DPA and l-lipid⋯, (l/d)-Phe adducts was investigated with the aid of Atom-centered Density Matrix Propagation (ADMP), a first principle quantum mechanical molecular dynamics approach. The phosphodiester fragment was the primary site of hydration where specific solvent interactions were simulated through single- and triple- "water-phosphate" interactions, as water cluster's "tetrahedral dice" to a "trimeric motif" transformation as a partial de-clusterization was evident. Under all the hydration patterns considered in both static and dynamic descriptions of density functional theory, l-lipid/d-amino acid enantiomer adducts continued to be stable structures while in dynamic systems, water rearranged without getting "squeezed-out" in the process of recognition. In spite of the challenging computational realm of this multiscale problem, the ADMP simulated molecular interactions complying with polarized vibrational spectroscopy unraveled a novel route to chiral recognition and

  7. Interfacial structures and energetics of the strengthening precipitate phase in creep-resistant Mg-Nd-based alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, D.; Banerjee, R.; Srinivasan, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    The extraordinary creep-resistance of Mg-Nd-based alloys can be correlated to the formation of nanoscale-platelets of β1-Mg3Nd precipitates, that grow along Mg in bulk hcp-Mg and on dislocation lines. The growth kinetics of β1 is sluggish even at high temperatures, and presumably occurs via vacancy migration. However, the rationale for the high-temperature stability of precipitate-matrix interfaces and observed growth direction is unknown, and may likely be related to the interfacial structure and excess energy. Therefore, we study two interfaces- {112}β1/{100}Mg and {111}β1/{110}Mg- that are commensurate with β1/hcp-Mg orientation relationship via first principles calculations. We find that β1 acquires plate-like morphology to reduce small lattice strain via the formation of energetically favorable {112}β1/{100}Mg interfaces, and predict that β1 grows along Mg on dislocation lines due to the migration of metastable {111}β1/{110}Mg. Furthermore, electronic charge distribution of the two interfaces studied here indicated that interfacial-energy of coherent precipitates is sensitive to the population of distorted lattice sites, and their spatial extent in the vicinity of interfaces. Our results have implications for alloy design as they suggest that formation of β1-like precipitates in the hcp-Mg matrix will require well-bonded coherent interface along precipitate broad-faces, while simultaneously destabilizing other interfaces.

  8. Effect of Cu2+ Activation on Interfacial Water Structure at the Sphalerite Surface as Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.; Wick, Collin D.

    2015-12-10

    In the first part of this paper, an experimental contact angle study of the fresh and Cu2+ activated sphalerite-ZnS surface as well as the covellite-CuS (001) surface is reported describing the increased hydrophobic character of the surface during Cu2+ activation. In addition to these experimental results, the fresh sphalerite-ZnS (110), copper-zinc sulfide-CuZnS2 (110), villamaninite- CuS2 (100), and covellite-CuS (001) surfaces were examined using Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS). Our MDS results on the behavior of interfacial water at the fresh sphalerite-ZnS (110), copper-zinc sulfide-CuZnS2 (110), villamaninite-CuS2 (100), and covellite-CuS (001) surfaces include simulated contact angles, water number density distribution, water dipole orientation, water residence time, and hydrogen-bonding considerations. The copper content at the Cu2+ activated sphalerite surface seems to account for the increased hydrophobicity as revealed by both experimental and MD simulated contact angle measurements. The relatively greater hydrophobic character developed at the Cu2+ activated sphalerite surface and at the copper-zinc sulfide surface has been described by MDS, based on the structure of interfacial water and its dynamic properties. L.X.D. acknowledges funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences.

  9. Electron density analysis of the effects of sugars on the structure of lipid bilayers at low hydration - a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenné, T.; Kent, B.; Koster, K.L.; Garvey, C.J.; Bryant, G. (ANSTO); (USD); (ANU); (RMIT)

    2012-02-06

    Small angle X-ray scattering is used to study the effects of sugars on membranes during dehydration. Previous work has shown that the bilayer and chain-chain repeat spacings of DPPC bilayers are relatively unaffected by the presence of sugars. In this work we present a preliminary analysis of the electron density profiles of DPPC in the presence of sugars at low hydration. The difficulties of determining the correct phasing are discussed. Sugars and other small solutes have been shown to have an important role in improving the tolerance of a range of species to desiccation and freezing. In particular it has been shown that sugars can stabilize membranes in the fluid membrane phase during dehydration, and in the fully dehydrated state. Equivalently, at a particular hydration, the presence of sugars lowers the transition temperature between the fluid and gel phases. There are two competing models for explaining the effects of sugars on membrane phase transition temperatures. One, designated the water replacement hypothesis (WRH) states that sugars hydrogen bond to phospholipid headgroups, thus hindering the fluid-gel phase transition. One version of this model suggests that certain sugars (such as trehalose) achieve the measured effects by inserting between the phospholipid head groups. An alternative model explains the observed effects of sugars in terms of the sugars effect on the hydration repulsion that develops between opposing membranes during dehydration. The hydration repulsion leads to a lateral compressive stress in the bilayer which squeezes adjacent lipids more closely together, resulting in a transition to the gel phase. When sugars are present, their osmotic and volumetric effects reduce the hydration repulsion, reduce the compressive stress in the membranes, and therefore tend to maintain the average lateral separation between lipids. This model is called the hydration forces explanation (HFE). We recently showed that neither mono- nor di

  10. Structure, transport properties and interfacial stability of PVdF/HFP electrolytes containing modified inorganic filler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolarska, M.; Niedzicki, L.; Borkowska, R.; Zalewska, A.; Wieczorek, W. [Department of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Noakowskiego 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-12-31

    Gel polymer electrolyte membranes composed of poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP) and surface modified aluminum or titanium oxide were prepared according to the so-called Bellcore process. Modifications were done by impregnating ceramic powder with 1-8% sulphuric acid aqueous solutions. Filler grain size varied from 10 to 12 {mu}m. The membranes were conditioned in liquid electrode - 1 mol/l LiClO{sub 4} in PC. The ionic conductivity of polymer membrane increased by more than one order of magnitude upon the addition of filler into polymer host. For electrolyte membrane containing modified aluminum or titanium oxide, the interfacial resistance is stable in time as opposed to unmodified gel electrolytes. An increase in lithium transference number is observed upon the addition of filler. Lithium transference number also increases with the fraction of acidic surface groups. (author)

  11. Optical properties of a conjugated-polymer-sensitised solar cell: the effect of interfacial structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumm, Daniel W; Bilic, A; Tachibana, Y; Miller, A; Russo, S P

    2015-06-14

    Dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSCs) have sparked considerable interest over two decades. Recently, a method of polymer-wire sensitisation was demonstrated; the polymer is suggested to form a hole transport pathway (wire) following initial charge separation. We predict the optical properties of this polymer in various interfacial configurations, including the effects of chain length and attachment to {100} or {101} TiO2 facets. Contrary to most DSSCs, the {100} facet model best describes the experimental spectrum, predicting a relative thickness of 5.7 ± 0.2 μm, although {101} attachment, if implemented, may improve collection efficiency. Long chains are optimal, and stable attachment sites show minimal differences to absorbance in the major solar emission (visible) band. Combinations of {100}, {101}, and pseudo-bulk TiO2 models in three-parameter fits to experiment confirm the relative importance of the {100} facet.

  12. The inhibition of methane hydrate formation by water alignment underneath surface adsorption of surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ngoc N.; Nguyen, Anh V.; Dang, Liem X.

    2017-06-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been widely shown to strongly promote the formation of methane hydrate. Here we show that SDS displays an extraordinary inhibition effect on methane hydrate formation when the surfactant is used in sub-millimolar concentration (around 0.3 mM). We have also employed Sum Frequency Generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) to elucidate the molecular mechanism of this inhibition. The SFG and MDS results revealed a strong alignment of water molecules underneath surface adsorption of SDS in its sub-millimolar solution. Interestingly, both the alignment of water and the inhibition effect (in 0.3 mM SDS solution) went vanishing when an oppositely-charged surfactant (tetra-n-butylammonium bromide, TBAB) was suitably added to produce a mixed solution of 0.3 mM SDS and 3.6 mM TBAB. Combining structural and kinetic results, we pointed out that the alignment of water underneath surface adsorption of dodecyl sulfate (DS-) anions gave rise to the unexpected inhibition of methane hydration formation in sub-millimolar solution of SDS. The adoption of TBAB mitigated the SDS-induced electrostatic field at the solution’s surface and, therefore, weakened the alignment of interfacial water which, in turn, erased the inhibition effect. We discussed this finding using the concept of activation energy of the interfacial formation of gas hydrate. The main finding of this work is to reveal the interplay of interfacial water in governing gas hydrate formation which sheds light on a universal molecular-scale understanding of the influence of surfactants on gas hydrate formation. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  13. Effect of temperature on the low-frequency vibrational spectrum and relative structuring of hydration water around a single-stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2015-01-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the single-stranded DNA oligomer (5'-CGCGAAT TCGCG-3') in aqueous solution have been carried out at different temperatures between 160 K and 300 K. The effects of temperature on the low-frequency vibrational spectrum and local structural arrangements of water molecules hydrating the DNA strand have been explored in detail. The low-frequency density of states distributions reveal that increasingly trapped transverse water motions play a dominant role in controlling the band corresponding to O⋯O⋯O bending or transverse oscillations of hydration water at supercooled temperatures. In addition, presence of a broad band around 260 (±20) cm(-1) under supercooled conditions indicates transformation from high density liquid-like structuring of hydration water at higher temperatures to that of a low density liquid at lower temperatures. It is found that long-range correlations between the supercooled hydration water molecules arise due to such local structural transition around the DNA oligomer.

  14. Fabrication and interfacial electronic structure studies on polypyrrole/TiO2 nano hybrid systems for photovoltaic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ganesan Mohan; Kawakita, Jin; Jayavel, Ramasamy

    2011-05-01

    The progress in studying the interfacial electronic structures of the developing new class of hybrid organic/inorganic material systems have envisaged a new dimension into the field of photovoltaics, which could be of great help in understanding the nature of charge transfer in them. In this regard, electropolymerization of pyrrole monomers have been carried out at room temperature on the surface of TiO2 working electrodes (assisted by UV radiations) and their interfacial electronic structure has been studied as a function of the applied photo anodic potentials. The formation of polypyrrole deposits has been ensured using FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy. Surface analysis of the hybrid matrix revealed the tendency of polymer molecules to cover up the spherical surface of TiO2 nanoparticles that could help in improving the light absorption rate. Signals (bands) corresponding to pyrrole molecules observed in the ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy measurements have been correlated with the polaronic states formed and identified to shift as a function of the applied photo anodic potentials, revealing the decrease in work function of the hybrid system to take place (confirmed using cyclic voltammetry measurements). The decreasing trend in the work function elucidates the adjustment in electronic structure of the system (hybrid materials possessing smaller work functions are generally preferred for photovoltaic studies). The aforementioned behavioural aspects have been reasoned with the increase in overpotential values for polarization, from the decrease in up-take rate of the anionic dopant, which increases the current density values, thereby modifying the conductivity of the systems.

  15. Effect of Surface Oxidation on Interfacial Water Structure at a Pyrite (100) Surface as Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.; Wick, Collin D.

    2015-06-01

    In the first part of this paper, a Scanning Electron Microscopy and contact angle study of a pyrite surface (100) is reported describing the relationship between surface oxidation and the hydrophilic surface state. In addition to these experimental results, the following simulated surface states were examined using Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS): fresh unoxidized (100) surface; polysulfide at the (100) surface; elemental sulfur at the (100) surface. Crystal structures for the polysulfide and elemental sulfur at the (100) surface were simulated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) quantum chemical calculations. The well known oxidation mechanism which involves formation of a metal deficient layer was also described with DFT. Our MDS results of the behavior of interfacial water at the fresh and oxidized pyrite (100) surfaces without/with the presence of ferric hydroxide include simulated contact angles, number density distribution for water, water dipole orientation, water residence time, and hydrogen-bonding considerations. The significance of the formation of ferric hydroxide islands in accounting for the corresponding hydrophilic surface state is revealed not only from experimental contact angle measurements but also from simulated contact angle measurements using MDS. The hydrophilic surface state developed at oxidized pyrite surfaces has been described by MDS, on which basis the surface state is explained based on interfacial water structure. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the DOE funded work performed by Liem X. Dang. Battelle operates the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES.

  16. Investigations of the structure and "interfacial" surface chemistry of Bioglass (RTM) materials by solid-state multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Gautam

    Bioactive materials such as BioglassRTM 45S5 (45% SiO 2, 24.5% CaO, 24.5% Na2O, and 6% P2O5 by weight) are sodium-phosphosilicate glasses containing independent three-dimensional silicate and phosphate networks and Na+ and Ca2+ ions as modifying cations. Due to their bioactivity, these materials are currently used as implants and for other surgical and clinical applications. The bioactivity of BioglassesRTM is due to their unique capability to form chemical bonds to tissues through an octacalciumphosphate (OCP)- and/or hydroxyapatite-like (HA) "interfacial" matrix. The formation of OCP and/or HA is preceded by the formation of a silica-rich surface layer and the subsequent growth of an amorphous calcium phosphate (a-CP) layer. Structural characterization of a series of commercial and synthesized Bioglass materials 45S5 52S, 55S, 60S, and synthesized 17O-labelled "Bioglass materials 45S, 52S, 55S and 60S" have been obtained using solid-state single-pulse magic-angle spinning (SP/MAS) 17O, 23Na, 29Si and 31P NMR. The 17O NMR isotropic chemical shifts and estimates of the quadrupole coupling constants (Cq) [at fixed asymmetry parameter ( hQ ) values of zero] have been obtained from solid-state spin-echo 17O SP/MAS NMR spectra of 17O-labelled "Bioglasses". The simulation results of these spectra reveal the presence of both bridging-oxygens (BO, i.e. ≡ Si-17OSi ≡ ) and non-bridging oxygens (NBO, i.e. ≡ Si-17O-Na+/Ca2+ ) in the silicate networks in these materials. 17O NMR spectra of these Bioglass materials do not show any direct evidence for the presence of BO and NBO atoms in the phosphate units; however, they are expected to be present in small amounts. In vitro reactions of BioglassRTM 45S5, 60S and 77S powders have been used to study the "interfacial" surface chemistry of these materials in simulated body-fluid (SBF, Kyoto or K9 solution) and/or 17O-enriched tris-buffer solution. 29Si and 31P SP/MAS NMR have been used to identify and quantify the extent of

  17. Amorphous oxide alloys as interfacial layers with broadly tunable electronic structures for organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nanjia; Kim, Myung-Gil; Loser, Stephen; Smith, Jeremy; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Guo, Xugang; Song, Charles; Jin, Hosub; Chen, Zhihua; Yoon, Seok Min; Freeman, Arthur J; Chang, Robert P H; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J

    2015-06-30

    In diverse classes of organic optoelectronic devices, controlling charge injection, extraction, and blocking across organic semiconductor-inorganic electrode interfaces is crucial for enhancing quantum efficiency and output voltage. To this end, the strategy of inserting engineered interfacial layers (IFLs) between electrical contacts and organic semiconductors has significantly advanced organic light-emitting diode and organic thin film transistor performance. For organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, an electronically flexible IFL design strategy to incrementally tune energy level matching between the inorganic electrode system and the organic photoactive components without varying the surface chemistry would permit OPV cells to adapt to ever-changing generations of photoactive materials. Here we report the implementation of chemically/environmentally robust, low-temperature solution-processed amorphous transparent semiconducting oxide alloys, In-Ga-O and Ga-Zn-Sn-O, as IFLs for inverted OPVs. Continuous variation of the IFL compositions tunes the conduction band minima over a broad range, affording optimized OPV power conversion efficiencies for multiple classes of organic active layer materials and establishing clear correlations between IFL/photoactive layer energetics and device performance.

  18. The investigation of structure and IR spectra for hydrated potassium ion clusters K+(H2O)n=1-16 by density functional theory*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fayan; Zhou, Hongxia; Zhou, Yongquan; Miao, Juntao; Fang, Chunhui; Fang, Yan; Sun, Pengchao; Ge, Haiwen; Liu, Hongyan

    2016-11-01

    The hydration of K+(H2O)n has been widely studied and believe to be important for understanding solvent properties in biological and chemical systems. However, understanding the structure and the spectrum information K+(H2O)n with changing n is limited. Here, we investigated the clusters K+(H2O)n=1-16 and further studied the IR spectrums of the most stable clusters with density functional theory. The configuration, bond length, vibration frequency were given out. It shows that K+(H2O)8(H2O)n, a distorted square antiprism in inner layer, is the main configuration with hydration distance rK - OI 0.296 nm when the hydration number n is bigger than 8. The saturated hydration number is 8 in the first hydration layer and the water molecules of the second hydration sphere have little effect on the inner ones when n> 8. A detailed classification about the hydrated water molecules was made according to the role of acceptor or donor hydrogen bonding in clusters. The vibration frequency of the different kinds of water molecules were also detailly identified. The results are valuable for further determination of the K+(H2O)n clusters in aqueous solutions. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2016-60529-7

  19. Interfacial wave theory for dendritic structure of a growing needle crystal. I - Local instability mechanism. II - Wave-emission mechanism at the turning point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian-Jun

    1989-01-01

    The complicated dendritic structure of a growing needle crystal is studied on the basis of global interfacial wave theory. The local dispersion relation for normal modes is derived in a paraboloidal coordinate system using the multiple-variable-expansion method. It is shown that the global solution in a dendrite growth process incorporates the morphological instability factor and the traveling wave factor.

  20. Structural and dynamical aspects of the unsymmetric hydration of Sb(III): an ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Len Herald V; Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Asam, S Sikander; Hofer, Thomas S; Randolf, Bernhard R; Rode, Bernd M

    2010-03-01

    An ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) simulation was performed to investigate the behavior of the Sb(3+) ion in aqueous solution. The simulation reveals a significant influence of the residual valence shell electron density on the solvation structure and dynamics of Sb(3+). A strong hemidirectional behavior of the ligand binding pattern is observed for the first hydration shell extending up to the second hydration layer. The apparent domain partitioned structural behavior was probed by solvent reorientational kinetics and three-body distribution functions. The three-dimensional hydration space was conveniently segmented such that domains having different properties were properly resolved. The approach afforded a fair isolation of localized solvent structural and dynamical motifs that Sb(3+) seems to induce to a remarkable degree. Most intriguing is the apparent impact of the lone pair electrons on the second hydration shell, which offers insight into the mechanistic aspects of hydrogen bonding networks in water. Such electronic effects observed in the hydration of Sb(3+) can only be studied by applying a suitable quantum mechanical treatment including first and second hydration shell as provided by the QMCF ansatz.

  1. Bicontinuous Fluid Structure with Low Cohesive Energy: Molecular Basis for Exceptionally Low Interfacial Tension of Complex Coacervate Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuo-Ying; Yoo, Hee Young; Jho, YongSeok; Han, Songi; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2016-05-24

    An exceptionally low interfacial tension of a dense fluid of concentrated polyelectrolyte complexes, phase-separated from a biphasic fluid known as complex coacervates, represents a unique and highly sought-after materials property that inspires novel applications from superior coating to wet adhesion. Despite extensive studies and broad interest, the molecular and structural bases for the unique properties of complex coacervates are unclear. Here, a microphase-separated complex coacervate fluid generated by mixing a recombinant mussel foot protein-1 (mfp-1) as the polycation and hyaluronic acid (HA) as the polyanion at stoichiometric ratios was macroscopically phase-separated into a dense complex coacervate and a dilute supernatant phase to enable separate characterization of the two fluid phases. Surprisingly, despite up to 4 orders of magnitude differing density of the polyelectrolytes, the diffusivity of water in these two phases was found to be indistinguishable. The presence of unbound, bulk-like, water in the dense fluid can be reconciled with a water population that is only weakly perturbed by the polyelectrolyte interface and network. This hypothesis was experimentally validated by cryo-TEM of the macroscopically phase-separated dense complex coacervate phase that was found to be a bicontinuous and biphasic nanostructured network, in which one of the phases was confirmed by staining techniques to be water and the other polyelectrolyte complexes. We conclude that a weak cohesive energy between water-water and water-polyelectrolytes manifests itself in a bicontinuous network, and is responsible for the exceptionally low interfacial energy of this complex fluid phase with respect to virtually any surface within an aqueous medium.

  2. Structure of misfit dislocations in niobium-sapphire interfaces and strength of interfacial bonding: An atomistic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levay, A.; Moebus, G.; Vitek, V.; Ruehle, M.; Tichy, G.

    1999-11-12

    The formation of networks of misfit dislocations is investigated at the (0001){sub Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}}{parallel}(111){sub Nb} interface using a recently proposed approach which employs a very simple pair-potential to describe interaction between the metal and the substrate that contains the strength of interfacial adhesion as a parameter. The calculations demonstrate how the strength of bonding between the two materials decides both the form of the network and the atomic structure of the cores of these dislocations. At the same time it reveals that diffusion is essential for the formation of the observed triangular network of 1/2{l{underscore}angle}111{r{underscore}angle} dislocations. The calculated structures are then used to investigate related high resolution electron microscope (HREM) images using a multislice technique. In these simulations translational symmetry along the electron beam was not assumed but for each slice of material along the beam different sub-structures were used. This allowed us to investigate fully the effect of the dislocation intersections upon the images of the dislocation cores. Their effect is, indeed, considerable if an intersection is in the region producing the image but if not, the images of the cores of misfit dislocations are affected only marginally and HREM can capture fine details of the core structure. A direct comparison of an experimental observation in Mayer and co-workers with the present simulations demonstrates this ability.

  3. Research data supporting "Structural Determinants of Hydration, Mechanics and Fluid Flow in Collagen Scaffolds"

    OpenAIRE

    Offeddu, Giovanni S.; Ashworth, Jennifer C; Cameron, Ruth E.; Oyen, Michelle L.

    2016-01-01

    The following data files are provided: Summary of results: numerical values used to plot each figure in the manuscript, as well as single measurements for each parameter when applicable. Raw indentation data: the load vs. time curves obtained by spherical indentation for the dry and hydrated samples. CT Analysis: Ellipse fit data giving the pore size analysis for each condition, scaling analysis for calculation of percolation diameter, 3D analysis giving the specific surface area for each sam...

  4. Structural Investigations of Portland Cement Components, Hydration, and Effects of Admixtures by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Jørgen Bengaard; Andersen, Morten D.; Jakobsen, Hans Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    Solid-state, magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy represents a valuable tool for structural investigations on the nanoscale of the most important phases in anhydrous and hydrated Portland cements and of various admixtures. This is primarily due to the fact that the method reflects the firs.......% flourine. Finally, the detection and quantification of strätlingite (2CaO·Al2O3·SiO2·8H2O) in Portland cement mixtures containing metakaolin will be demonstrated....

  5. Analysis of interfacial structure and bond strength of self-etch adhesive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, Lilliam M; Watanabe, Larry G; Reis, Andre F; Powers, John M; Marshall, Sally J; Marshall, Grayson W

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the bond strength, nanoleakage and interfacial morphology of four self-etch adhesives bonded to superficial dentin. Methods Micro-tensile (MT, n=15) and single plane shear (SP, n=8) bond tests were performed using human dentin polished through 320-grit SiC paper. Clearfil Protect Bond (PB), Clearfil S3 Bond (S3), Prompt L-Pop (PLP) and G-BOND (GB) were used according to manufacturers’ instructions. Composite was applied as cylinders with a thickness of 4 mm with a 1-mm diameter and stored in water at 37° C for 24 hours. Specimens were debonded with a testing machine at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Means and standard deviations of bond strength were calculated. Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Fisher’s PLSD intervals were calculated at the 0.05 level of significance. Failure modes were determined at 100X. The hybrid layer was revealed by treatment with 5N HCl/5% NaOCl or fractured perpendicular to the interface and sputter coated with gold. Specimens were viewed at 1000X, 2500X, and 5000X in a field emission SEM at 15 kV. Teeth (n=2) sectioned into 0.9-mm thick slabs were immersed in ammoniacal silver nitrate solution for 24 hours, rinsed and immersed in photo-developing solution for 8h. Specimens were sectioned (90-nm thick) and observed under TEM. Results Means ranged from 25.0 to 73.1 MPa for MT and from 15.5 to 56.4 MPa for SP. MT values were greater than SP, but were highly correlated (R2 = 0.99, p= 0.003) and provided the same order for the systems studied. Fisher’s PLSD intervals (pbond strength techniques and adhesives results were 1.7 and 2.3 MPa, respectively. Failures sites were mixed. TEM showed that hybrid layers were ~0.5 µm for PB, GB and S3 and ~5 µm for PLP. SEM showed morphologic differences among adhesives. Silver nitrate deposits were observed within interfaces for all adhesive systems. Clinical significance Simplification of application procedures appears to induce loss of adhesion capabilities. In this in vitro

  6. Analysis of interfacial structure and bond strength of self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, Lilliam M; Watanabe, Larry G; Reis, Andre F; Powers, John M; Marshall, Sally J; Marshall, Grayson W

    2013-12-01

    To determine the bond strength, nanoleakage and interfacial morphology of four self-etch adhesives bonded to superficial dentin. Microtensile (MT) (n= 15) and single plane shear (SP) (n= 8) bond tests were performed using human dentin polished through 320-grit SiC paper. Clearfil Protect Bond (PB), Clearfil S3 Bond (S3), Prompt L-Pop (PLP) and G-Bond (GB) were used according to their manufacturers' instructions. Composite was applied as cylinders with a thickness of 4 mm with a 1 mm diameter and stored in water at 370C for 24 hours. Specimens were debonded with a testing machine at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/minute. Means and standard deviations of bond strength were calculated. Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Fisher's PLSD intervals were calculated at the 0.05 level of significance. Failure modes were determined at x100. The hybrid layer was revealed by treatment with 5N HC1/5% NaOCl or fractured perpendicular to the interface and sputter coated with gold. Specimens were viewed at x1,000, x2,500, and x5,000 in a field emission SEM at 15 kV. Teeth (n=2) sectioned into 0.9 mm-thick slabs were immersed in ammoniacal silver nitrate solution for 24 hours, rinsed and immersed in photo-developing solution for 8 hours. Specimens were sectioned (90 nm-thick) and observed under TEM. Means ranged from 25.0 to 73.1 MPa for MT and from 15.5 to 56.4 MPa for SP. MT values were greater than SP, but were highly correlated (R2 = 0.99, P= 0.003) and provided the same order for the systems studied. Fisher's PLSD intervals (P< 0.05) for bond strength techniques and adhesives results were 1.7 and 2.3 MPa, respectively. Failures sites were mixed. TEM showed that hybrid layers were -0.5 pm for PB, GB and S3 and approximately 5 microm for PLP. SEM showed morphologic differences among adhesives. Silver nitrate deposits were observed within the interfaces for all adhesive systems.

  7. SEM Analysis of the Interfacial Transition Zone between Cement-Glass Powder Paste and Aggregate of Mortar under Microwave Curing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaning Kong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effects of microwave curing on the microstructure of the interfacial transition zone of mortar prepared with a composite binder containing glass powder and to explain the mechanism of microwave curing on the improvement of compressive strength, in this study, the compressive strength of mortar under microwave curing was compared against mortar cured using (a normal curing at 20 ± 1 °C with relative humidity (RH > 90%; (b steam curing at 40 °C for 10 h; and (c steam curing at 80 °C for 4 h. The microstructure of the interfacial transition zone of mortar under the four curing regimes was analyzed by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results showed that the improvement of the compressive strength of mortar under microwave curing can be attributed to the amelioration of the microstructure of the interfacial transition zone. The hydration degree of cement is accelerated by the thermal effect of microwave curing and Na+ partially dissolved from the fine glass powder to form more reticular calcium silicate hydrate, which connects the aggregate, calcium hydroxide, and non-hydrated cement and glass powder into a denser integral structure. In addition, a more stable triangular structure of calcium hydroxide contributes to the improvement of compressive strength.

  8. Structural Evolution Induced by Interfacial Lattice Mismatch in Self-Organized YBa2Cu3O7-δ Nanocomposite Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horide, Tomoya; Kametani, Fumitake; Yoshioka, Satoru; Kitamura, Takanori; Matsumoto, Kaname

    2017-02-28

    Intriguing properties of self-organized nanocomposites of perovskite oxides are usually derived from the complex interface of constituent material phases. A sophisticated control of such a system is required for a broad range of energy and device applications, which demand a comprehensive understanding of the interface at the atomic scale. Here, we visualized and theoretically modeled the highly elastically strained nanorod, the interface region with misfit dislocations and heterointerface distortion, and the matrix with strain-induced oxygen vacancies in the self-organized YBa2Cu3O7-δ nanocomposite films with Ba perovskite nanorods. Large misfit strain was elastically accommodated in the nanocomposites, but since the elastic strain was mainly accommodated by the nanorods, the concentration of strain-induced oxygen vacancies was small enough for the matrix to keep high critical temperature (>85 K). The interfacial bonding distorted the atomic structure of YBa2Cu3O7-δ, but the thickness of distortion was limited to a few unit cells (less than the coherence length) due to the electron screening. The effect of volume fraction on elastic strain and the electron screening are crucial for strong vortex pinning without significant degradation of both the elementary pinning force and critical temperature in the nanocomposites. Thus, we comprehensively clarified the self-organized nanocomposite structure for on-demand control of superconductivity and oxide functionality in the nanocomposite engineering of perovskite oxides.

  9. Stability of Hydrated Methylamine: Structural Characteristics and H2N···H–O Hydrogen Bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Sha-Sha; Liu, Yi-Rong; Huang, Teng; Feng, Ya-Juan; Jiang, Shuai; Huang, Wei

    2015-04-23

    Methylamine is the simplest aliphatic amine found in human urine, blood, and tissues. It is thought to play a significant part in central nervous system disturbances observed during renal and hepatic disease. In this work we have investigated the methylamine hydration clusters using a basin hopping (BH) algorithm with the density functional theory (DFT). The results presented herein yield a detailed understanding of the structure and stability for a system consisting of one methylamine molecule and up to seven waters: the most stable geometries arise from a fusion of tetramer or pentamer rings; by the geometrical parameters and topological parameters analysis, the strengths of the H2N···H–O hydrogen bonds of the global minima increase as the sizes of clusters increase, except for n = 5 where there is a slight fluctuation. This work may shed light on the form mechanism of methylamine existing in organisms and the hydration structures of larger molecules containing amino functional groups and their interaction with the water molecules nearby.

  10. New twist in the theories on the secondary structure dependence and hydration effect of the vibrational properties of peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Hajime

    2016-12-01

    The present paper deals with two aspects in relation to the secondary structure dependence and hydration effect of the vibrational properties of peptides. One is the dependence of the vibrational frequencies and IR intensities of the amide I and II modes on the angular position of hydrating water. Although we have vague expectation for a stretching mode that the frequency becomes lower as the hydrogen bond becomes stronger, the result of the present theoretical calculations on the amide I mode strongly contradicts it. It is shown that we can rationalize this situation by considering the scalar and vector components of the frequency shifts separately. The other is the secondary structure dependence of the IR intensity of the amide II mode. It is enhanced more than twice for the C5 conformation, while it is reduced to about 0.7 times for the α-helix conformation. It is shown from the analysis of the electron density derivatives that the former arises from the inter-peptide charge flux, while the latter arises from the electrostatic polarization effect.

  11. IMPACT OF LIQUID NITROGEN EXPOSURE ON SELECTED BIOCHEMICAL AND STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS OF HYDRATED Phaseolus vulgaris L. SEEDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejas, Inaudis; Rivas, Maribel; Nápoles, Lelurlys; Marrero, Pedro; Yabor, Lourdes; Aragón, Carlos; Pérez, Aurora; Engelmann, Florent; Martínez-Montero, Marcos Edel; Lorenzo, José Carlos

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that cryopreserving seeds with high water content is detrimental to survival, but biochemical and structural parameters of cryostored hydrated common bean seeds have not been published. The objective of this work was to study the effect of liquid nitrogen exposure on selected biochemical and structural parameters of hydrated Phaseolus vulgaris seeds. We cryopreserved seeds at various moisture contents and evaluated: germination; electrolyte leakage; fresh seed weight; levels of chlorophyll pigments, malondialdehyde, other aldehydes, phenolics and proteins; thickness of cotyledon epidermis, parenchyma, and starch storage parenchyma; and radicle and plumule lengths. Germination was totally inhibited when seeds were immersed in water for 50 min (moisture content of 38%, FW basis) before cryopreservation. The combined effects of seed water imbibition and cryostorage decreased phenolics (free, cell wall-linked, total), chlorophyll a and protein content. By contrast, electrolyte leakage and levels of chlorophyll b and other aldehydes increased as a result of the combination of these two experimental factors. These were the most significant effects observed during exposure of humid seed to liquid nitrogen. Further studies are still required to clarify the molecular events taking place in plant cells during cryostorage.

  12. Interfacial Instabilities in Evaporating Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Ross; Sefiane, Khellil; Matar, Omar

    2007-11-01

    We study the effect of substrate thermal properties on the evaporation of sessile drops of various liquids. An infra-red imaging technique was used to record the interfacial temperature. This technique illustrates the non-uniformity in interfacial temperature distribution that characterises the evaporation process. Our results also demonstrate that the evaporation of methanol droplets is accompanied by the formation of wave-trains in the interfacial temperature field; similar patterns, however, were not observed in the case of water droplets. More complex patterns are observed for FC-72 refrigerant drops. The effect of substrate thermal conductivity on the structure of the complex pattern formation is also elucidated.

  13. X-ray structure of Candida antarctica lipase A shows a novel lid structure and a likely mode of interfacial activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, Daniel J; Kasrayan, Alex; Johansson, Patrik; Bergfors, Terese; Sandström, Anders G; Bäckvall, Jan-E; Mowbray, Sherry L

    2008-02-08

    In nature, lipases (EC 3.1.1.3) catalyze the hydrolysis of triglycerides to form glycerol and fatty acids. Under the appropriate conditions, the reaction is reversible, and so biotechnological applications commonly make use of their capacity for esterification as well as for hydrolysis of a wide variety of compounds. In the present paper, we report the X-ray structure of lipase A from Candida antarctica, solved by single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering, and refined to 2.2-A resolution. The structure is the first from a novel family of lipases. Contrary to previous predictions, the fold includes a well-defined lid as well as a classic alpha/beta hydrolase domain. The catalytic triad is identified as Ser184, Asp334 and His366, which follow the sequential order considered to be characteristic of lipases; the serine lies within a typical nucleophilic elbow. Computer docking studies, as well as comparisons to related structures, place the carboxylate group of a fatty acid product near the serine nucleophile, with the long lipid tail closely following the path through the lid that is marked by a fortuitously bound molecule of polyethylene glycol. For an ester substrate to bind in an equivalent fashion, loop movements near Phe431 will be required, suggesting the primary focus of the conformational changes required for interfacial activation. Such movements will provide virtually unlimited access to solvent for the alcohol moiety of an ester substrate. The structure thus provides a basis for understanding the enzyme's preference for acyl moieties with long, straight tails, and for its highly promiscuous acceptance of widely different alcohol and amine moieties. An unconventional oxyanion hole is observed in the present structure, although the situation may change during interfacial activation.

  14. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  15. A study on gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byoung Jae; Jung, Tae Jin; Sunwoo, Don [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Sufficient documents were reviewed to understand solid components of water and gaseous hydrocarbon known as gas hydrates, which represent an important potential energy resource of the future. The review provides us with valuable information on crystal structures, kinetics, origin and distribution of gas hydrates. In addition, the review increased our knowledge of exploration and development methods of gas hydrates. Large amounts of methane, the principal component of natural gas, in the form of solid gas hydrate are found mainly offshore in outer continental margin sediment and, to a lesser extent, in polar regions commonly associated with permafrost. Natural gas hydrates are stable in some environments where the hydrostatic pressure exerted by overlying water column is sufficient for hydrate formation and stability. The required high pressures generally restrict gas hydrate to sediments beneath water of approximately 400 m. Higher sediment temperatures at greater subbottom depths destabilize gas hydrates. Based on the pressure- temperature condition, the outer continental margin of East Sea where water depth is deep enough to form gas hydrate is considered to have high potential of gas hydrate accumulations. (author). 56 refs., tabs., figs.

  16. Bulk and interfacial molecular structure near liquid-liquid critical points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzanares-Papayanopoulos, Emilio

    2000-09-01

    behaviour, and aqueous surfactant solutions.The classical techniques have included capillary viscometry yielding the shear viscosities. The modern techniques have fallen into two groups. The first, aimed at investigating adsorption and wetting layers at vapour-liquid and liquid-solid interfaces, comprise determinations of neutron reflection. In the second, fluorescence depolarization decay and muon spin relaxation rates have been directed towards a better understanding of the rotational behaviour in liquids of a large probe molecule BTBP, with the ultimate goal of exploring the nano rheology of near-critical systems. These modern measurements were made in Large Scale Central Laboratories at different centers in Europe, for example, the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) and Daresbury Laboratory (DL) in England, the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in France, and the Hahn-Meitner Institut (HMI) in Germany. The results of this kind of studies can be applied to interfacial problems across a wide range of industries such as the petroleum, paints, surfactants and refrigerants among others. [Spanish] Un comportamiento critico ocurre cuando dos fases coexistentes fusionan su identidad sin un cambio abrupto de las propiedades fisicas. El detalle de este comportamiento es considerado actualmente universal, siendo dominado por divergencia de la longitud de la correlacion {xi}. Siguiendo esta universalidad, el comportamiento detallado puede estudiarse experimentalmente usando cualquier sistema conveniente. Por esa razon, el estudio de fluidos y en particular de mezclas de fluidos ofrece una util plataforma puesto que el comportamiento critico en tales sistemas a menudo puede ser estudiado a temperaturas y presiones convenientes. A pesar de que la criticidad es una consecuencia de la divergencia de {xi}, y de esta manera, en cierto sentido, es un fenomeno a gran escala, a pesar de todo tiene influencia sobre los eventos a nivel molecular. A este aspecto de criticidad se le ha dedicado

  17. Interfacial Evolution of Cement and Steel in CO2 Dissolved Solution Under High Temperature and High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chengqiang; Peng, Ye; Li, Bing; Wang, Shuliang; Shi, Taihe

    2016-09-01

    The experiments were operated for the cylindrical sample (cement/steel) in high temperature and high pressure (HTHP) CO2 environment to simulate surrounding CO2 attack in oil and gas well. The interfacial evolutions between well cement and casing steel were measured, including mechanical property, structure alteration, chemical change and electrochemical character. The interfacial behaviors are attributed to the competition of hydration and degradation of Portland cement. The damage at the interface was faster than the cement bulk deterioration by carbonation. Thus, the interface provided a potential flow leakage pathway for the HTHP gas and fluid in the well, so improving interfacial stability between well cement and casing steel is the key issue to long-term zonal isolation.

  18. Interfacial structures of 1-methyladenine, 3-methyladenine, 7-methyladenine, and 9-methyladenine on gold nanoparticles by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dinh Bao; Joo, Sang-Woo; Choo, Jaebum

    2017-01-01

    Interfacial structures of 1-methyladenine (1 MA), 3-methyladenine (3 MA), 7-methyladenine (7 MA), and 9-methyladenine (9 MA) on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were investigated by means of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Different positions of the methyl group in the purine ring of adenine were found to result in not only dissimilarity among Raman spectral features but also surface binding schemes. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations predicted that the amino-9H tautomeric form would be most stable among the conformers of 1 MA, 3 MA, 7 MA, and 9 MA including amino and imino tautomeric conformers. SERS spectral features were analyzed with appropriate vibrational assignments based on DFT calculations. After considering the enhancement factors, the Raman spectra of 1 MA, 3 MA, 7 MA, and 9 MA on AuNPs were dissimilar, suggesting the methyl group at the purine ring of methyladenine may be significantly affecting the binding on AuNPs. Our Raman study indicates the position of the methyl group in methyladenine may play a significant role in coordinating metal surfaces.

  19. Laboratory Investigation of the Growth and Crystal Structure of Nitric Acid Hydrates by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David F.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A great deal of recent laboratory work has focussed on the characterization of the nitric acid hydrates, thought to be present in type I Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs). Phase relationships and vapor pressure measurements (1-3) and infrared characterizations (4-5) have been made. However, the observed properties of crystalline solids (composition, melting point, vapor pressure, surface reactivity, thermodynamic stability, extent of solid solution with other components, etc.) are controlled by their crystal structure. The only means of unequivocal structural identification for crystalline solids is diffraction (using electrons, X-rays, neutrons, etc.). Other observed properties of crystalline solids, such as their infrared spectra, their vapor pressure as a function of temperature, etc. yield only indirect information about what phases are present, their relative proportions, or whether they are crystalline or amorphous.

  20. Structural information from multilamellar liposomes at full hydration full q-range fitting with high quality X-ray data

    CERN Document Server

    Pabst, G; Amenitsch, H; Laggner, P; Pabst, Georg; Rappolt, Michael; Amenitsch, Heinz; Laggner, Peter

    2000-01-01

    We present a novel method for analyzing Small Angle X-ray Scattering data onmultilamellar phospholipid bilayer systems at full hydration. The methodutilizes a modified Caille' theory structure factor in combination with aGaussian model representation of the electron density profile such that itaccounts also for the diffuse scattering between Bragg peaks. Thus, the methodcan retrieve structural information even if only a few orders of diffractionare observed. We further introduce a new procedure to derive fundamentalparameters, such as area per lipid, membrane thickness, and number of watermolecules per lipid, directly from the electron density profile without theneed of additional volumetric measurements. The theoretical apparatus isapplied to experimental data on1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine liposome preparations.

  1. Synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of a new vanadium fluoride hydrate V{sub 2}F{sub 6} . 4H{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakhal, Suliman; Weber, Dominik; Irran, Elisabeth; Lerch, Martin [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Chemie; Schwarz, Bjoern; Ehrenberg, Helmut [Karlsruhe Institute for Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst for Applied Materials

    2013-09-01

    A new vanadium fluoride hydrate V{sub 2}F{sub 6} . 4H{sub 2}O was prepared by reacting vanadium metal with hexafluorosilicic acid solution. The crystal structure of the green compound was determined by X-ray diffraction. The identified structure of the CuMF{sub 6} . 4H{sub 2}O-type (M = Ti, Zr) has not been found amongst vanadium fluoride hydrates to date. In addition, thermal decomposition behaviour and magnetic properties of V{sub 2}F{sub 6} . 4H{sub 2}O were studied. (orig.)

  2. Structural incorporation of Neptunyl(V) into Calcite: Interfacial Reactions and Kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Heberling, Frank

    2010-01-01

    In this experimental work the calcite-water interface is characterized by means of zetapotential and surface diffraction measurements. Based on the experimental results a new Basic Stern Surface Complexation model for calcite is developed. Neptunyl(V) adsorption at the calcite surface and incorporation into the calcite structure is studied by batch type adsorption- and mixed flow reactor experiments. Adsorption and incorporation species of Neptunyl are investigated by EXAFS spectroscopy.

  3. Impact of interfacial interactions on optical and ammonia sensing in zinc oxide/polyaniline structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mansi Dhingra; Lalit Kumar; Sadhna Shrivastava; P Senthil Kumar; S Annapoorni

    2013-08-01

    Zinc oxide/polyaniline (ZnO/PANI) hybrid structures have been investigated for their optical and gas sensing properties. ZnO nanoparticles, prepared by the sol–gel method, pressed in the form of pellets were used for gas sensing. The hybrid ZnO/PANI structure was obtained by the addition of PANI on the surface of ZnO. The UV–Vis absorption of the modified pellets show band edge at 363 nm corresponding to ZnO, while a change in the absorption peaks for PANI was observed. The possible interaction between Zn2+ of ZnO and NH-group of PANI was confirmed using Raman spectroscopy studies. The results reveal that the hybrid structures exhibit much higher sensitivity to NH3 gas at room temperature than blank ZnO, which is sensitive to NH3 gas at higher temperature. This enhancement has been attributed to the creation of active sites on the ZnO surface due to the presence of PANI.

  4. The molecular interfacial structure and plasticizer migration behavior of "green" plasticized poly(vinyl chloride).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Li, Yaoxin; Hankett, Jeanne M; Chen, Zhan

    2015-02-14

    Tributyl acetyl citrate (TBAC), a widely-used "green" plasticizer, has been extensively applied in products for daily use. In this paper, a variety of analytical tools including sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG), coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS), contact angle goniometry (CA), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were applied together to investigate the molecular structures of TBAC plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) and the migration behavior of TBAC from PVC-TBAC mixtures into water. We comprehensively examine the effects of oxygen and argon plasma treatments on the surface structures of PVC-TBAC thin films containing various bulk percentages of plasticizers and the leaching behavior of TBAC into water. It was found that TBAC is a relatively stable PVC plasticizer compared to traditional non-covalent plasticizers but is also surface active. Oxygen plasma treatment increased the hydrophilicity of TBAC-PVC surfaces, but did not enhance TBAC leaching. However, argon plasma treatment greatly enhanced the leaching of TBAC molecules from PVC plastics to water. Based on our observations, we believe that oxygen plasma treatment could be applied to TBAC plasticized PVC products to enhance surface hydrophilicity for improving the biocompatibility and antibacterial properties of PVC products. The structural information obtained in this study will ultimately facilitate a molecular level understanding of plasticized polymers, aiding in the design of PVC materials with improved properties.

  5. X-ray diffraction: a powerful tool to probe and understand the structure of nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grangeon, Sylvain; Claret, Francis; Linard, Yannick; Chiaberge, Christophe

    2013-10-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns were calculated and compared to literature data with the aim of investigating the crystal structure of nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), the main binding phase in hydrated Portland cement pastes. Published XRD patterns from C-S-H of Ca/Si ratios ranging from ~ 0.6 to ~ 1.7 are fully compatible with nanocrystalline and turbostratic tobermorite. Even at a ratio close or slightly higher than that of jennite (Ca/Si = 1.5) this latter mineral, which is required in some models to describe the structure of C-S-H, is not detected in the experimental XRD patterns. The 001 basal reflection from C-S-H, positioned at ~ 13.5 Å when the C-S-H structural Ca/Si ratio is low (< 0.9), shifts towards smaller d values and sharpens with increasing Ca/Si ratio, to reach ~ 11.2 Å when the Ca/Si ratio is higher than 1.5. Calculations indicate that the sharpening of the 001 reflection may be related to a crystallite size along c* (i.e. a mean number of stacked layers) increasing with the C-S-H Ca/Si ratio. Such an increase would contribute to the observed shift of the 001 reflection, but fails to quantitatively explain it. It is proposed that the observed shift could result from interstratification of at least two tobermorite-like layers, one having a high and the other a low Ca/Si ratio with a basal spacing of 11.3 and 14 Å, respectively.

  6. The interfacial structure of plated copper alloy resistance spot welded joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingwei; Zhai, Guofu; Chen, Qing; Wang, Jianqi; Ren, Gang

    2008-09-01

    Plated copper alloys are widely used in electron industry. The plating lay caused the farther decreasing of the welding property of copper alloys, whose intrinsic weldability was poor. In this paper, the bronze and brass specimens with nickel-tin double plating layer were joined by resistance spot welding method. The microstructure and peel strength of the joints were investigated. The experiment results show that a sandwich-like structure was obtained in the faying surface after welding, and the nickel plating layer thickness had severe effect on the reliability of the joints.

  7. The interfacial structure of plated copper alloy resistance spot welded joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Jingwei [Xiamen Hongfa Electroacoustic Co., Ltd, 361021 Xiamen (China); Harbin Institute of Technology, 150001 Harbin (China)], E-mail: jingweiwu.hit@gmail.com; Zhai Guofu [Harbin Institute of Technology, 150001 Harbin (China); Chen Qing; Wang Jianqi; Ren Gang [Xiamen Hongfa Electroacoustic Co., Ltd, 361021 Xiamen (China)

    2008-09-15

    Plated copper alloys are widely used in electron industry. The plating lay caused the farther decreasing of the welding property of copper alloys, whose intrinsic weldability was poor. In this paper, the bronze and brass specimens with nickel-tin double plating layer were joined by resistance spot welding method. The microstructure and peel strength of the joints were investigated. The experiment results show that a sandwich-like structure was obtained in the faying surface after welding, and the nickel plating layer thickness had severe effect on the reliability of the joints.

  8. Micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoming [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy, School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Na [Green Construction Materials and Circulation Economy Center, Architectural Design and Research Institute of Tsinghua University Co., Ltd., Beijing 100084 (China); Yao, Yuan, E-mail: yuanyaocas@163.com [School of Engineering and Computer Science, University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA 95211 (United States); Sun, Henghu; Feng, Huan [School of Engineering and Computer Science, University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA 95211 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Al{sup IV} and Al{sup VI} both exist in the hydration products. • Increase of Ca/Si ratio promotes the conversion from [AlO{sub 4}] to [AlO{sub 6}]. • Polymerization degree of [SiO{sub 4}] in the hydration products declines. -- Abstract: In this research, the micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials has been investigated through SEM-EDS, {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR techniques, in which the used red mud was derived from the bauxite calcination method. The results show that the red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials mainly form fibrous C-A-S-H gel, needle-shaped/rod-like AFt in the early hydration period. With increasing of the hydration period, densification of the pastes were promoted resulting in the development of strength. EDS analysis shows that with the Ca/Si of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials increases, the average Ca/Si and Ca/(Si + Al) atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel increases, while the average Al/Si atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel decreases. MAS NMR analysis reveals that Al in the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials exists in the forms of Al{sup IV} and Al{sup VI}, but mainly in the form of Al{sup VI}. Increasing the Ca/Si ratio of raw material promotes the conversion of [AlO{sub 4}] to [AlO{sub 6}] and inhibits the combination between [AlO{sub 4}] and [SiO{sub 4}] to form C-A-S-H gel. Meanwhile, the polymerization degree of [SiO{sub 4}] in the hydration products declines.

  9. Interfacial Water Structure in Langmuir Monolayer and Gibbs Layer Probed by Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张贞; 郭源

    2012-01-01

    Langmuir monolayer and Gibbs layer exhibit surface-active properties and it can be used as simple model systems to investigate the physicochemical properties of biological membranes. In this report, we presented the OH stretching vibration of H2O in the 4"-n-pentyl-4-cyano-p-terphenyl (5CT), nonadecanenitrile (C18CN) Langmuir monolayer and compared them with CH3CN Gibbs layer at the air/water interface with polarization SFG-VS. This study demonstrated that the hydrogen bond network is different in the Langmuir monolayer of 5CT, C18CN from CH3CN Gibbs layer at the air/water interface which showed two different water structures on the different surface layer. The results provided a deeper insight into understanding the hydrogen bond on the interfaces.

  10. Protein packing defects "heat up" interfacial water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, María Belén; Accordino, Sebastián R; Rodriguez-Fris, J Ariel; Morini, Marcela A; Appignanesi, Gustavo A; Fernández Stigliano, Ariel

    2013-06-01

    Ligands must displace water molecules from their corresponding protein surface binding site during association. Thus, protein binding sites are expected to be surrounded by non-tightly-bound, easily removable water molecules. In turn, the existence of packing defects at protein binding sites has been also established. At such structural motifs, named dehydrons, the protein backbone is exposed to the solvent since the intramolecular interactions are incompletely wrapped by non-polar groups. Hence, dehydrons are sticky since they depend on additional intermolecular wrapping in order to properly protect the structure from water attack. Thus, a picture of protein binding is emerging wherein binding sites should be both dehydrons rich and surrounded by easily removable water. In this work we shall indeed confirm such a link between structure and dynamics by showing the existence of a firm correlation between the degree of underwrapping of the protein chain and the mobility of the corresponding hydration water molecules. In other words, we shall show that protein packing defects promote their local dehydration, thus producing a region of "hot" interfacial water which might be easily removed by a ligand upon association.

  11. Surface and interfacial interactions of multilayer graphitic structures with local environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzocco, R. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Robinson, B.J., E-mail: b.j.robinson@lancaster.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Rabot, C. [CEA-LETI-Minatec Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Delamoreanu, A. [Microelectronics Technology Laboratory (LTM), Joseph Fourier University, French National Research Center (CNRS), 17 Avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Zenasni, A. [CEA-LETI-Minatec Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Dickinson, J.W.; Boxall, C. [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Kolosov, O.V. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-30

    In order to exploit the potential of graphene in next-generation devices, such as supercapacitors, rechargeable batteries, displays and ultrathin sensors, it is crucial to understand the solvent interactions with the graphene surface and interlayers, especially where the latter may be in competition with the former, in the medium of application deployment. In this report, we combine quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and ultrasonic force microscopy methods to investigate the changes in the film–substrate and film–environment interfaces of graphene and graphene oxide films, produced by diverse scalable routes, in both polar (deionised water) and non-polar (dodecane) liquid and vapour environments. In polar liquid environments, we observe nanobubble adsorption/desorption on the graphene film corresponding to a surface coverage of up to 20%. As no comparable behaviour is observed for non-polar environment, we conclude that nanobubble formation is directly due to the hydrophobic nature of graphene with direct consequences for electrode structures immersed in electrolyte solutions. The amount of water adsorbed by the graphene films was found to vary considerably from 0.012 monolayers of water per monolayer of reduced graphene oxide to 0.231 monolayers of water per monolayer of carbon diffusion growth graphene. This is supported by direct nanomechanical mapping of the films immersed in water where an increased variation of local stiffness suggests water propagation within the film and/or between the film and substrate. Transferred film thickness calculations performed for QCM, atomic force microscopy topography and optical transmission measurements, returns results an order of magnitude larger (46 ± 1 layers) than Raman spectroscopy (1 - 2 graphene layers) on pristine pre-transferred films due to contamination during transfer and possible turbostratic structures of large areas. - Highlights: • Exploring interaction of graphene films with polar and nonpolar liquids

  12. Effects of electronic structure on the hydration of PbNO3(+) and SrNO3(+) ion pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Richard J; Heiles, Sven; Williams, Evan R

    2015-06-28

    Hydration of PbNO3(+) and SrNO3(+) with up to 30 water molecules was investigated with infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectroscopy and with theory. These ions are the same size, yet the IRPD spectra of these ion pairs for n = 2-8 are significantly different. Bands in the bonded O-H region (∼3000-3550 cm(-1)) indicate that the onset of a second hydration shell begins at n = 5 for PbNO3(+) and n = 6 for SrNO3(+). Spectra for [PbNO3](+)(H2O)2-5 and [SrNO3](+)(H2O)3-6 indicate that the structures of clusters with Pb(ii) are hemidirected with a void in the coordinate sphere. A natural bond orbital analysis of [PbNO3](+)(H2O)5 indicates that the anisotropic solvation of the ion is due to a region of asymmetric electron density on Pb(ii) that can be explained by charge transfer from the nitrate and water ligands into unoccupied p-orbitals on Pb(ii). There are differences in the IRPD spectra of PbNO3(+) and SrNO3(+) with up to 25 water molecules attached. IR intensity in the bonded O-H region is blue-shifted by ∼50 cm(-1) in nanodrops containing SrNO3(+) compared to those containing PbNO3(+), indicative of a greater perturbation of the water H-bond network by strontium. The free O-H stretches of surface water molecules in nanodrops containing 10, 15, 20, and 25 water molecules are red-shifted by ∼3-8 cm(-1) for PbNO3(+) compared to those for SrNO3(+), consistent with more charge transfer between water molecules and Pb(ii). These results demonstrate that the different electronic structure of these ions significantly influences how they are solvated.

  13. Interfacial engineering of two-dimensional nano-structured materials by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuiykov, Serge; Kawaguchi, Toshikazu; Hai, Zhenyin; Karbalaei Akbari, Mohammad; Heynderickx, Philippe M.

    2017-01-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is an enabling technology which provides coating and material features with significant advantages compared to other existing techniques for depositing precise nanometer-thin two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures. It is a cyclic process which relies on sequential self-terminating reactions between gas phase precursor molecules and a solid surface. ALD is especially advantageous when the film quality or thickness is critical, offering ultra-high aspect ratios. ALD provides digital thickness control to the atomic level by depositing film one atomic layer at a time, as well as pinhole-free films even over a very large and complex areas. Digital control extends to sandwiches, hetero-structures, nano-laminates, metal oxides, graded index layers and doping, and it is perfect for conformal coating and challenging 2D electrodes for various functional devices. The technique's capabilities are presented on the example of ALD-developed ultra-thin 2D tungsten oxide (WO3) over the large area of standard 4" Si substrates. The discussed advantages of ALD enable and endorse the employment of this technique for the development of hetero-nanostructure 2D semiconductors with unique properties.

  14. Synthesis, electronic structure, elastic properties, and interfacial behavior of icosahedral boron-rich solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunold, Oliver

    2017-08-01

    Boron-rich solids are commonly characterized by icosahedral clusters, where 12 B atoms form an icosahedron, giving rise to outstanding mechanical and transport properties. However, broader applications are limited due to the high synthesis temperature required to obtain the icosahedra-based crystalline structure. Utilizing high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS), the deposition temperature may be lowered as compared to direct current magnetron sputtering by enhanced surface diffusion. Therefore, HPPMS was utilized to investigate the influence of the substrate temperature on the structural evolution of B-rich Al-Y-B thin films. The formation of the intended AlYB{sub 14} phase together with the (Y,Al)B{sub 6} impurity phase, containing 1.8 at.% less B than AlYB{sub 14}, was observed at a growth temperature of 800 C and hence 600 C below the bulk synthesis temperature. Based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations it is inferred that minute compositional variations may lead to formation of competing phases, such as (Y,Al)B{sub 6}. Furthermore, 800 C still limits the usage significantly. Therefore, quantum mechanical material design was applied to identify phases with even higher phase stabilities compared to AlYB{sub 14}. Phase stability of T{sub 0.75}Y{sub 0.75}B{sub 14} (T= Sc, Ti, V, Y, Zr, Nb, Si) critically depends on the exact magnitude of charge transferred by T and Y to the B icosahedra. The highest phase stabilities have been identified for Sc{sub 0.75}Y{sub 0.75}B{sub 14}, Ti{sub 0.75}Y{sub 0.75}B{sub 14}, and Zr{sub 0.75}Y{sub 0.75}B{sub 14}. ln combination with Young's modulus values up to 517 GPa these phases are very interesting from a wear-resistance point of view. Still high synthesis temperatures limit the use of such systems onto technologically relevant substrate materials. However, amorphous B-rich solids, which can be synthesized without additional heating, exhibit attractive mechanical and electrical properties. Within these

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of methane hydrate pre-nucleation phenomena and the effect of PVCap kinetic inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Kvamme, Bjørn; Parmar, Archana

    2012-12-01

    MD simulations were employed to investigate a number of different systems of relevance for methane hydrate formation, dissociation and inhibition. Regions of stability for methane hydrate have been investigated using a model system consisting of a slab of hydrate embedded in liquid water. Water/methane interface structuring and possible precursors to hydrate formation have been investigated using a model system of water and methane at different densities. In yet another system we have investigated the impact of Dodecamers (twelve-unit molecules) of poly (vinyl caprolactam) or PVCap on structuring of water/methane interfaces. PVCap is well known for its performance as hydrate kinetic inhibitor1. Intermolecular interactions were treated by a combination of Coulomb and Lennard-Jones potentials. Temperature was controlled by a simple velocity scaling. Several of the hydrate-containing systems showed a tendency to melt when in contact with methane-saturated water even at temperatures well below the hydrate stability region. We have attributed this behavior to the fact that hydrate volume available in a MD experiment is small and lacks the stabilizing presence of bulk. Systems containing liquid water and methane showed certain signs of hydrate nucleation. The PVCap behavior was shown to be very dependent on its concentration in water. At low concentrations, PVCap tended to prefer the water-methane interface and not to interact with each other, similarly to another kinetic inhibitor, PVP2. When the liquid PVCap content was high, it evidently modified the interfacial tension of water-methane surface, converting the initially disperesed methane phase into separated bubbles. The PVCap molecules then built a system-wide network that partially covered the surface of methane bubbles.

  16. Micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Na; Yao, Yuan; Sun, Henghu; Feng, Huan

    2013-11-15

    In this research, the micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials has been investigated through SEM-EDS, (27)Al MAS NMR and (29)Si MAS NMR techniques, in which the used red mud was derived from the bauxite calcination method. The results show that the red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials mainly form fibrous C-A-S-H gel, needle-shaped/rod-like AFt in the early hydration period. With increasing of the hydration period, densification of the pastes were promoted resulting in the development of strength. EDS analysis shows that with the Ca/Si of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials increases, the average Ca/Si and Ca/(Si+Al) atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel increases, while the average Al/Si atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel decreases. MAS NMR analysis reveals that Al in the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials exists in the forms of Al(IV) and Al(VI), but mainly in the form of Al(VI). Increasing the Ca/Si ratio of raw material promotes the conversion of [AlO4] to [AlO6] and inhibits the combination between [AlO4] and [SiO4] to form C-A-S-H gel. Meanwhile, the polymerization degree of [SiO4] in the hydration products declines.

  17. DyeTiO2 interfacial structure of dye-sensitised solar cell working electrodes buried under a solution of I(-)/I3(-) redox electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCree-Grey, Jonathan; Cole, Jacqueline M; Holt, Stephen A; Evans, Peter J; Gong, Yun

    2017-08-17

    Dye-sensitised solar cells (DSCs) have niche prospects for electricity-generating windows that could equip buildings for energy-sustainable future cities. However, this 'smart window' technology is being held back by a lack of understanding in how the dye interacts with its device environment at the molecular level. A better appreciation of the dyeTiO2 interfacial structure of the DSC working electrodes would be particularly valuable since associated structure-function relationships could be established; these rules would provide a 'toolkit' for the molecular engineering of more suitable DSC dyes via rational design. Previous materials characterisation efforts have been limited to determining this interfacial structure within an environment exposed to air or situated in a solvent medium. This study is the first to reveal the structure of this buried interface within the functional device environment, and represents the first application of in situ neutron reflectometry to DSC research. By incorporating the electrolyte into the structural model of this buried interface, we reveal how lithium cations from the electrolyte constituents influence the dyeTiO2 binding configuration of an organic sensitiser, MK-44, via Li(+) complexation to the cyanoacrylate group. This dye is the molecular congener of the high-performance MK-2 DSC dye, whose hexa-alkyl chains appear to stabilise it from Li(+) complexation. Our in situ neutron reflectometry findings are built up from auxiliary structural models derived from ex situ X-ray reflectometry and corroborated via density functional theory and UV/vis absorption spectroscopy. Significant differences between the in situ and ex situ dyeTiO2 interfacial structures are found, highlighting the need to characterise the molecular structure of DSC working electrodes while in a fully assembled device.

  18. Structure and water exchange dynamics of hydrated oxo halo ions in aqueous solution using QMCF MD simulation, large angle X-ray scattering and EXAFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Lars; Hofer, Tomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) has been applied in conjunction with experimental large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and EXAFS measurements to study structure and dynamics of the hydrated oxo chloro anions chlorite, ClO2−, chlorate, ClO3−, and perchlorate, ClO4−. In addition, the structures of the hydrated hypochlorite, ClO−, bromate, BrO3−, iodate, IO3− and metaperiodate, IO4−, ions have been determined in aqueous solution by means of LAXS. The structures of the bromate, metaperiodate, and orthoperiodate, H2IO63−, ions have been determined by EXAFS as solid sodium salts and in aqueous solution as well. The results show clearly that the only form of periodate present in aqueous solution is metaperiodate. The Cl-O bond distances in the hydrated oxo chloro anions as determined by LAXS and obtained in the QMCF MD simulations are in excellent agreement, being 0.01–0.02 Å longer than in solid anhydrous salts due to hydration through hydrogen bonding to water molecules. The oxo halo anions, all with unit negative charge, have low charge density making them typical structure breakers, thus the hydrogen bonds formed to the hydrating water molecules are weaker and more short-lived than those between water molecules in pure water. The water exchange mechanism of the oxo chloro anions resembles those of the oxo sulfur anions with a direct exchange at the oxygen atoms for perchlorate and sulfate. The water exchange rate for the perchlorate ion is significantly faster, τ0.5=1.4 ps, compared to the hydrated sulfate ion and pure water, τ0.5=2.6 and 1.7 ps, respectively. The angular radial distribution functions show that the chlorate and sulfite ions have a more complex water exchange mechanism. As the chlorite and chlorate ions are more weakly hydrated than the sulfite ion the spatial occupancy is less well-defined and it is not possible to follow any well-defined migration pattern as it is difficult to

  19. Spectral phasor analysis of LAURDAN fluorescence in live A549 lung cells to study the hydration and time evolution of intracellular lamellar body-like structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malacrida, Leonel; Astrada, Soledad; Briva, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Using LAURDAN spectral imaging and spectral phasor analysis we concurrently studied the growth and hydration state of subcellular organelles (lamellar body-like, LB-like) from live A549 lung cancer cells at different post-confluence days. Our results reveal a time dependent two-step process...... also show that their hydration properties significantly differ from those observed in well-characterized artificial lamellar model membranes, challenging the notion that a pure lamellar membrane organization is present in these organelles at intracellular conditions. Finally, these LB-like structures...

  20. Crystal structures of hydrates of simple inorganic salts. III. Water-rich aluminium halide hydrates: AlCl3 · 15H2O, AlBr3 · 15H2O, AlI3 · 15H2O, AlI3 · 17H2O and AlBr3 · 9H2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Horst; Hennings, Erik; Voigt, Wolfgang

    2014-09-01

    Water-rich aluminium halide hydrate structures are not known in the literature. The highest known water content per Al atom is nine for the perchlorate and fluoride. The nonahydrate of aluminium bromide, stable pentadecahydrates of aluminium chloride, bromide and iodide, and a metastable heptadecahydrate of the iodide have now been crystallized from low-temperature solutions. The structures of these hydrates were determined and are discussed in terms of the development of cation hydration spheres. The pentadecahydrate of the chloride and bromide are isostructural. In AlI(3) · 15H2O, half of the Al(3+) cations are surrounded by two complete hydration spheres, with six H2O in the primary and 12 in the secondary. For the heptadecahydrate of aluminium iodide, this hydration was found for every Al(3+).

  1. Establishing the interfacial nano-structure and elemental composition of homeopathic medicines based on inorganic salts: a scientific approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temgire, Mayur Kiran; Suresh, Akkihebbal Krishnamurthy; Kane, Shantaram Govind; Bellare, Jayesh Ramesh

    2016-05-01

    Extremely dilute systems arise in homeopathy, which uses dilution factors 10(60), 10(400) and also higher. These amounts to potencies of 30c, 200c or more, those are far beyond Avogadro's number. There is extreme skepticism among scientists about the possibility of presence of starting materials due to these high dilutions. This has led modern scientists to believe homeopathy may be at its best a placebo effect. However, our recent studies on 30c and 200c metal based homeopathic medicines clearly revealed the presence of nanoparticles of starting metals, which were found to be retained due to the manufacturing processes involved, as published earlier.(9,10) Here, we use HR-TEM and STEM techniques to study medicines arising from inorganic salts as starting materials. We show that the inorganic starting materials are present as nano-scale particles in the medicines even at 1 M potency (having a large dilution factor of 10(2000)). Thus this study has extended our physicochemical studies of metal based medicines to inorganic based medicines, and also to higher dilution. Further, we show that the particles develop a coat of silica: these particles were seen embedded in a meso-microporous silicate layer through interfacial encapsulation. Similar silicate coatings were also seen in metal based medicines. Thus, metal and inorganic salt based homeopathic medicines retain the starting material as nanoparticles encapsulated within a silicate coating. On the basis of these studies, we propose a universal microstructural hypothesis that all types of homeopathic medicines consist of silicate coated nano-structures dispersed in the solvent. Copyright © 2015 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    and the role it plays in the global climate and the future of fuels. Russia, Japan, Nigeria, Peru, Chile, Pakistan, Indonesia, Korea, etc are various countries who are perusing the gas hydrates studies as a future resource for fuel. Indian Initiative..., 1993, Free gas at the base of the gas hydrate zone in the vicinity of the Chile Triple junction: Geology, v. 21, pp. 905-908. Borowski, W.S., C.K. Paull, and U. William, III, 1999, Global and local variations of interstitial sulfate gradients...

  3. Modeling and characterization of interfacial adhesion and fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qizhou

    2000-09-01

    The loss of interfacial adhesion is mostly seen in the failure of polymer adhesive joints. In addition to the intrinsic physical attraction across the interface, the interfacial adhesion strength is believed to highly depend on a number of factors, such as adhesive chemistry/structure, surface topology, fracture pattern, thermal and elastic mismatch across the interface. The fracture failure of an adhesive joint involves basically three aspects, namely, the intrinsic interfacial strength, the driving force for fracture and other energy dissipation. One may define the intrinsic interfacial strength as the maximum value of the intrinsic interfacial adhesion. The total work done by external forces to the component that contains the interface is partitioned into two parts. The first part is consumed by all other energy dissipation mechanisms (plasticity, heat generation, viscosity, etc.). The second part is used to debond the interface. This amount should equal to the intrinsic adhesion of the interface according to the laws of conservation of energy. It is clear that in order to understand the fundamental physics of adhesive joint failure, one must be able to characterize the intrinsic interfacial adhesion and be able to identify all the major energy dissipation mechanisms involved in the debonding process. In this study, both physical and chemical adhesion mechanisms were investigated for an aluminum-epoxy interface. The physical bonding energy was estimated by computing the Van de Waals forces across the interface. A hydration model was proposed and the associated chemical bonding energy was calculated through molecular simulations. Other energy dissipation mechanisms such as plasticity and thermal residual stresses were also identified and investigated for several four-point bend specimens. In particular, a micromechanics based model was developed to estimate the adhesion enhancement due to surface roughness. It is found that for this Al-epoxy system the major

  4. Use of vibrational spectroscopy to study protein and DNA structure, hydration, and binding of biomolecules: A combined theoretical and experimental approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalkanen, Karl J.; Jürgensen, Vibeke Würtz; Claussen, Anetta

    2006-01-01

    We report on our work with vibrational absorption, vibrational circular dichroism, Raman scattering, Raman optical activity, and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to study protein and DNA structure, hydration, and the binding of ligands, drugs, pesticides, or herbicides via a combined theoretic...

  5. Depositional and Structural Controls on the Evolution of the Gas Hydrate Petroleum System in Green Canyon 955, Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Collett, T. S.; Weimer, P.; Shedd, W. W.; Frye, M.; Boswell, R.

    2016-12-01

    The depositional, erosional, and deformational history at Green Canyon 955 (GC955), Gulf of Mexico, provides insight into the reservoir characteristics and the gas and gas hydrate petroleum system at this established research site. Using high-resolution 2D seismic data, industry 3D seismic data, and borehole logs, we have refined our knowledge of the area's geologic history. Following extended fine-grained deposition (while the primary sediment input was hundreds of km to the east), channel/levee activity shifted to the area of GC955 approximately 500 kya. The initial resulting deposits include sand-rich proximal levee packages, readily identifiable in high-resolution seismic images, and limited channel deposits. The levee deposits occur in discrete "pods", the result of intermingled deposition and erosion. Subsequently, salt diapirism initiated a period of uplift and caused channel activity to shift a few kilometers eastward. Pelagic deposition was followed by a mix of fine-grained sediments and limited sandy strata deposited in a distal levee and/or fan environment. Channel features from this time period are evident east of GC955, but the available data suggest that these were mainly erosional, with minimal sand deposition. Salt-driven structural deformation created a multi-kilometer-scale east-west graben and normal faults. These extensional faults facilitated upward migration of gas from deeper in the system, ultimately leading to creation of several gas chimneys. The presence of free gas at the location of well GC955-Q indicates that the fine-grained unit overlying the main reservoir provides a good seal, consistent with pelagic deposition. The absence of free gas at well GC955-H, coupled with the presence of ongoing chimney-related gas flow nearby, indicates that this seal can be broken where the pelagic unit is cut by the large-throw graben faults. Reservoir connectivity within the levee deposit "pods" is likely, based on established characteristics of levee

  6. Hydration and Thermal Expansion in Anatase Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, He; Li, Qiang; Ren, Yang; Fan, Longlong; Chen, Jun; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2016-08-01

    A tunable thermal expansion is reported in nanosized anatase by taking advantage of surface hydration. The coefficient of thermal expansion of 4 nm TiO2 along a-axis is negative with a hydrated surface and is positive without a hydrated surface. High-energy synchrotron X-ray pair distribution function analysis combined with ab initio calculations on the specific hydrated surface are carried out to reveal the local structure distortion that is responsible for the unusual negative thermal expansion.

  7. Hydration and Thermal Expansion in Anatase Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, He [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Li, Qiang [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Ren, Yang [Argonne National Laboratory, X-Ray Science Division, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Fan, Longlong [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Chen, Jun [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Deng, Jinxia [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Xing, Xianran [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China

    2016-06-06

    A tunable thermal expansion is reported in nanosized anatase by taking advantage of surface hydration. The coefficient of thermal expansion of 4 nm TiO2 along a-axis is negative with a hydrated surface and is positive without a hydrated surface. High-energy synchrotron X-ray pair distribution function analysis combined with ab initio calculations on the specific hydrated surface are carried out to reveal the local structure distortion that is responsible for the unusual negative thermal expansion.

  8. Structural changes of filled ice Ic hydrogen hydrate under low temperatures and high pressures from 5 to 50 GPa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Hisako; Kagawa, Shingo; Tanaka, Takehiko; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Yagi, Takehiko; Ohishi, Yasuo; Nakano, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2012-08-21

    Low-temperature and high-pressure experiments were performed on the filled ice Ic structure of hydrogen hydrate at previously unexplored conditions of 5-50 GPa and 30-300 K using diamond anvil cells and a helium-refrigeration cryostat. In situ x-ray diffractometry revealed that the cubic filled ice Ic structure transformed to tetragonal at low temperatures and high pressures; the axis ratio of the tetragonal phase changed depending on the pressure and temperature. These results were consistent with theoretical predictions performed via first principle calculations. The tetragonal phase was determined to be stable above 20 GPa at 300 K, above 15 GPa at 200 K, and above 10 GPa at 100 K. Further changes in the lattice parameters were observed from about 45-50 GPa throughout the temperature region examined, which suggests the transformation to another high-pressure phase above 50 GPa. In our previous x-ray study that was performed up to 80 GPa at room temperature, a similar transformation was observed above 50 GPa. In this study, the observed change in the lattice parameters corresponds to the beginning of that transformation. The reasons for the transformation to the tetragonal structure are briefly discussed: the tetragonal structure might be induced due to changes in the vibrational or rotational modes of the hydrogen molecules under low temperature and high pressure.

  9. Effect of temperature, pressure, and cosolvents on structural and dynamic properties of the hydration shell of SNase: a molecular dynamics computer simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolin, Nikolai; Winter, Roland

    2008-01-24

    It is now generally agreed that the hydration water and solvational properties play a crucial role in determining the dynamics and hence the functionality of proteins. We present molecular dynamics computer simulation studies on staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) at various temperatures and pressures as well as in different cosolvent solutions containing various concentrations of urea and glycerol. The aim is to provide a molecular level understanding of how different types of cosolvents (chaotropic and kosmotropic) as well as temperature and high hydrostatic pressure modify the structure and dynamics of the hydration water. Taken together, these three intrinsic thermodynamic variables, temperature, pressure, and chemical potential (or activity) of the solvent, are able to influence the stability and function of the protein by protein-solvent dynamic coupling in different ways. A detailed analysis of the structural and dynamical properties of the water and cosolvents at the protein surface (density profile, coordination numbers, hydrogen-bond distribution, average H-bond lifetimes (water-protein and water-water), and average residence time of water in the hydration shell) was carried out, and differences in the structural and dynamical properties of the hydration water in the presence of the different cosolvents and at temperatures between 300 and 400 K and pressures up to 5000 bar are discussed. Furthermore, the results obtained help understand various thermodynamic properties measured for the protein.

  10. Direct observation of hydration of TiO 2 on Ti using electrochemical AFM: freely corroding versus potentiostatically held

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearinger, Jane P.; Orme, Christine A.; Gilbert, Jeremy L.

    2001-10-01

    Hydration of titanium/titanium oxide surfaces under freely corroding and potentiostatically held conditions has been characterized using electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC AFM). In contrast to conventional high vacuum techniques, AFM enables measurement of morphological surface structure in the in situ hydrated state. Electrochemical probes in the imaging environment further enable acquisition of electrical characteristics during AFM imaging. Experiments were performed on etched, electropolished commercially pure titanium. As noted by direct observation and corroborated by power spectral density (Fourier analysis) measurements, oxide domes cover the titanium surface and grow laterally during hydration. Applied potential altered the growth rate. Under open circuit potential conditions, growth proceeded approximately six times faster than under a -1 V applied voltage ( 1098±52 nm2/ min ± versus 184.84±19 nm2/min). Film growth increased electrical resistance and lowered interfacial capacitance based on step polarization impedance spectroscopy tests.

  11. The preparation of an elastomer/silicate layer nanocompound with an exfoliated structure and a strong ionic interfacial interaction by utilizing an elastomer latex containing pyridine groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shao-jian; Wang, Yi-qing; Feng, Yi-ping; Liu, Qing-sheng; Zhang, Li-qun

    2010-03-19

    A great variety of polymer/layered silicate (PLS) nanocomposites have been reported, however, there are few exfoliated PLS nanocomposites and their inorganic-organic interfaces are still a great problem, especially for the elastomers. In this research, a kind of exfoliated elastomer/silicate layer nanocompound was prepared and proved by XRD and TEM, in which 10 phr Na(+)-montmorillonite was dispersed in butadiene-styrene-vinyl pyridine rubber by latex compounding method with acidic flocculants. Moreover, a dynamic mechanical thermal analyzer (DMTA) suggested a strong interfacial interaction (interaction parameter B(H) = 4.91) between the silicate layers and macromolecules in addition to the weak inorganic-organic interfacial interaction, and solid state (15)N NMR indicated the formation of a strong ionic interface through the acidifying pyridine. Subsequently, a remarkable improvement of the dispersing morphology, mechanical performance and gas barrier property appeared, compared to that using calcium ion flocculants. This supports the formation of an exfoliated structure and an improved interfacial interaction.

  12. Gas hydrates forming and decomposition conditions analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Павленко

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of gas hydrates has been defined; their brief description has been given; factors that affect the formation and decomposition of the hydrates have been reported; their distribution, structure and thermodynamic conditions determining the gas hydrates formation disposition in gas pipelines have been considered. Advantages and disadvantages of the known methods for removing gas hydrate plugs in the pipeline have been analyzed, the necessity of their further studies has been proved. In addition to the negative impact on the process of gas extraction, the hydrates properties make it possible to outline the following possible fields of their industrial use: obtaining ultrahigh pressures in confined spaces at the hydrate decomposition; separating hydrocarbon mixtures by successive transfer of individual components through the hydrate given the mode; obtaining cold due to heat absorption at the hydrate decomposition; elimination of the open gas fountain by means of hydrate plugs in the bore hole of the gushing gasser; seawater desalination, based on the hydrate ability to only bind water molecules into the solid state; wastewater purification; gas storage in the hydrate state; dispersion of high temperature fog and clouds by means of hydrates; water-hydrates emulsion injection into the productive strata to raise the oil recovery factor; obtaining cold in the gas processing to cool the gas, etc.

  13. Band alignment and interfacial chemical structure of the HfLaO/InGaZnO4 heterojunction investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ling-Xuan; Wu, Ze-Han; Zhang, Yi-Yu; Liu, Yuan; Song, Jia-Qi; Liu, Xing-Zhao; Li, Yan-Rong

    2017-04-01

    Amorphous InGaZnO4 thin film transistors (a-IGZO TFTs) with HfLaO gate dielectrics have been widely demonstrated to possess extremely excellent electrical characteristics, and thus show great potential for applications in various next-generation electronic products. Nevertheless, the in-depth understanding of HfLaO/IGZO interfacial features is still lacking, which makes further device optimization lack clear guidance. In this work, the band alignment and interfacial chemical structure of a sputtering-prepared HfLaO/IGZO heterojunction was investigated through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The valence and conduction band offsets (ΔE v and ΔE c) at the interface were determined to be 0.57 eV and 1.48 eV, respectively. The relatively large ΔE v is mainly attributed to the formation of the interfacial layer (IL) and thus the upward band bending from IGZO to the surface of HfLaO. Furthermore, it was found that the oxygen vacancies on the surface of IGZO were significantly suppressed upon the deposition of HfLaO, which not only explained the previously reported ultrahigh performance of a-IGZO/HfLaO TFTs to some extent, but also additionally validated the formation of the IL. Our findings have successfully revealed the importance of ILs in modifying the band alignment and interfacial trap states of HfLaO/IGZO heterojunctions, thus suggesting a potential route to further optimizing a-IGZO/HfLaO TFTs so as to satisfy the requirements of next-generation technologies.

  14. Effect of hydration on the stability of the collagen-like triple-helical structure of [4(R)-hydroxyprolyl-4(R)-hydroxyprolylglycine]10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Kazuki; Nishi, Yoshinori; Nakamura, Shota; Uchiyama, Susumu; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Nakazawa, Takashi; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2005-12-06

    X-ray analysis has been carried out on a crystal of the collagen model peptide (Hyp(R)-Hyp(R)-Gly)10 [where Hyp(R) is 4(R)-hydroxyproline] with 1.5 A resolution. The triple-helical structure of (Hyp(R)-Hyp(R)-Gly)10 has the same helical parameters and Rich and Crick II hydrogen bond patterns as those of other collagen model peptides. However, our full-length crystal structure revealed that almost all consecutive Hyp(R) residues take the up-up pucker in contrast to putative down-up puckering propensities of other collagen model peptides. The unique feature of thermodynamic parameters associated with the conformational transition of this peptide from triple helix to single coil is that both enthalpy and entropy changes of the transition are much smaller than those of other model peptides such as (Pro-Pro-Gly)10 and (Pro-Hyp(R)-Gly)10. To corroborate the precise structural information including main- and side-chain dihedral angles and intra- and interwater bridge networks, we estimated the degrees of hydration by comparing molecular volumes observed experimentally in solution to those calculated ones from the crystal structure. The results showed that the degree of hydration of (Hyp(R)-Hyp(R)-Gly)10 is comparable to that of (Pro-Hyp(R)-Gly)10 in the triple-helical state, but the former was more highly hydrated than (Pro-Hyp(R)-Gly)10 in the single-coil state. Because hydration reduces the enthalpy due to the formation of a hydrogen bond with a water molecule and diminishes the entropy due to the restriction of water molecules surrounding a peptide molecule, we concluded that the high thermal stability of (Hyp(R)-Hyp(R)-Gly)10 is able to be described by its high hydration in the single-coil state.

  15. [Hydration in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maristany, Cleofé Pérez-Portabella; Segurola Gurruchaga, Hegoi

    2011-01-01

    Water is an essential foundation for life, having both a regulatory and structural function. The former results from active and passive participation in all metabolic reactions, and its role in conserving and maintaining body temperature. Structurally speaking it is the major contributer to tissue mass, accounting for 60% of the basis of blood plasma, intracellular and intersticial fluid. Water is also part of the primary structures of life such as genetic material or proteins. Therefore, it is necessary that the nurse makes an early assessment of patients water needs to detect if there are signs of electrolyte imbalance. Dehydration can be a very serious problem, especially in children and the elderly. Dehydrations treatment with oral rehydration solution decreases the risk of developing hydration disorders, but even so, it is recommended to follow preventive measures to reduce the incidence and severity of dehydration. The key to having a proper hydration is prevention. Artificial nutrition encompasses the need for precise calculation of water needs in enteral nutrition as parenteral, so the nurse should be part of this process and use the tools for calculating the patient's requirements. All this helps to ensure an optimal nutritional status in patients at risk. Ethical dilemmas are becoming increasingly common in clinical practice. On the subject of artificial nutrition and hydration, there isn't yet any unanimous agreement regarding hydration as a basic care. It is necessary to take decisions in consensus with the health team, always thinking of the best interests of the patient.

  16. 管间界面特性对周向超声导波传播特性的影响∗%Influence of the interfacial prop erties on guided circumferential wave propagation in the circular tub e structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高广健; 邓明晰; 李明亮; 刘畅

    2015-01-01

    The mathematical expressions both of displacement and stress fields of circumferential wave propagation in circular tube structure with a weak interface are derived on condition that the interfacial properties between the two circular tubes are characterized by the interfacial spring model. Based on the said displacement and stress expressions derived, the dispersion equation of ultrasonic guided circumferential wave (UGCW) modes is formally presented by using the corresponding mechanical boundary conditions. According to the technique of modal expansion analysis for waveguide excitation, for a given excitation source used to generate circumferential wave in circular tube structure, the corresponding field of circumferential wave propagation can be decomposed into a series of UGCW modes. Using the reciprocity relations and mode orthogonality, the analytical expression of UGCW mode expansion coefficient is derived, which is closely related to the given excitation source for UGCW generation and the interfacial properties between the two tubes. The influences of change in the interfacial property on dispersion and acoustic field of the UGCW propagation are numerically analyzed. In the cases of perfect and sliding interfaces, for a given UGCW mode, the relative change rate of phase velocity is defined, and then its curve versus frequency is calculated, through which the specific frequency can be determined where the UGCW phase velocity appears to be most sensitive to the change in the interfacial property. For a given UGCW mode and driving frequency, it is numerically found that the displacement field on the outside surface of the circular tube structure changes sensitively and monotonically with change in interfacial property between the tubes. Clearly, through choosing the appropriate driving frequency and the mode of UGCW propagation, both the UGCW phase velocity and the displacement field on the outside surface of the circular tube structure will be monotonic and

  17. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  18. The structure of the hydrated electron. Part 2. A mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics embedded cluster density functional theory: single-excitation configuration interaction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Glover, William J; Larsen, Ross E; Schwartz, Benjamin J

    2007-06-21

    Adiabatic mixed quantum/classical (MQC) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to generate snapshots of the hydrated electron in liquid water at 300 K. Water cluster anions that include two complete solvation shells centered on the hydrated electron were extracted from the MQC MD simulations and embedded in a roughly 18 Ax18 Ax18 A matrix of fractional point charges designed to represent the rest of the solvent. Density functional theory (DFT) with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional and single-excitation configuration interaction (CIS) methods were then applied to these embedded clusters. The salient feature of these hybrid DFT(CIS)/MQC MD calculations is significant transfer (approximately 18%) of the excess electron's charge density into the 2p orbitals of oxygen atoms in OH groups forming the solvation cavity. We used the results of these calculations to examine the structure of the singly occupied and the lower unoccupied molecular orbitals, the density of states, the absorption spectra in the visible and ultraviolet, the hyperfine coupling (hfcc) tensors, and the infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of these embedded water cluster anions. The calculated hfcc tensors were used to compute electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectra for the hydrated electron that compared favorably to the experimental spectra of trapped electrons in alkaline ice. The calculated vibrational spectra of the hydrated electron are consistent with the red-shifted bending and stretching frequencies observed in resonance Raman experiments. In addition to reproducing the visible/near IR absorption spectrum, the hybrid DFT model also accounts for the hydrated electron's 190-nm absorption band in the ultraviolet. Thus, our study suggests that to explain several important experimentally observed properties of the hydrated electron, many-electron effects must be accounted for: one-electron models that do not allow for mixing of the excess

  19. The structure of the hydrated electron. Part 2. A mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics embedded cluster density functional theory : single-excitation configuration interaction study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkrob, I. A.; Glover, W. J.; Larsen, R. E.; Schwartz, B. J.; Chemistry; Univ. of California at Los Angeles

    2007-06-21

    Adiabatic mixed quantum/classical (MQC) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to generate snapshots of the hydrated electron in liquid water at 300 K. Water cluster anions that include two complete solvation shells centered on the hydrated electron were extracted from the MQC MD simulations and embedded in a roughly 18 Angstrom x 18 Angstrom x 18 Angstrom matrix of fractional point charges designed to represent the rest of the solvent. Density functional theory (DFT) with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional and single-excitation configuration interaction (CIS) methods were then applied to these embedded clusters. The salient feature of these hybrid DFT(CIS)/MQC MD calculations is significant transfer ({approx}18%) of the excess electron's charge density into the 2p orbitals of oxygen atoms in OH groups forming the solvation cavity. We used the results of these calculations to examine the structure of the singly occupied and the lower unoccupied molecular orbitals, the density of states, the absorption spectra in the visible and ultraviolet, the hyperfine coupling (hfcc) tensors, and the infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of these embedded water cluster anions. The calculated hfcc tensors were used to compute electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectra for the hydrated electron that compared favorably to the experimental spectra of trapped electrons in alkaline ice. The calculated vibrational spectra of the hydrated electron are consistent with the red-shifted bending and stretching frequencies observed in resonance Raman experiments. In addition to reproducing the visible/near IR absorption spectrum, the hybrid DFT model also accounts for the hydrated electron's 190-nm absorption band in the ultraviolet. Thus, our study suggests that to explain several important experimentally observed properties of the hydrated electron, many-electron effects must be accounted for: one-electron models that do not

  20. Crystal structure of 1H,1'H-[2,2'-biimid-azol]-3-ium hydrogen tartrate hemi-hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiao-Li; Bian, Li-Fang; Guo, Shao-Wei

    2014-11-01

    In the crystal of the title hydrated salt, C6H7N4 (+)·C4H5O6 (-)·0.5H2O, the bi-imidazole monocation, 1H,1'H-[2,2'-biimidazol]-3-ium, is hydrogen bonded, via N-H⋯O, O-H⋯O and O-H⋯N hydrogen bonds, to the hydrogen tartrate anion and the water mol-ecule, which is located on a twofold rotation axis, forming sheets parallel to (001). The sheets are linked via C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional structure. There are also C=O⋯π inter-actions present [O⋯π distances are 3.00 (9) and 3.21 (7) Å], involving the carbonyl O atoms and the imidazolium ring, which may help to consolidate the structure. In the cation, the dihedral angle between the rings is 11.6 (2)°.

  1. Electrospinning of polyvinylidene difluoride with carbon nanotubes: synergistic effects of extensional force and interfacial interaction on crystalline structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu; Yee, Wu Aik; Tjiu, Wuiwui Chauhari; Liu, Ye; Kotaki, Masaya; Boey, Yin Chiang Freddy; Ma, Jan; Liu, Tianxi; Lu, Xuehong

    2008-12-02

    Polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) solutions containing a very low concentration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) of similar surface chemistry, respectively, were electrospun, and the nanofibers formed were collected using a modified rotating disk collector. The polymorphic behavior and crystal orientation of the nanofibers were studied using wide-angle X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy, while the nanotube alignment and interfacial interactions in the nanofibers were probed by transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that the interfacial interaction between the SWCNTs and PVDF and the extensional force experienced by the nanofibers in the electrospinning and collection processes can work synergistically to induce highly oriented beta-form crystallites extensively. In contrast, the MWCNTs could not be well aligned along the nanofiber axis, which leads to a lower degree of crystal orientation.

  2. A comparative study regarding effects of interfacial ferroelectric Bi4Ti3O12 (BTO) layer on electrical characteristics of Au/-Si structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Yildirim; M Gökçen

    2014-04-01

    Present study focuses on the effects of interfacial ferroelectric BTO layer on the electrical characteristics of Au/-Si structures, hence Au/-Si (MS) and Au/BTO/-Si (MFS) structures were fabricated and admittance measurements (capacitance–voltage: - and conductance–voltage: G/-) of both structures were conducted between 10 kHz and 1 MHz at room temperature. Results showed that - and G/- characteristics were affected not only by frequency but also through deposition of BTO layer. Some effects can be listed as sharper peaks in - plots, higher capacitance and conductance values. Structure’s series resistance (s) also decreased due to BTO layer. Interface states (ss) profiles of the structures were obtained using Hill–Coleman and high-low frequency capacitance (HF - LF). Some of the main electrical parameters were extracted from -2- plots using depletion capacitance approach. Furthermore, current–voltage characteristics of MS and MFS structures were presented.

  3. High kappa Dielectrics on InGaAs and GaN - Growth, Interfacial Structural Studies, and Surface Fermi Level Unpinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    interface have attributed to the high device performance. In addition, compared to the state-of-the-art GaN HEMT devices, the HfO2/ GaN MOSFET...Final Report for FA2386-10-1-4058 AOARD Grant 104058 Research Title: High  dielectrics on InGaAs and GaN - Growth, interfacial structural studies...on the science and technology of III-V InGaAs and GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) systems using high dielectrics. The new technology of high

  4. The influence of interfacial roughness on the coherence of structure and magnetic coupling across barriers in Fe/MgO multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, R; Lee, S J; Goff, J P; Ward, R C C; Wang, S G; Kohn, A; Wang, C; Wildes, A R; Collins, S P

    2010-06-09

    Single-crystal Fe/MgO multilayers are model systems in which to study magnetic tunnel junctions. We find that the interfacial roughness leads to the loss of coherence of the crystal structure. For thick MgO layers ferromagnetic (FM) ordering is found using polarized neutron reflectivity (PNR). For thin MgO layers magnetization measurements reveal the presence of antiferromagnetic (AF) interactions, but no long-range AF order is found using PNR. After cycling in a hysteresis loop, FM correlations are found at the coercive point, and this will limit the maximum tunnelling magnetoresistance.

  5. Modeling the Nanophase Structural Dynamics of Phenylated Sulfonated Poly Ether Ether Ketone Ketone (Ph-SPEEKK) Membranes as a Function of Hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lins, Roberto D.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Dupuis, Michel

    2011-03-03

    Solvated phenylated sulfonated poly ether ether ketone ketone (Ph-SPEEKK) membranes in the presence of hydronium ions were modeled by classical molecular dynamics simulations. The characterization of the nanophase structure and dynamics of such membranes was carried out as a function of the water content lambda, where lambda is the number of water molecules per sulfonate group, for lambda values of 3.5, 6, 11, 25, and 40. Analysis of pair correlation functions supports the experimental observation of membrane swelling upon hydration as well the increase in water and hydronium ion diffusion with increasing lambda. While the average number of hydrogen bonds between hydronium ions and sulfonate groups is dramatically affected by the hydration level, the average lifetime of the hydrogen bonds remains essentially constant. The membrane is found to be relatively rigid and its overall flexibility shows little dependence on water content. Compared to Nafion, water and ion diffusion coefficients are considerably smaller at lower hydration levels and room temperature. However, at higher lambda values of 25 and 40 these coefficients are comparable to those in Nafion at a lambda value of 16. This study also shows that water diffusion in Ph-SPEEKK membranes at low hydration levels can be significantly improved by raising the temperature with important implications for proton conductivity.

  6. Particulate structure and microstructure evolution of concrete investigated by DEM: Part 2: Porosimetry in hydrating binders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huan He, H.; Le, N.L.B.; Stroeven, P.

    2012-01-01

    Durability of concrete in engineering structures is becoming more and more of a major problem. Research into such problems is complicated and expensive, however. Developments in computer technology make it possible nowadays realistically simulating cementitious materials and studying its pore

  7. Near-Quantitative Agreement of Model-Free DFT-MD Predictions with XAFS Observations of the Hydration Structure of Highly Charged Transition-Metal Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, John L; Bylaska, Eric J; Bogatko, Stuart; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Cauët, Emilie; Schenter, Gregory K; Weare, John H

    2012-09-20

    First-principles dynamics simulations (DFT, PBE96, and PBE0) and electron scattering calculations (FEFF9) provide near-quantitative agreement with new and existing XAFS measurements for a series of transition-metal ions interacting with their hydration shells via complex mechanisms (high spin, covalency, charge transfer, etc.). This analysis does not require either the development of empirical interparticle interaction potentials or structural models of hydration. However, it provides consistent parameter-free analysis and improved agreement with the higher-R scattering region (first- and second-shell structure, symmetry, dynamic disorder, and multiple scattering) for this comprehensive series of ions. DFT+GGA MD methods provide a high level of agreement. However, improvements are observed when exact exchange is included. Higher accuracy in the pseudopotential description of the atomic potential, including core polarization and reducing core radii, was necessary for very detailed agreement. The first-principles nature of this approach supports its application to more complex systems.

  8. Hydrated goethite (alpha-FeOOH) (100) interface structure: Ordered water and surface functional groups.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghose, S.K.; Waychunas, G.A.; Trainor, T.P.; Eng, P.J.

    2009-12-15

    Goethite({alpha}-FeOOH), an abundant and highly reactive iron oxyhydroxide mineral, has been the subject of numerous stud-ies of environmental interface reactivity. However, such studies have been hampered by the lack of experimental constraints on aqueous interface structure, and especially of the surface water molecular arrangements. Structural information of this type is crucial because reactivity is dictated by the nature of the surface functional groups and the structure or distribution of water and electrolyte at the solid-solution interface. In this study we have investigated the goethite(100) surface using surface diffraction techniques, and have determined the relaxed surface structure, the surface functional groups, and the three dimensional nature of two distinct sorbed water layers. The crystal truncation rod (CTR) results show that the interface structure consists of a double hydroxyl, double water terminated interface with significant atom relaxations. Further, the double hydroxyl terminated surface dominates with an 89% contribution having a chiral subdomain structure on the(100) cleavage faces. The proposed interface stoichiometry is ((H{sub 2}O)-(H{sub 2}O)-OH{sub 2}-OH-Fe-O-O-Fe-R) with two types of terminal hydroxyls; a bidentate (B-type) hydroxo group and a monodentate (A-type) aquo group. Using the bond-valence approach the protonation states of the terminal hydroxyls are predicted to be OH type (bidentate hydroxyl with oxygen coupled to two Fe{sup 3+} ions) and OH{sub 2} type (monodentate hydroxyl with oxygen tied to only one Fe{sup 3+}). A double layer three dimensional ordered water structure at the interface was determined from refinement of fits to the experimental data. Application of bond-valence constraints to the terminal hydroxyls with appropriate rotation of the water dipole moments allowed a plausible dipole orientation model as predicted. The structural results are discussed in terms of protonation and H-bonding at the interface

  9. Particulate structure and microstructure evolution of concrete investigated by DEM: Part 2: Porosimetry in hydrating binders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huan He, H.; Le, N.L.B.; Stroeven, P.

    2012-01-01

    Durability of concrete in engineering structures is becoming more and more of a major problem. Research into such problems is complicated and expensive, however. Developments in computer technology make it possible nowadays realistically simulating cementitious materials and studying its pore networ

  10. Characterization of crystalline structure of alumimum oxide and its hydrate%氧化铝及其水合物的结晶结构表征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔令斌

    2000-01-01

    综述了氧化铝及其水合物的结晶结构(包括聚集态结构)的表征方法,提出了尚待解决的一些问题。%The characterization of crystalline structure of alumimum oxide and its hydrate was reviewed. Some problems in this field needed to be solved were proposed.

  11. Structural and dynamical characteristics of trehalose and sucrose matrices at different hydration levels as probed by FTIR and high-field EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malferrari, M; Nalepa, A; Venturoli, G; Francia, F; Lubitz, W; Möbius, K; Savitsky, A

    2014-06-07

    Some organisms can survive complete dehydration and high temperatures by adopting an anhydrobiotic state in which the intracellular medium contains large amounts of disaccharides, particularly trehalose and sucrose. Trehalose is most effective also in protecting isolated in vitro biostructures. In an attempt to clarify the molecular mechanisms of disaccharide bioprotection, we compared the structure and dynamics of sucrose and trehalose matrices at different hydration levels by means of high-field W-band EPR and FTIR spectroscopy. The hydration state of the samples was characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and the structural organization was probed by EPR using a nitroxide radical dissolved in the respective matrices. Analysis of the EPR spectra showed that the structure and dynamics of the dehydrated matrices as well as their evolution upon re-hydration differ substantially between trehalose and sucrose. The dehydrated trehalose matrix is homogeneous in terms of distribution of the residual water and spin-probe molecules. In contrast, dehydrated sucrose forms a heterogeneous matrix. It is comprised of sucrose polycrystalline clusters and several bulk water domains. The amorphous form was found only in 30% (volume) of the sucrose matrix. Re-hydration leads to a structural homogenization of the sucrose matrix, whilst in the trehalose matrix several domains develop differing in the local water/radical content and radical mobility. The molecular model of the matrices provides an explanation for the different protein-matrix dynamical coupling observed in dried ternary sucrose and trehalose matrices, and accounts for the superior efficacy of trehalose as a bioprotectant. Furthermore, for bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers it is shown that at low water content the protein-matrix coupling is modulated by the sugar/protein molar ratio in sucrose matrices only. This effect is suggested to be related to the preference for sucrose, rather than trehalose, as a

  12. Molecular characterization of gel and liquid-crystalline structures of fully hydrated POPC and POPE bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leekumjorn, Sukit; Sum, Amadeu K

    2007-05-31

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used for a comprehensive study of the structural properties of monounsaturated POPC and POPE bilayers in the gel and liquid-crystalline state at a number of temperatures, ranging from 250 to 330 K. Though the chemical structures of POPC and POPE are largely similar (choline versus ethanolamine headgroup), their transformation processes from a gel to a liquid-crystalline state are contrasting. In the similarities, the lipid tails for both systems are tilted below the phase transition and become more random above the phase transition temperature. The average area per lipid and bilayer thickness were found less sensitive to phase transition changes as the unsaturated tails are able to buffer reordering of the bilayer structure, as observed from hysteresis loops in annealing simulations. For POPC, changes in the structural properties such as the lipid tail order parameter, hydrocarbon trans-gauche isomerization, lipid tail tilt-angle, and level of interdigitation identified a phase transition at about 270 K. For POPE, three temperature ranges were identified, in which the lower one (270-280 K) was associated with a pre-transition state and the higher (290-300 K) with the post-transition state. In the pre-transition state, there was a significant increase in the number of gauche arrangements formed along the lipid tails. Near the main transition (280-290 K), there was a lowering of the lipid order parameters and a disappearance of the tilted lipid arrangement. In the post-transition state, the carbon atoms along the lipid tails became less hindered as their density profiles showed uniform distributions. This study also demonstrates that atomistic simulations of current lipid force fields are capable of capturing the phase transition behavior of lipid bilayers, providing a rich set of molecular and structural information at and near the main transition state.

  13. Structural and interfacial analysis of WC92-Co8 coating deposited on titanium alloy by electrospark deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, R.J.; Qian, Y.Y.; Liu, J

    2004-04-30

    Electrospark deposition (ESD) is a promising process to produce hard and wear-resisting coatings on metallic substrates. In this paper, microstructure and interfacial characteristics of the WC92-Co8 coated-titanium are presented. A metallurgical bonding between the coating and substrate is obtained. The Ti element was found to distribute in WC92-Co8 at the metal pool, as well as the interface by diffusion. Some new phases were produced in the coating layer due to the chemical reaction during the ESD process. Experimental observation and thermodynamic analysis were utilized to study the mechanism of ESD.

  14. Structural and interfacial analysis of WC92 Co8 coating deposited on titanium alloy by electrospark deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R. J.; Qian, Y. Y.; Liu, J.

    2004-04-01

    Electrospark deposition (ESD) is a promising process to produce hard and wear-resisting coatings on metallic substrates. In this paper, microstructure and interfacial characteristics of the WC92-Co8 coated-titanium are presented. A metallurgical bonding between the coating and substrate is obtained. The Ti element was found to distribute in WC92-Co8 at the metal pool, as well as the interface by diffusion. Some new phases were produced in the coating layer due to the chemical reaction during the ESD process. Experimental observation and thermodynamic analysis were utilized to study the mechanism of ESD.

  15. Role of solvation structure in the shuttling of the hydrated excess proton

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RAJIB BISWAS; GREGORY A VOTH

    2017-07-01

    The classic Marcus electron transfer reaction model demonstrated that a barrierless electron transfer reaction can occur when both the reactant and product have almost similar solvation environment. In our recently developed proton model, we have incorporated the pre-solvation concept and showed that it indeed facilitates the proton diffusion in aqueous solution. In this work, we further quantify the degree of pre-solvation using different structural parameters, e.g., tetrahedral order parameter, average numbers of hydrogen bonds. All theabove said parameters exhibit a very strong correlation with the proton share parameter. The more Zundel-like configurations have almost identical solvation environment for both the water molecules and support the presolvationconcept. However, in the case of Eigen-like configurations, the central hydronium and “special pair” water have distinctly different solvation structures.

  16. Molecular structure of hydrated complex of trigonelline with L(+)-tartaric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dega-Szafran, Z.; Dutkiewicz, G.; Kosturkiewicz, Z.; Szafran, M.; Barczyński, P.

    2011-04-01

    Crystal structure of the 1:1:1 complex of trigonelline with L(+)-tartaric acid and water has been determined by X-ray diffraction. The crystals are monoclinic, space group P2 1. Trigonelline is protonated and it is linked with the semi-tartrate anion by the COOH⋯OOC hydrogen bond of 2.475(2) Å. The semi-tartrate anions form infinite chains through the COOH⋯OOC hydrogen bonds of 2.599(2) Å. Water molecules play a role of double donors and double acceptors of hydrogen bonds with the semi-tartrate anions and link them into a three-dimensional net. In the optimized structure of the title complex at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory trigonelline is linked with L(+)-tartaric acid by the COO⋯HOOC hydrogen bond of 2.473 Å. The solid-state FTIR spectrum is consistent with the X-ray results. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra elucidate the structure of the complex investigated in aqueous solutions. The value of p Ka of trigonelline has been determined by the potentiometric titration of its hydrochloride.

  17. Insights into the role of hydration in protein structure and stability obtained through hydrostatic pressure studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Royer

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available A thorough understanding of protein structure and stability requires that we elucidate the molecular basis for the effects of both temperature and pressure on protein conformational transitions. While temperature effects are relatively well understood and the change in heat capacity upon unfolding has been reasonably well parameterized, the state of understanding of pressure effects is much less advanced. Ultimately, a quantitative parameterization of the volume changes (at the basis of pressure effects accompanying protein conformational transitions will be required. The present report introduces a qualitative hypothesis based on available model compound data for the molecular basis of volume change upon protein unfolding and its dependence on temperature.

  18. Computational Material Modeling of Hydrated Cement Paste Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) Chemistry Structure - Influence of Magnesium Exchange on Mechanical Stiffness: C-S-H Jennite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-27

    material chemistry structure are studied following a molecular dynamics (MD) computational modeling methodology. Calcium ions are replaced with... chemistry structure. Conference Name: 1st Pan-American Conference on Computational Mechanics Conference Date: April 27, 2015 1st Pan-American Congress on...MODELING OF C-S-H Material chemistry level modeling following the principles and techniques commonly grouped under Computational Material Science is

  19. Inter-cage dynamics in structure I, II, and H fluoromethane hydrates as studied by NMR and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, Alondra Torres [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0R6 (Canada); Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Separation Technology Group, Den Dolech 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kroon, Maaike C. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Separation Technology Group, Den Dolech 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Peters, Cor J. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Separation Technology Group, Den Dolech 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); The Petroleum Institute, Chemical Engineering Department, P. O. Box 2533, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Moudrakovski, Igor L.; Ratcliffe, Christopher I.; Ripmeester, John A., E-mail: John.Ripmeester@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0R6 (Canada); Alavi, Saman [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2014-06-07

    Prospective industrial applications of clathrate hydrates as materials for gas separation require further knowledge of cavity distortion, cavity selectivity, and defects induction by guest-host interactions. The results presented in this contribution show that under certain temperature conditions the guest combination of CH{sub 3}F and a large polar molecule induces defects on the clathrate hydrate framework that allow intercage guest dynamics. {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts of a CH{sub 3}F/CH{sub 4}/TBME sH hydrate and a temperature analysis of the {sup 2}H NMR powder lineshapes of a CD{sub 3}F/THF sII and CD{sub 3}F/TBME sH hydrate, displayed evidence that the populations of CH{sub 4} and CH{sub 3}F in the D and D{sup ′} cages were in a state of rapid exchange. A hydrogen bonding analysis using molecular dynamics simulations on the TBME/CH{sub 3}F and TBME/CH{sub 4} sH hydrates showed that the presence of CH{sub 3}F enhances the hydrogen bonding probability of the TBME molecule with the water molecules of the cavity. Similar results were obtained for THF/CH{sub 3}F and THF/CH{sub 4} sII hydrates. The enhanced hydrogen bond formation leads to the formation of defects in the water hydrogen bonding lattice and this can enhance the migration of CH{sub 3}F molecules between adjacent small cages.

  20. Spatial and Orientational Structure of the Hydration Shell of Benzene in Sub- and Supercritical Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Ashu; Chandra, Amalendu

    2015-07-09

    The spatial and orientational structure of the solvation shell of benzene in sub- and supercritical water are investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The present study reveals different local organization of water molecules at different parts of the solute. The π-hydrogen-bonding between benzene and water along the axial direction is found to exist even at supercritical conditions although to a reduced extent. The coordination number of benzene decreases substantially on increase of temperature and decrease of density. While the π-hydrogen-bonded part in the axial region shows a slight expansion, the hydrophobically solvated part in the equatorial plane shows an opposite behavior as the temperature is increased from normal to the supercritical temperature. Two other distribution functions, namely the radial/angular and spatial orientational functions (SOFs) are calculated to explore the spatially resolved angular preferences of water molecules around the benzene solute. Water molecules located axial to the benzene are found to have strong inward orientation toward the solute, however an opposite behavior is found in the equatorial region. Although at supercritical conditions, the orientational distributions of water molecules are broadened, the preferential orientations in the axial and equatorial regions remain similar to that under ambient condition on average.

  1. Structural color change following hydration and dehydration of iridescent mourning dove (Zenaida macroura) feathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawkey, Matthew D; D'Alba, Liliana; Wozny, Joel; Eliason, Chad; Koop, Jennifer A H; Jia, Li

    2011-04-01

    Dynamic changes in integumentary color occur in cases as diverse as the neurologically controlled iridiphores of cephalopod skin and the humidity-responsive cuticles of longhorn beetles. By contrast, feather colors are generally assumed to be relatively static, changing by small amounts only over periods of months. However, this assumption has rarely been tested even though structural colors of feathers are produced by ordered nanostructures that are analogous to those in the aforementioned dynamic systems. Feathers are neither innervated nor vascularized and therefore any color change must be caused by external stimuli. Thus, we here explore how feathers of iridescent mourning doves Zenaida macroura respond to a simple stimulus: addition and evaporation of water. After three rounds of experimental wetting and subsequent evaporation, iridescent feather color changed hue, became more chromatic and increased in overall reflectance by almost 50%. To understand the mechanistic basis of this change, we used electron microscopy to examine macro- and nanostructures before and after treatment. Transmission electron microscopy and transfer matrix thin-film models revealed that color is produced by thin-film interference from a single (∼ 35 nm layer of keratin around the edge of feather barbules, beneath which lies a layer of air and melanosomes. After treatment, the most striking morphological difference was a twisting of colored barbules that exposed more of their surface area for reflection, explaining the observed increase in brightness. These results suggest that some plumage colors may be more malleable than previously thought, leading to new avenues for research on dynamic plumage color.

  2. Structural and electrical characteristics of ALD-HfO2/n-Si gate stack with SiON interfacial layer for advanced CMOS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Richa; Rajput, Renu; Prasher, Rakesh; Vaid, Rakesh

    2016-09-01

    We report the fabrication of an ultra-thin silicon oxynitride (SiON) as an interfacial layer (IL) for n-Si/ALD-HfO2 gate stack with reduced leakage current. The XRD, AFM, FTIR, FESEM and EDAX characterizations have been performed for structural and morphological studies. Electrical parameters such as dielectric constant (K), interface trap density (Dit), leakage current density (J), effective oxide charge (Qeff), barrier height (Φbo), ideality factor (ƞ), breakdown-voltage (Vbr) and series resistance (Rs) were extracted through C-V, G-V and I-V measurements. The determined values of K, Dit, J, Qeff, Φbo, ƞ, Vbr and Rs are 14.4, 0.5 × 10 11 eV-1 cm-2, 2.2 × 10-9 A/cm2, 0.3 × 1013 cm-2, 0.42, 2.1, -0.33 and 14.5 MΩ respectively. SiON growth prior to HfO2 deposition has curtailed the problem of high leakage current density and interfacial traps due to sufficient amount of N2 incorporated at the interface.

  3. Magnetization reorientation induced by interfacial structures in ultrathin disordered FePt film sandwiched by SiO{sub 2} layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Guang; Zhang, Jing-Yan [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang, Shou-Guo, E-mail: sgwang@iphy.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Jiang, Shao-Long; Zhao, Yun-Chi [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Ma, Qi-Di; Wang, Chao; Dong, Bo-Wen; Liu, Jia-Long; Zhang, Ying; Sun, Young [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wu, Zheng-Long [Analytical and Testing Center, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Yu, Guang-Hua, E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-10-30

    In general, ultrathin disordered FePt film exhibits in-plane magnetic anisotropy due to large demagnetization fields and negligible volume anisotropy. Here, we demonstrated that magnetization reorientation from in-plane to out-of-plane takes place when ultrathin disordered FePt film is sandwiched by amorphous SiO{sub 2} layers and annealed at 350 °C. Based on the interfacial and structural analysis from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy, the reorientation originates from the electronic structural changes because of strong bonding between Fe and O atoms at the top FePt/SiO{sub 2} interface. This interface anisotropy plays a crucial role in the magnetic behaviour, resulting in magnetization reorientation of ultrathin disordered FePt film.

  4. Effect of interfacial structures on spin dependent tunneling in epitaxial L1{sub 0}-FePt/MgO/FePt perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, G.; Li, D. L.; Wang, S. G., E-mail: Sgwang@iphy.ac.cn; Ma, Q. L.; Liang, S. H.; Wei, H. X.; Han, X. F. [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Hesjedal, T.; Ward, R. C. C. [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Kohn, A.; Elkayam, A.; Tal, N. [Department of Materials Engineering and the Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Zhang, X.-G. [Department of Physics and Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences and Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6493 (United States)

    2015-02-28

    Epitaxial FePt(001)/MgO/FePt magnetic tunnel junctions with L1{sub 0}-FePt electrodes showing perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxial growth. Tunnel magnetoresistance ratios of 21% and 53% were obtained at 300 K and 10 K, respectively. Our previous work, based on transmission electron microscopy, confirmed a semi-coherent interfacial structure with atomic steps (Kohn et al., APL 102, 062403 (2013)). Here, we show by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculation that the bottom FePt/MgO interface is either Pt-terminated for regular growth or when an Fe layer is inserted at the interface, it is chemically bonded to O. Both these structures have a dominant role in spin dependent tunneling across the MgO barrier resulting in a decrease of the tunneling magnetoresistance ratio compared with previous predictions.

  5. PMR Characterization of the Water Structure in Tibetan Milk Mushroom Zooglea: Influence of Medium Hydration and Hydrophobicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupskaya, T. V.; Prylutskyy, Yu. I.; Evstigneev, M. P.; Tsapko, M. D.; Turov, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    The state of water in Tibetan milk mushroom zooglea with different degrees of hydration (h) was investigated using low-temperature PMR spectroscopy in air and in contact with the hydrophobic media polydimethylsiloxane PDMS-1000 and CHCl3 with added trifl uoroacetic acid (TFA). The maximum hydration of the zooglea amounted to h = 32 g/g (of dry matter). Water existed as polyassociates (clusters or domains) of strongly and weakly associated water. Bound water decomposed into clusters in the presence of TFA. The NMR spectra showed six types of bound water at h = 0.3 g/g.

  6. Derivation of a non-local interfacial Hamiltonian for short-ranged wetting: II. General diagrammatic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, A. O.; Rascón, C.; Bernardino, N. R.; Romero-Enrique, J. M.

    2007-10-01

    In our first paper, we showed how a non-local effective Hamiltonian for short-ranged wetting may be derived from an underlying Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson model. Here, we combine the Green's function method with standard perturbation theory to determine the general diagrammatic form of the binding potential functional beyond the double-parabola approximation for the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson bulk potential. The main influence of cubic and quartic interactions is simply to alter the coefficients of the double parabola-like zigzag diagrams and also to introduce curvature and tube-interaction corrections (also represented diagrammatically), which are of minor importance. Non-locality generates effective long-ranged many-body interfacial interactions due to the reflection of tube-like fluctuations from the wall. Alternative wall boundary conditions (with a surface field and enhancement) and the diagrammatic description of tricritical wetting are also discussed.

  7. Derivation of a non-local interfacial Hamiltonian for short-ranged wetting: II. General diagrammatic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parry, A O [Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Rascon, C [Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos (GISC), Departamento de Matematicas, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Madrid) (Spain); Bernardino, N R [Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Romero-Enrique, J M [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado de Correos 1065, 41080 Seville (Spain)

    2007-10-17

    In our first paper, we showed how a non-local effective Hamiltonian for short-ranged wetting may be derived from an underlying Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson model. Here, we combine the Green's function method with standard perturbation theory to determine the general diagrammatic form of the binding potential functional beyond the double-parabola approximation for the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson bulk potential. The main influence of cubic and quartic interactions is simply to alter the coefficients of the double parabola-like zigzag diagrams and also to introduce curvature and tube-interaction corrections (also represented diagrammatically), which are of minor importance. Non-locality generates effective long-ranged many-body interfacial interactions due to the reflection of tube-like fluctuations from the wall. Alternative wall boundary conditions (with a surface field and enhancement) and the diagrammatic description of tricritical wetting are also discussed.

  8. Experimental Determination of Refractive Index of Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bylov, Martin; Rasmussen, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The refractive indexes of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate have been experimentally determined. The refractive indexes were determined in an indirect manner making use of the fact that two non-absorbing materials will have the same refractive index if they cannot be distinguished visually....... For methane hydrate (structure I) the refractive index was found to be 1.346 and for natural gas hydrate (structure II) it was found to be 1.350. The measurements further suggest that the gas hydrate growth rate increases if the water has formed hydrates before. The induction time, on the other hand, seems...

  9. Centrosome structure and function is altered by chloral hydrate and diazepam during the first reproductive cell cycles in sea urchin eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, H.; Chakrabarti, A.

    1998-01-01

    ability to reform normal mitotic figures. These results indicate that chloral hydrate and diazepam affect centrosome structure which results in the inability to reform normal microtubule formations and causes abnormal fertilization and mitosis.

  10. Clathrate hydrates in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Keith C; Brewer, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    Scientific knowledge of natural clathrate hydrates has grown enormously over the past decade, with spectacular new findings of large exposures of complex hydrates on the sea floor, the development of new tools for examining the solid phase in situ, significant progress in modeling natural hydrate systems, and the discovery of exotic hydrates associated with sea floor venting of liquid CO2. Major unresolved questions remain about the role of hydrates in response to climate change today, and correlations between the hydrate reservoir of Earth and the stable isotopic evidence of massive hydrate dissociation in the geologic past. The examination of hydrates as a possible energy resource is proceeding apace for the subpermafrost accumulations in the Arctic, but serious questions remain about the viability of marine hydrates as an economic resource. New and energetic explorations by nations such as India and China are quickly uncovering large hydrate findings on their continental shelves.

  11. Effects of Post Annealing Treatments on the Interfacial Chemical Properties and Band Alignment of AlN/Si Structure Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Long; Lu, Hong-Liang; Chen, Hong-Yan; Wang, Tao; Ji, Xin-Ming; Liu, Wen-Jun; Zhao, Dongxu; Devi, Anjana; Ding, Shi-Jin; Zhang, David Wei

    2017-12-01

    The influences of annealing temperature in N2 atmosphere on interfacial chemical properties and band alignment of AlN/Si structure deposited by atomic layer deposition have been investigated based on x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. It is found that more oxygen incorporated into AlN film with the increasing annealing temperature, resulting from a little residual H2O in N2 atmosphere reacting with AlN film during the annealing treatment. Accordingly, the Si-N bonding at the interface gradually transforms to Si-O bonding with the increasing temperature due to the diffusion of oxygen from AlN film to the Si substrate. Specially, the Si-O-Al bonding state can be detected in the 900 °C-annealed sample. Furthermore, it is determined that the band gap and valence band offset increase with increasing annealing temperature.

  12. Effects of Post Annealing Treatments on the Interfacial Chemical Properties and Band Alignment of AlN/Si Structure Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Long; Lu, Hong-Liang; Chen, Hong-Yan; Wang, Tao; Ji, Xin-Ming; Liu, Wen-Jun; Zhao, Dongxu; Devi, Anjana; Ding, Shi-Jin; Zhang, David Wei

    2017-02-01

    The influences of annealing temperature in N2 atmosphere on interfacial chemical properties and band alignment of AlN/Si structure deposited by atomic layer deposition have been investigated based on x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. It is found that more oxygen incorporated into AlN film with the increasing annealing temperature, resulting from a little residual H2O in N2 atmosphere reacting with AlN film during the annealing treatment. Accordingly, the Si-N bonding at the interface gradually transforms to Si-O bonding with the increasing temperature due to the diffusion of oxygen from AlN film to the Si substrate. Specially, the Si-O-Al bonding state can be detected in the 900 °C-annealed sample. Furthermore, it is determined that the band gap and valence band offset increase with increasing annealing temperature.

  13. SEISMIC STUDIES OF MARINE GAS HYDRATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Haibin

    2003-01-01

    We give a brief introduction of developments of seismic methods in the studies of marine gas hydrates. Then we give an example of seismic data processing for BSRs in western Nankai accretionary prism, a typical gas hydrate distribution region. Seismic data processing is proved to be important to obtain better images of BSRs distribution. Studies of velocity structure of hydrated sediments are useful for better understanding the distribution of gas hydrates. Using full waveform inversion, we successfully derived high-resolution velocity model of a double BSR in eastern Nankai Trough area. Recent survey and research show that gas hydrates occur in the marine sediments of the South China Sea and East China Sea.But we would like to say seismic researches on gas hydrate in China are very preliminary.

  14. Irradiation Effect of Argon Ion on Interfacial Structure Fe(2nm/Si(tsi=0.5-2 nm Multilayer thin Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Purwanto

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigation includes formation of interfacial structure of Fe(2nm/Si(tSi= 0.5-2 nm multilayer thin film and the behavior of antiferromagnetic coupling between Fe layers due to Argon ion irradiation was investigated. [Fe(2nm/Si]30 multilayers (MLs with a thickness of Si spacer 0.5 - 2 nanometer were prepared on n-type (100 Si substrate by the helicon plasma sputtering method. Irradiation were performed using 400keV Ar ion to investigate the behavior of magnetic properties of the Fe/Si MLs. The magnetization measurements of Fe/Si MLs after 400keV Ar ion irradiation show the degradation of antiferromagnetic behavior of Fe layers depend on the ion doses. The Magnetoresistance (MR measurements using by Four Point Probe (FPP method also confirm that MR ratio decrease after ion irradiation. X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns indicate that the intensity of a satellite peak induced by a superlattice structure does not change within the range of ion dose. These results imply that the surface of interface structures after ion irradiation become rough although the layer structures are maintained. Therefore, it is considered that the MR properties of Fe/Si MLs also are due to the metallic superlattice structures such as Fe/Cr and Co/Cu MLs.

  15. Accurate flexible fitting of high-resolution protein structures to small-angle x-ray scattering data using a coarse-grained model with implicit hydration shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenjun; Tekpinar, Mustafa

    2011-12-21

    Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) is a powerful technique widely used to explore conformational states and transitions of biomolecular assemblies in solution. For accurate model reconstruction from SAXS data, one promising approach is to flexibly fit a known high-resolution protein structure to low-resolution SAXS data by computer simulations. This is a highly challenging task due to low information content in SAXS data. To meet this challenge, we have developed what we believe to be a novel method based on a coarse-grained (one-bead-per-residue) protein representation and a modified form of the elastic network model that allows large-scale conformational changes while maintaining pseudobonds and secondary structures. Our method optimizes a pseudoenergy that combines the modified elastic-network model energy with a SAXS-fitting score and a collision energy that penalizes steric collisions. Our method uses what we consider a new implicit hydration shell model that accounts for the contribution of hydration shell to SAXS data accurately without explicitly adding waters to the system. We have rigorously validated our method using five test cases with simulated SAXS data and three test cases with experimental SAXS data. Our method has successfully generated high-quality structural models with root mean-squared deviation of 1 ∼ 3 Å from the target structures.

  16. 900-m high gas plumes rising from marine sediments containing structure II hydrates at Vestnesa Ridge, offshore W-Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew J.; Mienert, Jürgen; Bünz, Stefan; Greinert, Jens; Rasmussen, Tine L.

    2013-04-01

    We study an arctic sediment drift in ~1200 m water depth at Vestnesa Ridge, offshore western Svalbard. The ridge is spotted with pockmarks that range in size from a few meters to hundreds of meters in diameter and centimeters to tens of meters in height (e.g. Vogt et al., 1994). There is a strong negative-polarity seismic reflection below the ridge that is interpreted to record a negative impedance contrast marking the boundary between gas hydrate and water above and free gas and water below: it is the bottom-simulating reflector (BSR). Seismically transparent zones, interpreted as gas chimneys, extend from pockmarks at the seafloor to depths below the BSR (180-220 meters below the seafloor) (Bünz et al., 2012). Gas flares, gas hydrate, and methane-seep-specific biological communities (pogonphora and begiatoa bacterial mats) have been observed adjacent to pockmarks at the ridge (Bünz et al., 2012). We present new single-beam echosounding data that were acquired during 2010 and 2012 cruises on the R/V Helmer Hanssen at Vestnesa Ridge using a Simrad EK60 system that operates at frequencies of 18 and 38 kHz. During both cruises which lasted 3-5 days, we detected continuous bubble release from 4 separate pockmarks in 2010 and 6 separate pockmarks in 2012. There were no noticeable, short-term (hourly or daily) variations in the bubble release from the pockmarks, indicating that the venting from the pockmarks does not undergo rapid changes. Plumes from the pockmarks rise between 875 to 925m above the seafloor to a final water depth of 325 to 275m, respectively. This depth is in excellent agreement with the top of the hydrate stability zone (275 meters below sea level) for the gas composition of hydrate sampled at the ridge (96.31% C1; 3.36% C2; 0.21% C3; 0.11% IC4; 0.01% NC4). This suggests that hydrate skins are forming around the gas bubbles, inhibiting the dissolution of gas, and allowing the bubbles to rise to such great heights in the water column. Our results

  17. A study aimed at characterizing the interfacial structure in a tin–silver solder on nickel-coated copper plate during aging

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D C Lin; R Kovacevic; T S Srivatsan; G X Wang

    2008-06-01

    This paper highlights the interfacial structure of tin-silver (Sn-3·5Ag) solder on nickel-coated copper pads during aging performance studies at a temperature of 150°C for up to 96 h. Experimental results revealed the as-solidified solder bump made from using the lead-free solder (Sn-3·5Ag) exhibited or showed a thin layer of the tin–nickel–copper intermetallic compound (IMC) at the solder/substrate interface. This includes a sub-layer having a planar structure immediately adjacent to the Ni-coating and a blocky structure on the inside of the solder. Aging performance studies revealed the thickness of both the IMC layer and the sub-layer, having a planar structure, to increase with an increase in aging time. The observed increase was essentially non-linear. Fine microscopic cracks were observed to occur at the interfaces of the planar sub-layer and the block sub-layer.

  18. Desalination utilizing clathrate hydrates (LDRD final report).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Greathouse, Jeffery A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Majzoub, Eric H. (University of Missouri, Columbia, MO)

    2008-01-01

    Advances are reported in several aspects of clathrate hydrate desalination fundamentals necessary to develop an economical means to produce municipal quantities of potable water from seawater or brackish feedstock. These aspects include the following, (1) advances in defining the most promising systems design based on new types of hydrate guest molecules, (2) selection of optimal multi-phase reactors and separation arrangements, and, (3) applicability of an inert heat exchange fluid to moderate hydrate growth, control the morphology of the solid hydrate material formed, and facilitate separation of hydrate solids from concentrated brine. The rate of R141b hydrate formation was determined and found to depend only on the degree of supercooling. The rate of R141b hydrate formation in the presence of a heat exchange fluid depended on the degree of supercooling according to the same rate equation as pure R141b with secondary dependence on salinity. Experiments demonstrated that a perfluorocarbon heat exchange fluid assisted separation of R141b hydrates from brine. Preliminary experiments using the guest species, difluoromethane, showed that hydrate formation rates were substantial at temperatures up to at least 12 C and demonstrated partial separation of water from brine. We present a detailed molecular picture of the structure and dynamics of R141b guest molecules within water cages, obtained from ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and Raman spectroscopy. Density functional theory calculations were used to provide an energetic and molecular orbital description of R141b stability in both large and small cages in a structure II hydrate. Additionally, the hydrate of an isomer, 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, does not form at ambient conditions because of extensive overlap of electron density between guest and host. Classical molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory trials support the results for the isomer hydrate. Molecular dynamics simulations

  19. Gas hydrate of Lake Baikal: Discovery and varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlystov, Oleg; De Batist, Marc; Shoji, Hitoshi; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Nishio, Shinya; Naudts, Lieven; Poort, Jeffrey; Khabuev, Andrey; Belousov, Oleg; Manakov, Andrey; Kalmychkov, Gennаdy

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of recent gas-hydrate studies in Lake Baikal, the only fresh-water lake in the world containing gas hydrates in its sedimentary infill. We provide a historical overview of the different investigations and discoveries and highlight some recent breakthroughs in our understanding of the Baikal hydrate system. So far, 21 sites of gas hydrate occurrence have been discovered. Gas hydrates are of structures I and II, which are of thermogenic, microbial, and mixed origin. At the 15 sites, gas hydrates were found in mud volcanoes, and the rest six - near gas discharges. Additionally, depending on type of discharge and gas hydrate structure, they were visually different. Investigations using MIR submersibles allowed finding of gas hydrates at the bottom surface of Lake Baikal at the three sites.

  20. Compound Natural Gas Hydrate: A Natural System for Separation of Hydrate-Forming Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, M. D.; Osegovic, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Natural processes that separate materials from a mixture may exert a major influence on the development of the atmospheres and surfaces of planets, moons, and other planetary bodies. Natural distillation and gravity separation, amongst others, are well known means of differentiating materials through liquid-gas partitioning. One of the least known attributes of clathrate (gas) hydrates is their potential effect on the evolution of planetary system oceans and atmospheres. Gas hydrates separate gases from mixtures of gases by concentrating preferred hydrate-forming materials (HFM) guests within the water-molecule cage structure of crystalline hydrate. Different HFMs have very different fields of stability. When multiple hydrate formers are present, a preference series based on their selective uptake exists. Compound hydrate, which is formed from two or more species of HFM, extract preferred HFM from a mixture in very different proportions to their relative percentages of the original mixture. These compound hydrates can have different formation and dissociation conditions depending on the evolution of the environment. That is, the phase boundary of the compound hydrate that is required for dissociation lies along a lower pressure - higher temperature course. Compound hydrates respond to variations in temperature, pressure, and HFM composition. On Earth, the primary naturally occurring hydrate of interest to global climate modeling is methane hydrate. Oceanic hydrate on Earth is the largest store of carbon in the biosphere that is immediately reactive to environmental change, and is capable of releasing large amounts of methane into the atmosphere over a short geological time span. Hydrate formation is essentially metastable and is very sensitive to environmental change and to gas flux. Where natural variations in temperature and pressure varies so that hydrate will form and dissociate in some cyclical manner, such as in oceans where sea level is capable of rising and

  1. Hydration of highly charged ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Thomas S; Weiss, Alexander K H; Randolf, Bernhard R; Rode, Bernd M

    2011-08-01

    Based on a series of ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) simulations, the broad spectrum of structural and dynamical properties of hydrates of trivalent and tetravalent ions is presented, ranging from extreme inertness to immediate hydrolysis. Main group and transition metal ions representative for different parts of the periodic system are treated, as are 2 threefold negatively charged anions. The results show that simple predictions of the properties of the hydrates appear impossible and that an accurate quantum mechanical simulation in cooperation with sophisticated experimental investigations seems the only way to obtain conclusive results.

  2. Experimental Characterisation of the Interfacial Structure during Counter-Current Flow Limitation in a Model of the Hot Leg of a PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Vallée

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the two-phase flow behaviour during counter-current flow limitation in the hot leg of a pressurised water reactor, dedicated experiments were performed in a scaled down model of Kobe University. The experiments were performed with air and water at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. At high flow rates, CCFL occurs and the discharge of water to the reactor pressure vessel simulator is limited by the formation of slugs carrying liquid back to the steam generator. The structure of the interface was observed from the side of the channel test section using a high-speed video camera. An algorithm was developed to recognise the stratified interface in the camera frames after background subtraction. This method allows extracting the water level at any position in the image as well as performing further statistical treatments. The evolution of the interfacial structure along the horizontal part of the hot leg is shown by the visualisation of the probability distribution of the water level and analysed in function of the liquid and gas flow rates. The data achieved are useful for the analysis of the flow conditions as well as for the validation of modelling approaches like computational fluid dynamics.

  3. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lina

    2017-05-13

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10 was conducted for tricalcium silicate (C3S) to interpret long-term hydration process and investigate the formation, structure and properties of C-S-H. Based on results from XRD, IR, SEM, NMR and so forth, loose and dense clusters of C-S-H with analogous C/S ratio were obtained along with the corresponding chemical formulae proposed as Ca5Si4O13∙6.2H2O. Crystalline structure inside C-S-H was observed by TEM, which was allocated at the foil-like proportion as well as the edge of wrinkles of the product. The long-term hydration process of C3S in dilute suspension could be sketchily described as migration of calcium hydroxide and in-situ growth of C-S-H with equilibrium silicon in aqueous solution relatively constant and calcium varied.

  4. Molecular structures of N-ethylpiperidine betaine hydrate and its 1:1 complex with squaric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dega-Szafran, Z.; Dutkiewicz, G.; Kosturkiewicz, Z.; Szafran, M.

    2013-12-01

    N-ethylpiperidine betaine, (N-carboxymethyl-N-ethylpiperidinium inner salt, EtPB) crystallizes as a hydrate. EtPB and water molecules are bonded by intermolecular OH⋯O hydrogen bonds of 2.817(1) and 2.863(1) Å, into a centrosymmetric dimer, in which only one carboxylate oxygen atom is involved in H-bonds formation. In the complex of EtPB with squaric acid (3,4-dihydroxy-3-cyclobutene-1,2-dione, H2SQ) both carboxylate oxygen atoms are engaged in the hydrogen bonds which links molecules through two short, non-symmetric OH⋯O hydrogen bonds of 2.489(1) and 2.500(1) Å. The preferences of the conformation of the EtPB unit in the hydrogen bond formation have been studied by X-ray diffraction, FTIR and NMR spectroscopy and the results are supported by DFT calculations. EtPB, in hydrate and in the complex, has a chair conformation with the CH3CH2 group in the axial position and the CH2COO substituent in the equatorial position.

  5. The Structure of Hydrated Electron. Part 1. Magnetic Resonance of Internally Trapping Water Anions: A Density Functional Theory Study

    CERN Document Server

    Shkrob, I A

    2006-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is used to rationalize magnetic parameters of hydrated electron trapped in alkaline glasses as observed using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopies. To this end, model water cluster anions (n=4-8 and n=20,24) that localize the electron internally are examined. It is shown that EPR parameters of such water anions (such as hyperfine coupling tensors of H/D nuclei in the water molecules) are defined mainly by the cavity size and the coordination number of the electron; the water molecules in the second solvation shell play a relatively minor role. An idealized model of hydrated electron (that is usually attributed to L. Kevan) in which six hydroxyl groups arranged in an octahedral pattern point towards the common center is shown to provide the closest match to the experimental parameters, such as isotropic and anisotropic hyperfine coupling constants for the protons (estimated from ESEEM), the second moment of the E...

  6. Do the interfacial fluidities of cationic reverse micelles enhance with an increase in the water content?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, K. S.; Dutt, G. B.

    2009-11-01

    The role of cosurfactant and water on the interfacial fluidities of reverse micelles formed with the cationic surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) has been examined by measuring the fluorescence anisotropies of two structurally similar ionic solutes, rhodamine 110 and fluorescein. For this purpose, reverse micellar systems with (CTAB/1-pentanol/cyclohexane/water) and without a cosurfactant (CTAB/chloroform-isooctane/water) have been chosen. In this study, the mole ratio of water to surfactant W has been varied in the region of 4-25. Experimental results indicate that the average reorientation time of the probe, which is a measure of the fluidity near the interfacial region, decreases by a factor of 1.5 and 1.4 for rhodamine 110 and fluorescein, respectively, as W goes up from 5 to 25 in CTAB/1-pentanol/cyclohexane/water reverse micellar system. In contrast, the average reorientation time, remains invariant for both the probe molecules in CTAB/chloroform-isooctane/water reverse micellar system despite an increase in W from 4 to 24. In case of CTAB/1-pentanol/cyclohexane/water reverse micellar system, the added water binds to bromide counter ions and also the hydroxyl groups of the cosurfactant, 1-pentanol, which results in an increase in the effective head group area. Such an increase in the effective head group area leads to a decrease in the packing parameter, and hence an increase in the interfacial fluidity. On the other hand, in CTAB/chloroform-isooctane/water system, the added water merely hydrates the bromide ions, thereby leaving the effective head group area unchanged. Thus, the interfacial fluidities remain invariant upon the addition of water in the absence of a cosurfactant.

  7. Three-dimensional distribution of gas hydrate beneath southern Hydrate Ridge: Constraints from ODP Leg 204

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehu, A.M.; Long, P.E.; Torres, M.E.; Bohrmann, G.; Rack, F.R.; Collett, T.S.; Goldberg, D.S.; Milkov, A.V.; Riedel, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Bangs, N.L.; Barr, S.R.; Borowski, W.S.; Claypool, G.E.; Delwiche, M.E.; Dickens, G.R.; Gracia, E.; Guerin, G.; Holland, M.; Johnson, J.E.; Lee, Y.-J.; Liu, C.-S.; Su, X.; Teichert, B.; Tomaru, H.; Vanneste, M.; Watanabe, M. E.; Weinberger, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Large uncertainties about the energy resource potential and role in global climate change of gas hydrates result from uncertainty about how much hydrate is contained in marine sediments. During Leg 204 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) to the accretionary complex of the Cascadia subduction zone, we sampled the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) from the seafloor to its base in contrasting geological settings defined by a 3D seismic survey. By integrating results from different methods, including several new techniques developed for Leg 204, we overcome the problem of spatial under-sampling inherent in robust methods traditionally used for estimating the hydrate content of cores and obtain a high-resolution, quantitative estimate of the total amount and spatial variability of gas hydrate in this structural system. We conclude that high gas hydrate content (30-40% of pore space or 20-26% of total volume) is restricted to the upper tens of meters below the seafloor near the summit of the structure, where vigorous fluid venting occurs. Elsewhere, the average gas hydrate content of the sediments in the gas hydrate stability zone is generally <2% of the pore space, although this estimate may increase by a factor of 2 when patchy zones of locally higher gas hydrate content are included in the calculation. These patchy zones are structurally and stratigraphically controlled, contain up to 20% hydrate in the pore space when averaged over zones ???10 m thick, and may occur in up to ???20% of the region imaged by 3D seismic data. This heterogeneous gas hydrate distribution is an important constraint on models of gas hydrate formation in marine sediments and the response of the sediments to tectonic and environmental change. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Function of magnesium aluminate hydrate and magnesium nitrate as MgO addition in crystal structure and grain size control of -Al2O3 during sintering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soumen Pal; A K Bandyopadhyay; S Mukherjee; B N Samaddar; P G Pal

    2010-02-01

    Chemically pure reactive alumina (-Al2O3) which is commercially available was used for densification study in presence of widely accepted dopant MgO as additive. MgO was added both as spinel (MgAl2O4) forming precursor i.e. magnesium aluminate hydrate, and magnesium nitrate. Sintering investigations were conducted in the temperature range 1500–1600°C with 2 h soaking. Structural study of sintered pellets was carried out by extensive XRD analysis. Scanning electron mode SEM images of the specimens were considered to understand the effect of both types of additions. Addition of MgO within and beyond optimum amount had some effect on development of microstructure of sintered bodies. Densification, around 99% ρth, with fine grain microstructure was achieved. These different types of additions caused two distinct changes in crystal structure of alumina-one small contraction and the other expansion of unit cell parameters.

  9. Effect of Atmospheric Ions on Interfacial Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chang Kurt Kung

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of atmospheric positivity on the electrical properties of interfacial water was explored. Interfacial, or exclusion zone (EZ water was created in the standard way, next to a sheet of Nafion placed horizontally at the bottom of a water-filled chamber. Positive atmospheric ions were created from a high voltage source placed above the chamber. Electrical potential distribution in the interfacial water was measured using microelectrodes. We found that beyond a threshold, the positive ions diminished the magnitude of the negative electrical potential in the interfacial water, sometimes even turning it to positive. Additionally, positive ions produced by an air conditioner were observed to generate similar effects; i.e., the electrical potential shifted in the positive direction but returned to negative when the air conditioner stopped blowing. Sometimes, the effect of the positive ions from the air conditioner was strong enough to destroy the structure of interfacial water by turning the potential decidedly positive. Thus, positive air ions can compromise interfacial water negativity and may explain the known negative impact of positive ions on health.

  10. Pre-oxidized and nitrided stainless steel alloy foil for proton exchange membrane fuel cell bipolar plates: Part 1. Corrosion, interfacial contact resistance, and surface structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, M. P.; Wang, H.; Turner, J. A.; Meyer, H. M.; More, K. L.; Tortorelli, P. F.; McCarthy, B. D.

    Thermal (gas) nitridation of stainless steel alloys can yield low interfacial contact resistance (ICR), electrically conductive and corrosion-resistant nitride containing surface layers (Cr 2N, CrN, TiN, V 2N, VN, etc.) of interest for fuel cells, batteries, and sensors. This paper presents results of scale-up studies to determine the feasibility of extending the nitridation approach to thin 0.1 mm stainless steel alloy foils for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) bipolar plates. Developmental Fe-20Cr-4V alloy and type 2205 stainless steel foils were treated by pre-oxidation and nitridation to form low-ICR, corrosion-resistant surfaces. As-treated Fe-20Cr-4V foil exhibited target (low) ICR values, whereas 2205 foil suffered from run-to-run variation in ICR values, ranging up to 2× the target value. Pre-oxidized and nitrided surface structure examination revealed surface-through-layer-thickness V-nitride particles for the treated Fe-20Cr-4V, but near continuous chromia for treated 2205 stainless steel, which was linked to the variation in ICR values. Promising corrosion resistance was observed under simulated aggressive PEMFC anode- and cathode-side bipolar plate conditions for both materials, although ICR values were observed to increase. The implications of these findings for stamped bipolar plate foils are discussed.

  11. Large enhancement of Blocking temperature by control of interfacial structures in Pt/NiFe/IrMn/MgO/Pt multilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Blocking temperature (TB of Pt/NiFe/IrMn/MgO/Pt multilayers was greatly enhanced from far below room temperature (RT to above RT by inserting 1 nm thick Mg layer at IrMn/MgO interface. Furthermore, the exchange bias field (Heb was increased as well by the control of interfacial structures. The evidence for a significant fraction of Mn-O bonding at IrMn/MgO interface without Mg insertion layer was provided by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The bonding between Mn and O can decrease the antiferromagnetism of IrMn film, leading to lower value of TB in Pt/NiFe/IrMn/MgO/Pt multilayers. Ultrathin Mg film inserted at IrMn/MgO interface acting as an oxygen sinking layer can suppress the oxidation reactions between Mn and O and reduce the formation of Mn-O bonding greatly. The oxidation suppression results in the recovery of the antiferromagnetism of IrMn film, which can enhance TB and Heb. Furthermore, the high resolution transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that the Mg insertion layer can efficiently promote a high-quality MgO (200 texture. This study will enhance the understanding of physics in antiferromagnet-based spintronic devices.

  12. Structures and Properties of As(OH)3 Adsorption Complexes on Hydrated Mackinawite (FeS) Surfaces: A DFT-D2 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzade, Nelson Y; Roldan, Alberto; de Leeuw, Nora H

    2017-03-21

    Reactive mineral-water interfaces exert control on the bioavailability of contaminant arsenic species in natural aqueous systems. However, the ability to accurately predict As surface complexation is limited by the lack of molecular-level understanding of As-water-mineral interactions. In the present study, we report the structures and properties of the adsorption complexes of arsenous acid (As(OH)3) on hydrated mackinawite (FeS) surfaces, obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The fundamental aspects of the adsorption, including the registries of the adsorption complexes, adsorption energies, and structural parameters are presented. The FeS surfaces are shown to be stabilized by hydration, as is perhaps to be expected because the adsorbed water molecules stabilize the low-coordinated surface atoms. As(OH)3 adsorbs weakly at the water-FeS(001) interface through a network of hydrogen-bonded interactions with water molecules on the surface, with the lowest-energy structure calculated to be an As-up outer-sphere complex. Compared to the water-FeS(001) interface, stronger adsorption was calculated for As(OH)3 on the water-FeS(011) and water-FeS(111) interfaces, characterized by strong hybridization between the S-p and O-p states of As(OH)3 and the surface Fe-d states. The As(OH)3 molecule displayed a variety of chemisorption geometries on the water-FeS(011) and water-FeS(111) interfaces, where the most stable configuration at the water-FeS(011) interface is a bidentate Fe-AsO-Fe complex, but on the water-FeS(111) interface, a monodentate Fe-O-Fe complex was found. Detailed information regarding the adsorption mechanisms has been obtained via projected density of states (PDOS) and electron density difference iso-surface analyses and vibrational frequency assignments of the adsorbed As(OH)3 molecule.

  13. Tunable thermal conductivity of thin films of polycrystalline AlN by structural inhomogeneity and interfacial oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Fernandez, J; Ordonez-Miranda, J; Ollier, E; Volz, S

    2015-03-28

    The effect of the structural inhomogeneity and oxygen defects on the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films deposited on single-crystal silicon substrates is experimentally and theoretically investigated. The influence of the evolution of crystal structure, grain size, and out-of plane disorientation along the cross plane of the films on their thermal conductivity is analyzed. The impact of oxygen-related defects on thermal conduction is studied in AlN/AlN multilayered samples. Microstructure, texture, and grain size of the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The measured thermal conductivity obtained with the 3-omega technique for a single and multiple layers of AlN is in fairly good agreement with the theoretical predictions of our model, which is developed by considering a serial assembly of grain distributions. An effective thermal conductivity of 5.92 W m(-1) K(-1) is measured for a 1107.5 nm-thick multilayer structure, which represents a reduction of 20% of the thermal conductivity of an AlN monolayer with approximately the same thickness, due to oxygen impurities at the interface of AlN layers. Our results show that the reduction of the thermal conductivity as the film thickness is scaled down, is strongly determined by the structural inhomogeneities inside the sputtered films. The origin of this non-homogeneity and the effect on phonon scattering are also discussed.

  14. Effect of interfacial hydrogen b onds on the structure and dynamics of confined water%界面氢键对受限水结构和动态特性的影响∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王明; 段芳莉

    2015-01-01

    Reactive molecular dynamics (MD) is used to simulate the equilibrium process of water confined between two fully hydroxylatedα-quartz (001) surfaces with separation distances from 7 to 20 Å. Effect of different patterns of interfacial hydrogen bonds on the structure and dynamics of confined water is investigated. Density profiles, radial distribution functions, number of interfacial hydrogen bonds, and mean square displacements are calculated. The α-quartz (001) surface is cut from an α-quartz crystal at a certain depth to construct a surface with geminal silanols after being fully hydroxylated. The silanol groups on the surface are treated in two different ways in the MD simulations. One of the silanol groups are treated as to be fixed, and the other one is treated as no constraint for the movement of surface silanols. Our results show that different patterns of hydrogen bonds are formed at the interface between SiO2 surface and water. For the fixed silanol surface there is one type of strong hydrogen bonds interacting between the oxygen atoms of water and the hydrogen atoms of surface silanols, leading to the dipole moment of water molecules pointing out from the surface. For the movable silanol surface there are two types of strong hydrogen bonds formed at the interface. One is between the oxygen atoms of water and the hydrogen atoms of surface silanols, and the other is between the oxygen atoms of surface silanols and the hydrogen atoms of water. The number of hydrogen bonds of the first type is much less than those of the second type, leading to the dipole moment of water molecules pointing to the surface. Moreover, the total number of interfacial hydrogen bonds formed on the fixed silanol surfaces is larger than that on the movable silanol surfaces. The density profiles of the confined water indicate the formation of a strong layering of water in the vicinity of the fixed silanol surface, and the water layer is also more ordered with an ice-like structure

  15. Interfacial Structure and Photocatalytic Activity of Magnetron Sputtered TiO2 on Conducting Metal Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daviðsdóttir, Svava; Petit, Jean-Pierre; Mermoux, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The photocatalytic behavior of magnetron sputtered anatase TiO2 coatings on copper, nickel, and gold was investigated with the aim of understanding the effect of the metallic substrate and coating-substrate interface structure. Stoichiometry and nanoscale structure of the coating were investigated...... using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscope, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Photocatalytic behavior of the coating was explored by using optical spectrophotometry and electrochemical methods via photovoltage, photocurrent, and scanning kelvin probe microscopy...... measurements. The nature of the metal substrate and coating-substrate interface had profound influence on the photocatalytic behavior. Less photon energy was required for TiO2 excitation on a nickel substrate, whereas TiO2 coating on copper showed a higher band gap attributed to quantum confinement. However...

  16. Bioaccessibility of nutrients and micronutrients from dispersed food systems: impact of the multiscale bulk and interfacial structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marze, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    Many food systems are dispersed systems, that is, they possess at least two immiscible phases. This is generally due to the coexistence of domains with different physicochemical properties separated by many interfaces which control the apparent thermodynamic equilibrium. This feature was and is still largely studied to design pharmaceutical delivery systems. In food science, the recent intensification of in vitro digestion tests to complement the in vivo ones holds promises in the identification of the key parameters controlling the bioaccessibility of nutrients and micronutrients. In this review, we present the developments of in vitro digestion tests for dispersed food systems (mainly emulsions, dispersions and gels). We especially highlight the evidences detailing the roles of the constituting multiscale structures. In a perspective section, we show the potential of structured interfaces to allow controlled bioaccessibility.

  17. SYNTHESIS AND INTERFACIAL STRUCTURE OF NANOPARTICLESγ-Fe2O3 COATED WITH SURFACTANT DBS AND CTAB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles coated with DBS and CTAB were prepared by the microemulsion method.The coated samples show enhanced nonlinear optical properties compared with their bulk couterpart.The.Moessbauer spectra at room temperature were measured for the coated ferric oxides.The monolayers of the organic molecule are found to have a strong chemical bond with the surface atoms and thus have a significant influence on the electron structure of particle surface.@ 1999 Acta Metallurgica Inc.

  18. Surface Structure of Hydrogenated Diamond-like Carbon: Origin of Run-In Behavior Prior to Superlubricious Interfacial Shear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Azizi, Ala A; Eryilmaz, Osman; Erdemir, Ali; Kim, Seong H.

    2015-01-01

    The oxidized layers at the surface of hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (H-DLC) were studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure, and Raman spectroscopy. The structure of these layers was correlated with the friction and wear behavior observed on H-DLC. H-DLC is well-known for its ultralow friction in inert environments, but the steady superlubricious state is always preceded by a run-in period with a high friction. It was hypothesized that the run-in period is related to the surface oxide layer formed naturally upon exposure of the sample to air. To test this hypothesis, thermal oxide layers were grown, and their structures were analyzed and compared with the native oxide layer on a pristine sample. It was found that the Raman spectra of the surface oxide layers of H-DLC have higher D/G band ratio than the bulk, indicating a larger amount of aromatic clusters compared to the bulk film. Thick oxide layers grown at 300 °C showed a run-in friction behavior that resembled the friction of graphite. The run-in periods were found to become longer when the thickness of the oxide layers increased, indicating that the run-in behavior of H-DLC is attributed to the removal of the surface oxide layers.

  19. Emulsions for interfacial filtration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grillet, Anne Mary; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Souza, Caroline Ann; Welk, Margaret Ellen; Hartenberger, Joel David; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated a novel emulsion interfacial filter that is applicable for a wide range of materials, from nano-particles to cells and bacteria. This technology uses the interface between the two immiscible phases as the active surface area for adsorption of targeted materials. We showed that emulsion interfaces can effectively collect and trap materials from aqueous solution. We tested two aqueous systems, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and coal bed methane produced water (CBMPW). Using a pendant drop technique to monitor the interfacial tension, we demonstrated that materials in both samples were adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface, and did not readily desorb. A prototype system was built to test the emulsion interfacial filter concept. For the BSA system, a protein assay showed a progressive decrease in the residual BSA concentration as the sample was processed. Based on the initial prototype operation, we propose an improved system design.

  20. Aqua{pentahydrogennitrilotris(methylenephosphonato)}lithium hydrate [Li(H2O){N(CH2PO3)3H5}] • H2O: Synthesis and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somov, N. V.; Chausov, F. F.; Zakirova, R. M.

    2016-05-01

    Aqua{pentahydrogennitrilotris(methylenephosphonato)}lithium hydrate is a linear coordination polymer. Its crystal structure is described in space group P -1, Z = 2; a = 5.5732(2), b = 7.0106(2), and c = 16.9010(5) Å; α = 97.515(2)°, β = 94.551(2)°, and γ = 95.123(2)°. The tetrahedral coordination of the Li atom includes two oxygen atoms of a phosphonate ligand, one oxygen atom of another phosphonate ligand, and a water molecule. Complex formation is accompanied by closing of the eight-membered Li-O-P-C-N-C-P-O chelate ring. Polymeric chains run along the [100] direction. The chains are connected by hydrogen bonds.

  1. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  2. Solid state interconversion between anhydrous norfloxacin and its hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongcharoen, Wanchai; Byrn, Stephen R; Sutanthavibul, Narueporn

    2008-01-01

    This work is focused on characterizing and evaluating the solid state interconversion of norfloxacin (NF) hydrates. Four stoichiometric NF hydrates, dihydrate, hemipentahydrate, trihydrate, pentahydrate and a disordered NF state, were generated by various methods and characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD), thermal analysis and Karl Fisher titrimetry. XRPD patterns of all NF hydrates exhibited crystalline structures. NF hydrate conversion was studied with respect to mild elevated temperature and various degrees of moisture levels. NF hydrates transformed to anhydrous NF Form A after gentle heating at 60 degrees C for 48 h except dihydrate and trihydrate where mixture in XRPD patterns between anhydrous NF Form A and former structures existed. Desiccation of NF hydrates at 0% RH for 7 days resulted in only partial removal of water molecules from the hydrated structures. The hydrated transitional phase and the disordered NF state were obtained from the incomplete dehydration of NF hydrates after thermal treatment and pentahydrate NF after desiccation, respectively. Anhydrous NF Form A and NF hydrates transformed to pentahydrate NF when exposed to high moisture environment except dihydrate. In conclusion, surrounding moisture levels, temperatures and the duration of exposure strongly influenced the interconversion pathways and stoichiometry of anhydrous NF and its hydrates. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Crystal structure, optical and thermal studies of a new organic nonlinear optical material: L-Histidinium maleate 1.5-hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsago, C. Alosious [Department of Physics, A. J. College of Engineering, Chennai 603103 (India); Albert, Helen Merina [Department of Physics, Sathyabama University, Chennai 600119 (India); Karthikeyan, J. [Department of Chemistry, Sathyabama University, Chennai 600119 (India); Sagayaraj, P. [Department of Physics, Loyola College, Chennai 600034 (India); Pragasam, A. Joseph Arul, E-mail: drjosephsu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Sathyabama University, Chennai 600119 (India)

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: ► L-Histidinium maleate 1.5-hydrate, a new organic crystal has been grown for the first time. ► The crystal structure is reported for the first time (CCDC 845975). ► The crystal belongs to monoclinic system with space group P2{sub 1}, Z = 4, a = 11.4656(7) Å, b = 8.0530(5) Å, c = 14.9705(9) Å and β = 101.657(2)°. ► The optical absorption study substantiates the complete transparency of the crystal. ► Kurtz powder SHG test confirms the nonlinear property of the crystal. -- Abstract: A new organic nonlinear optical material L-histidinium maleate 1.5-hydrate (LHM) with the molecular formula C{sub 10}H{sub 16}N{sub 3}O{sub 7.5} has been successfully synthesized from aqueous solution by slow solvent evaporation method. The structural characterization of the grown crystal was carried out by single crystal X-ray diffraction at 293(2) K. In the crystal, molecules are linked through inter and intramolecular N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, generate edge fused ring motif. The hydrogen bonded motifs are linked to each other to form a three dimensional network. The FT-IR spectroscopy was used to identify the functional groups of the synthesized compound. The optical behavior of the grown crystal was examined by UV–visible spectral analysis, which shows that the optical absorption is almost negligible in the wavelength range 280–1300 nm. The nonlinear optical property was confirmed by the powder technique of Kurtz and Perry. The thermal behavior of the grown crystal was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis.

  4. Relation between interfacial structure and mechanical properties in AlN/TiN bilayers investigated by EXAFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersen, O. [Equipe de Recherche Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes de Fabrication, 61, rue Albert Camus, F-68093 Mulhouse (France)]. E-mail: ovidiu.ersen@ipcms.u-strasbg.fr; Tuilier, M.-H. [Equipe de Recherche Mecanique, Materiaux et Procedes de Fabrication, 61, rue Albert Camus, F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Thobor-Keck, A. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ecoulements les Surfaces et les Transferts (UMR CNRS 6000), ITSFC, 4, place Tharradin, BP 71427, F-25211 Montbeliard (France); Rousselot, C. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ecoulements les Surfaces et les Transferts (UMR CNRS 6000), ITSFC, 4, place Tharradin, BP 71427, F-25211 Montbeliard (France); Cortes, R. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee (UMR CNRS 7643), Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau cedex (France)

    2005-06-01

    The relation between the mechanical properties and the structure of AlN/TiN bilayers prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering in the 600 nm range is investigated. Al and Ti K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure is used in order to determine the local order around Al and Ti by comparison with 300 nm thick AlN and TiN single layers. The use of this powerful local probe allows the evidence of intermixing between AlN and TiN deposited layers, which is suggested by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy experiments. The effect of ionic bombardment applied at various steps of the deposition process is studied. The ionic bombardment applied during the deposit induces substantial changes in the absorption spectra that are assigned to a decrease of intermixing and an improvement of local order. Simulations of (Al, Ti)N ternary alloys Al and Ti K-edge absorption spectra for increasing mean occupation factors C {sub Ti} (C {sub Al}) of Ti(Al) substituting Al(Ti) in hexagonal AlN (cubic TiN) lattice are performed in order to determine the initial parameters for the fit of the experimental data. The refinements performed by using FEFFIT software demonstrate that an ionic bombardment applied during the deposition phase results in a significant reduction of the number of Al-Ti pairs within the bilayer and an improvement of the local order around Ti and Al, which is quantified by a decrease of the Debye-Waller parameters. This structural evolution is tentatively correlated with the improvement of mechanical properties of the bilayers.

  5. Effect of High Frequency Pulsing on the Interfacial Structure of Anodised Aluminium-TiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Jensen, Flemming; Bordo, Kirill;

    2015-01-01

    out using a high frequency pulse and pulse reverse pulse technique at a fixed frequency in a sulfuric acid bath. The structure of the composites and the anodized layer was studied using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The pulse reverse pulse anodizing technique, using a negative...... potential on the low voltage cycle, showed extensive pore branching and pore generation at the TiO2 particle-anodic alumina matrix interface. However, the pulse anodizing technique using zero potential during the low voltage cycle showed no such features in the pore morphology, but only entrapment of TiO2...

  6. Structure and collective dynamics of hydrated anti-freeze protein type III from 180 K to 298 K by X-ray diffraction and inelastic X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Koji; Baron, Alfred Q R; Uchiyama, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Toshio

    2016-04-07

    We investigated hydrated antifreeze protein type III (AFP III) powder with a hydration level h (=mass of water/mass of protein) of 0.4 in the temperature range between 180 K and 298 K using X-ray diffraction and inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS). The X-ray diffraction data showed smooth, largely monotonic changes between 180 K and 298 K without freezing water. Meanwhile, the collective dynamics observed by IXS showed a strong change in the sound velocity at 180 K, after being largely temperature independent at higher temperatures (298-220 K). We interpret this change in terms of the dynamic transition previously discussed using other probes including THz IR absorption spectroscopy and incoherent elastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering. This finding suggests that the dynamic transition of hydrated proteins is observable on the subpicosecond time scale as well as nano- and pico-second scales, both in collective dynamics from IXS and single particle dynamics from neutron scattering. Moreover, it is most likely that the dynamic transition of hydrated AFP III is not directly correlated with its hydration structure.

  7. Differential stability of 2'F-ANA*RNA and ANA*RNA hybrid duplexes: roles of structure, pseudohydrogen bonding, hydration, ion uptake and flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Jonathan K; Martín-Pintado, Nerea; Gómez-Pinto, Irene; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Portella, Guillem; Orozco, Modesto; González, Carlos; Damha, Masad J

    2010-04-01

    Hybrids of RNA with arabinonucleic acids 2'F-ANA and ANA have very similar structures but strikingly different thermal stabilities. We now present a thorough study combining NMR and other biophysical methods together with state-of-the-art theoretical calculations on a fully modified 10-mer hybrid duplex. Comparison between the solution structure of 2'F-ANA*RNA and ANA*RNA hybrids indicates that the increased binding affinity of 2'F-ANA is related to several subtle differences, most importantly a favorable pseudohydrogen bond (2'F-purine H8) which contrasts with unfavorable 2'-OH-nucleobase steric interactions in the case of ANA. While both 2'F-ANA and ANA strands maintained conformations in the southern/eastern sugar pucker range, the 2'F-ANA strand's structure was more compatible with the A-like structure of a hybrid duplex. No dramatic differences are found in terms of relative hydration for the two hybrids, but the ANA*RNA duplex showed lower uptake of counterions than its 2'F-ANA*RNA counterpart. Finally, while the two hybrid duplexes are of similar rigidities, 2'F-ANA single strands may be more suitably preorganized for duplex formation. Thus the dramatically increased stability of 2'F-ANA*RNA and ANA*RNA duplexes is caused by differences in at least four areas, of which structure and pseudohydrogen bonding are the most important.

  8. Octa-coordination and the hydrated Ba2+(aq) ion

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I; Rempe, Susan B

    2014-01-01

    The hydration structure of Ba^{2+} ion is important for understanding blocking mechanisms in potassium ion channels. Here, we combine statistical mechanical theory, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, and electronic structure methods to calculate the hydration free energy and local hydration structure of Ba^{2+}(aq). The predicted hydration free energy (-302.9$\\pm$0.7 kcal/mol) matches the experimental value (-302.56 kcal/mol) when the fully occupied and exclusive inner solvation shell is treated. In the local environment defined by the inner and first shell of hydrating waters, Ba^{2+} is directly coordinated by eight (8) waters. Octa-coordination resembles the structure of Ba^{2+} and K^+ bound in potassium ion channels, but differs from the local hydration structure of K^+(aq) determined earlier.

  9. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-14

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  10. Interfacial properties and emulsification performance of thylakoid membrane fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamayo Tenorio, A.; Jong, de E.W.M.; Nikiforidis, K.; Boom, R.M.; Goot, van der A.J.

    2017-01-01

    Thylakoids membranes are sophisticated, dynamic structures found in plant leaves, composed of protein complexes in a dynamic lipid matrix. The interfacial absorption dynamics and viscoelasticity of thylakoid membranes fragments were measured to assess the properties of the interfacial layer and to e

  11. 界面缺陷对压电薄层复合结构中Love波的影响%Effect of interfacial defect on Love waves in composite structures with piezoelectric thin film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王惠明; 赵志城

    2012-01-01

    基于剪切弹簧模型,建立考虑界面缺陷情形的弹性基底上覆盖压电薄层的复合结构中Love波的频散方程,并研究界面缺陷对Love波传播特性的影响,给出铝基底上覆盖PZT4压电薄层复合结构中Love波的频散曲线.数值结果表明:(1)对于长波情形,不同缺陷程度复合结构的Love波一阶模态的相速度均趋于弹性基底层的剪切波波速,而对于短波情形,则趋于压电薄层的Bleustein-Gulyaev(B-G)波波速;(2)界面缺陷的存在总是降低该复合结构内Love波的相速度,在一些特殊频率范围,Love波的相速度对界面缺陷非常敏感;(3)界面缺陷对压电层内的机械位移模态和电势模态有显著影响,且影响最大区域出现在界面附近.%Based on the shear spring model, the dispersion equation was established for Love waves propagating in a composite structure with interfacial defect. The composite structure consists of an elastic substrate covered by a piezoelectric thin film. The effect of the interfacial defect on the propagation properties of Love waves was investigated. The dispersion curves were presented for Love waves propagating in an aluminum substrate covered by a PZT4 piezoelectric thin film. Numerical results show that; (1) For different interfacial defects, the phase velocities of Love waves of the first mode at long wavelength region approach to the velocities of shear waves in elastic substrate, while those at short wavelength region approach to the velocities of Bleustein-Gulyaev (B-G) waves in piezoelectric thin film; (2) The existence of the interfacial defect always decreases the phase velocities of Love waves. At some special frequency ranges, the phase velocities of Love waves are more sensitive to the interfacial defect; (3) The interfacial defect has significant effect on the mode shapes of the mechanical displacement and the electric potential in the piezoelectric thin film, and the most susceptive region appears near

  12. Crystal structure of N,N,N',N',N'',N''-hexa-methyl-guanidinium cyanate 1.5-hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiritiris, Ioannis; Kantlehner, Willi

    2015-12-01

    The title hydrated salt, C7H18N3 (+)·OCN(-).1.5H2O, was synthesized starting from N,N,N',N',N'',N''-hexa-methyl-guanidinium chloride by a twofold anion-exchange reaction. The asymmetric unit contains two cations, two cyanate anions and three water mol-ecules. One cation shows orientational disorder and two sets of N-atom positions were found related by a 60° rotation, with an occupancy ratio of 0.852 (6):0.148 (6). The C-N bond lengths in both guanidin-ium ions range from 1.329 (2) to 1.358 (10) Å, indicating double-bond character, pointing towards charge delocalization within the NCN planes. Strong O-H⋯N hydrogen bonds between the crystal water mol-ecules and the cyanate ions and strong O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the water mol-ecules are present, resulting in a two-dimensional hydrogen bonded network running parallel to the (001) plane. The hexa-methyl-guanidinium ions are packed in between the layers built up by water mol-ecules and cyanate ions.

  13. Interfacial electronic structure-modulated magnetic anisotropy in Ta/CoFeB/MgO/Ta multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xi; Jiang, Shao Long; Yang, Guang; Liu, Yang; Teng, Jiao; Yu, Guang Hua, E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Kai You [SKLSM, Institute of Semiconductors, CAS, P. O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Wu, Zheng Long [Analytical and Testing Center, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2014-09-01

    We have observed several unexpected phenomena when a trace amount of Fe atoms is deposited onto the CoFeB/MgO interface in Ta/CoFeB/MgO/Ta multilayers. With the nominal thickness of the introduced Fe atoms (t{sub Fe}) varying from 0 to 0.1 Å, the effective magnetic anisotropy energy (K{sub eff}) of annealed multilayers is remarkably enhanced from 1.28 × 10{sup 6 }erg/cm{sup 3} to 2.14 × 10{sup 6 }erg/cm{sup 3}. As t{sub Fe} further increasing, the K{sub eff} decreases and even becomes negative when t{sub Fe} > 1 Å, indicating the change from perpendicular magnetic anisotropy to in-plane magnetic anisotropy. The analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectrometer reveals that the Fe atoms at annealed CoFeB/MgO interface show different electronic structures as t{sub Fe} increasing, which combine with O atoms to form FeO{sub x} (x < 1), Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, respectively, leading to modulation of Fe 3d-O 2p orbital hybridization and thus the K{sub eff}. On the other hand, we find that the introduction of Fe atoms also helps to reduce the multilayers' magnetic damping.

  14. Dye···TiO{sub 2} Interfacial Structure of Dye-Sensitised Solar Cell Working Electrodes Buried under a Solution of I-/I{sub 3}- Redox Electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCree-Grey, Jonathan; Cole, Jacqueline M.; Holt, Stephen A.; Evans, Peter J.; Gong, Yun

    2017-08-28

    Dye-sensitised solar cells (DSCs) have niche prospects for electricity-generating windows that could equip buildings for energy-sustainable future cities. However, this 'smart window' technology is being held back by a lack of understanding in how the dye interacts with its device environment at the molecular level. A better appreciation of the dye center dot center dot center dot TiO2 interfacial structure of the DSC working electrodes would be particularly valuable since associated structure-function relationships could be established; these rules would provide a 'toolkit' for the molecular engineering of more suitable DSC dyes via rational design. Previous materials characterisation efforts have been limited to determining this interfacial structure within an environment exposed to air or situated in a solvent medium. This study is the first to reveal the structure of this buried interface within the functional device environment, and represents the first application of in situ neutron reflectometry to DSC research. By incorporating the electrolyte into the structural model of this buried interface, we reveal how lithium cations from the electrolyte constituents influence the dye center dot center dot center dot TiO2 binding configuration of an organic sensitiser, MK-44, via Li+ complexation to the cyanoacrylate group. This dye is the molecular congener of the high-performance MK-2 DSC dye, whose hexa-alkyl chains appear to stabilise it from Li+ complexation. Our in situ neutron reflectometry findings are built up from auxiliary structural models derived from ex situ X-ray reflectometry and corroborated via density functional theory and UV/vis absorption spectroscopy. Significant differences between the in situ and ex situ dye center dot center dot center dot TiO2 interfacial structures are found, highlighting the need to characterise the molecular structure of DSC working electrodes while in a fully assembled device.

  15. Vibrational dynamics of hydration water in amylose

    CERN Document Server

    Cavatorta, F; Albanese, G; Angelini, N

    2002-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamical properties of hydration water associated with amylose helices, based on low-temperature vibrational spectra collected using the TOSCA inelastic spectrometer at ISIS. The structural constraints of the polysaccharidic chains favour the formation of a high-density structure for water, which has been suggested by Imberty and Perez on the basis of conformational analysis. According to this model, hydration water can only enter the pores formed by six adjacent helices and completely fills the pores at a hydration level of about 0.27-g water/g dry amylose. Our measurements show that the dynamical behaviour of hydration water is similar to that observed in high-density amorphous ice. (orig.)

  16. Interfacial (o/w) properties of naphthetic acids and metal naphthenates, naphtenic acid characterization and metal naphthenate inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandal, Oeystein

    2005-07-01

    Deposition of metal naphthenates in process facilities is becoming a huge problem for petroleum companies producing highly acidic crudes. In this thesis, the main focus has been towards the oil-water (o/w) interfacial properties of naphthenic acids and their ability to react with different divalent cations across the interface to form metal naphthenates. The pendant drop technique was utilized to determine dynamic interfacial tensions (IFT) between model oil containing naphthenic acid, synthetic as well as indigenous acid mixtures, and pH adjusted water upon addition of different divalent cations. Changes in IFT caused by the divalent cations were correlated to reaction mechanisms by considering two reaction steps with subsequent binding of acid monomers to the divalent cation. The results were discussed in light of degree of cation hydration and naphthenic acid conformation, which affect the interfacial conditions and thus the rate of formation of 2:1 complexes of acid and cations. Moreover, addition of non-ionic oil-soluble surfactants used as basis compounds in naphthenate inhibitors was found to hinder a completion of the reaction through interfacial dilution of the acid monomers. Formation and stability of metal naphthenate films at o/w interfaces were studied by means of Langmuir technique with a trough designed for liquid-liquid systems. The effects of different naphthenic acids, divalent cations, and pH of the subphase were investigated. The results were correlated to acid structure, cation hydration, and degree of dissociation, which all affect the film stability against compression. Naphthenic acids acquired from a metal naphthenate deposit were characterized by different spectroscopic techniques. The sample was found to consist of a narrow family of 4-protic naphthenic acids with molecular weights around 1230 g/mol. These acids were found to be very o/w interfacially active compared to normal crude acids, and to form Langmuir monolayers with stability

  17. Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

    2011-04-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with

  18. Towards a green hydrate inhibitor: imaging antifreeze proteins on clathrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimond Gordienko

    Full Text Available The formation of hydrate plugs in oil and gas pipelines is a serious industrial problem and recently there has been an increased interest in the use of alternative hydrate inhibitors as substitutes for thermodynamic inhibitors like methanol. We show here that antifreeze proteins (AFPs possess the ability to modify structure II (sII tetrahydrofuran (THF hydrate crystal morphologies by adhering to the hydrate surface and inhibiting growth in a similar fashion to the kinetic inhibitor poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP. The effects of AFPs on the formation and growth rate of high-pressure sII gas mix hydrate demonstrated that AFPs are superior hydrate inhibitors compared to PVP. These results indicate that AFPs may be suitable for the study of new inhibitor systems and represent an important step towards the development of biologically-based hydrate inhibitors.

  19. High-resolution structures of collagen-like peptides [(Pro-Pro-Gly)4-Xaa-Yaa-Gly-(Pro-Pro-Gly)4]: implications for triple-helix hydration and Hyp(X) puckering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Kenji; Hongo, Chizuru; Wu, Guanghan; Mizuno, Kazunori; Noguchi, Keiichi; Ebisuzaki, Shutoku; Tanaka, Yuji; Nishino, Norikazu; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2009-05-01

    Structures of (Pro-Pro-Gly)4-Xaa-Yaa-Gly-(Pro-Pro-Gly)4 (ppg9-XYG) where (Xaa, Yaa)=(Pro, Hyp), (Hyp, Pro) or (Hyp, Hyp) were analyzed at high resolution using synchrotron radiation. Molecular and crystal structures of these peptides are very similar to those of the (Pro-Pro-Gly)9 peptide. The results obtained in this study, together with those obtained from related compounds, indicated the puckering propensity of the Hyp in the X position: (1) Hyp(X) residues involved in the Hyp(X):Pro(Y) stacking pairs prefer the down-puckering conformation, as in ppg9-OPG, and ppg9-OOG; (2) Hyp(X) residues involved in the Hyp(X):Hyp(Y) stacking pairs prefer the up-puckering conformation if there is no specific reason to adopt the down-puckering conformation. Water molecules in these peptide crystals are classified into two groups, the 1st and 2nd hydration waters. Water molecules in the 1st hydration group have direct hydrogen bonds with peptide oxygen atoms, whereas those in the 2nd hydration group do not. Compared with globular proteins, the number of water molecules in the 2nd hydration shell of the ppg9-XYG peptides is very large, likely due to the unique rod-like molecular structure of collagen model peptides. In the collagen helix, the amino acid residues in the X and Y positions must protrude outside of the triple helix, which forces even the hydrophobic side chains, such as Pro, to be exposed to the surrounding water molecules. Therefore, most of the waters in the 2nd hydration shell are covering hydrophobic Pro side chains by forming clathrate structures.

  20. Synthesis, Crystal Structure, Vibrational Spectroscopy and Thermal Behavior of the First Alkali Metal Hydrated Hexaborate: K2[B6O9(OH)2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI,Hong-Juan; LIU,Zhi-Hong; SUN,Li-Mei

    2007-01-01

    New hydrated potassium hexaborate K2[B6O9(OH)2] has been synthesized under mild solvothermal conditions.The structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and further characterized by FT-IR, Raman spectra and DTA-TG. It crystallizes in the monoclinic system with space group P21/n, a=0.9036(2) nm, b=0.66052(18)nm, c= 1.5997(4) nm, β=91.862(4)°, V=0.9543(4) nm3 and Z=4. Its crystal structure consists of K-O polyhedra and 1-D stepped polyborate chains constructed by new [B6O9(OH)2]2- fundamental building blocks. 1-D polyborate chains contain 3,8-membered boron rings. Adjacent chains are further linked via H-bonding interactions into 2-D layers. The K+ cations reside not only between the layers but also in the 8-membered boron rings of the chains,compensating the negative charges of the borate chains and holding the layers together into the 3-D structure through bonding with oxygen atoms of the chains.

  1. Hydration Assessment of Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS · Although there is no scientific consensus for 1 ) howbest to assess the hydration status of athletes, 2)what criteria to use as acceptable outcome measurements, or 3) the best time to apply practical assessment methods, there are methods that can be used toprovide athletes with useful feedback about their hydration status

  2. Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory) and Mitosis and Replication Hydrate Theory (MRH-Theory): three-dimensional PC validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadyshevich, E. A.; Dzyabchenko, A. V.; Ostrovskii, V. E.

    2014-04-01

    Size compatibility of the CH4-hydrate structure II and multi-component DNA fragments is confirmed by three-dimensional simulation; it is validation of the Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory).

  3. In Situ Raman Analyses of Natural Gas and Gas Hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, E. T.; White, S. N.; Dunk, R. M.; Brewer, P. G.; Sherman, A. D.; Schmidt, K.; Hester, K. C.; Sloan, E. D.

    2004-12-01

    concentrations too low to be detected by the current DORISS instrument. In situ analyses of the hydrates show them to be structure I hydrates with methane as the primary guest molecule; the data compare well to laboratory data.

  4. Origin and character of gaseous hydrocarbons in the hydrate and non-hydrate charged sediments on the Norway - Svalbard margins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaular, Espen Nesheim

    2011-05-15

    Gas incubated in clathrate water-structures, stabilizes the hydrogen bonded substance termed gas hydrate. In the marine environment vast amount of carbon is stored as gas hydrates within the temperature and pressure zone these ice-like structures are stable. Natural gas hydrate mapping and characterization is important basic research that brings about critical knowledge concerning various topics. Natural gas hydrates is a vital part of the carbon cycle, it is a potential energy resource (and thereby a potential climate agent) and it is a potential geo-hazard. One of the goals the GANS initiative aimed at exploring, was the hydrate bearing sediment of the Norway -Svalbard margins, to investigate the character and expansion of natural gas hydrates. Part of the investigation was to define how the gas in the hydrated sediment was produced and where it came from. As a result this thesis addresses the matter of light hydrocarbon characterization and origin in two Norwegian hydrate deposits. On cruises to Vestnesa on the Svalbard margin and to Nyegga in the mid-Norwegian margin, samples of hydrate charged and non-hydrate charged sediments were obtained and analyzed. Through compositional and isotopic analyses the origin of the hydrate bound gas in the fluid escape feature G11 at Nyegga was determined. The hydrate incubated methane is microbial produced as well as parts of the hydrate bound ethane. The compositional analysis in both the Nyegga area and at the Vestnesa Ridge points at thermogenic contributions in the sediment interstitials and pore water. The two hydrate bearing margins show large differences in hydrocarbon content and microbial activity in the pockmarks investigated. The gravity cores from the penetrated pockmark at Vestnesa showed low hydrocarbon content and thus suggest ceased or periodic venting. The fluid flow escape features at Nyegga show large variety of flux rates based on ROV monitoring and headspace analysis of the sediment and pore water. The

  5. Quantifying hydrate formation and kinetic inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloan, E.D.; Subramanian, S.; Matthews, P.N.; Lederhos, J.P.; Khokhar, A.A. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Hydrate Research

    1998-08-01

    In the Prausnitz tradition, molecular and macroscopic evidence of hydrate formation and kinetic inhibition is presented. On the microscopic level, the first Raman spectra are presented for the formation of both uninhibited and inhibited methane hydrates with time. This method has the potential to provide a microscopic-based kinetics model. Three macroscopic aspects of natural gas hydrate kinetic inhibition are also reported: (1) The effect of hydrate dissociation residual structures was measured, which has application in decreasing the time required for subsequent formation. (2) The performance of a kinetic inhibitor (poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) or PVCap) was measured and correlated as a function of PVCap molecular weight and concentrations of PVCap, methanol, and salt in the aqueous phase. (3) Long-duration test results indicated that the use of PVCap can prevent pipeline blockage for a time exceeding the aqueous phase residence time in some gas pipelines.

  6. Dissolution of Hydrocarbon Gas Hydrates in Seawater at 1030-m; Effects of Porosity, Structure, and Compositional Variation as Determined by High-Definition Video and SEM Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L. A.; Peltzer, E. T.; Durham, W. B.; Kirby, S. H.; Brewer, P. G.; Circone, S.; Rehder, G.

    2002-12-01

    We compare dissolution rates of pure, porous, compacted, and oil-contaminated sI methane hydrate and sII methane-ethane hydrate to rates measured previously on pure, compacted, sI methane hydrate and sI carbon dioxide hydrate (Rehder et al., Fall AGU 2001). Laboratory-synthesized test specimens were used in both studies, allowing characterization of test materials prior to their transport and exposure to seawater at 1030-meter depth on the Monterey Canyon seafloor, off coastal Moss Landing, CA. Although pressure and temperature (P-T) conditions at this site are within the nominal P-T equilibrium fields of all gas hydrates tested here, the seawater is undersaturated with respect to the hydrate-forming gas species. Hence, samples dissolve with time, at a rate dependent on water current flow. Four samples were deployed in this second experiment: (1) pure, 30% porous methane hydrate; (2) pure, compacted methane hydrate; (3) pure methane hydrate compacted and then contaminated with a low-T mineral oil; and (4) pure, compacted sII methane-ethane hydrate with methane:ethane molar ratio 0.72. Samples were transferred by pressure vessel at 0 ° C and 15 MPa to the seafloor observatory via the MBARI remotely operated vehicle Ventana. Samples were then exposed to the deep ocean environment and monitored by HDTV camera for several hours at the beginning and end of a 25-hour period. Local current speed and direction were also measured throughout the experiment. Those samples that did not undergo complete dissolution after 25 h were successfully recovered to the laboratory for subsequent analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Previously, video analysis showed dissolution rates corresponding to 4.0 +/- 0.5 mmole CO2/m2 s for compacted CO2 hydrate samples, and 0.37 +/- 0.03 mmole CH4/m2s for compacted methane hydrate samples (Rehder et al, AGU 2001). The ratio of dissolution rates fits a simple diffusive boundary layer model that incorporates relative gas solubilities

  7. Effect of regular hydration on gas phase structural stability of [zwitterionic alanine+M{sup +}] (M{sup +} = Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}) complexes: A quantum chemical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, Nidhi [Department of Physics, Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology, Allahabad 211 004 (India); Ojha, Animesh K., E-mail: animesh@mnnit.ac.in [Department of Physics, Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology, Allahabad 211 004 (India)

    2011-04-28

    Graphical abstract: We have examined the gas phase structural stability of Ala-M{sup +}.(W){sub n=0-5} and ZAla-M{sup +}.(W){sub n=0-5} (M{sup +} = Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}) complexes. We found that the five water molecules are needed to stabilize the -OO coordinated structure of ZAla-M{sup +} over the -NO/OH coordinated structure of Ala-M{sup +}. The negative and large values of entropies of hydrated species also confirm that hydrated species are more stable over the nonhydrated species. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Effect of regular hydration on gas phase structural stability of differently coordinated Ala-M{sup +} and ZAla-M{sup +} (M{sup +} = Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}) complexes has been studied. {yields} Five water molecules are needed to stabilize the -OO coordinated structure of ZAla-M{sup +} over-NO/OH coordinated structures of Ala-M{sup +} complex. {yields} Planarity of the ZAla-M{sup +} complexes does not change by the addition of five water molecules. {yields} Loss of entropy by the stepwise addition of water molecules confirms that the hydrated species are more stable. - Abstract: In the present study, we have examined the effect of coordination of metal cations (M{sup +} = Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}) and water molecules (W) on the gas phase structural stability of D-alanine (Ala) and zwitterionic alanine (ZAla). The -NO/OH and -OO coordinated structures of Ala-M{sup +}.(W){sub n=0-5} and ZAla-M{sup +}.(W){sub n=0-5}, respectively were optimized in gas phase at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. In complexes, Ala-Li{sup +} and Ala-Na{sup +} the structures where Li{sup +} and Na{sup +} coordinated to -NO/OO modes of Ala were more stable. However, in case of Ala-K{sup +}, the structure where K{sup +} coordinated to -OH mode was found to be more stable. Stepwise addition of water molecules changes the order of stability of hydrate species of Ala-M{sup +} and ZAla-M{sup +} complexes and we found that five water molecules

  8. Micromechanical measurements of the effect of surfactants on cyclopentane hydrate shell properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Erika P; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the effect of surfactants on clathrate hydrate growth and morphology, especially particle shell strength and cohesion force, is critical to advancing new strategies to mitigate hydrate plug formation. In this study, dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid and polysorbate 80 surfactants were included during the growth of cyclopentane hydrates at several concentrations above and below the critical micelle concentration. A novel micromechanical method was applied to determine the force required to puncture the hydrate shell using a glass cantilever (with and without surfactants), with annealing times ranging from immediately after the hydrate nucleated to 90 minutes after formation. It was shown that the puncture force was decreased by the addition of both surfactants up to a maximum of 79%. Over the entire range of annealing times (0-90 minutes), the thickness of the hydrate shell was also measured. However, there was no clear change in shell thickness with the addition of surfactants. The growth rate of the hydrate shell was found to vary less than 15% with the addition of surfactants. The cohesive force between two hydrate particles was measured for each surfactant and found to be reduced by 28% to 78%. Interfacial tension measurements were also performed. Based on these results, microscopic changes to the hydrate shell morphology (due to the presence of surfactants) were proposed to cause the decrease in the force required to break the hydrate shell, since no macroscopic morphology changes were observed. Understanding the hydrate shell strength can be critical to reducing the capillary bridge interaction between hydrate particles or controlling the release of unconverted water from the interior of the hydrate particle, which can cause rapid hydrate conversion.

  9. Structure, interfacial properties, and dynamics of the sodium alkyl sulfate type surfactant monolayer at the water/trichloroethylene interface: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wen-Xiong; Guo, Hong-Xia

    2010-05-20

    In this work, we perform a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the category of sodium alkyl sulfate (SDS-type) surfactant monolayers at the water/trichloroethylene (TCE) interface. Three separate tail-length SDS-type molecules are used. We investigate the conformation of surfactant chain (i.e., packing, orientation, and order), interfacial properties (i.e., interfacial thickness, interfacial tension, area compressibility, and bending modulus), their dependence on the chain length, and the average area per surfactant chain. We also examine the behavior of the surfactant monolayer in the metastable regime of negative surface tension with reference to collapse. The simulation has clearly shown that the very dilute monolayer is well described as a two-dimensional gas. With the increase of interfacial surfactant coverage, the monolayer is in the liquid-expanded (LE) phase. The surfactant tails at the interface become straighter, more ordered, and thicker at higher surfactant coverage. At the same time, interfacial tension of long-tail systems is always lower than that of short-tail systems. In the LE phase, the area compressibility modulus and the bending modulus increase with an increase in tail length. With a further decrease in molecular areas, the monolayer with large negative surface tension becomes unstable. Our simulations show that buckling of the monolayers is of dynamic nature as a response to mechanical instability. The further transformation pathway from buckling to bud can be controlled by the bending modulus, which depends crucially on the tail length and interfacial surfactant coverage. At a given area per molecule, the short tail chain makes the monolayer softer, and the budding process becomes more probable. For the supersaturated softer SDS monolayer, the collapse transition is initiated by the buckling of monolayers, followed primarily by budding and detachment of the nanoscale swollen micelle from the monolayer. Despite a number of

  10. Role of interfacial rheological properties in oil field chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakatos-Szabo, J.; Lakatos, I.; Kosztin, B.

    1996-12-31

    Interfacial rheological properties of different Hungarian crude oil/water systems were determined in wide temperature and shear rate range and in presence of inorganic electrolytes, tensides, alkaline materials and polymers. The detailed laboratory study definitely proved that the interfacial rheological properties are extremely sensitive parameters towards the chemical composition of inmiscible formation liquids. Comparison and interpretation of the interfacial rheological properties may contribute significantly to extension of the weaponry of the reservoir characterization, better understanding of the displacement mechanism, development of the more profitable EOR/IOR methods, intensification of the surface technologies, optimization of the pipeline transportation and improvement of the refinery operations. It was evidenced that the interfacial rheology is an efficient and powerful detection technique, which may enhance the knowledge on formation, structure, properties and behaviour of interfacial layers. 17 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years.

  12. CCDC 970790: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : catena-[bis(mu~2~-Pyrazine)-(mu~2~-hexafluorosilicate)-copper(ii) hydrate

    KAUST Repository

    Shekhah, Osama

    2014-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  13. 部分水解的预交联凝胶型聚丙烯酰胺的水化层结构%Hydration Structure of Partially Hydrolyzed Preformed Particle Gel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马莹; 张恒; 苑世领

    2015-01-01

    部分水解的预交联凝胶型聚丙烯酰胺在水溶液中的吸水溶胀能对油藏高渗透区域产生有效封堵,有利于提高驱油效率。分子模拟结果表明,凝胶颗粒的溶胀主要归因于侧链亲水基团在水溶液中的水化作用,这些带负电的亲水基团中心原子通过氢键和静电作用在其周围极化出一层排列规整、有序而紧密的水化层,并将水分子束缚其中;同时水化层内的水分子之间依赖氢键网络促进水化层的稳定。本文从微观结构、动力学和氢键等方面比较了各亲水基团中心原子的水化能力,发现—COO-官能团具有较强的束缚水分子的能力,对水化层的稳定有重要影响。%Partially hydrolyzed preformed particle gel( PPG) was widely used in petroleum industry for enhan-cing oil recovery. Its aggregation and swelling in solution can effectively block the high permeability areas. In this work, a series of molecular dynamics simulations was conducted to investigate the swelling and hydration of PPG. After a 20 ns simulation, the volume and radius of gyration of the particle increased rapidly. The one reason was speculated as the strong hydration of hydrophilic groups of PPG( i. e. —COO- and —CONH2 ) in solution. It was shown that the structure of water was strongly modified by the presence of polymer. Then this polymer hydrophilic group induced modification was characterized from dynamic, structure and hydrogen bond aspects to gain a fully understanding of the hydration of PPG on molecular level. The structure of the hydration shell was investigated by spatial distribution function( SDF) , radial distribution function( RDF) and distribu-tion of dipole. The RDF and dipole distribution both indicated that O ( COO-) induced a more ordered and densely packed hydration shell than O(CONH2) and N(CONH2), which means that O(COO-) has a very strong hydration ability. The dynamics of water around hydrophilic groups, as

  14. The effect of water structure and solute hydration on the kinetics of mineral growth and dissolution (Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Young Scientists)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Agudo, E.; Putnis, C. V.; Putnis, A.

    2012-04-01

    Classical crystal growth theory relates growth and dissolution rates to the degree of supersaturation. However, the solution composition may also affect the growth rate of carbonate minerals, via the Ca2+ to CO32- concentration ratio (e.g. Perdikouri et al., 2009; Stack and Grantham, 2010), ionic strength (e.g. Ruiz-Agudo et al. 2010) or the presence of organic matter (Hoch et al., 2000). For this reason, the influence of these parameters on the kinetics of mineral growth and dissolution has generated a considerable amount of research in the last decade. In particular, effects of both inorganic and organic impurities on mineral growth and dissolution have been frequently reported in the literature. Commonly, water in contact with rock forming minerals, contains significant and variable amounts of ions in solution. The effect of such ions on dissolution and growth rates has been traditionally ascribed to changes in solubility. However, experimental studies performed on different minerals have shown that the dependence of growth or dissolution rates on ionic strength is complex, and that the effect of ionic strength is not independent of the ionic species producing it. Here, we report investigations aimed at addressing the basic hypothesis that mineral growth and dissolution is governed by complex interactions between solvent structure, surface hydration and the ion solvation environment induced by the presence of electrolytes. It is proposed that any factor affecting ion solvation should alter growth and dissolution rates. These results have opened the possibility of a new understanding of very diverse phenomena in geochemistry and demonstrate the need for the inclusion of this "hydration effect" in the development of predictive models that describe crystal growth and dissolution in complex systems, such as those found in nature. Furthermore, we can hypothesise that ion-assisted dehydration of trace and minor element ions could occur in biological systems, thus

  15. The structure of the hydrated electron. Part 2. A mixed quantum classical molecular dynamics - embedded cluster density functional theory: single-excitation configuration interaction study

    CERN Document Server

    Shkrob, I A; Larsen, R E; Schwartz, B J; Glover, William J.; Larsen, Ross E.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.; Shkrob, Ilya A.

    2006-01-01

    Adiabatic mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations were used to generate snapshots of the hydrated electron (e-) in liquid water at 300 K. Water cluster anions that include two complete solvation shells centered on the e- were extracted from these simulations and embedded in a matrix of fractional point charges designed to represent the rest of the solvent. Density functional theory and single-excitation configuration interaction methods were then applied to these embedded clusters. The salient feature of these hybrid calculations is significant transfer (ca. 0.18) of the excess electron's charge density into the O 2p orbitals in OH groups forming the solvation cavity. We used the results of these calculations to examine the structure of the molecular orbitals, the density of states, the absorption spectra in the visible and ultraviolet, the hyperfine coupling (hfc) tensors, and the IR and Raman spectra of the e-. The calculated hfc tensors were used to compute the EPR and ESEEM spectra for the ...

  16. Compositional Evolution of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) Structures by Total X-Ray Scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Soyer-Uzun, Sezen

    2011-12-09

    High-energy X-ray diffraction was employed to study the structural characteristics of a set of C-S-H samples with 0.6 ≤ C/S a;circ 1.75. It has been observed that Si is tetrahedrally coordinated to O for all samples irrespective of chemical composition and the Ca-O coordination number gradually decreases from ∼7 to ∼6 with increasing C/S ratio. This suggests that the C-S-H structure evolves from a tobermorite-like structure into a jennite-like structure as a function of increasing C/S ratio as the interlayer space decreases from ∼1.3 to ∼1 nm. Evolution of these short- and medium-range order structural characteristics in the C-S-H system is associated with the alteration of the Ca-O layers and silicate depolymerization with increasing C/S. © 2011 The American Ceramic Society.

  17. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  18. Wet hydrate dissolution plant

    OpenAIRE

    Stanković Mirjana S.; Kovačević Branimir T.; Pezo Lato L.

    2003-01-01

    The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant with capacity of 50,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE), Italy, in 1997, for increasing detergent zeolite production from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate ...

  19. Effects of mannose, fructose, and fucose on the structure, stability, and hydration of lysozyme in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahim, Abdoul; Peters, Günther H.J.; Jalkanen, Karl J.

    2013-01-01

    The bio-protective properties of monosaccharaides, namely mannose, fructose and fucose, on the stability and dynamical properties of the NMR determined hen egg-white lysozyme structure have been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature in aqueous solution and in...

  20. The characteristics of gas hydrates occurring in natural environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H.; Moudrakovski, I.; Udachin, K.; Enright, G.; Ratcliffe, C.; Ripmeester, J.

    2009-12-01

    In the past few years, extensive analyses have been carried out for characterizing the natural gas hydrate samples from Cascadia, offshore Vancouver Island; Mallik, Mackenzie Delta; Mount Elbert, Alaska North Slope; Nankai Trough, offshore Japan; Japan Sea and offshore India. With the results obtained, it is possible to give a general picture of the characteristics of gas hydrates occurring in natural environment. Gas hydrate can occur in sediments of various types, from sands to clay, although it is preferentially enriched in sediments of certain types, for example coarse sands and fine volcanic ash. Most of the gas hydrates in sediments are invisible, occurring in the pores of the sediments, while some hydrates are visible, appearing as massive, nodular, planar, vein-like forms and occurring around the seafloor, in the fractures related to fault systems, or any other large spaces available in sediments. Although methane is the main component of most of the natural gas hydrates, C2 to C7 hydrocarbons have been recognized in hydrates, sometimes even in significant amounts. Shallow marine gas hydrates have been found generally to contain minor amounts of hydrogen sulfide. Gas hydrate samples with complex gas compositions have been found to have heterogeneous distributions in composition, which might reflect changes in the composition of the available gas in the surrounding environment. Depending on the gas compositions, the structure type of a natural gas hydrate can be structure I, II or H. For structure I methane hydrate, the large cages are almost fully occupied by methane molecules, while the small cages are only partly occupied. Methane hydrates occurring in different environments have been identified with almost the same crystallographic parameters.

  1. Interfacial solvation thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have reached conflicting conclusions regarding the interplay of cavity formation, polarizability, desolvation, and surface capillary waves in driving the interfacial adsorptions of ions and molecules at air-water interfaces. Here we revisit these questions by combining exact potential distribution results with linear response theory and other physically motivated approximations. The results highlight both exact and approximate compensation relations pertaining to direct (solute-solvent) and indirect (solvent-solvent) contributions to adsorption thermodynamics, of relevance to solvation at air-water interfaces, as well as a broader class of processes linked to the mean force potential between ions, molecules, nanoparticles, proteins, and biological assemblies.

  2. Energy storage in ferroelectric polymer nanocomposites filled with core-shell structured polymer@BaTiO3 nanoparticles: understanding the role of polymer shells in the interfacial regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Huang, Xingyi; Yang, Ke; Zhai, Xing; Zhang, Jun; He, Jinliang; Jiang, Pingkai

    2014-11-26

    The interfacial region plays a critical role in determining the electrical properties and energy storage density of dielectric polymer nanocomposites. However, we still know a little about the effects of electrical properties of the interfacial regions on the electrical properties and energy storage of dielectric polymer nanocomposites. In this work, three types of core-shell structured polymer@BaTiO3 nanoparticles with polymer shells having different electrical properties were used as fillers to prepare ferroelectric polymer nanocomposites. All the polymer@BaTiO3 nanoparticles were prepared by surface-initiated reversible-addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, and the polymer shells were controlled to have the same thickness. The morphology, crystal structure, frequency-dependent dielectric properties, breakdown strength, leakage currents, energy storage capability, and energy storage efficiency of the polymer nanocomposites were investigated. On the other hand, the pure polymers having the same molecular structure as the shells of polymer@BaTiO3 nanoparticles were also prepared by RAFT polymerization, and their electrical properties were provided. Our results show that, to achieve nanocomposites with high discharged energy density, the core-shell nanoparticle filler should simultaneously have high dielectric constant and low electrical conductivity. On the other hand, the breakdown strength of the polymer@BaTiO3-based nanocomposites is highly affected by the electrical properties of the polymer shells. It is believed that the electrical conductivity of the polymer shells should be as low as possible to achieve nanocomposites with high breakdown strength.

  3. Structure, dynamics, and hydration of a collagen model polypeptide, (L-prolyl-L-prolylglycyl)10, in aqueous media: a chemical equilibrium analysis of triple helix-to-single coil transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikata, Toshiyuki; Minakawa, Ayako; Okuyama, Kenji

    2009-10-29

    The structure, dynamics, and hydration behavior of a collagen model polypeptide, (L-prolyl-L-prolylglycyl)(10) (PPG10), were investigated in pure water and dilute acetic acid over a wide temperature range using broadband dielectric relaxation (DR) techniques that spanned frequencies from 1 kHz to 20 GHz. All samples showed pronounced dielectric dispersion with two major relaxation processes around 3 MHz and 20 GHz. Because DR measurements sensitively probe dipoles and their dynamics, the structures and ionization states of the carboxy and amino termini of aqueous PPG10 were precisely determined from the relaxation times and strengths in the 3 MHz frequency range. In solution, PPG10 formed mixtures of monodisperse rods as triple helices with lengths and diameters of 8.6 and 1.5 nm, respectively, and monomeric random coils with radii of approximately 1.4 nm. Ionization of the C-terminus was suppressed by the addition of acetic acid in both states. The fraction of random coils (f(coil)) was found to be a function of temperature (T) and the concentration of PPG10 (c). At low temperatures, small f(coil) values were found, which increased with temperature to reach f(coil) = 1 at approximately 60 degrees C, irrespective of c. This phenomenon, well-known as a triple helix-to-single coil transition, is discussed on the basis of the chemical reaction, (PPG10)(3) 3PPG10, with an equilibrium constant of K = 3(c/55.6)(2)f(coil)(3)(1 - f(coil))(-1). The standard enthalpy change evaluated from Arrhenius plots (ln K versus T(-1)) was found to change dramatically at the same transition temperature that was previously determined by using optical rotation experiments. The other major DR process, observed at approximately 20 GHz, was assigned to free and hydrated water molecules and used to determine the average hydration number (m) per PPG10. The m values for the triple helix and random coil state at 25 degrees C were evaluated to be m(th) = 60-70 and m(coil) = 250-270. The m

  4. Ultrafast phosphate hydration dynamics in bulk H{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costard, Rene, E-mail: costard@mbi-berlin.de; Tyborski, Tobias; Fingerhut, Benjamin P., E-mail: fingerhut@mbi-berlin.de; Elsaesser, Thomas [Max-Born-Institut für Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-06-07

    Phosphate vibrations serve as local probes of hydrogen bonding and structural fluctuations of hydration shells around ions. Interactions of H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup −} ions and their aqueous environment are studied combining femtosecond 2D infrared spectroscopy, ab-initio calculations, and hybrid quantum-classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Two-dimensional infrared spectra of the symmetric (ν{sub S}(PO{sub 2}{sup −})) and asymmetric (ν{sub AS}(PO{sub 2}{sup −})) PO{sub 2}{sup −} stretching vibrations display nearly homogeneous lineshapes and pronounced anharmonic couplings between the two modes and with the δ(P-(OH){sub 2}) bending modes. The frequency-time correlation function derived from the 2D spectra consists of a predominant 50 fs decay and a weak constant component accounting for a residual inhomogeneous broadening. MD simulations show that the fluctuating electric field of the aqueous environment induces strong fluctuations of the ν{sub S}(PO{sub 2}{sup −}) and ν{sub AS}(PO{sub 2}{sup −}) transition frequencies with larger frequency excursions for ν{sub AS}(PO{sub 2}{sup −}). The calculated frequency-time correlation function is in good agreement with the experiment. The ν(PO{sub 2}{sup −}) frequencies are mainly determined by polarization contributions induced by electrostatic phosphate-water interactions. H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup −}/H{sub 2}O cluster calculations reveal substantial frequency shifts and mode mixing with increasing hydration. Predicted phosphate-water hydrogen bond (HB) lifetimes have values on the order of 10 ps, substantially longer than water-water HB lifetimes. The ultrafast phosphate-water interactions observed here are in marked contrast to hydration dynamics of phospholipids where a quasi-static inhomogeneous broadening of phosphate vibrations suggests minor structural fluctuations of interfacial water.

  5. Methane Production and Carbon Capture by Hydrate Swapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Liang; von Solms, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    gas molecules in the structural lattice. In this work, we quantitatively investigate the swapping behavior from injection of pure carbon dioxide and the (CO2 + N2) binary gas mixture through artificial hydrate-bearing sandstone samples by use of a core-flooding experimental apparatus. A total of 13...... of pure carbon dioxide in swapping methane from its hydrate phase; the methane recovery efficiency in brine water systems is enhanced relative to pure water systems. The replenishment of a fresh (CO2 + N2) gas mixture into the vapor phase can be considered as an efficient extraction method because 46...... in small hydrate cages, as long as the equilibrium formation pressure of (CO2 + N2) binary gas hydrate is below that of methane hydrate, even though adding nitrogen to carbon dioxide reduces the thermodynamic driving force for the formation of a new hydrate. When other conditions are similar, the methane...

  6. On the influence of hydrated imidazolium-based ionic liquid on protein structure stability: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qiang

    2013-09-01

    The structure stability of three α-helix bundle (the B domain of protein A) in an imidazolium-based ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIM-Cl)) is studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Consistent with previous experiments, the present simulation results show that the native structure of the protein is consistently stabilized in BMIM-Cl solutions with different concentrations. It is observed that BMIM+ cations have a strong tendency to accumulate on protein surface whereas Cl- anions are expelled from protein. BMIM+ cations cannot only have electrostatic interactions with the carbonyl groups on backbone and the carboxylate groups on negatively charged side chains, but also have hydrophobic interactions with the side chains of non-polar residues. In the meanwhile, the accumulation of large-size BMIM+ cations on protein surface could remove the surrounding water molecules, reduce the hydrogen bonding from water to protein, and thus stabilize the backbone hydrogen bonds. In summary, the present study could improve our understanding of the molecular mechanism of the impact of water-miscible ionic liquid on protein structure.

  7. Effect of nanoscale patterned interfacial roughness on interfacial toughness.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mook, William M. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN); Kennedy, Marian S. (Clemson University, Clemson, SC); Bahr, David F. (Washington State University, Pullman, WA); Zhou, Xiao Wang; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    The performance and the reliability of many devices are controlled by interfaces between thin films. In this study we investigated the use of patterned, nanoscale interfacial roughness as a way to increase the apparent interfacial toughness of brittle, thin-film material systems. The experimental portion of the study measured the interfacial toughness of a number of interfaces with nanoscale roughness. This included a silicon interface with a rectangular-toothed pattern of 60-nm wide by 90-nm deep channels fabricated using nanoimprint lithography techniques. Detailed finite element simulations were used to investigate the nature of interfacial crack growth when the interface is patterned. These simulations examined how geometric and material parameter choices affect the apparent toughness. Atomistic simulations were also performed with the aim of identifying possible modifications to the interfacial separation models currently used in nanoscale, finite element fracture analyses. The fundamental nature of atomistic traction separation for mixed mode loadings was investigated.

  8. Ordering kinetics in model systems with inhibited interfacial adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willart, J.-F.; Mouritsen, Ole G.; Naudts, J.

    1992-01-01

    The ordering kinetics in two-dimensional Ising-like spin moels with inhibited interfacial adsorption are studied by computer-simulation calculations. The inhibited interfacial adsorption is modeled by a particular interfacial adsorption condition on the structure of the domain wall between...... neighboring domains. This condition can be either hard, as modeled by a singularity in the domain-boundary potential, or soft, as modeled by a version of the Blume-Capel model. The results show that the effect of the steric hindrance, be it hard or soft, is only manifested in the amplitude, A...

  9. Structures of Hydrated Alkali Metal Cations, M+(H2O)nAr (m = Li, Na, K, rb and Cs, n = 3-5), Using Infrared Photodissociation Spectroscopy and Thermodynamic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Haochen; van der Linde, Christian; Lisy, James M.

    2014-06-01

    Alkali metal cations play vital roles in chemical and biochemical systems. Lithium is widely used in psychiatric treatment of manic states and bipolar disorder; Sodium and potassium are essential elements, having major biological roles as electrolytes, balancing osmotic pressure on body cells and assisting the electroneurographic signal transmission; Rubidium has seen increasing usage as a supplementation for manic depression and depression treatment; Cesium doped compounds are used as essential catalysts in chemical production and organic synthesis. Since hydrated alkali metal cations are ubiquitous and the basic form of the alkali metal cations in chemical and biochemical systems, their structural and thermodynamic properties serve as the foundation for modeling more complex chemical and biochemical processes, such as ion transport and ion size-selectivity of ionophores and protein channels. By combining mass spectrometry and infrared photodissociation spectroscopy, we have characterized the structures and thermodynamic properties of the hydrated alkali metal cations, i.e. M+(H2O)nAr, (M = Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs, n = 3-5). Ab initio calculations and RRKM-EE (evaporative ensemble) calculations were used to assist in the spectral assignments and thermodynamic analysis. Results showed that the structures of hydrated alkali metal cations were determined predominantly by the competition between non-covalent interactions, i.e. the water---water hydrogen bonding interactions and the water---cation electrostatic interactions. This balance, however, is very delicate and small changes, i.e. different cations, different levels of hydration and different effective temperatures clearly impact the balance.

  10. Investigating the Metastability of Clathrate Hydrates for Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Carolyn Ann [Colorado School of Mines

    2014-11-18

    Important breakthrough discoveries have been achieved from the DOE award on the key processes controlling the synthesis and structure-property relations of clathrate hydrates, which are critical to the development of clathrate hydrates as energy storage materials. Key achievements include: (i) the discovery of key clathrate hydrate building blocks (stable and metastable) leading to clathrate hydrate nucleation and growth; (ii) development of a rapid clathrate hydrate synthesis route via a seeding mechanism; (iii) synthesis-structure relations of H2 + CH4/CO2 binary hydrates to control thermodynamic requirements for energy storage and sequestration applications; (iv) discovery of a new metastable phase present during clathrate hydrate structural transitions. The success of our research to-date is demonstrated by the significant papers we have published in high impact journals, including Science, Angewandte Chemie, J. Am. Chem. Soc. Intellectual Merits of Project Accomplishments: The intellectual merits of the project accomplishments are significant and transformative, in which the fundamental coupled computational and experimental program has provided new and critical understanding on the key processes controlling the nucleation, growth, and thermodynamics of clathrate hydrates containing hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide, and other guest molecules for energy storage. Key examples of the intellectual merits of the accomplishments include: the first discovery of the nucleation pathways and dominant stable and metastable structures leading to clathrate hydrate formation; the discovery and experimental confirmation of new metastable clathrate hydrate structures; the development of new synthesis methods for controlling clathrate hydrate formation and enclathration of molecular hydrogen. Broader Impacts of Project Accomplishments: The molecular investigations performed in this project on the synthesis (nucleation & growth)-structure-stability relations of clathrate

  11. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  12. Interfacial Fluid Mechanics A Mathematical Modeling Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ajaev, Vladimir S

    2012-01-01

    Interfacial Fluid Mechanics: A Mathematical Modeling Approach provides an introduction to mathematical models of viscous flow used in rapidly developing fields of microfluidics and microscale heat transfer. The basic physical effects are first introduced in the context of simple configurations and their relative importance in typical microscale applications is discussed. Then,several configurations of importance to microfluidics, most notably thin films/droplets on substrates and confined bubbles, are discussed in detail.  Topics from current research on electrokinetic phenomena, liquid flow near structured solid surfaces, evaporation/condensation, and surfactant phenomena are discussed in the later chapters. This book also:  Discusses mathematical models in the context of actual applications such as electrowetting Includes unique material on fluid flow near structured surfaces and phase change phenomena Shows readers how to solve modeling problems related to microscale multiphase flows Interfacial Fluid Me...

  13. Influence of hydration and annealing on structure, PSL yield and spatial resolution of pressed powder imaging plates of the X-ray storage phosphor CsBr:Eu2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersting, E.; von Seggern, H.

    2017-08-01

    A new production route for europium doped cesium bromide (CsBr:Eu2+) imaging plates has been developed, synthesizing CsBr:Eu2+ powder from a precipitation reaction of aqueous CsBr solution with ethanol. This new route allows the control of features like homogeneous grain size and grain shape of the obtained powder. After drying and subsequent compacting the powder, disk-like samples were fabricated, and their resulting photostimulated luminescence (PSL) properties like yield and spatial resolution were determined. It will be shown that hydration of such disks causes the CsBr:Eu2+ powder to recrystallize starting from the humidity exposed surfaces to the sample interior up to a completely polycrystalline sample resulting in a decreasing PSL yield and an increasing resolution. Subsequent annealing leads to grain refinement combined with a large PSL yield increment and a minor effect on the spatial resolution. By first annealing the "as made" disk, one observes a strong increment of the PSL yield and almost no effect on the spatial resolution. During subsequent hydration, the recrystallization is hindered by minor structural changes of the grains. The related PSL yield drops slightly with increasing hydration time, and the spatial resolution drops considerably. The obtained PSL properties with respect to structure will be discussed with a simple model.

  14. Characteristics of shallow gas hydrate in Okhotsk Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUAN XiWu; JIN YoungKeun; Anatoly OBZHIROV; YUE BaoJing

    2008-01-01

    Multidisciplinary field investigations were carried out in Okhotsk Sea by R/V Akademik M.A. Lavrentyev (LV) of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) in May 2006, supported by funding agencies from Korea, Russia, Japan and China. Geophysical data including echo-sounder, bottom profile, side-scansonar, and gravity core sample were obtained aimed to understand the characteristics and formation mechanism of shallow gas hydrates. Based on the geophysical data, we found that the methane flare detected by echo-sounder was the evidence of free gas in the sediment, while the dome structure detected by side-scan sonar and bottom profile was the root of gas venting. Gas hydrate retrieved from core on top of the dome structure which was interbedded as thin lamination or lenses with thickness varying from a few millimeters to 3 cm. Gas hydrate content in hydrate-bearing intervals visually amounted to 5%-30% of the sediment volume. This paper argued that gases in the sediment core were not all from gas hydrate decomposition during the gravity core lifting process, free gases must existed in the gas hydrate stability zone, and tectonic structure like dome structure in this paper was free gas central, gas hydrate formed only when gases over-saturated in this gas central, away from these struc tures, gas hydrate could not form due to low gas concentration.

  15. Characteristics of shallow gas hydrate in Okhotsk Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anatoly; OBZHIROV

    2008-01-01

    Multidisciplinary field investigations were carried out in Okhotsk Sea by R/V Akademik M.A. Lavrentyev (LV) of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) in May 2006, supported by funding agencies from Ko- rea, Russia, Japan and China. Geophysical data including echo-sounder, bottom profile, side-scan- sonar, and gravity core sample were obtained aimed to understand the characteristics and formation mechanism of shallow gas hydrates. Based on the geophysical data, we found that the methane flare detected by echo-sounder was the evidence of free gas in the sediment, while the dome structure de- tected by side-scan sonar and bottom profile was the root of gas venting. Gas hydrate retrieved from core on top of the dome structure which was interbedded as thin lamination or lenses with thickness varying from a few millimeters to 3 cm. Gas hydrate content in hydrate-bearing intervals visually amounted to 5%―30% of the sediment volume. This paper argued that gases in the sediment core were not all from gas hydrate decomposition during the gravity core lifting process, free gases must existed in the gas hydrate stability zone, and tectonic structure like dome structure in this paper was free gas central, gas hydrate formed only when gases over-saturated in this gas central, away from these struc- tures, gas hydrate could not form due to low gas concentration.

  16. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.

    2014-07-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  17. Hydration behaviour of polyhydroxylated fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Zavala, J G [Departamento de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnologicas, Centro Universitario de Los Lagos, Universidad de Guadalajara, Enrique Diaz de Leon S/N, 47460 Jalisco (Mexico); Barajas-Barraza, R E [Departamento de Matematicas y Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Occidente, Periferico Sur, Manuel Gomez MorIn No 8585, 45604 Jalisco (Mexico); Padilla-Osuna, I; Guirado-Lopez, R A, E-mail: jgrz@culagos.udg.mx, E-mail: ebarajas@iteso.mx, E-mail: ismael@ifisica.uaslp.mx, E-mail: guirado@ifisica.uaslp.mx [Instituto de Fisica ' Manuel Sandoval Vallarta' , Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, 78000 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2011-10-28

    We have performed semi-empirical as well as density functional theory calculations in order to analyse the hydration properties of both bare C{sub 60} and highly hydroxylated C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} fullerenes. In all of our calculations, a total of 42 and 98 water molecules are always surrounding our here-considered carbon nanostructures. We found different wetting properties as a function of the chemical composition and structure of the OH-molecular over-layer covering the fullerene surface. In the case of bare C{sub 60}, water adsorption reveals that the H{sub 2}O species are not uniformly arranged around the carbon network but rather forms water droplets of different sizes, clearly revealing the hydrophobic nature of the C{sub 60} structure. In contrast, in the polyhydroxylated C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} fullerenes, the degree of wetting is strongly influenced by the precise location of the hydroxyl groups. We found that different adsorbed configurations for the OH-molecular coating can lead to the formation of partially hydrated or completely covered C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} compounds, a result that could be used to synthesize fullerene materials with different degrees of wettability. By comparing the relative stability of our hydroxylated structures in both bare and hydrated conditions we obtain that the energy ordering of the C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} isomers can change in the presence of water. The radial distribution function of our hydrated fullerenes reveals that water near these kinds of surfaces is densely packed. In fact, by counting the number of H{sub 2}O molecules which are adsorbed, by means of hydrogen bonds, to the surface of our more stable C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} isomer, we found that it varies in the range of 5-10, in good agreement with experiments. Finally, by comparing the calculated optical absorption spectra of various C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} structures in the presence and absence of water molecules, we note that only slight variations in the position and

  18. Interfacial dislocation motion and interactions in single-crystal superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Raabe, D. [Max Planck Inst. fur Eisenforshung. Dusseldorf (Germany); Roters, F. [Max Planck Inst. fur Eisenforshung. Dusseldorf (Germany); Arsenlis, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The early stage of high-temperature low-stress creep in single-crystal superalloys is characterized by the rapid development of interfacial dislocation networks. Although interfacial motion and dynamic recovery of these dislocation networks have long been expected to control the subsequent creep behavior, direct observation and hence in-depth understanding of such processes has not been achieved. Incorporating recent developments of discrete dislocation dynamics models, we simulate interfacial dislocation motion in the channel structures of single-crystal superalloys, and investigate how interfacial dislocation motion and dynamic recovery are affected by interfacial dislocation interactions and lattice misfit. Different types of dislocation interactions are considered: self, collinear, coplanar, Lomer junction, glissile junction, and Hirth junction. The simulation results show that strong dynamic recovery occurs due to the short-range reactions of collinear annihilation and Lomer junction formation. The misfit stress is found to induce and accelerate dynamic recovery of interfacial dislocation networks involving self-interaction and Hirth junction formation, but slow down the steady interfacial motion of coplanar and glissile junction forming dislocation networks. The insights gained from these simulations on high-temperature low-stress creep of single-crystal superalloys are also discussed.

  19. Redetermination of the crystal structure of 3,5-di-methyl-pyrazolium β-octa-molybdate tetra-hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarante, Tatiana R; Gonçalves, Isabel S; Almeida Paz, Filipe A

    2015-12-01

    The title compound, (C5H9N2)4[Mo8O26]·4H2O, was reported previously from a room-temperature data collection from which only the metal atoms could be refined anisotropically [FitzRoy et al. (1989 ▸). Inorg. Chim. Acta, 157, 187-194]. The current redetermination at 180 (2) K models all the non-H atoms with anisotropic displacement parameters and fully describes the supra-molecular N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen-bonded network connecting the 3,5-di-methyl-pyrazolium cations, the water mol-ecules of crystallization and the β-octa-molybdate anion. All H atoms involved in the three-dimensional hydrogen-bonding network could be located from difference Fourier maps, with the exception of those of one disordered water mol-ecule, firstly seen in this structural report [refined over two distinct locations with site-occupancy factors of 0.65 (2) and 0.35 (2)]. The complete β-octa-molybdate anion is generated by a crystallographic inversion centre.

  20. Molecular structure of hydrated complex of 1,4-dimethylpiperazine di-betaine with L-tartaric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dega-Szafran, Z.; Katrusiak, A.; Szafran, M.

    2008-12-01

    1,4-Dimethylpiperazine di-betaine (DBPZ) forms a crystalline complex with L-tartaric acid (TA) and two and a half water molecules. The crystals are monoclinic, space group P2 1. The piperazine has a chair conformation with the methyl groups in the equatorial positions and the axial CH 2COO substituents. One of the CH 2COO group is protonated and forms with the neighboring DBPZ molecule the COO sbnd H⋯OOC hydrogen bond of the length 2.476(3) Å, which links them into a chain. The semi-tartrate anions, form a chain through the symmetrical, short COO⋯H⋯OOC hydrogen bond of 2.464(3) Å. The crystals have a layer structure, where hydrogen-bonded sheets of TA and water molecules are separated by the chains of DBPZ; no H-bonds between water and DBPZ are present. In the optimized molecules in the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) approach, the tartaric acid interacts with the tartrate di-anions through the COO sbnd H⋯OOC hydrogen bonds of 2.506 Å, while the DBPZ has the same conformation as in the crystals. The FTIR spectrum of the solid complex is consistent with the X-ray results.

  1. Dentin-cement Interfacial Interaction: Calcium Silicates and Polyalkenoates

    OpenAIRE

    Atmeh, A.R.; Chong, E.Z.; Richard, G; Festy, F.; Watson, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    The interfacial properties of a new calcium-silicate-based coronal restorative material (Biodentine™) and a glass-ionomer cement (GIC) with dentin have been studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and two-photon auto-fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging. Results indicate the formation of tag-like structures alongside an interfacial layer called the “mineral infiltration zone”, where the alkaline c...

  2. Implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin methods and interfacial gauge methods for high-order accurate interface dynamics, with applications to surface tension dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and free surface flow: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saye, Robert

    2017-09-01

    In this two-part paper, a high-order accurate implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin (dG) framework is developed for fluid interface dynamics, facilitating precise computation of interfacial fluid flow in evolving geometries. The framework uses implicitly defined meshes-wherein a reference quadtree or octree grid is combined with an implicit representation of evolving interfaces and moving domain boundaries-and allows physically prescribed interfacial jump conditions to be imposed or captured with high-order accuracy. Part one discusses the design of the framework, including: (i) high-order quadrature for implicitly defined elements and faces; (ii) high-order accurate discretisation of scalar and vector-valued elliptic partial differential equations with interfacial jumps in ellipticity coefficient, leading to optimal-order accuracy in the maximum norm and discrete linear systems that are symmetric positive (semi)definite; (iii) the design of incompressible fluid flow projection operators, which except for the influence of small penalty parameters, are discretely idempotent; and (iv) the design of geometric multigrid methods for elliptic interface problems on implicitly defined meshes and their use as preconditioners for the conjugate gradient method. Also discussed is a variety of aspects relating to moving interfaces, including: (v) dG discretisations of the level set method on implicitly defined meshes; (vi) transferring state between evolving implicit meshes; (vii) preserving mesh topology to accurately compute temporal derivatives; (viii) high-order accurate reinitialisation of level set functions; and (ix) the integration of adaptive mesh refinement. In part two, several applications of the implicit mesh dG framework in two and three dimensions are presented, including examples of single phase flow in nontrivial geometry, surface tension-driven two phase flow with phase-dependent fluid density and viscosity, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and free

  3. Implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin methods and interfacial gauge methods for high-order accurate interface dynamics, with applications to surface tension dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and free surface flow: Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saye, Robert

    2017-09-01

    In this two-part paper, a high-order accurate implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin (dG) framework is developed for fluid interface dynamics, facilitating precise computation of interfacial fluid flow in evolving geometries. The framework uses implicitly defined meshes-wherein a reference quadtree or octree grid is combined with an implicit representation of evolving interfaces and moving domain boundaries-and allows physically prescribed interfacial jump conditions to be imposed or captured with high-order accuracy. Part one discusses the design of the framework, including: (i) high-order quadrature for implicitly defined elements and faces; (ii) high-order accurate discretisation of scalar and vector-valued elliptic partial differential equations with interfacial jumps in ellipticity coefficient, leading to optimal-order accuracy in the maximum norm and discrete linear systems that are symmetric positive (semi)definite; (iii) the design of incompressible fluid flow projection operators, which except for the influence of small penalty parameters, are discretely idempotent; and (iv) the design of geometric multigrid methods for elliptic interface problems on implicitly defined meshes and their use as preconditioners for the conjugate gradient method. Also discussed is a variety of aspects relating to moving interfaces, including: (v) dG discretisations of the level set method on implicitly defined meshes; (vi) transferring state between evolving implicit meshes; (vii) preserving mesh topology to accurately compute temporal derivatives; (viii) high-order accurate reinitialisation of level set functions; and (ix) the integration of adaptive mesh refinement. In part two, several applications of the implicit mesh dG framework in two and three dimensions are presented, including examples of single phase flow in nontrivial geometry, surface tension-driven two phase flow with phase-dependent fluid density and viscosity, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and free

  4. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  5. Continuous production of CO2 hydrate slurry added antifreeze proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, Y.; Ota, M.; Murakami, K. [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Ferdows, M. [Dhaka Univ., Dhaka (Bangladesh). Dept. of Mathematics; Endou, H. [Technova Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Ocean storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) hydrate is possible in deep seas where low temperature and high pressure conditions exist. However, when hydrates are produced in large quantities, they can plug pipelines. The addition of antifreeze proteins (AFPs) can prevent hydrate crystals from forming. The hydrate may then behave like a slurry which can be transported from a production place to a place of storage with minimal pressure loss. This study developed a production method for a CO{sub 2} hydrate slurry and presented the prospect of the inhibition effect for CO{sub 2} hydrate formation by adding AFPs. It revealed the shift in induction time, the formation rate and the torque of the agitator under conditions of AFPs at 0.01 mg/ml. It was concluded that compared to pure water, the induction time for hydrate production increased 244 per cent, the formation rate decreased 76 per cent and the ratio of the torque decreased 48 per cent by adding AFPs. The AFPs rendered the hydrate particles small and well dispersed. It was concluded that type 3 AFPs can effectively inhibit the production of structure s1 type hydrates. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Progressive dry-core-wet-rim hydration trend in a nested-ring topology of protein binding interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhenhua

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Water is an integral part of protein complexes. It shapes protein binding sites by filling cavities and it bridges local contacts by hydrogen bonds. However, water molecules are usually not included in protein interface models in the past, and few distribution profiles of water molecules in protein binding interfaces are known. Results In this work, we use a tripartite protein-water-protein interface model and a nested-ring atom re-organization method to detect hydration trends and patterns from an interface data set which involves immobilized interfacial water molecules. This data set consists of 206 obligate interfaces, 160 non-obligate interfaces, and 522 crystal packing contacts. The two types of biological interfaces are found to be drier than the crystal packing interfaces in our data, agreeable to a hydration pattern reported earlier although the previous definition of immobilized water is pure distance-based. The biological interfaces in our data set are also found to be subject to stronger water exclusion in their formation. To study the overall hydration trend in protein binding interfaces, atoms at the same burial level in each tripartite protein-water-protein interface are organized into a ring. The rings of an interface are then ordered with the core atoms placed at the middle of the structure to form a nested-ring topology. We find that water molecules on the rings of an interface are generally configured in a dry-core-wet-rim pattern with a progressive level-wise solvation towards to the rim of the interface. This solvation trend becomes even sharper when counterexamples are separated. Conclusions Immobilized water molecules are regularly organized in protein binding interfaces and they should be carefully considered in the studies of protein hydration mechanisms.

  7. Formation of porous gas hydrates

    CERN Document Server

    Salamatin, Andrey N

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates grown at gas-ice interfaces are examined by electron microscopy and found to have a submicron porous texture. Permeability of the intervening hydrate layers provides the connection between the two counterparts (gas and water molecules) of the clathration reaction and makes further hydrate formation possible. The study is focused on phenomenological description of principal stages and rate-limiting processes that control the kinetics of the porous gas hydrate crystal growth from ice powders. Although the detailed physical mechanisms involved in the porous hydrate formation still are not fully understood, the initial stage of hydrate film spreading over the ice surface should be distinguished from the subsequent stage which is presumably limited by the clathration reaction at the ice-hydrate interface and develops after the ice grain coating is finished. The model reveals a time dependence of the reaction degree essentially different from that when the rate-limiting step of the hydrate formation at...

  8. Evidence for change of the interfacially local structure of titanium oxide/bis[(4,4’—carboxy—2,2’—bipyridine)(thiocyanato)]ruthenium nanocomposite+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.Ju; J.Zhang; K.W.Wu; Y.J.Hou; B.W.Zhang; P.H.Xie

    2001-01-01

    Tianium oxide/bis[(4,4’-carboxy-2,2’-bigyridine)(thiocyanato)]ruthenium(cis-(NCS)2RuL2)nancomposites were prepared by the self-assembly method.In this system,their interfacially local structures were probed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS)and the Ti-O interatomic distance and the coordination number of the O atoms around the Ti central atoms were extracted.Copared with TiO2 annoparticles,the Ti local structure in the nanocomposite was changed,Which is responsible for binding cis(NCS)2RuL2 to the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles.copyright 2001 John Wiley and Sons,Ltd.

  9. The characteristics of gas hydrates recovered from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H.; Lorenson, T.D.; Moudrakovski, I.L.; Ripmeester, J.A.; Collett, T.S.; Hunter, R.B.; Ratcliffe, C.I.

    2011-01-01

    Systematic analyses have been carried out on two gas hydrate-bearing sediment core samples, HYPV4, which was preserved by CH4 gas pressurization, and HYLN7, which was preserved in liquid-nitrogen, recovered from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well. Gas hydrate in the studied core samples was found by observation to have developed in sediment pores, and the distribution of hydrate saturation in the cores imply that gas hydrate had experienced stepwise dissociation before it was stabilized by either liquid nitrogen or pressurizing gas. The gas hydrates were determined to be structure Type I hydrate with hydration numbers of approximately 6.1 by instrumentation methods such as powder X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and solid state 13C NMR. The hydrate gas composition was predominantly methane, and isotopic analysis showed that the methane was of thermogenic origin (mean ??13C=-48.6??? and ??D=-248??? for sample HYLN7). Isotopic analysis of methane from sample HYPV4 revealed secondary hydrate formation from the pressurizing methane gas during storage. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Hydration Study of Ordinary Portland Cement in the Presence of Lead(II) Oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Barbir, D.; Dabić, P.; Krolo, P.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of the addition of lead(II) oxide on hydration heat and specific conductivity of a CEM I Portland cement. The heat released during hydration was determined by differential microcalorimetry up to 48 hours of hydration and the specific conductivity by a digital conductometer. Thermogravimetric analysis was employed in the characterization of the cement structure. The hydration heat results show that the addition of lead(II) oxide affects the...

  11. Solid-state (79/81)Br NMR and gauge-including projector-augmented wave study of structure, symmetry, and hydration state in alkaline earth metal bromides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdifield, Cory M; Bryce, David L

    2010-02-11

    Bromine-79/81 solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is established as a tool to characterize the local structure and symmetry about bromide ions in inorganic systems. Benchmark experimental (79/81)Br SSNMR data are acquired for CaBr(2), SrBr(2), BaBr(2), MgBr(2).6H(2)O, SrBr(2).6H(2)O, BaBr(2).2H(2)O, and CaBr(2).xH(2)O using the Solomon echo and/or QCPMG pulse sequences in magnetic fields of 11.75 and 21.1 T. Analytical line-shape analysis provides (79/81)Br electric field gradient (EFG) tensor parameters (including (79)Br quadrupolar coupling constants, C(Q)((79)Br), of up to 75.1(5) MHz in CaBr(2)), chemical shift tensor parameters (including the largest reported anisotropy), and the relative orientation of the tensor principal axis systems. These data are interpreted in terms of structure and symmetry. Our results indicate that ionic bromide systems should be generally accessible to characterization by (79/81)Br SSNMR despite sizable quadrupolar interactions. The resolving capabilities of (79/81)Br SSNMR spectroscopy are illustrated, using samples which possess up to four magnetically inequivalent sites, and through a rare example of (79)Br magic-angle spinning NMR for a Br in a noncubic lattice. Bromine-79/81 SSNMR spectroscopy is demonstrated to be sensitive to the presence of hydrates (i.e., pseudopolymorphism), via drastic changes in C(Q) and delta(iso). The changes are diagnostic to an extent that the composition of the mixture CaBr(2).xH(2)O is determined for the first time. This technique should therefore be applicable to characterize other unknown mixtures or polymorphs. Important instances where (79)Br nuclear quadrupole resonance data were found to be deficient are noted and corrected. GIPAW DFT computations are shown to be generally in very good agreement with the experimental (79/81)Br SSNMR observations. Finally, it is demonstrated that the origin of the EFG at the Br nuclei cannot be described quantitatively using a point charge model, even after

  12. Interfacial forces in aqueous media

    CERN Document Server

    van Oss, Carel J

    2006-01-01

    Thoroughly revised and reorganized, the second edition of Interfacial Forces in Aqueous Media examines the role of polar interfacial and noncovalent interactions among biological and nonbiological macromolecules as well as biopolymers, particles, surfaces, cells, and both polar and apolar polymers. The book encompasses Lifshitz-van der Waals and electrical double layer interactions, as well as Lewis acid-base interactions between colloidal entities in polar liquids such as water. New in this Edition: Four previously unpublished chapters comprising a new section on interfacial propertie

  13. GLASS TRANSITION OF HYDRATED WHEAT GLIADIN POWDERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-min Sun; Li Zhao; Yi-hu Song; Qiang Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Modulated-temperature differential scanning calorimetric and dynamic mechanical analyses and dielectric spectroscopy were used to investigate the glass transition of hydrated wheat gliadin powders with moisture absorption ranged from 2.30 db% to 18.21 db%. Glass transition temperature (Tg) of dry wheat gliadin was estimated according to the GordonTaylor equation. Structural heterogeneity at high degrees of hydration was revealed in dielectric temperature and frequency spectra. The activation energies (Ea) of the two relaxations were calculated from Arrhenius equation.

  14. Component analysis of the protein hydration entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2012-05-01

    We report the development of an atomic decomposition method of the protein solvation entropy in water, which allows us to understand global change in the solvation entropy in terms of local changes in protein conformation as well as in hydration structure. This method can be implemented via a combined approach based on molecular dynamics simulation and integral-equation theory of liquids. An illustrative application is made to 42-residue amyloid-beta protein in water. We demonstrate how this method enables one to elucidate the molecular origin for the hydration entropy change upon conformational transitions of protein.

  15. Phase equilibria and thermodynamic modeling of ethane and propane hydrates in porous silica gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yongwon; Lee, Seungmin; Cha, Inuk; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Huen

    2009-04-23

    In the present study, we examined the active role of porous silica gels when used as natural gas storage and transportation media. We adopted the dispersed water in silica gel pores to substantially enhance active surface for contacting and encaging gas molecules. We measured the three-phase hydrate (H)-water-rich liquid (L(W))-vapor (V) equilibria of C(2)H(6) and C(3)H(8) hydrates in 6.0, 15.0, 30.0, and 100.0 nm silica gel pores to investigate the effect of geometrical constraints on gas hydrate phase equilibria. At specified temperatures, the hydrate stability region is shifted to a higher pressure region depending on pore size when compared with those of bulk hydrates. Through application of the Gibbs-Thomson relationship to the experimental data, we determined the values for the C(2)H(6) hydrate-water and C(3)H(8) hydrate-water interfacial tensions to be 39 +/- 2 and 45 +/- 1 mJ/m(2), respectively. By using these values, the calculation values were in good agreement with the experimental ones. The overall results given in this study could also be quite useful in various fields, such as exploitation of natural gas hydrate in marine sediments and sequestration of carbon dioxide into the deep ocean.

  16. Encapsulation of saline solution by tetrahydrofuran clathrate hydrates and inclusion migration by recrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Kazushige; Orihashi, Suguru; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Takahashi, Masayoshi

    2005-05-26

    Encapsulation of saline solution as an impurity in tetrahydrofuran clathrate hydrates grown in a stoichiometric solution with 3 wt % NaCl and the release of a saline solution during melting along with inclusion migration by hydrate recrystallization during annealing are studied using a directional growth apparatus in combination with a Mach-Zender interferometer. Interferometric observation revealed that the salt concentration increased locally in the solution near the growth interface. The time evolution of salt concentration in the solution was in accordance with the numerical results obtained from the diffusion equation for salt, assuming perfect rejection of salt by the hydrate. However, after the interfacial pattern developed into a serrated pattern (periodical array of trough and crest), the salt concentration in the solution ceased to increase, deviating from the theoretical value. This indicates that the saline solution was encapsulated by the growth hydrate. On the other hand, upon melting of the slowly grown hydrate, the salt concentration near the interface was observed to be locally high at the location of the trough during growth, whereas it was dilute at the location of the growth crest. Furthermore, when the hydrate was annealed under an applied temperature gradient, the inclusions (encapsulated saline solution) in the hydrate migrated toward the bulk solution and were finally expelled by hydrate recrystallization. The migration speed of the inclusions increased with a larger temperature gradient. By melting the sample over a sufficiently long anneal time, the melt was determined to be completely desalinated.

  17. Designing nanostructures for interfacial phonon transport via Bayesian optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Ju, Shenghong; Feng, Lei; Hou, Zhufeng; Tsuda, Koji; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate optimization of thermal conductance across nanostructures by developing a method combining atomistic Green's function and Bayesian optimization. With an aim to minimize and maximize the interfacial thermal conductance (ITC) across Si-Si and Si-Ge interfaces by means of Si/Ge composite interfacial structure, the method identifies the optimal structures from calculations of only a few percent of the entire candidates (over 60,000 structures). The obtained optimal interfacial structures are non-intuitive and impacting: the minimum-ITC structure is an aperiodic superlattice that realizes 50% reduction from the best periodic superlattice. The physical mechanism of the minimum ITC can be understood in terms of crossover of the two effects on phonon transport: as the layer thickness in superlattice increases, the impact of Fabry-P\\'erot interference increases, and the rate of reflection at the layer-interfaces decreases. Aperiodic superlattice with spatial variation in the layer thickness has a degree...

  18. Clathrate Hydrates for Thermal Energy Storage in Buildings: Overview of Proper Hydrate-Forming Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Castellani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing energy costs are at the origin of the great progress in the field of phase change materials (PCMs. The present work aims at studying the application of clathrate hydrates as PCMs in buildings. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline structures in which guest molecules are enclosed in the crystal lattice of water molecules. Clathrate hydrates can form also at ambient pressure and present a high latent heat, and for this reason, they are good candidates for being used as PCMs. The parameter that makes a PCM suitable to be used in buildings is, first of all, a melting temperature at about 25 °C. The paper provides an overview of groups of clathrate hydrates, whose physical and chemical characteristics could meet the requirements needed for their application in buildings. Simulations with a dynamic building simulation tool are carried out to evaluate the performance of clathrate hydrates in enhancing thermal comfort through the moderation of summer temperature swings and, therefore, in reducing energy consumption. Simulations suggest that clathrate hydrates have a potential in terms of improvement of indoor thermal comfort and a reduction of energy consumption for cooling. Cooling effects of 0.5 °C and reduced overheating hours of up to 1.1% are predicted.

  19. RESEARCH ON COUPLED RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HYDRATION NUMBER WITH RAMAN SPECTRUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Huaiyan; LIU Zhihong; FAN Shuanshi; XU Maoquan; GUAN Baocong

    2003-01-01

    As we know, there are three structures-sⅠ, sⅡ, and sH, with hydrocarbonate gas hydrate.Because of those special structures characteristics and potentail large fossil energy resource, gas hydrate play an important role in natural carbonate cycle system. In this paper, CH4, CO2, C3H8, and CH4 +CO2 system have been experimental performed in order to model hydrate formation and discomposition and to obtain hydrate stability conditions of tempreature and pressure. The results from laboratory using Raman spectra show that Raman spectrascopy is a effective tool to identify hydrate structure. Raman spectra of clathrate hydrate guest molecules are presented for two structure (sⅠ and sⅡ) in the following systems: CH4, CO2, C3 H8. Relatively occupancy of CH4 in the large and small cavities of sⅠ were determined by deconvoluting the v1 symmetric bands, resulting in hydration numbers of 6.04±0.03. The freqyuency of the v1 bands for CH4 in structures Ⅰ and Ⅱ differ statistically. The large cavities were measured to be almost fully occupied by CH4 and CO2, whereas only a small fraction of the small cavities are occupied by CH4. No CO2 was found in the small cavities.

  20. Modeling DNA hydration: comparison of calculated and experimental hydration properties of nuclic acid bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltev, V I; Malenkov, G G; Gonzalez, E J; Teplukhin, A V; Rein, R; Shibata, M; Miller, J H

    1996-02-01

    Hydration properties of individual nucleic acid bases were calculated and compared with the available experimental data. Three sets of classical potential functions (PF) used in simulations of nucleic acid hydration were juxtaposed: (i) the PF developed by Poltev and Malenkov (PM), (ii) the PF of Weiner and Kollman (WK), which together with Jorgensen's TIP3P water model are widely used in the AMBER program, and (iii) OPLS (optimized potentials for liquid simulations) developed by Jorgensen (J). The global minima of interaction energy of single water molecules with all the natural nucleic acid bases correspond to the formation of two water-base hydrogen bonds (water bridging of two hydrophilic atoms of the base). The energy values of these minima calculated via PM potentials are in somewhat better conformity with mass-spectrometric data than the values calculated via WK PF. OPLS gave much weaker water-base interactions for all compounds considered, thus these PF were not used in further computations. Monte Carlo simulations of the hydration of 9-methyladenine, 1-methyluracil and 1-methylthymine were performed in systems with 400 water molecules and periodic boundary conditions. Results of simulations with PM potentials give better agreement with experimental data on hydration energies than WK PF. Computations with PM PF of the hydration energy of keto and enol tautomers of 9-methylguanine can account for the shift in the tautomeric equilibrium of guanine in aqueous media to a dominance of the keto form in spite of nearly equal intrinsic stability of keto and enol tautomers. The results of guanine hydration computations are discussed in relation to mechanisms of base mispairing errors in nucleic acid biosynthesis. The data presented in this paper along with previous results on simulation of hydration shell structures in DNA duplex grooves provide ample evidence for the advantages of PM PF in studies of nucleic-acid hydration.

  1. 聚羧酸系超塑化剂与水泥单矿的界面作用及对单矿水化的影响%Interfacial Interaction between Polycarboxylate-based Superplasticizer and Cement Component Minerals and Its Impact on the Hydration Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞寅辉; 冉千平; 乔敏; 刘加平

    2012-01-01

    聚羧酸系超塑化剂(PC)与水泥颗粒间的相互作用是开发新型PC的理论前提,而水泥组成的复杂性使PC与水泥单矿间的作用研究成为热点.本文综述了PC在单矿上的吸附特性及其吸附对单矿zeta电位与水化的影响.PC在单矿上存在不均匀吸附;在铝酸三钙上的插层作用与其分子结构具有内在联系;单矿的zeta电位值与溶液组成息息相关;最后介绍了PC对单矿水化行为及水化产物影响.%Interactions between polycarboxylate-based superplasticizer and cement particles are the basic theory for the development of novel designed PC. The impact of PC onto cement component minerals has attracted much attention due to the complex composition of cement. Adsorption characteristic of PC and its effect on the zeta potential and hydration behavior has been well reviewed in this paper. It is established that not a uniform adsorption onto minerals exists. In addition, instinct link between PC architecture and its intercalation into C3A is also presented. It is confirmed that zeta potentials strongly depend on the chemical composition of the solvent. The influence of PC on the hydration behavior and hydration products of cement mineral phase is finally summarized.

  2. Roles of interfacial reaction on mechanical properties of solder interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pilin

    This study investigated roles of interfacial reaction in fracture and fatigue of solder interconnects. The interfacial reaction phases in the as-reflowed and after aging were examined by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) while interfacial mechanical properties were determined from a flexural peel fracture mechanics technique. Because of their widespread uses in microelectronic packaging, SnPb solder interfaces, and Bi-containing Pb-free solder interfaces were chosen as the subjects of this study. In the interfacial reaction study, we observed a complicated micro structural evolution during solid-state aging of electroless-Ni(P)/SnPb solder interconnects. In as-reflowed condition, the interfacial reaction produced Ni3Sn 4 and P-rich layers. Following overaging, the interfacial microstructure degenerated into a complex multilayer structure consisting of multiple layers of Ni-Sn compounds and transformed Ni-P phases. In SnPb solder interfacial system, fatigue study showed that the overaging of the high P electroless Ni-P/SnPb interconnects resulted in a sharp reduction in the fatigue resistance of the interface in the high crack growth rate regime. Fracture mechanism analysis indicated that the sharp drop in fatigue resistance was triggered by the brittle fracture of the Ni3Sn2 intermetallic phase developed at the overaged interface. The fatigue behavior was strongly dependent on P concentration in electroless Ni. Kirkendall voids were found in the interfacial region after aging, but they did not cause premature fracture of the solder interfaces. In Bi-containing solder interfacial system, we found that Bi segregated to the Cu-intermetallic interface during aging in SnBi/Cu interconnect. This caused serious embrittlement of Sn-Bi/Cu interface. Further aging induced numerous voids along the Cu3Sn/Cu interface. These interfacial voids were different from Kirkendall voids. Their formation was explained on basis of vacancy condensation at the

  3. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozovic, Ivan [Mount Sinai, NY; Logvenov, Gennady [Port Jefferson Station, NY; Gozar, Adrian Mihai [Port Jefferson, NY

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  4. Arguments for a Comprehensive Laboratory Research Subprogram on Hydrocarbon Gas Hydrates and Hydrate-Sediment Aggregates in the 2005-2010 DOE Methane Hydrate R & D Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, S. H.

    2005-12-01

    Field observations of natural hydrocarbon clathrate hydrates, including responses to drilling perturbations of hydrates, well logging and analysis of drill core, and field geophysics are, combined with theoretical modeling, justifiably key activities of the authorized 2005-2010 DOE Methane Hydrate Program. It is argued in this presentation that sustained fundamental laboratory research amplifies, extends and verifies results obtained from field and modeling investigations and does so in a cost-effective way. Recent developments of hydrocarbon clathrate hydrate and sediment aggregate synthesis methods, applications of in-situ optical cell, Raman, NMR, x-ray tomography and neutron diffraction techniques, and cryogenic x-ray and SEM methods re-enforce the importance of such lab investigations. Moreover, there are large data gaps for hydrocarbon-hydrate and hydrate-sediment-aggregate properties. We give three examples: 1) All natural hydrocarbon hydrates in sediment core have been altered to varying degrees by their transit, storage, depressurization, and subsequent lab investigations, as are well-log observations during drilling operations. Interpretation of drill core properties and structure and well logs are also typically not unique. Emulations of the pressure-temperature-deformation-time histories of synthetic samples offer a productive way of gaining insight into how natural samples and logging measurements may be compositionally and texturally altered during sampling and handling. 2) Rock physics models indicate that the effects of hydrates on sediment properties depend on the manner in which hydrates articulate with the sediment matrix (their conformation). Most of these models have not been verified by direct testing using hydrocarbon hydrates with conformation checked by optical cell observations or cryogenic SEM. Such tests are needed and technically feasible. 3) Modeling the effects of exchanges of heat, multiphase fluid fluxes, and deformation involve

  5. Electronic structures of TiO2-TCNE, -TCNQ, and -2,6-TCNAQ surface complexes studied by ionization potential measurements and DFT calculations: Mechanism of the shift of interfacial charge-transfer bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Jun-ichi; Hanaya, Minoru

    2016-06-01

    Interfacial charge-transfer (ICT) transitions between inorganic semiconductors and π-conjugated molecules allow direct charge separation without loss of energy. This feature is potentially useful for efficient photovoltaic conversions. Charge-transferred complexes of TiO2 nanoparticles with 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and its analogues (TCNX) show strong ICT absorption in the visible region. The ICT band was reported to be significantly red-shifted with extension of the π-conjugated system of TCNX. In order to clarify the mechanism of the red-shift, in this work, we systematically study electronic structures of the TiO2-TCNX surface complexes (TCNX; TCNE, TCNQ, 2,6-TCNAQ) by ionization potential measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations.

  6. Interfacial interaction of carbon fiber/PEEK and its effect on the mechanical performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李铁骑; 章明秋; 曾汉民

    2001-01-01

    An in-depth survey of the researches is presented on the anisotropic structure and properties of interphase in carbon fiber reinforced polyetheretherketone composites. The formation and structural nature of interfacial shortrange and long-range effects, micromechanical and macromechanical roles of interphase are discussed. Besides,prospects of further studies and a novel methodology for revealing interfacial properties of thermoplastic composites are demonstrated

  7. Silica Microcapsules Prepared by Interfacial Reaction Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M; Fujiwara; K; Shiokawa; Y; Nakahara

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Silica spherical particles with hollow structure are directly prepared by interfacial reaction methods using W/O/W emulsion (schematic diagram in Fig.1)[1].Fig.1 Silica microcapsule formationThe mixing of W/O emulsion consisting of sodium silicate solution (inner water phase) and n-hexane solution (oil phase) to outer water phase dissolving NH4HCO3 or other salts affords silica microcapsules.The critical feature of this method is the direct formation of hollow structure.Therefore,the core com...

  8. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saye, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of "gauge freedom" to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena.

  9. Theoretical description of biomolecular hydration - Application to A-DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.E.; Hummer, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Soumpasis, D.M. [Max Planck Inst. for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    The local density of water molecules around a biomolecule is constructed from calculated two- and three-points correlation functions of polar solvents in water using a Potential-of-Mean-Force (PMF) expansion. As a simple approximation, the hydration of all polar (including charged) groups in a biomolecule is represented by the hydration of water oxygen in bulk water, and the effect of non-polar groups on hydration are neglected, except for excluded volume effects. Pair and triplet correlation functions are calculated by molecular dynamics simulations. We present calculations of the structural hydration for ideal A-DNA molecules with sequences [d(CG){sub 5}]{sub 2} and [d(C{sub 5}G{sub 5})]{sub 2}. We find that this method can accurately reproduce the hydration patterns of A-DNA observed in neutron diffraction experiments on oriented DNA fibers.

  10. Interfacial microfluidic transport on micropatterned superhydrophobic textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Siyuan; Jiang, Jia; Pan, Tingrui

    2013-05-21

    Textile-enabled interfacial microfluidics, utilizing fibrous hydrophilic yarns (e.g., cotton) to guide biological reagent flows, has been extended to various biochemical analyses recently. The restricted capillary-driving mechanism, however, persists as a major challenge for continuous and facilitated biofluidic transport. In this paper, we have first introduced a novel interfacial microfluidic transport principle to drive three-dimensional liquid flows on a micropatterned superhydrophobic textile (MST) platform in a more autonomous and controllable manner. Specifically, the MST system utilizes the surface tension-induced Laplace pressure to facilitate the liquid motion along the hydrophilic yarn, in addition to the capillarity present in the fibrous structure. The fabrication of MST is simply accomplished by stitching hydrophilic cotton yarn into a superhydrophobic fabric substrate (contact angle 140 ± 3°), from which well-controlled wetting patterns are established for interfacial microfluidic operations. The geometric configurations of the stitched micropatterns, e.g., the lengths and diameters of the yarn and bundled arrangement, can all influence the transport process, which is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Two operation modes, discrete and continuous transport, are also presented in detail. In addition, the gravitational effect as well as the droplet removal process have been also considered and quantitatively analysed during the transport process. As a demonstration, an MST design has been implemented on an artificial skin surface to collect and remove sweat in a highly efficient and facilitated means. The results have illustrated that the novel interfacial transport on the textile platform can be potentially extended to a variety of biofluidic collection and removal applications.

  11. Surface and interfacial creases in a bilayer tubular soft tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Mir Jalil; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2016-08-01

    Surface and interfacial creases induced by biological growth are common types of instability in soft biological tissues. This study focuses on the criteria for the onset of surface and interfacial creases as well as their morphological evolution in a growing bilayer soft tube within a confined environment. Critical growth ratios for triggering surface and interfacial creases are investigated both analytically and numerically. Analytical interpretations provide preliminary insights into critical stretches and growth ratios for the onset of instability and formation of both surface and interfacial creases. However, the analytical approach cannot predict the evolution pattern of the model after instability; therefore nonlinear finite element simulations are carried out to replicate the poststability morphological patterns of the structure. Analytical and computational simulation results demonstrate that the initial geometry, growth ratio, and shear modulus ratio of the layers are the most influential factors to control surface and interfacial crease formation in this soft tubular bilayer. The competition between the stretch ratios in the free and interfacial surfaces is one of the key driving factors to determine the location of the first crease initiation. These findings may provide some fundamental understanding in the growth modeling of tubular biological tissues such as esophagi and airways as well as offering useful clues into normal and pathological functions of these tissues.

  12. Thermal Stability and Proton Conductivity of Rare Earth Orthophosphate Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anfimova, Tatiana; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2014-01-01

    Hydrated orthophosphate powders of three rare earth metals, lanthanum, neodymium and gadolinium, were prepared and studied as potential proton conducting materials for intermediate temperature electrochemical applications. The phosphates undergo a transformation from the rhabdophane structure...

  13. Spectroscopic determination of optimal hydration time of zircon surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez R, E. [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Garcia R, G. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Division de Estudios del Posgrado, Av. Tecnologico s/n, Ex-Rancho La Virgen, 52140 Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Garcia G, N., E-mail: eduardo.ordonez@inin.gob.m [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Av. Colon y Av. Tollocan, 50180 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    When a mineral surface is immersed in an aqueous solution, it develops and electric charge produced by the amphoteric dissociation of hydroxyl groups created by the hydration of the solid surface. This is one influential surface property. The complete hydration process takes a time which is specific for each mineral species. The knowledge of the aqueous solution contact time for complete surface hydration is mandatory for further surface phenomena studies. This study deals with the optimal hydration time of the raw zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) surface comparing the classical potentiometric titrations with a fluorescence spectroscopy technique. The latter is easy and rea liable as it demands only one sample batch to determine the optimal time to ensure a total hydration of the zircon surface. The analytical results of neutron activation analysis showed the presence of trace quantities of Dy{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3} in the bulk of zircon. The Dy{sup 3+} is structured in the zircon crystalline lattice and undergoes the same chemical reactions as zircon. Furthermore, the Dy{sup 3+} has a good fluorescent response whose intensity is enhanced by hydration molecules. The results show that, according to the potentiometric analysis, the hydration process for each batch (at least 8 sample batches) takes around 2 h, while the spectrometric method indicates only 5 minutes from only one batch. Both methods showed that the zircon surface have a 16 h optimal hydration time. (Author)

  14. Hydration dynamics of the collagen triple helix by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melacini, G; Bonvin, A M; Goodman, M; Boelens, R; Kaptein, R

    2000-07-28

    The hydration of the collagen-like Ac-(Gly-Pro-Hyp)(6)-NH(2) triple-helical peptide in solution was investigated using an integrated set of high-resolution NMR hydration experiments, including different recently developed exchange-network editing methods. This approach was designed to explore the hydration dynamics in the proximity of labile groups, such as the hydroxyproline hydroxyl group, and revealed that the first shell of hydration in collagen-like triple helices is kinetically labile with upper limits for water molecule residence times in the nanosecond to sub-nanosecond range. This result is consistent with a "hopping" hydration model in which solvent molecules are exchanged in and out of solvation sites at a rate that is not directly correlated to the degree of site localization. The hopping model thus reconciles the dynamic view of hydration revealed by NMR with the previously suggested partially ordered semi-clathrate-like cylinder of hydration. In addition, the nanosecond to sub-nanosecond upper limits for water molecule residence times imply that hydration-dehydration events are not likely to be the rate-limiting step for triple helix self-recognition, complementing previous investigations on water dynamics in collagen fibers. This study has also revealed labile proton features expected to facilitate the characterization of the structure and folding of triple helices in collagen peptides.

  15. CH3NH3PbI3 grain growth and interfacial properties in meso-structured perovskite solar cells fabricated by two-step deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhibo; Wang, Wenli; Shen, Heping; Zhang, Ye; Luo, Qiang; Yin, Xuewen; Dai, Xuezeng; Li, Jianbao; Lin, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Although the two-step deposition (TSD) method is widely adopted for the high performance perovskite solar cells (PSCs), the CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite crystal growth mechanism during the TSD process and the photo-generated charge recombination dynamics in the mesoporous-TiO2 (mp-TiO2)/CH3NH3PbI3/hole transporting material (HTM) system remains unexploited. Herein, we modified the concentration of PbI2 (C(PbI2)) solution to control the perovskite crystal properties, and observed an abnormal CH3NH3PbI3 grain growth phenomenon atop mesoporous TiO2 film. To illustrate this abnormal grain growth mechanism, we propose that a grain ripening process is taking place during the transformation from PbI2 to CH3NH3PbI3, and discuss the PbI2 nuclei morphology, perovskite grain growing stage, as well as Pb:I atomic ratio difference among CH3NH3PbI3 grains with different morphology. These C(PbI2)-dependent perovskite morphologies resulted in varied charge carrier transfer properties throughout the mp-TiO2/CH3NH3PbI3/HTM hybrid, as illustrated by photoluminescence measurement. Furthermore, the effect of CH3NH3PbI3 morphology on light absorption and interfacial properties is investigated and correlated with the photovoltaic performance of PSCs.

  16. Supertoughened Biobased Poly(lactic acid)-Epoxidized Natural Rubber Thermoplastic Vulcanizates: Fabrication, Co-continuous Phase Structure, Interfacial in Situ Compatibilization, and Toughening Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youhong; Chen, Kunling; Xu, Chuanhui; Chen, Yukun

    2015-09-10

    In the presence of dicumyl peroxide (DCP), biobased thermoplastic vulcanizates (TPVs) composed of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and epoxidized natural rubber (ENR) were prepared through dynamic vulcanization. Interfacial in situ compatibilization between PLA and ENR phases was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). A novel "sea-sea" co-continuous phase in the PLA/ENR TPVs was observed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differed from the typical "sea-island" morphology that cross-linked rubber particles dispersed in plastic matrix. A sharp, brittle-ductile transition occurred with 40 wt % of ENR, showing a significantly improved impact strength of 47 kJ/m(2), nearly 15 times that of the neat PLA and 2.6 times that of the simple blend with the same PLA/ENR ratio. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results suggested that a certain amount of DCP was consumed in the PLA phase, causing a slight cross-linking or branching of PLA molecules. the effects of various DCP contents on the impact property were investigated. The toughening mechanism under impact testing was researched, and the influence factors for toughening were discussed.

  17. Interfacial electronic structure and charge transfer of hybrid graphene quantum dot and graphitic carbon nitride nanocomposites: insights into high efficiency for photocatalytic solar water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zuju; Sa, Rongjian; Li, Qiaohong; Wu, Kechen

    2016-01-14

    New metal-free carbon nanodot/carbon nitride (C3N4) nanocomposites have shown to exhibit high efficiency for photocatalytic solar water splitting. (J. Liu, et al., Science, 2015, 347, 970) However, the mechanism underlying the ultrahigh performance of these nanocomposites and consequently the possibilities for further improvements are not at present clear. In this work, we performed hybrid functional calculations and included long-range dispersion corrections to accurately characterize the interfacial electron coupling of the graphene quantum dot-graphitic carbon nitride composites (Gdot/g-C3N4). The results revealed that the band gap of Gdot/g-C3N4 could be engineered by changing the lateral size of Gdots. In particular, the C24H12/g-C3N4 composites present an ideal band gap of 1.92 eV to harvest a large part of solar light. More interestingly, a type-II heterojunction is formed at the interface of the Gdot/g-C3N4 composites, a desirable feature for enhanced photocatalytic activity. The charge redistribution at the interface leads to strong electron depletion above the Gdot sheet and electron accumulation below the g-C3N4 monolayer, potentially facilitating the separation of H2O oxidation and reduction reactions. Furthermore, we suggested that the photocatalytic performance of the Gdot/g-C3N4 nanocomposites can be further improved by decreasing the thickness of Gdots and tuning the size of Gdots.

  18. Modeling Hydrates and the Gas Hydrate Markup Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Wang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates, as an important potential fuels, flow assurance hazards, and possible factors initiating the submarine geo-hazard and global climate change, have attracted the interest of scientists all over the world. After two centuries of hydrate research, a great amount of scientific data on gas hydrates has been accumulated. Therefore the means to manage, share, and exchange these data have become an urgent task. At present, metadata (Markup Language is recognized as one of the most efficient ways to facilitate data management, storage, integration, exchange, discovery and retrieval. Therefore the CODATA Gas Hydrate Data Task Group proposed and specified Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML as an extensible conceptual metadata model to characterize the features of data on gas hydrate. This article introduces the details of modeling portion of GHML.

  19. Properties of Hydrated Alkali Metals Aimed at the Ion Channel Selectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Hai-Long; LIU Yu-Zhi; ZHANG Su-Hua; ZHAN Yong; ZHANG Hai-Lin

    2008-01-01

    The hydration structure properties of different alkali metal ions with eight water molecules and potassium ions with different numbers of water molecules are studied using the mixed density functional theory, B3LYP, with 6-311G basis set. The hydration structures are obtained from structure optimization and the optimum numbers of water molecules in the innermost hydration shell for the alkali metal ions are found. Some useful information about the ion channel selectivity is presented.

  20. Drilling Gas Hydrates on hydrate Ridge, Oregon continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehu, A. M.; Bohrmann, G.; Leg 204 Science Party

    2002-12-01

    During Leg 204, we cored and logged 9 sites on the Oregon continental margin to determine the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates in an accretionary ridge and adjacent slope basin, investigate the mechanisms that transport methane and other gases into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and obtain constraints on physical properties of hydrates in situ. A 3D seismic survey conducted in 2000 provided images of potential subsurface fluid conduits and indicated the position of the GHSZ throughout the survey region. After coring the first site, we acquired Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) data at all but one site to provide an overview of downhole physical properties. The LWD data confirmed the general position of key seismic stratigraphic horizons and yielded an initial estimate of hydrate concentration through the proxy of in situ electrical resistivity. These records proved to be of great value in planning subsequent coring. The second new hydrate proxy to be tested was infrared thermal imaging of cores on the catwalk as rapidly as possible after retrieval. The thermal images were used to identify hydrate samples and to estimate the distribution and texture of hydrate within the cores. Geochemical analyses of interstitial waters and of headspace and void gases provide additional information on the distribution and concentration of hydrate within the stability zone, the origin and pathway of fluids into and through the GHSZ, and the rates at which gas hydrate is forming. Bio- and lithostratigraphic description of cores, measurement of physical properties, and in situ pressure core sampling and thermal measurements complement the data set, providing ground-truth tests of inferred physical and sedimentological properties. Among the most interesting preliminary results are: 1) that gas hydrates are distributed through a broad depth range within the GHSZ and that different physical and chemical proxies for hydrate distribution and concentration give generally

  1. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  2. A statistical mechanical description of biomolecular hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    We present an efficient and accurate theoretical description of the structural hydration of biological macromolecules. The hydration of molecules of almost arbitrary size (tRNA, antibody-antigen complexes, photosynthetic reaction centre) can be studied in solution and in the crystal environment. The biomolecular structure obtained from x-ray crystallography, NMR, or modeling is required as input information. The structural arrangement of water molecules near a biomolecular surface is represented by the local water density analogous to the corresponding electron density in an x-ray diffraction experiment. The water-density distribution is approximated in terms of two- and three-particle correlation functions of solute atoms with water using a potentials-of-mean-force expansion.

  3. Hydration of protein–RNA recognition sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Amita; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the role of water molecules in 89 protein–RNA complexes taken from the Protein Data Bank. Those with tRNA and single-stranded RNA are less hydrated than with duplex or ribosomal proteins. Protein–RNA interfaces are hydrated less than protein–DNA interfaces, but more than protein–protein interfaces. Majority of the waters at protein–RNA interfaces makes multiple H-bonds; however, a fraction do not make any. Those making H-bonds have preferences for the polar groups of RNA than its partner protein. The spatial distribution of waters makes interfaces with ribosomal proteins and single-stranded RNA relatively ‘dry’ than interfaces with tRNA and duplex RNA. In contrast to protein–DNA interfaces, mainly due to the presence of the 2′OH, the ribose in protein–RNA interfaces is hydrated more than the phosphate or the bases. The minor groove in protein–RNA interfaces is hydrated more than the major groove, while in protein–DNA interfaces it is reverse. The strands make the highest number of water-mediated H-bonds per unit interface area followed by the helices and the non-regular structures. The preserved waters at protein–RNA interfaces make higher number of H-bonds than the other waters. Preserved waters contribute toward the affinity in protein–RNA recognition and should be carefully treated while engineering protein–RNA interfaces. PMID:25114050

  4. Hydration dynamics near a model protein surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-09-01

    The evolution of water dynamics from dilute to very high concentration solutions of a prototypical hydrophobic amino acid with its polar backbone, N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA), is studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation for both the completely deuterated and completely hydrogenated leucine monomer. We observe several unexpected features in the dynamics of these biological solutions under ambient conditions. The NALMA dynamics shows evidence of de Gennes narrowing, an indication of coherent long timescale structural relaxation dynamics. The translational water dynamics are analyzed in a first approximation with a jump diffusion model. At the highest solute concentrations, the hydration water dynamics is significantly suppressed and characterized by a long residential time and a slow diffusion coefficient. The analysis of the more dilute concentration solutions takes into account the results of the 2.0M solution as a model of the first hydration shell. Subtracting the first hydration layer based on the 2.0M spectra, the translational diffusion dynamics is still suppressed, although the rotational relaxation time and residential time are converged to bulk-water values. Molecular dynamics analysis shows spatially heterogeneous dynamics at high concentration that becomes homogeneous at more dilute concentrations. We discuss the hydration dynamics results of this model protein system in the context of glassy systems, protein function, and protein-protein interfaces.

  5. A DFT-based comparative equilibrium study of thermal dehydration and hydrolysis of CaCl₂ hydrates and MgCl₂ hydrates for seasonal heat storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Amar Deep; Nedea, Silvia; Zondag, Herbert; Rindt, Camilo; Smeulders, David

    2016-04-21

    Salt hydrates store solar energy in chemical form via a reversible dehydration-hydration reaction. However, as a side reaction to dehydration, hydrolysis (HCl formation) may occur in chloride based salt hydrates (specially in MgCl2 hydrates), affecting the durability of the storage system. The mixture of CaCl2 and MgCl2 hydrates has been shown experimentally to have exceptional cycle stability and improved kinetics. However, the optimal operating conditions for the mixture are unknown. To understand the appropriate balance between dehydration and hydrolysis kinetics in the mixtures, it is essential to gain in-depth insight into the mixture components. We present a GGA-DFT level study to investigate the various gaseous structures of CaCl2 hydrates and to understand the relative stability of their conformers. The hydration strength and relative stability of conformers are dominated by electrostatic interactions. A wide network of intramolecular homonuclear and heteronuclear hydrogen bonds is observed in CaCl2 hydrates. Equilibrium product concentrations are obtained during dehydration and hydrolysis reactions under various temperature and pressure conditions. The trend of the dehydration curve with temperature in CaCl2 hydrates is similar to the experiments. Comparing these results to those of MgCl2 hydrates, we find that CaCl2 hydrates are more resistant towards hydrolysis in the temperature range of 273-800 K. Specifically, the present study reveals that the onset temperatures of HCl formation, a crucial design parameter for MgCl2 hydrates, are lower than for CaCl2 hydrates except for the mono-hydrate.

  6. Basin-Wide Temperature Constraints On Gas Hydrate Stability In The Gulf Of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Reagan, M. T.; Guinasso, N. L.; Garcia-Pineda, O. G.

    2012-12-01

    Gas hydrate deposits commonly occur at the seafloor-water interface on marine margins. They are especially prevalent in the Gulf of Mexico where they are associated with natural oil seeps. The stability of these deposits is potentially challenged by fluctuations in bottom water temperature, on an annual time-scale, and under the long-term influence of climate change. We mapped the locations of natural oil seeps where shallow gas hydrate deposits are known to occur across the entire Gulf of Mexico basin based on a comprehensive review of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data (~200 images). We prepared a bottom water temperature map based on the archive of CTD casts from the Gulf (~6000 records). Comparing the distribution of gas hydrate deposits with predicted bottom water temperature, we find that a broad area of the upper slope lies above the theoretical stability horizon for structure 1 gas hydrate, while all sites where gas hydrate deposits occur are within the stability horizon for structure 2 gas hydrate. This is consistent with analytical results that structure 2 gas hydrates predominate on the upper slope (Klapp et al., 2010), where bottom water temperatures fluctuate over a 7 to 10 C range (approx. 600 m depth), while pure structure 1 hydrates are found at greater depths (approx. 3000 m). Where higher hydrocarbon gases are available, formation of structure 2 gas hydrate should significantly increase the resistance of shallow gas hydrate deposits to destabilizing effects variable or increasing bottom water temperature. Klapp, S.A., Bohrmann, G., Kuhs, W.F., Murshed, M.M., Pape, T., Klein, H., Techmer, K.S., Heeschen, K.U., and Abegg, F., 2010, Microstructures of structure I and II gas hydrates from the Gulf of Mexico: Marine and Petroleum Geology, v. 27, p. 116-125.Bottom temperature and pressure for Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate outcrops and stability horizons for sI and sII hydrate.

  7. Mechanics of finite cracks in dissimilar anisotropic elastic media considering interfacial elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Pierre-Alexandre; Dingreville, Rémi

    2017-02-01

    Interfacial crack fields and singularities in bimaterial interfaces (i.e., grain boundaries or dissimilar materials interfaces) are considered through a general formulation for two-dimensional (2-D) anisotropic elasticity while accounting for the interfacial structure by means of an interfacial elasticity paradigm. The interfacial elasticity formulation introduces boundary conditions that are effectively equivalent to those for a weakly bounded interface. This formalism considers the 2-D crack-tip elastic fields using complex variable techniques. While the consideration of the interfacial elasticity does not affect the order of the singularity, it modifies the oscillatory effects associated with problems involving interface cracks. Constructive or destructive "interferences" are directly affected by the interface structure and its elastic response. This general formulation provides an insight on the physical significance and the obvious coupling between the interface structure and the associated mechanical fields in the vicinity of the crack tip.

  8. Hydrated Electron Transfer to Nucleobases in Aqueous Solutions Revealed by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Mei; Fu, Aiyun; Yang, Hongfang; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-08-03

    We present an ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation study into the transfer dynamics of an excess electron from its cavity-shaped hydrated electron state to a hydrated nucleobase (NB)-bound state. In contrast to the traditional view that electron localization at NBs (G/A/C/T), which is the first step for electron-induced DNA damage, is related only to dry or prehydrated electrons, and a fully hydrated electron no longer transfers to NBs, our AIMD simulations indicate that a fully hydrated electron can still transfer to NBs. We monitored the transfer dynamics of fully hydrated electrons towards hydrated NBs in aqueous solutions by using AIMD simulations and found that due to solution-structure fluctuation and attraction of NBs, a fully hydrated electron can transfer to a NB gradually over time. Concurrently, the hydrated electron cavity gradually reorganizes, distorts, and even breaks. The transfer could be completed in about 120-200 fs in four aqueous NB solutions, depending on the electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs and the structural fluctuation of the solution. The transferring electron resides in the π*-type lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the NB, which leads to a hydrated NB anion. Clearly, the observed transfer of hydrated electrons can be attributed to the strong electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs over the hydrated electron cavity, which is the driving force, and the transfer dynamics is structure-fluctuation controlled. This work provides new insights into the evolution dynamics of hydrated electrons and provides some helpful information for understanding the DNA-damage mechanism in solution. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. 基于水泥水化模拟的水泥石毛细孔结构分析%Cement Hydration Simulation Based Analysis of Capillary Pore Structure in Cement Paste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴芬; 郑建军; 周欣竹

    2015-01-01

    通过水泥水化模拟分析了水泥石毛细孔结构。基于水化动力学原理,模拟水泥水化全过程,将模拟所得的水化度与试验结果比较,验证了模拟方法的有效性。提出了水泥石毛细孔隙率和内表面积的数值方法,数值结果表明,孔隙率随着时间不断减小,内表面积先随着时间不断增大,到达峰值后随着时间逐渐减小,水灰比越小,出现峰值的时间越短。水化28 d 时,水灰比为0.3的水泥石毛细孔隙率和内表面积分别比水灰比为0.5的水泥石毛细孔隙率和内表面积小61%和11%。%The capillary pore structure in cement paste is analyzed through cement hydration simulation.Based on the principles of hydration kinetics,the whole process of cement hydration is simulated.The validity of the simulation method is verified by comparing the simulated degree of hydration with experimental results.A numerical method is presented for the porosity and internal surface area of capillary pores in cement paste.Numerical results show the cap-illary porosity decreases with time.The internal surface area of capillary pores first increases continuously with time and then decreases gradually with time after the peak value reached.The smaller the water/cement ratio is,the shorter the time corresponding to the peak value is.At the age of 28 days,the porosity and internal surface area of capillary pores in cement paste with a water/cement ratio of 0.3 is smaller than those with a water/cement ratio of 0.5 by 61%and 1 1%,respectively.

  10. The Hydrated Electron -- Jekyll And Hyde In A Test Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, G. W.; Hameka, H. F.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental evidence pertaining to the structure of the hydrated electron is reviewed. In agreement with recent picosecond optoelectronic data, it is concluded that at low or moderate temperatures the hydrated electron is not an electron at all! Rather, it is very likely a hydrated semi-ionic pair (OH...H30)(aq), having the chemical properties of either OH-(aq) or H(aq). However, under certain conditions, where the hydrogen-bond structure of the solvent is weak, the hydrated electron may delocalize somewhat into the surrounding water medium.to become "its old self", behaving more like an electron in a cavity. This fragmented personality of one of chemistry's most celebrated fundamental particles is further substantiated by ab initio quantum mechanical calculations.

  11. Interaction Study of Guest with Host in Clathrate Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Wang; Shunle Dong

    2007-01-01

    Lattice dynamical simulations of noble gas hydrate structures I and II have been performed. Potential energies were investigated to study the influence of guest species on the stability of the hydrate structure. Results show that when the diameter of inclusion molecules is between 3 A and 4.2 A, such as Ar and Kr, the critical role of the 512 cage in the stabilization of hydrates becomes effective. For Xe hydrates SI and SII, with the help of lattice dynamical calculations, the modes attributions are identified directly. We proposed the resonant effect of the fingerprint frequency at about 7 meV and 10 meV which arise from the coupling of Xe molecules in the 512 cage with the host lattice.

  12. Geophysical Indicators of Gas Hydrate in the Northern Continental Margin, South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujuan Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas hydrate drilling results show that gas hydrate has a close relationship with strong bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs identified from seismic data in the Baiyun sag, South China Sea. The BSRs observed on seismic profiles at the crests of submarine canyons indicate the likely existence of gas hydrate. We calculate the acoustic impedance using constrained sparse spike inversion (CSSI, the interval velocity, and the seismic reflection characteristics such as reflection strength, instantaneous frequency, blanking, and enhanced reflection to demonstrate the presence of gas hydrate. Higher acoustic impedance and P-wave velocity were identified above the BSR. A remarkable low impedance, low frequency, and acoustic blanking indicated the presence of gas below gas hydrate stability zone. The occurrence of gas hydrate at the crests of canyons suggests that the abundance of gas hydrate in Baiyun sag may be due to the migrating submarine canyons providing the structural reliefs and the topographic ridges.

  13. Asymptotic Modelling of Crystallisation in Two Layers Systems. Application to Methane Hydrate Formation in Batch Reactor.

    OpenAIRE

    Cournil, Michel; Herri, Jean-Michel

    2002-01-01

    6 pages; This paper proposes to re-visit the problem of gas-liquid crystallization in the framework of a two-layer model and with the help of data coming from experiments on methane hydrate crystallization in a semi-batch reactor. Preliminary quantitative discussion of the order of magnitude of different effects makes possible realistic simplifications in the theoretical models. In particular, the role of the interfacial film is clearly defined. As previous authors did, we use a formulation i...

  14. MORPHOLOGY OF METHANE HYDRATE HOST SEDIMENTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JONES,K.W.; FENG,H.; TOMOV,S.; WINTER,W.J.; EATON,M.; MAHAJAN,D.

    2004-12-01

    Results from simulated experiments in several laboratories show that host sediments influence hydrate formation in accord with known heterogeneity of host sediments at sites of gas hydrate occurrence (1). For example, in Mackenzie Delta, NWT Canada (Mallik 2L-38 well), coarser-grained units (pore-filling model) are found whereas in the Gulf of Mexico, the found hydrate samples do not appear to be lithologically controlled. We have initiated a systematic study of sediments, initially focusing on samples from various depths at a specific site, to establish a correlation with hydrate occurrence (or variations thereof) to establish differences in their microstructure, porosity, and other associated properties. The synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) set-up at the X-27A tomography beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory was used as a tool to study sediments from Blake Ridge at three sub bottom depths of 0.2, 50, and 667 meters. Results from the tomographic analysis of the deepest sample (667 m) are presented here to illustrate how tomography can be used to obtain new insights into the structures of methane hydrate host sediments. The investigation shows the internal grain/pore space resolution in the microstructure and a 3-D visualization of the connecting pathways obtained following data segmentation into pore space and grains within the sediment sample. The analysis gives the sample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity, as well. An earlier report on the experimental program has been given by Mahajan et al. (2).

  15. Hydration and physical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Bob

    2007-10-01

    There is a rich scientific literature regarding hydration status and physical function that began in the late 1800s, although the relationship was likely apparent centuries before that. A decrease in body water from normal levels (often referred to as dehydration or hypohydration) provokes changes in cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, metabolic, and central nervous function that become increasingly greater as dehydration worsens. Similarly, performance impairment often reported with modest dehydration (e.g., -2% body mass) is also exacerbated by greater fluid loss. Dehydration during physical activity in the heat provokes greater performance decrements than similar activity in cooler conditions, a difference thought to be due, at least in part, to greater cardiovascular and thermoregulatory strain associated with heat exposure. There is little doubt that performance during prolonged, continuous exercise in the heat is impaired by levels of dehydration >or= -2% body mass, and there is some evidence that lower levels of dehydration can also impair performance even during relatively short-duration, intermittent exercise. Although additional research is needed to more fully understand low-level dehydration's effects on physical performance, one can generalize that when performance is at stake, it is better to be well-hydrated than dehydrated. This generalization holds true in the occupational, military, and sports settings.

  16. Some thermodynamical aspects of protein hydration water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallamace, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.mallamace@unime.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Corsaro, Carmelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Mallamace, Domenico [Dipartimento SASTAS, Università di Messina, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Sebastiano [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Cirino [CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Stanley, H. Eugene [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Chen, Sow-Hsin [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    We study by means of nuclear magnetic resonance the self-diffusion of protein hydration water at different hydration levels across a large temperature range that includes the deeply supercooled regime. Starting with a single hydration shell (h = 0.3), we consider different hydrations up to h = 0.65. Our experimental evidence indicates that two phenomena play a significant role in the dynamics of protein hydration water: (i) the measured fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover temperature is unaffected by the hydration level and (ii) the first hydration shell remains liquid at all hydrations, even at the lowest temperature.

  17. Scanning electron microscopy investigations of laboratory-grown gas clathrate hydrates formed from melting ice, and comparison to natural hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Circone, S.; Durham, W.B.

    2004-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate grain texture and pore structure development within various compositions of pure sI and sII gas hydrates synthesized in the laboratory, as well as in natural samples retrieved from marine (Gulf of Mexico) and permafrost (NW Canada) settings. Several samples of methane hydrate were also quenched after various extents of partial reaction for assessment of mid-synthesis textural progression. All laboratory-synthesized hydrates were grown under relatively high-temperature and high-pressure conditions from rounded ice grains with geometrically simple pore shapes, yet all resulting samples displayed extensive recrystallization with complex pore geometry. Growth fronts of mesoporous methane hydrate advancing into dense ice reactant were prevalent in those samples quenched after limited reaction below and at the ice point. As temperatures transgress the ice point, grain surfaces continue to develop a discrete "rind" of hydrate, typically 5 to 30 ??m thick. The cores then commonly melt, with rind microfracturing allowing migration of the melt to adjacent grain boundaries where it also forms hydrate. As the reaction continues under progressively warmer conditions, the hydrate product anneals to form dense and relatively pore-free regions of hydrate grains, in which grain size is typically several tens of micrometers. The prevalence of hollow, spheroidal shells of hydrate, coupled with extensive redistribution of reactant and product phases throughout reaction, implies that a diffusion-controlled shrinking-core model is an inappropriate description of sustained hydrate growth from melting ice. Completion of reaction at peak synthesis conditions then produces exceptional faceting and euhedral crystal growth along exposed pore walls. Further recrystallization or regrowth can then accompany even short-term exposure of synthetic hydrates to natural ocean-floor conditions, such that the final textures may closely mimic

  18. Interfacial behavior of polymer electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, John; Kerr, John B.; Han, Yong Bong; Liu, Gao; Reeder, Craig; Xie, Jiangbing; Sun, Xiaoguang

    2003-06-03

    Evidence is presented concerning the effect of surfaces on the segmental motion of PEO-based polymer electrolytes in lithium batteries. For dry systems with no moisture the effect of surfaces of nano-particle fillers is to inhibit the segmental motion and to reduce the lithium ion transport. These effects also occur at the surfaces in composite electrodes that contain considerable quantities of carbon black nano-particles for electronic connection. The problem of reduced polymer mobility is compounded by the generation of salt concentration gradients within the composite electrode. Highly concentrated polymer electrolytes have reduced transport properties due to the increased ionic cross-linking. Combined with the interfacial interactions this leads to the generation of low mobility electrolyte layers within the electrode and to loss of capacity and power capability. It is shown that even with planar lithium metal electrodes the concentration gradients can significantly impact the interfacial impedance. The interfacial impedance of lithium/PEO-LiTFSI cells varies depending upon the time elapsed since current was turned off after polarization. The behavior is consistent with relaxation of the salt concentration gradients and indicates that a portion of the interfacial impedance usually attributed to the SEI layer is due to concentrated salt solutions next to the electrode surfaces that are very resistive. These resistive layers may undergo actual phase changes in a non-uniform manner and the possible role of the reduced mobility polymer layers in dendrite initiation and growth is also explored. It is concluded that PEO and ethylene oxide-based polymers are less than ideal with respect to this interfacial behavior.

  19. Effect of interfacial coupling on rectification in organic spin rectifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Gui-Chao; Zuo, Meng-Ying; Li, Ying; Zhang, Zhao; Ren, Jun-Feng; Wang, Chuan-Kui

    2015-07-01

    The effect of interfacial coupling on rectification in an organic co-oligomer spin diode is investigated theoretically by considering spin-independent and spin-resolved couplings respectively. In the case of spin-independent coupling, an optimal interfacial coupling strength with a significant enhanced rectification ratio is found, whose value depends on the structural asymmetry of the molecule. In the case of spin-resolved coupling, we found that only the variation of the interfacial coupling with specific spin is effective to modulate the rectification, which is due to the spin-filtering property of the central asymmetric magnetic molecule. A transition of the spin-current rectification between parallel spin-current rectification and antiparallel spin-current rectification may be observed with the variation of the spin-resolved interfacial coupling. The interfacial effect on rectification is further analyzed from the spin-dependent transmission spectrum at different biases. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 1374195), the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. ZR2014AM017), and the Excellent Young Scholars Research Fund of Shandong Normal University, China.

  20. Molecular modeling of the dissociation of methane hydrate in contact with a silica surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherzadeh, S Alireza; Englezos, Peter; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A

    2012-03-15

    We use constant energy, constant volume (NVE) molecular dynamics simulations to study the dissociation of the fully occupied structure I methane hydrate in a confined geometry between two hydroxylated silica surfaces between 36 and 41 Å apart, at initial temperatures of 283, 293, and 303 K. Simulations of the two-phase hydrate/water system are performed in the presence of silica, with and without a 3 Å thick buffering water layer between the hydrate phase and silica surfaces. Faster decomposition is observed in the presence of silica, where the hydrate phase is prone to decomposition from four surfaces, as compared to only two sides in the case of the hydrate/water simulations. The existence of the water layer between the hydrate phase and the silica surface stabilizes the hydrate phase relative to the case where the hydrate is in direct contact with silica. Hydrates bound between the silica surfaces dissociate layer-by-layer in a shrinking core manner with a curved decomposition front which extends over a 5-8 Å thickness. Labeling water molecules shows that there is exchange of water molecules between the surrounding liquid and intact cages in the methane hydrate phase. In all cases, decomposition of the methane hydrate phase led to the formation of methane nanobubbles in the liquid water phase.

  1. Flow assurance intervention, hydrates remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Christopher S. [Oceaneering International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the issues of removing hydrates in sub sea flow lines and associated equipment with an Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) of opportunity and a multi-service-vessel (MSV). The paper is split into three topics: the equipment used with the ROV, assessing the interface points and handling fluids produced from drawing down the pressure. Each section is explained thoroughly and backed up with real world experience. The equipment section details information from actual jobs performed and why the particular components were utilized. The system is generally contained in an ROV mounted skid. Pumps are utilized to draw down the pressure inside the hydrated section of equipment, removing one of the three necessary components for hydrates formation. Once the section is pumped down, several options exist for handling the fluids pumped out of the system: pumping to surface, re-injection into the well, or injection into an operating flow line. This method of hydrates remediation is both economical and timely. Hydrate blockages form in low temperatures and high pressures. Reducing the pressure or increasing the temperature so the conditions lie to the right of the hydrate dissociation curve will slowly decompose the blockage. Depressurization and the use of MEG or methanol will give favorable conditions to remove the hydrate plug. Oceaneering has the capabilities to remove hydrates using the FRS in conjunction with an installation vessel to dispose of the gas and fluid removed from the flow line. Hydrate remediation techniques should be implemented into the initial design to reduce costs later. The cost of stopped production combined with the day rate for equipment needed for hydrate removal outweighs the costs if no technique is utilized. (author)

  2. Crystal structure of 4-(3-carb-oxy-pro-pan-amido)-2-hy-droxy-benzoic acid mono-hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Ahmed, Muhammad Naeem; Butt, Arshad Farooq; Shad, Hazoor Ahmad

    2014-12-01

    In the title hydrate, C11H11NO6·H2O, the organic mol-ecule is approximately planar (r.m.s. deviation for the non-H atoms = 0.129 Å) and an intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond closes an S(6) ring. In the crystal, the benzoic acid group participates in an O-H⋯O hydrogen bond to the water mol-ecule and accepts a similar bond from another water mol-ecule. The other -CO2H group forms a carb-oxy-lic acid inversion dimer, thereby forming an R 2 (2)(8) loop. These bonds, along with N-H⋯O and C-H⋯O inter-actions, generate a three-dimensional network.

  3. Quantitative morphological characterization of bicontinuous Pickering emulsions via interfacial curvatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Matthew; Stratford, Kevin; Thijssen, Job H. J.

    Bicontinuous Pickering emulsions (bijels) are a physically interesting class of soft materials with many potential applications including catalysis, microfluidics and tissue engineering. They are created by arresting the spinodal decomposition of a partially-miscible liquid with a (jammed) layer of interfacial colloids. Porosity $L$ (average interfacial separation) of the bijel is controlled by varying the radius ($r$) and volume fraction ($\\phi$) of the colloids ($L \\propto r/\\phi$). However, to optimize the bijel structure with respect to other parameters, e.g. quench rate, characterizing by $L$ alone is insufficient. Hence, we have used confocal microscopy and X-ray CT to characterize a range of bijels in terms of local and area-averaged interfacial curvatures. In addition, the curvatures of bijels have been monitored as a function of time, which has revealed an intriguing evolution up to 60 minutes after bijel formation, contrary to previous understanding.

  4. Interfacial electronic effects control the reaction selectivity of platinum catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangxu; Xu, Chaofa; Huang, Xiaoqing; Ye, Jinyu; Gu, Lin; Li, Gang; Tang, Zichao; Wu, Binghui; Yang, Huayan; Zhao, Zipeng; Zhou, Zhiyou; Fu, Gang; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-05-01

    Tuning the electronic structure of heterogeneous metal catalysts has emerged as an effective strategy to optimize their catalytic activities. By preparing ethylenediamine-coated ultrathin platinum nanowires as a model catalyst, here we demonstrate an interfacial electronic effect induced by simple organic modifications to control the selectivity of metal nanocatalysts during catalytic hydrogenation. This we apply to produce thermodynamically unfavourable but industrially important compounds, with ultrathin platinum nanowires exhibiting an unexpectedly high selectivity for the production of N-hydroxylanilines, through the partial hydrogenation of nitroaromatics. Mechanistic studies reveal that the electron donation from ethylenediamine makes the surface of platinum nanowires highly electron rich. During catalysis, such an interfacial electronic effect makes the catalytic surface favour the adsorption of electron-deficient reactants over electron-rich substrates (that is, N-hydroxylanilines), thus preventing full hydrogenation. More importantly, this interfacial electronic effect, achieved through simple organic modifications, may now be used for the optimization of commercial platinum catalysts.

  5. Thermal properties and structural characterizations of new types of phase change material: Anhydrous and hydrated palmitic acid/camphene solid dispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tu, E-mail: tulee@cc.ncu.edu.tw; Chiu, Yu Hsiu; Lee, Yun; Lee, Hung Lin

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: • Solid dispersion is implemented on phase change materials. • Water is added as a tertiary component. • Specific heat of solid is increased by partially amorphous camphene. • Microstructures are characterized by LTDSC, PXRD and SAXS. • Thermal properties are linked to microstructures. - Abstract: Two new types of phase change material anhydrous and hydrated palmitic acid/camphene solid dispersions (PA1CA1) are prepared and characterized by low-temperature differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering and temperature–history method. Their microstructures contain nanometer-sized palmitic acid (PA) crystallites with lamellar periodicity dispersed in a partially amorphous plastic crystalline camphene (CA) matrix. The PA phase apparently possesses a relatively high latent heat value inherited from the pristine crystalline PA of 229.7 ± 0.1 kJ kg{sup −1}. The relatively high specific heat of solid, C{sub ps}, for anhydrous PA1CA1 of 2.17 ± 0.06 kJ kg{sup −1} K{sup −1} is originated from the presence of disordered CA matrix. Hydration of PA1CA1 can further increase the C{sub ps} to 2.61 ± 0.01 kJ kg{sup −1} K{sup −1}. The mixing of partially amorphous CA, some PA and the small amount of water may have turned the matrix into more disorder due to their different bonding natures, molecular weights, and various molecular shapes and sizes.

  6. Photon Upconversion Through Tb(3+) -Mediated Interfacial Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Yang, Weifeng; Han, Sanyang; Sun, Qiang; Liu, Xiaogang

    2015-10-28

    A strategy of interfacial energy transfer upconversion is demonstrated through the use of a terbium (Tb(3+) ) dopant as energy donor or energy migrator in core-shell-structured nanocrystals. This mechanistic investigation presents a new pathway for photon upconversion, and, more importantly, contributes to the better control of energy transfer at the nanometer length scale.

  7. Hyper-cross-linked, hybrid membranes via interfacial polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, M.J.T.

    2015-01-01

    Hyper-cross-linked, hybrid membranes consist of covalent networks of alternating organic and inorganic, or biological groups. This thesis reports on the preparation of such hybrid networks via interfacial polymerization. The structure-property relationships of the hybrid networks depend strongly on

  8. Optimization of interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via carbon nanotube sizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hongwei; Sui, Xianhang; Zhao, Zhongbo; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Lei; Deng, Hui; Liu, Ya; Qian, Xiaoming

    2015-08-01

    Repetitious sizing treatment was used to modify the carbon fiber (CF) surface with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for improving interfacial properties of CF/epoxy composites. Interlaminar shear and flexural results showed that mechanical properties of composites were significantly depended on the dispersion state and contents of CNTs in interfacial regions. Increases of 13.45% in interlaminar shear strength and 20.31% in flexural strength were achieved in quintuple sized-CF/epoxy composites, whereas excessive CNTs led to decrease of interfacial performance due to defects induced by agglomerated CNTs. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and force modulation atomic force microscope were used to detect the structure of interfacial phase and results indicated that gradient interfacial structure with various thicknesses was formed due to CNT incorporation. This means that such a simple and efficient method to improve interfacial performance of composites via regulating the fiber-matrix interphase structure was developed and showed great commercial application potential.

  9. Investigation on Gas Storage in Methane Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigao Sun; Rongsheng Ma; Shuanshi Fan; Kaihua Guo; Ruzhu Wang

    2004-01-01

    The effect of additives (anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), nonionic surfactant alkyl polysaccharide glycoside (APG), and liquid hydrocarbon cyclopentane (CP)) on hydrate induction time and formation rate, and storage capacity was studied in this work. Micelle surfactant solutions were found to reduce hydrate induction time, increase methane hydrate formation rate and improve methane storage capacity in hydrates. In the presence of surfactant, hydrate could form quickly in a quiescent system and the energy costs of hydrate formation were reduced. The critical micelle concentrations of SDS and APG water solutions were found to be 300× 10-6 and 500× 10-6 for methane hydrate formation system respectively. The effect of anionic surfactant (SDS) on methane storage in hydrates is more pronounced compared to a nonionic surfactant (APG). CP also reduced hydrate induction time and improved hydrate formation rate, but could not improve methane storage in hydrates.

  10. The interfacial chemistry of organic materials on commercial glass surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Joy

    The hydrolytic stability of glass is dependent on its composition. Glasses are exposed to water during their processing and in many applications; therefore, their surface or interface with other materials must withstand hydrolytic attack. Multi-component silicate glasses are widely used but have been the least studied. In coatings-based applications, these glasses come in contact with organosilanes and organic molecules where the adsorption may be affected by surface water. For example, the influence of glass composition on the wet strength of a glass/polymer composite material is unclear, but it is presumed to be driven by the hydrolytic stability of the interfacial chemistry. Organosilanes are critical for increasing the performance of composite materials in humid environments but the precise manner by which the improvement occurs has not been verified. The current school of thought is that the application of silane coatings on a multi-component glass surface transforms the chemically heterogeneous surface into a homogenous and hydrolytically stable surface. In this study, multi-component silicate glass surfaces were silanized by both aqueous and non-aqueous methods. The effect of glass composition and surface hydration on silane coverage was quantified by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The monolayer-level adsorption results showed that the low-sodium content glasses had greater coverage than a high-sodium content glass in dry conditions in contrast to an equivalent coverage in wet conditions. The hydrolytically-stable coverage on multi-component silicate glass surfaces by both silanization methods was found to be sub-monolayer. A thin film model in conjunction with XPS and Infrared Spectroscopy was used to probe the interfacial region of a fiberglass insulation material containing a sodium-rich multi-component silicate glass and an acrylate resin binder. Upon the application of the aqueous binder, the leaching of sodium from the glass promoted

  11. Theoretical and computational studies of hydrophobic and hydrophilic hydration: Towards a molecular description of the hydration of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garde, Shekhar

    The unique balance of forces underlying biological processes-such as protein folding, aggregation, molecular recognition, and the formation of biological membranes-owes its origin in large part to the surrounding aqueous medium. A quantitative description of fundamental noncovalent interactions, in particular hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions at molecular- scale separations, requires an accurate description of water structure. Thus, the primary goals of our research are to understand the role of water in mediating interactions between molecules and to incorporate this understanding into molecular theories for calculating water-mediated interactions. We have developed a molecular model of hydrophobic interactions that uses methods of information theory to relate hydrophobic effects to the density fluctuations in liquid water. This model provides a quantitative description of small-molecule hydration thermodynamics, as well as insights into the entropies of unfolding globular proteins. For larger molecular solutes, we relate the inhomogeneous water structure in their vicinity to their hydration thermodynamics. We find that the water structure in the vicinity of nonpolar solutes is only locally sensitive to the molecular details of the solute. Water structures predicted using this observation are used to study the association of two neopentane molecules and the conformational equilibria of n-pentane molecule. We have also studied the hydration of a model molecular ionic solute, a tetramethylammonium ion, over a wide range of charge states of the solute. We find that, although the charge dependence of the ion hydration free energy is quadratic, negative ions are more favorably hydrated compared to positive ions. Moreover, this asymmetry of hydration can be reconciled by considering the differences in water organization surrounding positive and negative ions. We have also developed methods for predicting water structure surrounding molecular ions and relating

  12. In-situ spectroscopic studies and interfacial engineering on FeSe/oxide heterostructures:Insights on the interfacial superconductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭瑞; 徐海超; 封东来

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of high temperature superconductivity in single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 provides a new platform for ex-ploring superconductivity and pursuing higher Tc (superconducting transition temperature) through fabricating artificial heterostructures. In this paper, we review the recent progress in studying and tuning the interfacial superconductivity in single-layer FeSe, through the combined in-situ spectroscopic studies and atomic-scale engineering. By fabricating arti-ficial heterostructures, various interfacial factors were tuned, and the corresponding evolutions of electronic structure and superconducting gap behavior were investigated. These studies enrich the current understanding on the interfacial super-conductivity, and provide clues for further enhancing Tc through interface engineering.

  13. Identification of the nano/micro structure of CeO2(rod) and the essential role of interfacial copper-ceria interaction in CuCe(rod) for selective oxidation of CO in H2-rich streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaolin; Zhou, Renxian

    2017-09-01

    CeO2(rod) has been found to be exposed four {111} planes and two {100} planes with a hexangular cross section, and the growth mechanism follows to the oriented attachment of the cube-like basic grains with a [110] growth direction and the subsequent Ostwald ripening, corresponding to the increasing lateral size and longitudinal size with prolonging the hydrothermal time. Equal amount of copper oxide totally highly distributed on the surface of CeO2(rod) supports with different abundance of oxygen vacancies facilitate to produce the strongly bound Cu-[Ox]-Ce species to different degrees (supported by XPS, H2-TPR and in situ DRIFTs results), which is encouraged by prolongation of hydrothermal time of CeO2(rod) supports. The essential role of interfacial Cu-Ce interaction in CuCe(rod) catalysts for CO-PROX was identified by the enhanced catalytic performance of CuCe(rod)-48h, on account of much stronger Cu-Ce interaction generated in it. Moreover, we proposed a potential structural model of strongly bound Cu-[Ox]-Ce to interpret the synergetic effect of copper and ceria species in CuO/CeO2 catalysts and generalized the possible reaction mechanism for CO-PROX over the CuCe(rod) catalyst.

  14. Quasichemical analysis of the cluster-pair approximation for the thermodynamics of proton hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollard, Travis [Department of Chemistry, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States); Beck, Thomas L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States)

    2014-06-14

    A theoretical analysis of the cluster-pair approximation (CPA) is presented based on the quasichemical theory of solutions. The sought single-ion hydration free energy of the proton includes an interfacial potential contribution by definition. It is shown, however, that the CPA involves an extra-thermodynamic assumption that does not guarantee uniform convergence to a bulk free energy value with increasing cluster size. A numerical test of the CPA is performed using the classical polarizable AMOEBA force field and supporting quantum chemical calculations. The enthalpy and free energy differences are computed for the kosmotropic Na{sup +}/F{sup −} ion pair in water clusters of size n = 5, 25, 105. Additional calculations are performed for the chaotropic Rb{sup +}/I{sup −} ion pair. A small shift in the proton hydration free energy and a larger shift in the hydration enthalpy, relative to the CPA values, are predicted based on the n = 105 simulations. The shifts arise from a combination of sequential hydration and interfacial potential effects. The AMOEBA and quantum chemical results suggest an electrochemical surface potential of water in the range −0.4 to −0.5 V. The physical content of single-ion free energies and implications for ion-water force field development are also discussed.

  15. The role of water in gas hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    When raised to temperatures above the ice melting point, gas hydrates release their gas in well-defined, reproducible events that occur within self-maintained temperature ranges slightly below the ice point. This behavior is observed for structure I (carbon dioxide, methane) and structure II gas hydrates (methane-ethane, and propane), including those formed with either H2O- or D2O-host frameworks, and dissociated at either ambient or elevated pressure conditions. We hypothesize that at temperatures above the H2O (or D2O) melting point: (1) hydrate dissociation produces water + gas instead of ice + gas, (2) the endothermic dissociation reaction lowers the temperature of the sample, causing the water product to freeze, (3) this phase transition buffers the sample temperatures within a narrow temperature range just below the ice point until dissociation goes to completion, and (4) the temperature depression below the pure ice melting point correlates with the average rate of dissociation and arises from solution of the hydrate-forming gas, released by dissociation, in the water phase at elevated concentrations. In addition, for hydrate that is partially dissociated to ice + gas at lower temperatures and then heated to temperatures above the ice point, all remaining hydrate dissociates to gas + liquid water as existing barriers to dissociation disappear. The enhanced dissociation rates at warmer temperatures are probably associated with faster gas transport pathways arising from the formation of water product.

  16. Prediction of protein hydration sites from sequence by modular neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrlich, L.; Reczko, M.; Bohr, Henrik;

    1998-01-01

    The hydration properties of a protein are important determinants of its structure and function. Here, modular neural networks are employed to predict ordered hydration sites using protein sequence information. First, secondary structure and solvent accessibility are predicted from sequence with t...... provide insight into the mutual interdependencies between the location of ordered water sites and the structural and chemical characteristics of the protein residues.......The hydration properties of a protein are important determinants of its structure and function. Here, modular neural networks are employed to predict ordered hydration sites using protein sequence information. First, secondary structure and solvent accessibility are predicted from sequence with two...... structure and solvent accessibility and, using actual values of these properties, redidue hydration can be predicted to 77% accuracy with a Metthews coefficient of 0.43. However, predicted property data with an accuracy of 60-70% result in less than half the improvement in predictive performance observed...

  17. Crystal structures of 1-bromo-3,5-bis(4,4-dimethyl-1,3-oxazolin-2-ylbenzene 0.15-hydrate and 3,5-bis(4,4-dimethyl-1,3-oxazolin-2-yl-1-iodobenzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Stein

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The bromo and iodo derivatives of a meta-bis(1,3-oxazolin-2-yl-substituted benzene, C16H19BrN2O2·0.15H2O (1 and C16H19IN2O2 (2, have been prepared and studied in terms of their molecular and crystal structures. While the former crystallizes as a sub-hydrate, with 0.15 formula units of water and shows an almost all-planar arrangement of the three ring systems, the latter crystallizes solvate-free with the flanking heterocycles twisted considerably with respect to the central arene. Non-covalent contacts include parallel-displaced π–π interactions and (non-classical hydrogen bonding for both (1 and (2, as well as relatively short I...N contacts for (2.

  18. Study of the interfacial interactions in the molybdenite floatation system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hui; GU Guo-hua; FU Jian-gang; CHEN Li; HAO Ye

    2008-01-01

    Interfacial interactions involving Van der Waals force, hydrophobic attractive force and hydration exclusive force were investigated in this paper. The interfacial interactive free energy of a series of interfaces occurring between minerals, water, collectors and bubble was calculated. The results show that a Van der Waals attractive force and a hydrophobic attractive force exist between each mineral and water interface. The hydrophobic attractive force between molybdenite and water is markedly weaker than the hydrophobic attractive force between gangue and water. The hydrophobic attractive force between collector molecules and water is the main driving force that causes the collectors to become dispersed in the pulp. The strong hydrophobic attractive force between molybdenite and the bubble interface is the basic reason for the natural floatability of molybdenite. The Van der Waals force between molybdenite and the collectors is attractive in water solution, but it is not the cause of the main force between them. The main force that results in the collection effect is a hydrophobic attractive force caused by the Lewis acid-base interaction at the molybdenite surface. A floatation experiment shows that the adsorption intensity of the collector on the molybdenite surface is not the crucial factor for molybdenite floatation. Rather, the dispersing capability of the collector in the water phase and its selectivity for the various minerals in the floatation system are more important.

  19. Interfacial Friction and Adhesion of Polymer Brushes

    KAUST Repository

    Landherr, Lucas J. T.

    2011-08-02

    A bead-probe lateral force microscopy (LFM) technique is used to characterize the interfacial friction and adhesion properties of polymer brushes. Our measurements attempt to relate the physical structure and chemical characteristics of the brush to their properties as thin-film, tethered lubricants. Brushes are synthesized at several chain lengths and surface coverages from polymer chains of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), polystyrene (PS), and a poly(propylene glycol)-poly(ethylene glycol) block copolymer (PPG/PEG). At high surface coverage, PDMS brushes manifest friction coefficients (COFs) that are among the lowest recorded for a dry lubricant film (μ ≈ 0.0024) and close to 1 order of magnitude lower than the COF of a bare silicon surface. Brushes synthesized from higher molar mass chains exhibit higher friction forces than those created using lower molar mass polymers. Increased grafting density of chains in the brush significantly reduces the COF by creating a uniform surface of stretched chains with a decreased surface viscosity. Brushes with lower surface tension and interfacial shear stresses manifest the lowest COF. In particular, PDMS chains exhibit COFs lower than PS by a factor of 3.7 and lower than PPG/PEG by a factor of 4.7. A scaling analysis conducted on the surface coverage (δ) in relation to the fraction (ε) of the friction force developing from adhesion predicts a universal relation ε ∼ δ4/3, which is supported by our experimental data. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  20. The missing hydrate AlF3·6H2Odbnd [Al(H2O)6]F3: Ionothermal synthesis, crystal structure and characterization of aluminum fluoride hexahydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangmei; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2016-11-01

    AlF3 is a strong Lewis acid and several hydrates of it are known, namely the monohydrate, the trihydrate (of which two polymorphs have been described) and the nonohydrate, which forms in the abundance of water, as well as a more complex fluoride of composition Al0.82□0.18F2.46(H2O)0.54 whose structure has been related to the ReO3 type. The monohydrate features edge connected [AlF6] octahedra, in the tri- and nonahydrate mixed F/O coordination of aluminum is observed. Here we report on a new aluminium fluoride hydrate, AlF3·6H2O, which could be obtained via ionothermal synthesis in the ionic liquid n-hexyl-pyridinium tetrafluoroborate. The ionic liquid serves in the synthesis of AlF3·6H2O as the reaction partner (fluoride source) and solvent. Overmore it controls the water activity allowing access to the missing AlF3·6H2O. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of AlF3·6H2O shows that it crystallizes in the anti-Li3Bi-type of structure according to F3[Al(H2O)6] (Fm-3m, a = 893.1(2) pm, Z = 4) featuring hexaaqua aluminium(III) cations and isolated fluoride anions. The compound was further characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, TG/DTA, IR analyses.

  1. Prediction of protein hydration sites from sequence by modular neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrlich, L.; Reczko, M.; Bohr, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    The hydration properties of a protein are important determinants of its structure and function. Here, modular neural networks are employed to predict ordered hydration sites using protein sequence information. First, secondary structure and solvent accessibility are predicted from sequence with t...

  2. AR-Glass Fibre-Cement Interfacial Transition Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The microstructure of ITZ (Interfacial Transition Zone) in single glass fibre-cement was investigated by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope), EPXM (Electron Probe X-ray Microanalyzer) and ESEM (Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope). The surface morphology of glass fibres and the hydration products in the vicinity of the interfaces were observed.Chemical element (Zr, Ca and Si) distributions over the ITZ thickness were determined by line-scanning with EPXM.The results show that a low-density transition zone existed in the vicinity of glass fibres. The shape of the fibre-cement ITZ was non-symmetrical and its thickness was variable. In the present study, the width of the zone ranged from 1-5μm.Locally, it came to 10μm.Occasionally, some hydration products with high alkalinity were embedded inside the ITZ, and attached on the glass surface,making the ITZ denser and causing local glass to corrode.The test results are helpful for the further understanding of the GRC degradation.

  3. Interfacial transport processes and rheology

    CERN Document Server

    Brenner, Howard

    1991-01-01

    This textbook is designed to provide the theory, methods of measurement, and principal applications of the expanding field of interfacial hydrodynamics. It is intended to serve the research needs of both academic and industrial scientists, including chemical or mechanical engineers, material and surface scientists, physical chemists, chemical and biophysicists, rheologists, physiochemical hydrodynamicists, and applied mathematicians (especially those with interests in viscous fluid mechanics and continuum mechanics).As a textbook it provides materials for a one- or two-semester graduate-level

  4. Study on molecular controlled mining system of methane hydrate; Methane hydrate no bunshi seigyo mining ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyagawa, M.; Saito, T.; Kobayashi, H.; Karasawa, H.; Kiyono , F.; Nagaoki, R.; Yamamoto, Y.; Komai, T.; Haneda, H.; Takahashi, Y. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan); Nada, H. [Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    Basic studies are conducted for the collection of methane from the methane hydrate that exists at levels deeper than 500m in the sea. The relationship between the hydrate generation mechanism and water cluster structure is examined by use of mass spectronomy. It is found that, among the stable liquid phase clusters, the (H2O)21H{sup +} cluster is the most stable. Stable hydrate clusters are in presence in quantities, and participate in the formation of hydrate crystal nuclei. For the elucidation of the nucleus formation mechanism, a kinetic simulation is conducted of molecules in the cohesion system consisting of water and methane molecules. Water molecules that array near methane molecules at the normal pressure is disarrayed under a higher pressure for rearray into a hydrate structure. Hydrate formation and breakdown in the three-phase equilibrium state of H2O, CH4, and CO2 at a low temperature and high pressure are tested, which discloses that supercooling is required for formation, that it is possible to extract CH4 first for replacement by guest molecule CO2 since CO2 is stabler than CH4 at a lower pressure or higher temperature, and that formation is easier to take place when the grain diameter is larger at the formation point since larger grain diameters result in a higher formation temperature. 3 figs.

  5. Interfacial Effects in Polymer Membranes for Clean Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soles, Christopher

    2013-03-01

    Polymeric membranes are critical components in several emerging clean energy technologies. Examples include proton exchange membranes for hydrogen fuel cells, anion exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cells, flow batteries, and even block copolymer membranes for solid electrolytes/separators in lithium ion and other battery technologies. In all of these examples the function of the membrane is to physically separate two reactive electrodes or reactants, but allow the transport or exchange of specific ions through the membrane between the active electrodes. The flow of the charged ionic species between the electrodes can be used to balance the flow of electrons through an external electrical circuit that connects the electrodes, thereby storing or delivering charge electrochemically. In this presentation I will review the use of polymeric membranes in electrochemical energy storage technologies and discuss the critical issues related to the membranes that hinder these technologies. In particular I will also focus on the role the polymer membrane interface on device performance. At some point the polymer membrane must be interfaced with an active electrode or catalyst and the nature of this interface can significantly impact performance. Simulations of device performance based on bulk membrane transport properties often fail to predict the actual performance and empirical interfacial impedance terms usually added to capture the device performance. In this presentation I will explore the origins of this interfacial impedance in the different types of fuel cell membranes (proton and alkaline) by creating model thin film membranes where all of the membrane can be considered interfacial. We then use these thin films as a surrogate for the interfacial regions of a bulk membrane and then quantify the structure, dynamics, and transport properties of water and ions in the confined interfacial films. Using neutron reflectivity, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and

  6. Hydrates fighting tools; Des outils de lutte contre les hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2003-04-01

    Shell Exploration and Production company (SEPCo) is the operator of the 'Popeye' deep offshore field in the Gulf of Mexico. Thanks to the introduction of a low dosing hydrates inhibitor (LDHI) elaborated by Shell Global Solutions, the company has added a 7.5 Gpc extra volume of gas to its recoverable reserves. This new technology avoids the plugging of pipes by hydrates formation. (J.S.)

  7. SELF-HEALING CAPACITY OF CONCRETE - COMPUTER SIMULATION STUDY OF UNHYDRATED CEMENT STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan He

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Aggregate occupies at least three-quarters of the volume of concrete, so its impact on concrete's properties is large. The aggregate's influence on the non-hydrated part of the matured paste is assessed by concurrent algorithm-based computer simulation system SPACE in this paper. A distinction is made between interfacial zones (ITZs and bulk paste. Containers with rigid boundaries were employed for the production of series of cement pastes. They were subjected to quantitative microstructure analysis. Relevant gradient structures in the ITZ and bulk are presented and discussed. The relevance of this structure information for possible selfhealing of cracks is briefly discussed.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of the interfacial structure of [C(n)mim][PF6] adsorbed on a graphite surface: effects of temperature and alkyl chain length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Q; Sha, M L; Fu, H Y; Wu, G Z

    2011-05-01

    The structures and diffusion behaviors of a series of ionic liquids [C(n)mim][PF(6)] (n = 1, 4, 8 and 12) on a graphite surface have been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulation. It was found that three or four ordering layers of ionic liquids were formed near the graphite surface, and this layering structure was stable over the temperature range investigated. At the liquid/vacuum interface, the ionic liquid with a butyl chain had a monolayer ordering surface, while [C(8)mim][PF(6)] and [C(12)mim][PF(6)] exhibited a bilayer ordering with a polar domain sandwiched between two orientational nonpolar domains. More impressively, the simulated results showed that for the ionic liquids with alkyl chains longer than C(4), the adjacent alkyl chains in the whole film tended to be parallel to each other, with the imidazolium rings packed closely together. This indicated that the ionic liquids have a better regulated short-range structure than was previously expected. It was also found that both in the bottom layer and in the bulk region, the diffusion of the alkyl chains was much faster than that of the polar groups. However, as the alkyl chain length increased, the charge delocalization in the cation and the enhanced van der Waals interaction between the nonpolar groups contributed by reducing this difference in the diffusivity of major groups.

  9. Healing of polymer interfaces: Interfacial dynamics, entanglements, and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Ting; Robbins, Mark O; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S

    2014-07-01

    Self-healing of polymer films often takes place as the molecules diffuse across a damaged region, above their melting temperature. Using molecular dynamics simulations we probe the healing of polymer films and compare the results with those obtained for thermal welding of homopolymer slabs. These two processes differ from each other in their interfacial structure since damage leads to increased polydispersity and more short chains. A polymer sample was cut into two separate films that were then held together in the melt state. The recovery of the damaged film was followed as time elapsed and polymer molecules diffused across the interface. The mass uptake and formation of entanglements, as obtained from primitive path analysis, are extracted and correlated with the interfacial strength obtained from shear simulations. We find that the diffusion across the interface is significantly faster in the damaged film compared to welding because of the presence of short chains. Though interfacial entanglements increase more rapidly for the damaged films, a large fraction of these entanglements are near chain ends. As a result, the interfacial strength of the healing film increases more slowly than for welding. For both healing and welding, the interfacial strength saturates as the bulk entanglement density is recovered across the interface. However, the saturation strength of the damaged film is below the bulk strength for the polymer sample. At saturation, cut chains remain near the healing interface. They are less entangled and as a result they mechanically weaken the interface. Chain stiffness increases the density of entanglements, which increases the strength of the interface. Our results show that a few entanglements across the interface are sufficient to resist interfacial chain pullout and enhance the mechanical strength.

  10. Hydrophobic hydration from small to large lengthscales: Understanding and manipulating the crossover

    OpenAIRE

    Rajamani, Sowmianarayanan; Truskett, Thomas M.; Garde, Shekhar

    2005-01-01

    Small and large hydrophobic solutes exhibit remarkably different hydration thermodynamics. Small solutes are accommodated in water with minor perturbations to water structure, and their hydration is captured accurately by theories that describe density fluctuations in pure water. In contrast, hydration of large solutes is accompanied by dewetting of their surfaces and requires a macroscopic thermodynamic description. A unified theoretical description of these lengthscale dependencies was pres...

  11. Obsidian Hydration: A New Paleothermometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Riciputi, Lee R [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Fayek, Mostafa [ORNL; Elam, J. Michael [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2006-01-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  12. Obsidian hydration: A new paleothermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Riciputi, Lee R.; Cole, David R.; Fayek, Mostafa; Elam, J. Michael

    2006-07-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  13. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  14. Nonequilibrium adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations of methane clathrate hydrate decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, J. A.

    2010-04-01

    Nonequilibrium, constant energy, constant volume (NVE) molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the decomposition of methane clathrate hydrate in contact with water. Under adiabatic conditions, the rate of methane clathrate decomposition is affected by heat and mass transfer arising from the breakup of the clathrate hydrate framework and release of the methane gas at the solid-liquid interface and diffusion of methane through water. We observe that temperature gradients are established between the clathrate and solution phases as a result of the endothermic clathrate decomposition process and this factor must be considered when modeling the decomposition process. Additionally we observe that clathrate decomposition does not occur gradually with breakup of individual cages, but rather in a concerted fashion with rows of structure I cages parallel to the interface decomposing simultaneously. Due to the concerted breakup of layers of the hydrate, large amounts of methane gas are released near the surface which can form bubbles that will greatly affect the rate of mass transfer near the surface of the clathrate phase. The effects of these phenomena on the rate of methane hydrate decomposition are determined and implications on hydrate dissociation in natural methane hydrate reservoirs are discussed.

  15. Pectin as an Extraordinary Natural Kinetic Hydrate Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shurui; Fan, Shuanshi; Fang, Songtian; Lang, Xuemei; Wang, Yanhong; Chen, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Pectin as a novel natural kinetic hydrate inhibitor, expected to be eco-friendly and sufficiently biodegradable, was studied in this paper. The novel crystal growth inhibition (CGI) and standard induction time methods were used to evaluate its effect as hydrate inhibitor. It could successfully inhibit methane hydrate formation at subcooling temperature up to 12.5 °C and dramatically slowed the hydrate crystal growth. The dosage of pectin decreased by 66% and effective time extended 10 times than typical kinetic inhibitor. Besides, its maximum growth rate was no more than 2.0%/h, which was far less than 5.5%/h of growth rate for PVCap at the same dosage. The most prominent feature was that it totally inhibited methane hydrate crystal rapid growth when hydrate crystalline occurred. Moreover, in terms of typical natural inhibitors, the inhibition activity of pectin increased 10.0-fold in induction time and 2.5-fold in subcooling temperature. The extraordinary inhibition activity is closely related to its hydrogen bonding interaction with water molecules and the hydrophilic structure. Finally, the biodegradability and economical efficiency of pectin were also taken into consideration. The results showed the biodegradability improved 75.0% and the cost reduced by more than 73.3% compared to typical commercial kinetic inhibitors.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of the structure and interfacial free energy barriers of mixtures of ionic liquids and divalent salts near a graphene wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-González, Víctor; Docampo-Álvarez, Borja; Méndez-Morales, Trinidad; Cabeza, Oscar; Ivaništšev, Vladislav B; Fedorov, Maxim V; Gallego, Luis J; Varela, Luis M

    2016-12-21

    A molecular dynamics study of mixtures of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIm][BF4]) with magnesium tetrafluoroborate (Mg[BF4]2) confined between two parallel graphene walls is reported. The structure of the system is analyzed by means of ionic density profiles, lateral structure of the first layer close to the graphene surface and angular orientations of imidazolium cations. Free energy profiles for divalent magnesium cations are calculated using two different methods in order to evaluate the height of the potential barriers near the walls, and the results are compared with those of mixtures of the same ionic liquid and a lithium salt (Li[BF4]). Preferential adsorption of magnesium cations is analyzed using a simple model and compared to that of lithium cations, and vibrational densities of states are calculated for the cations close to the walls analyzing the influence of the graphene surface charge. Our results indicate that magnesium cations next to the graphene wall have a roughly similar environment to that in the bulk. Moreover, they face higher potential barriers and are less adsorbed on the charged graphene walls than lithium cations. In other words, magnesium cations have a more stable solvation shell than lithium ones.

  17. Core-shell-structured silica/polyacrylate particles prepared by Pickering emulsion: influence of the nucleation model on particle interfacial organization and emulsion stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jing; Shu, Shi; Wang, Feng; Li, Zhilin; Liu, Jingjun; Song, Ye; Jia, Yi

    2014-01-01

    This work reports a new evidence of the versatility of silica sol as a stabilizer for Pickering emulsions. The organization of silica particles at the oil-water interface is a function of the nucleation model. The present results show that nucleation model, together with monomer hydrophobicity, can be used as a trigger to modify the packing density of silica particles at the oil-water interface: Less hydrophobic methylmethacrylate, more wettable with silica particles, favors the formation of core-shell-structured composite when the composite particles are prepared by miniemulsion polymerization in which monomers are fed in batch (droplet nucleation). By contrast, hydrophobic butylacrylate promotes the encapsulating efficiency of silica when monomers are fed dropwise (homogeneous nucleation). The morphologies of polyacrylate-nano-SiO2 composites prepared from different feed ratio of methylmethacrylate/butylacrylate (with different hydrophobicity) and by different feed processes are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The results from SEM and TEM show that the morphologies of the as-prepared polyacrylate/nano-SiO2 composite can be a core-shell structure or a bare acrylic sphere. The stability of resulting emulsions composed of these composite particles is strongly dependent on the surface coverage of silica particles. The emulsion stability is improved by densely silica-packed composite particles.

  18. A constitutive mechanical model for gas hydrate bearing sediments incorporating inelastic mechanisms

    KAUST Repository

    Sánchez, Marcelo

    2016-11-30

    Gas hydrate bearing sediments (HBS) are natural soils formed in permafrost and sub-marine settings where the temperature and pressure conditions are such that gas hydrates are stable. If these conditions shift from the hydrate stability zone, hydrates dissociate and move from the solid to the gas phase. Hydrate dissociation is accompanied by significant changes in sediment structure and strongly affects its mechanical behavior (e.g., sediment stiffenss, strength and dilatancy). The mechanical behavior of HBS is very complex and its modeling poses great challenges. This paper presents a new geomechanical model for hydrate bearing sediments. The model incorporates the concept of partition stress, plus a number of inelastic mechanisms proposed to capture the complex behavior of this type of soil. This constitutive model is especially well suited to simulate the behavior of HBS upon dissociation. The model was applied and validated against experimental data from triaxial and oedometric tests conducted on manufactured and natural specimens involving different hydrate saturation, hydrate morphology, and confinement conditions. Particular attention was paid to model the HBS behavior during hydrate dissociation under loading. The model performance was highly satisfactory in all the cases studied. It managed to properly capture the main features of HBS mechanical behavior and it also assisted to interpret the behavior of this type of sediment under different loading and hydrate conditions.

  19. Storing natural gas as frozen hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudmundsson, J.S.; Kho