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Sample records for hydrated hafnium tetrachloride

  1. Separation of hafnium from zirconium in their tetrachloride solution in molten alkali metal chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salyulev, A.B.; Kudyakov, V.Ya.; Smirnov, M.V.; Moskalenko, N.I. (AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Ehlektrokhimii)

    1984-08-01

    The coefficient of HfCl/sub 4/ and ZrCl/sub 4/ separation in the process of vapour sublimation from their solutions in molten NaCl, KCl, CsCl, NaCl-KCl and NaCl-CsCl equimolar mixtures is found to vary in the series from approximately 1.10 to approximately 1.22 and practically not to depend on the temperature (in the 600-910 deg) range and concentration (2-25 mol.% ZrCl/sub 4/+HfCl/sub 4/). HfCl/sub 4/ and ZrCl/sub 4/ are shown to form almost perfect solutions with each other, which in their turn form imperfect solutions with molten alkali metal chlorides, with the strength of hafnium complex chloride anions increasing higher than that of zirconium in the series from NaCl to CsCl.

  2. Design of an Extractive Distillation Column for the Environmentally Benign Separation of Zirconium and Hafnium Tetrachloride for Nuclear Power Reactor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Quang Minh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear power with strengthened safety regulations continues to be used as an important resource in the world for managing atmospheric greenhouse gases and associated climate change. This study examined the environmentally benign separation of zirconium tetrachloride (ZrCl4 and hafnium tetrachloride (HfCl4 for nuclear power reactor applications through extractive distillation using a NaCl-KCl molten salt mixture. The vapor–liquid equilibrium behavior of ZrCl4 and HfCl4 over the molten salt system was correlated with Raoult’s law. The molten salt-based extractive distillation column was designed optimally using a rigorous commercial simulator for the feasible separation of ZrCl4 and HfCl4. The molten salt-based extractive distillation approach has many potential advantages for the commercial separation of ZrCl4 and HfCl4 compared to the conventional distillation because of its milder temperatures and pressure conditions, smaller number of required separation trays in the column, and lower energy requirement for separation, while still taking the advantage of environmentally benign feature by distillation. A heat-pump-assisted configuration was also explored to improve the energy efficiency of the extractive distillation process. The proposed enhanced configuration reduced the energy requirement drastically. Extractive distillation can be a promising option competing with the existing extraction-based separation process for zirconium purification for nuclear power reactor applications.

  3. Hafnium extraction from acidic chloride solutions by Cyanex 923

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Ammouri, E.; Distin, P.A. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)

    1996-08-01

    Hafnium extraction from hydrochloric acid/lithium chloride solutions into Cyanex 923 in kerosene has been studied. Variables investigated were hydrochloric acid, total chloride and hafnium concentrations in the aqueous phase, and extractant/modifier (isodecanol) levels in the organic phase. Hafnium is considered to load as the tetrachloride complex forming a disolvate with Cyanex 923. Results are compared with equivalent data for zirconium extraction. 14 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. SEPARATING HAFNIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, B.A.J.; Duncan, J.F.

    1956-08-21

    A dilute aqueous solution of zirconyl chloride which is 1N to 2N in HCl is passed through a column of a cation exchange resin in acid form thereby absorbing both zirconium and associated hafnium impurity in the mesin. The cation exchange material with the absorbate is then eluted with aqueous sulfuric acid of a O.8N to 1.2N strength. The first portion of the eluate contains the zirconium substantially free of hafnium.

  5. Synthesis of organozirconium and -hafnium compounds containing silaneopentyl-type groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vdovin, V.M.; Bespalova, N.B.; Ivaschenko, D.A.; Nikitin, V.S.; Sergeeva, M.B.; Strelenko, Y.A.

    1986-01-10

    This paper proposes a new method for the synthesis of organic compounds of zirconium and hafnium containing the group MCH/sub 2/Si, by reacting Zr or Hf tetrachloride with 1,1,3,3-tetramethyl-1,3-disilacyclobutane (I). Using equimolar amounts of the reactants and a temperature of 20 C, cleavage of the disilacyclobutane ring occurs with the formation of the appropriate organometallic compound 2,2,4,4-tetramethyl-4-chloro-2,4-disilabutylzirconium (or hafnium) trichloride (II). The C 13 chemical shifts of compound (II) in C/sub 6/D/sub 6/ solution relative to (CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/Si are presented.

  6. SEPARATION OF HAFNIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholser, L.B.; Barton, C.J. Sr.; Ramsey, J.W.

    1960-05-31

    The separation of hafnium impurities from zirconium can be accomplished by means of organic solvent extraction. The hafnium-containing zirconium feed material is dissolved in an aqueous chloride solution and the resulting solution is contacted with an organic hexone phase, with at least one of the phases containing thiocyanate. The hafnium is extracted into the organic phase while zirconium remains in the aqueous phase. Further recovery of zirconium is effected by stripping the onganic phase with a hydrochloric acid solution and commingling the resulting strip solution with the aqueous feed solution. Hexone is recovered and recycled by means of scrubbing the onganic phase with a sulfuric acid solution to remove the hafnium, and thiocyanate is recovered and recycled by means of neutralizing the effluent streams to obtain ammonium thiocyanate.

  7. Hafnium germanium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Gyung-Joo; Yun, Hoseop

    2008-01-01

    The title hafnium germanium telluride, HfGeTe4, has been synthesized by the use of a halide flux and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. HfGeTe4 is isostructural with stoichiometric ZrGeTe4 and the Hf site in this compound is also fully occupied. The crystal structure of HfGeTe4 adopts a two-dimensional layered structure, each layer being composed of two unique one-dimensional chains of face-sharing Hf-centered bicapped trigonal prisms and corner-sharing Ge-centered tetra­hedra. These layers stack on top of each other to complete the three-dimensional structure with undulating van der Waals gaps. PMID:21202163

  8. Hafnium germanium telluride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoseop Yun

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The title hafnium germanium telluride, HfGeTe4, has been synthesized by the use of a halide flux and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. HfGeTe4 is isostructural with stoichiometric ZrGeTe4 and the Hf site in this compound is also fully occupied. The crystal structure of HfGeTe4 adopts a two-dimensional layered structure, each layer being composed of two unique one-dimensional chains of face-sharing Hf-centered bicapped trigonal prisms and corner-sharing Ge-centered tetrahedra. These layers stack on top of each other to complete the three-dimensional structure with undulating van der Waals gaps.

  9. Ablation Resistant Zirconium and Hafnium Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Jeffrey (Inventor); White, Michael J. (Inventor); Kaufman, Larry (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    High temperature ablation resistant ceramic composites have been made. These ceramics are composites of zirconium diboride and zirconium carbide with silicon carbide, hafnium diboride and hafnium carbide with silicon carbide and ceramic composites which contain mixed diborides and/or carbides of zirconium and hafnium. along with silicon carbide.

  10. Amphoteric Aqueous Hafnium Cluster Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goberna-Ferrón, Sara; Park, Deok-Hie; Amador, Jenn M; Keszler, Douglas A; Nyman, May

    2016-05-17

    Selective dissolution of hafnium-peroxo-sulfate films in aqueous tetramethylammonium hydroxide enables extreme UV lithographic patterning of sub-10 nm HfO2 structures. Hafnium speciation under these basic conditions (pH>10), however, is unknown, as studies of hafnium aqueous chemistry have been limited to acid. Here, we report synthesis, crystal growth, and structural characterization of the first polynuclear hydroxo hafnium cluster isolated from base, [TMA]6 [Hf6 (μ-O2 )6 (μ-OH)6 (OH)12 ]⋅38 H2 O. The solution behavior of the cluster, including supramolecular assembly via hydrogen bonding is detailed via small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The study opens a new chapter in the aqueous chemistry of hafnium, exemplifying the concept of amphoteric clusters and informing a critical process in single-digit-nm lithography. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Studies on Optical and Electrical Properties of Hafnium Oxide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Venkatachalam; Sagadevan, Suresh; Sudhakar, Rajesh

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the synthesis and physico-chemical properties of hafnium oxide nanoparticles (HfO2 NPs) are analyzed and reported. The synthesis was carried out by the precipitation route by using hafnium tetrachloride (HfCl4) as precursor material with potassium hydroxide (KOH) dissolved in Millipore water. In the precipitation technique, the chemical reaction is comparatively simple, low-cost and non-toxic compared to other synthetic methods. The synthesized HfO2 NPs were characterized by using powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD), ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, Raman analysis, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The monoclinic structure of the HfO2 NPs was resolved utilizing x-ray diffraction (XRD). The optical properties were studied from the UV-Vis absorption spectrum. The optical band gap of the HfO2NPs was observed to be 5.1 eV. The Raman spectrum shows the presence of HfO2 NPs. The HRTEM image showed that the HfO2 NPs were of spherical shape with an average particle size of around 28 nm. The energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) spectrum obviously demonstrated the presence of HfO2 NPs. Analysis and studies on the dielectric properties of the HfO2 NPs such as the dielectric constant, the dielectric loss, and alternating current (AC) conductivity were carried out at varying frequencies and temperatures.

  12. Zirconium and hafnium in meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehmann, W. D.; Chyi, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    The abundances of zirconium and hafnium have been determined in nine stony meteorites by a new, precise neutron-activation technique. The Zr/Hf abundance ratios for the chondrites vary in a rather narrow range, consistent with previously published observations from our group. Replicate analyses of new, carefully selected clean interior samples of the Cl chondrite Orgueil yield mean zirconium and hafnium abundances of 5.2 and 0.10 ppm, respectively. These abundances are lower than we reported earlier for two Cl chondrite samples which we now suspect may have suffered contamination. The new Cl zirconium and hafnium abundances are in closer agreement with predictions based on theories of nucleosynthesis than the earlier data.

  13. Hafnium implanted in iron .2.Isolated Hafnium Nitrogen Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bakker, J.M.G.J.; Pleiter, F; Smulders, P.J M

    1993-01-01

    We have used the perturbed angular correlation technique to study the interaction of interstitially diffusing nitrogen atoms with substitutional hafnium atoms implanted in iron. It was found that after post-implantation of 250 eV nitrogen ions at 450 K, isolated HfVN(x) complexes with x = 1, 2 are

  14. Hafnium radioisotope recovery from irradiated tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Wayne A.; Jamriska, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Hafnium is recovered from irradiated tantalum by: (a) contacting the irradiated tantalum with at least one acid to obtain a solution of dissolved tantalum; (b) combining an aqueous solution of a calcium compound with the solution of dissolved tantalum to obtain a third combined solution; (c) precipitating hafnium, lanthanide, and insoluble calcium complexes from the third combined solution to obtain a first precipitate; (d) contacting the first precipitate of hafnium, lanthanide and calcium complexes with at least one fluoride ion complexing agent to form a fourth solution; (e) selectively adsorbing lanthanides and calcium from the fourth solution by cationic exchange; (f) separating fluoride ion complexing agent product from hafnium in the fourth solution by adding an aqueous solution of ferric chloride to obtain a second precipitate containing the hafnium and iron; (g) dissolving the second precipitate containing the hafnium and iron in acid to obtain an acid solution of hafnium and iron; (h) selectively adsorbing the iron from the acid solution of hafnium and iron by anionic exchange; (i) drying the ion exchanged hafnium solution to obtain hafnium isotopes. Additionally, if needed to remove residue remaining after the product is dried, dissolution in acid followed by cation exchange, then anion exchange, is performed.

  15. Hafnium isotope stratigraphy of ferromanganese crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.-C.; Halliday, A.N.; Hein, J.R.; Burton, K.W.; Christensen, J.N.; Gunther, D.

    1999-01-01

    A Cenozoic record of hafnium isotopic compositions of central Pacific deep water has been obtained from two ferromanganese crusts. The crusts are separated by more than 3000 kilometers but display similar secular variations. Significant fluctuations in hafnium isotopic composition occurred in the Eocene and Oligocene, possibly related to direct advection from the Indian and Atlantic oceans. Hafnium isotopic compositions have remained approximately uniform for the past 20 million years, probably reflecting increased isolation of the central Pacific. The mechanisms responsible for the increase in 87Sr/86Sr in seawater through the Cenozoic apparently had no effect on central Pacific deep-water hafnium.

  16. Silver-hafnium braze alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Jr., John J.; Hosking, F. Michael; Yost, Frederick G.

    2003-12-16

    A binary allow braze composition has been prepared and used in a bonded article of ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal materials. The braze composition comprises greater than approximately 95 wt % silver, greater than approximately 2 wt % hafnium and less than approximately 4.1 wt % hafnium, and less than approximately 0.2 wt % trace elements. The binary braze alloy is used to join a ceramic material to another ceramic material or a ceramic material, such as alumina, quartz, aluminum nitride, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, and mullite, to a metal material, such as iron-based metals, cobalt-based metals, nickel-based metals, molybdenum-based metals, tungsten-based metals, niobium-based metals, and tantalum-based metals. A hermetic bonded article is obtained with a strength greater than 10,000 psi.

  17. Formulation and method for preparing gels comprising hydrous hafnium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jack L; Hunt, Rodney D; Montgomery, Frederick C

    2013-08-06

    Formulations useful for preparing hydrous hafnium oxide gels contain a metal salt including hafnium, an acid, an organic base, and a complexing agent. Methods for preparing gels containing hydrous hafnium oxide include heating a formulation to a temperature sufficient to induce gel formation, where the formulation contains a metal salt including hafnium, an acid, an organic base, and a complexing agent.

  18. Process for separating hafnium and zirconium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, Y.; Van Sandwijk, A.

    2010-01-01

    The invention is directed to a process for separating a mixture comprising hafnium and zirconium. The process of the present invention comprises a step in which a molten metal phase comprising zirconium and hafnium dissolved in a first metal M1 and a second metal M2 is contacted with a molten salt

  19. Process for separating hafnium and zirconium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, Y.; Van Sandwijk, A.

    2010-01-01

    The invention is directed to a process for separating a mixture comprising hafnium and zirconium. The process of the present invention comprises a step in which a molten metal phase comprising zirconium and hafnium dissolved in a first metal M1 and a second metal M2 is contacted with a molten salt p

  20. Thermal Expansion of Hafnium Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1960-01-01

    Since hafnium carbide (HfC) has a melting point of 7029 deg. F, it may have many high-temperature applications. A literature search uncovered very little information about the properties of HfC, and so a program was initiated at the Lewis Research Center to determine some of the physical properties of this material. This note presents the results of the thermal expansion investigation. The thermal-expansion measurements were made with a Gaertner dilatation interferometer calibrated to an accuracy of +/- 1 deg. F. This device indicates expansion by the movement of fringes produced by the cancellation and reinforcement of fixed wave-length light rays which are reflected from the surfaces of two parallel quartz glass disks. The test specimens which separate these disks are three small cones, each approximately 0.20 in. high.

  1. Formation and control of stoichiometric hafnium nitride thin films by direct sputtering of hafnium nitride target

    CERN Document Server

    Gotoh, Y; Ishikawa, J; Liao, M Y

    2003-01-01

    Hafnium nitride thin films were prepared by radio-frequency sputter deposition with a hafnium nitride target. Deposition was performed with various rf powers, argon pressures, and substrate temperatures, in order to investigate the influences of these parameters on the film properties, particularly the nitrogen composition. It was found that stoichiometric hafnium nitride films were formed at an argon gas pressure of less than 2 Pa, irrespective of the other deposition parameters within the range investigated. Maintaining the nitrogen composition almost stoichiometric, orientation, stress, and electrical resistivity of the films could be controlled with deposition parameters. (author)

  2. Investigation of Melting Dynamics of Hafnium Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wei Chun; Lim, Thong Leng; Yoon, Tiem Leong

    2017-03-27

    Melting dynamics of hafnium clusters are investigated using a novel approach based on the idea of the chemical similarity index. Ground state configurations of small hafnium clusters are first derived using Basin-Hopping and Genetic Algorithm in the parallel tempering mode, employing the COMB potential in the energy calculator. These assumed ground state structures are verified by using the Low Lying Structures (LLS) method. The melting process is carried out either by using the direct heating method or prolonged simulated annealing. The melting point is identified by a caloric curve. However, it is found that the global similarity index is much more superior in locating premelting and total melting points of hafnium clusters.

  3. Titanium tetrachloride burns to the eye.

    OpenAIRE

    Chitkara, D K; McNeela, B. J.

    1992-01-01

    We present eight cases of chemical burns of the eyes from titanium tetrachloride, an acidic corrosive liquid. However it causes severe chemical burns which have a protracted course and features more akin to severe alkali burns. Injuries related to titanium tetrachloride should be treated seriously and accordingly appropriate management is suggested.

  4. Detection of carbon tetrachloride associates in isooctane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byakov, V. M.; Lanshina, L. V.; Stepanova, O. P.; Stepanov, S. V.

    2010-07-01

    The cryoscopic and radiospectroscopic data revealed that carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) n agglomerates ( n ≥ 4) could form in cyclohexane and carbon tetrachloride itself. Additional arguments in favor of the formation of similar CCl4 agglomerates in isooctane were presented by analyzing the available data on positron annihilation in CCl4 solutions in isooctane.

  5. Hafnium transistor process design for neural interfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, David W; Basham, Eric J

    2009-01-01

    A design methodology is presented that uses 1-D process simulations of Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS) structures to design the threshold voltage of hafnium oxide based transistors used for neural recording. The methodology is comprised of 1-D analytical equations for threshold voltage specification, and doping profiles, and 1-D MIS Technical Computer Aided Design (TCAD) to design a process to implement a specific threshold voltage, which minimized simulation time. The process was then verified with a 2-D process/electrical TCAD simulation. Hafnium oxide films (HfO) were grown and characterized for dielectric constant and fixed oxide charge for various annealing temperatures, two important design variables in threshold voltage design.

  6. Calibration of the Lutetium-Hafnium Clock

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erik Scherer; Carsten Münker; Klaus Mezger

    2001-01-01

    ... −1 , in agreement with the two most recent decay-counting experiments. Lutetium-hafnium ages that are based on the previously used λ 176 Lu of 1.93 × 10 −11 to 1.94 × 10 −11 year −1 are thus ∼4...

  7. Work Function Calculation For Hafnium- Barium System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.A. Tursunmetov

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption process of barium atoms on hafnium is considered. A structural model of the system is presented and on the basis of calculation of interaction between ions dipole system the dependence of the work function on the coating.

  8. Percolation conductivity in hafnium sub-oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islamov, D. R., E-mail: damir@isp.nsc.ru; Gritsenko, V. A., E-mail: grits@isp.nsc.ru [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Cheng, C. H. [Department of Mechatronic Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chin, A., E-mail: albert-achin@hotmail.com [National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2014-12-29

    In this study, we demonstrated experimentally that formation of chains and islands of oxygen vacancies in hafnium sub-oxides (HfO{sub x}, x < 2) leads to percolation charge transport in such dielectrics. Basing on the model of Éfros-Shklovskii percolation theory, good quantitative agreement between the experimental and theoretical data of current-voltage characteristics was achieved. Based on the percolation theory suggested model shows that hafnium sub-oxides consist of mixtures of metallic Hf nanoscale clusters of 1–2 nm distributed onto non-stoichiometric HfO{sub x}. It was shown that reported approach might describe low resistance state current-voltage characteristics of resistive memory elements based on HfO{sub x}.

  9. The metallurgy and functional properties of hafnium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricot, Roland

    1992-08-01

    Like the two similar elements, titanium and zirconium, hafnium is a young and little known metal whose industrial development began with the nuclear power industry in 1950. After a brief historical survey, the paper describes the specific problems which arise due to the highly specialized chemistry and extractive metallurgy of this metal, dealing with its purification, melting and processing, before going on to review its different applications and discuss future prospects.

  10. Calibration of the lutetium-hafnium clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, E; Munker, C; Mezger, K

    2001-07-27

    Well-defined constants of radioactive decay are the cornerstone of geochronology and the use of radiogenic isotopes to constrain the time scales and mechanisms of planetary differentiation. Four new determinations of the lutetium-176 decay constant (lambda176Lu) made by calibration against the uranium-lead decay schemes yield a mean value of 1.865 +/- 0.015 x 10(-11) year(-1), in agreement with the two most recent decay-counting experiments. Lutetium-hafnium ages that are based on the previously used lambda176Lu of 1.93 x 10(-11) to 1.94 x 10(-11) year(-1) are thus approximately 4% too young, and the initial hafnium isotope compositions of some of Earth's oldest minerals and rocks become less radiogenic relative to bulk undifferentiated Earth when calculated using the new decay constant. The existence of strongly unradiogenic hafnium in Early Archean and Hadean zircons implies that enriched crustal reservoirs existed on Earth by 4.3 billion years ago and persisted for 200 million years or more. Hence, current models of early terrestrial differentiation need revision.

  11. HAFNIUM IMPLANTED IN IRON .1. LATTICE LOCATION AND ANNEALING BEHAVIOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBAKKER, JMGJ; PLEITER, F; SMULDERS, PJM

    1993-01-01

    Perturbed angular correlation, Rutherford backscattering and channelling experiments were conducted to study the lattice location and annealing behaviour of 110 keV hafnium ions implanted into iron single crystals. It was found that a fraction of 11-25% of the implanted hafnium atoms are located at

  12. Hafnium implanted in iron 1. Lattice location and annealing behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bakker, J.M.G.J.; Pleiter, F; Smulders, P.J M

    1993-01-01

    Perturbed angular correlation, Rutherford backscattering and channelling experiments were conducted to study the lattice location and annealing behaviour of 110 keV hafnium ions implanted into iron single crystals. It was found that a fraction of 11-25% of the implanted hafnium atoms are located at

  13. Hafnium implanted in iron 1. Lattice location and annealing behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bakker, J.M.G.J.; Pleiter, F; Smulders, P.J M

    1993-01-01

    Perturbed angular correlation, Rutherford backscattering and channelling experiments were conducted to study the lattice location and annealing behaviour of 110 keV hafnium ions implanted into iron single crystals. It was found that a fraction of 11-25% of the implanted hafnium atoms are located at

  14. Compound list: carbon tetrachloride [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available carbon tetrachloride CCL4 00003 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/carbon...ates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/carbon_tetrachloride.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open...-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/carbon_tetrachloride.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.S...ingle.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/carbon_tetrachloride.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  15. Ferroelectricity in yttrium-doped hafnium oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, J.; Schröder, U; Böscke, T. S.; Müller, I.; U. Böttger; De Wilde, L; Sundqvist, J.; Lemberger, M.; Kücher, P.; Mikolajick, T; Frey, Lothar

    2012-01-01

    Structural and electrical evidence for a ferroelectric phase in yttrium doped hafnium oxide thin films is presented. A doping series ranging from 2.3 to 12.3 mol% YO1.5 in HfO2 was deposited by a thermal atomic layer deposition process. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction of the 10 nm thick films revealed an orthorhombic phase close to the stability region of the cubic phase. The potential ferroelectricity of this orthorhombic phase was confirmed by polarization hysteresis measurements on tit...

  16. Hafnium transistor design for neural interfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, David W; Basham, Eric J

    2008-01-01

    A design methodology is presented that uses the EKV model and the g(m)/I(D) biasing technique to design hafnium oxide field effect transistors that are suitable for neural recording circuitry. The DC gain of a common source amplifier is correlated to the structural properties of a Field Effect Transistor (FET) and a Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS) capacitor. This approach allows a transistor designer to use a design flow that starts with simple and intuitive 1-D equations for gain that can be verified in 1-D MIS capacitor TCAD simulations, before final TCAD process verification of transistor properties. The DC gain of a common source amplifier is optimized by using fast 1-D simulations and using slower, complex 2-D simulations only for verification. The 1-D equations are used to show that the increased dielectric constant of hafnium oxide allows a higher DC gain for a given oxide thickness. An additional benefit is that the MIS capacitor can be employed to test additional performance parameters important to an open gate transistor such as dielectric stability and ionic penetration.

  17. Hafnium binary alloys from experiments and first principles

    OpenAIRE

    Levy, Ohad; Hart, Gus L. W.; Curtarolo, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    Despite the increasing importance of hafnium in numerous technological applications, experimental and computational data on its binary alloys is sparse. In particular, data is scant on those binary systems believed to be phase separating. We performed a comprehensive study of 44 hafnium binary systems with alkali metals, alkaline earths, transition metals and metals, using high-throughput first principles calculations. These computations predict novel unsuspected compounds in six binary syste...

  18. Ferroelectricity in yttrium-doped hafnium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, J.; Schröder, U.; Böscke, T. S.; Müller, I.; Böttger, U.; Wilde, L.; Sundqvist, J.; Lemberger, M.; Kücher, P.; Mikolajick, T.; Frey, L.

    2011-12-01

    Structural and electrical evidence for a ferroelectric phase in yttrium doped hafnium oxide thin films is presented. A doping series ranging from 2.3 to 12.3 mol% YO1.5 in HfO2 was deposited by a thermal atomic layer deposition process. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction of the 10 nm thick films revealed an orthorhombic phase close to the stability region of the cubic phase. The potential ferroelectricity of this orthorhombic phase was confirmed by polarization hysteresis measurements on titanium nitride based metal-insulator-metal capacitors. For 5.2 mol% YO1.5 admixture the remanent polarization peaked at 24 μC/cm2 with a coercive field of about 1.2 MV/cm. Considering the availability of conformal deposition processes and CMOS-compatibility, ferroelectric Y:HfO2 implies high scaling potential for future, ferroelectric memories.

  19. Nanoscale radiotherapy with hafnium oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiorella, Laurence; Barouch, Gilles; Devaux, Corinne; Pottier, Agnès; Deutsch, Eric; Bourhis, Jean; Borghi, Elsa; Levy, Laurent

    2012-09-01

    There is considerable interest in approaches that could improve the therapeutic window of radiotherapy. In this study, hafnium oxide nanoparticles were designed that concentrate in tumor cells to achieve intracellular high-energy dose deposit. Conventional methods were used, implemented in different ways, to explore interactions of these high-atomic-number nanoparticles and ionizing radiation with biological systems. Using the Monte Carlo simulation, these nanoparticles, when exposed to high-energy photons, were shown to demonstrate an approximately ninefold radiation dose enhancement compared with water. Importantly, the nanoparticles show satisfactory dispersion and persistence within the tumor and they form clusters in the cytoplasm of cancer cells. Marked antitumor activity is demonstrated in human cancer models. Safety is similar in treated and control animals as demonstrated by a broad program of toxicology evaluation. These findings, supported by good tolerance, provide the basis for developing this new type of nanoparticle as a promising anticancer approach in human patients.

  20. 40 CFR 421.330 - Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. 421.330 Section 421.330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Zirconium and Hafnium Subcategory § 421.330 Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  1. 40 CFR 471.90 - Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. 471.90 Section 471.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zirconium-Hafnium Forming Subcategory § 471.90 Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of...

  2. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    and the role it plays in the global climate and the future of fuels. Russia, Japan, Nigeria, Peru, Chile, Pakistan, Indonesia, Korea, etc are various countries who are perusing the gas hydrates studies as a future resource for fuel. Indian Initiative..., 1993, Free gas at the base of the gas hydrate zone in the vicinity of the Chile Triple junction: Geology, v. 21, pp. 905-908. Borowski, W.S., C.K. Paull, and U. William, III, 1999, Global and local variations of interstitial sulfate gradients...

  3. Hafnium isotope variations in oceanic basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchett, P. J.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1980-01-01

    Hafnium isotope ratios generated by the beta(-) decay of Lu-176 are investigated in volcanic rocks derived from the suboceanic mantle. Hf-176/Hf-177 and Lu/Hf ratios were determined to precisions of 0.01-0.04% and 0.5%, respectively, by routine, low-blank chemistry. The Hf-176/Hf-177 ratio is found to be positively correlated with the Nd-143/Nd-144 ratio and negatively correlated with the Sr-87/Sr-86 and Pb-206/Pb-204 ratios, and to increase southwards along the Iceland-Reykjanes ridge traverse. An approximate bulk earth Hf-176/Hf-177 ratio of 0.28295 is inferred from the bulk earth Nd-143/Nd-144 ratio, which requires a bulk earth Lu/Hf ratio of 0.25, similar to the Juvinas eucrite. Midocean ridge basalts are shown to account for 60% of the range of Hf isotope ratios, and it is suggested that Lu-Hf fractionation is decoupled from Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr fractionation in very trace-element-depleted source regions as a result of partial melting.

  4. Ground-state structures of Hafnium clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Wei Chun; Yoon, Tiem Leong [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Lim, Thong Leng [Faculty of Engineering and Technoloty, Multimedia University, Melaca Campus, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Hafnium (Hf) is a very large tetra-valence d-block element which is able to form relatively long covalent bond. Researchers are interested to search for substitution to silicon in the semi-conductor industry. We attempt to obtain the ground-state structures of small Hf clusters at both empirical and density-functional theory (DFT) levels. For calculations at the empirical level, charge-optimized many-body functional potential (COMB) is used. The lowest-energy structures are obtained via a novel global-minimum search algorithm known as parallel tempering Monte-Carlo Basin-Hopping and Genetic Algorithm (PTMBHGA). The virtue of using COMB potential for Hf cluster calculation lies in the fact that by including the charge optimization at the valence shells, we can encourage the formation of proper bond hybridization, and thus getting the correct bond order. The obtained structures are further optimized using DFT to ensure a close proximity to the ground-state.

  5. Emissions of carbon tetrachloride from Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziosi, Francesco; Arduini, Jgor; Bonasoni, Paolo; Furlani, Francesco; Giostra, Umberto; Manning, Alistair J.; McCulloch, Archie; O'Doherty, Simon; Simmonds, Peter G.; Reimann, Stefan; Vollmer, Martin K.; Maione, Michela

    2016-10-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is a long-lived radiatively active compound with the ability to destroy stratospheric ozone. Due to its inclusion in the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (MP), the last two decades have seen a sharp decrease in its large-scale emissive use with a consequent decline in its atmospheric mole fractions. However, the MP restrictions do not apply to the use of carbon tetrachloride as feedstock for the production of other chemicals, implying the risk of fugitive emissions from the industry sector. The occurrence of such unintended emissions is suggested by a significant discrepancy between global emissions as derived from reported production and feedstock usage (bottom-up emissions), and those based on atmospheric observations (top-down emissions). In order to better constrain the atmospheric budget of carbon tetrachloride, several studies based on a combination of atmospheric observations and inverse modelling have been conducted in recent years in various regions of the world. This study is focused on the European scale and based on long-term high-frequency observations at three European sites, combined with a Bayesian inversion methodology. We estimated that average European emissions for 2006-2014 were 2.2 (± 0.8) Gg yr-1, with an average decreasing trend of 6.9 % per year. Our analysis identified France as the main source of emissions over the whole study period, with an average contribution to total European emissions of approximately 26 %. The inversion was also able to allow the localisation of emission "hot spots" in the domain, with major source areas in southern France, central England (UK) and Benelux (Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg), where most industrial-scale production of basic organic chemicals is located. According to our results, European emissions correspond, on average, to 4.0 % of global emissions for 2006-2012. Together with other regional studies, our results allow a better constraint

  6. Discovery of Gallium, Germanium, Lutetium, and Hafnium Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Gross, J L

    2011-01-01

    Currently, twenty-eight gallium, thirty-one germanium, thirty-five lutetium, and thirty-six hafnium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  7. Standard specification for nuclear-grade hafnium oxide powder

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This specification defines the physical and chemical requirements for hafnium oxide powder intended for fabrication into shapes for use in a nuclear reactor core. 1.2 The material described herein shall be particulate in nature. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard.

  8. Mineral resource of the month: zirconium and hafnium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambogi, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Zirconium and hafnium are corrosion-resistant metals that are grouped in the same family as titanium on the periodic table. The two elements commonly occur in oxide and silicate minerals and have significant economic importance in everything from ink, ceramics and golf shoes to nuclear fuel rods.

  9. Corrosion and tribocorrosion of hafnium in simulated body fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rituerto Sin, J; Neville, A; Emami, N

    2014-08-01

    Hafnium is a passive metal with good biocompatibility and osteogenesis, however, little is known about its resistance to wear and corrosion in biological environments. The corrosion and tribocorrosion behavior of hafnium and commercially pure (CP) titanium in simulated body fluids were investigated using electrochemical techniques. Cyclic polarization scans and open circuit potential measurements were performed in 0.9% NaCl solution and 25% bovine calf serum solution to assess the effect of organic species on the corrosion behavior of the metal. A pin-on-plate configuration tribometer and a three electrode electrochemical cell were integrated to investigate the tribocorrosion performance of the studied materials. The results showed that hafnium has good corrosion resistance. The corrosion density currents measured in its passive state were lower than those measured in the case of CP titanium; however, it showed a higher tendency to suffer from localized corrosion, which was more acute when imperfections were present on the surface. The electrochemical breakdown of the oxide layer was retarded in the presence of proteins. Tribocorrosion tests showed that hafnium has the ability to quickly repassivate after the oxide layer was damaged; however, it showed higher volumetric loss than CP titanium in equivalent wear-corrosion conditions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 102B: 1157-1164, 2014. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. X-Ray Photoemission Study of the Oxidation of Hafnium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Chourasia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available About 20 Å of hafnium were deposited on silicon substrates using the electron beam evaporation technique. Two types of samples were investigated. In one type, the substrate was kept at the ambient temperature. After the deposition, the substrate temperature was increased to 100, 200, and 300∘C. In the other type, the substrate temperature was held fixed at some value during the deposition. For this type, the substrate temperatures used were 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 550, and 600∘C. The samples were characterized in situ by the technique of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. No trace of elemental hafnium is observed in the deposited overlayer. Also, there is no evidence of any chemical reactivity between the overlayer and the silicon substrate over the temperature range used. The hafnium overlayer shows a mixture of the dioxide and the suboxide. The ratio of the suboxide to dioxide is observed to be more in the first type of samples. The spectral data indicate that hafnium has a strong affinity for oxygen. The overlayer gets completely oxidized to form HfO2 at substrate temperature around 300∘C for the first type of samples and at substrate temperature greater than 550∘C for the second type.

  11. Isotope effects of hafnium in solvent extraction using crown ethers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Moriyama, Hirotake [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan); Hirata, Takafumi [Laboratory for Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Nishizawa, Kazushige [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    Hafnium isotopes were fractionated in a liquid-liquid extraction system by using seven types of crown ethers, tributyl phosphate, or {omicron}-diethoxybenzene. The largest isotope effect was observed in the isotope pair of {sup 177}Hf-{sup 179}Hf with dibenzo-24-crown-8; the isotope enrichment factor was observed to be 0.0129{+-}0.0032. (author)

  12. Isomerization of -carotene by titanium tetrachloride catalyst

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Rajendran; B H Chen

    2007-05-01

    Isomerization of all-trans--carotene occurs during shaking with 0.5% of titanium tetrachloride catalyst in methylene chloride at room temperature. In the present study we compared two types of columns C18 and C30 and various solvent systems for the separation of -carotene and its cis isomers by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results showed that -carotene isomers were resolved by employing a C30 column with a mobile phase of methanol (100%) (A) and methylene chloride (100%) (B) under a gradient elution condition. A total of eleven cis isomers and one all-trans--carotene isomer were resolved within 50 min at a flow rate of 1 ml/min and detection wave-length of 470 nm.

  13. [Carbon tetrachloride poisoning: a report of 3 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, E; Martínez Ara, J; Valencia, M E; Mostaza, J M; Miguel, J L; Sánchez Sicilia, L

    1989-09-01

    Carbon tetrachloride is a toxic solvent easily obtained in our country. 3 cases of poisoning by accidental inhalation at place of work. The main clinical manifestations were acute renal failure and toxic hepatopathy. All patients, had a good evolution with dialysis therapy after a few weeks. We comment on some possible additional therapies to be used in treating patients with severe poisoning due to carbon tetrachloride.

  14. Synthesis of Hafnium-Based Ceramic Materials for Ultra-High Temperature Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Feldman, Jay

    2004-01-01

    This project involved the synthesis of hafnium (Hf)-based ceramic powders and Hf-based precursor solutions that were suitable for preparation of Hf-based ceramics. The Hf-based ceramic materials of interest in this project were hafnium carbide (with nominal composition HE) and hafnium dioxide (HfO2). The materials were prepared at Georgia Institute of Technology and then supplied to research collaborators Dr. Sylvia Johnson and Dr. Jay Feldman) at NASA Ames Research Center.

  15. Effect of Copper Addition on Crystallization and Properties of Hafnium Containing HITPERM Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2010-2190 EFFECT OF COPPER ADDITION ON CRYSTALLIZATION AND PROPERTIES OF HAFNIUM CONTAINING HITPERM ALLOYS (POSTPRINT) L...SUBTITLE EFFECT OF COPPER ADDITION ON CRYSTALLIZATION AND PROPERTIES OF HAFNIUM CONTAINING HITPERM ALLOYS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house...8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 Effect of copper addition on crystallization and properties of hafnium containing HITPERM alloys „invited

  16. Synthesis of Hafnium-Based Ceramic Materials for Ultra-High Temperature Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Feldman, Jay

    2004-01-01

    This project involved the synthesis of hafnium (Hf)-based ceramic powders and Hf-based precursor solutions that were suitable for preparation of Hf-based ceramics. The Hf-based ceramic materials of interest in this project were hafnium carbide (with nominal composition HE) and hafnium dioxide (HfO2). The materials were prepared at Georgia Institute of Technology and then supplied to research collaborators Dr. Sylvia Johnson and Dr. Jay Feldman) at NASA Ames Research Center.

  17. Hafnium carbide structural foams synthesized from polymer precursors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Hai-bo; YANG Hong; N. K. RAVALA; H. C. WIKLE III; R. H. ZEE; B. A. CHIN

    2006-01-01

    Hafnium carbide (HfC) was applied in space and aerospace due to its ultra high melting temperature, high specific strength and moderate oxidation resistance. A novel synthesizing method was used to produce low density and high strength HfC structural foams through the thermolysis and pyrolysis of Hf containing polymer precursors (mixing of hafnium trifluoroacetylacetonate and epoxy) under vacuum atmosphere. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the produced foam is primarily composed of HfC containing 9%-10% HfO2. Several polymer powder compaction methods were used to improve the mechanical properties of HfC foam. Compression strengths of 200 MPa are achieved for HfC foams with density of 1.9 g/cm3 (total porosity about 85%). The proposed methodology of synthesizing HfC foam has the advantages of simple, inexpensive and less production time than alternate methods.

  18. Hydrothermal chemistry, structures, and luminescence studies of alkali hafnium fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Christopher C; McMillen, Colin D; Chen, Hongyu; Anker, Jeffery N; Kolis, Joseph W

    2013-01-07

    This paper describes the hydrothermal chemistry of alkali hafnium fluorides, including the synthesis and structural characterization of five new alkali hafnium fluorides. Two ternary alkali hafnium fluorides are described: Li(2)HfF(6) in space group P31m with a = 4.9748(7) Å and c = 4.6449(9) Å and Na(5)Hf(2)F(13) in space group C2/m with a = 11.627(2) Å, b = 5.5159(11) Å, and c = 8.4317(17) Å. Three new alkali hafnium oxyfluorides are also described: two fluoroelpasolites, K(3)HfOF(5) and (NH(4))(3)HfOF(5), in space group Fm3m with a = 8.9766(10) and 9.4144(11) Å, respectively, and K(2)Hf(3)OF(12) in space group R3m with a = 7.6486(11) Å and c = 28.802(6) Å. Infrared (IR) spectra were obtained for the title solids to confirm the structure solutions. Comparison of these materials was made based on their structures and synthesis conditions. The formation of these species in hydrothermal fluids appears to be dependent upon both the concentration of the alkali fluoride mineralizer solution and the reaction temperature. Both X-ray and visible fluorescence studies were conducted on compounds synthesized in this study and showed that fluorescence was affected by a variety of factors, such as alkali metal size, the presence/absence of oxygen in the compound, and the coordination environment of Hf(4+).

  19. Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl Zirconium and Hafnium Polyhydride Complexes : Synthesis, Structure, and Reactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Cindy; Hende, Johannes R. van den; Meetsma, Auke; Hessen, Bart; Teuben, Jan H.

    2001-01-01

    The half-sandwich zirconium and hafnium N,N-dimethylaminopropyl complexes Cp*M[(CH2)3NMe2]Cl2 (Cp* = η5-C5Me5, M = Zr, 1; Hf, 2) and Cp*M[(CH2)3NMe2]2Cl (M = Zr, 3; Hf, 4) were synthesized by mono- or dialkylation of Cp*MCl3 with the corresponding alkyllithium and Grignard reagents. Hydrogenolysis

  20. Clathrate hydrates in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Keith C; Brewer, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    Scientific knowledge of natural clathrate hydrates has grown enormously over the past decade, with spectacular new findings of large exposures of complex hydrates on the sea floor, the development of new tools for examining the solid phase in situ, significant progress in modeling natural hydrate systems, and the discovery of exotic hydrates associated with sea floor venting of liquid CO2. Major unresolved questions remain about the role of hydrates in response to climate change today, and correlations between the hydrate reservoir of Earth and the stable isotopic evidence of massive hydrate dissociation in the geologic past. The examination of hydrates as a possible energy resource is proceeding apace for the subpermafrost accumulations in the Arctic, but serious questions remain about the viability of marine hydrates as an economic resource. New and energetic explorations by nations such as India and China are quickly uncovering large hydrate findings on their continental shelves.

  1. Hafnium trifluoromethanesulfonate (hafnium triflate) as a highly efficient catalyst for chemoselective thioacetalization and transthioacetalization of carbonyl compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan-Chao; Zhu, Jieping

    2008-12-05

    A range of carbonyl compounds including aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes and ketones were converted to the corresponding thioacetals in high yields in the presence of a catalytic amount of hafnium trifluoromethanesulfonate (0.1 mol %, room temperature). The mild conditions tolerated various sensitive functional and protecting groups and were racemization-free when applied to alpha-aminoaldehydes. Transacetalization and chemoselective thioacetalization of aromatic aldehydes in the presence of aliphatic aldehydes and ketones were also documented.

  2. Hafnium silicate and hafnium silicon oxynitride gate dielectrics for strained Si_xGe_1-x: Interface stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addepalli, Swarna; Sivasubramani, Prasanna; El-Bouanani, Mohamed; Kim, Moon; Gnade, Bruce; Wallace, Robert

    2003-03-01

    Strained Si_xGe_1-x layers have gained considerable attention due to hole mobility enhancement, and ease of integration with Si-based CMOS technology. The deposition of stable high-κ dielectrics [1] such as hafnium silicate and hafnium silicon oxynitride in direct contact with SiGe would simultaneously improve the capacitance of the gate stack and lower the leakage current for high performance SiGe devices. However, the oxidation of the Si_xGe_1-x substrate either during dielectric deposition or post-deposition processing would degrade device performance due to the thermodynamic instability of germanium oxide [2,3]. Results from XPS, HR-TEM, and C-V, and I-V analyses after various annealing treatments will be presented for hafnium silicate and hafnium silicon oxynitride films deposited on strained Si_xGe_1-x(100), and correlated with dielectric-Si_xGe_1-x(100) interface stability. Implications to the introduction of these oxides as viable gate dielectric candidates for SiGe-based CMOS technology will be discussed. This work is supported by DARPA through SPAWAR Grant No. N66001-00-1-8928, and the Texas Advanced Technology Program. References: [1] G. D. Wilk, R. M. Wallace and J. M. Anthony, Journal of Applied Physics, 89, 5243 (2001) [2] W. S. Liu, J .S. Chen, M.-A. Nicolet, V. Arbet-Engels, K. L. Wang, Journal of Applied Physics, 72, 4444 (1992), and, Applied Physics Letters, 62, 3321 (1993) [3] W. S. Liu, M. -A. Nicolet, H. -H. Park, B. -H. Koak, J. -W. Lee, Journal of Applied Physics, 78, 2631 (1995)

  3. On the stabilization of niobium(V) solutions by zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, E.; Bjerre, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    Niobium cannot be separated from zirconium or hafnium when these elements occur together in solution with common anions such as chloride and sulphate. This is ascribed to the co-polymerization of niobium(V) and the hydrolysed ionic species of zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV) to form colloidal...

  4. A simple spectrophotometric method for determination of zirconium or hafnium in selected molybdenum-base alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupraw, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    A simple analytical procedure is described for accurately and precisely determining the zirconium or hafnium content of molybdenum-base alloys. The procedure is based on the reaction of the reagent Arsenazo III with zirconium or hafnium in strong hydrochloric acid solution. The colored complexes of zirconium or hafnium are formed in the presence of molybdenum. Titanium or rhenium in the alloy have no adverse effect on the zirconium or hafnium complex at the following levels in the selected aliquot: Mo, 10 mg; Re, 10 mg; Ti, 1 mg. The spectrophotometric measurement of the zirconium or hafnium complex is accomplished without prior separation with a relative standard deviation of 1.3 to 2.7 percent.

  5. Hafnium carbamates and ureates: new class of precursors for low-temperature growth of HfO2 thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Milanov, Andrian P; Barreca, Davide; Gasparotto, Alberto; Becker, Hans-Werner; Winter, Manuela; Fischer, Roland A; Devi, Anjana

    2009-04-21

    Novel volatile compounds of hafnium, namely tetrakis-N,O-dialkylcarbamato hafnium(iv) [Hf((i)PrNC(O)O(i)Pr)(4)] () and tetrakis-N,N,N'-trialkylureato hafnium(iv) [Hf((i)PrNC(O)N-(Me)Et)(4)] (), have been synthesized through the simple insertion reaction of isopropyl isocyanate into hafnium isopropoxide and hafnium ethylmethylamide, respectively; based on the promising thermal properties, compound has been evaluated as a precursor for metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of HfO(2) thin films, which resulted in the growth of stoichiometric and crystalline layers with a uniform morphology at temperature as low as 250 degrees C.

  6. Assessment of Carbon Tetrachloride Groundwater Transport in Support of the Hanford Carbon Tetrachloride Innovative Technology Demonstration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J.; Murray, Christopher J.; Cole, Charles R.; Cameron, Richard J.; Johnson, Michael D.; Skeen, Rodney S.; Johnson, Christian D.

    2001-07-13

    Groundwater modeling was performed in support of the Hanford Carbon Tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Demonstration (ITRD) Program. The ITRD program is facilitated by Sandia National Laboratory for the Department of Energy Office of Science and Technology. This report was prepared to document the results of the modeling effort and facilitate discussion of characterization and remediation options for the carbon tetrachloride plume among the ITRD participants. As a first step toward implementation of innovative technologies for remediation of the carbon tetrachloride (CT) plume underlying the 200-West Area, this modeling was performed to provide an indication of the potential impact of the CT source on the compliance boundary approximately 5000 m distant. The primary results of the modeling bracket the amount of CT source that will most likely result in compliance/non-compliance at the boundary and the relative influence of the various modeling parameters.

  7. Phase transitions in ferroelectric silicon doped hafnium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böscke, T. S.; Teichert, St.; Bräuhaus, D.; Müller, J.; Schröder, U.; Böttger, U.; Mikolajick, T.

    2011-09-01

    We investigated phase transitions in ferroelectric silicon doped hafnium oxide (FE-Si:HfO2) by temperature dependent polarization and x-ray diffraction measurements. If heated under mechanical confinement, the orthorhombic ferroelectric phase reversibly transforms into a phase with antiferroelectric behavior. Without confinement, a transformation into a monoclinic/tetragonal phase mixture is observed during cooling. These results suggest the existence of a common higher symmetry parent phase to the orthorhombic and monoclinic phases, while transformation between these phases appears to be inhibited by an energy barrier.

  8. Electronic structure of hafnium: A Compton profile study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Khera; S Mathur; B L Ahuja

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report the first-ever isotropic Compton profile of hafnium measured at an intermediate resolution, with 661.65 keV -radiation. To compare our experimental data, the theoretical computations have also been carried out within the framework of pseudopotential using CRYSTAL03 code and the renormalized-free-atom (RFA) model. It is found that the present experimental profile is in better agreement with the RFA calculations if the outer electronic configuration is chosen as 5d3.26s0.8. The cohesive energy of Hf is also deduced from the experimental data and is compared with the available data.

  9. Properties of neutron-rich hafnium high-spin isomers

    CERN Document Server

    Tungate, G; Walker, P M; Neyens, G; Billowes, J; Flanagan, K; Koester, U H; Litvinov, Y

    It is proposed to study highly-excited multi-quasiparticle isomers in neutron-rich hafnium (Z=72) isotopes. Long half-lives have already been measured for such isomers in the storage ring at GSI, ensuring their accessibility with ISOL production. The present proposal focuses on:\\\\ (i) an on-line experiment to measure isomer properties in $^{183}$Hf and $^{184}$Hf, and\\\\ (ii) an off-line molecular breakup test using REXTRAP, to provide Hf$^{+}$ beams for future laser spectroscopy and greater sensitivity for the future study of more neutron-rich isotopes.

  10. Slow DNA transport through nanopores in hafnium oxide membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Joseph; Henley, Robert; Bell, David C; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Wanunu, Meni

    2013-11-26

    We present a study of double- and single-stranded DNA transport through nanopores fabricated in ultrathin (2-7 nm thick) freestanding hafnium oxide (HfO2) membranes. The high chemical stability of ultrathin HfO2 enables long-lived experiments with 50 000 DNA translocations with no detectable pore expansion. Mean DNA velocities are slower than velocities through comparable silicon nitride pores, providing evidence that HfO2 nanopores have favorable physicochemical interactions with nucleic acids that can be leveraged to slow down DNA in a nanopore.

  11. Hafnium carbide structural foams synthesized from polymer precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Haibo

    2005-11-01

    A study was conducted to investigate a new low cost approach to produce Hafnium Carbide (HfC) structural foams through the thermolysis and pyrolysis of polymer precursors. Hafnium carbide has a melting point of over 3900 °C, the highest melting point of any known binary alloy. HfC structural foams can be fabricated into high temperature components or used as a thermal insulation material. Current available methods for creating HfC structural foams are time consuming, expensive or the material produced lacks mechanical strength. The objectives of this research were to produce HfC foam through the thermolysis and pyrolysis of Hf containing polymer mixture, optimize the properties of the HfC foam, and develop a knowledge base of acceptable process parameters. With the proposed method, HfC foam was produced by mixing a hafnium containing Macromolecular Metal Complex (MMC) and carbon source polymers, followed by heat treating the mixture under vacuum. XRD analysis showed that the produced foam was largely composed of HfC, with small amounts of hafnium oxide. The foam total porosity was measured to be over 85%. The HfC lattice parameter was found to range from 0.4613 nm to 0.4647 nm. The HfC conversion mechanism was investigated using Residual Gas Analysis, where it was observed that polymer decomposition occurred from 80 through 550 °C and HfC conversion started around 1100 °C. The HfC foam mechanical properties and microstructure were improved by optimizing the process methods and parameters. The initial research yielded an HfC foam with a compression strength of 15.16 +/- 4.66 MPa and evenly distributed foam cells with diameter sizes up to 50 mum. Continued research showed that HfC foams with total porosity of about 85% (density 1.9g/cm 3), and a foam compression strength of 212 +/- 25MPa were achievable. The proposed methodology for synthesizing HfC foam was found to be simple, inexpensive and require less production time. The process can be controlled to produce

  12. Structure and Optical Properties of Nanocrystalline Hafnium Oxide Thin Films (PostPrint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2014-0214 STRUCTURE AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF NANOCRYSTALLINE HAFNIUM OXIDE THIN FILMS (POSTPRINT) Neil R. Murphy AFRL...OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF NANOCRYSTALLINE HAFNIUM OXIDE THIN FILMS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...publication is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.optmat.2014.08.005 14. ABSTRACT Hafnium oxide (HfO2) films were grown by sputter-deposition by

  13. Hafnium-Based Contrast Agents for X-ray Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Markus; Bauser, Marcus; Frenzel, Thomas; Hilger, Christoph Stephan; Jost, Gregor; Lauria, Silvia; Morgenstern, Bernd; Neis, Christian; Pietsch, Hubertus; Sülzle, Detlev; Hegetschweiler, Kaspar

    2017-05-15

    Heavy-metal-based contrast agents (CAs) offer enhanced X-ray absorption for X-ray computed tomography (CT) compared to the currently used iodinated CAs. We report the discovery of new lanthanide and hafnium azainositol complexes and their optimization with respect to high water solubility and stability. Our efforts culminated in the synthesis of BAY-576, an uncharged hafnium complex with 3:2 stoichiometry and broken complex symmetry. The superior properties of this asymmetrically substituted hafnium CA were demonstrated by a CT angiography study in rabbits that revealed excellent signal contrast enhancement.

  14. Amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc oxide semiconductor thin film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Jung; Kim, Sangwook; Lee, Je-Hun; Park, Jin-Seong; Kim, Sunil; Park, Jaechul; Lee, Eunha; Lee, Jaechul; Park, Youngsoo; Kim, Joo Han; Shin, Sung Tae; Chung, U.-In

    2009-12-01

    We developed amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc oxide (HIZO) thin films as oxide semiconductors and investigated the films electrically and physically. Adding of hafnium (Hf) element can suppress growing the columnar structure and drastically decrease the carrier concentration and hall mobility in HIZO films. The thin film transistors (TFTs) with amorphous HIZO active channel exhibit good electrical properties with field effect mobility of around 10 cm2/Vs, S of 0.23 V/decade, and high Ion/off ratio of over 108, enough to operate the next electronic devices. In particular, under bias-temperature stress test, the HIZO TFTs with 0.3 mol % (Hf content) showed only 0.46 V shift in threshold voltage, compared with 3.25 V shift in HIZO TFT (0.1 mol %). The Hf ions may play a key role to improve the instability of TFTs due to high oxygen bonding ability. Therefore, the amorphous HIZO semiconductor will be a prominent candidate as an operation device for large area electronic applications.

  15. Zirconium and hafnium Salalen complexes in isospecific polymerisation of propylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, Konstantin; Venditto, Vincenzo; Goldberg, Israel; Kol, Moshe

    2013-07-07

    The activity of dibenzylzirconium and dibenzylhafnium Salalen complexes in polymerisation of propylene with MAO as a cocatalyst is described. Three Salalen ligand precursors combining a bulky alkyl group (1-adamantyl) on the imine-side phenol and electron withdrawing halo groups of different sizes on the amine-side phenol were explored. All metal complexes were obtained as single diastereomers. An X-ray crystallographic structure of a hafnium complex of an additional ligand carrying the combination of tert-butyl and chloro substituted phenolates, 4-Hf, revealed a fac-mer wrapping of the Salalen ligand around the metal centre. All complexes led to active catalysts in propylene polymerisation and to isotactic polypropylene of high regioregularity. The zirconium complexes led to polypropylene having molecular weights of Mw = 132,000-200,000 and isotacticities of [mmmm] = 65.7-75.0%. The hafnium complexes led to polypropylene of higher molecular weights of Mw = 375,000-520,000 and higher stereoregularities of [mmmm] = 80.6-89.3%, the highest isotacticity obtained with 3-Hf.

  16. Enrichment/isolation of phosphorylated peptides on hafnium oxide prior to mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, José G; Choi, Yong Seok; Vujcic, Stefan; Wood, Troy D; Colón, Luis A

    2009-01-01

    Hafnium oxide (hafnia) exhibits unique enrichment properties towards phosphorylated peptides that are complementary to those of titanium oxide (titania) and zirconium oxide (zirconia) for use with mass spectrometric analysis in the field of proteomics.

  17. Hafnium metallocene compounds used as cathode interfacial layers for enhanced electron transfer in organic solar cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Park, Keunhee; Oh, Seungsik; Jung, Donggeun; Chae, Heeyeop; Kim, Hyoungsub; Boo, Jin-Hyo

    2012-01-01

    ...) + [6, 6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester, bis-(ethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium(IV) dichloride, and aluminum were deposited as a hole transport layer, an active layer, a cathode interfacial layer, and a cathode, respectively...

  18. Metal-Element Compounds of Titanium, Zirconium, and Hafnium as Pyrotechnic Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-04

    1-11 1 METAL-ELEMENT COMPOUNDS OF TITANIUM, ZIRCONIUM , AND HAFNIUM AS PYROTECHNIC FUELS Anthony P. Shaw,* Rajendra K. Sadangi, Jay C...have started to explore the pyrotechnic properties of other inorganic compounds, particularly those of titanium, zirconium , and hafnium. The...The group 4 metals—titanium, zirconium , and hafnium—are potent pyrotechnic fuels. However, the metals themselves are often pyrophoric as fine

  19. Simple spectrophotometric method for determination of zirconium or hafnium in selected molybdenum-base alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupraw, W A

    1972-06-01

    A simple analytical procedure is described for determining zirconium or hafnium in molybdenum-base alloys by formation of the Arsenazo III complex of zirconium or hafnium in 9 M hydrochloric acid medium. The absorbance is measured at 670 nm. Molybdenum (10 mg), titanium (1 mg), and rhenium (10 mg) have no adverse effect. No prior separation is needed. The relative standard deviation is 1.3-2.7%.

  20. Dose estimate of inhaled hafnium tritide using the ICRP 66 lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yung-Sung; Zhou, Yue; Wang, Yang-Sheng; Inkret, William C; Wermer, Joseph R

    2002-06-01

    Metal tritide is widely used for research, purification, compression, and storage of tritium. The current understanding of metal tritide and its radiation dosimetry for internal exposure is limited, and ICRP publications do not provide the tritium dosimetry for hafnium tritide. The current radiation protection guidelines for metal tritide particles (including hafnium tritide) are based on the assumption that their biological behavior is similar to tritiated water, which is completely absorbed by the body. However, the solubility of metal tritide particles depends on the chemical form of the material. The biological half-live of hafnium tritide particles and the dosimetry of an inhalation exposure to those particles could be quite different from tritiated water. This paper describes experiments on the dissolution rate of hafnium tritide particles in a simulated lung fluid. The results showed that less than 1% of the tritium was dissolved in the simulated lung fluid for hafnium tritide particles after 215 d. The short-term and long-term dissolution half times were 46 and 4.28 x 10(5) d, respectively. This indicates that hafnium tritide is an extremely insoluble material. Self-absorption of beta rays in the hafnium tritide particles was estimated by a numerical method. The dose coefficients were calculated as a function of particle size using in vitro solubility data and a calculated self-absorption factor. The dose coefficient decreased with aerodynamic diameters in the range of 0.25 to 10 microm, mainly because the self-absorption factor decreased with increasing particle size. For a particle 1 microm in aerodynamic diameter, the dose coefficient of a hafnium tritide particle was about 10 times higher than that of tritiated water but was about 1.4 times lower than that calculated by ICRP Publication 71 for Type S tritiated particles. The ICRP estimate did not include a self-absorption factor and thus might have overestimated the dose. This finding has significant

  1. Precipitation behaviour and recrystallisation resistance in aluminum alloys with additions of hafnium, scandium and zirconium

    OpenAIRE

    Hallem, Håkon

    2005-01-01

    The overall objective of this work has been to develop aluminium alloys, which after hot and cold deformation are able to withstand high temperatures without recrystallising. This has been done by investigating aluminium alloys with various additions of hafnium, scandium and zirconium, with a main focus on Hf and to which extent it may partly substitute or replace Zr and/or Sc as a dispersoid forming elements in these alloys. What is the effect of hafnium, alone and in combination with Zr...

  2. Application of hafnium hydride control rod to large sodium cooled fast breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Kazumi, E-mail: kazumi_ikeda@mfbr.mhi.co.jp [Mitsubishi FBR Systems, Inc., 34-17, Jingumae 2-Chome, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0001 (Japan); Moriwaki, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hiroyuki_moriwaki@mfbr.mhi.co.jp [Mitsubishi FBR Systems, Inc., 34-17, Jingumae 2-Chome, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0001 (Japan); Ohkubo, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: yoshiyuki_okubo@mfbr.mhi.co.jp [Mitsubishi FBR Systems, Inc., 34-17, Jingumae 2-Chome, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0001 (Japan); Iwasaki, Tomohiko, E-mail: tomohiko.iwasaki@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi, Miyagi-ken 980-8579 (Japan); Konashi, Kenji, E-mail: konashi@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashi-Ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki-ken 311-1313 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Application of hafnium hydride control rod to large sodium cooled fast breeder reactor. • This paper treats application of an innovative hafnium hydride control rod to a large sodium cooled fast breeder reactor. • Hydrogen absorption triples the reactivity worth by neutron spectrum shift at H/Hf ratio of 1.3. • Lifetime of the control rod quadruples because produced daughters of hafnium isotopes are absorbers. • Nuclear and thermal hydraulic characteristics of the reactor are as good as or better than B-10 enriched boron carbide. - Abstract: This study treats the feasibility of long-lived hafnium hydride control rod in a large sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor by nuclear and thermal analyses. According to the nuclear calculations, it is found that hydrogen absorption of hafnium triples the reactivity by the neutron spectrum shift at the H/Hf ratio of 1.3, and a hafnium transmutation mechanism that produced daughters are absorbers quadruples the lifetime due to a low incineration rate of absorbing nuclides under irradiation. That is to say, the control rod can function well for a long time because an irradiation of 2400 EFPD reduces the reactivity by only 4%. The calculation also reveals that the hafnium hydride control rod can apply to the reactor in that nuclear and thermal characteristics become as good as or better than 80% B-10 enriched boron carbide. For example, the maximum linear heat rate becomes 3% lower. Owing to the better power distribution, the required flow rate decreases approximately by 1%. Consequently, it is concluded on desk analyses that the long lived hafnium hydride control rod is feasible in the large sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor.

  3. In-situ ALD growth of hafnium oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karavaev, Konstantin; Tallarida, Massimo; Schmeisser, Dieter [Brandenburgische Technische Universitaet Cottbus (Germany). Angewandte Physik - Sensorik; Zschech, Ehrenfried [AMD Saxony LLC and Co. KG, Center for Complex Analysis, Dresden (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    We report on a novel system for in-situ atomic layer growth (ALD) of high-k dielectric films. First results were obtained for Hf-oxide samples by using Hf-tetrachloride as precursor and water as oxidizer. We compare the photoelectron spectra of Si 2p, O 1s and Hf 4f of our in-situ prepared films with samples (ex-situ) prepared by industrial ALD reactors and discuss similarities and differences observed in the core level spectra of the various samples by considering the different growth conditions.

  4. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-14

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  5. Ionization of Hafnium L-Shell by Electron Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗正明; 傅玉川; 安竹; 彭秀峰; 何福庆; 龙先灌

    2002-01-01

    A lower-energy electron beam has been directed on to a hafnium thin target with thick backing to investigate the process of L-shell ionization. By using a Si(Li) detector to count the x-raysfrom the L-subshell, the partial and total production cross sections and mean ionization cross sections versus electron energies have been deduced simultaneously (from threshold to 36keV). The influence of the electron reflected from the backing on measurements has been corrected. The path of the electron multi-scattered in the target itself has also been calculated by using the Monte Carlo programme (EGS4). A comparison with both theoretical predictions is given.

  6. Amorphous Hafnium-Indium-Zinc Oxide Semiconductor Thin Film Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Po Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We reported on the performance and electrical properties of co-sputtering-processed amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc oxide (α-HfIZO thin film transistors (TFTs. Co-sputtering-processed α-HfIZO thin films have shown an amorphous phase in nature. We could modulate the In, Hf, and Zn components by changing the co-sputtering power. Additionally, the chemical composition of α-HfIZO had a significant effect on reliability, hysteresis, field-effect mobility (μFE, carrier concentration, and subthreshold swing (S of the device. Our results indicated that we could successfully and easily fabricate α-HfIZO TFTs with excellent performance by the co-sputtering process. Co-sputtering-processed α-HfIZO TFTs were fabricated with an on/off current ratio of ~106, higher mobility, and a subthreshold slope as steep as 0.55 V/dec.

  7. Cyclopentadienyl complexes of hafnium and zirconium containing nitrate ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minacheva, M.Kh.; Brajnina, Eh.M.; Klemenkova, Z.S.; Lokshin, B.V.; Nikolaeva, T.D.; Zhdanov, S.I.; Petrovskij, P.V. (AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Ehlementoorganicheskikh Soedinenij)

    1983-06-01

    New types of monocyclopentadienyl nitrate complexes of zirconium and hafnium CpHf(DBM)(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ and CpHfCl/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)x4H/sub 2/O (DBM = dibenzoylmethane residue) are synthesized. CpMCl/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/) dichlorides are formed during the reaction of CpM(chel)/sub 2/Cl and HNO/sub 3/ as a result of the interaction of the extracted HCl with the CpM(chel)/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/) exchange product. A supposition is made about the non-ionic character of the metal-nitrate bonds and the bidentate character of the nitrate ligands in Cp/sub 2/M(NO/sub 3/)Cl on the base of studying the electric conductivity, IR- and Raman spectra.

  8. Pressure-stabilized hafnium nitrides and their properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Oganov, Artem R.; Li, Xinfeng; Niu, Haiyang

    2017-01-01

    We report hafnium nitrides under pressure using first-principles evolutionary calculations. Metallic P 63/m m c -HfN (calculated Vickers hardness 23.8 GPa) is found to be more energetically favorable than NaCl-type HfN at zero and high pressure. Moreover, NaCl-type HfN actually undergoes a phase transition to P 63/m m c -HfN below 670 K at ambient pressure. HfN10, which simultaneously has infinite armchairlike polymeric N chains and N2 molecules in its crystal structure, is discovered to be stable at moderate pressure above 23 GPa and can be preserved as a metastable phase at ambient pressure. At ambient conditions (298 K, 0 GPa), the gravimetric energy densities and the volumetric energy densities of HfN10 are 2.8 kJ/g and 14.1 kJ/cm3, respectively.

  9. Hafnium as a neutron absorber in research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jatuff, F.E.; Villarino, E.A. [INVAP S.E., S.C. de Bariloche (Argentina)

    1995-12-31

    Research reactors usually require the periodic replacement of control rods because of the burnup of the neutron absorber material, even if devices have been mainly withdrawn. The purpose of this paper is the study of the reactivity worth of hafnium as a neutron absorber in the multi-purpose-type research reactor (MPTRR). The MPTRR design develops 20 MW, and it is configured by five rows of six low-enriched uranium (200% enrichment) materials test reactor fuels inside a Zircaloy chimney. The standard control plates are given by two rows of three plates of silver-indium-cadmium alloy (85% silver, 10% indium, and 5% cadmium, in weight percents; 0.26 cm of maximum absorber width), separating the central three rows of fuel elements from the peripheral first and fifth rows. The burnup of control plates decreases the reactivity worth below the licensing criteria in {approximately}6 months.

  10. Analytical methods for the determination of carbon tetrachloride in soils.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado, J. S.; Spokas, K.; Taylor, J.

    1999-06-01

    Improved methods for the determination of carbon tetrachloride are described. These methods incorporate purge-and-trap concentration of heated dry samples, an improved methanol extraction procedure, and headspace sampling. The methods minimize sample pretreatment, accomplish solvent substitution, and save time. The methanol extraction and headspace sampling procedures improved the method detection limits and yielded better sensitivity, good recoveries, and good performance. Optimization parameters are shown. Results obtained with these techniques are compared for soil samples from contaminated sites.

  11. Hydration Assessment of Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS · Although there is no scientific consensus for 1 ) howbest to assess the hydration status of athletes, 2)what criteria to use as acceptable outcome measurements, or 3) the best time to apply practical assessment methods, there are methods that can be used toprovide athletes with useful feedback about their hydration status

  12. Thermal Reversible Breakdown and Resistivity Switching in Hafnium Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Raghavan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a model of thermal reversible breakdown via conductive filaments (CFs in hafnium dioxide (HfO2. These CFs appear as a result of electrical pretreatment of a metal/HfO2/metal (semiconductor nanostructure (MIM(S. The model is based on an assumption that the thermal reversible breakdown of a CF is due to of Joule heating displaying an exponential dependence of conductivity on temperature. The corresponding current-voltage characteristic and temperature of a CF in its middle and at the interface with an electrode are calculated taking into account the heat conduction equation and boundary conditions with heat dissipation via electrodes. It is found that the current-voltage characteristic of a CF has three specific regions. The initial and final regions have turned out to be linear with respect to the current and display different slopes, while the middle region is characterized by both the S-shaped and ultralinear dependences which are affected by the ambient temperature and nanostructure parameters. The switching potential from the high resistivity state (HRS to the low resistivity state (LRS was shown to decrease with the ambient temperature and with worsening of heat dissipation conditions. We present a model of thermal reversible breakdown via conductive filaments (CFs in hafnium dioxide (HfO2. These CFs appear as a result of electrical pretreatment of a metal/HfO2/metal (semiconductor nanostructure (MIM(S. The model is based on an assumption that the thermal reversible breakdown of a CF is due to of Joule heating displaying an exponential dependence of conductivity on temperature. The corresponding current-voltage characteristic and temperature of a CF in its middle and at the interface with an electrode are calculated taking into account the heat conduction equation and boundary conditions with heat dissipation via electrodes. It is found that the current-voltage characteristic of a CF has three specific regions. The initial and

  13. RF-sputtered silicon and hafnium nitrides - Properties and adhesion to 440C stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon nitride and hafnium nitride coatings were deposited by reactive RF sputtering on oxidized and unoxidized 440C stainless steel substrates. Sputtering was done in mixtures of argon and nitrogen gases from pressed powder silicon nitride and from hafnium metal targets. Depositions were at two background pressures, 8 and 20 mtorr, and at two different fractions (f) of nitrogen in argon, 0.25 and 0.60, for hafnium nitride and at f = 0.25 for silicon nitride. The coatings and the interface between the coating and substrates were investigated by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Auger electron spectroscopy. A Knoop microhardness of 1650 + or 100 kg/sq mm was measured for hafnium nitride and 3900 + or 500 kg/sq mm for silicon nitride. The friction coefficients between a 440C rider and the coatings were measured under lubricated conditions. Scratch test results demonstrate that the adhesion of hafnium nitride to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C is superior to that of silicon nitride. Oxidized 440C is found to have increased adhesion, to both nitrides, over that of unoxidized 440C.

  14. RF-sputtered silicon and hafnium nitrides - Properties and adhesion to 440C stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon nitride and hafnium nitride coatings were deposited by reactive RF sputtering on oxidized and unoxidized 440C stainless steel substrates. Sputtering was done in mixtures of argon and nitrogen gases from pressed powder silicon nitride and from hafnium metal targets. Depositions were at two background pressures, 8 and 20 mtorr, and at two different fractions (f) of nitrogen in argon, 0.25 and 0.60, for hafnium nitride and at f = 0.25 for silicon nitride. The coatings and the interface between the coating and substrates were investigated by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Auger electron spectroscopy. A Knoop microhardness of 1650 + or 100 kg/sq mm was measured for hafnium nitride and 3900 + or 500 kg/sq mm for silicon nitride. The friction coefficients between a 440C rider and the coatings were measured under lubricated conditions. Scratch test results demonstrate that the adhesion of hafnium nitride to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C is superior to that of silicon nitride. Oxidized 440C is found to have increased adhesion, to both nitrides, over that of unoxidized 440C.

  15. High P-T phase transitions and P-V-T equation of state of hafnium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrubiak, Rostislav; Drozd, Vadym; Karbasi, Ali; Saxena, Surendra K. (FIU)

    2016-07-29

    We measured the volume of hafnium at several pressures up to 67 GPa and at temperatures between 300 to 780 K using a resistively heated diamond anvil cell with synchrotron x-ray diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source. The measured data allows us to determine the P-V-T equation of state of hafnium. The previously described [Xia et al., Phys. Rev. B 42, 6736-6738 (1990)] phase transition from hcp ({alpha}) to simple hexagonal ({omega}) phase at 38 GPa at room temperature was not observed even up to 51 GPa. The {omega} phase was only observed at elevated temperatures. Our measurements have also improved the experimental constraint on the high P-T phase boundary between the {omega} phase and high pressure bcc ({beta}) phase of hafnium. Isothermal room temperature bulk modulus and its pressure derivative for the {alpha}-phase of hafnium were measured to be B{sub 0} = 112.9{+-}0.5 GPa and B{sub 0}'=3.29{+-}0.05, respectively. P-V-T data for the {alpha}-phase of hafnium was used to obtain a fit to a thermodynamic P-V-T equation of state based on model by Brosh et al. [CALPHAD 31, 173-185 (2007)].

  16. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years.

  17. Mechanism underlying carbon tetrachloride-inhibited protein synthesis in liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the mechanism underlying carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced alterations of protein synthesis in liver. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given CCl4 (1 mL/100 g body weight) and 3H-leucine incorporation. Malondialdehyde (MDA) level in the liver, in vitro response of hepatocyte nuclei nucleotide triphosphatase (NTPase) to free radicals, and nuclear export of total mRNA with 3'-poly A+ were measured respectively. Survival response of HepG2 cells to CCl4 treatment was assessed by methyl thia...

  18. Hafnium oxide nanoparticles: toward an in vitro predictive biological effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marill, Julie; Anesary, Naeemunnisa Mohamed; Zhang, Ping; Vivet, Sonia; Borghi, Elsa; Levy, Laurent; Pottier, Agnes

    2014-06-30

    Hafnium oxide, NBTXR3 nanoparticles were designed for high dose energy deposition within cancer cells when exposed to ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility of predicting in vitro the biological effect of NBTXR3 nanoparticles when exposed to ionizing radiation. Cellular uptake of NBTXR3 nanoparticles was assessed in a panel of human cancer cell lines (radioresistant and radiosensitive) by transmission electron microscopy. The radioenhancement of NBTXR3 nanoparticles was measured by the clonogenic survival assay. NBTXR3 nanoparticles were taken up by cells in a concentration dependent manner, forming clusters in the cytoplasm. Differential nanoparticle uptake was observed between epithelial and mesenchymal or glioblastoma cell lines. The dose enhancement factor increased with increase NBTXR3 nanoparticle concentration and radiation dose. Beyond a minimum number of clusters per cell, the radioenhancement of NBTXR3 nanoparticles could be estimated from the radiation dose delivered and the radiosensitivity of the cancer cell lines. Our preliminary results suggest a predictable in vitro biological effect of NBTXR3 nanoparticles exposed to ionizing radiation.

  19. Oxidation Effect in Octahedral Hafnium Disulfide Thin Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Sang Hoon; Jin, Youngjo; Kim, Tae Soo; Chung, Dong Seob; Na, Hyunyeong; Nam, Honggi; Kim, Hyun; Perello, David J; Jeong, Hye Yun; Ly, Thuc Hue; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-26

    Atomically smooth van der Waals materials are structurally stable in a monolayer and a few layers but are susceptible to oxygen-rich environments. In particular, recently emerging materials such as black phosphorus and perovskite have revealed stronger environmental sensitivity than other two-dimensional layered materials, often obscuring the interesting intrinsic electronic and optical properties. Unleashing the true potential of these materials requires oxidation-free sample preparation that protects thin flakes from air exposure. Here, we fabricated few-layer hafnium disulfide (HfS2) field effect transistors (FETs) using an integrated vacuum cluster system and study their electronic properties and stability under ambient conditions. By performing all the device fabrication and characterization procedure under an oxygen- and moisture-free environment, we found that few-layer AA-stacking HfS2-FETs display excellent field effect responses (Ion/Ioff ≈ 10(7)) with reduced hysteresis compared to the FETs prepared under ambient conditions. Oxidation of HfS2 occurs uniformly over the entire area, increasing the film thickness by 250% at a prolonged oxidation time of >120 h, while defects on the surface are the preferential initial oxidation sites. We further demonstrated that the stability of the device in air is significantly improved by passivating FETs with BN in a vacuum cluster.

  20. Ultrafast laser-triggered emission from hafnium carbide tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kealhofer, Catherine; Foreman, Seth M.; Gerlich, Stefan; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2012-07-01

    Electron emission from hafnium carbide (HfC) field emission tips induced by a sub-10-fs, 150-MHz repetition rate Ti:sapphire laser is studied. Two-photon emission is observed at low power with a moderate electric bias field applied to the tips. As the bias field and/or laser power is increased, the average current becomes dominated by thermally enhanced field emission due to laser heating: both the low thermal conductivity of HfC and the laser's high repetition rate can lead to a temperature rise of several hundred Kelvin at the tip apex. The contribution of current from a thermal transient at times shorter than the electron-phonon coupling time is considered in the context of the two-temperature model (TTM). Under the conditions of this experiment, the integrated current from the thermal transient is shown to be negligible in comparison with the two-photon emission. A finite element model of the laser heating and thermal conduction supports these conclusions and is also used to compare the nature of thermal effects in HfC, tungsten, and gold tips.

  1. Reinvestigation of high pressure polymorphism in hafnium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, K. K., E-mail: kkpandey@barc.gov.in; Sharma, Surinder M. [High Pressure and Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400 085 (India); Gyanchandani, Jyoti; Dey, G. K. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400 085 (India); Somayazulu, M. [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, D.C. 20015 (United States); Sikka, S. K. [Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi-110 002 (India)

    2014-06-21

    There has been a recent controversy about the high pressure polymorphism of Hafnium (Hf). Unlike, the earlier known α→ω structural transition at 38 ± 8 GPa, at ambient temperature, Hrubiak et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 111, 112612 (2012)] did not observe it till 51 GPa. They observed this transition only at elevated temperatures. We have reinvestigated the room temperature phase diagram of Hf, employing x-ray diffraction (XRD) and DFT based first principles calculations. Experimental investigations have been carried out on several pure and impure Hf samples and also with different pressure transmitting media. Besides demonstrating the significant role of impurity levels on the high pressure phase diagram of Hf, our studies re-establish room temperature α→ω transition at high pressures, even in quasi-hydrostatic environment. We observed this transition in pure Hf with equilibrium transition pressure P{sub o} = 44.5 GPa; however, with large hysteresis. The structural sequence, transition pressures, the lattice parameters, the c/a ratio and its variation with compression for the α and ω phases as predicted by our ab-initio scalar relativistic (SR) calculations are found to be in good agreement with our experimental results of pure Hf.

  2. Cathodo- and photoluminescence increase in amorphous hafnium oxide under annealing in oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, E. V., E-mail: ivanova@mail.ioffe.ru; Zamoryanskaya, M. V. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Pustovarov, V. A. [Ural State Technical University (Russian Federation); Aliev, V. Sh.; Gritsenko, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Yelisseyev, A. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-15

    Cathodo- and photoluminescence of amorphous nonstoichiometric films of hafnium oxide are studied with the aim to verify the hypothesis that oxygen vacancies are responsible for the luminescence. To produce oxygen vacancies, hafnium oxide was enriched in surplus metal during synthesis. To reduce the oxygen concentration, the film was annealed in oxygen. A qualitative control of the oxygen concentration was carried out by the refractive index. In the initial, almost stoichiometric films we observed a 2.7-eV band in cathodoluminescence. Annealing in oxygen results in a considerable increase in its intensity, as well as in the appearance of new bands at 1.87, 2.14, 3.40, and 3.6 eV. The observed emission bands are supposed to be due to single oxygen vacancies and polyvacancies in hafnium oxide. The luminescence increase under annealing in an oxygen atmosphere may be a result of the emission quenching effect.

  3. The Hot-Pressing of Hafnium Carbide (Melting Point, 7030 F)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, William A.; Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the effects of the hot-pressing variables (temperature, pressure, and time) on the density and grain size of hafnium carbide disks. The purpose was to provide information necessary for the production of high-density test shapes for the determination of physical and mechanical properties. Hot-pressing of -325 mesh hafnium carbide powder was accomplished with a hydraulic press and an inductively heated graphite die assembly. The ranges investigated for each variable were as follows: temperature, 3500 to 4870 F; pressure, 1000 to 6030 pounds per square inch; and time, 5 to 60 minutes. Hafnium carbide bodies of approximately 98 percent theoretical density can be produced under the following minimal conditions: 4230 F, 3500 pounds per square inch, and 15 minutes. Further increases in temperature and time resulted only in greater grain size.

  4. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  5. Wet hydrate dissolution plant

    OpenAIRE

    Stanković Mirjana S.; Kovačević Branimir T.; Pezo Lato L.

    2003-01-01

    The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant with capacity of 50,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE), Italy, in 1997, for increasing detergent zeolite production from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate ...

  6. Hafnium(IV) chloride complexes with chelating β-ketiminate ligands: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and volatility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Siddappa A; Medina, Phillip A; Antic, Aleks; Ziller, Joseph W; Vohs, Jason K; Fahlman, Bradley D

    2015-09-05

    The synthesis and characterization of four new β-ketiminate hafnium(IV) chloride complexes dichloro-bis[4-(phenylamido)pent-3-en-2-one]-hafnium (4a), dichloro-bis[4-(4-methylphenylamido)pent-3-en-2-one]-hafnium (4b), dichloro-bis[4-(4-methoxyphenylamido)pent-3-en-2-one]-hafnium (4c), and dichloro-bis[4-(4-chlorophenylamido)pent-3-en-2-one]-hafnium (4d) are reported. All the complexes (4a-d) were characterized by spectroscopic methods ((1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, IR), and elemental analysis while the compound 4c was further examined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, revealing that the complex is monomer with the hafnium center in octahedral coordination environment and oxygens of the chelating N-O ligands are trans to each other and the chloride ligands are in a cis arrangement. Volatile trends are established for four new β-ketiminate hafnium(IV) chloride complexes (4a-d). Sublimation enthalpies (ΔHsub) were calculated from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data, which show that, the dependence of ΔHsub on the molecular weight (4a-c) and inductive effects from chlorine (4d). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cytotoxicity and physicochemical properties of hafnium oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, James A; Luna-Velasco, Antonia; Boitano, Scott A; Shadman, Farhang; Ratner, Buddy D; Barnes, Chris; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2011-09-01

    Nano-sized hafnium oxide (HfO(2)) particles are being considered for applications within the semiconductor industry. However, little is known about their cytotoxicity. The objective of this work was to assess several HfO(2) nanoparticles (NPs) samples for their acute cytotoxicity. Dynamic light scattering analysis of the samples indicated that the average particle size of the HfO(2) in aqueous dispersions was in the submicron range with a fraction of particles having nano-dimensions. The media used in the toxicity assays decreased or increased the average particle size of HfO(2) NPs due to dispersion or agglomeration. Static time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) revealed numerous surface contaminants on the NPs. Only one HfO(2) sample caused moderate cytotoxicity to human cell lines. The inhibitory sample caused a 50% response in the Live/Dead assay with HaCaT skin cells at 2200 mg L(-1); and a 50% response in the mitochondrial toxicity test at 300 mg L(-1). A microbial inhibition assay based on methanogenic activity also revealed that another HFO(2) sample caused moderate inhibition. The difference in toxicity between samples could not be attributed to size. Instead the difference in toxicity was likely due to differences in the contaminants of the HfO(2). The ToF-SIMS analysis indicated unique signatures of Br and P in the sample toxic to human cell lines suggesting a distinct synthesis was used for that sample which may have been accompanied by inhibitory impurities. The results taken as a whole indicate that HfO(2) itself is relatively non-toxic. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. FY 93 site characterization status report and data package for the carbon tetrachloride site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohay, V.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-09-28

    This report provides the status and accomplishments from fiscal year site characterization activities conducted as part of the 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action and the Volatile Organic Compounds - Arid Integrated Demonstration. The report includes or references all available raw data collected as part of these tasks. During fiscal year 1993, the 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action and the Volatile Organic Compounds - Arid Integrated Demonstration programs focused on the carbon tetrachloride plume in the unsaturated zone underlying the 200 West Area at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington.

  9. ENTIRELY AQUEOUS SOLUTION-GEL ROUTE FOR THE PREPARATION OF ZIRCONIUM CARBIDE, HAFNIUM CARBIDE AND THEIR TERNARY CARBIDE POWDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Changrui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An entirely aqueous solution-gel route has been developed for the synthesis of zirconium carbide, hafnium carbide and their ternary carbide powders. Zirconium oxychloride (ZrOCl₂.8H₂O, malic acid (MA and ethylene glycol (EG were dissolved in water to form the aqueous zirconium carbide precursor. Afterwards, this aqueous precursor was gelled and transformed into zirconium carbide at a relatively low temperature (1200 °C for achieving an intimate mixing of the intermediate products. Hafnium and the ternary carbide powders were also synthesized via the same aqueous route. All the zirconium, hafnium and ternary carbide powders exhibited a particle size of ∼100 nm.

  10. Measurement of L(III) Subshell Absorption Jump Parameters of Hafnium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, E; Saritas, N; Dogan, M; Koksal, O K; Karabulut, K; Apaydin, G; Tirasoglu, E

    2015-12-01

    The L(III) subshell absorption jump ratio and jump factor of hafnium have been measured using two different ways which are X-ray attenuation method and Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence technique. The results obtained both ways have been compared with theoretical values. They are in good agreement with each other.

  11. Self-diffusion in the hexagonal structure of Zirconium and Hafnium: computer simulation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Hernán Ruiz

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-diffusion by vacancy mechanism is studied in two metals of hexagonal close packed structure, namely Hafnium and Zirconium. Computer simulation techniques are used together with many-body potentials of the embedded atom type. Defect properties are calculated at 0 K by molecular static while molecular dynamic is used to explore a wide temperature range.

  12. "Decarbonization" of an imino N-heterocyclic carbene via triple benzyl migration from hafnium

    Science.gov (United States)

    An imino N-heterocyclic carbene underwent three sequential benzyl migrations upon reaction with tetrabenzylhafnium, resulting in complete removal of the carbene carbon from the ligand. The resulting eneamido-amidinato hafnium complex showed alkene polymerization activity comparable to that of a prec...

  13. The corrosion behavior of hafnium in high-temperature-water environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rishel, D.M.; Smee, J.D.; Kammenzind, B.F.

    1999-10-01

    The high-temperature-water corrosion performance of hafnium is evaluated. Corrosion kinetic data are used to develop correlations that are a function of time and temperature. The evaluation is based on corrosion tests conducted in out-of-pile autoclaves and in out-of-flux locations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at temperatures ranging from 288 to 360 C. Similar to the corrosion behavior of unalloyed zirconium, the high-temperature-water corrosion response of hafnium exhibits three corrosion regimes: pretransition, posttransition, and spalling. In the pretransition regime, cubic corrosion kinetics are exhibited, whereas in the posttransition regime, linear corrosion kinetics are exhibited. Because of the scatter in the spalling regime data, it is not reasonable to use a best fit of the data to describe spalling regime corrosion. Data also show that neutron irradiation does not alter the corrosion performance of hafnium. Finally, the data illustrate that the corrosion rate of hafnium is significantly less than that of Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4.

  14. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  15. Plasma quench production of titanium from titanium tetrachloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, J.W.

    1994-10-01

    This project, Plasma Quench Production of Titanium from Titanium Tetrachloride, centers on developing a technique for rapidly quenching the high temperature metal species and preventing back reactions with the halide. The quenching technique chosen uses the temperature drop produced in a converging/diverging supersonic nozzle. The rapid quench provided by this nozzle prevents the back reaction of the halide and metal. The nature of the process produces nanosized particles (10 to 100 nm). The powders are collected by cyclone separators, the hydrogen flared, and the acid scrubbed. Aluminum and titanium powders have been produced in the laboratory-scale device at 1 gram per hour. Efforts to date to scale up this process have not been successful.

  16. The Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Budget: Mystery or Not

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qing; Newman, Paul A.; Daniel, John S.; Reimann, Stefan; Hall, Bradley; Dutton, Geoff; Kuijpers, Lambert J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is a major anthropogenic ozone-depleting substance and greenhouse gas and has been regulated under the Montreal Protocol. However, atmospheric observations show a very slow decline in CCl4 concentrations, inconsistent with the nearly zero emissions estimate based on the UNEP reported production and feedstock usage in recent years. It is now apparent that there are either unidentified industrial leakages, an unknown production source of CCl4, or large legacy emissions from CCl4 contaminated sites. In this paper we use a global chemistry climate model to assess the budget mystery of atmospheric CCl4. We explore various factors that affect the global trend and the gradient between the Northern and Southern hemispheres or interhemispheric gradient (IHG): emissions, emission hemispheric partitioning, and lifetime variations. We find a present-day emission of 30-50 Gg per yr and a total lifetime 25 - 36 years are necessary to reconcile both the observed CCl4 global trend and IHG.

  17. Formation of porous gas hydrates

    CERN Document Server

    Salamatin, Andrey N

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates grown at gas-ice interfaces are examined by electron microscopy and found to have a submicron porous texture. Permeability of the intervening hydrate layers provides the connection between the two counterparts (gas and water molecules) of the clathration reaction and makes further hydrate formation possible. The study is focused on phenomenological description of principal stages and rate-limiting processes that control the kinetics of the porous gas hydrate crystal growth from ice powders. Although the detailed physical mechanisms involved in the porous hydrate formation still are not fully understood, the initial stage of hydrate film spreading over the ice surface should be distinguished from the subsequent stage which is presumably limited by the clathration reaction at the ice-hydrate interface and develops after the ice grain coating is finished. The model reveals a time dependence of the reaction degree essentially different from that when the rate-limiting step of the hydrate formation at...

  18. Tensile and stress-rupture behavior of hafnium carbide dispersed molybdenum and tungsten base alloy wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hee Mann; Titran, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    The tensile strain rate sensitivity and the stress-rupture strength of Mo-base and W-base alloy wires, 380 microns in diameter, were determined over the temperature range from 1200 K to 1600 K. Three molybdenum alloy wires; Mo + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC), Mo + 25w/o W + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC+25W) and Mo + 45w/o W + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC+45W), and a W + 0.4w/o hafnium carbide (WHfC) tungsten alloy wire were evaluated. The tensile strength of all wires studied was found to have a positive strain rate sensitivity. The strain rate dependency increased with increasing temperature and is associated with grain broadening of the initial fibrous structures. The hafnium carbide dispersed W-base and Mo-base alloys have superior tensile and stress-rupture properties than those without HfC. On a density compensated basis the MoHfC wires exhibit superior tensile and stress-rupture strengths to the WHfC wires up to approximately 1400 K. Addition of tungsten in the Mo-alloy wires was found to increase the long-term stress rupture strength at temperatures above 1400 K. Theoretical calculations indicate that the strength and ductility advantage of the HfC dispersed alloy wires is due to the resistance to recrystallization imparted by the dispersoid.

  19. IRIS Toxicological Review and Summary Documents for Carbon Tetrachloride (Peer Review Plan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon tetrachloride is a volatile haloalkane with a wide range of industrial and chemical applications. It is produced commercially from chlorination of a variety of low molecular weight hydrocarbons such as carbon disulfide, methanol, methane, propane, and ethylene dichloride....

  20. Recent Site-Wide Transport Modeling Related to the Carbon Tetrachloride Plume at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeron, Marcel P.; Cole, C R.

    2005-11-01

    Carbon tetrachloride transport in the unconfined aquifer system at the Hanford Site has been the subject of follow-on studies since the Carbon Tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Demonstration (ITRD) Program was completed in FY 2002. These scoping analyses were undertaken to provide support for strategic planning and guidance for the more robust modeling needed to obtain a final record of decision (ROD) for the carbon tetrachloride plume in the 200 West Area. This report documents the technical approach and the results of these follow-on, site-wide scale-modeling efforts. The existing site-wide groundwater model was used in this effort. The work extended that performed as part of the ITRD modeling study in which a 200 West Area scale submodel was developed to examine arrival concentrations at an arbitrary boundary between the 200 E and 200 W areas. These scoping analyses extended the analysis to predict the arrival of the carbon tetrachloride plume at the Columbia River. The results of these analyses illustrate the importance of developing field-scale estimates of natural attenuation parameters, abiotic degradation rate and soil/water equilibrium sorption coefficient, for carbon tetrachloride. With these parameters set to zero, carbon tetrachloride concentrations will exceed the compliance limit of 5 ?g/L outside the 200 Area Plateau Waste Management Area, and the aquifer source loading and area of the aquifer affected will continue to grow until arrival rates of carbon tetrachloride equal source release rates, estimated at 33 kg/yr. Results of this scoping analysis show that the natural attenuation parameters are critical in predicting the future movement of carbon tetrachloride from the 200 West Area. Results also show the significant change in predictions between continual source release from the vadose zone and complete source removal.

  1. [Hydration in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maristany, Cleofé Pérez-Portabella; Segurola Gurruchaga, Hegoi

    2011-01-01

    Water is an essential foundation for life, having both a regulatory and structural function. The former results from active and passive participation in all metabolic reactions, and its role in conserving and maintaining body temperature. Structurally speaking it is the major contributer to tissue mass, accounting for 60% of the basis of blood plasma, intracellular and intersticial fluid. Water is also part of the primary structures of life such as genetic material or proteins. Therefore, it is necessary that the nurse makes an early assessment of patients water needs to detect if there are signs of electrolyte imbalance. Dehydration can be a very serious problem, especially in children and the elderly. Dehydrations treatment with oral rehydration solution decreases the risk of developing hydration disorders, but even so, it is recommended to follow preventive measures to reduce the incidence and severity of dehydration. The key to having a proper hydration is prevention. Artificial nutrition encompasses the need for precise calculation of water needs in enteral nutrition as parenteral, so the nurse should be part of this process and use the tools for calculating the patient's requirements. All this helps to ensure an optimal nutritional status in patients at risk. Ethical dilemmas are becoming increasingly common in clinical practice. On the subject of artificial nutrition and hydration, there isn't yet any unanimous agreement regarding hydration as a basic care. It is necessary to take decisions in consensus with the health team, always thinking of the best interests of the patient.

  2. Immobilization mechanisms of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) to hafnium dioxide (HfO2) surfaces for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenkopf, Nicholas M; Rice, P Zachary; Bergkvist, Magnus; Deskins, N Aaron; Cady, Nathaniel C

    2012-10-24

    Immobilization of biomolecular probes to the sensing substrate is a critical step for biosensor fabrication. In this work we investigated the phosphate-dependent, oriented immobilization of DNA to hafnium dioxide surfaces for biosensing applications. Phosphate-dependent immobilization was confirmed on a wide range of hafnium oxide surfaces; however, a second interaction mode was observed on monoclinic hafnium dioxide. On the basis of previous materials studies on these films, DNA immobilization studies, and density functional theory (DFT) modeling, we propose that this secondary interaction is between the exposed nucleobases of single stranded DNA and the surface. The lattice spacing of monoclinic hafnium dioxide matches the base-to-base pitch of DNA. Monoclinic hafnium dioxide is advantageous for nanoelectronic applications, yet because of this secondary DNA immobilization mechanism, it could impede DNA hybridization or cause nonspecific surface intereactions. Nonetheless, DNA immobilization on polycrystalline and amorphous hafnium dioxide is predominately mediated by the terminal phosphate in an oriented manner which is desirable for biosensing applications.

  3. A rapid procedure for the simultaneous determination of zirconium and hafnium in high-temperature alloys by means of a spectrophotometric masking approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulski, T R

    1982-06-01

    Data are presented for a refined spectrophotometric procedure for the simultaneous determination of zirconium and hafnium based on the combined effects of hydrogen peroxide, sodium sulphate, and excess of zirconium ion on the hafnium and zirconium complexes with Xylenol Orange in 0.2M perchloric acid. Isolation procedures for the hafnium/zirconium content of complex high-temperature alloys which result in an ionic substrate compatible with the spectrophotometric masking method were devised.

  4. Modeling Hydrates and the Gas Hydrate Markup Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Wang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates, as an important potential fuels, flow assurance hazards, and possible factors initiating the submarine geo-hazard and global climate change, have attracted the interest of scientists all over the world. After two centuries of hydrate research, a great amount of scientific data on gas hydrates has been accumulated. Therefore the means to manage, share, and exchange these data have become an urgent task. At present, metadata (Markup Language is recognized as one of the most efficient ways to facilitate data management, storage, integration, exchange, discovery and retrieval. Therefore the CODATA Gas Hydrate Data Task Group proposed and specified Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML as an extensible conceptual metadata model to characterize the features of data on gas hydrate. This article introduces the details of modeling portion of GHML.

  5. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  6. A study on gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byoung Jae; Jung, Tae Jin; Sunwoo, Don [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Sufficient documents were reviewed to understand solid components of water and gaseous hydrocarbon known as gas hydrates, which represent an important potential energy resource of the future. The review provides us with valuable information on crystal structures, kinetics, origin and distribution of gas hydrates. In addition, the review increased our knowledge of exploration and development methods of gas hydrates. Large amounts of methane, the principal component of natural gas, in the form of solid gas hydrate are found mainly offshore in outer continental margin sediment and, to a lesser extent, in polar regions commonly associated with permafrost. Natural gas hydrates are stable in some environments where the hydrostatic pressure exerted by overlying water column is sufficient for hydrate formation and stability. The required high pressures generally restrict gas hydrate to sediments beneath water of approximately 400 m. Higher sediment temperatures at greater subbottom depths destabilize gas hydrates. Based on the pressure- temperature condition, the outer continental margin of East Sea where water depth is deep enough to form gas hydrate is considered to have high potential of gas hydrate accumulations. (author). 56 refs., tabs., figs.

  7. Chemical solution deposition of ferroelectric yttrium-doped hafnium oxide films on platinum electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starschich, S.; Griesche, D.; Schneller, T.; Waser, R.; Böttger, U.

    2014-05-01

    Ferroelectric hafnium oxide films were fabricated by chemical solution deposition with a remnant polarization of >13 μC/cm2. The samples were prepared with 5.2 mol. % yttrium-doping and the thickness varied from 18 nm to 70 nm. The hafnium oxide layer was integrated into a metal-insulator-metal capacitor using platinum electrodes. Due to the processing procedure, no thickness dependence of the ferroelectric properties was observed. To confirm the ferroelectric nature of the deposited samples, polarization, capacitance, and piezoelectric displacement measurements were performed. However, no evidence of the orthorhombic phase was found which has been proposed to be the non-centrosymmetric, ferroelectric phase in HfO2.

  8. Effect of hafnium and titanium coated implants on several blood biochemical markers after osteosynthesis in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Ashraf; Akhtyamov, Ildar; Shakirova, Faina; Zubairova, Lyaili; Gatina, Elmira; Aliev, Capital Ie Cyrilliclchin

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study comparing the dynamics of several biochemical markers before and after osteosynthesis, utilizing implants coated with titanium and hafnium nitrides and non-coated implants on rabbits' bones. The Study has been conducted on 30 rabbits of both sexes, at the age of 6-7 months, weighing 2526.5±74.4 gm. Animals underwent open osteotomy of the tibia in the middle third of the diaphysis followed by the intramedullary nailing. The level of alkaline phosphatase, calcium, phosphorus, total protein, glucose, ALT and AST were monitored for 60 days. the use of implants coated with titanium and hafnium nitrides, which have high strength, thermal and chemical stability, was not accompanied by the development of additional negative reactive changes compared to non-coated implants. Nanotechnology used in manufacturing bioinert coatings for implants for osteosynthesis, has made the post-operative period less complicated as reflected by less expressed changing in the markers of bone metabolism and hepatotoxicity.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of hafnium oxide films for thermo and photoluminescence applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, J Guzmán; Frutis, M A Aguilar; Flores, G Alarcón; Hipólito, M García; Maciel Cerda, A; Azorín Nieto, J; Montalvo, T Rivera; Falcony, C

    2010-01-01

    Hafnium oxide (HfO(2)) films were deposited by the ultrasonic spray pyrolysis process. The films were synthesized from hafnium chloride as raw material in deionized water as solvent and were deposited on corning glass substrates at temperatures from 300 to 600 degrees C. For substrate temperatures lower than 400 degrees C the deposited films were amorphous, while for substrate temperatures higher than 450 degrees C, the monoclinic phase of HfO(2) appeared. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the film's surface resulted rough with semi-spherical promontories. The films showed a chemical composition close to HfO(2), with an Hf/O ratio of about 0.5. UV radiation was used in order to achieve the thermoluminescent characterization of the films; the 240 nm wavelength induced the best response. In addition, preliminary photoluminescence spectra, as a function of the deposition temperatures, are shown. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hafnium-an optical hydrogen sensor spanning six orders in pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelsma, C; Bannenberg, L J; van Setten, M J; Steinke, N-J; van Well, A A; Dam, B

    2017-06-05

    Hydrogen detection is essential for its implementation as an energy vector. So far, palladium is considered to be the most effective hydrogen sensing material. Here we show that palladium-capped hafnium thin films show a highly reproducible change in optical transmission in response to a hydrogen exposure ranging over six orders of magnitude in pressure. The optical signal is hysteresis-free within this range, which includes a transition between two structural phases. A temperature change results in a uniform shift of the optical signal. This, to our knowledge unique, feature facilitates the sensor calibration and suggests a constant hydrogenation enthalpy. In addition, it suggests an anomalously steep increase of the entropy with the hydrogen/metal ratio that cannot be explained on the basis of a classical solid solution model. The optical behaviour as a function of its hydrogen content makes hafnium well-suited for use as a hydrogen detection material.

  11. Switching Kinetics in Nanoscale Hafnium Oxide Based Ferroelectric Field-Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulaosmanovic, Halid; Ocker, Johannes; Müller, Stefan; Schroeder, Uwe; Müller, Johannes; Polakowski, Patrick; Flachowsky, Stefan; van Bentum, Ralf; Mikolajick, Thomas; Slesazeck, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    The recent discovery of ferroelectricity in thin hafnium oxide films has led to a resurgence of interest in ferroelectric memory devices. Although both experimental and theoretical studies on this new ferroelectric system have been undertaken, much remains to be unveiled regarding its domain landscape and switching kinetics. Here we demonstrate that the switching of single domains can be directly observed in ultrascaled ferroelectric field effect transistors. Using models of ferroelectric domain nucleation we explain the time, field and temperature dependence of polarization reversal. A simple stochastic model is proposed as well, relating nucleation processes to the observed statistical switching behavior. Our results suggest novel opportunities for hafnium oxide based ferroelectrics in nonvolatile memory devices.

  12. Highly flexible resistive switching memory based on amorphous-nanocrystalline hafnium oxide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jie; Xue, Wuhong; Ji, Zhenghui; Liu, Gang; Niu, Xuhong; Yi, Xiaohui; Pan, Liang; Zhan, Qingfeng; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Li, Run-Wei

    2017-06-01

    Flexible and transparent resistive switching memories are highly desired for the construction of portable and even wearable electronics. Upon optimization of the microstructure wherein an amorphous-nanocrystalline hafnium oxide thin film is fabricated, an all-oxide based transparent RRAM device with stable resistive switching behavior that can withstand a mechanical tensile stress of up to 2.12% is obtained. It is demonstrated that the superior electrical, thermal and mechanical performance of the ITO/HfOx/ITO device can be ascribed to the formation of pseudo-straight metallic hafnium conductive filaments in the switching layer, and is only limited by the choice of electrode materials. When the ITO bottom electrode is replaced with platinum metal, the mechanical failure threshold of the device can be further extended.

  13. Evidence for oxygen vacancies movement during wake-up in ferroelectric hafnium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starschich, S.; Böttger, U. [Institut für Werkstoffe der Elektrotechnik 2, RWTH Aachen University, Sommerfeldstraße 24, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Menzel, S. [Peter Grünberg Institut 7, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2016-01-18

    The wake-up effect which is observed in ferroelectric hafnium oxide is investigated in yttrium doped hafnium oxide prepared by chemical solution deposition. It can be shown that not the amount of cycles but the duration of the applied electrical field is essential for the wake-up. Temperature dependent wake-up cycling in a range of −160 °C to 100 °C reveals a strong temperature activation of the wake-up, which can be attributed to ion rearrangement during cycling. By using asymmetrical electrodes, resistive valence change mechanism switching can be observed coincident with ferroelectric switching. From the given results, it can be concluded that redistribution of oxygen vacancies is the origin of the wake-up effect.

  14. Hafnium--an optical hydrogen sensor spanning six orders in pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelsma, C.; Bannenberg, L. J.; van Setten, M. J.; Steinke, N.-J.; van Well, A. A.; Dam, B.

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen detection is essential for its implementation as an energy vector. So far, palladium is considered to be the most effective hydrogen sensing material. Here we show that palladium-capped hafnium thin films show a highly reproducible change in optical transmission in response to a hydrogen exposure ranging over six orders of magnitude in pressure. The optical signal is hysteresis-free within this range, which includes a transition between two structural phases. A temperature change results in a uniform shift of the optical signal. This, to our knowledge unique, feature facilitates the sensor calibration and suggests a constant hydrogenation enthalpy. In addition, it suggests an anomalously steep increase of the entropy with the hydrogen/metal ratio that cannot be explained on the basis of a classical solid solution model. The optical behaviour as a function of its hydrogen content makes hafnium well-suited for use as a hydrogen detection material.

  15. Inductively coupled plasma etching of hafnium-indium-zinc oxide using chlorine based gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yong-Hee; Jang, Ho-Kyun; Jin, Jun-Eon; Joo, Min-Kyu; Piao, Mingxing; Shin, Jong Mok; Kim, Jae-Sung; Na, Junhong; Kim, Gyu Tae

    2014-04-01

    We report the etching characteristics of a stacked hafnium-indium-zinc oxide (HIZO) with a photoresist using the gas mixture of chlorine and argon (Cl2/Ar). The etching behaviors of HIZO have been investigated in terms of a source power, a bias power and a chamber pressure. As the concentration of Cl2 was increased compared to pure Ar, the etch rate of HIZO film was found slightly different from that of indium-zinc oxide (IZO) film. Moreover, to investigate the etching mechanism systematically, various inspections were carried out such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depending on the portion of Cl2. Additionally, we compared the etching mechanism of HIZO film with IZO film to confirm the difference of chemical bonds caused by the influence of hafnium doping.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of hafnium oxide films for thermo and photoluminescence applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman Mendoza, J. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Legaria 694, Miguel Hidalgo, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: joguzman@ipn.mx; Aguilar Frutis, M.A.; Flores, G. Alarcon [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Legaria 694, Miguel Hidalgo, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Garcia Hipolito, M. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Coyoacan, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Maciel Cerda, A. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Legaria 694, Miguel Hidalgo, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Azorin Nieto, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana- Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rivera Montalvo, T. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Legaria 694, Miguel Hidalgo, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana- Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Falcony, C. [Departamento de Fisica, CINVESTAV-IPN, A.P. 14-740, 07000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-04-15

    Hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) films were deposited by the ultrasonic spray pyrolysis process. The films were synthesized from hafnium chloride as raw material in deionized water as solvent and were deposited on corning glass substrates at temperatures from 300 to 600 deg. C. For substrate temperatures lower than 400 deg. C the deposited films were amorphous, while for substrate temperatures higher than 450 deg. C, the monoclinic phase of HfO{sub 2} appeared. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the film's surface resulted rough with semi-spherical promontories. The films showed a chemical composition close to HfO{sub 2}, with an Hf/O ratio of about 0.5. UV radiation was used in order to achieve the thermoluminescent characterization of the films; the 240 nm wavelength induced the best response. In addition, preliminary photoluminescence spectra, as a function of the deposition temperatures, are shown.

  17. Drilling Gas Hydrates on hydrate Ridge, Oregon continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehu, A. M.; Bohrmann, G.; Leg 204 Science Party

    2002-12-01

    During Leg 204, we cored and logged 9 sites on the Oregon continental margin to determine the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates in an accretionary ridge and adjacent slope basin, investigate the mechanisms that transport methane and other gases into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and obtain constraints on physical properties of hydrates in situ. A 3D seismic survey conducted in 2000 provided images of potential subsurface fluid conduits and indicated the position of the GHSZ throughout the survey region. After coring the first site, we acquired Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) data at all but one site to provide an overview of downhole physical properties. The LWD data confirmed the general position of key seismic stratigraphic horizons and yielded an initial estimate of hydrate concentration through the proxy of in situ electrical resistivity. These records proved to be of great value in planning subsequent coring. The second new hydrate proxy to be tested was infrared thermal imaging of cores on the catwalk as rapidly as possible after retrieval. The thermal images were used to identify hydrate samples and to estimate the distribution and texture of hydrate within the cores. Geochemical analyses of interstitial waters and of headspace and void gases provide additional information on the distribution and concentration of hydrate within the stability zone, the origin and pathway of fluids into and through the GHSZ, and the rates at which gas hydrate is forming. Bio- and lithostratigraphic description of cores, measurement of physical properties, and in situ pressure core sampling and thermal measurements complement the data set, providing ground-truth tests of inferred physical and sedimentological properties. Among the most interesting preliminary results are: 1) that gas hydrates are distributed through a broad depth range within the GHSZ and that different physical and chemical proxies for hydrate distribution and concentration give generally

  18. On-line separation of refractory hafnium and tantalum isotopes at the ISOCELE separator

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, C F; Obert, J; Paris, P; Putaux, J C

    1981-01-01

    By chemical evaporation technique, neutron deficient hafnium nuclei have been on-line separated at the ISOCELE facility, from the isobar rare-earth elements, in the metal-fluoride HfF/sub 3//sup +/ ion form. Half-lives of /sup 162-165/Hf have been measured. Similarly, tantalum has been selectively separated on the TaF/sub 4//sup +/ form. (4 refs) .

  19. Hafnium nitride buffer layers for growth of GaN on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Robert D.; Weber, Eicke R.

    2005-08-16

    Gallium nitride is grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on (111) and (001) silicon substrates using hafnium nitride buffer layers. Wurtzite GaN epitaxial layers are obtained on both the (111) and (001) HfN/Si surfaces, with crack-free thickness up to 1.2 {character pullout}m. However, growth on the (001) surface results in nearly stress-free films, suggesting that much thicker crack-free layers could be obtained.

  20. The Effect of Boron Impurity on the Structure and Mechanical Properties of Hafnium

    OpenAIRE

    S.V. Chornobuk; V.A. Makara; A.O. Goncharenko

    2017-01-01

    In present study the influence of low concentrations (≤ 1.5 at. %) impurities of boron on the structure and mechanical properties of hafnium has been discussed. Experimental specimens of the alloys with different content of impurities of boron have been compacted during reaction hot syntering. Revealed significant dependence of structure and mechanical properties of these alloys on their composition. The prospective use of boron as an alloying element to improve the operational characteristic...

  1. Hafnium germanosilicate thin films for gate and capacitor dielectric applications: thermal stability studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addepalli, Swarna; Sivasubramani, Prasanna; El-Bouanani, Mohamed; Kim, Moon; Gnade, Bruce; Wallace, Robert

    2003-03-01

    The use of SiO_2-GeO2 mixtures in gate and capacitor dielectric applications is hampered by the inherent thermodynamic instability of germanium oxide. Studies to date have confirmed that germanium oxide is readily converted to elemental germanium [1,2]. In sharp contrast, germanium oxide is known to form stable compounds with transition metal oxides such as hafnium oxide (hafnium germanate, HfGeO_4) [3]. Thus, the incorporation of hafnium in SiO_2-GeO2 may be expected to enhance the thermal stability of germanium oxide via Hf-O-Ge bond formation. In addition, the introduction of a transition metal would simultaneously enhance the capacitance of the dielectric thereby permitting a thicker dielectric which reduces leakage current [4]. In this study, the thermal stability of PVD-grown hafnium germanosilicate (HfGeSiO) films was investigated. XPS, HR-TEM, C-V and I-V results of films after deposition and subsequent annealing treatments will be presented. The results indicate that the presence or formation of elemental germanium drastically affects the stability of the HfGeSiO films. This work is supported by DARPA through SPAWAR Grant No. N66001-00-1-8928, and the Texas Advanced Technology Program. References: [1] W. S. Liu, J .S. Chen, M.-A. Nicolet, V. Arbet-Engels, K. L. Wang, Journal of Applied Physics, 72, 4444 (1992), and, Applied Physics Letters, 62, 3321 (1993) [2] W. S. Liu, M. -A. Nicolet, H. -H. Park, B. -H. Koak, J. -W. Lee, Journal of Applied Physics, 78, 2631 (1995) [3] P. M. Lambert, Inorganic Chemistry, 37, 1352 (1998) [4] G. D. Wilk, R. M. Wallace and J. M. Anthony, Journal of Applied Physics, 89, 5243 (2001)

  2. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  3. Hafnium metallocene compounds used as cathode interfacial layers for enhanced electron transfer in organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Keunhee; Oh, Seungsik; Jung, Donggeun; Chae, Heeyeop; Kim, Hyoungsub; Boo, Jin-Hyo

    2012-01-09

    We have used hafnium metallocene compounds as cathode interfacial layers for organic solar cells [OSCs]. A metallocene compound consists of a transition metal and two cyclopentadienyl ligands coordinated in a sandwich structure. For the fabrication of the OSCs, poly[3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene]:poly(styrene sulfonate), poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) + 66-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester, bis-(ethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium(IV) dichloride, and aluminum were deposited as a hole transport layer, an active layer, a cathode interfacial layer, and a cathode, respectively. The hafnium metallocene compound cathode interfacial layer improved the performance of OSCs compared to that of OSCs without the interfacial layer. The current density-voltage characteristics of OSCs with an interfacial layer thickness of 0.7 nm and of those without an interfacial layer showed power conversion efficiency [PCE] values of 2.96% and 2.34%, respectively, under an illumination condition of 100 mW/cm2 (AM 1.5). It is thought that a cathode interfacial layer of an appropriate thickness enhances the electron transfer between the active layer and the cathode, and thus increases the PCE of the OSCs.

  4. CO assisted N2 functionalization activated by a dinuclear hafnium complex: a DFT mechanistic exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuelu; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Wenchao; Lei, Ming

    2013-01-21

    In this paper, the reaction mechanisms of CO assisted N(2) cleavage and functionalization activated by a dinuclear hafnium complex are studied using a density function theory (DFT) method. Several key intermediates (Ia, Ib, Ic and Id) with axial/equatorial N=C=O coordination structures are found to be of importance along reaction pathways of CO assisted N(2) functionalization, which could provide a profound theoretical insight into the C-N bond formation and N-N bond cleavage. There are two different attack directions to insert the first CO molecule into the Hf-N bonds of the dinuclear hafnium complex, which lead to C-N bond formation. The calculated results imply that CO insertion into the Hf(1)-N(3) bond (Path A1) reacts more easily than that into the Hf(2)-N(3) bond (Path A3). But for the insertion of the second CO insertion to give 2A, there are two possibilities (Path A1 and Path A2) according to this insertion being after/before N-N bond cleavage. Two pathways (Path A1 and Path A2) are proved to be possible to form final dinitrogen functionalized products (oxamidide 2A, 2B and 2C) in this study, which explain the formation of different oxamidide isomers in CO assisted N(2) functionalization activated by a dinuclear hafnium complex.

  5. Hepatoprotective effect of Centella asiatica (L in carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antony B

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to evaluate the hepatoprotective effects of the Centella asiatica extract in carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury in rats. Sprague Dawley rats were treated with alcohol extract of Centella asiatica orally in two doses (20 and 40 mg/kg/day for 3 mo along with intraperitoneal injection of carbon tetrachloride (1 ml/kg. Biochemical parameters such as serum total protein, albumin and marker enzymes (aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase were estimated both before and after the experiment. Histopathological studies of liver were also carried out to confirm the biochemical changes. Carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxic effects were evident by a significant (p < 0.05 increase in the serum marker enzymes and a decrease in the total serum protein and albumin. Administration of extract of Centella asiatica effectively inhibited these changes in a dose-dependent manner; maximum effect was with 40 mg/kg. Histopathological examination of liver tissue corroborated well with the biochemical changes. Hepatic steatosis, hydropic degeneration and necrosis were observed in carbon tetrachloride-treated group, while these were completely absent in the treatment group. Centella asiatica extract exhibited hepatoprotective action against carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury. This effect is attributed to the presence of asiaticoside (14.5% in the extract.

  6. Excess enthalpies from displacement calorimetry excess enthalpies for 1,1,1- trichloroethane+carbon tetrachloride and 2-chloro-2-methylpropane+carbon tetrachloride at 298.15 K

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miltenburg, J.C. van der; Obbink, J.H.; Meijer, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    Excess enthalpies HE are reported for the 1,1,1-trichloroethane+carbon tetrachloride and 2-chloro-2-methylpropane+carbon tetrachloride systems. The results are fitted to the formula HE = x(1−x)Σiai(1−2x)i.

  7. Correlations between nuclear data and results of integral slab experiments. Case of hafnium; Correlations entre donnees nucleaires et experiences integrales a plaques: le cas du hafnium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, J.M

    1997-10-22

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate how much integral slab experiments can both reduce discrepancies between experimental results and calculations, and improve the knowledge of hafnium isotopes neutronic parameters by an adapted sensitivity and uncertainty method. A statistical approach, based on the generalized least squares method and perturbation theory, has been incorporated into our calculation system in order to deduce microscopic cross-section adjustments from observed integral measurements on this particular `mock-up` reactor. In this study it has been established that the correlations between integral parameters and hafnium capture cross-sections enable specific variations in the region of resolved resonances at the level of multigroup and punctual cross-sections recommended data (JEF-2.2 evaluation) to be highlighted. The use of determinist methods (APOLLO2 code) together with Monte Carlo- type simulations (TRIPOLI4 code) enabled a depth analysis of the modelling approximations to be carried out. Furthermore, the sensitivity coefficient validation technique employed leads to a reliable assessment of the quality of the new basic nuclear data. In this instance, the adjustments proposed for certain isotope {sup 177}Hf resonance parameters reduce, after error propagation, by 3 to 5 per cent the difference between experimental results and calculations related to this absorbent`s efficiency. Beyond this particular application, the qualification methodology integrated in our calculation system should enable other basic sizing parameters to be treated (chemical / geometric data or other unexplored nuclear data) to make technological requirements less stringent. (author) 128 refs.

  8. Correlations between nuclear data and integral slab experiments: the case of hafnium; Correlations entre donnees nucleaires et experiences integrales a plaques: le cas du hafnium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, J.M

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate how much integral slab experiments can both reduce discrepancies between experimental results and calculations, and improve the knowledge of hafnium isotopes neutronic parameters by an adapted sensitivity and uncertainty method. A statistical approach, based on the generalized least squares method and perturbation theory, has been incorporated into our calculation system in order to deduce microscopic cross-section adjustments from observed integral measurements on this particular 'mock-up' reactor.In this study it has been established that the correlations between integral parameters and hafnium capture cross-sections enable specific variations in the region of resolved resonances at the level of multigroup and punctual cross-sections recommended data (JEF-2.2 evaluation) to be highlighted. The use of determinist methods together with Monte Carlo- type simulations enabled a depth analysis of the modelling approximations to be carried out. Furthermore, the sensitivity coefficient validation technique employed leads to a reliable assessment of the quality of the new basic nuclear data. In this instance, the adjustments proposed for certain isotope {sup 177}Hf resonance parameters reduce, after error propagation, by 3 to 5 per cent the difference between experimental results and calculations related to this absorbent's efficiency. Beyond this particular application, the qualification methodology integrated in our calculation system should enable other basic sizing parameters to be treated (chemical / geometric data or other unexplored nuclear data) to make technological requirements less stringent. (author)

  9. Correlations between nuclear data and results of integral slab experiments. Case of hafnium; Correlations entre donnees nucleaires et experiences integrales a plaques: le cas du hafnium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, J.M

    1997-10-22

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate how much integral slab experiments can both reduce discrepancies between experimental results and calculations, and improve the knowledge of hafnium isotopes neutronic parameters by an adapted sensitivity and uncertainty method. A statistical approach, based on the generalized least squares method and perturbation theory, has been incorporated into our calculation system in order to deduce microscopic cross-section adjustments from observed integral measurements on this particular `mock-up` reactor. In this study it has been established that the correlations between integral parameters and hafnium capture cross-sections enable specific variations in the region of resolved resonances at the level of multigroup and punctual cross-sections recommended data (JEF-2.2 evaluation) to be highlighted. The use of determinist methods (APOLLO2 code) together with Monte Carlo- type simulations (TRIPOLI4 code) enabled a depth analysis of the modelling approximations to be carried out. Furthermore, the sensitivity coefficient validation technique employed leads to a reliable assessment of the quality of the new basic nuclear data. In this instance, the adjustments proposed for certain isotope {sup 177}Hf resonance parameters reduce, after error propagation, by 3 to 5 per cent the difference between experimental results and calculations related to this absorbent`s efficiency. Beyond this particular application, the qualification methodology integrated in our calculation system should enable other basic sizing parameters to be treated (chemical / geometric data or other unexplored nuclear data) to make technological requirements less stringent. (author) 128 refs.

  10. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of another electron donor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Best, JH; Hunneman, P; Doddema, HJ; Janssen, DB; Harder, W; Doddema, Hans J.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (52 mu M) was biodegraded for more than 72% in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of an external electron donor. The chloride mass balance demonstrated that all carbon tetrachloride transformed was completely dechlorinated. Chloroform and dichloromethane were somet

  11. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of another electron donor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Best, J.H. de; Hunneman, P.; Doddema, H.J.; Janssen, D.B.; Harder, W.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (52 μM) was biodegraded for more than 72% in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of an external electron donor. The chloride mass balance demonstrated that all carbon tetrachloride transformed was completely dechlorinated. Chloroform and dichloromethane were sometim

  12. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of another electron donor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Best, J.H. de; Hunneman, P.; Doddema, H.J.; Janssen, D.B.; Harder, W.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (52 μM) was biodegraded for more than 72% in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of an external electron donor. The chloride mass balance demonstrated that all carbon tetrachloride transformed was completely dechlorinated. Chloroform and dichloromethane were

  13. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of another electron donor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Best, JH; Hunneman, P; Doddema, HJ; Janssen, DB; Harder, W; Doddema, Hans J.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (52 mu M) was biodegraded for more than 72% in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of an external electron donor. The chloride mass balance demonstrated that all carbon tetrachloride transformed was completely dechlorinated. Chloroform and dichloromethane were somet

  14. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of another electron donor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Best, J.H. de; Hunneman, P.; Doddema, H.J.; Janssen, D.B.; Harder, W.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (52 μM) was biodegraded for more than 72% in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of an external electron donor. The chloride mass balance demonstrated that all carbon tetrachloride transformed was completely dechlorinated. Chloroform and dichloromethane were sometim

  15. Telmisartan ameliorates carbon tetrachloride-induced acute hepatotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atawia, Reem T; Esmat, Ahmed; Elsherbiny, Doaa A; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal

    2017-02-01

    This study assessed the potential hepatoprotective effect of telmisartan (TLM), a selective angiotensin II type 1 (AT1 ) receptor blocker, on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 )-induced acute hepatotoxity in rats. Intraperitoneal injection of male Wistar rats with CCl4 1 mL kg(-1) , 1:1 mixture with corn oil for 3 days increased serum alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, and alkaline phosphatase activities as well as total bilirubin, triglycerides and total cholesterol levels. This is in addition to the disrupted histological architecture in the CCl4 group. Rats receiving CCl4 and co-treated with TLM (3 and 10 mg kg(-1) , orally) showed ameliorated serum biochemical and histological changes almost to the control level. Nevertheless, rats treated with TLM (1 mg kg(-1) ) didn't show any significant changes compared to CCl4 intoxicated group. In addition, TLM rectified oxidative status disrupted by CCl4 intoxication. Interestingly, TLM protected against CCl4 -induced expressions of nuclear factor-κB, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-II, in a dose related manner. Moreover, TLM (3 and 10 mg kg(-1) ) significantly modified CCl4 -induced elevation in tumor necrosis factor-α and nitric oxide levels. Furthermore, TLM showed a marked decline in CD68+ cells stained areas and reduced activity of myeloperoxidase enzyme compared to CCl4 -intoxicated group. In conclusion, both doses of TLM (3 and 10 mg kg(-1) ) showed significant hepato-protective effects. However, TLM at a dose of 10 mg kg(-1) didn't show significant efficacy above 3 mg kg(-1) which is nearly equivalent to the human anti-hypertensive dose of 40 mg. Thus, may be effective in guarding against several hepatic complications due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 359-370, 2017.

  16. Improved ACE-FTS observations of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jeremy; Chipperfield, Martyn; Boone, Chris; Bernath, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS), on board the SCISAT satellite, has been recording solar occultation spectra through the Earth's atmosphere since 2004 and continues to take measurements with only minor loss in performance. ACE-FTS time series are available for a range of chlorine 'source' gases, including CCl3F (CFC-11), CCl2F2 (CFC-12), CHF2Cl (HCFC-22), CH3Cl and CCl4. Recently there has been much community interest in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), a substance regulated by the Montreal Protocol because it leads to the catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone. Estimated sources and sinks of CCl4 remain inconsistent with observations of its abundance. Satellite observations of CCl4 in the stratosphere are particularly useful in validating stratospheric loss (photolysis) rates; in fact the atmospheric loss of CCl4 is essentially all due to photolysis in the stratosphere. However, the latest ACE-FTS v3.5 CCl4 retrieval is biased high by ˜ 20-30%. A new ACE-FTS retrieval scheme utilising new laboratory spectroscopic measurements of CCl4 and improved microwindow selection has recently been developed. This improves upon the v3.5 retrieval and resolves the issue of the high bias; this new scheme will form the basis for the upcoming v4 processing version of ACE-FTS data. This presentation will outline the improvements made in the retrieval, and a subset of data will be compared with modelled CCl4 distributions from SLIMCAT, a state-of-the-art three-dimensional chemical transport model. The use of ACE-FTS data to evaluate the modelled stratospheric loss rate of CCl4 will also be discussed. The evaluated model, which also includes a treatment of surface soil and ocean sinks, will then be used to quantify current uncertainties in the global budget of CCl4.

  17. Carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in pregnant and lactating rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Masahiro; Shimizu, Satomi; Urasoko, Yoshinaka; Umeshita, Kazuhiko; Kamata, Takashi; Kitazawa, Takahiro; Nakamura, Daichi; Nishihata, Yoshito; Ohishi, Takumi; Edamoto, Hiroshi

    2009-04-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is well known to induce hepatotoxicity after being metabolized to trichloromethyl free radical ((.)CCl3) by CYP2E1. In the present study, the hepatotoxicity induced by a single oral dose (2,000 mg/kg) of CCl4 was compared between pregnant (gestation days (GD) 13 and 19) or postpartum (postpartum days (PPD) 1, 13 and 27) and non-pregnant rats. Hepatotoxicity in CCl4-treated pregnant rats evaluated by blood chemistry (alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities) and histopathological finding (area of damaged hepatocytes) was minimal on GD19, being weaker than that in non-pregnant rats. CYP2E1 expression in non-treated pregnant rats decreased as pregnancy progressed and reached minimum level on GD19. Thus, the degree of CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity roughly corresponded to CYP2E1 levels during pregnancy. After delivery, hepatotoxicity in CCl4-treated lactating rats was maximal on PPD13, being stronger than that in non-pregnant rats, and then it decreased slightly on PPD27. The CYP2E1 level in the non-treated lactating rats tended to increase but remained at lower levels until PPD13 compared with that in non-pregnant rats. Thus, the degree of CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity did not correspond to CYP2E1 levels during lactation. This suggests that during lactation, there may be certain factors other than CYP2E1 expression responsible for the degree of CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity.

  18. Carbon tetrachloride pollution pathway of groundwater a typical contaminated site in the east of the city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, P.; Ma, Z. M.; Yu, W. W.; Wen, M.

    2017-08-01

    Determine 40 sampling points basing on a comprehensive monitoring. Determine the spatial distribution characteristics of the carbon tetrachloride by using the software of ArcGIS. Determine the location of the pollution sources by using MT3DMS program and Hook-Jeeves arithmetic to simulate, and connecting with the actual situation of carbon tetrachloride to analyze pollution causes. The results show that the source of carbon tetrachloride is located in the northeast near a chemical plant in the study area, whose pollutant concentration is diminishing from northeast to southwest. The main reasons to the pollution are that factories discharge waste water at random, leakage of open channel and culvert, sewage irrigation and the vulnerability of geological conditions in this area.

  19. Low-voltage bendable pentacene thin-film transistor with stainless steel substrate and polystyrene-coated hafnium silicate dielectric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Dong-Jin; Lee, Seunghyup; Yong, Kijung; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2012-04-01

    The hafnium silicate and aluminum oxide high-k dielectrics were deposited on stainless steel substrate using atomic layer deposition process and octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) and polystyrene (PS) were treated improve crystallinity of pentacene grown on them. Besides, the effects of the pentacene deposition condition on the morphologies, crystallinities and electrical properties of pentacene were characterized. Therefore, the surface treatment condition on dielectric and pentacene deposition conditions were optimized. The pentacene grown on polystyrene coated high-k dielectric at low deposition rate and temperature (0.2-0.3 Å/s and R.T.) showed the largest grain size (0.8-1.0 μm) and highest crystallinity among pentacenes deposited various deposition conditions, and the pentacene TFT with polystyrene coated high-k dielectric showed excellent device-performance. To decrease threshold voltage of pentacene TFT, the polystyrene-thickness on high-k dielectric was controlled using different concentration of polystyrene solution. As the polystyrene-thickness on hafnium silicate decreases, the dielectric constant of polystyrene/hafnium silicate increases, while the crystallinity of pentacene grown on polystyrene/hafnium silicate did not change. Using low-thickness polystyrene coated hafnium silicate dielectric, the high-performance and low voltage operating (1 × 10(4)) and complementary inverter (DC gains, ~20) could be fabricated.

  20. Comparison of hafnium silicate thin films on silicon (1 0 0) deposited using thermal and plasma enhanced metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangarajan, Vishwanathan; Bhandari, Harish; Klein, Tonya M

    2002-11-01

    Hafnium silicate thin films were deposited by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on Si at 400 deg. C using hafnium (IV) t-butoxide. Films annealed in O{sub 2} were compared to as-deposited films using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Hafnium silicate films were deposited by both thermal and plasma enhanced MOCVD using 2% SiH{sub 4} in He as the Si precursor. An O{sub 2} plasma increased Si content to as much as {approx}26 at.% Si. Both thermal and plasma deposited Hf silicates are amorphous as deposited, however, thermal films exhibit crystallinity after anneal. Surface roughness as measured by atomic force microscopy was found to be 1.1 and 5.1 nm for MOCVD hafnium silicate and plasma enhanced MOCVD hafnium silicate, respectively.

  1. Hydration and physical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Bob

    2007-10-01

    There is a rich scientific literature regarding hydration status and physical function that began in the late 1800s, although the relationship was likely apparent centuries before that. A decrease in body water from normal levels (often referred to as dehydration or hypohydration) provokes changes in cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, metabolic, and central nervous function that become increasingly greater as dehydration worsens. Similarly, performance impairment often reported with modest dehydration (e.g., -2% body mass) is also exacerbated by greater fluid loss. Dehydration during physical activity in the heat provokes greater performance decrements than similar activity in cooler conditions, a difference thought to be due, at least in part, to greater cardiovascular and thermoregulatory strain associated with heat exposure. There is little doubt that performance during prolonged, continuous exercise in the heat is impaired by levels of dehydration >or= -2% body mass, and there is some evidence that lower levels of dehydration can also impair performance even during relatively short-duration, intermittent exercise. Although additional research is needed to more fully understand low-level dehydration's effects on physical performance, one can generalize that when performance is at stake, it is better to be well-hydrated than dehydrated. This generalization holds true in the occupational, military, and sports settings.

  2. Kinetic equation for the reaction of titanium tetrachloride with hydride functional groups of diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhidkov, A.B.; Smirnov, E.P.

    1989-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the kinetics of the reaction of titanium tetrachloride with the hydride functional groups of diamond. The research was performed on submicron powders of ASM 0.7/0.3 grade synthetic diamond with a specific surface area of 8.0 m/sup 2//g as measured from the adsorption of nitrogen. The reaction was carried out in a flow-through quartz reactor in a flow of dry He. The content of the titanium in the samples was determined by a photocolorimetric method. A kinetic equation for the reaction of diamond with titanium tetrachloride was found on the basis of a statistical approach.

  3. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  4. Some thermodynamical aspects of protein hydration water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallamace, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.mallamace@unime.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Corsaro, Carmelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Mallamace, Domenico [Dipartimento SASTAS, Università di Messina, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Sebastiano [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Cirino [CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Stanley, H. Eugene [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Chen, Sow-Hsin [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    We study by means of nuclear magnetic resonance the self-diffusion of protein hydration water at different hydration levels across a large temperature range that includes the deeply supercooled regime. Starting with a single hydration shell (h = 0.3), we consider different hydrations up to h = 0.65. Our experimental evidence indicates that two phenomena play a significant role in the dynamics of protein hydration water: (i) the measured fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover temperature is unaffected by the hydration level and (ii) the first hydration shell remains liquid at all hydrations, even at the lowest temperature.

  5. Flow assurance intervention, hydrates remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Christopher S. [Oceaneering International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the issues of removing hydrates in sub sea flow lines and associated equipment with an Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) of opportunity and a multi-service-vessel (MSV). The paper is split into three topics: the equipment used with the ROV, assessing the interface points and handling fluids produced from drawing down the pressure. Each section is explained thoroughly and backed up with real world experience. The equipment section details information from actual jobs performed and why the particular components were utilized. The system is generally contained in an ROV mounted skid. Pumps are utilized to draw down the pressure inside the hydrated section of equipment, removing one of the three necessary components for hydrates formation. Once the section is pumped down, several options exist for handling the fluids pumped out of the system: pumping to surface, re-injection into the well, or injection into an operating flow line. This method of hydrates remediation is both economical and timely. Hydrate blockages form in low temperatures and high pressures. Reducing the pressure or increasing the temperature so the conditions lie to the right of the hydrate dissociation curve will slowly decompose the blockage. Depressurization and the use of MEG or methanol will give favorable conditions to remove the hydrate plug. Oceaneering has the capabilities to remove hydrates using the FRS in conjunction with an installation vessel to dispose of the gas and fluid removed from the flow line. Hydrate remediation techniques should be implemented into the initial design to reduce costs later. The cost of stopped production combined with the day rate for equipment needed for hydrate removal outweighs the costs if no technique is utilized. (author)

  6. Use of hafnium in control bars of nuclear reactors; Uso de hafnio en barras de control de reactores nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J.R.; Alonso V, G. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: jrrs@nuclear.inin-mx

    2003-07-01

    Recently the use of hafnium as neutron absorber material in nuclear reactors has been reason of investigation by virtue of that this material has nuclear properties as to the neutrons absorption and structural that can prolong the useful life of the control mechanisms of the nuclear reactors. In this work some of those more significant hafnium properties are presented like nuclear material. Also there are presented calculations carried out with the HELIOS code for fuel cells of uranium oxide and of uranium and plutonium mixed oxides under controlled conditions with conventional bars of boron carbide and also with similar bars to which are substituted the absorbent material by metallic hafnium, the results are presented in this work. (Author)

  7. Investigation on Gas Storage in Methane Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigao Sun; Rongsheng Ma; Shuanshi Fan; Kaihua Guo; Ruzhu Wang

    2004-01-01

    The effect of additives (anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), nonionic surfactant alkyl polysaccharide glycoside (APG), and liquid hydrocarbon cyclopentane (CP)) on hydrate induction time and formation rate, and storage capacity was studied in this work. Micelle surfactant solutions were found to reduce hydrate induction time, increase methane hydrate formation rate and improve methane storage capacity in hydrates. In the presence of surfactant, hydrate could form quickly in a quiescent system and the energy costs of hydrate formation were reduced. The critical micelle concentrations of SDS and APG water solutions were found to be 300× 10-6 and 500× 10-6 for methane hydrate formation system respectively. The effect of anionic surfactant (SDS) on methane storage in hydrates is more pronounced compared to a nonionic surfactant (APG). CP also reduced hydrate induction time and improved hydrate formation rate, but could not improve methane storage in hydrates.

  8. Abiotic degradation rates for carbon tetrachloride and chloroform: Final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amonette, James E.; Jeffers, Peter M.; Qafoku, Odeta; Russell, Colleen K.; Humphrys, Daniel R.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Truex, Michael J.

    2012-12-01

    This report documents the objectives, technical approach, and progress made through FY 2012 on a project initiated in FY 2006 to help address uncertainties related to the rates of hydrolysis in groundwater for carbon tetrachloride (CT) and chloroform (CF). The project also sought to explore the possible effects of contact with minerals and sediment (i.e., heterogeneous hydrolysis) on these rates. We conducted 114 hydrolysis rate experiments in sealed vessels across a temperature range of 20-93 °C for periods as long as 6 years, and used the Arrhenius equation to estimate activation energies and calculate half-lives for typical Hanford groundwater conditions (temperature of 16 °C and pH of 7.75). We calculated a half-life of 630 years for hydrolysis for CT under these conditions and found that CT hydrolysis was unaffected by contact with sterilized, oxidized minerals or Hanford sediment within the sensitivity of our experiments. In contrast to CT, hydrolysis of CF was generally slower and very sensitive to pH due to the presence of both neutral and base-catalyzed hydrolysis pathways. We calculated a half-life of 3400 years for hydrolysis of CF in homogeneous solution at 16 °C and pH 7.75. Experiments in suspensions of Hanford sediment or smectite, the dominant clay mineral in Hanford sediment, equilibrated to an initial pH of 7.2, yielded calculated half-lives of 1700 years and 190 years, respectively, at 16 °C. Experiments with three other mineral phases at the same pH (muscovite mica, albite feldspar, and kaolinite) showed no change from the homogeneous solution results (i.e., a half-life of 3400 years). The strong influence of Hanford sediment on CF hydrolysis was attributed to the presence of smectite and its ability to adsorb protons, thereby buffering the solution pH at a higher level than would otherwise occur. The project also determined liquid-vapor partition coefficients for CT under the temperatures and pressures encountered in the sealed vessels that

  9. Model Sensitivity Studies of the Decrease in Atmospheric Carbon Tetrachloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Liang, Qing; Rigby, Matt; Hossaini, Ryan; Montzka, Stephen A.; Dhomse, Sandip; Feng, Wuhu; Prinn, Ronald G.; Weiss, Ray F.; Harth, Christina M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is an ozone-depleting substance, which is controlled by the Montreal Protocol and for which the atmospheric abundance is decreasing. However, the current observed rate of this decrease is known to be slower than expected based on reported CCl4 emissions and its estimated overall atmospheric lifetime. Here we use a three-dimensional (3-D) chemical transport model to investigate the impact on its predicted decay of uncertainties in the rates at which CCl4 is removed from the atmosphere by photolysis, by ocean uptake and by degradation in soils. The largest sink is atmospheric photolysis (74% of total), but a reported 10% uncertainty in its combined photolysis cross section and quantum yield has only a modest impact on the modelled rate of CCl4 decay. This is partly due to the limiting effect of the rate of transport of CCl4 from the main tropospheric reservoir to the stratosphere, where photolytic loss occurs. The model suggests large interannual variability in the magnitude of this stratospheric photolysis sink caused by variations in transport. The impact of uncertainty in the minor soil sink (9%of total) is also relatively small. In contrast, the model shows that uncertainty in ocean loss (17%of total) has the largest impact on modelled CCl4 decay due to its sizeable contribution to CCl4 loss and large lifetime uncertainty range (147 to 241 years). With an assumed CCl4 emission rate of 39 Gg year(exp -1), the reference simulation with the best estimate of loss processes still underestimates the observed CCl4 (overestimates the decay) over the past 2 decades but to a smaller extent than previous studies. Changes to the rate of CCl4 loss processes, in line with known uncertainties, could bring the model into agreement with in situ surface and remote-sensing measurements, as could an increase in emissions to around 47 Gg year(exp -1). Further progress in constraining the CCl4 budget is partly limited by systematic biases between

  10. Potentiation of carbon tetrachloride hepatotoxicity by pentosan polysulfate in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zim M.C.A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Few data are available in the literature regarding the effect of pentosan polysulfate (PPS on normal and fibrotic rat livers. In addition, the combination of PPS and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 has not been studied so far. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of PPS on rat livers treated or not with CCl4 for the induction of liver fibrosis. The study consisted of four stages: 1 hepatic fibrosis induction with CCl4 (N = 36 rats; 2 evaluation of the effect of PPS on CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis (N = 36 rats; 3 evaluation of the effect of higher doses of PPS in combination with CCl4 (N = 50 rats; 4 evaluation of the presence of an enzymatic inductor effect by PPS (N = 18 rats using the sodium pentobarbital test which indirectly evaluates hepatic microsomal enzyme activity in vivo. Adult (60 to 70 days male Wistar rats weighing 180 to 220 g were used. All animals receiving 0.5 ml 8% CCl4 (N = 36 developed hepatic fibrosis, and after 8 weeks they also developed cirrhosis. No delay or prevention of hepatic fibrosis was observed with the administration of 5 mg/kg PPS (N = 8 and 1 mg/kg PPS (N = 8 1 h after the administration of CCl4, but the increased hepatotoxicity resulting from the combination of the two substances caused massive hepatic necrosis in most rats (N = 45. PPS (40 mg/kg alone caused hepatic congestion only after 8 weeks, but massive hepatic necrosis was again observed in association with 0.5 ml CCl4 after 1 to 4 weeks of treatment. Unexpectedly, sleeping time increased with time of PPS administration (1, 2, or 3 weeks. This suggests that PPS does not function as an activator of the hepatic microsomal enzymatic system. Further studies are necessary in order to clarify the unexpected increase in hepatotoxicity caused by the combination of CCl4 and high doses of PPS, which results in massive hepatic necrosis.

  11. Potentiation of carbon tetrachloride hepatotoxicity by pentosan polysulfate in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zim, M C A; Silveira, T R; Schwartsmann, G; Cerski, T; Motta, A

    2002-11-01

    Few data are available in the literature regarding the effect of pentosan polysulfate (PPS) on normal and fibrotic rat livers. In addition, the combination of PPS and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) has not been studied so far. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of PPS on rat livers treated or not with CCl4 for the induction of liver fibrosis. The study consisted of four stages: 1) hepatic fibrosis induction with CCl4 (N = 36 rats); 2) evaluation of the effect of PPS on CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis (N = 36 rats); 3) evaluation of the effect of higher doses of PPS in combination with CCl4 (N = 50 rats); 4) evaluation of the presence of an enzymatic inductor effect by PPS (N = 18 rats) using the sodium pentobarbital test which indirectly evaluates hepatic microsomal enzyme activity in vivo. Adult (60 to 70 days) male Wistar rats weighing 180 to 220 g were used. All animals receiving 0.5 ml 8% CCl4 (N = 36) developed hepatic fibrosis, and after 8 weeks they also developed cirrhosis. No delay or prevention of hepatic fibrosis was observed with the administration of 5 mg/kg PPS (N = 8) and 1 mg/kg PPS (N = 8) 1 h after the administration of CCl4, but the increased hepatotoxicity resulting from the combination of the two substances caused massive hepatic necrosis in most rats (N = 45). PPS (40 mg/kg) alone caused hepatic congestion only after 8 weeks, but massive hepatic necrosis was again observed in association with 0.5 ml CCl4 after 1 to 4 weeks of treatment. Unexpectedly, sleeping time increased with time of PPS administration (1, 2, or 3 weeks). This suggests that PPS does not function as an activator of the hepatic microsomal enzymatic system. Further studies are necessary in order to clarify the unexpected increase in hepatotoxicity caused by the combination of CCl4 and high doses of PPS, which results in massive hepatic necrosis.

  12. Atmospheric Carbon Tetrachloride: Mysterious Emissions Gap Almost Closed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Q.; Newman, P. A.; Reimann, S.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is a major ozone-depleting substance and its production and consumption is controlled under the Montreal Protocol for emissive uses. The most recent WMO/UNEP Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion [WMO, 2014] estimated a 2007-2012 CCl4 bottom-up emission of 1-4 Gg yr-1, based on country-by-country reports to UNEP, vs. a global top-down emissions estimate of 57 Gg yr-1, based on atmospheric measurements. To understand the gap between the top-down and bottom-up emissions estimates, a CCl4 activity was formed under the auspices of the Stratosphere-Troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate (SPARC) project. Several new findings were brought forward by the SPARC CCl4 activity. CCl4 is destroyed in the stratosphere, oceans, and soils. The total lifetime estimate has been increased from 26 to 33 years. The new 33-year total lifetime lowers the top-down emissions estimate to 40 (25-55) Gg yr-1. In addition, a persistent hemispheric difference implies substantial ongoing Northern Hemisphere emissions, yielding an independent emissions estimate of 30 Gg yr-1. The combination of these two yields an emissions estimate of 35 Gg yr-1. Regional estimates have been made for Australia, North America, East Asia, and Western Europe. The sum of these estimates results in emissions of 21 Gg yr-1, albeit this does not include all regions of the world. Four bottom-up CCl4 emissions pathways have been identified, i.e., fugitive, unreported non-feedstock, unreported inadvertent, and legacy emissions. The new industrial bottom-up emissions estimate includes emissions from chloromethanes plants (13 Gg yr-1) and feedstock fugitive emissions (2 Gg yr-1). When combined with legacy emissions and unreported inadvertent emissions ( 10 Gg yr-1), the total global emissions are 20±5 Gg yr-1. While the new bottom-up value is still less than the aggregated top-down values, these estimates reconcile the CCl4 budget discrepancy when considered at the edges of their

  13. Study on the formation of self-assembled monolayers on sol-gel processed hafnium oxide as dielectric layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Guy G; Acton, Orb; Ma, Hong; Ka, Jae Won; Jen, Alex K-Y

    2009-02-17

    High dielectric constant (k) metal oxides such as hafnium oxide (HfO2) have gained significant interest due to their applications in microelectronics. In order to study and control the surface properties of hafnium oxide, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of four different long aliphatic molecules with binding groups of phosphonic acid, carboxylic acid, and catechol were formed and characterized. Surface modification was performed to improve the interface between metal oxide and top deposited materials as well as to create suitable dielectric properties, that is, leakage current and capacitance densities, which are important in organic thin film transistors. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, contact angle goniometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and simple metal-HfO2-SAM-metal devices were used to characterize the surfaces before and after SAM modification on sol-gel processed hafnium oxide. The alkylphosphonic acid provided the best monolayer formation on sol-gel processed hafnium oxide to generate a well-packed, ultrathin dielectric exhibiting a low leakage current density of 2x10(-8) A/cm2 at an applied voltage of -2.0 V and high capacitance density of 0.55 microF/cm2 at 10 kHz. Dialkylcatechol showed similar characteristics and the potential for using the catechol SAMs to modify HfO2 surfaces. In addition, the integration of this alkylphosphonic acid SAM/hafnium oxide hybrid dielectric into pentacene-based thin film transistors yields low-voltage operation within 1.5 V and improved performance over bare hafnium oxide.

  14. Strong influence of polymer architecture on the microstructural evolution of hafnium-alkoxide-modified silazanes upon ceramization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papendorf, Benjamin; Nonnenmacher, Katharina; Ionescu, Emanuel; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Riedel, Ralf

    2011-04-04

    The present study focuses on the synthesis and ceramization of novel hafnium-alkoxide-modified silazanes as well as on their microstructure evolution at high temperatures. The synthesis of hafnia-modified polymer-derived SiCN ceramic nanocomposites is performed via chemical modification of a polysilazane and of a cyclotrisilazane, followed by cross-linking and pyrolysis in argon atmosphere. Spectroscopic investigation (i.e., NMR, FTIR, and Raman) shows that the hafnium alkoxide reacts with the N-H groups of the cyclotrisilazane; in the case of polysilazane, reactions of N-H as well as Si-H groups with the alkoxide are observed. Consequently, scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies reveal that the ceramic nanocomposites obtained from cyclotrisilazane and polysilazane exhibited markedly different microstructures, which is a result of the different reaction pathways of the hafnium alkoxide with cyclotrisilazane and with polysilazane. Furthermore, the two prepared ceramic nanocomposites are unexpectedly found to exhibit extremely different high-temperature behavior with respect to decomposition and crystallization; this essential difference is found to be related to the different distribution of hafnium throughout the ceramic network in the two samples. Thus, the homogeneous distribution of hafnium observed in the polysilazane-derived ceramic leads to an enhanced thermal stability with respect to decomposition, whereas the local enrichment of hafnium within the matrix of the cyclotrisilazane-based sample induces a pronounced decomposition upon annealing at high temperatures. The results indicate that the chemistry and architecture of the precursor has a crucial effect on the microstructure of the resulting ceramic material and consequently on its high-temperature behavior. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Long period gratings coated with hafnium oxide by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition for refractive index measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Luis; Burton, Geoff; Kubik, Philip; Wild, Peter

    2016-04-04

    Long period gratings (LPGs) are coated with hafnium oxide using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) to increase the sensitivity of these devices to the refractive index of the surrounding medium. PEALD allows deposition at low temperatures which reduces thermal degradation of UV-written LPGs. Depositions targeting three different coating thicknesses are investigated: 30 nm, 50 nm and 70 nm. Coating thickness measurements taken by scanning electron microscopy of the optical fibers confirm deposition of uniform coatings. The performance of the coated LPGs shows that deposition of hafnium oxide on LPGs induces two-step transition behavior of the cladding modes.

  16. Hafnium at subduction zones: isotopic budget of input and output fluxes; L'hafnium dans les zones de subduction: bilan isotopique des flux entrant et sortant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marini, J.Ch

    2004-05-15

    Subduction zones are the primary regions of mass exchanges between continental crust and mantle of Earth through sediment subduction toward the earth's mantle and by supply of mantellic magmas to volcanic arcs. We analyze these mass exchanges using Hafnium and Neodymium isotopes. At the Izu-Mariana subduction zone, subducting sediments have Hf and Nd isotopes equivalent to Pacific seawater. Altered oceanic crust has Hf and Nd isotopic compositions equivalent to the isotopic budget of unaltered Pacific oceanic crust. At Luzon and Java subduction zones, arc lavas present Hf isotopic ratios highly radiogenic in comparison to their Nd isotopic ratios. Such compositions of the Luzon and Java arc lavas are controlled by a contamination of their sources by the subducted oceanic sediments. (author)

  17. Hepatoprotective effect ofAverrhoea carambolafruit extract on carbon tetrachloride induced hepatotoxicity in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AK Azeem; Molly Mathew; Chandramohan Nair DilipC

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the hepatoprotective activity ofAverroha carambola fruit extract against carbon tetrachloride induced hepatic injury.Methods:Hepatotoxicity was induced on albino mice by intraperitoneal administration ofCCl4, half an hour after the administration of the last dose of the extract ofAverroha carambola fruit. Aqueous extract of the fruit ofAverroha carambola was administered at a dose of 0.9 g/kg body weight once daily for seven days. The hepatic injury and its prevention was assessed by the estimation of serum activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase(AST), alkaline phosphates(ALP), glutathione level and histopathological studies of liver.Results: Pre-treatment of mice with the fruit extract ofAverrhoea carambola significantly reduced serum levels ofALT, AST andALP enzyme and significantly increased the liver reduced glutathione levels24 h after the administration of carbon tetrachloride. A marked improvement in the enzyme activities and the liver reduced glutathione level was observed in the pre-treated mice 4 days after the administration of carbon tetrachloride. Histopathological studies provided supportive evidence for the biochemical analysis. Conclusions:The aqueous extract of the fruit ofAverrhoea carambola has hepatoprotective effect against carbon tetrachloride induced liver damage in mice.

  18. Quinone-respiration improves dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride by anaerobic sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cervantes, F.J.; Vu-Thi-Thu, L.; Lettinga, G.; Field, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of humic acids and the humic model compound, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), on the biodegradation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) by anaerobic granular sludge was studied. Addition of both humic acids and AQDS at sub-stoichiometric levels increased the first-order rate of conversion o

  19. Insights into electrical characteristics of silicon doped hafnium oxide ferroelectric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dayu; Müller, J.; Xu, Jin; Knebel, S.; Bräuhaus, D.; Schröder, U.

    2012-02-01

    Silicon doped hafnium oxide thin films were recently discovered to exhibit ferroelectricity. In the present study, metal-ferroelectric-metal capacitors with Si:HfO2 thin films as ferroelectric material and TiN as electrodes have been characterized with respect to capacitance and current density as functions of temperature and applied voltage. Polarity asymmetry of the frequency dependent coercive field was explained by interfacial effects. No ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition was observed at temperatures up to 478 K. Clear distinctions between current evolutions with or without polarization switching were correlated to the time competition between the measurement and the response of relaxation mechanisms.

  20. A thermally robust and thickness independent ferroelectric phase in laminated hafnium zirconium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, S.; Polakowski, P.; Müller, J.

    2016-09-01

    Ferroelectric properties in hafnium oxide based thin films have recovered the scaling potential for ferroelectric memories due to their ultra-thin-film- and CMOS-compatibility. However, the variety of physical phenomena connected to ferroelectricity allows a wider range of applications for these materials than ferroelectric memory. Especially mixed HfxZr1-xO2 thin films exhibit a broad compositional range of ferroelectric phase stability and provide the possibility to tailor material properties for multiple applications. Here it is shown that the limited thermal stability and thick-film capability of HfxZr1-xO2 can be overcome by a laminated approach using alumina interlayers.

  1. Zirconium(IV)- and hafnium(IV)-catalyzed highly enantioselective epoxidation of homoallylic and bishomoallylic alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2010-06-16

    In this report, zirconium(IV)- and hafnium(IV)-bishydroxamic acid complexes were utilized in the highly enantioselective epoxidation of homoallylic alcohols and bishomoallylic alcohols, which used to be quite difficult substrates for other types of asymmetric epoxidation reactions. The performance of the catalyst was improved by adding polar additive and molecular sieves. For homoallylic alcohols, the reaction could provide epoxy alcohols in up to 83% yield and up to 98% ee, while, for bishomoallylic alcohols, up to 79% yield and 99% ee of epoxy alcohols rather than cyclized tetrahydrofuran compounds could be obtained in most cases.

  2. Zirconium(IV) and Hafnium(IV)-Catalyzed Highly Enantioselective Epoxidation of Homoallylic and Bishomoallylic Alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2010-01-01

    In this report, zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV)-bishydroxamic acid complexes were utilized in the highly enantioselective epoxidation of homoallylic alcohols and bishomoallylic alcohols, which used to be quite difficult substrates for other types of asymmetric epoxidation reactions. The performance of the catalyst was improved by adding polar additive and molecular sieves. For homoallylic alcohols, the reaction could provide epoxy alcohols in up to 81% yield and up to 98% ee, while for bishomoallylic alcohols, up to 75% yield and 99% ee of epoxy alcohols rather than cyclize compounds could be obtained in most cases. PMID:20481541

  3. Improvement of aging kinetics and precipitate size refinement in Mg–Sn alloys by hafnium additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behdad, S. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Zhou, L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Henderson, H.B.; Manuel, M.V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Sohn, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Agarwal, A. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Boesl, B., E-mail: bboesl@fiu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)

    2016-01-10

    Two Mg–Sn alloys were microalloyed by addition of Hafnium and their age-hardening response was studied at 200 °C. Time to reach peak hardness was significantly reduced and improved by Hf addition. TEM study showed Hf clusters in the close vicinity and at the surface of Mg{sub 2}Sn precipitates, which confirms that Hf clusters act as additional nucleation centers for Mg{sub 2}Sn precipitate formation. Our results support the validity of thermokinetic criterion proposed by Mendis for selection of microalloying elements in order to refine precipitate size, accelerate aging kinetics and enhance peak hardness.

  4. Structural phase transition and elastic properties of hafnium dihydride: A first principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh, M., E-mail: rrpalanichamy@gmail.com; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R., E-mail: rrpalanichamy@gmail.com; Sudhapriyanga, G.; Murugan, A.; Chinthia, A. Jemmy [Department of Physics, N.M.S.S.V.N College, Madurai, Tamil Nadu-625019 (India); Kanagaprabha, S. [Department of Physics, Kamaraj College, Tuticorin, Tamil Nadu-628003 (India); Iyakutti, K. [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, SRM University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu-603203 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The structural and elastic properties of Hafnium dihydride (HfH{sub 2}) are investigated by first principles calculation based on density functional theory using Vienna ab-initio simulation package (VASP). The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the available results. A pressure induced structural phase transition from CaF{sub 2} to FeS{sub 2} phase is observed in HfH{sub 2} at 10.75 GPa. The calculated elastic constants indicate that this hydride is mechanically stable at ambient condition.

  5. Effect of Hafnium Impurities on the Magnetoresistance of {YBa}2{Cu}3{O}_{7-δ }

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savich, S. V.; Samoylov, A. V.; Kamchatnaya, S. N.; Goulatis, I. L.; Vovk, R. V.; Chroneos, A.; Solovjov, A. L.; Omelchenko, L. V.

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we investigate the influence of the hafnium (Hf) impurities on the magnetoresistance of {YBa}2{Cu}3{O}_{7-δ } ceramic samples in the temperature interval of the transition to the superconducting state in constant magnetic field up to 12 T. The cause of the appearance of low- temperature "tails" (paracoherent transitions) on the resistive transitions, corresponding to different phase regimes of the vortex matter state is discussed. At temperatures higher than the critical temperature ( T > T_c), the temperature dependence of the excess paraconductivity can be described within the Aslamazov-Larkin theoretical model of the fluctuation conductivity for layered superconductors.

  6. High stability of amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc-oxide thin film transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Eugene; Jo, Kyoung Chul; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2010-04-01

    Time dependence of the threshold voltage (Vth) shift in amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc oxide (a-HIZO) thin film transistor has been reported under on-current bias temperature stress measured at 60 °C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results show the decrease in oxygen vacancies by Hf metal cations in a-HIZO systems after annealing process. High stability of a-HIZO systems has been observed due to low charge injection from the channel layer. Hf metal cations have been effectively incorporated into the IZO thin films as a suppressor against both the oxygen deficiencies and the carrier generation.

  7. Properties of Ultra-Thin Hafnium Oxide and Interfacial Layer Deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taeho Lee; Young-Bae Kim; Kyung-Il Hong; Duck-Kyun Choi; Jinho Ahn

    2004-01-01

    Ultra-thin hafnium-oxide gate dielectric films deposited by atomic layer deposition technique using HfCl4 and H2O precursor on a hydrogen-terminated Si substrate were investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the interface layer is Hf-silicate rather than phase separated Hf-silicide and silicon oxide structure. The Hf-silicate interfacial layer partially changes into SiOx after high temperature annealing, resulting in a complex HfO2-silicate-SiOx dielectric structure. Electrical measurements confirms that HfO2 on Si is stable up to 700 ℃ for 30 s under N2 ambient.

  8. Hydrates fighting tools; Des outils de lutte contre les hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2003-04-01

    Shell Exploration and Production company (SEPCo) is the operator of the 'Popeye' deep offshore field in the Gulf of Mexico. Thanks to the introduction of a low dosing hydrates inhibitor (LDHI) elaborated by Shell Global Solutions, the company has added a 7.5 Gpc extra volume of gas to its recoverable reserves. This new technology avoids the plugging of pipes by hydrates formation. (J.S.)

  9. Obsidian Hydration: A New Paleothermometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Riciputi, Lee R [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Fayek, Mostafa [ORNL; Elam, J. Michael [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2006-01-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  10. Obsidian hydration: A new paleothermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Riciputi, Lee R.; Cole, David R.; Fayek, Mostafa; Elam, J. Michael

    2006-07-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  11. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  12. Application of the Zr/Hf ratio in the determination of hafnium in geochemical samples by high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya Xuan; Li, Qing Xia; Ma, Na; Sun, Xiao Ling; Bai, Jin Feng; Zhang, Qin

    2014-12-02

    Hafnium content and its change are of significance in geochemistry and cosmochemistry; however, the determination of hafnium has always been problematic in analytical chemistry. In this paper, a new idea is proposed for the determination of hafnium in geochemical samples, including rocks, soils, and stream sediments. Through the comparison of two conventional open-type acid digestion methods (HF-HNO3-HClO4 and HF-HNO3-H2SO4), it was found that although neither of these methods could fully digest the zirconium and hafnium in a sample, the zirconium and hafnium digestion behaviors in one sample were consistent in the 60 experimental geochemical reference materials with different properties, so the experimentally determined Zr/Hf ratio in solution could be used to calculate the hafnium content in a sample. In addition, possible mass spectral interferences during the determination of zirconium and hafnium by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICPMS) were studied, and it was found that the mass spectral interferences of the selected isotopes (90)Zr and (178)Hf could be neglected. The mass spectral behaviors of (90)Zr and (178)Hf were also very consistent during the determination by HR-ICPMS. Since the hafnium content was calculated using the ratio value, all of the errors (including the errors in weighing process, the accidental errors during operation and the instrument fluctuation in the determination) of the Zr/Hf ratio could be effectively reduced or even eliminated. The relative standard deviation of the actual samples was lower than 3.2%, and the detection limit of the method (considering the dilution effect and matrix effect during measurement of the Zr/Hf ratio and zirconium content) was 0.04 μg/g. The proposed method could satisfy the requirement for the determination of hafnium in geochemical samples.

  13. Storing natural gas as frozen hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudmundsson, J.S.; Khokhar, A.A. (Univ. of Trondheim (Norway)); Parlaktuna, M. (Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey))

    1994-02-01

    The formation of natural gas hydrates is a well-known problem in the petroleum and natural gas industries. Hydrates are solid materials that form when liquid water and natural gas are brought in contact under pressure. Hydrate formation need not be a problem. On the contrary, it can be an advantage. The volume of hydrates is much less than that of natural gas. At standard conditions, hydrates occupy 150 to 170 times less volume than the corresponding gas. Typically, natural gas hydrates contain 15% gas and 85% water by mass. It follows that hydrates can be used for large-scale storage of natural gas. Benesh proposed using hydrates to improve the load factor of natural gas supply systems. The author suggested that hydrates could be produced by bringing liquid water into contact with natural gas at the appropriate temperature and high pressure. The hydrate then would be stored at a temperature and pressure where it was stable. When gas was needed for the supply system, the hydrate would be melted at low pressure. The stability of a natural gas hydrate during storage at atmospheric pressure and below-freezing temperatures was studied in the laboratory. The gas hydrate was produced in a stirred vessel at 2- to 6-MPa pressure and temperatures from 0 to 20 C. The hydrate was refrigerated and stored in deep freezers at [minus]5, [minus]10, and [minus]18 C for up to 10 days. The natural gas hydrate remained stable when kept frozen at atmospheric pressure.

  14. Airway Hydration and COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arunava; Boucher, R.C.; Tarran, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the prevalent causes of worldwide mortality and encompasses two major clinical phenotypes, i.e., chronic bronchitis (CB) and emphysema. The most common cause of COPD is chronic tobacco inhalation. Research focused on the chronic bronchitic phenotype of COPD has identified several pathological processes that drive disease initiation and progression. For example, the lung’s mucociliary clearance (MCC) system performs the critical task of clearing inhaled pathogens and toxic materials from the lung. MCC efficiency is dependent on: (i) the ability of apical plasma membrane ion channels such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) to maintain airway hydration; (ii) ciliary beating; and, (iii) appropriate rates of mucin secretion. Each of these components is impaired in CB and likely contributes to the mucus stasis/accumulation seen in CB patients. This review highlights the cellular components responsible for maintaining MCC and how this process is disrupted following tobacco exposure and with CB. We shall also discuss existing therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic bronchitis and how components of the MCC can be used as biomarkers for the evaluation of tobacco or tobacco-like-product exposure. PMID:26068443

  15. Mechanism of gypsum hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco, G.

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an hypothesis that the mechanism o f gypsum hydration and dehydration is performed through two simultaneous phenomena. In this study we try to clear up this phenomenon using chlorides as accelerators or a mixture of ethanol-methanol as retarders to carry out the gypsum setting. Natural Mexican gypsum samples and a hemihydrate prepared in the laboratory are used. The following analytical techniques are used: MO, DRX, DTA, TG and DTG. In agreement with the obtained results, it can be concluded: that colloid formation depends on the action of accelerators or retarders and the crystals are a consequence of the quantity of hemihydrate formed.

    En el mecanismo de hidratación y deshidratación del yeso existe la hipótesis de que éste se efectúa por dos fenómenos simultáneos. Este estudio intenta esclarecer estos fenómenos, empleando: cloruros como aceleradores o mezcla etanol-metanol como retardadores para efectuar el fraguado del yeso. Se emplean muestras de yeso de origen natural mexicano y hemihydrate preparado en laboratorio; se utilizan técnicas analíticas: MO, DRX, DTA, TG y DTG. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos se puede deducir: que la formación del coloide depende de la acción de los agentes aceleradores o retardadores y que los cristales son consecuencia de la cantidad de hemihidrato formado.

  16. Thermal behaviour of hafnium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate studied using the perturbed angular correlation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chain, Cecilia Y. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), La Plata (Argentina). IFLP-CCT; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rivas, Patricia [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), La Plata (Argentina). IFLP-CCT; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias y Forestales; Pasquevich, Alberto F. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), La Plata (Argentina). IFLP-CCT; Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CIC-PBA) (Argentina)

    2014-07-01

    Polyaminecarboxilic ligands like diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid form stable complexes with many heavy metal ions, excelling as cation chelants especially in the field of radiopharmacy. The aim of this work is to characterize, by using the Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlations (TDPAC) technique, the hyperfine interactions at hafnium sites in hafnium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate and to investigate their evolution as temperature increases. TDPAC results for KHfDTPA.3H{sub 2}O obtained by chemical synthesis yield a well defined and highly asymmetric interaction of quadrupole frequency ω{sub Q} = 141 Mrad/s, which is consistent with the existence of a unique site for the metal in the crystal lattice. The thermal behaviour of the chelate is investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetrical analyses revealing that an endothermic dehydration of KHfDTPA.3H{sub 2}O takes place in one step between 80 C and 180 C. The anhydrous KHfDTPA thus arising is characterized by a fully asymmetric and well defined interaction of quadrupole frequency ω{sub Q} = 168 Mrad/s. (orig.)

  17. Effect of hafnium addition on solidifi cation structure of cast Ti-46Al alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yanqing

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of hafnium addition on the solidifi cation structure, Ti-46Al alloys with nominal compositions of Ti-46Al-xHf (x = 0, 3, 5, 7 (at.% were arc-melted into small ingots in an argon atmosphere. The characteristics of the macrostructures and microstructures were studied using a linear intercept method, OM, SEM (BSE, XRD and TEM. The results showed that the ingots with Hf have near lamellar microstructure in columnar and dendrite morphology. The hafnium concentration has a strong effect on the columnar spacing refi nement. Increasing Hf from 0 to 7 (at.%, the columnar spacing can be reduced from ~ 1000 to ~ 400 μm. Constitute phases of the ingots are α2, a small amount of B2 and c. Most of the B2 phases, richer in Hf and leaner in Al and Ti, exist on the node of the dendrite core in block shape and a little across the lamellar colonies in stick shape. The c phases exist on the boundaries of lamellar colonies in small cellular shape. There also exists a segregation of Hf on the columnar and dendrite core. Particularly, both the α- and β-phase form from the melt as prior phases. The possible phase sequencing during solidifi cation and solid-state transformations with Hf is given in this paper.

  18. Microstructure and optical properties of Pr3+-doped hafnium silicate films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we report on the evolution of the microstructure and photoluminescence properties of Pr3+-doped hafnium silicate thin films as a function of annealing temperature (TA). The composition and microstructure of the films were characterized by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, spectroscopic ellipsometry, Fourier transform infrared absorption, and X-ray diffraction, while the emission properties have been studied by means of photoluminescence (PL) and PL excitation (PLE) spectroscopies. It was observed that a post-annealing treatment favors the phase separation in hafnium silicate matrix being more evident at 950°C. The HfO2 phase demonstrates a pronounced crystallization in tetragonal phase upon 950°C annealing. Pr3+ emission appeared at TA = 950°C, and the highest efficiency of Pr3+ ion emission was detected upon a thermal treatment at 1,000°C. Analysis of the PLE spectra reveals an efficient energy transfer from matrix defects towards Pr3+ ions. It is considered that oxygen vacancies act as effective Pr3+ sensitizer. Finally, a PL study of undoped HfO2 and HfSiOx matrices is performed to evidence the energy transfer. PMID:23336520

  19. Effect of hafnium addition on solidification structure of cast Ti-46AI alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Yanqing; Zhang Li; Guo Jingjie; K. Maruyama; Li Zhiming

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the effect of hafnium addition on the solidification structure, Ti-46Al alloys with nominal compositions of Ti-46Al-xHf (x = 0, 3, 5, 7) (at.%) were arc-melted into small ingots in an argon atmosphere. The characteristics of the macrostructures and microstructures were studied using a linear intercept method, OM, SEM (BSE), XRD and TEM. The results showed that the ingots with Hf have near lamellar microstructure in columnar and dendrite morphology. The hafnium concentration has a strong effect on the columnar spacing refinement. Increasing Hf from 0 to 7 (at.%), the columnar spacing can be reduced from~1000 to~400 pm. Constitute phases of the ingots are α2, a small amount of B2 and γ. Most of the B2 phases, richer in Hf and leaner in AI and Ti, exist on the node of the dendrite core in block shape and a little across the lamellar colonies in stick shape. The γ phases exist on the boundaries of lamellar colonies in small cellular shape. There also exists a segregation of Hf on the columnar and dendrite core. Particularly, both the α- andβ-phase form from the melt as prior phases. The possible phase sequencing during solidification and solid-state transformations with Hf is given in this paper.

  20. Compositional analysis of polycrystalline hafnium oxide thin films by heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, F.L. [Departamento de Electronica y Tecnologia de Computadoras, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Campus Universitario Muralla del Mar, E-30202 Cartagena (Spain)]. E-mail: Felix.Martinez@upct.es; Toledano, M. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28025 Madrid (Spain); San Andres, E. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28025 Madrid (Spain); Martil, I. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28025 Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez-Diaz, G. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada III, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28025 Madrid (Spain); Bohne, W. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Abteilung SF-4, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Roehrich, J. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Abteilung SF-4, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Strub, E. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, Abteilung SF-4, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2006-10-25

    The composition of polycrystalline hafnium oxide thin films has been measured by heavy-ion elastic recoil detection analysis (HI-ERDA). The films were deposited by high-pressure reactive sputtering (HPRS) on silicon wafers using an oxygen plasma at pressures between 0.8 and 1.6 mbar and during deposition times between 0.5 and 3.0 h. Hydrogen was found to be the main impurity and its concentration increased with deposition pressure. The composition was always slightly oxygen-rich, which is attributed to the oxygen plasma. Additionally, an interfacial silicon oxide thin layer was detected and taken into account. The thickness of the hafnium oxide film was found to increase linearly with deposition time and to decrease exponentially with deposition pressure, whereas the thickness of the silicon oxide interfacial layer has a minimum as a function of pressure at around 1.2 mbar and increases slightly as a function of time. The measurements confirmed that this interfacial layer is formed mainly during the early stages of the deposition process.

  1. Linear Trimeric Hafnium Clusters in Hf0.86(1I3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Beekhuizen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of hafnium tetraiodide, HfI4, with aluminum at 600 °C or 850 °C in the presence of a NaI flux resulted in black single crystals of Hf0.86(1I3. This composition corresponds well to the upper end of the non-stoichiometry range 0.89 ≤ x ≤ 1.00 previously reported for HfxI3. The crystal structure (a = 1250.3(2, c = 1999.6(3 pm, R-3m, Z = 18 is made up of hexagonal closest packed layers of iodide ions. One third of the octahedral holes would be filled as in TiI3 or ZrI3 if it were Hf1.00I3. In Hf0.86(1I3, one out of six octahedral holes along [001] are, however, only occupied by 16%. In contrast to TiI3-I and ZrI3, one striking structural feature is in the formation of linear hafnium trimers with identical Hf―Hf distances of 318.3(2 pm rather than the formation of dimers. These may be associated with Hf―Hf bonding although only 2.64 electrons are available for one Hf5.16I18 column.

  2. Trapping of hydrogen in hafnium-based high kappa dielectric thin films for advanced CMOS applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukirde, Vaishali

    In recent years, advanced high kappa gate dielectrics are under serious consideration to replace SiO2 and SiON in semiconductor industry. Hafnium-based dielectrics such as hafnium oxides, oxynitrides and Hf-based silicates/nitrided silicates are emerging as some of the most promising alternatives to SiO2/SiON gate dielectrics in complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices. Extensive efforts have been taken to understand the effects of hydrogen impurities in semiconductors and its behavior such as incorporation, diffusion, trapping and release with the aim of controlling and using it to optimize the performance of electronic device structures. In this dissertation, a systematic study of hydrogen trapping and the role of carbon impurities in various alternate gate dielectric candidates, HfO2/Si, HfxSi1-xO2/Si, HfON/Si and HfON(C)/Si is presented. It has been shown that processing of high kappa dielectrics may lead to some crystallization issues. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) for measuring oxygen deficiencies, elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) for quantifying hydrogen and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) for quantifying carbon, X-ray diffraction (XRD) for measuring degree of crystallinity and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize these thin dielectric materials. ERDA data are used to characterize the evolution of hydrogen during annealing in hydrogen ambient in combination with preprocessing in oxygen and nitrogen.

  3. Solvolysis of titanium tetrachloride in non-aqueous media as a method for producing titanium dioxide particles of different morphology

    OpenAIRE

    A. M Nemeryuk; M. M Lylina

    2015-01-01

    The processes of solvolysis of titanium tetrachloride in nonaqueous media were studied. The influence of the conditions of solvolysis on the size and morphology of the particles of titanium dioxide produced have been described.

  4. Observation of the hepatoprotective and antioxidant activities of Trianthema decandra Linn. (Vallai sharunnai roots on carbon tetrachloride-treated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Balamurugan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to observe the hepatoprotective effect and antioxidant activity of the ethanol extract of the roots of Trianthema decandra Linn. (200 and 400 mg/kg in rats treated with carbon tetrachloride for 8 weeks. Extract at the tested doses restored the levels of all serum (aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, total bilirubin and total protein and liver homogenate enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase and catalase significantly. Histology demonstrated profound steatosis degeneration and nodule formation were observed in the hepatic architecture of carbon tetrachloride treated rats which were found to acquire near-normalcy in extract plus carbon tetrachloride administrated rats, and supported the biochemical observations. This study suggests that ethanol extract of T. decandra has a liver protective effect against carbon tetrachloride- induced hepatotoxicity and possess antioxidant activities.

  5. Tetrahydrofuran hydrate decomposition characteristics in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongchen; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Shenglong; Zhao, Jiafei; Yang, Mingjun

    2016-12-01

    Many tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate properties are similar to those of gas hydrates. In the present work THF hydrate dissociation in four types of porous media is studied. THF solution was cooled to 275.15 K with formation of the hydrate under ambient pressure, and then it dissociated under ambient conditions. THF hydrate dissociation experiments in each porous medium were conducted three times. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to obtain images. Decomposition time, THF hydrate saturation and MRI mean intensity (MI) were measured and analyzed. The experimental results showed that the hydrate decomposition time in BZ-4 and BZ-3 was similar and longer than that in BZ-02. In each dissociation process, the hydrate decomposition time of the second and third cycles was shorter than that of the first cycle in BZ-4, BZ-3, and BZ-02. The relationship between THF hydrate saturation and time is almost linear.

  6. Numerical investigation on three-dimensional dispersion and conversion behaviors of silicon tetrachloride release in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianwen, Zhang; Xinxin, Yin; Yanan, Xin; Jian, Zhang; Xiaoping, Zheng; Chunming, Jiang

    2015-05-15

    The world has experienced heavy thirst of energy as it has to face a dwindling supply of fossil fuel and polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic solar energy technology has been assigned great importance. Silicon tetrachloride is the main byproducts of polysilicon industry, and it's volatile and highly toxic. Once silicon tetrachloride releases, it rapidly forms a dense gas cloud and reacts violently with water vapor in the atmosphere to form a gas cloud consisting of the mixture of silicon tetrachloride, hydrochloric acid and silicic acid, which endangers environment and people. In this article, numerical investigation is endeavored to explore the three dimensional dispersion and conversion behaviors of silicon tetrachloride release in the atmosphere. The k-ϵ model with buoyancy correction on k is applied for turbulence closure and modified EBU model is applied to describe the hydrolysis reaction of silicon tetrachloride. It is illustrated that the release of silicon tetrachloride forms a dense cloud, which sinks onto the ground driven by the gravity and wind and spreads both upwind and downwind. Complicated interaction occurs between the silicon tetrachloride cloud and the air mass. The main body of the dense cloud moves downwind and reacts with the water vapor on the interface between the dense cloud and the air mass to generate a toxic mixture of silicon tetrachloride, hydrogen chloride and silicic acid. A large coverage in space is formed by the toxic mixture and imposes chemical hazards to the environment. The exothermic hydrolysis reaction consumes water and releases reaction heat resulting in dehydration and temperature rise, which imposes further hazards to the ecosystem over the affected space.

  7. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.;

    1999-01-01

    Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations...... and experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6...

  8. Progress of Gas Hydrate Studies in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊栓狮; 汪集旸

    2006-01-01

    A brief overview is given on the gas hydrate-related research activities carried out by Chinese researchers in the past 15 years. The content involves: (1) Historical review. Introducing the gas hydrate research history in China; (2) Gas hydrate research groups in China. There are nearly 20 groups engaged in gas hydrate research now; (3) Present studies.Including fundamental studies, status of the exploration of natural gas hydrate resources in the South China Sea region, and development of hydrate-based new techniques; (4) Future development.

  9. Effect of hafnium doping on density of states in dual-target magnetron co-sputtering HfZnSnO thin film transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chuan-Xin; Li, Jun, E-mail: SHUniverjunli@163.com; Fu, Yi-Zhou; Jiang, Xue-Yin [School of Material Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Jiading, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhang, Jian-Hua [Key Laboratory of Advanced Display and System Applications, Ministry of Education, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Zhang, Zhi-Lin [School of Material Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Jiading, Shanghai 201800 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Display and System Applications, Ministry of Education, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2015-11-23

    This study investigates the effect of hafnium doping on the density of states (DOSs) in HfZnSnO thin film transistors fabricated by dual-target magnetron co-sputtering system. The DOSs is extracted by temperature-dependent field-effect measurements, and they decrease from 1.1 × 10{sup 17} to 4.6 × 10{sup 16 }eV/cm{sup 3} with increasing the hafnium concentrations. The behavior of DOSs for the increasing hafnium concentration HfZnSnO thin film transistors can be confirmed by both the reduction of ΔV{sub T} under bias stress and the trapping charges calculated by capacitance voltage measurements. It suggests that the reduction in DOSs due to the hafnium doping is closely related with the bias stability and thermal stability.

  10. Hydration of fly ash cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etsuo Sakai; Shigeyoshi Miyahara; Shigenari Ohsawa; Seung-Heun Lee; Masaki Daimon [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Graduate School of Science and Engineering

    2005-06-01

    It is necessary to establish the material design system for the utilization of large amounts of fly ash as blended cement instead of disposing of it as a waste. Cement blended with fly ash is also required as a countermeasure to reduce the amount of CO{sub 2} generation. In this study, the influences of the glass content and the basicity of glass phase on the hydration of fly ash cement were clarified and hydration over a long curing time was characterized. Two kinds of fly ash with different glass content, one with 38.2% and another with 76.6%, were used. The hydration ratio of fly ash was increased by increasing the glass content in fly ash in the specimens cured for 270 days. When the glass content of fly ash is low, the basicity of glass phase tends to decrease. Reactivity of fly ash is controlled by the basicity of the glass phase in fly ash during a period from 28 to 270 days. However, at an age of 360 days, the reaction ratios of fly ash show almost identical values with different glass contents. Fly ash also affected the hydration of cement clinker minerals in fly ash cement. While the hydration of alite was accelerated, that of belite was retarded at a late stage.

  11. Pharmacologic application of fourier transform IR spectroscopy: in vivo toxicity of carbon tetrachloride on rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, A M; Perromat, A; Déléris, G

    2000-01-01

    Microsomal fractions from rat liver were examined by means of Fourier transform IR (FTIR) spectroscopy to study the in vivo toxic effect of carbon tetrachloride administered by intraperitoneal injection. Lipid content was significantly enhanced in the liver of treated rats compared with untreated ones. The level of saturated fatty acids largely increased while that of unsaturated acids slightly decreased as a consequence of lipid peroxidation induced by the xenobiotic compound. The conformational structure of membrane proteins was changed, which was shown by the large decrease in the alpha-helical configuration. In the polysaccharide region we observed an important loss in glucidic structures that could be related to the metabolic changes caused by carbon tetrachloride intoxication. Thus, FTIR spectroscopy appears to be a useful tool to rapidly investigate the chemical alterations induced by this drug in liver microsomes and to correlate them with biochemical and physiological data.

  12. Attenuation of Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Hepatotoxicity by Cow Urine Distillate in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M PGURURAJA; A B JOSHI; HIMANSHU JOSHI; D SATHYANARAYANA; E V S SUBRAHMANYAM; K S CHANDRASHEKHAR

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To study the carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatoprotective activity in cow urine. Methods Effect of cow urine distillate on liver function was studied in vivo in rats intoxicated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Hepatotoxicity was induced by a 1:1 (v/v) mixture of CCl4 in olive oil (5 mL/kg i.p). Protective effect of cow urine distillate (in three dose levels) and standard drug Silymarin (100 mg/kg, p.o) on liver function were studied in intoxicated rats. Parameters in the study included liver function tests and histological observations. Results The cow urine distillate decreased the levels of SGOT, SGPT, ALP, GGT, and total bilirubin in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05) as sylimarin. Conclusion The observed protective effects of cow urine distillate on liver function might be due to the presence of antioxidants in cow urine.

  13. Comparison of stromal hydration techniques for clear corneal cataract incisions: conventional hydration versus anterior stromal pocket hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifflin, Mark D; Kinard, Krista; Neuffer, Marcus C

    2012-06-01

    Anterior stromal pocket hydration was compared with conventional hydration for preventing wound leak after 2.8 mm uniplanar clear corneal incisions (CCIs) in patients having routine cataract surgery. Conventional hydration involves hydration of the lateral walls of the main incision with visible whitening of the stroma. The anterior stromal pocket hydration technique involves creation of an additional supraincisional stromal pocket overlying the main incision, which is then hydrated instead of the main incision. Sixty-six eyes of 48 patients were included in the data analysis with 33 assigned to each study group. The anterior stromal pocket hydration technique was significantly better than conventional hydration in preventing wound leak due to direct pressure on the posterior lip of the incision. Copyright © 2012 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The extraction of vanadium pentoxide from waste of titanium tetrachloride by various methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Инна Михайловна Гунько

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In article the recovery possibility of vanadium pentoxide from wastes, formed as a result of purification from impurities of technical titanium tetrachloride is researched. The purification from impurities is realized by different methods – pulp of lower titanium chlorides, hydrocarbonic reducer and cascade-rectifying purification. Usage of these purification methods leads to formation of anthropogenic wastes. The researches is shown that processing of these wastes is reasonable for the purpose of vanadium pentoxide extraction

  15. Efficient dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride by hydrophobic green rust intercalated with dodecanoate anions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayala Luis, Karina Barbara; Ginette Anneliese Cooper, Nicola; Bender Koch, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride (CT) by Fe-II-Fe-III hydroxide (green rust) intercalated with dodecanoate, (Fe4Fe2III)-Fe-II (OH)(12)(C12H23O2)(2)center dot gamma H2O (designated GR(C12)), at pH similar to 8 and at room temperature was investigated. CT at concentration levels...

  16. Solanum muricatum Aiton Juice as A Hepatoprotective Agent in Wistar Rats Induced With Carbon Tetrachloride

    OpenAIRE

    Justine Sim Wei Yang; Istriati; Tiene Rostini

    2015-01-01

    Background: Liver participates in various metabolic processes in human body. Exposures to toxins such as carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) results in hepatocyte destruction and release the cell contents. Enzymes such as serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) were used as a parameter to diagnose liver damage. Pepino (Solanum muricatum Aiton) contains antioxidants that protect liver from hepatoxicity. The aim of this experiment is to determine the effect of pepino in protecting the hepatocyte fro...

  17. Graphene oxide-mediated rapid dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride by green rust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Li-Zhi; Hansen, Hans Christian B.; Daasbjerg, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Graphene-based nanomaterials can mediate environmentally relevant abiotic redox reactions of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons. In this study as low amounts as ∼0.007 % of graphene oxide (GO) was found to catalyze the reduction of carbon tetrachloride by layered Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxide (Green....... This study indicates that traces of graphene oxide can affect reaction pathways as well as kinetics for dechlorination processes in anoxic sediments by facilitating a partial dechlorination....

  18. Amelioration of carbon tetrachloride induced hepatotoxicity in rats by standardized Feronia limonia. Linn leaf extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Devkar, Ranjitsinh V; Jadeja, Ravirajsinh N.; Jain, Mahendra; Kapadia, Rakhee; Mishra, S. H.; Menaka C. Thounaojam

    2012-01-01

    The hepatoprotective potential of standardized Feronia limonia (Family, Rutaceae) methanolic extract (FL-7) and chloroform soluble fraction (FL-9) were assessed against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity in rats. Rats treated with CCl4 recorded significant elevation in plasma markers of hepatic injury, alteration in hepatic antioxidant status and histopathological damages. However, rats pretreated with FL-7 (200 or 400 mg/kg, p.o.) and FL-9 (100 or 200 mg/...

  19. Gas hydrates forming and decomposition conditions analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Павленко

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of gas hydrates has been defined; their brief description has been given; factors that affect the formation and decomposition of the hydrates have been reported; their distribution, structure and thermodynamic conditions determining the gas hydrates formation disposition in gas pipelines have been considered. Advantages and disadvantages of the known methods for removing gas hydrate plugs in the pipeline have been analyzed, the necessity of their further studies has been proved. In addition to the negative impact on the process of gas extraction, the hydrates properties make it possible to outline the following possible fields of their industrial use: obtaining ultrahigh pressures in confined spaces at the hydrate decomposition; separating hydrocarbon mixtures by successive transfer of individual components through the hydrate given the mode; obtaining cold due to heat absorption at the hydrate decomposition; elimination of the open gas fountain by means of hydrate plugs in the bore hole of the gushing gasser; seawater desalination, based on the hydrate ability to only bind water molecules into the solid state; wastewater purification; gas storage in the hydrate state; dispersion of high temperature fog and clouds by means of hydrates; water-hydrates emulsion injection into the productive strata to raise the oil recovery factor; obtaining cold in the gas processing to cool the gas, etc.

  20. Summary of canister overheating incident at the Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driggers, S.A.

    1994-03-10

    The granular activated carbon (GAC)-filled canister that overheated was being used to adsorb carbon tetrachloride vapors drawn from a well near the 216-Z-9 Trench, a subsurface disposal site in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The overheating incident resulted in a band of discolored paint on the exterior surface of the canister. Although there was no other known damage to equipment, no injuries to operating personnel, and no releases of hazardous materials, the incident is of concern because it was not anticipated. It also poses the possibility of release of carbon tetrachloride and other hazardous vapors if the incident were to recur. All soil vapor extraction system (VES) operations were halted until a better understanding of the cause of the incident could be determined and controls implemented to reduce the possibility of a recurrence. The focus of this report and the intent of all the activities associated with understanding the overheating incident has been to provide information that will allow safe restart of the VES operations, develop operational limits and controls to prevent recurrence of an overheating incident, and safely optimize recovery of carbon tetrachloride from the ground.

  1. Buckwheat Honey Attenuates Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Liver and DNA Damage in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ni; Wu, Liming; Zheng, Jianbin; Cao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Buckwheat honey, which is widely consumed in China, has a characteristic dark color. The objective of this study was to investigate the protective effects of buckwheat honey on liver and DNA damage induced by carbon tetrachloride in mice. The results revealed that buckwheat honey had high total phenolic content, and rutin, hesperetin, and p-coumaric acid were the main phenolic compounds present. Buckwheat honey possesses super DPPH radical scavenging activity and strong ferric reducing antioxidant power. Administration of buckwheat honey for 10 weeks significantly inhibited serum lipoprotein oxidation and increased serum oxygen radical absorbance capacity. Moreover, buckwheat honey significantly inhibited aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities, which are enhanced by carbon tetrachloride. Hepatic malondialdehyde decreased and hepatic antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) increased in the presence of buckwheat honey. In a comet assay, lymphocyte DNA damage induced by carbon tetrachloride was significantly inhibited by buckwheat honey. Therefore, buckwheat honey has a hepatoprotective effect and inhibits DNA damage, activities that are primarily attributable to its high antioxidant capacity. PMID:26508989

  2. Buckwheat Honey Attenuates Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Liver and DNA Damage in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Buckwheat honey, which is widely consumed in China, has a characteristic dark color. The objective of this study was to investigate the protective effects of buckwheat honey on liver and DNA damage induced by carbon tetrachloride in mice. The results revealed that buckwheat honey had high total phenolic content, and rutin, hesperetin, and p-coumaric acid were the main phenolic compounds present. Buckwheat honey possesses super DPPH radical scavenging activity and strong ferric reducing antioxidant power. Administration of buckwheat honey for 10 weeks significantly inhibited serum lipoprotein oxidation and increased serum oxygen radical absorbance capacity. Moreover, buckwheat honey significantly inhibited aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities, which are enhanced by carbon tetrachloride. Hepatic malondialdehyde decreased and hepatic antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase increased in the presence of buckwheat honey. In a comet assay, lymphocyte DNA damage induced by carbon tetrachloride was significantly inhibited by buckwheat honey. Therefore, buckwheat honey has a hepatoprotective effect and inhibits DNA damage, activities that are primarily attributable to its high antioxidant capacity.

  3. A Systematic Approach to In Situ Bioremediation in Groundwater Including Decision Trees on In Situ Bioremediation for Nitrates, Carbon Tetrachloride, and Perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-08-01

    facility also had associated seed treatment operations that may have contributed mercury compounds to the subsurface. The time of the releases will...tetrachloride is a dense nonaqueous-phase liquid ( DNAPL ) that does not occur naturally. The physical properties of carbon tetrachloride and its most...et al., 2001). DOE’s Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee has an historical carbon tetrachloride plume with suspected DNAPL in fractured bedrock (see

  4. Coagulation performance and floc characteristics of polytitanium tetrachloride (PTC) compared with titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) and ferric chloride (FeCl3) in algal turbid water

    KAUST Repository

    Chekli, L.

    2016-11-11

    Seasonal green algae blooms in freshwaters have raised attention on the need to develop novel effective treatment processes for the removal of algae in water. In the present study, the performance of newly developed polytitanium tetrachloride (PTC) coagulant for the removal of freshwater microalga Chlorella vulgaris has been investigated and compared with titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) coagulant and the conventional ferric chloride (FeCl3) coagulant. The main benefit of using titanium-based coagulants is that the sludge produced after flocculation may be recycled into a valuable product: titanium dioxide photocatalyst. Both titanium-based coagulants achieved good flocculation over a broader pH range and coagulant dose compared to conventional FeCl3 coagulant. All three coagulants achieved comparable performance in terms of turbidity removal (i.e. turbidity removal efficiency >97%); although TiCl4 performed slightly better at the lower tested dose (i.e. <9 mg/L). Zeta potential measurements indicated that charge neutralisation may not be the sole mechanism involved in the coagulation of algae for all three coagulants. Analysis of the dynamic floc size variation during floc breakage showed no regrowth after floc breakage for the three coagulants. The flocs formed by both Ti-based coagulants were larger than those formed by FeCl3 and also grew at a faster rate. This study indicates that Ti-based coagulants are effective and promising coagulants for algae removal in water.

  5. Hydration of highly charged ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Thomas S; Weiss, Alexander K H; Randolf, Bernhard R; Rode, Bernd M

    2011-08-01

    Based on a series of ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) simulations, the broad spectrum of structural and dynamical properties of hydrates of trivalent and tetravalent ions is presented, ranging from extreme inertness to immediate hydrolysis. Main group and transition metal ions representative for different parts of the periodic system are treated, as are 2 threefold negatively charged anions. The results show that simple predictions of the properties of the hydrates appear impossible and that an accurate quantum mechanical simulation in cooperation with sophisticated experimental investigations seems the only way to obtain conclusive results.

  6. Great Market Potential of Hydrazine Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Yuying

    2007-01-01

    @@ Stable consumption growth worldwide Hydrazine hydrate is an organic chemical raw material with extensive applications. The world's capacity to produce hydrazine hydrate has reached more than 200 thousand t/atoday (based on 100% hydrazine content).

  7. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  8. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lina

    2017-05-13

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10 was conducted for tricalcium silicate (C3S) to interpret long-term hydration process and investigate the formation, structure and properties of C-S-H. Based on results from XRD, IR, SEM, NMR and so forth, loose and dense clusters of C-S-H with analogous C/S ratio were obtained along with the corresponding chemical formulae proposed as Ca5Si4O13∙6.2H2O. Crystalline structure inside C-S-H was observed by TEM, which was allocated at the foil-like proportion as well as the edge of wrinkles of the product. The long-term hydration process of C3S in dilute suspension could be sketchily described as migration of calcium hydroxide and in-situ growth of C-S-H with equilibrium silicon in aqueous solution relatively constant and calcium varied.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-30

    properties of key hydrated cement constituent calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) at the molecular, nanometer scale level. Due to complexity, still unknown...public release; distribution is unlimited. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate- Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure The views... Cement Molecular Structure Report Title Multi-scale modeling of complex material systems requires starting from fundamental building blocks to

  10. A thermally robust and thickness independent ferroelectric phase in laminated hafnium zirconium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Riedel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ferroelectric properties in hafnium oxide based thin films have recovered the scaling potential for ferroelectric memories due to their ultra-thin-film- and CMOS-compatibility. However, the variety of physical phenomena connected to ferroelectricity allows a wider range of applications for these materials than ferroelectric memory. Especially mixed HfxZr1-xO2 thin films exhibit a broad compositional range of ferroelectric phase stability and provide the possibility to tailor material properties for multiple applications. Here it is shown that the limited thermal stability and thick-film capability of HfxZr1-xO2 can be overcome by a laminated approach using alumina interlayers.

  11. Cesium hafnium chloride: A high light yield, non-hygroscopic cubic crystal scintillator for gamma spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, Arnold, E-mail: aburger@fisk.edu [Department of Life and Physical Sciences, Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee 37208 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Rowe, Emmanuel; Groza, Michael; Morales Figueroa, Kristle [Department of Life and Physical Sciences, Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee 37208 (United States); Cherepy, Nerine J.; Beck, Patrick R.; Hunter, Steven; Payne, Stephen A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-10-05

    We report on the scintillation properties of Cs{sub 2}HfCl{sub 6} (cesium hafnium chloride or CHC) as an example of a little-known class of non-hygroscopic compounds having the generic cubic crystal structure of K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}. The crystals are easily growable from the melt using the Bridgman method with minimal precursor treatments or purification. CHC scintillation is centered at 400 nm, with a principal decay time of 4.37 μs and a light yield of up to 54 000 photons/MeV when measured using a silicon CCD photodetector. The light yield is the highest ever reported for an undoped crystal, and CHC also exhibits excellent light yield nonproportionality. These desirable properties allowed us to build and test CHC gamma-ray spectrometers providing energy resolution of 3.3% at 662 keV.

  12. Wake-up effects in Si-doped hafnium oxide ferroelectric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dayu; Xu, Jin; Li, Qing; Guan, Yan; Cao, Fei; Dong, Xianlin; Müller, Johannes; Schenk, Tony; Schröder, Uwe

    2013-11-01

    Hafnium oxide based ferroelectric thin films have shown potential as a promising alternative material for non-volatile memory applications. This work reports the switching stability of a Si-doped HfO2 film under bipolar pulsed-field operation. High field cycling causes a "wake-up" in virgin "pinched" polarization hysteresis loops, demonstrated by an enhancement in remanent polarization and a shift of negative coercive voltage. The rate of wake-up is accelerated by either reducing the frequency or increasing the amplitude of the cycling field. We suggest de-pinning of domains due to reduction of the defect concentration at bottom electrode interface as origin of the wake-up.

  13. Dinitrogen cleavage and functionalization by carbon monoxide promoted by a hafnium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Donald J; Lobkovsky, Emil; Chirik, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    Molecular nitrogen (N(2)) and carbon monoxide (CO) have the two strongest bonds in chemistry and present significant challenges in developing new transformations that exploit these two abundant feedstocks. At the core of this objective is the discovery of transition-metal compounds that promote the six-electron reductive cleavage of N(2) at ambient temperature and pressure and also promote new nitrogen-element bond formation. Here we show that an organometallic hafnium compound induces N(2) cleavage on the addition of CO, with a simultaneous assembly of new nitrogen-carbon and carbon-carbon bonds. Subsequent addition of a weak acid liberates oxamide, which demonstrates that an important agrochemical can be synthesized directly from N(2) and CO. These studies introduce an alternative paradigm for N(2) cleavage and functionalization in which the six-electron reductive cleavage is promoted by both the transition metal and the incoming ligand, CO, used for the new bond formations.

  14. Hafnium dioxide as a dielectric for highly-sensitive waveguide-coupled surface plasmon resonance sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal Tiwari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hafnium dioxide has been recognized as an excellent dielectric for microelectronics. However, its usefulness for the surface plasmon based sensors has not yet been tested. Here we investigate its usefulness for waveguide-coupled bi-metallic surface plasmon resonance sensors. Several Ag/HfO2/Au multilayer structure sensors were fabricated and evaluated by optical measurements and computer simulations. The resulting data establish correlations between the growth parameters and sensor performance. The sensor sensitivity to refractive index of analytes is determined to be S n = ∂ θ SPR ∂ n ≥ 4 7 0 . The sensitivity data are supported by simulations, which also predict 314 nm for the evanescent field decay length in air.

  15. Surface State Capture Cross-Section at the Interface between Silicon and Hafnium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Chien Chiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interfacial properties between silicon and hafnium oxide (HfO2 are explored by the gated-diode method and the subthreshold measurement. The density of interface-trapped charges, the current induced by surface defect centers, the surface recombination velocity, and the surface state capture cross-section are obtained in this work. Among the interfacial properties, the surface state capture cross-section is approximately constant even if the postdeposition annealing condition is changed. This effective capture cross-section of surface states is about 2.4 × 10−15 cm2, which may be an inherent nature in the HfO2/Si interface.

  16. Composition effects on mechanical properties of tungsten-rhenium-hafnium-carbon alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzke, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanical properties of rod and sheet fabricated from arc melted W-4Re-Hf-C alloys containing up to about 0.8 mol percent hafnium carbide (HfC) were evaluated in the as-worked condition. The DBTT's of electropolished bend and tensile specimens were independent of HfC content in this range but dependent on excess Hf or C above that required for stoichiometric HfC. Low temperature ductility was a maximum at Hf contents slightly in excess of stoichiometric. Variations in high temperature strength were also dependent on excess Hf and C. Maximum creep strengthening also occurred at Hf contents in excess of stoichiometric. Analysis of extracted second phase particles indicated that creep strength was reduced by increasing WC content in the HfC particles.

  17. Pyroelectric response in crystalline hafnium zirconium oxide (Hf1-xZrxO2) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. W.; Kitahara, A. R.; Rodriguez, M. A.; Henry, M. D.; Brumbach, M. T.; Ihlefeld, J. F.

    2017-02-01

    Pyroelectric coefficients were measured for 20 nm thick crystalline hafnium zirconium oxide (Hf1-xZrxO2) thin films across a composition range of 0 ≤ x ≤ 1. Pyroelectric currents were collected near room temperature under zero applied bias and a sinusoidal oscillating temperature profile to separate the influence of non-pyroelectric currents. The pyroelectric coefficient was observed to correlate with zirconium content, increased orthorhombic/tetragonal phase content, and maximum polarization response. The largest measured absolute value was 48 μCm-2 K-1 for a composition with x = 0.64, while no pyroelectric response was measured for compositions which displayed no remanent polarization (x = 0, 0.91, and 1).

  18. First principle study of the electronic structure of hafnium-doped anatase TiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Lezhong; Yang Weiqing; DingYingchun; Zhu Xinghua

    2012-01-01

    Crystal structures and electronic structures of hafnium doping anatase TiO2 were calculated by first principles with the plane-wave ultrasoft pseudopotential method based on the density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation.The calculated results show that the lattice parameters a and c of Hf-doped anatase TiO2 are larger than those of intrinsic TiO2 under the same calculated condition.The calculated band structure and density of states show that the conduction band width of Hf-doped TiO2 is broadened which results in the band gap of Hf-doped being smaller than the band gap of TiO2.

  19. Multiphonon ionization of traps formed in hafnium oxide by electrical stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilyuk, A.L.; Migas, D.B.; Danilyuk, M.A.; Borisenko, V.E. [Belorussian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics, P. Browka 6, 220013 Minsk (Belarus); Wu, X.; Pey, K.L. [Microelectronics Center, School of EEE, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Concurrently with Engineering Product Development Pillar, Singapore University of Technology and Design, 20 Dover Drive, Singapore 138682 (Singapore); Raghavan, N. [Microelectronics Center, School of EEE, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2013-02-15

    We have investigated behavior of traps formed in hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) by electrical stress and their influence on the charge carrier transport through Si/SiO{sub 2}/HfO{sub 2}/poly-Si nanostructures. The traps govern the transport process assuming a capture of charge carriers followed by their ionization via the multiphonon transition mechanism. The multiphonon transitions via the Poole-Frenkel effect or electron tunneling as well as the multiphonon tunneling ionization of neutral traps have been carefully considered for charged traps. We also provide a set of parameters including the trap concentration, ionization energy, the frequency factor, the effective mass of charge carriers, optical energy, and phonon energy in order to reproduce and reasonably fit available experimental data. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Hydration and Thermal Expansion in Anatase Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, He; Li, Qiang; Ren, Yang; Fan, Longlong; Chen, Jun; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2016-08-01

    A tunable thermal expansion is reported in nanosized anatase by taking advantage of surface hydration. The coefficient of thermal expansion of 4 nm TiO2 along a-axis is negative with a hydrated surface and is positive without a hydrated surface. High-energy synchrotron X-ray pair distribution function analysis combined with ab initio calculations on the specific hydrated surface are carried out to reveal the local structure distortion that is responsible for the unusual negative thermal expansion.

  1. Hydration and Thermal Expansion in Anatase Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, He [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Li, Qiang [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Ren, Yang [Argonne National Laboratory, X-Ray Science Division, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Fan, Longlong [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Chen, Jun [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Deng, Jinxia [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Xing, Xianran [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China

    2016-06-06

    A tunable thermal expansion is reported in nanosized anatase by taking advantage of surface hydration. The coefficient of thermal expansion of 4 nm TiO2 along a-axis is negative with a hydrated surface and is positive without a hydrated surface. High-energy synchrotron X-ray pair distribution function analysis combined with ab initio calculations on the specific hydrated surface are carried out to reveal the local structure distortion that is responsible for the unusual negative thermal expansion.

  2. Characterization of a Novel Hafnium-Based X-ray Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Thomas; Bauser, Marcus; Berger, Markus; Hilger, Christoph Stephan; Hegele-Hartung, Christa; Jost, Gregor; Neis, Christian; Hegetschweiler, Kaspar; Riefke, Björn; Suelzle, Detlev; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2016-12-01

    Characterization of BAY-576, a new x-ray contrast agent which is not based on iodine, but rather on the heavy metal hafnium. Compared with iodine, hafnium provides better x-ray absorption in the energy range of computed tomography (CT) and allows images of comparable quality to be acquired at a significantly reduced radiation dose. A range of standard methods were used to explore the physicochemistry of BAY-576 as well as its tolerability in in vitro assays, its pharmacokinetics and toxicology in rats, and its performance in CT imaging in rabbits. BAY-576 is an extraordinarily stable chelate with a metal content of 42% (wt/wt) and with excellent water solubility. Formulations of 300 mg Hf/mL exhibited viscosity (3.3-3.6 mPa) and osmolality (860-985 mOsm/kg) in the range of nonionic x-ray agents. No relevant effects on erythrocytes, the coagulation, or complement system or on a panel of 87 potential biological targets were observed. The compound did not bind to plasma proteins of a number of species investigated. After intravenous injection in rats, it was excreted fast and mainly via the kidneys. Its pharmacokinetics was comparable to known extracellular contrast agents. A dose of 6000 mg Hf/kg, approximately 10 to 20 times the expected diagnostic dose, was well tolerated by rats with only moderate adverse effects. Computed tomography imaging in rabbits bearing a tumor in the liver demonstrated excellent image quality when compared with iopromide at the same contrast agent dose in angiography during the arterial phase. At 70% of the radiation dose, BAY-576 provided a contrast-to-noise ratio of the tumor, which was equivalent to iopromide at 100% radiation dose. The profile of BAY-576 indicates its potential as the first compound in a new class of noniodine x-ray contrast agents, which can contribute to the reduction of the radiation burden in contrast-enhanced CT imaging.

  3. Effect of reactive magnetron sputtering parameters on structural and electrical properties of hafnium oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymańska, Magdalena, E-mail: magdalena_szymanska@its.waw.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Motor Transport Institute, Jagiellońska 80, 03-301 Warsaw (Poland); Gierałtowska, Sylwia; Wachnicki, Łukasz [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Grobelny, Marcin; Makowska, Katarzyna [Motor Transport Institute, Jagiellońska 80, 03-301 Warsaw (Poland); Mroczyński, Robert [Warsaw University of Technology, Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Structural and electrical characterization of HfO{sub x} and HfO{sub x}N{sub y} thin films. • Analysis of the influence of deposition process parameters on properties of films. • Investigation of the post-deposition annealing on HfO{sub x} and HfO{sub x}N{sub y} properties. • Experiment has been designed with use of Taguchi's orthogonal arrays. • The most favorable annealing temperature of HfO{sub x} and HfO{sub x}N{sub y} is 300 °C. - Abstract: The purpose of this work was to compare the structural and electrical properties of magnetron sputtered hafnium oxide (HfO{sub x}) and hafnium oxynitride (HfO{sub x}N{sub y}) thin films. A careful analysis of the influence of deposition process parameters, among them: pressure in the reactor chamber, Ar and O{sub 2} flow rate, power applied to the reactor chamber and deposition time, on electro-physical properties of HfO{sub x} and HfO{sub x}N{sub y} layers has been performed. In the course of this work we performed number of experiments by means of Taguchi's orthogonal arrays approach. Such a method allowed for the determination of dielectric layers properties depending on process parameters with relatively low amount of experiments. Moreover, the effects of post-deposition annealing on electrical characteristics of metal–insulator–semiconductor (MIS) structures with HfO{sub x} or HfO{sub x}N{sub y} gate dielectric and its structural properties have also been reported. Investigated hafnia thin films were characterized by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), electrical characteristics measurements, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS)

  4. Terahertz sensing of corneal hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul S; Tewari, Priyamvada; Bourges, Jean Louis; Hubschman, Jean Pierre; Bennett, David B; Taylor, Zachary D; Lee, H; Brown, Elliott R; Grundfest, Warren S; Culjat, Martin O

    2010-01-01

    An indicator of ocular health is the hydrodyanmics of the cornea. Many corneal disorders deteriorate sight as they upset the normal hydrodynamics of the cornea. The mechanisms include the loss of endothelial pump function of corneal dystophies, swelling and immune response of corneal graft rejection, and inflammation and edema, which accompany trauma, burn, and irritation events. Due to high sensitivity to changes of water content in materials, a reflective terahertz (300 GHz and 3 THz) imaging system could be an ideal tool to measure the hydration level of the cornea. This paper presents the application of THz technology to visualize the hydration content across ex vivo porcine corneas. The corneas, with a thickness variation from 470 - 940 µm, were successfully imaged using a reflective pulsed THz imaging system, with a maximum SNR of 50 dB. To our knowledge, no prior studies have reported on the use of THz in measuring hydration in corneal tissues or other ocular tissues. These preliminary findings indicate that THz can be used to accurately sense hydration levels in the cornea using a pulsed, reflective THz imaging system.

  5. Physical properties of gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliner, J.T.R.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Gas hydrates are naturally occurring, solid crystalline compounds (clathrates) that encapsulate gas molecules inside the lattices of hydrogen bonded water molecules within a specific temperature-pressure stability zone. Estimates of the total quantity of available methane gas in natural occurring hydrates are based on twice the energy content of known conventional fossil fuels reservoirs. Accurate and reliable in-situ quantification techniques are essential in determining the economic viability of this potential energy yield, which is dependent upon several factors such as sensitivity of the temperature-pressure stability zone, sediment type, porosity, permeability, concentration/abundance of free gas, spatial distribution in pore spaces, specific cage occupancy, and the influence of inhibitors. Various techniques like acoustic P and S waves, time domain reflectometry, and electrical resistance have been used to analyze the quantity and spatial distribution of the gas hydrate samples. These techniques were reviewed and the results obtained in the course of gas hydrate research were presented. 34 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Hydration kinetics of transgenic soybeans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Francielle Fracasso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic and experimental analyses of the hydration process of transgenic soybeans (BRS 225 RR are provided. The importance of the hydration process consists of the grain texture modifications which favor grinding and extraction of soybeans. The soaking isotherms were obtained for four different temperatures. Results showed that temperature affected transgenic soybeans´ hydration rate and time. Moisture content d.b. of the soybeans increased from 0.12 ± 0.01 kg kg-1 to 1.45 ± 0.19 kg kg-1 during 270 min. of process. Two models were used to fit the kinetic curves: an empirical model developed by Peleg (1988 and a phenomenological one, proposed by Omoto et al. (2009. The two models adequately represented the hydration kinetics. Peleg model was applied to the experimental data and the corresponding parameters were obtained and correlated to temperature. The model by Omoto et al. (2009 showed a better statistical fitting. Although Ks was affected by temperature (Ks = 0.38079 exp (-2289.3 T-1, the equilibrium concentration remained practically unchanged.

  7. Physical activity, hydration and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascensión Marcos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of mankind, man has sought ways to promote and preserve health as well as to prevent disease. Hydration, physical activity and exercise are key factors for enhancing human health. However, either a little dose of them or an excess can be harmful for health maintenance at any age. Water is an essential nutrient for human body and a major key to survival has been to prevent dehydration. However, there is still a general controversy regarding the necessary amount to drink water or other beverages to properly get an adequate level of hydration. In addition, up to now the tools used to measure hydration are controversial. To this end, there are several important groups of variables to take into account such as water balance, hydration biomarkers and total body water. A combination of methods will be the most preferred tool to find out any risk or situation of dehydration at any age range. On the other hand, physical activity and exercise are being demonstrated to promote health, avoiding or reducing health problems, vascular and inflammatory diseases and helping weight management. Therefore, physical activity is also being used as a pill within a therapy to promote health and reduce risk diseases, but as in the case of drugs, dose, intensity, frequency, duration and precautions have to be evaluated and taken into account in order to get the maximum effectiveness and success of a treatment. On the other hand, sedentariness is the opposite concept to physical activity that has been recently recognized as an important factor of lifestyle involved in the obesogenic environment and consequently in the risk of the non-communicable diseases. In view of the literature consulted and taking into account the expertise of the authors, in this review a Decalogue of global recommendations is included to achieve an adequate hydration and physical activity status to avoid overweight/obesity consequences.

  8. Group IV Mixed Sandwich Compounds : Synthesis of Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl-Titanium, -Zirconium and -Hafnium Cycloheptatrienyl and Cyclooctatetraene Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blenkers, J.; Bruin, P.; Teuben, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The first complete series of Group IV sandwich complexes Cp*MCHT (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) (Cp* = η5-C5Me5, CHT = η7-C7H7) has been made and characterized. Cp*HfCHT is the first reported sandwich compound of hafnium. The d1, η8-C8H8(COT) complex Cp*MCOT were also synthesised similarly for M = Ti, Zr, but the

  9. Hafnium isotope evidence for a transition in the dynamics of continental growth 3.2 Gyr ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Næraa, T; Scherstén, A; Rosing, M T; Kemp, A I S; Hoffmann, J E; Kokfelt, T F; Whitehouse, M J

    2012-05-30

    Earth's lithosphere probably experienced an evolution towards the modern plate tectonic regime, owing to secular changes in mantle temperature. Radiogenic isotope variations are interpreted as evidence for the declining rates of continental crustal growth over time, with some estimates suggesting that over 70% of the present continental crustal reservoir was extracted by the end of the Archaean eon. Patterns of crustal growth and reworking in rocks younger than three billion years (Gyr) are thought to reflect the assembly and break-up of supercontinents by Wilson cycle processes and mark an important change in lithosphere dynamics. In southern West Greenland numerous studies have, however, argued for subduction settings and crust growth by arc accretion back to 3.8 Gyr ago, suggesting that modern-day tectonic regimes operated during the formation of the earliest crustal rock record. Here we report in situ uranium-lead, hafnium and oxygen isotope data from zircons of basement rocks in southern West Greenland across the critical time period during which modern-like tectonic regimes could have initiated. Our data show pronounced differences in the hafnium isotope-time patterns across this interval, requiring changes in the characteristics of the magmatic protolith. The observations suggest that 3.9-3.5-Gyr-old rocks differentiated from a >3.9-Gyr-old source reservoir with a chondritic to slightly depleted hafnium isotope composition. In contrast, rocks formed after 3.2 Gyr ago register the first additions of juvenile depleted material (that is, new mantle-derived crust) since 3.9 Gyr ago, and are characterized by striking shifts in hafnium isotope ratios similar to those shown by Phanerozoic subduction-related orogens. These data suggest a transitional period 3.5-3.2 Gyr ago from an ancient (3.9-3.5 Gyr old) crustal evolutionary regime unlike that of modern plate tectonics to a geodynamic setting after 3.2 Gyr ago that involved juvenile crust generation by plate

  10. Seismic reflections associated with submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassen, K.

    1995-12-31

    Gas hydrates are often suggested as a future energy resource. This doctoral thesis improves the understanding of the concentration and distribution of natural submarine gas hydrates. The presence of these hydrates are commonly inferred from strong bottom simulating reflection (BSR). To investigate the nature of BSR, this work uses seismic studies of hydrate-related BSRs at two different locations, one where gas hydrates are accepted to exist and interpreted to be very extensive (in the Beaufort Sea), the other with good velocity data and downhole logs available (offshore Oregon). To ascertain the presence of free gas under the BSR, prestack offset data must supplement near-vertical incidence seismic data. A tentative model for physical properties of sediments partially saturated with gas hydrate and free gas is presented. This model, together with drilling information and seismic data containing the BSR beneath the Oregon margin and the Beaufort Sea, made it possible to better understand when to apply the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) method to constrain BSR gas hydrate and gas models. Distribution of natural gas hydrates offshore Norway and Svalbard is discussed and interpreted as reflections from the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, overlying sediments containing free gas. Gas hydrates inferred to exist at the Norwegian-Svalbard continental margin correlate well with Cenozoic depocenters, and the associated gas is assumed to be mainly biogenic. Parts of that margin have a high potential for natural gas hydrates of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. 235 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Handbook of gas hydrate properties and occurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuustraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.

    1983-12-01

    This handbook provides data on the resource potential of naturally occurring hydrates, the properties that are needed to evaluate their recovery, and their production potential. The first two chapters give data on the naturally occurring hydrate potential by reviewing published resource estimates and the known and inferred occurrences. The third and fourth chapters review the physical and thermodynamic properties of hydrates, respectively. The thermodynamic properties of hydrates that are discussed include dissociation energies and a simplified method to calculate them; phase diagrams for simple and multi-component gases; the thermal conductivity; and the kinetics of hydrate dissociation. The final chapter evaluates the net energy balance of recovering hydrates and shows that a substantial positive energy balance can theoretically be achieved. The Appendices of the Handbook summarize physical and thermodynamic properties of gases, liquids and solids that can be used in designing and evaluating recovery processes of hydrates. 158 references, 67 figures, 47 tables.

  12. Separation of water through gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boch Andersen, Torben; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goa...... volumes and the needs for high pressure. The process could be interesting for concentration of heat sensitive, high value products......Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goal...... of the project was to formulate an alternative separation concept, which can replace the traditional water evaporation process in the sugar production. Work with the separation concept showed that gas hydrates can be used for water separation. The process is not suitable for sugar production because of large...

  13. Aminopyridinate-FI hybrids, their hafnium and titanium complexes, and their application in the living polymerization of 1-hexene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Isabelle; Dietel, Thomas; Press, Konstantin; Kol, Moshe; Kempe, Rhett

    2013-10-11

    Based on two well-established ligand systems, the aminopyridinato (Ap) and the phenoxyimine (FI) ligand systems, new Ap-FI hybrid ligands were developed. Four different Ap-FI hybrid ligands were synthesized through a simple condensation reaction and fully characterized. The reaction of hafnium tetrabenzyl with all four Ap-FI hybrid ligands exclusively led to mono(Ap-FI) complexes of the type [(Ap-FI)HfBn2 ]. The ligands acted as tetradentate dianionic chelates. Upon activation with tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, the hafnium-dibenzyl complexes led to highly active catalysts for the polymerization of 1-hexene. Ultrahigh molecular weights and extremely narrow polydispersities support the living nature of this polymerization process. A possible deactivation product of the hafnium catalysts was characterized by single-crystal X-ray analysis and is discussed. The coordination modes of these new ligands were studied with the help of model titanium complexes. The reaction of titanium(IV) isopropoxide with ligand 1 led to a mono(Ap-FI) complex, which showed the desired fac-mer coordination mode. Titanium (IV) isopropoxide reacted with ligand 4 to give a complex of the type [(ApH-FI)2 Ti(OiPr)2 ], which featured the ligand in its monoanionic form. The two titanium complexes were characterized by X-ray crystal-structure analysis. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Ion-bombardment-induced reduction in vacancies and its enhanced effect on conductivity and reflectivity in hafnium nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Zhiqing; Wang, Jiafu; Hu, Chaoquan; Zhang, Xiaobo; Dang, Jianchen; Gao, Jing; Zheng, Weitao [Jilin University, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Mobile Materials, MOE, and State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Changchun (China); Zhang, Sam [Nanyang Technological University, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Singapore (Singapore); Wang, Xiaoyi [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Optical System Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Changchun (China); Chen, Hong [Jilin University, Department of Control Science and Engineering, Changchun (China)

    2016-08-15

    Although the role of ion bombardment on electrical conductivity and optical reflectivity of transition metal nitrides films was reported previously, the results were controversial and the mechanism was not yet well explored. Here, we show that proper ion bombardment, induced by applying the negative bias voltage (V{sub b}), significantly improves the electrical conductivity and optical reflectivity in rocksalt hafnium nitride films regardless of level of stoichiometry (i.e., in both near-stoichiometric HfN{sub 1.04} and over-stoichiometric HfN{sub 1.17} films). The observed improvement arises from the increase in the concentration of free electrons and the relaxation time as a result of reduction in nitrogen and hafnium vacancies in the films. Furthermore, HfN{sub 1.17} films have always much lower electrical conductivity and infrared reflectance than HfN{sub 1.04} films for a given V{sub b}, owing to more hafnium vacancies because of larger composition deviation from HfN exact stoichiometry (N:Hf = 1:1). These new insights are supported by good agreement between experimental results and theoretical calculations. (orig.)

  15. Well log characterization of natural gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2011-01-01

    In the last 25 years we have seen significant advancements in the use of downhole well logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrate in nature: From an early start of using wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gas hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments to today where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. The most established and well known use of downhole log data in gas hydrate research is the use of electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data (both compressional- and shear-wave data) to make estimates of gas hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. New downhole logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation resistivity log measurements have provided the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly inter-bedded and fracture dominated gas hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing have also allowed for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids (i.e., free-water along with clay and capillary bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms controlling the formation and occurrence of gas hydrate in nature along with data on gas hydrate reservoir properties (i.e., permeabilities) needed to accurately predict gas production rates for various gas hydrate

  16. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn

    2009-11-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  17. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, D.D.; Martin, A.I.; Yun, T.S.; Francisca, F.M.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. The effect of hydrate saturation on water retention curves in hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabadi, Nariman; Zheng, Xianglei; Jang, Jaewon

    2016-05-01

    The experimental measurement of water retention curve in hydrate-bearing sediments is critically important to understand the behavior of hydrate dissociation and gas production. In this study, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is selected as hydrate former. The pore habit of THF hydrates is investigated by visual observation in a transparent micromodel. It is confirmed that THF hydrates are not wetting phase on the quartz surface of the micromodel and occupy either an entire pore or part of pore space resulting in change in pore size distribution. And the measurement of water retention curves in THF hydrate-bearing sediments with hydrate saturation ranging from Sh = 0 to Sh = 0.7 is conducted for excess water condition. The experimental results show that the gas entry pressure and the capillary pressure increase with increasing hydrate saturation. Based on the experimental results, fitting parameters for van Genuchten equation are suggested for different hydrate saturation conditions.

  19. Bioavailability of andrographolide and protection against carbon tetrachloride-induced oxidative damage in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Haw-Wen [Department of Nutrition, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chin-Shiu [Department of Health and Nutrition Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Li, Chien-Chun [School of Nutrition, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Nutrition, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Ai-Hsuan; Huang, Yu-Ju [Department of Nutrition, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Tsu-Shing [Department of Biomedical Science, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yao, Hsien-Tsung, E-mail: htyao@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Nutrition, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lii, Chong-Kuei, E-mail: cklii@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Nutrition, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Health and Nutrition Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-01

    Andrographolide, a bioactive diterpenoid, is identified in Andrographis paniculata. In this study, we investigated the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of andrographolide in rats and studied whether andrographolide enhances antioxidant defense in a variety of tissues and protects against carbon tetrachloride-induced oxidative damage. After a single 50-mg/kg administration, the maximum plasma concentration of andrographolide was 1 μM which peaked at 30 min. The bioavailability of andrographolide was 1.19%. In a hepatoprotection study, rats were intragastrically dosed with 30 or 50 mg/kg andrographolide for 5 consecutive days. The results showed that andrographolide up-regulated glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL) catalytic and modifier subunits, superoxide dismutase (SOD)-1, heme oxygenase (HO)-1, and glutathione (GSH) S-transferase (GST) Ya/Yb protein and mRNA expression in the liver, heart, and kidneys. The activity of SOD, GST, and GSH reductase was also increased in rats dosed with andrographolide (p < 0.05). Immunoblot analysis and EMSA revealed that andrographolide increased nuclear Nrf2 contents and Nrf2 binding to DNA, respectively. After the 5-day andrographolide treatment, one group of animals was intraperitoneally injected with carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) at day 6. Andrographolide pretreatment suppressed CCl{sub 4}-induced plasma aminotransferase activity and hepatic lipid peroxidation (p < 0.05). These results suggest that andrographolide is quickly absorbed in the intestinal tract in rats with a bioavailability of 1.19%. Andrographolide protects against chemical-induced oxidative damage by up-regulating the gene transcription and activity of antioxidant enzymes in various tissues. - Highlights: • The bioavailability of andrographolide is 1.19% in rats. • Plasma concentration reaches 1 μM after giving 50 mg/kg andrographolide. • Andrographolide up-regulates Nrf2-dependent antioxidant genes. • Andrographolide increases antioxidant defense

  20. Synthesis of hydrated lutetium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Liu [South China Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Guangdong (China); Rong-jun Ma [Changsha Research Institute of Minig and Metallurgy, Hunan (China)

    1997-09-01

    Crystalline lutetium carbonate was synthesized for the corresponding chloride using ammonium bicarbonate as precipitant. The chemical analyses suggest that the synthesized lutetium carbonate is a hydrated basic carbonate or oxycarbonate. The X-ray powder diffraction data are presented. The IR data for the compound show the presence of two different carbonate groups. There is no stable intermediate carbonate in the process of thermal decomposition of the lutetium carbonate. (au) 15 refs.

  1. Sesamin ameliorates oxidative liver injury induced by carbon tetrachloride in rat

    OpenAIRE

    Lv, Dan; Zhu, Chang-Qing; Liu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Sesamin is naturally occurring lignan from sesame oil with putative antioxidant property. The present study was designed to investigate the protective role of sesamin against carbon tetrachloride induced oxidative liver injury. Male Wistar albino rats (180-200 g) were divided in to 5 groups (n=6). Hepatotoxicity was induced by the administration of CCl4 (0.1 ml/100 g bw., 50% v/v with olive oil) intraperitoneally. Sesamin was administered in two different dose (5 and 10 ml/kg bw) to evaluate ...

  2. Hepatoprotective activity of Ficus carica Linn leaf extract against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan G.K.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The methanol extract of the leaves of Ficus carica Linn. (Moraceae was evaluated for hepatoprotective activity in rats with liver damage induced by carbon tetrachloride. The extract at an oral dose of 500 mg/kg exhibited a significant protective effect by lowering the serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, total serum bilirubin, and malondialdehyde equivalent, an index of lipid peroxidation of the liver. These biochemical observations were supplemented by histopathological examination of liver sections. The activity of extract was also comparable to that of silymarin, a known hepatoprotective. 

  3. Self-Templated Synthesis of Mesoporous Carbon from Carbon Tetrachloride Precursor for Supercapacitor Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Duihai; Hu, Shi; Dai, Fang; Yi, Ran; Gordin, Mikhail L; Chen, Shuru; Song, Jiangxuan; Wang, Donghai

    2016-03-23

    A high-surface-area mesoporous carbon material has been synthesized using a self-templating approach via reduction of carbon tetrachloride by sodium potassium alloy. The advantage is the reduction-generated salt templates can be easily removed with just water. The produced mesoporous carbon has a high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution. When used as a supercapacitor electrode, this material exhibits a high specific capacitance (259 F g(-1)) and excellent cycling performance (>92% capacitance retention for 6000 cycles).

  4. Crystallite size distributions of marine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klapp, S.A.; Bohrmann, G.; Abegg, F. [Bremen Univ., Bremen (Germany). Research Center of Ocean Margins; Hemes, S.; Klein, H.; Kuhs, W.F. [Gottingen Univ., Gottingen (Germany). Dept. of Crystallography

    2008-07-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to determine the crystallite size distributions of natural gas hydrate samples retrieved from the Gulf of Mexico, the Black Sea, and a hydrate ridge located near offshore Oregon. Synchrotron radiation technology was used to provide the high photon fluxes and high penetration depths needed to accurately analyze the bulk sediment samples. A new beam collimation diffraction technique was used to measure gas hydrate crystallite sizes. The analyses showed that gas hydrate crystals were globular in shape. Mean crystallite sizes ranged from 200 to 400 {mu}m for hydrate samples taken from the sea floor. Larger grain sizes in the hydrate ridge samples suggested differences in hydrate formation ages or processes. A comparison with laboratory-produced methane hydrate samples showed half a lognormal curve with a mean value of 40{mu}m. Results of the study showed that a cautious approach must be adopted when transposing crystallite-size sensitive physical data from laboratory-made gas hydrates to natural settings. It was concluded that crystallite size information may also be used to resolve the formation ages of gas hydrates when formation processes and conditions are constrained. 48 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  5. IMPORTANCE OF HYDRATION IN SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Vasić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Importance of hydration is detrmined by importance of functions of water in the human organism: i.e. regulation of body temperature, transport, excretion of waste materials through urine, digestion of food which is facilititated by saliva and gastric juices, maintenance of flexibility of organs and tissues About 60 % body mass of an adult person (males: 61 %, females: 54 % is made up of water. Water content of a newly born baby reaches 77 %, and it is up to 50 % in adults. It is very important for sportsmen to provide adequate hydration during and after the time of bodily activities. A symptom of water shortage is thirst. However, thirst is a late response of an organism and it occurs when dehydration has already taken place. Minimum in take of fluids in humans should range between one-and-half to two liters. It has been known for a long time that there is no success in sport without proper hydration in a sportsman.

  6. Internal correction of hafnium oxide spectral interferences and mass bias in the determination of platinum in environmental samples using isotope dilution analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Castrillón, José Angel; Moldovan, Mariella; García Alonso, J Ignacio

    2009-05-01

    A method has been developed for the accurate determination of platinum by isotope dilution analysis, using enriched (194)Pt, in environmental samples containing comparatively high levels of hafnium without any chemical separation. The method is based on the computation of the contribution of hafnium oxide as an independent factor in the observed isotope pattern of platinum in the spiked sample. Under these conditions, the ratio of molar fractions between natural abundance and isotopically enriched platinum was independent of the amount of hafnium present in the sample. Additionally, mass bias was corrected by an internal procedure in which the regression variance was minimised. This was possible as the mass bias factor for hafnium oxide was very close to that of platinum. The final procedure required the measurement of three platinum isotope ratios (192/194, 195/194 and 196/194) to calculate the concentration of platinum in the sample. The methodology has been validated using the reference material "BCR-723 road dust" and has been applied to different environmental matrices (road dust, air particles, bulk wet deposition and epiphytic lichens) collected in the Aspe Valley (Pyrenees Mountains). A full uncertainty budget, using Kragten's spreadsheet method, showed that the total uncertainty was limited only by the uncertainty in the measured isotope ratios and not by the uncertainties of the isotopic composition of platinum and hafnium.

  7. Hafnium-doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with ionizing radiation for lung cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min-Hua; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Huang, Jian-Yuan; Li, Keng-Yuan; Lin, Chun-Pin; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2016-06-01

    Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the new clinical options by generating cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) to kill cancer cells. However, the optical approach of PDT is limited by tissue penetration depth of visible light. In this study, we propose that a ROS-enhanced nanoparticle, hafnium-doped hydroxyapatite (Hf:HAp), which is a material to yield large quantities of ROS inside the cells when the nanoparticles are bombarded with high penetrating power of ionizing radiation. Hf:HAp nanoparticles are generated by wet chemical precipitation with total doping concentration of 15mol% Hf(4+) relative to Ca(2+) in HAp host material. The results show that the HAp particles could be successfully doped with Hf ions, resulted in the formation of nano-sized rod-like shape and with pH-dependent solubility. The impact of ionizing radiation on Hf:HAp nanoparticles is assessed by using in-vitro and in-vivo model using A549 cell line. The 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) results reveal that after being exposed to gamma rays, Hf:HAp could significantly lead to the formation of ROS in cells. Both cell viability (WST-1) and cytotoxicity (LDH) assay show the consistent results that A549 lung cancer cell lines are damaged with changes in the cells' ROS level. The in-vivo studies further demonstrate that the tumor growth is inhibited owing to the cells apoptosis when Hf:HAp nanoparticles are bombarded with ionizing radiation. This finding offer a new therapeutic method of interacting with ionizing radiation and demonstrate the potential of Hf:HAp nanoparticles in tumor treatment, such as being used in a palliative treatment after lung surgical procedure. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the new clinical options by generating cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) to kill cancer cells. Unfortunately, the approach of PDT is usually limited to the treatment of systemic disease and deeper tumor, due to the limited tissue penetration depth of visible

  8. Characterization of hafnium oxide resistive memory layers deposited on copper by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, B.D.; Bishop, S.M. [SUNY College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, 255 Fuller Road, Albany, NY 12203 (United States); Leedy, K.D. [Air Force Research Laboratory, 2241 Avionics Circle, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States); Cady, N.C., E-mail: ncady@albany.edu [SUNY College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, 255 Fuller Road, Albany, NY 12203 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Hafnium oxide-based resistive memory devices have been fabricated on copper bottom electrodes. The HfO{sub x} active layers in these devices were deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 250 °C with tetrakis(dimethylamido)hafnium(IV) as the metal precursor and an O{sub 2} plasma as the reactant. Depth profiles of the HfO{sub x} by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy revealed a copper concentration on the order of five atomic percent throughout the HfO{sub x} film. In addition to the Cu doped HfO{sub x}, a thin layer (20 nm) of Cu{sub x}O is present at the surface. This surface layer is believed to have formed during the ALD process, and greatly complicates the analysis of the switching mechanism. The resistive memory structures fabricated from the ALD HfO{sub x} exhibited non-polar resistive switching, independent of the top metal electrode (Ni, Pt, Al, Au). Resistive switching current voltage (I–V) curves were analyzed using Schottky emission and ionic hopping models to gain insight into the physical mechanisms underpinning the device behavior. During the forming process it was determined that, at voltages in excess of 2.5 V, an ionic hopping model is in good agreement with the I–V data. The extracted ion hopping distance ∼ 4 Å was within the range of interatomic spacing of HfO{sub 2} during the forming process consistent with ionic motion of Cu{sup 2+} ions. Lastly the on state I–V data was dominated at larger voltages by Schottky emission with an estimated barrier height of ∼ 0.5 eV and a refractive index of 2.59. The consequence of the Schottky emission analysis indicates the on state resistance to be a product of a Pt/Cu{sub 2}O/Cu filament(s)/Cu{sub 2}O/Cu structure. - Highlights: • HfO{sub 2} was grown via atomic layer deposition at 250 and 100 °C on Cu substrates. • A Cu{sub 2}O surface layer and Cu doping were observed in post-deposition of HfO{sub 2}. • Resistive memory devices were fabricated and

  9. Theoretical study of hafnium oxide as a gate-material for CMOS devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharia, Onise

    The continual downscaling of the thickness of the SiO 2 layer in the complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) transistors has been one of the main driving forces behind the growth of the semiconductor industry for past 20-30 years. The gate dielectric works as a capacitor and therefore the reduction in thickness results in increase of capacitance and the speed of the device. However, this process has reached the limit when the further reduction of the SiO2 thickness will result in a leakage current above the acceptable limit, especially for mobile devices. This problem can be resolved by replacing SiO2 with materials which have higher dielectric constants (high-k). The leading candidates to replace SiO 2 as a gate material are hafnium dioxide and hafnium silicate. However, several problems arise when using these materials in the device. One of them is to find p and n type gate metals to match with the valence and conduction band edges of silicon. This problem can be rooted in lack of our understanding of the band alignment and its controlling mechanisms between the materials in the gate stack. Theoretical simulations using density functional theory can be very useful to address such problems. In this dissertation present a theoretical study of the band alignment between HfO2 and SiO 2 interface. We identify oxygen coordination as a governing factor for the band alignment. Next, we discuss effects of Al incorporation on the band alignment at the SiO2/HfO2 interface. We find that one can tune the band alignment by controlling the concentration of Al atoms in the stack. We also perform a theoretical study of HfO2/Metal interface in case of Rh. We identify Rh as a good candidate for a p-type gate metal due to its large work-function and the low oxidation energy. Finally, we report a study of the stability of oxygen vacancies across the gate stack. We model a gate stack composed of n-Si/SiO2/HO2/Rh. We find that oxygen vacancies are easier to create in SiO2 than

  10. Study of Formation Mechanisms of Gas Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    Gas hydrates, which had been found in subsurface geological environments of deep-sea sediments and permafrost regions, are solid crystalline compounds of gas molecules and water. The estimated energy resources of hydrates are at least twice of that of the conventional fossil fuel in the world. Gas hydrates have a great opportunity to become a dominating future energy. In the past years, many laboratory experiments had been conducted to study chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of gas hydrates in order to investigate the formation and dissociation mechanisms of hydrates. However, it is difficult to observe the formation and dissociation of hydrates in a porous media from a physical experiment directly. The purpose of this study was to model the dynamic formation mechanisms of gas hydrate in porous media by reservoir simulation. Two models were designed for this study: 1) a closed-system static model with separated gas and water zones; this model was a hydrate equilibrium model to investigate the behavior of the formation of hydrates near the initial gas-water contact; and 2) an open-system dynamic model with a continuous bottom-up gas flow; this model simulated the behavior of gas migration and studied the formation of hydrates from flowed gas and static formation water in porous media. A phase behavior module was developed in this study for reservoir simulator to model the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) behavior of hydrates. The thermodynamic equilibriums and chemical reactions were coupled with the phase behavior module to have functions modelling the formation and dissociation of hydrates from/to water and gas. The simulation models used in this study were validated from the code-comparison project proposed by the NETL. According to the modelling results of the closed-system static model, we found that predominated location for the formation of hydrates was below the gas-water contact (or at the top of water zone). The maximum hydrate saturation

  11. Study of the behaviour under neutron irradiation of hafnium diboride; Etude du comportement sous irradiation neutronique du diborure d`hafnium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheminant-Coatanlem, P

    1998-12-31

    Owing to its good neutron cross section and to its high melting point, hafnium diboride is a potential candidate for a use as neutron absorbing material in control rod of pressurized water reactor of the next generation. The main causes of damage under neutron irradiation in this ceramic are due to the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction that introduces in the crystal structure new atoms and point defects. The materials under consideration are the stoichiometric HfB{sub 2} compound and the HfB{sub 2} + 10 vol. % Hf compound. They are been irradiated with neutrons at several fluences and temperatures. Electron irradiations, helium and lithium implantations have been carried out in order to simulate the creation of point defects and/or fission products. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy have been used to determine damage mechanisms in HfB{sub 2}. At a low temperature (<500 deg C), irradiation defects precipitate in dislocation loops of both nature, interstitial and vacancy. Those loops have a particular organisation in the HfB{sub 2} lattice: vacancy loops are lying in the basal plane and interstitial loops in planes perpendicular to basal planes. This induces anisotropic deformation of grains that originates internal stress development. These stresses are associated with the dislocation staking and consequently with the cavity formation at grain boundaries. At a higher temperature (>700 deg C), the same dislocation loops are observed. But, in addition, the irradiation defects diffuse to grain boundaries where helium bubbles are formed. The damage caused by this latter mechanism becomes predominant. The HfB{sub 2} + 10 vol. % Hf materials is more resistant under neutron irradiation than the HfB{sub 2} pellets that display a very damaged surface. This result is explained by the fact that, on the one band, the HfB{sub 2} + 10 vol. % Hf pellets have a higher toughness than the HfB{sub 2} pellets and, on the other hand, the HfB{sub 2} + 10 vol. % Hf

  12. SEISMIC STUDIES OF MARINE GAS HYDRATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Haibin

    2003-01-01

    We give a brief introduction of developments of seismic methods in the studies of marine gas hydrates. Then we give an example of seismic data processing for BSRs in western Nankai accretionary prism, a typical gas hydrate distribution region. Seismic data processing is proved to be important to obtain better images of BSRs distribution. Studies of velocity structure of hydrated sediments are useful for better understanding the distribution of gas hydrates. Using full waveform inversion, we successfully derived high-resolution velocity model of a double BSR in eastern Nankai Trough area. Recent survey and research show that gas hydrates occur in the marine sediments of the South China Sea and East China Sea.But we would like to say seismic researches on gas hydrate in China are very preliminary.

  13. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  14. Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy for Structure-II Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeya, Kei; Zhang, Caihong; Kawayama, Iwao

    2009-01-01

    For the nondestructive inspection of gas hydrates, terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) was applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate and propane hydrate. The absorption of propane hydrate monotonically increases with frequency, similar to the case of ice, while THF hydrate has a charact...

  15. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...... prehydration may occur. In the report both theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during water vapour exposure is nucleation controlled....

  16. Prediction of Refrigerant Gas Hydrates Formation Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deqing Liang; Ruzhu Wang; Kaihua Guo; Shuanshi Fan

    2001-01-01

    A fugacity model was developed for prediction of mixed refrigerant gas hydrates formation conditions based on the molecule congregation and solution theories. In this model, g as hydrates were regarded as non-ideal solid solution composed of water groups and guest molecules, and the expressions of fugacity of guest molecules in hydrate phase was proposed accordingly. It has been shown that the developed model can indicate successfully the effect of guest-guest molecule interaction. The results showed that the model can describe better the characteristics of phase equilibrium of mixed refrigerant gas hydrates and predictions are in good agreement with experimental data.

  17. Desalination utilizing clathrate hydrates (LDRD final report).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Greathouse, Jeffery A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Majzoub, Eric H. (University of Missouri, Columbia, MO)

    2008-01-01

    Advances are reported in several aspects of clathrate hydrate desalination fundamentals necessary to develop an economical means to produce municipal quantities of potable water from seawater or brackish feedstock. These aspects include the following, (1) advances in defining the most promising systems design based on new types of hydrate guest molecules, (2) selection of optimal multi-phase reactors and separation arrangements, and, (3) applicability of an inert heat exchange fluid to moderate hydrate growth, control the morphology of the solid hydrate material formed, and facilitate separation of hydrate solids from concentrated brine. The rate of R141b hydrate formation was determined and found to depend only on the degree of supercooling. The rate of R141b hydrate formation in the presence of a heat exchange fluid depended on the degree of supercooling according to the same rate equation as pure R141b with secondary dependence on salinity. Experiments demonstrated that a perfluorocarbon heat exchange fluid assisted separation of R141b hydrates from brine. Preliminary experiments using the guest species, difluoromethane, showed that hydrate formation rates were substantial at temperatures up to at least 12 C and demonstrated partial separation of water from brine. We present a detailed molecular picture of the structure and dynamics of R141b guest molecules within water cages, obtained from ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and Raman spectroscopy. Density functional theory calculations were used to provide an energetic and molecular orbital description of R141b stability in both large and small cages in a structure II hydrate. Additionally, the hydrate of an isomer, 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, does not form at ambient conditions because of extensive overlap of electron density between guest and host. Classical molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory trials support the results for the isomer hydrate. Molecular dynamics simulations

  18. Fatigue mechanism of yttrium-doped hafnium oxide ferroelectric thin films fabricated by pulsed laser deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fei; Chen, Xing; Liang, Xiao; Qin, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Huang, Taixing; Wang, Zhuo; Peng, Bo; Zhou, Peiheng; Lu, Haipeng; Zhang, Li; Deng, Longjiang; Liu, Ming; Liu, Qi; Tian, He; Bi, Lei

    2017-02-01

    Owing to their prominent stability and CMOS compatibility, HfO2-based ferroelectric films have attracted great attention as promising candidates for ferroelectric random-access memory applications. A major reliability issue for HfO2 based ferroelectric devices is fatigue. So far, there have been a few studies on the fatigue mechanism of this material. Here, we report a systematic study of the fatigue mechanism of yttrium-doped hafnium oxide (HYO) ferroelectric thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition. The influence of pulse width, pulse amplitude and temperature on the fatigue behavior of HYO during field cycling is studied. The temperature dependent conduction mechanism is characterized after different fatigue cycles. Domain wall pinning caused by carrier injection at shallow defect centers is found to be the major fatigue mechanism of this material. The fatigued device can fully recover to the fatigue-free state after being heated at 90 °C for 30 min, confirming the shallow trap characteristic of the domain wall pinning defects.

  19. Dinitrogen functionalization with bis(cyclopentadienyl) complexes of zirconium and hafnium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirik, Paul J

    2007-01-07

    The rich chemistry of substituted bis(cyclopentadienyl)zirconium and hafnium complexes bearing side-on coordinated dinitrogen ligands is highlighted in this Perspective. Our studies in this area were initially motivated by the desire to understand side-on vs. end-on dinitrogen coordination in bimetallic zirconocene and hafnocene N2 compounds. In the cases where eta2,eta2-dinitrogen compounds were isolated, both structural and computational data have established significant imido character in the metal-nitrogen bonds. This additional bonding interaction, which is diminished in end-on complexes bearing both terminal and bridging N2 ligands, facilitates dinitrogen functionalization by non-polar reagents including dihydrogen, carbon-hydrogen bonds and weak Brønsted acids such as water and ethanol. In hafnocene chemistry, where unwanted side-on, end-on isomerization is suppressed, cycloaddition of phenylisocyanate to coordinated N2 has also been accomplished. For N-H bond forming reactions involving H2, kinetic measurements, in addition to isotopic labelling and computational studies, are consistent with dinitrogen functionalization by 1,2-addition involving a highly ordered, four-centred transition structure.

  20. Conduction Channel Formation and Dissolution Due to Oxygen Thermophoresis/Diffusion in Hafnium Oxide Memristors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Suhas; Wang, Ziwen; Huang, Xiaopeng; Kumari, Niru; Davila, Noraica; Strachan, John Paul; Vine, David; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Nishi, Yoshio; Williams, R. Stanley

    2016-12-27

    Due to the favorable operating power, endurance, speed, and density., transition-metal-oxide memristors, or resistive random-access memory (RRAM) switches, are under intense development for storage-class memory. Their commercial deployment critically depends on predictive compact models based on understanding nanoscale physiocochemical forces, which remains elusive and controversial owing to the difficulties in directly observing atomic motions during resistive switching, Here, using scanning transmission synchrotron X-ray spectromicroscopy to study in situ switching of hafnium oxide memristors, we directly observed the formation of a localized oxygen-deficiency-derived conductive channel surrounded by a low-conductivity ring of excess oxygen. Subsequent thermal annealing homogenized the segregated oxygen, resetting the cells toward their as-grown resistance state. We show that the formation and dissolution of the conduction channel are successfully modeled by radial thermophoresis and Fick diffusion of oxygen atoms driven by Joule heating. This confirmation and quantification of two opposing nanoscale radial forces that affect bipolar memristor switching are important components for any future physics-based compact model for the electronic switching of these devices.

  1. Arc Jet Testing of Hafnium Diboride Based Ultra High Temperature Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerby, Don; Beckman, Sarah; Irby, Edward; Squire, Tom; Olejniczak, Joe; Johnson, Sylvia M.; Gusman, Michael; Gasch, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Hafnium Diboride (HFB,) based materials have shown promise for use in a number of high temperature aerospace applications, including rocket nozzles and as leading edges on hypersonic reentry vehicles. The stability of the materials in relevant environments is key to determining their suitability for a particular application. In this program we have been developing HfB2/SiC materials for use as sharp leading edges. The program as a whole included processing and characterization of the HfBJSiC materials. The specific work discussed here will focus on studies of the materials oxidation behavior in simulated reentry environments through arc jet testing. Four flat face models were tested to examine the influence of heat flux and stagnation pressure on the materials oxidation behavior. The results from arc jet testing of two HfB2/SiC cone models will also be discussed. Each cone model was run multiple times with gradually increasing heat fluxes. Total run times on a single cone model exceeded 80 minutes. For both the flat face and cone models surface temperatures well in excess of 2200 C were measured. Post test microstructural examination of the models and correlations with measured temperatures will be discussed.

  2. Conduction Channel Formation and Dissolution Due to Oxygen Thermophoresis/Diffusion in Hafnium Oxide Memristors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suhas; Wang, Ziwen; Huang, Xiaopeng; Kumari, Niru; Davila, Noraica; Strachan, John Paul; Vine, David; Kilcoyne, A L David; Nishi, Yoshio; Williams, R Stanley

    2016-12-27

    Transition-metal-oxide memristors, or resistive random-access memory (RRAM) switches, are under intense development for storage-class memory because of their favorable operating power, endurance, speed, and density. Their commercial deployment critically depends on predictive compact models based on understanding nanoscale physicochemical forces, which remains elusive and controversial owing to the difficulties in directly observing atomic motions during resistive switching, Here, using scanning transmission synchrotron X-ray spectromicroscopy to study in situ switching of hafnium oxide memristors, we directly observed the formation of a localized oxygen-deficiency-derived conductive channel surrounded by a low-conductivity ring of excess oxygen. Subsequent thermal annealing homogenized the segregated oxygen, resetting the cells toward their as-grown resistance state. We show that the formation and dissolution of the conduction channel are successfully modeled by radial thermophoresis and Fick diffusion of oxygen atoms driven by Joule heating. This confirmation and quantification of two opposing nanoscale radial forces that affect bipolar memristor switching are important components for any future physics-based compact model for the electronic switching of these devices.

  3. Optical reflectivity and hardness improvement of hafnium nitride films via tantalum alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhiqing; Huang, Haihua; Zhang, Sam; Wang, Xiaoyi; Gao, Jing; Zhao, Lei; Zheng, Weitao; Hu, Chaoquan

    2016-12-01

    It is found that incorporation of tantalum in a hafnium nitride film induces a tunable optical reflectivity and improves the hardness. The underlying mechanism can be illustrated by a combination of experiments and first-principles calculations. It is shown that the evolution of optical reflectivity and the increase in hardness arise from the formation of Hf1-xTaxN solid solutions and the resulting changes in the electronic structure. The increase in infrared reflectance originates from the increase in concentration of free electrons (n) because Ta (d3s2) has one more valence electron than Hf (d2s2). The sharp blue-shift in cutoff wavelength is attributed to the increase in n and the appearance of t2g → eg interband absorption. These results suggest that alloying of a second transition metal renders an effective avenue to improve simultaneously the optical and mechanical properties of transition metal nitride films. This opens up a door in preparing high-reflectance yet hard films.

  4. Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of Hafnium-Based Bulk Metallic Glass at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshri, Anup Kumar; Behl, Lovish; Lahiri, Debrupa; Dulikravich, George S.; Agarwal, Arvind

    2016-09-01

    Dry sliding wear behavior of hafnium-based bulk metallic glass was studied at two loads (5 and 15 N) and two temperatures (298 and 673 K) using aluminum oxide (Al2O3) ball as a wear counterpart. At 5 N load, wear reduced by ~71% on increasing the temperature from 298 to 673 K. At a higher load of 15 N, the weight loss reduction was much lower (45%) on increasing the temperature from 298 to 673 K. Decreased wear weight loss on increasing the temperature was attributed to the increased hardness of the Hf-based metallic glass at high temperatures. Micro-hardness of the alloy at 293 K was found to be 636 Hv, which gradually increased to 655 Hv on annealing at 673 K. Improvement in the hardness at elevated temperature is attributed to: (1) free volume annihilation, (2) surface oxide formation and (3) nano-crystallites precipitation. Reduced wear at elevated temperature resulted in smaller volume of debris generation that restricted three-body wear to obtain lower coefficient of friction (COF) (0.25-0.35) compared to COF (0.65-0.75) at room temperature.

  5. Ion-assisted deposition of moisture-stable hafnium oxide films for ultraviolet applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Traci R.; Warren, John; Johnson,, Robert L., Jr.

    2002-06-01

    A design-of-experiments statistical approach was taken to determine the optimum ion gun operating parameters for the deposition of moisture-stable, low-absorbing hafnium oxide films by ion-assisted electron-beam evaporation. Factors identified as affecting the quality of hafnia films were chamber pressure, deposition rate, ion gun source gas composition, and ion gun current. Both oxygen and argon were used as source gases. High and low levels of the factors were chosen on the basis of our experience with the operating range of the system, and we made a series of 24 runs with all possible combinations of these factors. From a statistical analysis of the data, we find that the best films are obtained with a 1:1 mixture of argon and oxygen, 3-3.5 x 10-4 Torr chamber pressure, 0.3-nm/s deposition rate, and 0.5-A ion gun current. X-ray diffraction measurements show that the ion-assisted films exhibit a partial monoclinic crystalline structure, whereas the unassisted films are amorphous.

  6. Carrier Transport at Metal/Amorphous Hafnium-Indium-Zinc Oxide Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seoungjun; Gil, Youngun; Choi, Youngran; Kim, Kyoung-Kook; Yun, Hyung Joong; Son, Byoungchul; Choi, Chel-Jong; Kim, Hyunsoo

    2015-10-14

    In this paper, the carrier transport mechanism at the metal/amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc oxide (a-HIZO) interface was investigated. The contact properties were found to be predominantly affected by the degree of interfacial reaction between the metals and a-HIZO; that is, a higher tendency to form metal oxide phases leads to excellent Ohmic contact via tunneling, which is associated with the generated donor-like oxygen vacancies. In this case, the Schottky-Mott theory is not applicable. Meanwhile, metals that do not form interfacial metal oxide, such as Pd, follow the Schottky-Mott theory, which results in rectifying Schottky behavior. The Schottky characteristics of the Pd contact to a-HIZO can be explained in terms of the barrier inhomogeneity model, which yields a mean barrier height of 1.40 eV and a standard deviation of 0.14 eV. The work function of a-HIZO could therefore be estimated as 3.7 eV, which is in good agreement with the ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (3.68 eV). Our findings will be useful for establishing a strategy to form Ohmic or Schottky contacts to a-HIZO films, which will be essential for fabricating reliable high-performance electronic devices.

  7. Extraction chromatographic separations of tantalum and tungsten from hafnium and complex matrix constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Mathew S; Finck, Martha R; Carney, Kevin P; Morrison, Samuel S

    2017-02-10

    Tantalum (Ta), hafnium (Hf), and tungsten (W) analyses from complex matrices require high purification of these analytes from each other and major/trace matrix constituents, however, current state-of-the-art Ta/Hf/W separations rely on traditional anion exchange approaches that show relatively similar distribution coefficient (Kd) values for each element. This work reports an assessment of three commercially available extraction chromatographic resins (TEVA, TRU, and UTEVA) for Ta/Hf/W separations. Batch contact studies show differences in Ta/Hf and Ta/W Kd values of up to 10(6) and 10(4) (respectively), representing an improvement of a factor of 100 and 300 in Ta/Hf and Ta/W Kd values (respectively) over AG1×4 resin. Variations in the Kd values as a function of HCl concentration for TRU resin show that this resin is well suited for Ta/Hf/W separations, with Ta/Hf, Ta/W, and W/Hf Kd value improvements of 10, 200, and 30 (respectively) over AG1×4 resin. Analyses of digested soil samples (NIST 2710a) using TRU resin and tandem TEVA-TRU columns demonstrate the ability to achieve extremely high purification (>99%) of Ta and W from each other and Hf, as well as enabling very high purification of Ta and W from the major and trace elemental constituents present in soils using a single chromatographic step.

  8. Measurement and Simulation of Thermal Conductivity of Hafnium-Aluminum Thermal Neutron Absorber Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillen, Donna Post; Harris, William H.

    2016-09-01

    A metal matrix composite (MMC) material composed of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) intermetallic particles in an aluminum matrix has been identified as a promising material for fast flux irradiation testing applications. This material can filter thermal neutrons while simultaneously providing high rates of conductive cooling for experiment capsules. The purpose of this work is to investigate effects of Hf-Al material composition and neutron irradiation on thermophysical properties, which were measured before and after irradiation. When performing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) on the irradiated specimens, a large exotherm corresponding to material annealment was observed. Therefore, a test procedure was developed to perform DSC and laser flash analysis (LFA) to obtain the specific heat and thermal diffusivity of pre- and post-annealment specimens. This paper presents the thermal properties for three states of the MMC material: (1) unirradiated, (2) as-irradiated, and (3) irradiated and annealed. Microstructure-property relationships were obtained for the thermal conductivity. These relationships are useful for designing components from this material to operate in irradiation environments. The ability of this material to effectively conduct heat as a function of temperature, volume fraction Al3Hf, radiation damage, and annealing is assessed using the MOOSE suite of computational tools.

  9. Waters of Hydration of Cupric Hydrates: A Comparison between Heating and Absorbance Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2011-01-01

    The empirical formulas of four cupric hydrates are determined by measuring the absorbance in aqueous solution. The Beer-Lambert Law is verified by constructing a calibration curve of absorbance versus known Cu[superscript 2+](aq) concentration. A solution of the unknown hydrate is prepared by using 0.2-0.3 g of hydrate, and water is added such…

  10. Hydration in soccer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. The rates that carbohydrate and water are absorbed by the organism are limited by the rates of gastric emptying and intestinal absorption. The composition of drinks offered to the players should be influenced by the relative importance of the need of supplying carbohydrates or water; it should be remembered that the depletion of carbohydrate can result in fatigue and decrease of performance, but it is not usually a life-threatening condition. The addition of carbohydrate in these drinks increases the concentrations of blood glucose, increases the use of external fuel through the increase of the glucose oxidation in the muscles and it spares muscle glycogen. So, the ingestion of carbohydrate before and during the exercise can delay the emergence of fatigue and increase the players' performance. Several tactics can be used to avoid dehydration, like hyperhydration before exercise and player's acclimatization. The ideal situation to restore the player's fluid losses is between the sessions of exercises. Since soccer is a sport with quite peculiar characteristics related to hydration, the players should be concerned and educated about the importance of fluid ingestion before, during and after the exercise.

  11. Hydration behaviour of polyhydroxylated fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Zavala, J G [Departamento de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnologicas, Centro Universitario de Los Lagos, Universidad de Guadalajara, Enrique Diaz de Leon S/N, 47460 Jalisco (Mexico); Barajas-Barraza, R E [Departamento de Matematicas y Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Occidente, Periferico Sur, Manuel Gomez MorIn No 8585, 45604 Jalisco (Mexico); Padilla-Osuna, I; Guirado-Lopez, R A, E-mail: jgrz@culagos.udg.mx, E-mail: ebarajas@iteso.mx, E-mail: ismael@ifisica.uaslp.mx, E-mail: guirado@ifisica.uaslp.mx [Instituto de Fisica ' Manuel Sandoval Vallarta' , Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, 78000 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2011-10-28

    We have performed semi-empirical as well as density functional theory calculations in order to analyse the hydration properties of both bare C{sub 60} and highly hydroxylated C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} fullerenes. In all of our calculations, a total of 42 and 98 water molecules are always surrounding our here-considered carbon nanostructures. We found different wetting properties as a function of the chemical composition and structure of the OH-molecular over-layer covering the fullerene surface. In the case of bare C{sub 60}, water adsorption reveals that the H{sub 2}O species are not uniformly arranged around the carbon network but rather forms water droplets of different sizes, clearly revealing the hydrophobic nature of the C{sub 60} structure. In contrast, in the polyhydroxylated C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} fullerenes, the degree of wetting is strongly influenced by the precise location of the hydroxyl groups. We found that different adsorbed configurations for the OH-molecular coating can lead to the formation of partially hydrated or completely covered C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} compounds, a result that could be used to synthesize fullerene materials with different degrees of wettability. By comparing the relative stability of our hydroxylated structures in both bare and hydrated conditions we obtain that the energy ordering of the C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} isomers can change in the presence of water. The radial distribution function of our hydrated fullerenes reveals that water near these kinds of surfaces is densely packed. In fact, by counting the number of H{sub 2}O molecules which are adsorbed, by means of hydrogen bonds, to the surface of our more stable C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} isomer, we found that it varies in the range of 5-10, in good agreement with experiments. Finally, by comparing the calculated optical absorption spectra of various C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} structures in the presence and absence of water molecules, we note that only slight variations in the position and

  12. Protein dynamics: hydration and cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Heremans

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-pressure behavior of proteins seems to be unique among the biological macromolecules. Thermodynamic as well as kinetic data show the typical elliptical stability diagram. This may be extended by assuming that the unfolded state gives rise to volume and enthalpy-driven liquid-liquid transitions. A molecular interpretation follows from the temperature and the pressure dependence of the hydration and cavities. We suggest that positron annihilation spectroscopy can provide additional quantitative evidence for the contributions of cavities to the dynamics of proteins. Only mature amyloid fibrils that form from unfolded proteins are very resistant to pressure treatment.

  13. Thermal diffusion factor for carbon tetrachloride-cyclohexane and benzene-n-heptane mixtures from thermogravitational column separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, J.L.; Madariaga, J.A.; Santamaria, C.M.; Saviron, J.M.; Carrion, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the separation of liquid mixtures of n-heptane/benzene and carbon tetrachloride/cyclohexane in a thermogravitational column are reported. The results show that thermal diffusion columns of little mechanical precision can furnish suitable thermal diffusion factors when the diffusion coefficient, viscosity, density, and compressibility factor for the mixture are known. 23 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  14. Influence of Phenobarbital and Carbon tetrachloride on the Modulation of Tissue Retention Profile of Hexachlorocyclohexane in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The study was designed to investigate the role of hepatic metabolic activity on body burden of HCH residue. Male albino rats were orally administered 0, 5, and 10 mg/kg HCH for 90 days, followed by either sodium phenobarbital or carbon tetrachloride treatment for 0, 15 and 30 days after withdrawal of their respective HCH administration. The liver weight was significantly increased at 30 days after the administration of phenobarbital and carbon tetrachloride in both 5 mg and 10 mg/kg HCH withdrawal groups when compared to control. HCH residue was maximun in fat followed by adrenal>thymus>liver>kidney>spleen>testes>brain>plasma. Carbon tetrachloride caused an accumul-ation of HCH residues in the liver 15 and 30 days after administration of both doses of HCH. Phenobarbital did not show significant variation in HCH residues in hepatic tissue. Phenobarbital treatment caused significant induction of hepatic RED, APD, AHH, GST and QR activities. Significant decreases in activities were observed by carbon tetrachloride when compared to animals treated with HCH alone. The overall results clearly suggest the role of P450 protein on the body burden of HCH residues.

  15. Formation rate of natural gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, Marit

    2002-07-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 deg C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted to hydrate. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by gas injection rate and pressure. The effect of stirring rate is less significant and subcooling has no observable effect on the formation rate. Hydrate crystal concentration and gas composition do not influence the hydrate formation rate. Observations of produced hydrate crystals indicate that the crystals are elongated, about 5 micron in diameter and 10 micron long. Analysis of the results shows that the rate of hydrate formation is dominated by gas-liquid mass transfer. A mass transfer model, the bubble-to-crystal model, was developed for the hydrate formation rate in a continuous stirred tank reactor, given in terms of concentration driving force and an overall mass transfer coefficient. The driving force is the difference between the gas concentration at the gas-liquid interface and at the hydrate crystal surface. These concentrations correspond to the solubility of gas in water at experimental temperature and pressure and the solubility of gas at hydrate equilibrium temperature and experimental pressure, respectively. The overall mass transfer coefficient is expressed in terms of superficial gas velocity and impeller power consumption, parameters commonly used in study of stirred tank reactors. Experiments and modeling show that the stirred tank reactor has a considerable potential for increased production capacity. However, at higher hydrate production rates the

  16. 3-phenyl-4-acyl-5-isoxazolones as reagents for liquid-liquid extraction of tetravalent zirconium and hafnium from acidic chloride solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy,B. Ramachandra; Kumar,J. Rajesh; Reddy,A. Varada

    2006-01-01

    Liquid liquid extraction of tetravalent zirconium and hafnium from acidic chloride solutions has been investigated using 3-phenyl-4-acyl-5-isoxazolones in xylene such as 3-phenyl-4-benzoyl-5-isoxazolones (HPBI), 3-phenyl-4-(4-fluorobenzoyl)-5-isoxazolone (HFBPI) and 3-phenyl-4-(4-toluoyl)-5-isoxazolone (HTPI). The extraction of zirconium(IV) / hafnium(IV) shows a ion exchange mechanism: MO2+ (aq) + 2 HA (org) « MOA2 (org) + 2 H+(aq), where M = Zr(IV) / Hf(IV) and HA = HPBI or HFBPI or H...

  17. In-Pile Experiment of a New Hafnium Aluminide Composite Material to Enable Fast Neutron Testing in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen; Douglas L. Porter; James R. Parry; Heng Ban

    2010-06-01

    A new hafnium aluminide composite material is being developed as a key component in a Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) system designed to provide fast neutron flux test capability in the Advanced Test Reactor. An absorber block comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) particles (~23% by volume) dispersed in an aluminum matrix can absorb thermal neutrons and transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels. However, the thermophysical properties, such as thermal conductivity, of this material and the effect of irradiation are not known. This paper describes the design of an in-pile experiment to obtain such data to enable design and optimization of the BFFL neutron filter.

  18. Routes to new hafnium(IV) tetraaryl porphyrins and crystal structures of unusual phosphate-, sulfate-, and peroxide-bridged dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falber, Alexander; Todaro, Louis; Goldberg, Israel; Favilla, Michael V; Drain, Charles Michael

    2008-01-21

    New routes for the synthesis of mono tetraaryl porphyrinato hafnium(IV) complexes, Hf(IV)Por(L)(2), are reported, where the secondary ligands, L, are determined by the method of purification. These synthetic routes cater to the solubility of the macrocycles and provide access to Hf(IV) complexes of meso tetraaryl porphyrins bearing diverse functional groups such as phenyl, tolyl, pyridyl, pentafluorophenyl, and carboxyphenyl. The latter three derivatives significantly expand the repertoire of hafnium porphyrinates. One route refluxes the porphyrin with HfCl(4) in 1-chloronaphthalene or in a mixed solvent of 1-chloronaphthalene and o-cresol. A second, solventless method is also reported wherein the porphyrin is mixed with Hf(cp)(2)Cl(2) and heated to give the metalated porphyrin in good yields. Simultaneous purification and formation of stable porphyrinato hafnium(IV) diacetate complexes, Hf(Por)OAc(2), is accomplished by elution over silica gel using 3-5% acetic acid in the eluent. Exchange of the acetate ligands for other oxo-bearing ligands can be nearly quantitative, such as p-aminobenzoate (PABA), pentanoate (pent), or octanoate (oct). Notably, we find that two to three of a variety of small multitopic dianions such as peroxo (O(2)(-2)), SO(4)(-2), and HPO(4)(-2) serve to bridge between two Hf(Por) moieties to form stable dimers. The crystal structures of this library of Hf(Por) complexes are reported, and we note that careful analysis of crystallography data reveals (Por)Hf(micro-eta(2)-O(2))(2)Hf(Por) rather than four bridging oxo or hydroxy ions.

  19. Dynamics of a photoexcited hydrated electron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pshenichnikov, M.S.; Baltuška, A.; Wiersma, D.A.; Kärtner, F.X.

    2004-01-01

    Combining photon-echo and frequency-resolved pump-probe techniques with extremely short laser pulses that consist of only few optical cycles, we investigate the dynamics of the equilibrated hydrated electron. The pure dephasing time of the hydrated electron deduced from the photon-echo measurements

  20. Gas hydrate inhibition of drilling fluid additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaolan, L.; Baojiang, S.; Shaoran, R. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Dongying (China). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates that form during offshore well drilling can have adverse impacts on well operational safety. The hydrates typically form in the risers and the annulus between the casing and the drillstring, and can stop the circulation of drilling fluids. In this study, experiments were conducted to measure the effect of drilling fluid additives on hydrate inhibition. Polyalcohols, well-stability control agents, lubricating agents, and polymeric materials were investigated in a stirred tank reactor at temperatures ranging from -10 degree C to 60 degrees C. Pressure, temperature, and torque were used to detect onset points of hydrate formation and dissociation. The inhibitive effect of the additives on hydrate formation was quantified. Phase boundary shifts were measured in terms of temperature difference or sub-cooling gained when chemicals were added to pure water. Results showed that the multiple hydroxyl groups in polyalcohol chemicals significantly inhibited hydrate formation. Polymeric and polyacrylamide materials had only a small impact on hydrate formation, while sulfonated methyl tannins were found to increase hydrate formation. 6 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  1. Hydration shells exchange charge with their protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abitan, Haim; Lindgård, Per-Anker; Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert;

    2010-01-01

    Investigation of the interaction between a protein and its hydration shells is an experimental and theoretical challenge. Here, we used ultrasonic pressure waves in aqueous solutions of a protein to explore the conformational states of the protein and its interaction with its hydration shells. In...

  2. A new geotechnical gas hydrates research laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Gas hydrates encapsulate natural gas molecules in a very compact form, as ice-like compounds composed of water molecules. Permafrost environments and offshore areas contain vast quantities of gas hydrates within soil and rock. This paper describes the role played by gas hydrates in submarine slope instability, their potential as a sustainable energy source, and their effects on global climate change. A new state-of-the-art laboratory located at the University of Calgary, which was developed to study the geomechanical behaviour of gas hydrate-sediment mixtures, was also presented. A specialized high pressure low temperature triaxial apparatus capable of performing a suite of tests on gas hydrate-sediment mixtures is housed in this laboratory. Extensive renovations were required in order to enable the use of methane gas to simulate natural hydrate formation conditions. The laboratory is specifically designed to examine the properties and behaviour of reconstituted gas hydrate-sediment mixtures and natural gas hydrate core samples. 26 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Investigations into surfactant/gas hydrate relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Rudy; Zhang, Guochang; Dearman, Jennifer; Woods, Charles [Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Gas hydrates have unique physical properties portending useful industrial applications of gas storage, gas separation, or water desalination. When gas hydrates were found in the early 1990s to occur naturally and abundantly in seafloors, three other primary interests and concerns emerged: potential new energy source, climate threat from their greenhouse gases, and seafloor instabilities. This paper presents research showing how anionic synthetic surfactants helped develop an industrial gas hydrate storage process for natural gas and how naturally-occurring in-situ anionic biosurfactants influence the formation and placement of gas hydrates in ocean sediments. The catalytic effects, mechanisms, and surface specificities imparted by synthetic surfactants in the gas storage process and imparted by biosurfactants in porous media are discussed. The Bacillus subtilis bacterium that is indigenous to gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico was cultured in the laboratory. Its biosurfactant was separated and found to catalyze gas hydrates in porous media. The experiments indicate that seafloor-biosurfactants can be produced rapidly in-situ to achieve threshold concentrations whereby hydrates are promoted. The biosurfactants accumulate and promote hydrate formation on specific mineral surfaces such as sodium montmorillonite. (author)

  4. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  5. Effect of nitrogen on tensile properties and structures of T-111 (tantalum, 8 percent tungsten, 2 percent hafnium) tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzard, R. J.; Metroka, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of controlled nitrogen additions was evaluated on the mechanical properties of T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) fuel pin cladding material proposed for use in a lithium-cooled nuclear reactor concept. Additions of 80 to 1125 ppm nitrogen resulted in increased strengthening of T-111 tubular section test specimens at temperatures of 25 to 1200 C. Homogeneous distributions of up to 500 ppm nitrogen did not seriously decrease tensile ductility. Both single and two-phase microstructures, with hafnium nitride as the second phase, were evaluated in this study.

  6. Effect of Channel Layer Thickness on Characteristics and Stability of Amorphous Hafnium-Indium-Zinc Oxide Thin Film Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Jae; Lee, Soo-Yeon; Lee, Young-Wook; Lee, Woo-Geun; Yoon, Kap-Soo; Kwon, Jang-Yeon; Han, Min-Koo

    2011-02-01

    We investigated the channel layer thickness dependence of the characteristics and stability in amorphous hafnium indium zinc-oxide (HIZO) thin film transistors (TFTs). HIZO TFTs were prepared with various channel thicknesses from 400 to 700 Å. In HIZO TFTs, carrier concentration is considerably high, which leads to channel layer thickness dependence. The threshold voltages of TFTs negatively shifted as the channel thickness increased. The threshold voltage shift at a high temperature is more severe in TFTs with thicker channel layers. The channel thickness dependence of the bias stability of HIZO TFTs is closely related to the back interface, rather than the bulk state.

  7. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the

  8. Compound Natural Gas Hydrate: A Natural System for Separation of Hydrate-Forming Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, M. D.; Osegovic, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Natural processes that separate materials from a mixture may exert a major influence on the development of the atmospheres and surfaces of planets, moons, and other planetary bodies. Natural distillation and gravity separation, amongst others, are well known means of differentiating materials through liquid-gas partitioning. One of the least known attributes of clathrate (gas) hydrates is their potential effect on the evolution of planetary system oceans and atmospheres. Gas hydrates separate gases from mixtures of gases by concentrating preferred hydrate-forming materials (HFM) guests within the water-molecule cage structure of crystalline hydrate. Different HFMs have very different fields of stability. When multiple hydrate formers are present, a preference series based on their selective uptake exists. Compound hydrate, which is formed from two or more species of HFM, extract preferred HFM from a mixture in very different proportions to their relative percentages of the original mixture. These compound hydrates can have different formation and dissociation conditions depending on the evolution of the environment. That is, the phase boundary of the compound hydrate that is required for dissociation lies along a lower pressure - higher temperature course. Compound hydrates respond to variations in temperature, pressure, and HFM composition. On Earth, the primary naturally occurring hydrate of interest to global climate modeling is methane hydrate. Oceanic hydrate on Earth is the largest store of carbon in the biosphere that is immediately reactive to environmental change, and is capable of releasing large amounts of methane into the atmosphere over a short geological time span. Hydrate formation is essentially metastable and is very sensitive to environmental change and to gas flux. Where natural variations in temperature and pressure varies so that hydrate will form and dissociate in some cyclical manner, such as in oceans where sea level is capable of rising and

  9. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  10. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated

  11. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-07-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  12. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-06-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  13. Benzylene-linked [PNP] scaffolds and their cyclometalated zirconium and hafnium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sietzen, Malte; Batke, Sonja; Antoni, Patrick W; Wadepohl, Hubert; Ballmann, Joachim

    2017-05-09

    The benzylene-linked [PNP] scaffolds HN(CH2-o-C6H4PPh2)2 ([A]H) and HN(C6H4-o-CH2PPh2)2 ([B]H) have been used for the synthesis of zirconium and hafnium complexes. For both ligands, the dimethylamides [A]M(NMe2)3 ([A]1-M) and [B]M(NMe2)3 ([B]1-M) were prepared and converted to the iodides [A]MI3 ([A]2-M) and [B]MI3 ([B]2-M) (M = Zr, Hf). Starting from these iodides, the corresponding benzyl derivatives [A]MBn3 ([A]3-M) and [B]MBn3 ([B]3-M) (M = Zr, Hf) were obtained via reaction with Bn2Mg(OEt2)2. For zirconium, the benzylic ligand positions in [A]3-Zr and [B]3-Zr were found to cyclometalate readily, which led to the corresponding κ(4)-[PCNP]ZrBn2 complexes [A]4-Zr and [B]4-Zr. As these complexes failed to hydrogenate cleanly, cyclometalated derivatives with only one alkyl substituent were targeted and the mixed benzyl chlorides κ(4)-[PCNP]MBnCl ([B]5-M, M = Zr, Hf) were obtained in the case of ligand [B]. Upon hydrogenation of [B]5-Zr, the η(6)-tolyl complex [B]Zr(η(6)-C7H8)Cl ([B]6-Zr) was generated cleanly, but the corresponding hafnium complex [B]5-Hf was found to decompose unselectively in the presence of H2. Using a closely related carbazole-based [PNP] ligand, Gade and co-workers have shown recently that zirconium η(6)-arene complexes similar to [B]6-Zr may serve as zirconium(ii) synthons, namely when reacted with 2,6-Dipp-NC (L) or pyridine (py). Both these substrates were shown to react cleanly with [B]6-Zr, which led to the formation of the bis-isocyanide complex [B]ZrCl(L)2 ([B]7-Zr) and the 2,2'-bipyridine derivative [B]ZrCl(bipy) ([B]8-Zr), respectively. Upon reaction of [B]Zr(η(6)-C7H8)Cl ([B]6-Zr) with NaBEt3H, the cyclometalated derivative κ(4)-[PCNP]Zr(η(6)-C7H8) ([B]9-Zr) was isolated. In an attempt to synthesise terminal hydrides, complexes [A]MI3 ([A]2-M) were treated with KBEt3H, which led to the isolation of the cyclometalated hydrido complexes κ(4)-[PCNP]M(H)(κ(3)-Et3BH) ([A]10-M; M = Zr, Hf) featuring a κ(3)-bound triethyl

  14. Preparation of octahydro- and tetrahydro-[1,10]phenanthroline zirconium and hafnium complexes for olefin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eun Yeong; Park, Geun Ho; Lee, Chun Sun; Kang, Yi Young; Lee, Junseong; Lee, Bun Yeoul

    2015-02-28

    Post-metallocenes were constructed for olefin polymerization using 1,2,3,4,7,8,9,10-octahydro[1,10]phenanthroline and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro[1,10]phenanthroline derivatives. A series of zirconium complexes - LZrCl2(NHMe2)2 [L = 2,9-H2-C12H12N2 (4), 2,9-Me2-C12H12N2 (5), 2,9-nBu2-C12H12N2 (6), and 2,9-iPr2-C12H12N2 (7)] - and hafnium complexes - LHfCl2(NHMe2)2 [L = 2,9-H2-C12H12N2 (8), 2,9-Me2-C12H12N2 (9), 2,9-nBu2-C12H12N2 (10), and 2,9-iPr2-C12H12N2 (11)] - were synthesized via the reaction of octahydro[1,10]phenanthrolines (2,9-R2-C12H12(NH)2) with (Me2N)2MCl2 (DME). The reaction of 2,9-R2-C12H12(NH)2 with (PhCH2)2ZrCl2 in the presence of a small amount of THF afforded a series of THF adduct analogs, i.e., LZrCl2(THF)2 [L = 2,9-H2-C12H12N2 (12), 2,9-Me2-C12H12N2 (13), 2,9-nBu2-C12H12N2 (14), and 2,9-iPr2-C12H12N2 (15)]. The treatment of 12 and 13 with excess Me3Al resulted in the formation of unexpected complexes, i.e., (η(4)-LAlMe2)ZrCl2(Me) [L = 2,9-H2-C12H12N2 (16) and 2,9-Me2-C12H12N2 (17)], in which the Me2Al unit forms a five-membered ring through binding with the two nitrogen donors and the MeCl2Zr unit slips to an η(4)-binding mode containing the N-C-C-N fragment. The treatment of tetrahydro[1,10]phenanthrolines [2,9-R2-C12NH9(NH)] with M(CH2Ph)4 afforded tribenzyl zirconium complexes LZr(CH2Ph)3 - [L = 2,9-Me2-C12NH9N (18) and 2,9-nBu2-C12NH9N (19)] - and hafnium complexes - LHf(CH2Ph)3 [L = 2,9-Me2-C12NH9N (20), 2,9-nBu2-C12NH9N (21), and 2,9-iPr2-C12NH9N (22)]. The structures of 4, 5, 12, 17, and 22 were elucidated by X-ray crystallography. The newly prepared complexes were screened for ethylene/1-octene copolymerization activity: 12 and 16 were potent catalysts (activities of 74 × 10(6) g mol-Zr h(-1) at ∼120 °C under 30 bar ethylene) for the production of wax-like low-molecular weight polyethylene (Mn: ∼5000), which is widely used in industry.

  15. Protective coatings of hafnium dioxide by atomic layer deposition for microelectromechanical systems applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdova, Maria, E-mail: maria.berdova@aalto.fi [Aalto University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 02150, Espoo (Finland); Wiemer, Claudia; Lamperti, Alessio; Tallarida, Grazia; Cianci, Elena [Laboratorio MDM, IMM CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864, Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Lamagna, Luca; Losa, Stefano; Rossini, Silvia; Somaschini, Roberto; Gioveni, Salvatore [STMicroelectronics, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864, Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Fanciulli, Marco [Laboratorio MDM, IMM CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864, Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Università degli studi di Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, 20126, Milano (Italy); Franssila, Sami, E-mail: sami.franssila@aalto.fi [Aalto University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 02150, Espoo (Finland)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2} from (CpMe){sub 2}Hf(OMe)Me or Hf(NMeEt){sub 4} and ozone for potential applications in microelectromechanical systems. • ALD HfO{sub 2} protects aluminum substrates from degradation in moist environment and at the same time retains good reflectance properties of the underlying material. • The resistance of hafnium dioxide to moist environment is independent of chosen precursors. - Abstract: This work presents the investigation of HfO{sub 2} deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) from either HfD-CO4 or TEMAHf and ozone for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications, in particular, for environmental protection of aluminum micromirrors. This work shows that HfO{sub 2} films successfully protect aluminum in moist environment and at the same time retain good reflectance properties of underlying material. In our experimental work, the chemical composition, crystal structure, electronic density and roughness of HfO{sub 2} films remained the same after one week of humidity treatment (relative humidity of 85%, 85 °C). The reflectance properties underwent only minor changes. The observed shift in reflectance was only from 80–90% to 76–85% in 400–800 nm spectral range when coated with ALD HfO{sub 2} films grown with Hf(NMeEt){sub 4} and no shift (remained in the range of 68–83%) for films grown from (CpMe){sub 2}Hf(OMe)Me.

  16. Effects of trimethylaluminium and tetrakis(ethylmethylamino) hafnium in the early stages of the atomic-layer-deposition of aluminum oxide and hafnium oxide on hydroxylated GaN nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Plata, Paola A; Coan, Mary R; Seminario, Jorge M

    2013-10-01

    We calculate the interactions of two atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactants, trimethylaluminium (TMA) and tetrakis(ethylmethylamino) hafnium (TEMAH) with the hydroxylated Ga-face of GaN clusters when aluminum oxide and hafnium oxide, respectively, are being deposited. The GaN clusters are suitable as testbeds for the actual Ga-face on practical GaN nanocrystals of importance not only in electronics but for several other applications in nanotechnology. We find that TMA spontaneously interacts with hydroxylated GaN; however it does not follow the atomic layer deposition reaction path unless there is an excess in potential energy introduced in the clusters at the beginning of the optimization, for instance, using larger bond lengths of various bonds in the initial structures. TEMAH also does not interact with hydroxylated GaN, unless there is an excess in potential energy. The formation of a Ga-N(CH3)(CH2CH3) bond during the ALD of HfO2 using TEMAH as the reactant without breaking the Hf-N bond could be the key part of the mechanism behind the formation of an interface layer at the HfO2/GaN interface.

  17. Antihepatotoxic effect of golden berry (Physalis peruviana Linn.) in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) intoxicated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taj, Darakhshan; Khan, Hira; Sultana, Viqar; Ara, Jehan; Ehteshamul-Haque, Syed

    2014-05-01

    Liver is the main site in the body for intense metabolism and excretion. A number of chemicals and drugs which are used routinely cause liver damage. The present study investigates the antihepatotoxic effect of Physalis peruviana whole ripe fruit, water and ethanol extracts of fruit in normal as well as in carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) intoxicated rats. The CCl(4) treated rats showed marked elevation in liver enzymes: alanine transaminse, aspratate transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase and other biochemical parameters: bilirubin, creatinine and urea, thus indicating liver injury. Whereas animal treated/fed with various preparations of Physalis peruviana showed significant lowering effect (pPhysalis peruviana showed highest activity in both rat models while ripe fruit and ethanol extract showed moderate activity compared to standard drug.

  18. Sesamin ameliorates oxidative liver injury induced by carbon tetrachloride in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Dan; Zhu, Chang-Qing; Liu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Sesamin is naturally occurring lignan from sesame oil with putative antioxidant property. The present study was designed to investigate the protective role of sesamin against carbon tetrachloride induced oxidative liver injury. Male Wistar albino rats (180-200 g) were divided in to 5 groups (n=6). Hepatotoxicity was induced by the administration of CCl4 (0.1 ml/100 g bw., 50% v/v with olive oil) intraperitoneally. Sesamin was administered in two different dose (5 and 10 ml/kg bw) to evaluate the hepatoprotective activity. Sesamin significantly reduced the elevated serum liver marker enzymes (Psesamin treated groups shows the amelioration of oxidative stress induced by CCl4. Histopathological report also supported the hepatoprotection offered by sesamin. Sesamin effects in both the dose were in comparable to reference standard drug silymarin. From these above findings it has been concluded that sesamin ameliorate the oxidative liver injury in terms of reduction of lipid peroxidation and enhancement of liver antioxidant enzymes.

  19. Biogenic FeS accelerates reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Ying-Chao; Li, Wen-Wei; Chen, Chang-Bin; Li, Chen-Xuan; Zeng, Raymond; Lau, Tai-Chu; Huang, Tian-Yin

    2016-12-01

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) widely exist in the subsurface environment and are involved in various contaminant degradation and element geochemical cycling processes. Recent studies suggest that DMRB can biosynthesize metal nanoparticles during metal reduction, but it is unclear yet how such biogenic nanomaterials would affect their decontamination behaviors. In this study, we found that the dechlorination rates of carbon tetrachloride (CT) by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 was significantly increased by 8 times with the formation of biogenic ferrous sulfide (FeS) nanoparticles. The pasteurized biogenic FeS enabled 5 times faster dechlorination than abiotic FeS that had larger sizes and irregular structure, confirming a significant contribution of the biogenic FeS to CT bioreduction resulting from its good dispersion and relatively high dechlorination activity. This study highlights a potentially important role of biosynthesized nanoparticles in environmental bioremediation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Amelioration of carbon tetrachloride- and paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity in rats by Ficus dalhousiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Safiullah Ghori

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to investigate hepatoprotective activity of Ficus dalhousiae leaves ethanolic extract based on its traditional claim. Paracetamol- and carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in albino Wistar rats, experimental models was used for the evaluation. Various biochemical parameters like SGPT, SGOT, serum albumin, alkaline phosphatase, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin and total protein were estimated. Oral treatment with the extract 250 and 500 mg/kg, significantly (p<0.01 altered all the serum marker levels to the normal in both the experimental models. The activity of the extract was comparable to that of standard drug, silymarin (25 mg/kg, p.o.. Histopathological observations also demonstrated protective effect of the test extract on liver anatomy. Overall results suggest that F. dalhousiae possesses in vivo hepatoprotective activity.

  1. Abiotic Degradation Rates for Carbon Tetrachloride and Chloroform: Progress in FY2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amonette, James E.; Jeffers, Peter M.; Qafoku, Odeta; Russell, Colleen K.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Truex, Michael J.

    2010-03-31

    This report documents the progress made through FY 2009 on a project initiated in FY 2006 to help address uncertainties related to the rates of hydrolysis in groundwater for carbon tetrachloride (CT) and chloroform (CF). The study seeks also to explore the possible effects of contact with minerals and sediment (i.e., heterogeneous hydrolysis) on these rates. In previous years the work was funded as two separate projects by various sponsors, all of whom received their funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In FY2009, the projects were combined and funded by CH2MHill Plateau Remediation Corporation (CHPRC). Work in FY2009 was performed by staff at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Staff from the State University of New York at Cortland (SUNY–Cortland) contributed in previous years.

  2. HEPATOPROTECTIVE ACTIVITY OF ALSTONIA SCHOLARIS FRUITS AGAINST CARBON TETRACHLORIDE-INDUCED HEPATOTOXICITY IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. RAVI SHANKAR, A. LAKSHMANA RAO, L. KALYANI

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The hepatoprotective activity of ethanolic extract of fruits of Alstonia scholaris was evaluated by carbon tetrachloride (CCL4-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. The toxicant CCL4 was used to induce hepatotoxicity at a dose of 2 ml/kg as 1:1 mixture with olive oil. The ethanolic extract of fruits of Alstonia scholaris was administered in the dose of 150 and 300 mg/kg/day orally for 5 days. Silymarin (50 mg/kg was used as standard drug. The hepatoprotective effect of the ethanolic extract was evaluated by the assessment of biochemical parameters such as SGOT, SGPT, SALKP, total bilirubin and histopathological studies of the liver. Treatment of animals with the ethanolic extract significantly reduced the liver damage and the symptoms of liver injury by restoration of architecture of liver as indicated by lower levels of serum bilirubin as compared with the normal and silymarin treated groups.

  3. Carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic and renal damages in rat: inhibitory effects of cacao polyphenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Koichiro; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Miyazawa, Taiki; Kimura, Fumiko; Kamei, Masanori; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2015-01-01

    Here, we investigated the protective effect of cacao polyphenol extract (CPE) on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepato-renal oxidative stress in rats. Rats were administered CPE for 7 days and then received intraperitoneal injection of CCl4. Two hours after injection, we found that CCl4 treatment significantly increased biochemical injury markers, lipid peroxides (phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide (PCOOH) and malondialdehyde (MDA)) and decreased glutathione peroxidase activity in kidney rather than liver, suggesting that kidney is more vulnerable to oxidative stress under the present experimental conditions. CPE supplementation significantly reduced these changes, indicating that this compound has antioxidant properties against CCl4-induced oxidative stress. An inhibitory effect of CPE on CCl4-induced CYP2E1 mRNA degradation may provide an explanation for CPE antioxidant property. Together, these results provide quantitative evidence of the in vivo antioxidant properties of CPE, especially in terms of PCOOH and MDA levels in the kidneys of CCl4-treated rats.

  4. The protective effect of aqueous propolis extract on isolated rat hepatocytes against carbon tetrachloride toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahran, L G; el-Khatib, A S; Agha, A M; Khayyal, M T

    1996-01-01

    The protective effect of honeybee aqueous propolis extract (APE) against the hepatotoxicity of carbon tetrachloride was investigated using isolated liver-cell suspensions as the experimental model. Various concentrations of the extract were preincubated with the hepatocyte suspensions for 30 min before being subjected to the hepatotoxin for a further 30 min. The hepatocyte toxicity was assessed using three parameters, namely, the release of lactate dehydrogenase, the formation of lipid peroxides and the depletion of intracellular reduced glutathione. It was found that a dose-related protection against the induced cell injury was conferred by APE as evidenced by its inhibitory influence on the changes induced by CCl4 on the measured parameters. The hepatocyte protective effect of APE is probably a result of its antioxidant and free-radical-scavenging properties which in turn help to maintain the intracellular level of reduced glutathione.

  5. Protective effects of sodium molybdate on carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidi, Akram; Eidi, Maryam; Al-Ebrahim, Mahsa; Rohani, Ali Haeri; Mortazavi, Pejman

    2011-01-01

    Molybdenum is an essential trace micronutrient element that plays an important role in animal and plant physiology. Molybdenum is a constituent of at least three mammalian metalloflavoproteins: xanthine oxidase, aldehyde oxidase and sulphite oxidase. In the present study, the hepatoprotective potential of sodium molybdate was investigated against carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4))-induced liver damage in rats. Administration of CCl(4) increased the serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase levels in rats and reduced levels of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase in the liver. Treatment with sodium molybdate significantly attenuated these changes to nearly undetectable levels. The histopathological changes induced by CCl(4) were also significantly attenuated by sodium molybdate treatment. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that sodium molybdate can protect the liver against CCl(4)-induced oxidative damage in rats, and this hepatoprotective effect might be attributable to its modulation of detoxification enzymes and/or its antioxidant and free radical scavenger effects.

  6. Steam Treated Ordered Mesoporous Carbon Nanomaterials for Catalytic Conversion of Silicon Tetrachloride to Trichlorosilane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Do-Hwan; Akhtar, M Shaheer; Kim, Ji Man; Yang, O-Bong

    2015-09-01

    The steam-pretreatment on ordered-mesoporous carbon (OMC) catalysts was conducted to improve the catalytic properties for silicon tetrachloride (STC) to trichlorosilane (TCS) conversion. The surface area, pore size and pore volume of OMC were significantly changed as a function of pretreatment temperature. The steam-pretreated OMC at 500 degrees C exhibited the high surface area (-1476.4 m2/g) and pore volume (1.89 cm3/g), which leads the highest conversion rate of 10.8% as compared to bare-OMC (4.3%) and the steam-pretreated OMC. The steam-pretreatment on OMC might increase active oxygenated species, which promoted the generation of active sites of C-O-Si-for high conversion of STC to TCS.

  7. Curcuma longa attenuates carbon tetrachloride-induced oxidative stress in T-lymphocyte subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Rizq, H A; Mansour, Mohamed H; Afzal, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    A comparison of crude curcuminoid extract and purified curcumin was made to evaluate the immunoprotective effect of Curcuma longa (turmeric) Zingiberaceae. Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced selective cytolytic effects among immature (PNA(+)) thymocytes and peripheral helper (CD4(+)) T lymphocytes in the spleen were paralleled by a significant reduction in CD25, CD71, and Con A receptor expression. Treatment with curcumanoid crude extract, at two different doses, showed a significant restoration of lymphocyte viability and CD25, CD71, and Con A receptor expression in both immature (PNA+) thymocytes and splenic helper (CD4(+)) T lymphocytes. Turmeric crude extract, at both low and high dose, was found to be more efficient as compared to purified curcumin, suggesting synergistic effect of curcumin with other components of the crude extract.

  8. Efficiency of ethylene dichloride and carbon tetrachloride mixture for fumigation of important animal feeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. G. Khalsa

    1964-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been found that animal feeds like crushed barley, crushed gram and wheat bran can be effectively disinfested by fumigation with 3:1 mixture of ethylene dichloride and carbon tetrachloride at a dosage of 2.5 gallons per 1,000 cuft. The lowest average atmospheric temperatures, at which the fumigation for 48 hours and for 72 hours was found effective, were 28.6 and 24.15 degree celcius respectively. It was also found that the order of susceptibility of the three test insects, viz. Tribolium castaneum Herbst, Trogoderma granerium Everts and Latheticus oryzae Watrh and their various stages varied considerably. in all cases, adults and pupae were found to be more susceptible than larvae.

  9. Hepatoprotective mechanism of lycorine against carbon tetrachloride induced toxicity in swiss albino mice - A proteomic approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soundarrajan Ilavenil; Dhanaraj Karthik; Mariadhas Valan Arasu; Mayakrishnan Vijayakumar; Srisesharam Srigopalram; Selvaraj Arokiyaraj; Sivanesan Ravikumar; Ki Choon Choi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the differential of protein expression in CCl4 induced mice treated with lycorine. Methods: The present study was carried out to identify the differentially expressed protein in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced oxidative stress mice treated with lycorine (5 mg/kg. bw) using 2D gel and MALDI-TOF. Results: We observed many kinds of differentially expressed protein in experimental liver. Among these, three are much differently expressed protein which is identified as ATP synthase, regucalcin and HSP60; these proteins are involved in the ATP synthesis, calcium regulation and rescue the integrity cellular proteins respectively. Conclusion: This investigation provided a molecular mechanism of the lycorine during CCl4 induced oxidative stress in mice liver.

  10. Experimental Study of Natural Gas Storage in Hydrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙志高; 王如竹; 郭开华; 樊栓狮

    2004-01-01

    Hydrate formation rate plays an important role in the making of hydrates for natural gas storage. The effect of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), alkyl polysaccharide glycoside (APG) and cyclopentane (CP) on natural gas hydrate formation rate, induction time and storage capacity was studied. Micellar surfactant solutions were found to increase hydrate formation rate in a quiescent system and improve hydrate formation rate and natural gas storage capacity. The process of hydrate formation includes two stages with surfactant presence. Hydrate forms quickly in the first stage, and then the formation rate is slowed down. Surfactants (SDS or APG) reduce the induction time of hydrate formation. The effect of an anionic surfactant (SDS) on gas storage in hydrates is more pronounced compared to a nonionic surfactant (APG). CP also reduces the induction time of hydrate formation, but can not improve the natural gas storage capacity in hydrates.

  11. Hepatoprotective Effect of Trigona spp. Bee Propolis against Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Liver Injury in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Amelia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxidative stress reaction can cause liver injury. This process can be prevented by antioxidant activities which can break the destructive chain caused by free radical substances in the liver. Propolis produced by Trigona spp. bee is known to have a high level of antioxidant. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of Trigona spp. bee propolis on liver histological toxicity caused by carbon tetrachloride-induced oxidative stress. Methods:This experimental study was conducted in September 2013 at the Animal Laboratory of Departement of Pharmacology and Therapy, Faculty of Medicine Universitas Padjadjaran. Twenty-four healthy male Wistar rats as objects were adapted for one week and randomly divided into 3 groups. Group I was the control negative, group II was given carbon tetrachloride on day 14, group III was given Trigona spp. bee propolis on day 1-14. On day 14, group III was injected CCl4 intraperitoneally. The quantitative data were statistically analyzed using the one way ANOVA and Tukey test with p value < 0.05. Results: Group I showed the liver contained normal cells, without significant injury of the membrane, round and complete nucleus. The average number of liver cell was 464 ± 9.59281 cells/field; group II underwent necrosis and the average of the cells was 146 ± 7.56885 cells/field; group III showed some normal liver cells, and some necrotic area with the normal liver cells average was 263 ± 14.10860 cells/field. The p-value=0.00. Conclusions: Trigona spp. bee propolis has a hepatoprotective effect against CCl4-induced liver injury histologically.

  12. Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

    2011-04-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with

  13. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a

  14. Mass fractionation of noble gases in synthetic methane hydrate: Implications for naturally occurring gas hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Stern, Laura; Pohlman, John W.; Ruppel, Carolyn; Moscati, Richard J.; Landis, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of contemporary or longer term (since 15 ka) climate warming, gas hydrates in some settings may presently be dissociating and releasing methane and other gases to the ocean-atmosphere system. A key challenge in assessing the impact of dissociating gas hydrates on global atmospheric methane is the lack of a technique able to distinguish between methane recently released from gas hydrates and methane emitted from leaky thermogenic reservoirs, shallow sediments (some newly thawed), coal beds, and other sources. Carbon and deuterium stable isotopic fractionation during methane formation provides a first-order constraint on the processes (microbial or thermogenic) of methane generation. However, because gas hydrate formation and dissociation do not cause significant isotopic fractionation, a stable isotope-based hydrate-source determination is not possible. Here, we investigate patterns of mass-dependent noble gas fractionation within the gas hydrate lattice to fingerprint methane released from gas hydrates. Starting with synthetic gas hydrate formed under laboratory conditions, we document complex noble gas fractionation patterns in the gases liberated during dissociation and explore the effects of aging and storage (e.g., in liquid nitrogen), as well as sampling and preservation procedures. The laboratory results confirm a unique noble gas fractionation pattern for gas hydrates, one that shows promise in evaluating modern natural gas seeps for a signature associated with gas hydrate dissociation.

  15. Hydration Properties of Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag (GGBS Under Different Hydration Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua LIU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The hydration properties of various cementitious materials containing Ground Granulated Blast-furnace Slag (GGBS, two alkali-activated slag cements (AAS-1 and AAS-2 in which sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide act as alkaline activators respectively, supersulfated cement (SSC and slag Portland cement(PSC, are compared with ordinary Portland cement (OPC to investigate the effect of activating environment on the hydration properties in this study by determining the compressive strength of the pastes, the hydration heat of binders within 96 hours, and the hydration products at age of 28 days. The results show that C-S-H gels are the main hydrated products for all cementitious systems containing GGBS. Ca(OH2 is the hydration products of OPC and PSC paste. However, ettringite and gypsum crystals instead of Ca(OH2 are detected in SSC paste. Additionally, tobermorite, a crystalline C-S-H, and calcite are hydrated products in AAS-1. Tobermorite, cowlesite and calcite are hydrated products of AAS-2 as well. Based on strength results, AAS-1 paste exhibits the highest compressive strength followed by POC, PSC, SSC in order at all testing ages and AAS-2 give the lowest compressive strength except for the early age at 3 days, which is higher than SSC but still lower than PSC. From hydration heat analysis, alkalinity in the reaction solution is a vital factor influencing the initial hydration rate and the initial hydration rate from higher to lower is AAS-2, AAS-1, OPC, PSC and SSC. Although AAS possesses a faster reaction rate in the initial hours, cumulative hydration heat of AAS is comparably lower than that of OPC, but higher than those of PSC and SSC in turn, which indicates that the hydration heat of clinkers is much higher than that of slag.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.14934

  16. Highly active and stereoselective zirconium and hafnium alkoxide initiators for solvent-free ring-opening polymerization of rac-lactide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmura, Amanda J; Davidson, Matthew G; Frankis, Catherine J; Jones, Matthew D; Lunn, Matthew D

    2008-03-21

    Under solvent-free conditions (at 130 degrees C), zirconium and hafnium amine tris(phenolate) alkoxides are extremely active, well-controlled, single-site initiators for the ring-opening polymerization of rac-lactide, yielding highly heterotactic polylactide.

  17. Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

    2011-12-31

    This project seeks to understand regional differences in gas hydrate systems from the perspective of as an energy resource, geohazard, and long-term climate influence. Specifically, the effort will: (1) collect data and conceptual models that targets causes of gas hydrate variance, (2) construct numerical models that explain and predict regional-scale gas hydrate differences in 2-dimensions with minimal 'free parameters', (3) simulate hydrocarbon production from various gas hydrate systems to establish promising resource characteristics, (4) perturb different gas hydrate systems to assess potential impacts of hot fluids on seafloor stability and well stability, and (5) develop geophysical approaches that enable remote quantification of gas hydrate heterogeneities so that they can be characterized with minimal costly drilling. Our integrated program takes advantage of the fact that we have a close working team comprised of experts in distinct disciplines. The expected outcomes of this project are improved exploration and production technology for production of natural gas from methane hydrates and improved safety through understanding of seafloor and well bore stability in the presence of hydrates. The scope of this project was to more fully characterize, understand, and appreciate fundamental differences in the amount and distribution of gas hydrate and how this would affect the production potential of a hydrate accumulation in the marine environment. The effort combines existing information from locations in the ocean that are dominated by low permeability sediments with small amounts of high permeability sediments, one permafrost location where extensive hydrates exist in reservoir quality rocks and other locations deemed by mutual agreement of DOE and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations were Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location was Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the project was to understand

  18. Study of hafnium (IV) oxide nanoparticles synthesized by polymerized complex and polymer precursor derived sol-gel methods

    KAUST Repository

    Ramos-González, R.

    2010-03-01

    This work reports the preparation and characterization of hafnium (IV) oxide (HfO2) nanoparticles grown by derived sol-gel routes that involves the formation of an organic polymeric network. A comparison between polymerized complex (PC) and polymer precursor (PP) methods is presented. For the PC method, citric acid (CA) and ethylene glycol (EG) are used as the chelating and polymerizable reagents, respectively. In the case of PP method, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) is used as the chelating reagent. In both cases, different precursor gels were prepared and the hafnium (IV) chloride (HfCl4) molar ratio was varied from 0.1 to 1.0 for the PC method and from 0.05 to 0.5 for the PP method. In order to obtain the nanoparticles, the precursors were heat treated at 500 and 800 °C. The thermal characterization of the precursor gels was carried out by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and the structural and morphological characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The XRD patterns of the samples obtained by both methods shows the formation of HfO2 at 500 °C with monoclinic crystalline phase. The PC method exhibited also the cubic phase. Finally, the HfO2 nanoparticles size (4 to 11 nm) was determined by TEM and XRD patterns. © (2010) Trans Tech Publications.

  19. Luminescent characteristics of hafnium oxide layers activated with trivalent terbium (HfO{sub 2}: Tb{sup 3+})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman M, J.; Albarran A, D.; Alvarez F, O.; Alvarez P, M.A.; Garcia H, M. [IIM-UNAM, A.P. 70-360, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Falcony, C. [CINVESTAV-IPN, A.P. 14-740, 07000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Hafnium oxide layers doped with trivalent terbium ions have been synthesized using the ultrasonic spray pyrolysis technique. Photoluminescence properties were studied as a function of growth parameters such as the substrate temperature and the terbium concentration. The films were grown starting from aqueous solution of Hafnium and Terbium chlorides. The results show that crystalline structure of HfO{sub 2}: Tb{sup +3} films, depends on the temperature of the substrate during the growth. For substrate temperatures less than 400 C the deposited material is amorphous and for substrate temperatures greater than 450 C, the crystalline structure turns out to be monoclinic. The elementary composition shows the HfO{sub 2} stoichiometric value with slight variations due to the incorporation of Tb, and Cl in the material processed at the highest temperature. Emission and excitation spectra were obtained for the HfO{sub 2}: Tb{sup +3} films using 262 nm as excitation wavelength. All emission spectra show bands centered at 488 nm, 542 nm, 584 nm and 621 nm, which correspond to the electronic transitions: {sup 5}D{sub 4} {yields} {sup 7}F{sub j} (j 3,...,6) characteristic of trivalent terbium ion. The dominant emission intensity corresponds to the green color, which depend on the terbium concentration incorporated inside the host matrix. (Author)

  20. Metal-Organic Nanosheets Formed via Defect-Mediated Transformation of a Hafnium Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliffe, Matthew J; Castillo-Martínez, Elizabeth; Wu, Yue; Lee, Jeongjae; Forse, Alexander C; Firth, Francesca C N; Moghadam, Peyman Z; Fairen-Jimenez, David; Gaultois, Michael W; Hill, Joshua A; Magdysyuk, Oxana V; Slater, Ben; Goodwin, Andrew L; Grey, Clare P

    2017-04-19

    We report a hafnium-containing MOF, hcp UiO-67(Hf), which is a ligand-deficient layered analogue of the face-centered cubic fcu UiO-67(Hf). hcp UiO-67 accommodates its lower ligand:metal ratio compared to fcu UiO-67 through a new structural mechanism: the formation of a condensed "double cluster" (Hf12O8(OH)14), analogous to the condensation of coordination polyhedra in oxide frameworks. In oxide frameworks, variable stoichiometry can lead to more complex defect structures, e.g., crystallographic shear planes or modules with differing compositions, which can be the source of further chemical reactivity; likewise, the layered hcp UiO-67 can react further to reversibly form a two-dimensional metal-organic framework, hxl UiO-67. Both three-dimensional hcp UiO-67 and two-dimensional hxl UiO-67 can be delaminated to form metal-organic nanosheets. Delamination of hcp UiO-67 occurs through the cleavage of strong hafnium-carboxylate bonds and is effected under mild conditions, suggesting that defect-ordered MOFs could be a productive route to porous two-dimensional materials.

  1. Metal–Organic Nanosheets Formed via Defect-Mediated Transformation of a Hafnium Metal–Organic Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    We report a hafnium-containing MOF, hcp UiO-67(Hf), which is a ligand-deficient layered analogue of the face-centered cubic fcu UiO-67(Hf). hcp UiO-67 accommodates its lower ligand:metal ratio compared to fcu UiO-67 through a new structural mechanism: the formation of a condensed “double cluster” (Hf12O8(OH)14), analogous to the condensation of coordination polyhedra in oxide frameworks. In oxide frameworks, variable stoichiometry can lead to more complex defect structures, e.g., crystallographic shear planes or modules with differing compositions, which can be the source of further chemical reactivity; likewise, the layered hcp UiO-67 can react further to reversibly form a two-dimensional metal–organic framework, hxl UiO-67. Both three-dimensional hcp UiO-67 and two-dimensional hxl UiO-67 can be delaminated to form metal–organic nanosheets. Delamination of hcp UiO-67 occurs through the cleavage of strong hafnium-carboxylate bonds and is effected under mild conditions, suggesting that defect-ordered MOFs could be a productive route to porous two-dimensional materials. PMID:28343394

  2. Synthesis of a base-free hafnium nitride from N2 cleavage: a versatile platform for dinitrogen functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semproni, Scott P; Chirik, Paul J

    2013-07-31

    The synthesis and characterization of a metastable, base-free isocyanato dihafnocene μ-nitrido complex from CO-induced dinitrogen cleavage is described. The open coordination site at hafnium suggested the possibility of functionalization of the nitrogen atom by cycloaddition and insertion chemistry. Addition of the strained, activated alkyne, cyclooctyne, resulted in N-C bond formation by cycloaddition. The alkyne product is kinetically unstable engaging the terminal hafnocene isocyanate and promoting deoxygenation and additional N-C bond formation resulting in a substituted cyanamide ligand. Group transfer between hafnium centers was observed upon treatment with Me3SiCl resulting in bridging carbodiimidyl ligands. Amidinato-type ligands, [NC(R)N](3-) were prepared by addition of either cyclohexyl or isobutyronitrile to the base free dihafnocene μ-nitrido complex, which also engages in additional N-C bond formation with the terminal isocyanate to form bridging ureate-type ligands. Heterocummulenes also proved reactive as exposure of the nitride complex to CO2 resulted in deoxygenation and N-C bond formation to form isocyanate ligands. With substituted isocyanates, cycloaddition to the dihafnocene μ-nitrido was observed forming ureate ligands, which upon thermolysis isomerize to bridging carbodiimides. Taken together, these results establish the base free dihafnocene μ-nitrido as a versatile platform to synthesize organic molecules from N2 and carbon monoxide.

  3. Transformation Temperatures, Shape Memory and Magnetic Properties of Hafnium Modified Ti-Ta Based High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, W. Q.; Wang, Q.; Jin, X.

    2017-02-01

    In this study the modification effect of Hf content on the shape memory properties and magnetic permeability of a 75.5-77Ti-20Ta-3-4.5Hf alloy system has been systematically studied by DSC, three-point bend test, vector network analyzer and XRD. The martensitic transformation temperature, heat of reaction and recovery strain increases with the increase of hafnium and tantalum content. A stable high temperature shape memory effect was observed (Ms = 385-390 °C) during the two thermal cycles between 20 °C and 725 °C. Transformation temperatures and heats of reaction were determined by DSC measurements. Recovery strain was determined by three-point bend testing. Also an alloy, 70Ti-26Ta-4Hf, with higher tantalum content was produced to observe the effect of Ta on the shape memory properties. Permeability increases gradually from 1.671 to 1.919 with increasing content of hafnium modification and remains stable in the frequency range of 450 MHz to 1 GHz.

  4. Adsorption behavior of some metal ions on hydrated amorphous titanium dioxide surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panit Sherdshoopongse

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide was prepared from titanium tetrachloride and diluted ammonia solution at low temperature. The product obtained was characterized by XRD, EDXRF, TGA, DSC, and FT-IR techniques. It was found that the product was in the form of hydrated amorphous titanium dioxide, TiO2·1.6H2O (ha- TiO2. Ha-TiO2 exhibits high BET surface area at 449 m2/g. Adsorptions of metal ions onto the ha-TiO2 surface were investigated in the batch equilibrium experiments, using Mn(II, Fe(III, Cu(II, and Pb(II solutions. The concentrations of metal ions were determined by atomic absorption spectrometer. The adsorption isotherms of all metal ions were studied at pH 7. The adsorption of Mn(II, Cu(II, and Pb(II ions on ha-TiO2 conformed to the Langmuir isotherm while that of Fe(III fit equally well to both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms.

  5. Prospecting for marine gas hydrate resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Shipp, Craig; Reichel, Thomas; Shelander, Dianna; Saeki, Tetsuo; Frye, Matthew; Shedd, William; Collett, Timothy S.; McConnell, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    As gas hydrate energy assessment matures worldwide, emphasis has evolved away from confirmation of the mere presence of gas hydrate to the more complex issue of prospecting for those specific accumulations that are viable resource targets. Gas hydrate exploration now integrates the unique pressure and temperature preconditions for gas hydrate occurrence with those concepts and practices that are the basis for conventional oil and gas exploration. We have aimed to assimilate the lessons learned to date in global gas hydrate exploration to outline a generalized prospecting approach as follows: (1) use existing well and geophysical data to delineate the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), (2) identify and evaluate potential direct indications of hydrate occurrence through evaluation of interval of elevated acoustic velocity and/or seismic events of prospective amplitude and polarity, (3) mitigate geologic risk via regional seismic and stratigraphic facies analysis as well as seismic mapping of amplitude distribution along prospective horizons, and (4) mitigate further prospect risk through assessment of the evidence of gas presence and migration into the GHSZ. Although a wide range of occurrence types might ultimately become viable energy supply options, this approach, which has been tested in only a small number of locations worldwide, has directed prospect evaluation toward those sand-hosted, high-saturation occurrences that were presently considered to have the greatest future commercial potential.

  6. Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2009-12-09

    Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

  7. Gas hydrate dissociation structures in submarine slopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidley, I.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Studies have suggested that gas hydrates may play a role in submarine slope failures. However, the mechanics surrounding such failures are poorly understood. This paper discussed experimental tests conducted on a small-scale physical model of submarine soils with hydrate inclusions. The laboratory tests investigated the effects of slope angle and depth of burial of the hydrate on gas escape structures and slope stability. Laponite was used to model the soils due to its ability to swell and produce a clear, colorless thixotropic gel when dispersed in water. An R-11 refrigerant was used to form hydrate layers and nodules. The aim of the experiment was to investigate the path of the fluid escape structures and the development of a subsequent slip plane caused by the dissociation of the R-11 hydrates. Slope angles of 5, 10, and 15 degrees were examined. Slopes were examined using high-resolution, high-speed imaging techniques. Hydrate placement and slope inclinations were varied in order to obtain stability data. Results of the study showed that slope angle influenced the direction of travel of the escaping gas, and that the depth of burial affected sensitivity to slope angle. Theoretical models developed from the experimental data have accurately mapped deformations and stress states during testing. Further research is being conducted to investigate the influence of the size, shape, and placement of the hydrates. 30 refs., 15 figs.

  8. Reaction of carbon tetrachloride with methane in a non-equilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure, and characterisation of the polymer thus formed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Vaibhav; Kennedy, Eric; Mackie, John; Holdsworth, Clovia; Molloy, Scott; Kundu, Sazal; Stockenhuber, Michael; Dlugogorski, Bogdan

    2014-09-15

    In this paper we focus on the development of a methodology for treatment of carbon tetrachloride utilising a non-equilibrium plasma operating at atmospheric pressure, which is not singularly aimed at destroying carbon tetrachloride but rather at converting it to a non-hazardous, potentially valuable commodity. This method encompasses the reaction of carbon tetrachloride and methane, with argon as a carrier gas, in a quartz dielectric barrier discharge reactor. The reaction is performed under non-oxidative conditions. Possible pathways for formation of major products based on experimental results and supported by quantum chemical calculations are outlined in the paper. We elucidate important parameters such as carbon tetrachloride conversion, product distribution, mass balance and characterise the chlorinated polymer formed in the process.

  9. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by Maurer Technology, Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. We plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. We also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. We are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. We hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, our goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

  10. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release as much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  11. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  12. Research Progress on Mechanism of the Separation of Zirconium and Hafnium Extraction%锆铪萃取分离机理的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董雪平; 郭树军; 徐欣

    2015-01-01

    Chemical properties of zirconium and hafnium is very similar, the extraction of zirconium and hafnium separation is main method.The mechanism of different solvent extraction separation of zirconium and hafnium was reviewed, such as MIBK extracting hafnium, ( DIBK)-P204 extracting hafnium, TBP extracting zirconium, N235-H2 SO4 extracting zirconium, and the mechanism of other solvent extraction system, petroleum sulfoxide, Versatic Acid10, Cyanex301, LIX 84-IC, etc.The application of relatively mature system of extraction separation of zirconium and hafnium in industrial were compared, and the promote industrialization direction of the extraction separation of zirconium and hafnium were discussed as follows: the new extractant research, extraction agent modification of existing research, minimum consumption extractant, the new extraction technology of short time extraction research.%锆和铪的化学性质十分相似,主要通过萃取进行锆铪分离。文章综述不同溶剂萃取分离锆铪的机理: MIBK优先萃取铪、(DIBK)-P204优先萃取铪、 TBP优先萃取锆、 N235-H2SO4优先萃取锆;以及其他溶剂萃取体系的机理:石油亚砜、 Versatic Acid10、 Cyanex301、 LIX 84-IC等;对工业上得以应用和较为成熟的萃取分离锆铪的体系进行了比较,并讨论了推进产业化的萃取分离锆铪的方向:①新萃取剂的研究;②现有萃取剂改性的研究;③萃取剂消耗量小、萃取时间短的新型萃取技术的研究。

  13. Synthesis of some new bis-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-ones by using silica-supported tin chloride and titanium tetrachloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khodabakhsh; Niknam; Alireza; Hasaninejad; Madihe; Arman

    2010-01-01

    Silica-supported tin chloride and titanium tetrachloride were prepared by the reaction of tin chloride and titanium tetrachloride with activated silica gel in refluxing toluene.These solid acids have been employed as the catalysts for the synthesis of bisdihydropyrimidin -2(1H)-ones from aromatic dialdehydes,1,3-dicarbonyl compounds and urea at 90℃under solvent-free conditions.

  14. Proton percolation on hydrated lysozyme powders

    OpenAIRE

    Careri, G; Giansanti, A; Rupley, John A.

    1986-01-01

    The framework of percolation theory is used to analyze the hydration dependence of the capacitance measured for protein samples of pH 3-10, at frequencies from 10 kHz to 4 MHz. For all samples there is a critical value of the hydration at which the capacitance sharply increases with increase in hydration level. The threshold hc = 0.15 g of water per g of protein is independent of pH below pH 9 and shows no solvent deuterium isotope effect. The fractional coverage of the surface at hc is in cl...

  15. Glass powder blended cement hydration modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Huda

    The use of waste materials in construction is among the most attractive options to consume these materials without affecting the environment. Glass is among these types of potential waste materials. In this research, waste glass in powder form, i.e. glass powder (GP) is examined for potential use in enhancing the characteristics of concrete on the basis that it is a pozzolanic material. The experimental and the theoretical components of the work are carried out primarily to prove that glass powder belongs to the "family" of the pozzolanic materials. The chemical and physical properties of the hydrated activated glass powder and the hydrated glass powder cement on the microstructure level have been studied experimentally and theoretically. The work presented in this thesis consists of two main phases. The first phase contains experimental investigations of the reaction of glass powder with calcium hydroxide (CH) and water. In addition, it includes experiments that are aimed at determining the consumption of water and CH with time. The reactivity, degree of hydration, and nature of the pore solution of the glass powder-blended cement pastes and the effect of adding different ratios of glass powder on cement hydration is also investigated. The experiments proved that glass powder has a pozzolanic effect on cement hydration; hence it enhances the chemical and physical properties of cement paste. Based on the experimental test results, it is recommended to use a glass powder-to-cement ratio (GP/C) of 10% as an optimum ratio to achieve the best hydration and best properties of the paste. Two different chemical formulas for the produced GP C-S-H gel due to the pure GP and GP-CH pozzolanic reaction hydration are proposed. For the pure GP hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a calcium-to-silica ratio (C/S) of 0.164, water-to-silica ratio (H/S) of 1.3 and sodium/silica ratio (N/S) of 0.18. However, for the GP-CH hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a C/S ratio of 1

  16. Effect of Some Admixtures on the Hydration of Silica Fume and Hydrated Lime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The effects of sodium salt of naphthalene formaldehyde sulfonic acid and stearic acid on the hydration of silica fume and Ca(0H)2 have been investigated. The hydration was carried out at 60℃ and W/S ratio of 4 for various time intervals namely, 1, 3, 7 and 28 days and in the presence of 0.2% and 5% superplasticizer and stearic acid. The results of the hydration kinetics show that both admixtures accelerate the hydration reaction of silica fume and calcium hydroxide during the first 7 days. Whereas, after 28 days hydration there is no significant effect. Generally, most of free calcium hydroxide seems to be consumed after 28 days. In addition, the phase composition as well as the microstructure of the formed hydrates was examined by using X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) respectively.

  17. Three-dimensional distribution of gas hydrate beneath southern Hydrate Ridge: Constraints from ODP Leg 204

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehu, A.M.; Long, P.E.; Torres, M.E.; Bohrmann, G.; Rack, F.R.; Collett, T.S.; Goldberg, D.S.; Milkov, A.V.; Riedel, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Bangs, N.L.; Barr, S.R.; Borowski, W.S.; Claypool, G.E.; Delwiche, M.E.; Dickens, G.R.; Gracia, E.; Guerin, G.; Holland, M.; Johnson, J.E.; Lee, Y.-J.; Liu, C.-S.; Su, X.; Teichert, B.; Tomaru, H.; Vanneste, M.; Watanabe, M. E.; Weinberger, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Large uncertainties about the energy resource potential and role in global climate change of gas hydrates result from uncertainty about how much hydrate is contained in marine sediments. During Leg 204 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) to the accretionary complex of the Cascadia subduction zone, we sampled the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) from the seafloor to its base in contrasting geological settings defined by a 3D seismic survey. By integrating results from different methods, including several new techniques developed for Leg 204, we overcome the problem of spatial under-sampling inherent in robust methods traditionally used for estimating the hydrate content of cores and obtain a high-resolution, quantitative estimate of the total amount and spatial variability of gas hydrate in this structural system. We conclude that high gas hydrate content (30-40% of pore space or 20-26% of total volume) is restricted to the upper tens of meters below the seafloor near the summit of the structure, where vigorous fluid venting occurs. Elsewhere, the average gas hydrate content of the sediments in the gas hydrate stability zone is generally <2% of the pore space, although this estimate may increase by a factor of 2 when patchy zones of locally higher gas hydrate content are included in the calculation. These patchy zones are structurally and stratigraphically controlled, contain up to 20% hydrate in the pore space when averaged over zones ???10 m thick, and may occur in up to ???20% of the region imaged by 3D seismic data. This heterogeneous gas hydrate distribution is an important constraint on models of gas hydrate formation in marine sediments and the response of the sediments to tectonic and environmental change. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Effect on Hydrate Formation in Spray Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of reaction condition on hydrate formation were conducted in spray reactor. The temperature, pressure, and gas volume of reaction on hydrate formation were measured in pure water and SDS solutions at different temperature and pressure with a high-pressure experimental rig for hydrate formation. The experimental data and result reveal that additives could improve the hydrate formation rate and gas storage capacity. Temperature and pressure can restrict the hydrate formation. Lower temperature and higher pressure can promote hydrate formation, but they can increase production cost. So these factors should be considered synthetically. The investigation will promote the advance of gas storage technology in hydrates.

  19. A Hydrate Database: Vital to the Technical Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Sloan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates may contain more energy than all the combined other fossil fuels, causing hydrates to be a potentially vital aspect of both energy and climate change. This article is an overview of the motivation, history, and future of hydrate data management using a CODATA vehicle to connect international hydrate databases. The basis is an introduction to the Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML to connect various hydrate databases. The accompanying four articles on laboratory hydrate data by Smith et al., on field hydrate data by L?wner et al., on hydrate modeling by Wang et al., and on construction of a Chinese gas hydrate system by Xiao et al. provide details of GHML in their respective areas.

  20. Work Plan for a Limited CCC/USDA Investigation of the Current Carbon Tetrachloride Contamination in Groundwater at Navarre, Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-05-01

    During private well testing in 1990-1991, carbon tetrachloride was identified in the groundwater at several locations in the town of Navarre, Kansas, at levels exceeding the Kansas Tier 2 level and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5.0 μg/L. Several subsequent investigations through 2006 evaluated the concentrations and distribution of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater. This work included the identification of the contaminant sources (Argonne 2007). The history of activities to address the contamination in soil and groundwater is summarized in Table 1.1. The most recent studies, conducted by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), include a brownfields investigation initiated in 2013 (Phase I) and continuing in early 2014 (Phase II), as well as private well testing.

  1. Vibrational dynamics of hydration water in amylose

    CERN Document Server

    Cavatorta, F; Albanese, G; Angelini, N

    2002-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamical properties of hydration water associated with amylose helices, based on low-temperature vibrational spectra collected using the TOSCA inelastic spectrometer at ISIS. The structural constraints of the polysaccharidic chains favour the formation of a high-density structure for water, which has been suggested by Imberty and Perez on the basis of conformational analysis. According to this model, hydration water can only enter the pores formed by six adjacent helices and completely fills the pores at a hydration level of about 0.27-g water/g dry amylose. Our measurements show that the dynamical behaviour of hydration water is similar to that observed in high-density amorphous ice. (orig.)

  2. ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrate Production Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoderbek, David; Farrell, Helen; Howard, James; Raterman, Kevin; Silpngarmlert, Suntichai; Martin, Kenneth; Smith, Bruce; Klein, Perry

    2013-06-30

    Work began on the ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrates Production Test (DOE award number DE-NT0006553) on October 1, 2008. This final report summarizes the entire project from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013.

  3. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Thomas Williams; Bjorn Paulsson; Alexander Goertz

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a drilling hazard by the oil and gas industry for years. Drilling engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous problems, including drilling kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates as a potential energy source agree that the resource potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained from physical samples taken from actual hydrate-bearing rocks. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The project team drilled and continuously cored the Hot Ice No. 1 well on Anadarko-leased acreage beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and used for determining physical characteristics of hydrates and surrounding rock. After the well was logged, a 3D vertical seismic profile (VSP) was recorded to calibrate the shallow geologic section with seismic data and to investigate techniques to better resolve lateral subsurface variations of potential hydrate-bearing strata. Paulsson Geophysical Services, Inc. deployed their 80 level 3C clamped borehole seismic receiver array in the wellbore to record samples every 25 ft. Seismic vibrators were successively positioned at 1185 different surface positions in a circular pattern around the wellbore. This technique generated a 3D image of the subsurface. Correlations were

  4. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  5. Polyethylene oxide hydration in grafted layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Wang, Zilu

    Hydration of water soluble polymers is one of the key-factors defining their conformation and properties, similar to biopolymers. Polyethylene oxide (PEO) is one of the most important biomedical-applications polymers and is known for its reverse temperature solubility due to hydrogen bonding with water. As in many practical applications PEO chains are grafted to surfaces, e.g. of nanoparticles or planar surfaces, it is important to understand PEO hydration in such grafted layers. Using atomistic molecular dynamic simulations we investigate the details of molecular conformation and hydration of PEO end-grafted to gold surfaces. We analyze polymer and water density distribution as a function of distance from the surface for different grafting densities. Based on a detailed analysis of hydrogen bonding between polymer and water in grafted PEO layers, we will discuss the extent of PEO hydration and its implication for polymer conformation, mobility and layer properties. This research is supported by NSF (DMR-1410928).

  6. Formulating formation mechanism of natural gas hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palodkar, Avinash V; Jana, Amiya K

    2017-07-25

    A large amount of energy, perhaps twice the total amount of all other hydrocarbon reserves combined, is trapped within gas hydrate deposits. Despite emerging as a potential energy source for the world over the next several hundred years and one of the key factors in causing future climate change, gas hydrate is poorly known in terms of its formation mechanism. To address this issue, a mathematical formulation is proposed in the form of a model to represent the physical insight into the process of hydrate growth that occurs on the surface and in the irregular nanometer-sized pores of the distributed porous particles. To evaluate the versatility of this rigorous model, the experimental data is used for methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) hydrates grown in different porous media with a wide range of considerations.

  7. Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Savidge

    2008-10-31

    The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

  8. Quantifying hydrate formation and kinetic inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloan, E.D.; Subramanian, S.; Matthews, P.N.; Lederhos, J.P.; Khokhar, A.A. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Hydrate Research

    1998-08-01

    In the Prausnitz tradition, molecular and macroscopic evidence of hydrate formation and kinetic inhibition is presented. On the microscopic level, the first Raman spectra are presented for the formation of both uninhibited and inhibited methane hydrates with time. This method has the potential to provide a microscopic-based kinetics model. Three macroscopic aspects of natural gas hydrate kinetic inhibition are also reported: (1) The effect of hydrate dissociation residual structures was measured, which has application in decreasing the time required for subsequent formation. (2) The performance of a kinetic inhibitor (poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) or PVCap) was measured and correlated as a function of PVCap molecular weight and concentrations of PVCap, methanol, and salt in the aqueous phase. (3) Long-duration test results indicated that the use of PVCap can prevent pipeline blockage for a time exceeding the aqueous phase residence time in some gas pipelines.

  9. Nano-crystals of cerium–hafnium binary oxide: Their size-dependent structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raitano, Joan M. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Materials Science and Engineering Program, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Khalid, Syed [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Marinkovic, Nebojsa [Chemical Engineering Department, Columbia University, 500 W 120th St, Mudd 801, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Chan, Siu-Wai, E-mail: sc174@columbia.edu [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Materials Science and Engineering Program, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2015-09-25

    Highlights: • (1 − x)CeO{sub 2}–xHfO{sub 2} was precipitated (0 < x < 1) and calcined in air. • For x ⩽ 0.14, crystallites ⩽140 nm in size exhibit only the fluorite structure. • This low hafnia solubility is attributable to no auto-reduction (Ce{sup 3+} = 0). • The low solubility is also due to the high temperature required for homogenization. • Coarsening is lessened as Hf{sup 4+} ions slow cation diffusion in these crystallites. - Abstract: Cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}, “ceria”) and hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}, “hafnia”) were aqueously co-precipitated and subsequently calcined to allow for homogenization. The size of the (1−x)CeO{sub 2}–xHfO{sub 2} crystallites, determined by the Scherrer equation, varied from 140 nm for x = 0 to 15 nm for x = 0.73. For x ⩽ 0.14, only cubic structures are visible in X-ray diffractograms, and the lattice parameters are consistent with the values expected for structurally cubic solid solutions of hafnia in ceria. At x = 0.26, tetragonal and monoclinic phases nucleated with the former not being observed in the bulk phase diagram for ceria–hafnia. Therefore, the solubility limit of the cubic structure is between x = 0.14 and x = 0.26 for 40–61 nm crystallites, the sizes of these respective compositions. More specifically, for the 40 nm crystallites of x = 0.26 (1 − x)CeO{sub 2}–xHfO{sub 2}, 15% of the hafnia remains in a structurally cubic solid solution with ceria based on the observed cubic lattice parameter. The compositional domain for the cubic fluorite structure in this study is narrower than other nanostructured (1 − x)CeO{sub 2}–xHfO{sub 2} studies, especially studies with crystallite sizes less than 10 nm, but wider than observed in the bulk and helps to expand the size regime over which the relationship between crystallite size and phase stability is known. The extent of this cubic-structure domain is mainly attributable to the intermediate crystallite size and the roughly zero Ce{sup 3

  10. Deposition and characterization of titanium dioxide and hafnium dioxide thin films for high dielectric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Meeyoung

    The industry's demand for higher integrated circuit density and performance has forced the gate dielectric layer thickness to decrease rapidly. The use of conventional SiO2 films as gate oxide is reaching its limit due to the rapid increase in tunneling current. Therefore, a need for a high dielectric material to produce large oxide capacitance and low leakage current has emerged. Metal-oxides such as titanium dioxide (TiO2) and hafnium dioxide (HfO2) are attractive candidates for gate dielectrics due to their electrical and physical properties suitable for high dielectric applications. MOCVD of TiO2 using titanium isopropoxide (TTIP) precursor on p-type Si(100) has been studied. Insertion of a TiO x buffer layer, formed by depositing metallic Ti followed by oxidation, at the TiO2/Si interface has reduced the carbon contamination in the TiO2 film. Elemental Ti films, analyzed by in-situ AES, were found to grow according to Stranski-Krastanov mode on Si(100). Carbon-free, stoichiometric TiO2 films were successfully produced on Si(100) without any parasitic SiO2 layers at the TiO 2/Si interface. Electron-beam deposition of HfO2 films on Si(100) has also been investigated in this work. HfO2 films are formed by depositing elemental Hf on Si(100) and then oxidizing it either in O2 or O 3. XPS results reveal that with oxidation Hf(4f) peak shifts +3.45eV with 02 and +3.65eV with O3 oxidation. LEED and AFM studies show that the initially ordered crystalline Hf becomes disordered after oxidation. The thermodynamic stability of HfO2 films on Si has been studied using a unique test-bed structure of Hf/O3/Si. Post-Oxidation of Layer Deposition (POLD) has been employed to produce HfO2 films with a desired thickness. XPS results indicate that stoichiometric HfO 2 films were successfully produced using the POLD process. The investigation of the growth and thin film properties of TiO 2 and HfO2 using oxygen and ozone has laid a foundation for the application of these metal

  11. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  12. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2004-11-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained

  13. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained

  14. Experimental Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Through Depressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgfeldt, T.; Flemings, P. B.; Meyer, D.; You, K.

    2015-12-01

    We dissociated methane hydrates by stepwise depressurization. The initial hydrates were formed by injecting gas into a cylindrical sample of brine-saturated, coarse-grained sand at hydrate-stable conditions with the intention of reaching three-phase equilibrium. The sample was initially at 1°C with a pore pressure of 1775 psi and a salinity of 7 wt. % NaBr. The depressurization setup consisted of one pump filled with tap water attached to the confining fluid port and a second pump attached to the inlet port where the methane was injected. Depressurization was conducted over sixteen hours at a constant temperature of 1°C. The pore pressure was stepwise reduced from 1775 psi to atmospheric pressure by pulling known volumes of gas from the sample. After each extraction, we recorded the instantaneous and equilibrium pore pressure. 0.503 moles of methane were removed from the sample. The pore pressure decreased smoothly and nonlinearly with the cumulative gas withdrawn from the sample. We interpret that hydrate began to dissociate immediately with depressurization, and it continued to dissociate when the pressure decreased below the three-phase pressure for 1°C and 0 wt. % salinity. Two breaks in slope in the pressure vs. mass extracted data are bounded by smooth, nonlinear curves with differing slopes on either side. We attribute the breaks to dissociation of three zones of hydrate concentration. We created a box model to simulate the experimental behavior. For a 10% initial gas saturation (estimated from the hydrate formation experiment and based on mass conservation), an initial hydrate saturation of 55% is required to match the total methane extracted from the sample. Future experiments will be conducted over a longer timespan while monitoring hydrate dissociation with CT imaging throughout the process.

  15. Hydration of polyethylene glycol-grafted liposomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Tirosh, O; Barenholz, Y.; Katzhendler, J; Priev, A

    1998-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the effect of polyethylene glycol of 2000 molecular weight (PEG2000) attached to a dialkylphosphatidic acid (dihexadecylphosphatidyl (DHP)-PEG2000) on the hydration and thermodynamic stability of lipid assemblies. Differential scanning calorimetry, densitometry, and ultrasound velocity and absorption measurements were used for thermodynamic and hydrational characterization. Using a differential scanning calorimetry technique we showed that each molecule of PEG...

  16. Exploitation of subsea gas hydrate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas hydrates are considered to be a potential energy resource in the future. They occur in permafrost areas as well as in subsea sediments and are stable at high pressure and low temperature conditions. According to estimations the amount of carbon bonded in natural gas hydrates worldwide is two times larger than in all known conventional fossil fuels. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e.g. depressurization and/or injection of carbon dioxide) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR«. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into a numerical model. The physics of the process leads to strong non-linear couplings between hydraulic fluid flow, hydrate dissociation and formation, hydraulic properties of the sediment, partial pressures and seawater solution of components and the thermal budget of the system described by the heat equation. This paper is intended to provide an overview of the recent development regarding the production of natural gas from subsea gas hydrate reservoirs. It aims at giving a broad insight into natural gas hydrates and covering relevant aspects of the exploitation process. It is focused on the thermodynamic principles and technological approaches for the exploitation. The effects occurring during natural gas production within hydrate filled sediment layers are identified and discussed by means of numerical simulation results. The behaviour of relevant process parameters such as pressure, temperature and phase saturations is described and compared for different strategies. The simulations are complemented by calculations for different safety relevant problems.

  17. Preservation of methane hydrate at 1 atm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    A "pressure-release" method that enables reproducible bulk preservation of pure, porous, methane hydrate at conditions 50 to 75 K above its equilibrium T (193 K) at 1 atm is refined. The amount of hydrate preserved by this method appears to be greatly in excess of that reported in the previous citations, and is likely the result of a mechanism different from ice shielding.

  18. HEPATOPROTECTIVE ACTIVITY OF ETHANOLIC EXTRACT OF ALTHAEA OFFICINALIS LINN AGAINST CARBON TETRACHLORIDE INDUCED HEPATOTOXICITY ON ALBINO WISTAR RATS

    OpenAIRE

    Jabbar Zoobi; Ali Mohd.

    2011-01-01

    In Indian traditional system of medicine, herbal remedies are prescribed for the treatment of various diseases including liver diseases. The present study was aimed to investigate the hepatoprotective activity of the ethanolic extract of Althaea officinalis against Carbon tetrachloride induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Liver function were assessed by the determination of SGPT and SGOT studies. The serum biochemical analysis results suggested that the use of ethanolic extract of Althaea officina...

  19. Transcriptome Analysis of the Effects of Gomisin A on the Recovery of Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Damage in Rat Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Young Mi; Choi, In Soo; Lee, Sang Mong; Hwang, Dae Youn; Choi, Young Whan; Park, Young Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Gomisin A possesses a hepatic function-facilitating property in liver-injured rats. Its preventive action on carbon tetrachloride-induced cholestasis is due to maintenance of the function of the bile acids-independent fraction. To investigate alterations in gene expression after gomisin A treatment on injured rat liver, DNA microarray analyses were performed on a Rat 44K 4-Plex Gene Expression platform with duplicated reactions after gomisin A treatment. We identified 255 up-regulated and 230...

  20. Palladium-Catalyzed Addition of Carbon Monoxide and Carbon Tetrachloride to 1-Octene in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张群健; 孙均华; 江焕峰; 欧阳小月; 程金生

    2003-01-01

    The Pd-catalyzed addition of carbon monoxide and carbon tetrachloride to 1-octene gave coadduct [alkyl 2-( 2, 2, 2-trichloroethyl)octanoate] as the major product in supercritical carbon dioxide by using pyridine as the base. It was found that the selectivity and the yield of coadduct were greatly affected by the pressure of carbon dioxide, the reaction temperature and the amounts of alcohol and base used.

  1. Surfactant effects on SF6 hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo Ram; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Ryu, Young Bok; Lee, Man Sig; Kim, Young Seok; Englezos, Peter; Kim, Myung Hyun; Kim, Yang Do

    2009-03-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) has been widely used in a variety of industrial processes, but it is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. For this reason, it is necessary to separate or collect it from waste gas streams. One separation method is through hydrate crystal formation. In this study, SF(6) hydrate was formed in aqueous surfactant solutions of 0.00, 0.01, 0.05, 0.15 and 0.20 wt% to investigate the effects of surfactants on the hydrate formation rates. Three surfactants, Tween 20 (Tween), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LABS), were tested in a semi-batch stirred vessel at the constant temperature and pressures of 276.2 K and 0.78 MPa, respectively. All surfactants showed kinetic promoter behavior for SF(6) hydrate formation. It was also found that SF(6) hydrate formation proceeded in two stages with the second stage being the most rapid. In situ Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that the increased gas consumption rate with the addition of surfactant was possibly due to the increased gas filling rate in the hydrate cavity.

  2. New and improved infra-red absorption cross sections and ACE-FTS retrievals of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jeremy J.; Boone, Christopher D.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is one of the species regulated by the Montreal Protocol on account of its ability to deplete stratospheric ozone. As such, the inconsistency between observations of its abundance and estimated sources and sinks is an important problem requiring urgent attention (Carpenter et al., 2014) [5]. Satellite remote-sensing has a role to play, particularly limb sounders which can provide vertical profiles into the stratosphere and therefore validate stratospheric loss rates in atmospheric models. This work is in two parts. The first describes new and improved high-resolution infra-red absorption cross sections of carbon tetrachloride/dry synthetic air over the spectral range 700-860 cm-1 for a range of temperatures and pressures (7.5-760 Torr and 208-296 K) appropriate for atmospheric conditions. This new cross-section dataset improves upon the one currently available in the HITRAN and GEISA databases. The second describes a new, preliminary ACE-FTS carbon tetrachloride retrieval that improves upon the v3.0/v3.5 data products, which are biased high by up to 20-30% relative to ground measurements. Making use of the new spectroscopic data, this retrieval also improves the microwindow selection, contains additional interfering species, and utilises a new instrumental lineshape; it will form the basis for the upcoming v4.0 CCl4 data product.

  3. In Situ Raman Analyses of Natural Gas and Gas Hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, E. T.; White, S. N.; Dunk, R. M.; Brewer, P. G.; Sherman, A. D.; Schmidt, K.; Hester, K. C.; Sloan, E. D.

    2004-12-01

    During a July 2004 cruise to Hydrate Ridge, Oregon, MBARI's sea-going laser Raman spectrometer was used to obtain in situ Raman spectra of natural gas hydrates and natural gas venting from the seafloor. This was the first in situ analysis of gas hydrates on the seafloor. The hydrate spectra were compared to laboratory analyses performed at the Center for Hydrate Research, Colorado School of Mines. The natural gas spectra were compared to MBARI gas chromatography (GC) analyses of gas samples collected at the same site. DORISS (Deep Ocean Raman In Situ Spectrometer) is a laboratory model laser Raman spectrometer from Kaiser Optical Systems, Inc modified at MBARI for deployment in the deep ocean. It has been successfully deployed to depths as great as 3600 m. Different sampling optics provide flexibility in adapting the instrument to a particular target of interest. An immersion optic was used to analyze natural gas venting from the seafloor at South Hydrate Ridge ( ˜780 m depth). An open-bottomed cube was placed over the vent to collect the gas. The immersion optic penetrated the side of the cube as did a small heater used to dissociate any hydrate formed during sample collection. To analyze solid hydrates at both South and North Hydrate Ridge ( ˜590 m depth), chunks of hydrate were excavated from the seafloor and collected in a glass cylinder with a mesh top. A stand-off optic was used to analyze the hydrate inside the cylinder. Due to the partial opacity of the hydrate and the small focal volume of the sampling optic, a precision underwater positioner (PUP) was used to focus the laser spot onto the hydrate. PUP is a stand-alone system with three degrees-of-freedom, capable of moving the DORISS probe head with a precision of 0.1 mm. In situ Raman analyses of the gas indicate that it is primarily methane. This is verified by GC analyses of samples collected from the same site. Other minor constituents (such as CO2 and higher hydrocarbons) are present but may be in

  4. Hepatoprotective effects of Quercus infectoria gall extract against carbon tetrachloride treated liver injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Lodhi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Summary. In the present study, galls of Quercus infectoria possessing potent antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties were evaluated for their hepatoprotective effect against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Subcutaneous injection of CCl4, administered twice a week, produced a marked elevation in the serum levels of aspartate transaminase (AST, alanine transaminase (ALT and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α. Histological analysis of the liver of these rats revealed marked necro-inflammatory changes that were associated with increase in the levels of TBARS, PGE2 and catalase and decrease in the levels of glutathione (GSH, superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx. Daily oral administration of aqueous ethanolic extract of Quercus infectoria galls at 200, 400 and 600 mg/kg doses produced a dose dependent reduction in the serum levels of liver enzymes and inflammatory mediators and attenuated the necroinflammatory changes in the liver. The QIE treatment also normalized various biochemical parameters of oxidative stress. Our study shows that the hepatoprotective effects of QIE and silymarin were comparable and suggests that QIE could be used as a hepatoprotective agent. Industrial relevance. Research in traditional medicine has lead to the development of many modern medicines. In recent times, focus on plants research has increased all over the world and a large body of evidence has been collected to show immense potential of medicinal plants used in various traditional systems. It is very interesting to note that there is no drug available in the modern system of medicine for treating hepatic disorders; only certain herbal preparations are available to treat this quite vulnerable disease. The situation/background thus explained above warrants for developing a safe, effective and scientifically validated hepatoprotective agent taking lead from traditional medicine, which is affordable for the rural poor

  5. Using magnetic resonance imaging to monitor CH4 hydrate formation and spontaneous conversion of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Bernard A; Stevens, Jim; Howard, James J; Graue, Arne; Kvamme, Bjorn; Aspenes, Erick; Ersland, Geir; Husebø, Jarle; Zornes, David R

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was used to monitor and quantify methane hydrate formation and exchange in porous media. Conversion of methane hydrate to carbon dioxide hydrate, when exposed to liquid carbon dioxide at 8.27 MPa and approximately 4 degrees C, was experimentally demonstrated with MRI data and verified by mass balance calculations of consumed volumes of gases and liquids. No detectable dissociation of the hydrate was measured during the exchange process.

  6. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  7. Solid state tungsten oxide hydrate/tin oxide hydrate electrochromic device prepared by electrochemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Kentaro; Matsuo, Ryo; Sasano, Junji; Yokoyama, Seiji; Izaki, Masanobu

    2017-03-01

    The solid state electrochromic device composed of tungsten oxide hydrate (WO3(H2O)0.33) and tin oxide hydrate (Sn(O,OH)) has been constructed by anodic deposition of WO3(H2O)0.33 and Sn(O,OH) layers and showed the color change from clear to blue by applying voltage through an Au electrode.

  8. Kinetic studies of gas hydrate formation with low-dosage hydrate inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Pipeline blockage by gas hydrates is a serious problem in the petroleum industry.Low-dosage inhibitors have been developed for its cost-effective and environmentally acceptable characteristics.In a 1.072-L reactor with methane,ethane and propane gas mixture under the pressure of about 8.5 MPa at 4 °C,hydrate formation was investigated with low-dosage hydrate inhibitors PVP and GHI1,the change of the compressibility factor and gas composition in the gas phase was analyzed,the gas contents in hydrates were compared with PVP and GHI1 added,and the inhibition mechanism of GHI1 was discussed.The results show that PVP and GHI1 could effectively inhibit the growth of gas hydrates but not nucleation.Under the experimental condition with PVP added,methane and ethane occupied the small cavities of the hydrate crystal unit and the ability of ethane entering into hydrate cavities was weaker than that of methane.GHI1 could effectively inhibit molecules which could more readily form hydrates.The ether and hydroxy group of diethylene glycol monobutyl ether have the responsibility for stronger inhibition ability of GHI1 than PVP.

  9. Tetra­kis(8-quinolinolato-κ2 N,O)hafnium(IV) dimethyl­formamide solvate monohydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljoen, Johannes A.; Visser, Hendrik G.; Roodt, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    In the title compound, [Hf(C9H6NO)]·C3H7NO·H2O, the hafnium(IV) atom is coordinated by four 8-quinolinolate (Ox) ligands, forming a slightly distorted square-anti­prismatic coordination polyhedron. The crystal packing is controlled by O—H⋯O and C—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter­actions and π–π inter­actions between quinoline ligands of neighbouring mol­ecules. The inter­planar distances vary between 3.150 (1) and 3.251 (2) Å, while centroid–centroid distances vary from 3.589 (1) to 4.1531 (1) Å. PMID:21579072

  10. Application of principle component analysis-artificial neural network for simultaneous determination of zirconium and hafnium in real samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaspour, A; Baramakeh, L

    2006-05-15

    Determination of zirconium and hafnium were done by applying singular value decomposition and a feed forward Neural Network Algorithm with back propagation of error. The determination of trace amounts of mixtures of Zr(IV) and Hf(IV) in various matrices (river, tap and industrial wastewater) were investigated by PC-ANN using the complexes formed between Alizarin Red S, Zr and Hf. The results showed that measurement is possible in the ranges of 0.03-3.4 and 0.2-7.0 microg ml-1 for Zr(IV) and Hf(IV), respectively. The detection limits were 0.02 and 0.08 microg ml-1 for Zr(IV) and Hf(IV), respectively. The results also show very good agreement between true and predicted concentration values and have the ability to use in routine analysis.

  11. Effect of post-deposition annealing on the structural and electrical properties of RF sputtered hafnium oxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, K. C.; Ghosh, S. P.; Tripathy, N.; Bose, G.; Kar, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Hafnium oxide films were deposited on silicon substrates by RF sputtering at room temperature. Post-deposition rapid thermal annealing of the sputtered HfO2 films was carried out in the temperature range of 400°C to 800°C in oxygen ambient. The structural properties ware studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), where the enhancement in the crystallinity of HfO2 (1¯11) orientation was observed. The Capacitance —Voltage (C-V) and Current density —Voltage (J-V) characteristics of the annealed dielectric film were investigated employing Al/HfO2/Si Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) capacitor structure. The flatband voltage (V fb ) and oxide charge density (Q ox ) were extracted from the high frequency (1 MHz) C-V curve. Leakage current was found to be minimum for the annealing temperature of 600°C.

  12. Coexistence of bipolar and threshold resistive switching in TiO2 based structure with embedded hafnium nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelakaki, Irini; Bousoulas, Panagiotis; Stathopoulos, Spyros; Boukos, Nikos; Tsoukalas, Dimitris

    2017-02-01

    The coexistence of nonvolatile memory switching and volatile threshold switching in a single device is of importance for suppressing the sneak-path currents in crossbar resistive memory architectures. This study demonstrates that the combination of a thin film of TiO2 with hafnium nanoparticles in Au/Ti/TiO2/Hf nanoparticles/Au device configuration enables conversion between memory switching and volatile threshold switching by adjusting the current compliance through the materials stack. The presence of hexagonal closed packed Hf nanoparticles, a synthesis of which has not been reported before, is critical for the device operation that exhibits beneficial features as it is forming free and operates at low voltage and power consumption. Analysis of measured current-voltage (I-V) characteristics reveal a filamentary nature of switching phenomena and present operating similarities with electrochemical metallization cells suggesting that Hf metal atoms and not only oxygen vacancies are responsible for conductive filament formation.

  13. Experimental characterization of production behavior accompanying the hydrate reformation in methane hydrate bearing sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, T.; Kang, J.M.; Nguyen, H.T. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, C. [Kangwon National Univ., (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. [Korea Inst., of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    This study investigated the production behaviour associated with gas hydrate reformation in methane hydrate-bearing sediment by hot-brine injection. A range of different temperature and brine injection rates were used to analyze the pressure and temperature distribution, the gas production behaviour and the movement of the dissociation front. The study showed that hydrate reformation reduces the production rate considerably at an early time. However, gas production increases during the dissociation, near the outlet because the dissociated methane around the inlet is consumed in reforming the hydrate and increases the hydrate saturation around the outlet. Higher temperature also increases the gas production rate and the speed of the dissociation front. 12 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  14. Sida rhombifolia ssp. retusa seed extract inhibits DEN induced murine hepatic preneoplasia and carbon tetrachloride hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poojari, Radhika; Gupta, Sanjay; Maru, Girish; Khade, Bharat; Bhagwat, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    Sida rhombifolia ssp. retusa is a well established drug in the Ayurvedic system of medicine used for antirheumatism and antiasthmatism. Inhibitory effects of S. rhombifolia ssp. retusa seed extract on DEN induced hepatocellular preneoplastic foci and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced hepatotoxicity was investigated in rats. Rats received DEN, 1ppm/g b.w. in drinking water for 6 weeks or CCl(4), 0.7 ml/kg i.p. once a week for 4 weeks and seed extract 50 mg, 100 mg/kg b.w. orally prior, during and after exposure to DEN/CCl4 for 20 or 5 weeks, respectively. Treatment with seed extract significantly inhibited the increase in DEN/CCl(4) induced activities of pre-cancerous marker enzymes; gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, glutathione-S-transferase, hepatotoxicity marker enzymes; glutamate pyruvate transaminase, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase as well as lipid peroxidase. Depleted glutathione, protein and albumin levels were restored. Also, histopathological and transmission electron microscopic studies showed prevention of cellular degenerative changes. The chemopreventive and hepatoprotective potentials of seed extract are due to free radical scavenging activity and restoration of cellular structural integrity.

  15. The protective role of pomegranate juice against carbon tetrachloride-induced oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirinççioğlu, Mihdiye; Kızıl, Göksel; Kızıl, Murat; Kanay, Zeki; Ketani, Aydın

    2014-11-01

    Most pomegranate (Punica granatum Linn., Punicaceae) fruit parts are known to possess enormous antioxidant activity. The present study was carried out to determine the phenolic and flavonoid contents of Derik pomegranate juice and determine its effect against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced toxicity in rats. Animals were divided into four groups (n = 6): group I: control, group II: CCl4 (1 ml/kg), group III: CCl4 + pomegranate juice and group IV: CCl4 + ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). Treatment duration was 4 weeks, and the dose of CCl4 was administered once a week to groups II, III and IV during the experimental period. CCl4-treated rats caused a significant increase in serum enzyme levels, such as aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and total bilirubin, and decrease in albumin, when compared with control. Administration of CCl4 along with pomegranate juice or UDCA significantly reduces these changes. Analysis of lipid peroxide (LPO) levels by thiobarbutiric acid reaction showed a significant increase in liver, kidney and brain tissues of CCl4-treated rats. However, both pomegranate juice and UDCA prevented the increase in LPO level. Histopathological reports also revealed that there is a regenerative activity in the liver and kidney cells. Derik pomegranate juice showed to be hepatoprotective against CCl4-induced hepatic injury. In conclusion, present study reveals a biological evidence that supports the use of pomegranate juice in the treatment of chemical-induced hepatotoxicity.

  16. Simulation and reference interaction site model theory of methanol and carbon tetrachloride mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munaò, G; Costa, D; Saija, F; Caccamo, C

    2010-02-28

    We report molecular dynamics and reference interaction site model (RISM) theory of methanol and carbon tetrachloride mixtures. Our study encompasses the whole concentration range, by including the pure component limits. We majorly focus on an analysis of partial, total, and concentration-concentration structure factors, and examine in detail the k-->0 limits of these functions. Simulation results confirm the tendency of methanol to self-associate with the formation of ring structures in the high dilution regime of this species, in agreement with experimental studies and with previous simulations by other authors. This behavior emerges as strongly related to the high nonideality of the mixture, a quantitative estimate of which is provided in terms of concentration fluctuation correlations, through the structure factors examined. The interaggregate correlation distance is also thereby estimated. Finally, the compressibility of the mixture is found in good agreement with experimental data. The RISM predictions are throughout assessed against simulation; the theory describes better the apolar solvent than the alcohol properties. Self-association of methanol is qualitatively reproduced, though this trend is much less marked in comparison with simulation results.

  17. Xanthohumol prevents carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Carmen; Duque, Antonio L; Rodríguez-Galdón, Beatriz; Cestero, Juan J; Macías, Pedro

    2012-10-01

    Xanthohumol (XN), a prenyl flavonoid present in beer, prevents the acute hepatic injury induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in rats. Pre-treatment of rats with XN significantly reduced the increased liver weight observed in CCl4-intoxicated rats, normalised the increased values of plasma lactate dehydrogenase, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase and glutamate pyruvate transaminase activities and reduced the incidence of histopathological alterations produced by CCl4. The oxidative stress induced by CCl4 administration elicited a significant decrease in the levels of reduced glutathione as well as an increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and H2O2 concentrations. Pre-treatment of rats with XN resulted in a significant (p<0.05) increase in reduced glutathione (GSH) content and a reduction in TBARS and H2O2 concentrations to their normal values. XN pre-treatment also prevented the significant reductions of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and glutathione S-transferase activities observed in CCl4-treated rats compared to control animals. Our results suggest that the hepatoprotective effect of XN is based on its antioxidant properties as well as it being an efficient inhibitor of lipid peroxidation and a protector against the degradation of antioxidant enzymes induced by CCl4 intoxication.

  18. Carbon tetrachloride/carbon disulfide exposures in grain fumigation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marano, D.E.; White, K.L.; Deer, H.; Alexander, G.

    1986-03-01

    The use of 80/20 compounds as liquid-fumigant mixtures in the grain-handling industry was considered. Worker exposures to carbon tetrachloride and carbon disulfide were measured at representative facilities throughout the industry. Work practices that may contribute to high exposure levels were cited. Approximately equal amounts of liquid fumigants and solid formulations of phosphine are used throughout the industry. As spraying is done on a sporadic basis, it does not appear likely to present a major problem such as might be encountered in continuous exposure situations. The authors conclude that grain workers do not appear to be an ideal study group for a neurotoxicity morbidity study due to the fact that the physical distance between study sites and the small number of workers at each site makes it difficult logistically. A concerted effort throughout the grain industry to educate those workers in the grain-handling portions of that industry toward the safe handling of fumigants should go far in alleviating any problems arising from exposure to fumigants.

  19. Protection effect of kallistatin on carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis in rats via antioxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Huang

    Full Text Available Prolonged inflammation and oxidative stress are emerging as key causes of pathological wound healing and the development of liver fibrosis. We have investigated the effects of recombinant human kallistatin, produced in Pichia. pastoris, on preventing carbon tetrachloride (CCl4-induced liver fibrosis in rats. Daily administration of kallistatin prevented development of CCl4-induced liver fibrosis, which was evidenced by histological study. In all kallistatin treated rats, activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC as assessed by s-smooth muscle actin staining was attenuated, TGF- β1 expression was inhibited, class I serum biomarkers associated with the process of fibrogenesis, such as hyaluronic acid, laminin, and procollagen III, were lowered, compared with that in the model control group. Furthermore, residual hepatic functional reserve was improved by kallistatin treatment. CCl4 induced elevation of malondialdehyde level and reduced superoxide dismutase activity in the liver, while kallistatin reduced these oxidative parameters. We also investigated the effects of kallistatin on rat primary HSC and LX-2, the human HSC cell line. Kallistatin scavenged H2O2-induced ROS in the LX-2 cells, and suppressed the activation of primary HSC. These results suggest recombinant human kallistatin might be a promising drug candidate for therapeutic intervention of liver fibrosis.

  20. Hepatoprotective effect of pinoresinol on carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic damage in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo-Yeon; Kim, Joon-Ki; Choi, Jun-Ho; Jung, Joo-Yeon; Oh, Woo-Yong; Kim, Dong Chun; Lee, Hee Sang; Kim, Yeong Shik; Kang, Sam Sik; Lee, Seung-Ho; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2010-01-01

    Forsythiae Fructus is known to have diuretic, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. This study examined the hepatoprotective effects of pinoresinol, a lignan isolated from Forsythiae Fructus, against carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4))-induced liver injury. Mice were treated intraperitoneally with vehicle or pinoresinol (25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) 30 min before and 2 h after CCl4 (20 microl/kg) injection. In the vehicle-treated CCl(4 )group, serum aminotransferase activities were significantly increased 24 h after CCl4 injection, and these increases were attenuated by pinoresinol at all doses. Hepatic glutathione contents were significantly decreased and lipid peroxidation was increased after CCl4 treatment. These changes were attenuated by 50 and 100 mg/kg of pinoresinol. The levels of protein and mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2, were significantly increased after CCl4 injection; and these increases were attenuated by pinoresinol. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and phosphorylation of c-Jun, one of the components of activating protein 1 (AP-1), were inhibited by pinoresinol. Our results suggest that pinoresinol ameliorates CCl4)-induced acute liver injury, and this protection is likely due to anti-oxidative activity and down-regulation of inflammatory mediators through inhibition of NF-kappaB and AP-1.

  1. Hepatoprotective effect of Rosa canina fruit extract against carbon tetrachloride induced hepatotoxicity in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heibatollah Sadeghi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study was conducted to investigate the hepatoprotective activity of hydro-ethanolic fruit extract of Rosa canina (R. canina against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Methods: Male Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into six groups of 8 animals of each, including control, toxic (CCl4, R. canina 250, 500, and 750 mg/kg + CCl4 and R. canina 750 mg/kg alone. R. canina (p.o., daily and CCl4 (1 ml/kg twice a week, 50% v/v in olive oil, i.p. were administered to animals for six weeks. Serum analysis was performed to assay the levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine amino transaminase (ALT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, albumin (ALB, total protein (TP and malondialdehyde (MDA. Biochemical observations were also supplemented with histopathological examination (haematoxylin and eosin staining of liver section.Results: Hepatotoxicity was evidenced by considerable increase in serum levels of AST, ALT, ALP, and lipid peroxidation (MDA and decrease in levels of ALB and TP. Injection of CCL4 also induced congestion in central vein, and lymphocyte infiltration. Treatment with hydro-alcoholic fruit extract of R. canina at doses of 500 and 750 mg/kg significantly reduced CCl4-elevated levels of ALT, AST, ALP and MDA (p

  2. Enhanced reductive degradation of carbon tetrachloride by biogenic vivianite and Fe(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sungjun; Lee, Woojin

    2012-05-01

    We demonstrated that reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride (CT) can be enhanced by iron-bearing soil minerals (IBSMs) in the presence of Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 (CN32) due to the formation of biogenic vivianite and Fe(II). The bioreduction efficiency of magnetite was the highest (51.1%), followed by lepidocrocite (25.7%), goethite (3.6%), and hematite (1.8%). The dechlorination kinetic of CT by lepidocrocite (0.043 d-1) in the presence of CN32 was three times faster than that by microbial transformation with CN32 (0.014 d-1). Chloroform (16.1-29.4%), carbon monoxide (2.4-23.8%), and formate (0-58.0%) were measured as main products for the degradation of CT by magnetite and lepidocrocite in the presence of CN32. X-ray diffraction and electron microscope analyses revealed that the biogenic vivianite can form during the CT degradation in magnetite and lepidocrocite suspensions with CN32. The dechlorination kinetics of CT by chemogenic vivianite was much faster than that by magnetite and lepidocrocite with CN32. The highest formate production (84.2%) was observed during a full degradation of CT by the chemogenic vivianite. The experimental results showed that biogenic vivianite and sorbed Fe(II) formed during the bioreduction of IBSMs played a pivotal role for the reductive dechlorination of CT.

  3. Radon inhalation protects mice from carbon-tetrachloride-induced hepatic and renal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Yuichi; Toyota, Teruaki; Yoshimoto, Masaaki; Sakoda, Akihiro; Ishimori, Yuu; Aoyama, Yutaka; Taguchi, Takehito; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2011-12-01

    We assessed whether radon inhalation provided protection from carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatic and renal damage in mice. Mice were subjected to intraperitoneal injection of CCl4 after inhaling approximately 18 kBq/m3 radon for 6 h. Radon inhalation significantly increased total glutathione (t-GSH) content and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in the liver and kidney. Injection of CCl4 was associated with significantly higher levels of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and creatinine level in serum, and pretreatment with radon significantly decreased the GOT and ALP activity and creatinine level associated with CCl4 injection, suggesting that radon inhalation alleviates CCl4-induced hepatic and renal damage. The t-GSH contents and GPx activity in the liver and kidney of animals pretreated with radon were significantly higher than those of the CCl(4)-only group. These findings suggested that radon inhalation activated antioxidative functions and inhibited CCl4-induced hepatic and renal damage in mice.

  4. Total Flavonoids from Mimosa Pudica Protects Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Acute Liver Injur y in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Zhen-qin; CAI Lei; CHEN Da-shuai

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To observe the protective effect of total lfavonoids from Mimosa pudica on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced acute liver injury in mice. Methods:CCl4-induced acute liver injury model in mice was established. The activity of ALT and AST, the content of serum albumin (Alb) and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) were determined. The content of malondiadehyde (MDA) was measured and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was determined. The histopathological changes of liver were observed. Results:Compared with CCl4 model group, each dose group of total lfavonouida from Mimosa pudica could reduced the activity of ALT and AST in mice obviously (P<0.01), indicating they had remarkably protective effect on CCl4-induced acute liver injury in mice. High and middle dose groups of total lfavonouida from Mimosa pudica could increase the content of Alb in mice (P<0.01). Each dose group of total lfavonouida from Mimosa pudica could enhance the level of T-AOC (P<0.01), and lower the content of liver homogenate MDA, but enhance the activity of SOD in a dose-depended manner (P<0.01).

  5. Protective effects of polydatin from Polygonum cuspidatum against carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury in mice.

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    Hong Zhang

    Full Text Available Polydatin is one of main compounds in Polygonum cuspidatum, a plant with both medicinal and nutritional value. The possible hepatoprotective effects of polydatin on acute liver injury mice induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4 and the mechanisms involved were investigated. Intraperitoneal injection of CCl(4 (50 µl/kg resulted in a significant increase in the levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT and hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA, also a marked enhancement in the expression of hepatic tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and nuclearfactor-kappa B (NF-κB. On the other hand, decreased glutathione (GSH content and activities of glutathione transferase (GST, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were observed following CCl(4 exposure. Nevertheless, all of these phenotypes were evidently reversed by preadministration of polydatin for 5 continuous days. The mRNA and protein expression levels of hepatic growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β(1 were enhanced further by polydatin. These results suggest that polydatin protects mice against CCl(4-induced liver injury through antioxidant stress and antiinflammatory effects. Polydatin may be an effective hepatoprotective agent and a promising candidate for the treatment of oxidative stress- and inflammation-related diseases.

  6. Beneficial effects of yam on carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yin-Ching; Chang, Shih-Chieh; Liu, Sin-Yie; Yang, Hsin-Ling; Hseu, You-Cheng; Liao, Jiunn-Wang

    2010-01-15

    In a previous study, lyophilised yam reduced brain amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) accumulation and improved the antioxidative defence system in senescence-accelerated (SAMP8) mice. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the hepatic protection of yam in the carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic fibrosis of rats. Hepatic fibrosis was induced in rats via intraperitoneal injections of CCl(4) at a dose of 1 mL kg(-1) body weight (BW) twice weekly for 8 weeks. Three groups of rats were gavaged daily with yams at doses of 0.5, 1 and 2 g kg(-1) BW for 8 weeks, respectively. Yam treatments significantly decreased the ratio of liver/body weight, levels of gamma-glutaminotranspeptidase (GGT), low-density lipoprotein, and triglyceride in serum when compared with those administered CCl(4) alone. Treatment with yams significantly elevated antioxidant activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxidase dismutase (SOD) in livers. Microscopically, yam-treated groups presented with low histoscores of CCl(4)-induced liver injury and fibrosis. Additionally, yam treatment reduced the area of GGT-positive foci and the index of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in liver. Daily administration of yam attenuates CCl(4)-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats in a dose-dependent manner; this attenuation may be related to the antioxidant properties of yams. Copyright (c) 2009 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Apoptosis initiated by carbon tetrachloride in mitochondria of rat primary cultured hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan CAI; Li-kun GONG; Xin-ming QI; Xiang-hong LI; Jin REN

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the mitochondria-initiated apoptosis pathway involved in Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) hepatotoxicity in vitro. Methods: Several cytotoxicity endpoints, including WST-8 metabolism, lactate dehydrogenase leakage and morphological changes, were examined. The 5,5'-dithio-bis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)reaction was used to measure reduced glutathione level, and the malondialdehyde level was determined using the thiobarbituric acid assay. The release of cytochrome c and Bcl-XL was detected by Western blot. Caspase-3 activity was measured using the fiuorogenic substrate Ac-DEVD-AMC. DNA fragmentation was used to evaluate cell apoptosis. Results: A time- and dose-dependent decrease in cellular glutathione content was observed, along with a concomitant increase in malondialdehyde levels following the application of CC14. Caspase 3 activity was stimulated at all doses of CCl4, with the most significant activation at 3 mmol/L.Cytochrome c was released obviously after CC14 treatment. A time-dependent decrease in Bcl-XL expression was observed. DNA fragmentation results revealed apoptosis and necrosis following CC14 treatment. Conclusion: Oxidative damage is one of the essential mechanisms of CC14 hepatotoxicity, which triggers apoptosis via the mitochondria-initiated pathway.

  8. Accelerated biotransformation of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform by sulfate-reducing enrichment cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, D.L.; Hashsham, S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Lasecki, M. [HDR Engineering Inc., Lake Oswego, OR (United States); Scholze, R. [Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States). Construction Engineering Research Labs.

    1995-12-31

    The biotransformation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) and chloroform (CF) was examined with lactate- and acetate-grown sulfate-reducing enrichment cultures. Both cultures transformed CT, with approximately 50% reductively dechlorinated to CF and up to 10% to dichloromethane (DCM). Addition of cyanocobalamin increased the rate of CT transformation more than 100-fold. The principal product from [{sup 14}C]CT with cyanocobalamin added was carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}); less than 3% was reduced to CF plus DCM. Autoclaved cultures that received cyanocobalamin were only one third as fast as their live counterparts, but produced similar amounts of CS{sub 2}. With CF, addition of cyanocobalamin to acetate- and lactate-grown cultures also increased the rate of transformation more than 100-fold. DCM was the principal transformation product until CF additions reached 270 mg/L, at which point almost no increase in DCM was observed. Thus, low levels of cyanocobalamin substantially accelerated the rate of CT and CF transformation and altered the distribution of products formed.

  9. Protective effect of boric acid against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Sinan; Keles, Hikmet; Erdogan, Metin; Hazman, Omer; Kucukkurt, Ismail

    2012-07-01

    The protective effect of boric acid against liver damage was evaluated by its attenuation of carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4))-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. Male albino mice were treated intraperitoneally (i.p.) with boric acid (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) or silymarin daily for 7 days and received 0.2% CCl(4) in olive oil (10 mL/kg, i.p.) on day 7. Results showed that administration of boric acid significantly reduced the elevation in serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, and the level of malondialdehyde in the liver that were induced by CCl(4) in mice. Boric acid treatment significantly increased glutathione content, as well as the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase in the liver. Boric acid treatment improved the catalytic activity of cytochrome P450 2E1 and maintained activation of nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cell gene expression, with no effect on inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression in the livers of mice. Histopathologically, clear decreases in the severity of CCl(4)-induced lesions were observed, particularly at high boric acid concentrations. Results suggest that boric acid exhibits potent hepatoprotective effects on CCl(4)-induced liver damage in mice, likely the result of both the increase in antioxidant-defense system activity and the inhibition of lipid peroxidation.

  10. Effect of Mallotus Philippensis Muell.-Arg leaves against hepatotoxicity of Carbon tetrachloride in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishna.S,

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Liver Toxicity is a major health problem of worldwide proportions. Herbal medicines derived from plant extracts are being increasingly utilized to treat a wide variety of clinical diseases. In the present study MEMP leaves is used to screen the hepatoprotective activity. Hepatotoxicity was induced in experimental animals by administration of carbon tetra chloride (CCl4 (25ml/kg, i.p.. Silymarin (25 mg/kg, p.o. was used as the standard. Functional parameters like onset of sleep and duration of sleep, Biochemical Parameters like serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT, serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT, serum alkaline phosphatase (SALP, total bilirubin and direct bilirubin were measured. Cytotoxicity of CCl4 was estimated by quantitating the release of malondialdehyde (MDA. The activity of tissue antioxidant enzymes namely super oxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and the level of total protein (TP were also measured. Histopathological evaluation of liver sections was also done. CCl4 administration in rats elevated the levels of SGPT, SGOT, SALP and bilirubin. Administration of MEMP significantly (P<0.001 prevented this increase. The activity of anti-oxidant enzymes in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 group was decreased and these enzyme levels were significantly (p<0.001 increased in Mallotus philippensis leaves groups. Histopathological studies revealed that the concurrent administration of MEMP with CCl4 exhibited protection of liver tissue, which further evidenced the above results. Thestudy confirmed the hepatoprotective activity of MEMP, which may be attributed to its antioxidant property.

  11. Hepatoprotective potential of threesargassum species from Karachi coast against carbon tetrachloride and acetaminophen intoxication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khan Hira; Viqar Sultana; Jehan Ara; Syed Ehteshamul-Haque; Mohammad Athar

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To assess the hepatoprotective effect of ethanol extracts ofSargassum variegatum (S. variegatum),Sargassum tenerrimum (S. tenerrimum) andSargassum binderi occurring at Karachi coast against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and acetaminophen intoxication in rats. Methods:Sargassum species were collected at low tide from Buleji beach at Karachi coast. Effect of ethanol extracts ofSargassum spp., on lipid parameter, serum glucose and kidney function was examined. Liver damage in rats was induced by CCl4 or acetaminophen. Rats were administered with ethanol extracts ofS. tenerrimum,S. variegatum andSargassum binderi at 200 mg/kg body weight daily for 14 days separately. Hepatotoxicity was determined in terms of cardiac and liver enzymes and other biochemical parameters. Results:S. variegatum showed highest activity by reducing the elevated level of hepatic enzymes, bilirubin, serum glucose, triglyceride with restoration of cholesterol. Urea and creatinine concentrations were also significantly (P < 0.05) reduced as compared to acetaminophen intoxicated rats.S. tenerrimum andS. variegatum showed moderate activity against CCl4 hepatic toxicity. Conclusions: The protective role ofS. variegatum against acetaminophen liver damage and its positive impact on disturbed lipid, glucose metabolism, kidney dysfunction andS. tenerrimum against CCl4 liver toxicity suggest thatSargassum species offer a non-chemical means for the treatment of toxicity mediated liver damage.

  12. Hepatoprotective effect of Origanum vulgare in Wistar rats against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikander, Mohammad; Malik, Shabnam; Parveen, Kehkashan; Ahmad, Maqsood; Yadav, Deepak; Hafeez, Zubair Bin; Bansal, Manish

    2013-04-01

    The effect of an aqueous extract of Origanum vulgare (OV) leaves extract on CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity was investigated in normal and hepatotoxic rats. To evaluate the hepatoprotective activity of OV, rats were divided into six groups: control group, O. vulgare group, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4; 2 ml/kg body weight) group, and three treatment groups that received CCl4 and OV at doses of 50, 100, 150 mg/kg body weight orally for 15 days. Alanine amino transferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and aspartate amino transferase (AST) in serum, lipid peroxide (LPO), GST, CAT, SOD, GPx, GR, and GSH in liver tissue were estimated to assess liver function. CCl4 administration led to pathological and biochemical evidence of liver injury as compared to controls. OV administration led to significant protection against CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity in dose-dependent manner, maximum activity was found in CCl4 + OV3 (150 mg/kg body weight) groups and changes in the hepatocytes were confirmed through histopathological analysis of liver tissues. It was also associated with significantly lower serum ALT, ALP, and AST levels, higher GST, CAT, SOD, GPx, GR, and GSH level in liver tissue. The level of LPO also decreases significantly after the administration of OV leaves extract. The biochemical observations were supplemented with histopathological examination of rat liver sections. Thus, the study suggests O. vulgare showed protective activity against CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar rats and might be beneficial for the liver toxicity.

  13. The Aqueous Seed Extract Of Carica papaya Linn. Prevents Carbon Tetrachloride Induced Hepatotoxicity In Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A A Adeneye

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Carica papaya Linn. is known to have a versatile application in African folkloric medicine. In the current study, the dose-dependent (100 – 400 mg/kg/day/oral route and time-course protective effects of the 400 mg/kg/oral route of the aqueous seed extract of unripe and mature Carica papaya fruit (CPE were investigated in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 hepatotoxic rats for 72 hours. Results showed the extract to cause significant (p<0.05, p<0.001, dose related attenuation in the elevation of serum liver enzyme markers of acute hepatocellular injury (ALT, AST, serum lipids (TG, TC, HDL-c, LDL-c and VLDL-c and serum proteins (TP and ALB. Maximum hepatoprotection was offered at an oral dose of 400 mg/kg/day of the extract. The biochemical results obtained were corroborated by improvements in the CCl4-induced hepatic histological changes. In addition, maximum hepatoprotection was offered at the 400 mg/kg of CPE for up to 3 hours post-CCl4 induction. In conclusion, the results obtained in the current study justify the folkloric application of CPE in the treatment of drug-related hepatic injury. Industrial relevance: Results of the current study provide some scientific information to develop safe and effective products such as food supplements, dietary supplements, etc. that could be useful in the clinical management of patients with drug related hepatic disorders.

  14. Carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in rat is reversed by treatment with riboflavin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Naif O; Imam, Faisal; Nadeem, Ahmed; Al-Harbi, Mohammed M; Iqbal, Muzaffar; Ahmad, Sheikh Fayaz

    2014-08-01

    Liver is a vital organ for the detoxification of toxic substances present in the body and hepatic injury is associated with excessive exposure to toxicants. The present study was designed to evaluate the possible hepatoprotective effects of riboflavin against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced hepatic injury in rats. Rats were divided into six groups. Hepatotoxicity was induced by the administration of a single intraperitoneal dose of CCl4 in experimental rats. Riboflavin was administered at 30 and 100mg/kg by oral gavage to test its protective effect on hepatic injury biochemically and histopathologically in the blood/liver and liver respectively. The administration of CCl4 resulted in marked alteration in serum hepatic enzymes (like AST, ALT and ALP), oxidant parameters (like GSH and MDA) and pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α release from blood leukocytes indicative of hepatic injury. Changes in serum hepatic enzymes, oxidant parameters and TNF-α production induced by CCl4 were reversed by riboflavin treatment in a dose dependent manner. Treatment with standard drug, silymarin also reversed CCl4 induced changes in biomarkers of liver function, oxidant parameters and inflammation. The biochemical observations were paralleled by histopathological findings in rat liver both in the case of CCl4 and treatment groups. In conclusion, riboflavin produced a protective effect against CCl4-induced liver damage. Our study suggests that riboflavin may be used as a hepato-protective agent against toxic effects caused by CCl4 and other chemical agents in the liver.

  15. Protective effects of Cornus mas fruit extract on carbon tetrachloride induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Es Haghi, M; Dehghan, G; Banihabib, N; Zare, S; Mikaili, P; Panahi, F

    2014-09-01

    Oxidative damage is implicated in the pathogenesis of kidney injury. Cornus mas is used for in renal aliments traditionally in Iran. The present study was aimed to investigate the antioxidant activity of C. mas fruit extract (CMFE) on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) treated oxidative stress in Wistar albino rats. Forty two male albino rats were divided into seven groups. Group I served as a sham; Group II served as a normal control; Group III served as a toxic control, with CCl4 (1 ml/kg body weight; 80% in olive oil); Groups IV and V received CMFE at doses of 300 and 700 mg/kg before CCl4 injection; Groups VI and VII received extract at same doses orally at 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after CCl4 intoxication. CCl4 injection produced a significant rise in serum markers of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde along with the reduction of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismuta, catalase and glutathion peroxidase. Serum creatinine, urea and uric acid concentrations were increased whereas level of protein and albumin were reduced. Treatment of rats with different doses of fruit extract (300 and 700 mg/kg) significantly (P induced with CCl4 in lipid peroxidation, antioxidant defenses, biochemical and renal lesions. Based on these results, we conclude that CMFE protects kidney from oxidative stress induced by CCl4.

  16. Hepatoprotective and antioxidant activity of pentagamavunon-0 against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arief Nurrochmad; Supardjan Amir Margono; Sardjiman; Arief Rahman Hakim; Ernawati; Erna Kurniawati; Erva Fatmawati

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the hepatoprotective and antioxidant activity of pentagamavunon-0(PGV-0) against CCl4-induced hepatic injury in rats. Methods: The groups of animals were administered with PGV-0 at the doses 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg b.w., p.o. once in a day for 6 days and at day 7 the animals were administrated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) (20%, 2 mL/kg b.w. in liquid paraffin (i.p.). The effect of PGV-0 on serum transaminase (SGPT), alkaline phosphates (ALP) and total bilirubin were determined in CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Further, the effects of PGV-0 on glutathione (GSH) content, catalase (CAT) and NO free radical scavenging activity also were investigated. Results: The results demonstrated that PGV-0 significantly reduced the activity of SGPT, serum ALP and total bilirubin in CCl4 induced rat hepatotoxicity. PGV-0 has effect on the antioxidant and free radical defense system. It prevented the depletion level of GSH and decrease activity of CAT in CCl4-induced liver injury in rats. PGV-0 also demonstrated the free radical scavenger effects on NO free radical scavenging activity with ES value of 32.32 μM. Conculsion: All of our findings suggests that PGV-0 could protect the liver cells from CCl4-induced liver damages and the mechanism may through the antioxidative effect of PGV-0 to prevent the accumulation of free radicals and protect the liver damage.

  17. Propolis prevents hepatorenal injury induced by chronic exposure to carbon tetrachloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadauria, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) is a well-known hepatotoxicant, and its exposure induces hepatorenal injury via oxidative stress and biochemical alterations. This study had been conducted to confirm the protective role of propolis extract on CCl(4)-induced hepatorenal oxidative stress and resultant injury. Propolis extracts collected from Gwalior district and 24 female Sprague Dawley rats were used for experiment. Animals were exposed to CCl(4) (0.15 mL/kg, i.p.) for 12 weeks (5 days/week) followed by treatment with propolis extract (200 mg/kg, p.o.) for consecutive 2 weeks. CCl(4) exposure significantly depleted blood sugar and hemoglobin level and raised the level of transaminases, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, protein, urea, albumin, bilirubin, creatinine, triglycerides, and cholesterol in serum. Lipid peroxidation was enhanced, whereas GSH was decreased significantly in liver and kidney in CCl(4)-intoxicated group. Ethanolic extract of propolis successfully prevented these alterations in experimental animals. Activities of catalase, adenosine triphosphatase, glucose-6-phosphatase, acid, and alkaline phosphatase were also maintained towards normal with propolis therapy. Light microscopical studies showed considerable protection in liver and kidney with propolis treatment, thus, substantiated biochemical observations. This study confirmed hepatoprotective potential of propolis extract against chronic injury induced by CCl(4) by regulating antioxidative defense activities.

  18. Propolis Prevents Hepatorenal Injury Induced by Chronic Exposure to Carbon Tetrachloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Bhadauria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 is a well-known hepatotoxicant, and its exposure induces hepatorenal injury via oxidative stress and biochemical alterations. This study had been conducted to confirm the protective role of propolis extract on CCl4-induced hepatorenal oxidative stress and resultant injury. Propolis extracts collected from Gwalior district and 24 female Sprague Dawley rats were used for experiment. Animals were exposed to CCl4 (0.15 mL/kg, i.p. for 12 weeks (5 days/week followed by treatment with propolis extract (200 mg/kg, p.o. for consecutive 2 weeks. CCl4 exposure significantly depleted blood sugar and hemoglobin level and raised the level of transaminases, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, protein, urea, albumin, bilirubin, creatinine, triglycerides, and cholesterol in serum. Lipid peroxidation was enhanced, whereas GSH was decreased significantly in liver and kidney in CCl4-intoxicated group. Ethanolic extract of propolis successfully prevented these alterations in experimental animals. Activities of catalase, adenosine triphosphatase, glucose-6-phosphatase, acid, and alkaline phosphatase were also maintained towards normal with propolis therapy. Light microscopical studies showed considerable protection in liver and kidney with propolis treatment, thus, substantiated biochemical observations. This study confirmed hepatoprotective potential of propolis extract against chronic injury induced by CCl4 by regulating antioxidative defense activities.

  19. Multiple treatment of propolis extract ameliorates carbon tetrachloride induced liver injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadauria, Monika; Nirala, Satendra Kumar; Shukla, Sangeeta

    2008-08-01

    Propolis, a resinous wax-like beehive product has been used as a traditional remedy for various diseases due to a variety of biological activities of this folk medicine. In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to validate hepatoprotective activity of ethanolic extract of propolis (50-400mg/kg, p.o.) against carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4,) 0.5 ml/kg, p.o.) induced acute liver injury in rats. Silymarin, a known hepatoprotective drug was used as a positive control. Administration of CCl(4) altered various diagnostically important biochemical variables. Multiple treatment of propolis significantly prevented the release of transaminases, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, urea and uric acid in serum; improved the activity of hepatic microsomal drug metabolizing enzymes, i.e., aniline hydroxylase and amidopyrine-N-demethylase; significantly inhibited lipid peroxidation and markedly enhanced glutathione in liver and kidney as well as brought altered carbohydrate contents (blood sugar and tissue glycogen), protein contents (serum, microsomal and tissue protein) and lipid contents (serum and tissue triglycerides, serum cholesterol, total and esterified cholesterol in tissue) towards control. Propolis treatment also reversed CCl(4) induced severe alterations in histoarchitecture of liver and kidney in a dose dependent manner. Hepatoprotective activity of propolis at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg was statistically compared to silymarin and found that propolis exhibited better effectiveness than silymarin in certain parameters, concluded its hepatoprotective potential.

  20. Histoprotective effect of vitamin D against carbon tetrachloride nephrotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmubarak, Smeo; Özsoy, N

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the protective effect of vitamin D against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Adult male Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups ((A) control; (B) 10-week exposure to CCl4; (C) 10-week exposure to CCl4 + vitamin D treatment; and (D) 10-week exposure to CCl4 + 12 weeks of vitamin D treatment). The CCl4 dose (1.5 ml kg(-1)) was injected subcutaneously twice a week, while the 0.5 mg kg(-1) dose of vitamin D was administered intraperitoneally every day, as appropriate for each group. Whole animal and kidney weights as well as serum urea, creatinine, and glucose levels were measured. Kidney tissue sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Masson's trichrome, and periodic acid-Schiff. Tubular and glomerular degeneration were detected in the kidney tissues of CCl4-treated rats, together with dilatation and vacuolization within the tubules and hemorrhage in the intertubular region. In the kidney glomeruli; congestion, atrophy, and adhesion to parietal layer were observed. Tissue disorganization and aggregation of Bowman's capsules were noted. Mononuclear cell infiltration was observed between the glomeruli and the tubules. In contrast, the kidney sections and functional parameters of vitamin D-treated rats were similar to the controls, suggesting that vitamin D treatment is able to reduce renal damage.

  1. Fasting ameliorates metabolism, immunity, and oxidative stress in carbon tetrachloride-intoxicated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Km; Saleh, Ea

    2014-12-01

    Fasting has been recently discovered to improve overall health, but its beneficial effects in the presence of hepatic insufficiency have not been proven. The influence of fasting on the metabolism, immunological aspects, and oxidative stress of 40 male carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-intoxicated Wistar rats was investigated in the present study. The rats were divided into four groups, including a placebo group, CCl4-intoxicated rats, which were injected subcutaneously with 1.0 ml/kg of CCl4 solution, a fasting group, which was fasted 12 h/day for 30 days, and a fourth group, which was injected with CCl4 and fasted. The metabolism, immunity, and oxidative stress improved in CCl4-intoxicated rats fasted for 12 h/day for 30 days, as evidenced in significant increase (p fasting improved metabolism, immunity, and oxidative stress in CCl4-intoxicated rats. Thus, fasting during Ramadan is safe for patients with hepatic disorders, as the prophet Mohammed (S) said "Keep the fast, keep your health". © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Hepatocurative potential of sesquiterpene lactones of Taraxacum officinale on carbon tetrachloride induced liver toxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesh, A; Jeyachandran, R; Cindrella, L; Thangadurai, D; Veerapur, V P; Muralidhara Rao, D

    2010-06-01

    The hepatocurative potential of ethanolic extract (ETO) and sesquiterpene lactones enriched fraction (SL) of Taraxacum officinale roots was evaluated against carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) induced hepatotoxicity in mice. The diagnostic markers such as alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and total bilirubin contents were significantly elevated, whereas significant reduction in the level of reduced glutathione (GSH) and enhanced hepatic lipid peroxidation, liver weight and liver protein were observed in CCl 4 induced hepatotoxicity in mice. Post-treatment with ETO and SL significantly protected the hepatotoxicity as evident from the lower levels of hepatic enzyme markers, such as serum transaminase (ALT, AST), ALP and total bilirubin. Further, significant reduction in the liver weight and liver protein in drug-treated hepatotoxic mice and also reduced oxidative stress by increasing reduced glutathione content and decreasing lipid peroxidation level has been noticed. The histopathological evaluation of the liver also revealed that ETO and SL reduced the incidence of liver lesions induced by CCl 4 . The results indicate that sesquiterpene lactones have a protective effect against acute hepatotoxicity induced by the administration of CCl 4 in mice. Furthermore, observed activity of SL may be due to the synergistic action of two sesquiterpene lactones identified from enriched ethyl acetate fraction by HPLC method.

  3. In vitro study of lovastatin interactions with amiodarone and with carbon tetrachloride in isolated rat hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AZ Krasteva; MK Mitcheva; MS Kondeva-Burdina; VA Descatoire

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the interactions at a metabolic level between lovastatin, amiodarone and carbon tetrachloride in isolated rat hepatocytes.METHODS: For cell isolation two-step collagenase liver perfusion was performed. Lovastatin was administered alone in increasing concentrations (1 μmol/L, 3 μmol/L,5 μmol/L and 10 μmol/L) and in combination with CCl4 (86 μmol/L). The cells were also pretreated with 14 μmol/Lamiodarone and then the other two compounds were added.RESULTS: Lovastatin promoted concentration-dependent significant toxicity estimated by decrease in cell viability and GSH level by 45% and 84%, respectively. LDH-activity increased by 114% and TBARS content by 90%. CCl4 induced the expected severe damage on the examined parameters. CCl4 induced toxicity was attenuated after lovastatin pretreatment, which was expressed in less increased values of LDH activity and TBARS levels, as well as in less decreased cell viability and GSH concentrations. However, the pretreatment of hepatocytes with amiodarone abolished the protective effect of lovastatin.CONCLUSION: We suggest that the observed cytoprotective effect was due to interactions between lovastatin,CCl4 and amiodarone at a metabolic level.

  4. Gas Phase Conversion of Carbon Tetrachloride to Alkyl Chlorides Catalyzed by Supported Ionic Liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Aijun; ZHANG Jinlong; LI Chunxi; MENG Hong

    2009-01-01

    An efficient way of converting carbon tetrachloride(CTC)to alkyl chlorides is reported,which uses the catalysts of ionic liquids supported on granular active carbon.The catalytic performance was evaluated in a temperature range of 120-200℃ and atmospheric pressure for different ionic liquids,namely 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride,1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride,hydrochloric salts of N-methylimidazole(MIm),pyridine and triethylamine,as well as bisulfate and dihydric phosphate of N-methylimidazole.On this basis,the reaction mechanism was proposed,and the influences of the reaction temperature and the attributes of ionic liquids were discussed.The overall reaction was assumed to be comprised of two steps,the hydrolysis of CTC and reaction of HCI with alcohols under acidic catalyst.The results indicate that the conversion of CTC increased monotonically with temperature and even approached 100% at 200 ℃,while the maximum selectivity to alkyl chlorides was obtained around 160 ℃.This reaction might be potentially applicable to the resource utilization of superfluous byproduct of CTC in the chloromethane industry.

  5. Hepatoprotective potential of three sargassum species from Karachi coast against carbon tetrachloride and acetaminophen intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Hira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the hepatoprotective effect of ethanol extracts of Sargassum variegatum (S. variegatum, Sargassum tenerrimum (S. tenerrimum and Sargassum binderi occurring at Karachi coast against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 and acetaminophen intoxication in rats. Methods: Sargassum species were collected at low tide from Buleji beach at Karachi coast. Effect of ethanol extracts of Sargassum spp., on lipid parameter, serum glucose and kidney function was examined. Liver damage in rats was induced by CCl4 or acetaminophen. Rats were administered with ethanol extracts of S. tenerrimum, S. variegatum and Sargassum binderi at 200 mg/kg body weight daily for 14 days separately. Hepatotoxicity was determined in terms of cardiac and liver enzymes and other biochemical parameters. Results: S. variegatum showed highest activity by reducing the elevated level of hepatic enzymes, bilirubin, serum glucose, triglyceride with restoration of cholesterol. Urea and creatinine concentrations were also significantly (P < 0.05 reduced as compared to acetaminophen intoxicated rats. S. tenerrimum and S. variegatum showed moderate activity against CCl4 hepatic toxicity. Conclusions: The protective role of S. variegatum against acetaminophen liver damage and its positive impact on disturbed lipid, glucose metabolism, kidney dysfunction and S. tenerrimum against CCl4 liver toxicity suggest that Sargassum species offer a non-chemical means for the treatment of toxicity mediated liver damage.

  6. Evaluation of hepatoprotective effect of Amalkadi Ghrita against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achliya, Girish S; Wadodkar, Sudhir G; Dorle, Avinash K

    2004-02-01

    Amalkadi Ghrita (AG), a polyherbal formulation, was evaluated for its hepatoprotective activity against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatic damage in rats. The hepatoprotective activity of AG was evaluated by measuring levels of serum marker enzymes like serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and acid phosphatase (ACP). The serum levels of total proteins and bilirubin were also estimated. The histological studies were also carried out to support the above parameters. Silymarin was used as standard drug. Administration of AG (100 and 300 mg/kg, p.o.) markedly prevented CCl4-induced elevation of levels of serum GPT, GOT, ACP, ALP, and bilirubin. The decreased level of total proteins due to hepatic damage induced by CCl4 was found to be increased in AG-treated group. The results are comparable to that of silymarin. A comparative histopathological study of liver exhibited almost normal architecture, as compared to CCl4-treated group. Hepatoprotective effect of AG is probably due to combined action of all ingredients.

  7. Carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity: Protective effect of 'Rocket' Eruca sativa L. in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqasoumi, Saleh

    2010-01-01

    The hepatoprotective and antioxidant effect of an ethanolic extract of 'Rocket' Eruca sativa L. (EER), on liver injury induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) was investigated. Wistar albino rats were administered 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight extract orally for 10 consecutive days. Marker enzymes GOT, GPT, ALP, GGT and bilirubin were estimated in serum. Whereas, non-protein sulfhydryl (NP-SH), total protein (TP) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were estimated in liver tissue as markers for oxidative stress. Histopathological assessment was also done on liver tissue. CCl(4) induced liver poisoning in all treated animals was evident by elevated serum GOT, GPT, ALP, GGT and bilirubin levels. Induction of oxidative stress in the liver tissue by CCl(4) was evidenced by a fall in the levels of NP-SH and TP; and an increased level of MDA concentration. EER administration for 10 days prevented the CCl(4) induced hepatic injury and oxidative stress. Furthermore, the extract also reduced the pentobarbital-induced prolongation of sleeping time in mice. The ability of rocket extract to protect the liver toxicity in rats was further confirmed by histological findings in the liver tissue. In conclusion, it was observed that Eruca sativa L. extract protects the liver against CCl(4) induced hepatic injury through its potent antioxidant activity in rats.

  8. Molecular Interaction Studies of Benzyl Alcohols with Methacrylates in Carbon Tetrachloride using Frequency Domain Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Radhakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric relaxation of benzyl alcohol substitutents (benzyl alcohol, m-methylbenzyl alcohol and m-nitrobenzyl alcohol with methyl methacrylate and butyl methacrylate in dilute solution of carbon tetrachloride is measured at 9.37 GHz using Frequency domain (X-band technique. Different dielectric parameters like dielectric constant (ε׳, dielectric loss factor (ε״ at Microwave frequency, static dielectric constant (ε0 and dielectric constant at infinite dilution (ε∞ at optical frequency have been determined. From the measured dielectric data, the relaxation time (t calculated using Higasi method and activation energies (∆Ft and ∆Fη have been determined. All the dielectric parameters that are vary with the substitutent change in benzyl alcohol andchain length of acrylic esters. Suggests that, the proton donating ability is varying with the substitution of benzyl alcohol and proton accepting ability is varying with the chain length of acrylic esters. The relaxation time and molar free energy activation of 1:1 molar ratio is greater than other higher molar ratios (i.e. 3:1, 2:1, 1:2, 1:3 confirm that the existence of most likely 1:1 complex formation between the studied systems and also complex formation formed between free hydroxyl group of substituted benzyl alcohols and carbonyl group of acrylic esters (MMA and EMA.

  9. Effect of aluminum and tellurium tetrachloride addition on the loss of arsenic selenide optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vinh Q.; Drake, Gryphon; Villalobos, Guillermo; Gibson, Daniel; Bayya, Shyam; Kim, Woohong; Baker, Colin; Chin, Geoff; Kung, Frederic H.; Kotov, Mikhail I.; Busse, Lynda; Sanghera, Jasbinder S.

    2017-02-01

    Arsenic selenide glass optical fibers typically possess extrinsic absorption bands in the infrared wavelength regions associated with residual hydrogen and oxygen related impurities, despite using 6N purified elemental precursors. Consequently, special additives and refined processing steps are utilized in an attempt to reduce these and other impurities. We investigate the formation of particulate impurities during a purification process based on the addition of 0.1 wt% elemental aluminum (Al) and 0.2 wt% tellurium tetrachloride (TeCl4) during glass synthesis. It was found that during purification and melting steps, Al reacts with TeCl4 to form AlCl3, which in turn reacts with oxygen and hydrogen impurities and the fused quartz (SiO2) ampoule to produce HCl and stable submicron Al2SiO5 compounds in the As-Se glass and fibers. The intensity of the H-Se absorption band centered at 4.57 μm has been significantly reduced from 18 dB/m to 0.8 dB/m. Using thermodynamic data, we have identified stable Al2SiO5 submicron inclusions in the glass and fibers. A two-step gettering process is proposed as a solution to eliminating these inclusions.

  10. Total Flavonoids from Mimosa Pudica Protects Carbon Tetrachloride -Induced Acute Liver Injury in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-qin QIU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the protective effect of total flavonoids from Mimosa pudica on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4-induced acute liver injury in mice. Methods: CCl4-induced acute liver injury model in mice was established. The activity of ALT and AST, the content of serum albumin (Alb and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC were determined. The content of malondiadehyde (MDA was measured and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD was determined. The histopathological changes of liver were observed.Results: Compared with CCl4 modle group, each dose group of total flavonouida from Mimosa pudica couldreduced the activity of ALT and AST in mice obviously (P<0.01, indicating they had remarkably protective effect on CCl4-induced acute liver injury in mice. high and middle dose groups of total flavonouida from Mimosa pudica couldincrease the content of Alb in mice (P<0.01. Each dose group of total flavonouida from Mimosa pudica could enhance the level of T-AOC (P<0.01. each dose group of total flavonouida from Mimosa pudica could lower the content of liver homogenate MDA but enhance the activity of SOD in a dose-depended manner (P<0.01. Conclusion: Total flavones from Mimosa Pudica have obvious protective effect on CCl4-induced acute liver injury in mice.

  11. D-Pinitol Protects Against Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengarajan, Thamaraiselvan; Rajendran, Peramaiyan; Nandakumar, Natarajan; Lokeshkumar, Boobathy; Balasubramanian, Maruthaiveeran Periyasamy

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the protective activity of D-Pinitol against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. The animals were divided into six groups, with each group consisting of six animals. Group I animals served as normal controls and received olive oil vehicle (1.0 ml/kg body weight intraperitoneally). Group II rats served as CCl4 controls, which received 30% CCl4 suspended in olive oil (3.0 ml/kg body weight intraperitoneally) twice a week for 4 weeks. Group III rats were treated with 30% CCl4 suspended in olive oil (3.0 ml/kg body weight intraperitoneally) twice a week for 4 weeks, followed by D-Pinitol (100 mg/kg body weight) given for 28 days intragastrically. Group IV rats received D-Pinitol alone at a concentration of 100 mg/kg body weight for 28 days intragastrically. At the end of the experimental period, serum marker enzymes and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels were significantly increased in group II animals. On the other hand, D-Pinitol treatment significantly decreased marker enzymes and LPO levels and increased the antioxidant level. CYP expression was also investigated. Therefore, the present study revealed that D-Pinitol acts as a protective agent by decreasing metabolic activation of xenobiotics through its antioxidant nature.

  12. Hepatoprotective effects of Arctium lappa on carbon tetrachloride- and acetaminophen-induced liver damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S C; Chung, T C; Lin, C C; Ueng, T H; Lin, Y H; Lin, S Y; Wang, L Y

    2000-01-01

    The root of Arctium lappa Linne (A. lappa) (Compositae), a perennial herb, has been cultivated for a long time as a popular vegetable. In order to investigate the hepatoprotective effects of A. lappa, male ICR mice were injected with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4, 32 microl/kg, i.p.) or acetaminophen (600 mg/kg, i.p.). A. lappa suppressed the SGOT and SGPT elevations induced by CCl4 or acetaminophen in a dose-dependent manner and alleviated the severity of liver damage based on histopathological observations. In an attempt to elucidate the possible mechanism(s) of this hepatoprotective effect, glutathione (GSH), cytochrome P-450 (P-450) and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were studied. A. lappa reversed the decrease in GSH and P-450 induced by CCl4 and acetaminophen. It was also found that A. lappa decreased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content in CCl4 or acetaminophen-intoxicated mice. From these results, it was suggested that A. lappa could protect the liver cells from CCl4 or acetaminophen-induced liver damages, perhaps by its antioxidative effect on hepatocytes, hence eliminating the deleterious effects of toxic metabolites from CCl4 or acetaminophen.

  13. Enhanced degradation of carbon tetrachloride by surfactant-modified zero-valent iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Ya-feng; GUAN Bao-hong; WU Zhong-biao; WANG Da-hui

    2006-01-01

    Sorption of carbon tetrachloride (CT) by zero-valent iron (ZVI) is the rate-limiting step in the degradation of CT, so the sorption capacity of ZVI is of great importance. This experiment was aimed at enhancing the sorption of CT by ZVI and the degradation rate of CT by modification of surfactants. This study showed that ZVI modified by cationic surfactants has favorable synergistic effect on the degradation of CT. The CT degradation rate of ZVI modified by cetyl pyridinium bromide (CPB) was higher than that of the unmodified ZVI by 130%, and the CT degradation rate of ZVI modified by cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) was higher than that of the unmodified ZVI by 81%. This study also showed that the best degradation effect is obtained at the near critical micelle concentrations (CMC) and that high loaded cationic surfactant does not have good synergistic effect on the degradation due to its hydrophilicity and the block in surface reduction sites. Furthermore degradation of CT by ZVI modified by nonionic surfactant has not positive effect on the degradation as the ionic surfactant and the ZVI modified by anionic surfactant has hardly any obvious effects on the degradation.

  14. Authigenic gypsum found in gas hydrate-associated sediments from Hydrate Ridge, the eastern North Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Jiasheng; Erwin; Suess; Dirk; Rickert

    2004-01-01

    Characteristic gypsum micro-sphere and granular mass were discovered by binocular microscope in the gas hydrate-associated sediments at cores SO143-221 and SO143/TVG40-2A respectively on Hydrate Ridge of Cascadia margin, the eastern North Pacific. XRD patterns and EPA analyses show both micro-sphere and granular mass of the crystals have the typical peaks and the typical main chemical compositions of gypsum, although their weight percents are slightly less than the others in the non-gas hydrate-associated marine regions. SEM pictures show that the gypsum crystals have clear crystal boundaries, planes, edges and cleavages of gypsum in form either of single crystal or of twin crystals. In view of the fact that there are meanwhile gas hydrate-associated authigenic carbonates and SO42(-rich pore water in the same sediment cores, it could be inferred reasonably that the gypsums formed also authigenically in the gas hydrate-associated environment too, most probably at the interface between the downward advecting sulfate-rich seawater and the below gas hydrate, which spilled calcium during its formation on Hydrate Ridge. The two distinct forms of crystal intergrowth, which are the granular mass of series single gypsum crystals at core SO143/TVG40-2A and the microsphere of gypsum crystals accompanied with detrital components at core SO143-221 respectively, indicate that they precipitated most likely in different interstitial water dynamic environments. So, the distinct authigenic gypsums found in gas hydrate-associated sediments on Hydrate Ridge could also be believed as one of the parameters which could be used to indicate the presence of gas hydrate in an unknown marine sediment cores.

  15. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom

  16. Experimental Determination of Refractive Index of Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bylov, Martin; Rasmussen, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The refractive indexes of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate have been experimentally determined. The refractive indexes were determined in an indirect manner making use of the fact that two non-absorbing materials will have the same refractive index if they cannot be distinguished visually....... For methane hydrate (structure I) the refractive index was found to be 1.346 and for natural gas hydrate (structure II) it was found to be 1.350. The measurements further suggest that the gas hydrate growth rate increases if the water has formed hydrates before. The induction time, on the other hand, seems...

  17. Complex admixtures of clathrate hydrates in a water desalination method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Blake A.; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Anderson, David W.

    2009-07-14

    Disclosed is a method that achieves water desalination by utilizing and optimizing clathrate hydrate phenomena. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds of gas and water that desalinate water by excluding salt molecules during crystallization. Contacting a hydrate forming gaseous species with water will spontaneously form hydrates at specific temperatures and pressures through the extraction of water molecules from the bulk phase followed by crystallite nucleation. Subsequent dissociation of pure hydrates yields fresh water and, if operated correctly, allows the hydrate-forming gas to be efficiently recycled into the process stream.

  18. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.

    2014-07-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  19. Interfacial phenomena in gas hydrate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Zachary M; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-03-21

    Gas hydrates are crystalline inclusion compounds, where molecular cages of water trap lighter species under specific thermodynamic conditions. Hydrates play an essential role in global energy systems, as both a hinderance when formed in traditional fuel production and a substantial resource when formed by nature. In both traditional and unconventional fuel production, hydrates share interfaces with a tremendous diversity of materials, including hydrocarbons, aqueous solutions, and inorganic solids. This article presents a state-of-the-art understanding of hydrate interfacial thermodynamics and growth kinetics, and the physiochemical controls that may be exerted on both. Specific attention is paid to the molecular structure and interactions of water, guest molecules, and hetero-molecules (e.g., surfactants) near the interface. Gas hydrate nucleation and growth mechanics are also presented, based on studies using a combination of molecular modeling, vibrational spectroscopy, and X-ray and neutron diffraction. The fundamental physical and chemical knowledge and methods presented in this review may be of value in probing parallel systems of crystal growth in solid inclusion compounds, crystal growth modifiers, emulsion stabilization, and reactive particle flow in solid slurries.

  20. Stability evaluation of hydrate-bearing sediments during thermally-driven hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, T.; Cho, G.; Santamarina, J.; Kim, H.; Lee, J.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrate-bearing sediments may destabilize spontaneously as part of geological processes, unavoidably during petroleum drilling/production operations, or intentionally as part of gas extraction from the hydrate itself. In all cases, high pore fluid pressure generation is anticipated during hydrate dissociation. This study examined how thermal changes destabilize gas hydrate-bearing sediments. First, an analytical formulation was derived for predicting fluid pressure evolution in hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to thermal stimulation without mass transfer. The formulation captures the self-preservation behavior, calculates the hydrate and free gas quantities during dissociation, considering effective stress-controlled sediment compressibility and gas solubility in aqueous phase. Pore fluid pressure generation is proportional to the initial hydrate fraction and the sediment bulk stiffness; is inversely proportional to the initial gas fraction and gas solubility; and is limited by changes in effective stress that cause the failure of the sediment. Second, the analytical formulation for hydrate dissociation was incorporated as a user-defined function into a verified finite difference code (FLAC2D). The underlying physical processes of hydrate-bearing sediments, including hydrate dissociation, self-preservation, pore pressure evolution, gas dissolution, and sediment volume expansion, were coupled with the thermal conduction, pore fluid flow, and mechanical response of sediments. We conducted the simulations for a duration of 20 years, assuming a constant-temperature wellbore transferred heat to the surrounding hydrate-bearing sediments, resulting in dissociation of methane hydrate in the well vicinity. The model predicted dissociation-induced excess pore fluid pressures which resulted in a large volume expansion and plastic deformation of the sediments. Furthermore, when the critical stress was reached, localized shear failure of the sediment around the borehole was

  1. Methane hydrates in nature - Current knowledge and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated effort, the United States Congress enacted the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. At the same time, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan launched a research program to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. India, China, the Republic of Korea, and other nations also have established large methane hydrate research and development programs. Government-funded scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrates in nature. Numerous studies have shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world may exceed the volume of known organic carbon sources. However, methane hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge, and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of methane hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various methane hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural methane hydrates, (5) analyzing the methane hydrate role as a geohazard, (6) establishing the means to detect and characterize methane hydrate accumulations using geologic and geophysical data, and (7) establishing the thermodynamic phase equilibrium properties of methane hydrates as a function of temperature, pressure, and gas composition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) combined their efforts in 2012 to assess the contributions that scientific drilling has made and could continue to make to advance

  2. Apparatus investigates geological aspects of gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, J.S.; Winters, W.J.; Dillon, William P.

    1999-01-01

    The US Geological Survey has developed a laboratory research system which allows the study of the creation and dissociation of gas hydrates under deepwater conditions and with different sediment types and pore fluids. The system called GHASTLI (gas hydrate and sediment test laboratory instrument) comprises a pressure chamber which holds a sediment specimen, and which can simulate water depths to 2,500m and different sediment overburden. Seawater and gas flow through a sediment specimen can be precisely controlled and monitored. It can simulate a wide range of geology and processes and help to improve understanding of gas hydrate processes and aid prediction of geohazards, their control and potential use as an energy source. This article describes GHASTLI and how it is able to simulate natural conditions, focusing on fluid volume, acoustic velocity-compressional and shear wave, electric resistance, temperature, pore pressure, shear strength, and permeability.

  3. Simulation of Methane Recovery from Gas Hydrates Combined with Storing Carbon Dioxide as Hydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Janicki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the medium term, gas hydrate reservoirs in the subsea sediment are intended as deposits for carbon dioxide (CO2 from fossil fuel consumption. This idea is supported by the thermodynamics of CO2 and methane (CH4 hydrates and the fact that CO2 hydrates are more stable than CH4 hydrates in a certain P-T range. The potential of producing methane by depressurization and/or by injecting CO2 is numerically studied in the frame of the SUGAR project. Simulations are performed with the commercial code STARS from CMG and the newly developed code HyReS (hydrate reservoir simulator especially designed for hydrate processing in the subsea sediment. HyReS is a nonisothermal multiphase Darcy flow model combined with thermodynamics and rate kinetics suitable for gas hydrate calculations. Two scenarios are considered: the depressurization of an area 1,000 m in diameter and a one/two-well scenario with CO2 injection. Realistic rates for injection and production are estimated, and limitations of these processes are discussed.

  4. Salen complexes of zirconium and hafnium: synthesis, structural characterization, controlled hydrolysis, and solvent-free ring-opening polymerization of cyclic esters and lactides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Tanmoy Kumar; Ramkumar, Venkatachalam; Chakraborty, Debashis

    2011-04-04

    Dinuclear salen compounds of zirconium and hafnium are efficient initiators for the solvent-free ring-opening polymerization of cyclic ester monomers and lactides. There is a correlation between the theoretical and experimental number-average molecular weights (M(n)'s) in these polymerizations. Polymerization of β-butyrolactone gives poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) with a good M(n) and molecular weight distribution.

  5. PHYSIC AND CHEMICAL BASIS FOR THE INVOLVEMENT OF D-ELEMENTS OF THE FOURTH GROUP (TITANIUM, ZIRCONIUM, HAFNIUM IN THE SYNTHESIS OF BUILDING AND SILICATE MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Bolshakov

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the studies of physico-chemical grounds of involving the fourth group elements (titanium, zirconium, hafnium for syntheses of construction silicate materials are presented. The physico-chemical approach proposed allows involving the great group of technogenic titanium-containing semi-products, concentrates, slags and slimes for production of construction silicate materials and manufacture the products and building structures.

  6. D296树脂吸附分离锆铪试验研究%Separation of Hafnium From Zirconium by D296 Ion-exchange Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘小龙; 任萌; 李佳; 黎志万; 刘锦洪

    2015-01-01

    研究了用 D296树脂从硫酸体系中吸附锆、铪,考察了吸附时间、初始料液质量浓度、温度、硫酸浓度对树脂吸附锆、铪及锆、铪分离系数的影响及吸附反应动力学。结果表明:溶液中锆离子质量浓度为120 g/L 、温度1℃、硫酸浓度1.6 mol/L 条件下,D296树脂对锆、铪的静态吸附分离系数最大,为1.19。动力学研究结果表明,D296树脂吸附锆离子的控制步骤为液膜扩散,D296树脂吸附锆离子的活化能 E=158.639 kJ/mol 。%Adsorption separation of hafnium from zirconium in sulfuric acid medium by D 296 ion‐exchange resin was researched .The effects of adsorption time ,initial concentrate of zirconium and hafnium in solution ,temperature and sulfuric acid concentrate on separation coefficient of zirconium and hafnium were examined ,and the reaction dynamics was also studied .The results show that under the conditions of zirconium ion mass concentrate of 120 g/L ,temperature of 1 ℃ ,sulfuric acid concentrate of 1 .6 mol/L ,the static adsorption separation coefficient of zirconium and hafnium is maximum(1 .19) .Dynamics research results show that the main controlling step for D296 adsorption zirconium ion is liquid membrane diffusion .The adsorption activation energy of D296 for zirconium ion is 158 .639 kJ/mol .

  7. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  8. Simulation of subsea gas hydrate exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2014-05-01

    The recovery of methane from gas hydrate layers that have been detected in several subsea sediments and permafrost regions around the world is a promising perspective to overcome future shortages in natural gas supply. Being aware that conventional natural gas resources are limited, research is going on to develop technologies for the production of natural gas from such new sources. Thus various research programs have started since the early 1990s in Japan, USA, Canada, India, and Germany to investigate hydrate deposits and develop required technologies. In recent years, intensive research has focussed on the capture and storage of CO2 from combustion processes to reduce climate impact. While different natural or man-made reservoirs like deep aquifers, exhausted oil and gas deposits or other geological formations are considered to store gaseous or liquid CO2, the storage of CO2 as hydrate in former methane hydrate fields is another promising alternative. Due to beneficial stability conditions, methane recovery may be well combined with CO2 storage in the form of hydrates. Regarding technological implementation many problems have to be overcome. Especially mixing, heat and mass transfer in the reservoir are limiting factors causing very long process times. Within the scope of the German research project »SUGAR« different technological approaches for the optimized exploitation of gas hydrate deposits are evaluated and compared by means of dynamic system simulations and analysis. Detailed mathematical models for the most relevant chemical and physical processes are developed. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into simulation programs. Simulations based on geological field data have been carried out. The studies focus on the potential of gas production from turbidites and their fitness for CO2 storage. The effects occurring during gas production and CO2 storage within

  9. GLASS TRANSITION OF HYDRATED WHEAT GLIADIN POWDERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-min Sun; Li Zhao; Yi-hu Song; Qiang Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Modulated-temperature differential scanning calorimetric and dynamic mechanical analyses and dielectric spectroscopy were used to investigate the glass transition of hydrated wheat gliadin powders with moisture absorption ranged from 2.30 db% to 18.21 db%. Glass transition temperature (Tg) of dry wheat gliadin was estimated according to the GordonTaylor equation. Structural heterogeneity at high degrees of hydration was revealed in dielectric temperature and frequency spectra. The activation energies (Ea) of the two relaxations were calculated from Arrhenius equation.

  10. Component analysis of the protein hydration entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2012-05-01

    We report the development of an atomic decomposition method of the protein solvation entropy in water, which allows us to understand global change in the solvation entropy in terms of local changes in protein conformation as well as in hydration structure. This method can be implemented via a combined approach based on molecular dynamics simulation and integral-equation theory of liquids. An illustrative application is made to 42-residue amyloid-beta protein in water. We demonstrate how this method enables one to elucidate the molecular origin for the hydration entropy change upon conformational transitions of protein.

  11. Gas hydrate of Lake Baikal: Discovery and varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlystov, Oleg; De Batist, Marc; Shoji, Hitoshi; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Nishio, Shinya; Naudts, Lieven; Poort, Jeffrey; Khabuev, Andrey; Belousov, Oleg; Manakov, Andrey; Kalmychkov, Gennаdy

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of recent gas-hydrate studies in Lake Baikal, the only fresh-water lake in the world containing gas hydrates in its sedimentary infill. We provide a historical overview of the different investigations and discoveries and highlight some recent breakthroughs in our understanding of the Baikal hydrate system. So far, 21 sites of gas hydrate occurrence have been discovered. Gas hydrates are of structures I and II, which are of thermogenic, microbial, and mixed origin. At the 15 sites, gas hydrates were found in mud volcanoes, and the rest six - near gas discharges. Additionally, depending on type of discharge and gas hydrate structure, they were visually different. Investigations using MIR submersibles allowed finding of gas hydrates at the bottom surface of Lake Baikal at the three sites.

  12. Effect of Ribavirin Alone or Combined with Silymarin on Carbon Tetrachloride Induced Hepatic Damage in Rats

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    Omar M.E. Abdel Salam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the antiviral agent ribavirin given alone or in combination with silymarin on the development of liver injury induced in rats with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4; 2.8 ml/kg followed by 1.4 ml/kg after one week was studied. Ribavirin at three dose levels (30, 60 or 90 mg/kg, silymarin (25 mg/kg or combination of ribavirin (60 mg/kg and silymarin (25 mg/kg was administered once daily orally for 14 days, starting at time of administration of CCl4. The administration of ribavirin decreased the elevations in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT by 78.5, 82.1, 75.1%, aspartate aminotransferase (AST 47.5, 37.4, 38.8%, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP by 23.4, 16, 21.6%, respectively and also prevented the development of hepatic necrosis caused by CCl4. In comparison, the elevated serum ALT, AST and ALP levels decreased to 43.3%, 46%, and 37.5% of controls, respectively by silymarin. When silymarin was combined with ribavirin, the serum activities of AST and ALP were further decreased, indicating a benefi cial additive effect. Morphometric analysis indicated signifi cant reduction in the area of necrosis and fi brosis on ribavirin treatment and this was further reduced after the addition of silymarin. Metabolic pertuberations caused by CCl4 as refl ected in a decrease in intracellular protein content in hepatocytes were improved by ribavirin monotherapy and to higher extent by combined silymarin and ribavirin therapy. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen was reduced in nuclei of hepatocytes by ribavirin montherapy or the combination of ribavirin and silymarin compared with CCl4-control group. The study demonstrates that ribavirin treatment in the model of CCl4- induced liver injury results in less liver damage. Results also indicate that the combined application of ribavirin and silymarin is likely to be a useful additive in reducing liver injury.

  13. Hydrogen sulfide attenuates carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity, liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension in rats.

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    Gang Tan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hydrogen sulfide (H(2S displays vasodilative, anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective activities. Impaired production of H(2S contributes to the increased intrahepatic resistance in cirrhotic livers. The study aimed to investigate the roles of H(2S in carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4-induced hepatotoxicity, cirrhosis and portal hypertension. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, a donor of H(2S, and DL-propargylglycine (PAG, an irreversible inhibitor of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE, were applied to the rats to investigate the effects of H(2S on CCl(4-induced acute hepatotoxicity, cirrhosis and portal hypertension by measuring serum levels of H(2S, hepatic H(2S producing activity and CSE expression, liver function, activity of cytochrome P450 (CYP 2E1, oxidative and inflammatory parameters, liver fibrosis and portal pressure. CCl(4 significantly reduced serum levels of H(2S, hepatic H(2S production and CSE expression. NaHS attenuated CCl(4-induced acute hepatotoxicity by supplementing exogenous H(2S, which displayed anti-oxidative activities and inhibited the CYP2E1 activity. NaHS protected liver function, attenuated liver fibrosis, inhibited inflammation, and reduced the portal pressure, evidenced by the alterations of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, hyaluronic acid (HA, albumin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6 and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1, liver histology, hepatic hydroxyproline content and α-smooth muscle actin (SMA expression. PAG showed opposing effects to NaHS on most of the above parameters. CONCLUSIONS: Exogenous H(2S attenuates CCl(4-induced hepatotoxicity, liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension by its multiple functions including anti-oxidation, anti-inflammation, cytoprotection and anti-fibrosis, indicating that targeting H(2S may present a promising approach, particularly for its prophylactic effects, against liver

  14. Erythropoietin decreases carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic fibrosis by inhibiting transforming growth factor-beta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soo Young Park; Joo Young Lee; Won Young Tak; Young Oh Kweon; Mi Suk Lee

    2012-01-01

    Background In addition to hematopoietic effect,the erythropoietin is known as a multifunctional cytokine with anti-fibrosis and organ-protective activities.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) on hepatic fibrosis and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs).Methods Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced hepatic fibrosis mice models were used for in vivo study and HSCs line for in vitro study.CCl4 and rhEPO (0,200 or 1000 U/kg) was injected intraperitoneally in BALB/c mice three times a week for 4 weeks.Immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting were performed to evaluate expressions of transforming growth factor-β31 (TGF-β1),α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA),and fibronectin in explanted liver.Immunoblotting of α-SMA,phophorylated Smad-2 and Smad-2/3 was performed in HSCs treated with TGF-β1 and/or rhEPO.Results Expressions of TGF-β1,α-SMA,and fibronectin were increased in CCl4 injected mice livers,but significantly attenuated by co-treatment with CCl4 and rhEPO.Co-treatment of rhEPO markedly suppressed fibrosis in Masson's trichrome compared with treatment of only CCl4.TGF-β1 increased phosphorylated α-SMA,Smad-2 expressions in HSCs,which were decreased by rhEPO co-treatment.Conclusions Treatment of rhEPO effectively suppressed fibrosis in CCl4-induced liver fibrosis mice models.Anti-fibrosis effect of rhEPO could be related to inhibition of TGF-β1 induced activation of HSCs.

  15. Pigment Epithelium Derived Factor Peptide Protects Murine Hepatocytes from Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Injury.

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    Shou-Chuan Shih

    Full Text Available Fibrogenesis is induced by repeated injury to the liver and reactive regeneration and leads eventually to liver cirrhosis. Pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF has been shown to prevent liver fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4. A 44 amino acid domain of PEDF (44-mer was found to have a protective effect against various insults to several cell types. In this study, we investigated the capability of synthetic 44-mer to protect against liver injury in mice and in primary cultured hepatocytes. Acute liver injury, induced by CCl4, was evident from histological changes, such as cell necrosis, inflammation and apoptosis, and a concomitant reduction of glutathione (GSH and GSH redox enzyme activities in the liver. Intraperitoneal injection of the 44-mer into CCl4-treated mice abolished the induction of AST and ALT and markedly reduced histological signs of liver injury. The 44-mer treatment can reduce hepatic oxidative stress as evident from lower levels of lipid hydroperoxide, and higher levels of GSH. CCl4 caused a reduction of Bcl-xL, PEDF and PPARγ, which was markedly restored by the 44-mer treatment. Consequently, the 44-mer suppressed liver fibrosis induced by repeated CCl4 injury. Furthermore, our observations in primary culture of rat hepatocytes showed that PEDF and the 44-mer protected primary rat hepatocytes against apoptosis induced by serum deprivation and TGF-β1. PEDF/44-mer induced cell protective STAT3 phosphorylation. Pharmacological STAT3 inhibition prevented the antiapoptotic action of PEDF/44-mer. Among several PEDF receptor candidates that may be responsible for hepatocyte protection, we demonstrated that PNPLA2 was essential for PEDF/44-mer-mediated STAT3 phosphorylation and antiapoptotic activity by using siRNA to selectively knockdown PNPLA2. In conclusion, the PEDF 44-mer protects hepatocytes from single and repeated CCl4 injury. This protective effect may stem from strengthening the counter oxidative stress

  16. Role of the sympathetic nervous system in carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity and systemic inflammation.

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    Jung-Chun Lin

    Full Text Available Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 is widely used as an animal model of hepatotoxicity and the mechanisms have been arduously studied, however, the contribution of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS in CCl4-induced acute hepatotoxicity remains controversial. It is also known that either CCl4 or SNS can affect systemic inflammatory responses. The aim of this study was to establish the effect of chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA in a mouse model of CCl4-induced acute hepatotoxicity and systemic inflammatory response. Mice exposed to CCl4 or vehicle were pretreated with 6-OHDA or saline. The serum levels of aminotransferases and alkaline phosphatase in the CCl4-poisoning mice with sympathetic denervation were significantly lower than those without sympathetic denervation. With sympathetic denervation, hepatocellular necrosis and fat infiltration induced by CCl4 were greatly decreased. Sympathetic denervation significantly attenuated CCl4-induced lipid peroxidation in liver and serum. Acute CCl4 intoxication showed increased expression of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines [eotaxin-2/CCL24, Fas ligand, interleukin (IL-1α, IL-6, IL-12p40p70, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α], as well as decreased expression of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and keratinocyte-derived chemokine. The overexpressed levels of IL-1α, IL-6, IL-12p40p70, MCP-1/CCL2, and TNF-α were attenuated by sympathetic denervation. Pretreatment with dexamethasone significantly reduced CCl4-induced hepatic injury. Collectively, this study demonstrates that the SNS plays an important role in CCl4-induced acute hepatotoxicity and systemic inflammation and the effect may be connected with chemical- or drug-induced hepatotoxicity and circulating immune response.

  17. A comprehensive estimate for loss of atmospheric carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) to the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, James H.; Yvon-Lewis, Shari A.; Lobert, Jurgen M.; King, Daniel B.; Montzka, Stephen A.; Bullister, John L.; Koropalov, Valentin; Elkins, James W.; Hall, Bradley D.; Hu, Lei; Liu, Yina

    2016-09-01

    Extensive undersaturations of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in Pacific, Atlantic, and Southern Ocean surface waters indicate that atmospheric CCl4 is consumed in large amounts by the ocean. Observations made on 16 research cruises between 1987 and 2010, ranging in latitude from 60° N to 77° S, show that negative saturations extend over most of the surface ocean. Corrected for physical effects associated with radiative heat flux, mixing, and air injection, these anomalies were commonly on the order of -5 to -10 %, with no clear relationship to temperature, productivity, or other gross surface water characteristics other than being more negative in association with upwelling. The atmospheric flux required to sustain these undersaturations is 12.4 (9.4-15.4) Gg yr-1, a loss rate implying a partial atmospheric lifetime with respect to the oceanic loss of 183 (147-241) yr and that ˜ 18 (14-22) % of atmospheric CCl4 is lost to the ocean. Although CCl4 hydrolyzes in seawater, published hydrolysis rates for this gas are too slow to support such large undersaturations, given our current understanding of air-sea gas exchange rates. The even larger undersaturations in intermediate depth waters associated with reduced oxygen levels, observed in this study and by other investigators, strongly suggest that CCl4 is ubiquitously consumed at mid-depth, presumably by microbiota. Although this subsurface sink creates a gradient that drives a downward flux of CCl4, the gradient alone is not sufficient to explain the observed surface undersaturations. Since known chemical losses are likewise insufficient to sustain the observed undersaturations, this suggests a possible biological sink for CCl4 in surface or near-surface waters of the ocean. The total atmospheric lifetime for CCl4, based on these results and the most recent studies of soil uptake and loss in the stratosphere is now 32 (26-43) yr.

  18. Antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects of flower extract of Millingtonia hortensis Linn. on carbon tetrachloride induced hepatotoxicity

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    S Babitha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Millingtonia hortensis Linn is an abundant resource of flavonoids, which might be beneficial in protecting liver tissue from injury. The hepatoprotective and antioxidant potential of ethanolic extract of M. hortensis on carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 induced hepatotoxicity and the possible mechanism involved therein were investigated in rats. Materials and Methods: Preliminary phytochemical studies were carried out to determine the total phenol and flavonoid contents. 30 adult Wistar rats were allocated into 5 groups. Control group received vehicle, group-2 received CCl 4 alone (1 ml/kg body weight, intraperitonially, groups 3 - 5 received the ethanolic flower extract in 2 dose levels (200 and 400 mg/kg and Curcumin (100 mg/kg as a standard for 8 days orally, followed by CCl 4 as a single dose on the 8 th day. 48 hours later, blood was withdrawn, serum was subjected to biochemical assessments, and liver homogenate was examined for lipid peroxides, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase and total protein levels. Furthermore, hepatic tissues were subjected to histopatological studies. Results: CCl 4 treatment produced a profound increase in the levels of malondialdehyde, hepatic marker enzymes and bilirubin content compared with the control (P < 0.05. Pre-treatment with the flower extract of M. hortensis significantly enhanced the levels of endogenous antioxidants and reduced the levels of hepatic marker enzymes in relation to the CCl 4 treated group (P < 0.05. Balloning degeneration and fatty changes in hepatocytes was prevented by pre-treatment with the flower extract. Conclusion: The antioxidant nature of the flower extract of M. hortensis could be responsible for averting damage to the liver.

  19. Protective Effect of Berberis integerrima Fruit Extract on Carbon-Tetrachloride Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats

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    fereshteh rafiee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Hepatoprotective effect of antioxidants such as flavnoids has been demonstrated. The aim of the present study was to assess the hepatoprotective effect of the methanolic extract of Berberis integerrima fruit (MEBIF on carbon-tetrachloride (CCL4 induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Materials & Methods: Forty male rats were divided into 5 groups as follows: 1 normal, 2 toxicant control (CCL4 was injected intraperitoneally (1 mg/kg bw, 3&4 toxicant rats treated with MEBIF at dose 250 and 500 mg/kg bw, and 5 toxicant rats treated with silymarin. At the end of the study, all the rats were sacrificed and some biochemical parameters of serum such as Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST and Alk‌aline Phosphatase (ALP, total proptein, total bilirubin and albumin, and concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD, Catalase (CAT and FRAP (Ferric Reducing/Antioxidant Power in liver tissue hemogenate were estimated. The Data was analyzed by one way variance analysis and Tukey’s test using SPSS 21. Results: injection of CCl4 significantly (P≤001/0 increased levels of ALT, AST, ALP, total bilirubin and MDA and decreased levels of total protein, albumin CAT, SOD (P≤ (001/0and FRAP in toxicant rats. In groups toxicant + Berberis (250&500 and toxicant + silymarin restored these changes to normal levels. Histopathological findings are cosistent with biochemical findings. Conclusion: MEBIF have a hepatoprotective effect on CCL4- induced hepatic damage in rats and these effects might be contributed to modulation of detoxification enzymes and antioxidant and free radical scavenger effects.

  20. Pharmacological investigation of Polyherbal formulation on Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4-induced liver damage in wistar rats

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    Hardik Soni

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate effect of Polyherbal formulation on Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4-induced liver damage in wistar rats. Methods: Wistar albino rats weighing 180-230 g either sex were used. The selected animals were divided in to four groups where each group consisted of six animals. Experimentally liver damage was produced by intra-peritoneal administration of CCl4 and olive oil mixture (1:1 v/v (1 mL/kg, once daily, i.p. for 7 days. Test Drug, Polyherbal formulation was administered orally for 7 consecutive days at 3 mL/kg, once daily. On 8th day, Blood samples were collected to evaluate different serum biochemical parameters like Aspartate aminotransferase (AST, Alanine aminotransferase (ALT, Alkaline phosphatase (ALP, Total bilirubin and Total protein. Liver from animals of each group was dissected out for histopathological examination. Statistical analysis: Statistical calculation were done by analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by post hoc Dunnett’s test, with significant level of p<0.05. Results and dDiscussion: Polyherbal formulation showed significant effect on activity levels of serum AST, ALT, ALP and total bilirubin level while comparing test group to disease control group. It also showed significant elevation in decreased level of serum total protein. Pre-treatment of Polyherbal formulation restored the hepatic architecture and protected the liver tissue from fatty degenerative changes by preventing the toxic chemical reaction induced by CCl4. Conclusion: Finding of this study concludes that Polyherbal formulation (Vasuliv Syrup has promising hepatoprotective activity against CCl4-induced liver damage. It can be employed as safe and effective treatment for hepato-toxicity or liver damage.

  1. Hepatoprotective effect of Matrine salvianolic acid B salt on Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Hepatic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of Matrine salvianolic acid B salt on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats. Salvianolic acid B and Matrine has long been used to treat liver fibrosis. Matrine salvianolic acid B salt is a new compound containing Salvianolic acid B and Matrine. Hepatic fibrosis induced by CCl4 was studied in animal models using Wistar rats. Organ coefficient, serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), hexadecenoic acid (HA), laminin (LN), hydroxyproline (Hyp), and glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) in liver tissues were measured, respectively. Histopathological changes in the livers were studied by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining and Masson Trichrome (MT) examination. The expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was observed by immunohistochemical analysis. A significant reduction in serum levels of AST, ALT, HA, LN and Hyp was observed in the Matrine salvianolic acid B salt treated groups, suggesting that the salt had hepatoprotective effects. The depletion of GSH and SOD, as well as MDA accumulation in liver tissues was suppressed by Matrine salvianolic acid B salt too. The expression of TGF-β1 and α-SMA measured by immunohistology was significantly reduced by Matrine salvianolic acid B salt in a dose-dependent manner. Matrine salvianolic acid B salt treatment attenuated the necro-inflammation and fibrogenesis induced by CCl4 injection, and thus it is promising as a therapeutic anti-fibrotic agent against hepatic fibrosis. PMID:22559721

  2. Hepatoprotective effect of Matrine salvianolic acid B salt on Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Hepatic Fibrosis

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    Gao Hong-Ying

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of Matrine salvianolic acid B salt on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats. Salvianolic acid B and Matrine has long been used to treat liver fibrosis. Matrine salvianolic acid B salt is a new compound containing Salvianolic acid B and Matrine. Hepatic fibrosis induced by CCl4 was studied in animal models using Wistar rats. Organ coefficient, serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, hexadecenoic acid (HA, laminin (LN, hydroxyproline (Hyp, and glutathione (GSH, malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD in liver tissues were measured, respectively. Histopathological changes in the livers were studied by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E staining and Masson Trichrome (MT examination. The expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA was observed by immunohistochemical analysis. A significant reduction in serum levels of AST, ALT, HA, LN and Hyp was observed in the Matrine salvianolic acid B salt treated groups, suggesting that the salt had hepatoprotective effects. The depletion of GSH and SOD, as well as MDA accumulation in liver tissues was suppressed by Matrine salvianolic acid B salt too. The expression of TGF-β1 and α-SMA measured by immunohistology was significantly reduced by Matrine salvianolic acid B salt in a dose-dependent manner. Matrine salvianolic acid B salt treatment attenuated the necro-inflammation and fibrogenesis induced by CCl4 injection, and thus it is promising as a therapeutic anti-fibrotic agent against hepatic fibrosis.

  3. Solanum muricatum Aiton Juice as A Hepatoprotective Agent in Wistar Rats Induced With Carbon Tetrachloride

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    Justine Sim Wei Yang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Liver participates in various metabolic processes in human body. Exposures to toxins such as carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 results in hepatocyte destruction and release the cell contents. Enzymes such as serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT were used as a parameter to diagnose liver damage. Pepino (Solanum muricatum Aiton contains antioxidants that protect liver from hepatoxicity. The aim of this experiment is to determine the effect of pepino in protecting the hepatocyte from hepatotoxic effect of CCl4. Methods: A total of 16 Wistar rats used as the subject were divided into Control and Therapeutic Group. The Control group was induced with CCl4 but was not given pepino juice. Meanwhile, the Therapeutic Group was given pepino juice for 10 days. For induction of hepatotoxicity, CCl4 10% was given at a dosage of 2.0 ml/kg intra-peritoneal. Each Wistar rat in Therapeutic Group was given 1.0 ml of 300 g/ml pepino juice via oral feeding. Spectrophotometer with adjusted wavelength of 340 nm was used to measure SGPT level of the Wistar rats and statistical T-test was used to analyze the data. Results: Wistar rats in Therapeutic group showed a larger decrease (6898.9 IU/L–79.1 IU/L in SGPT level compared to the Control group (6469.8 IU/L–418.5 IU/L. The SGPT level of the Wistar rat in Therapeutic group reached normal baseline (50 IU/L–150 IU/L. The significance of the experiment was supported by the T-test, P-value <0.05 Discussion: Pepino juice had antioxidants that protect the hepatocyte of Wistar rats from free radicals. The synergistic action of antioxidants and hepatocyte regeneration of Wistar rats in Therapeutic group caused a decrease in SGPT level. Therefore, the experiment concluded that pepino juice at the dosage of 300 g/ml has hepatoprotective effect.

  4. Propolis protects CYP 2E1 enzymatic activity and oxidative stress induced by carbon tetrachloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadauria, Monika; Nirala, Satendra Kumar; Shukla, Sangeeta

    2007-08-01

    Induction of CYP 2E1 by carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) is one of the central pathways by which CCl(4) generates oxidative stress in hepatocytes. Experimental liver injury was induced in rats by CCl(4) to determine toxicological actions on CYP 2E1 by microsomal drug metabolizing enzymes. In this report, ethanolic extract of propolis at a dose of 200 mg/kg (po) was used after 24 h of toxicant administration to validate its protective potential. Intraperitoneal injection of CCl(4) (1.5 ml/kg) induced hepatotoxicity after 24 h of its administration that was associated with elevated malonyldialdehyde (index of lipid peroxidation), lactate dehydrogenase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase release (index of a cytotoxic effect). Hepatic microsomal drug metabolizing enzymes of CYP 2E1 showed sharp depletion as assessed by estimating aniline hydroxylase and amidopyrine N-demethylase activity after CCl(4) exposure. Toxic effect of CCl(4) was evident on CYP 2E1 activity by increased hexobarbitone induced sleep time and bromosulphalein retention. Propolis extract showed significant improvement in the activity of both enzymes and suppressed toxicant induced increase in sleep time and bromosulphalein retention. Choleretic activity of liver did not show any sign of toxicity after propolis treatment at a dose of 200 mg/kg (id). Histopathological evaluation of the liver revealed that propolis reduced the incidence of liver lesions including hepatocyte swelling and lymphocytic infiltrations induced by CCl(4). Electron microscopic observations also showed improvement in ultrastructure of liver and substantiated recovery in biochemical parameters. Protective activity of propolis at 200 mg/kg dose was statistically compared with positive control silymarin (50 mg/kg, po), a known hepatoprotective drug seems to be better in preventing hepatic CYP 2E1 activity deviated by CCl(4). These results lead us to speculate that propolis may play hepatoprotective role via improved CYP 2E1 activity and

  5. Dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride by the catalyzed Fe-Cu process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Wen-ying; GAO Ting-yao

    2007-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction characteristics of carbon tetrachloride (CT) were investigated using cyclic voltammetry in this study. In addition, the difference in reduction mechanisms of CT between Master Builders' iron and the catalyzed Fe-Cu process was discussed. The results showed that CT was reduced directly on the surface of copper rather than by atomic hydrogen produced at the cathode in the catalyzed Fe-Cu process. The reduction was realized largely by atomic hydrogen in Master Builders' iron. The entire CT in 350 ml aqueous solution with 320 mg/L was reduced to trichloromethane and dichloromethane in 2.25 h when 100 g of scrap iron with Fe/Cu ratio of 10:1 (w/w) were used. Moreover, the reduction rate slowed with time. CT could be reduced at acidic, neutral and alkaline pH from solution by Fe-Cu bimetallic media, but the mechanisms were different. The degradation rate was not significantly influenced by pH in the catalyzed Fe-Cu process; in Master Builders' iron it clearly increased with decreasing pH. The kinetics of the reductions followed pseudo-first order in both cases. Furthermore, the reductions under acidic conditions proceeded faster than that under the neutral and alkaline conditions. The catalyzed Fe-Cu process was superior to Master Builders' iron in treating CT-containing water and this advantage was particularly noticeable under alkaline conditions. The reduction was investigated in the cathode (Cu) and anode (Fe) compartments respectively, the results showed that the direct reduction pathway played an important role in the reduction by the catalyzed Fe-Cu process. The catalyzed Fe-Cu process is of practical value.

  6. Contribution of mononuclear bone marrow cells to carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-Qiang Cao; Ji-Zong Lin; Yue-Si Zhong; Shao-Bin Huang; Nan Lin; Zhao-Feng Tang; Rui Chen; Peng Xiang; Rui-Yun Xu

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To study the inhibitory effect of mononuclear bone marrow cell (BMC) transplantation on carbon tetrachloride (CCIt) -induced liver fibrosis in rats.METHODS:Rat liver fibrosis models were induced by CCN and alcohol administration. After 8 wk,twenty rats were randomly allocated into treatment group (n = 10) and control group (n = 10). BMC were infused into the rats in treatment group via the portal vein,while heparinized saline was infused in control group. CCU was hypodermically injected into the rats twice a week for 4 wk. At the end of wk 12,all rats were humanely sacrificed. Liver samples were taken and stained with HE or Masson trichrome. The general conditions,liver fibrSsis (hydroxyproline and collagen fibre) and liver pathological grades in rats were evaluated.± 128.8μg/g in treatment group,and 596.0 ± 341. 8μg/g in control group.The percentage of collagen fibre was 3.75% ± 0.98% in treatment group and 5.02% ± 0.44% in control group.There was a significant difference berween the two groups (P<0.05).Liver pathological grade decreased from grade Ⅳ to grade Ⅲ partially in treatment group (P<0.05) with no obvious improvement in control group (P<0.05).There was a significant difference between treatment group and control group(P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Transplantation of BMC can improve liver fibrosis due to chronic liver injury in rats.

  7. A Historical Perspective on Primary and Possible Secondary Sources of Atmospheric Carbon Tetrachloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hanwant B.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric sources of Carbon Tetrachloride (CTC) have been controversial since its detection in the early 1970. Initial proposals were that it is globally uniformly distributed and its lack of current emissions and inferred lifetime indicated that it was likely of natural origin. Historical analysis of CTC use and emissions showed that atmospheric CTC was long-lived and mainly of man-made origin although small natural sources and sinks (e. g. oceans) could not be ruled out. This deduction was hard because a majority of emissions had occurred in early part of the 20th century when CTC was commonly used as a fumigant, a solvent, and a raw material for the manufacture of many chemicals. In the 1940's adverse health effects of exposure to CTC became evident and its emissions were greatly curtailed and substituted with C2Cl4 which was thought to be much safer. There were smog chamber studies that showed that C2Cl4, a widely used solvent during the late 20th century, could produce CTC with up to a 7% yield. Subsequently it was discovered that this chemistry probably required Cl atoms and since Cl atoms were not abundant in the atmosphere actual yields based on OH oxidation were probably closer to 0.1%. CTC was subsequently banned by the Montreal Protocol to prevent stratospheric ozone depletion and its preferred substitute C2Cl4 was also banned by EPA for reasons of potential carcinogenicity and toxicity. CTC since has been measured in many airborne NASA campaigns in which plumes have been sampled from a variety of regions which may still be emitting CTC. I will briefly discuss this historical perspective of CTC and show some recent data that may shed light on its current sources or lack there off.

  8. Melatonin enhances mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis in rats with carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Woo; Hong, Jeong-Min; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2016-05-01

    Liver fibrosis leads to liver cirrhosis and failure, and no effective treatment is currently available. Growing evidence supports a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and liver fibrogenesis and mitochondrial quality control-based therapy has emerged as a new therapeutic target. We investigated the protective mechanisms of melatonin against mitochondrial dysfunction-involved liver fibrosis, focusing on mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis. Rats were treated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) dissolved in olive oil (0.5 mL/kg, twice a week, i.p.) for 8 wk. Melatonin was administered orally at 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg once a day. Chronic CCl4 exposure induced collagen deposition, hepatocellular damage, and oxidative stress, and melatonin attenuated these increases. Increases in mRNA and protein expression levels of transforming growth factor β1 and α-smooth muscle actin in response to CCl4 were attenuated by melatonin. Melatonin attenuated hallmarks of mitochondrial dysfunction, such as mitochondrial swelling and glutamate dehydrogenase release. Chronic CCl4 exposure impaired mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis, and melatonin attenuated this impairment, as indicated by increases in mitochondrial DNA and in protein levels of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1); Parkin; peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1α (PGC-1α); nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1); and transcription factor A, mitochondrial (TFAM). CCl4-mediated decreases in mitochondrial fission- and fusion-related proteins, such as dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) and mitofusin 2, were also attenuated by melatonin. Moreover, melatonin induced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation. These results suggest that melatonin protects against liver fibrosis via upregulation of mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis, and may be useful as an anti-fibrotic treatment.

  9. Hepatoprotective Potential of Propolis toward Hepar Injury Rats (Rattus norvegicus Induced by Carbon Tetrachloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diah Krisnansari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prevalence of chronic liver disease continues to increase. One potentially hepatotoxic substances that cause chronic liver disease is carbon tetrachloride. The process of liver damage can be prevented by the antioxidant role of propolis. The aims of this research was to study the hepatoprotective potential of propolis toward hepar injury rats induced by carbon tetrachlorida. Method: This was an experimental study with pre-post test. Twenty five male Wistar rats aged 12–16 week old, weighing 125–200 gr were allocated into 5 groups. Group I: standard meal + aquadest-gavage; group II: standard meal + CCl4 1% 1 mL + aquadest-gavage, group III: standard meal + CCl4 1% 1 mL + 0,054 gr propolis-gavage, group IV: standard meal + CCl4 1% 1 mL + 0,108 gr propolis-gavage and group V: standard meal + CCl4 1% 1 mL + sylimarin 50 mg/kg-gavage. IL-6, SOD, NAS score+fibrotic were measured after treatment. Analysed of IL-6 and NAS score+fibrotic with Kruskal Wallis to Mann Whitney and analysed of SOD with One-Way ANOVA to LSD. Results: The study showed that there were significant differences in IL-6, SOD and NAS score + fibrotic between groups. Discussion: Provision of 0,054 gr and 0,108 gr have hepatoprotective potential toward hepar injury rats induced by carbon tetrachlorida. Further research need to identify antioxidants and hepatoprotective potential of propolis on human with liver disease. Keywords: IL-6, SOD, fibrotic, propolis

  10. Metallocoenzyme-mediated reductive transformation of carbon tetrachloride in titanium (III) citrate aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, P.C.; Reinhard, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Transformation pathways for carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) catalyzed by hematin or vitamin B{sub 12} in aqueous titanium(III) citrate solution are proposed. The reaction of CCl{sub 4} with B{sub 12} was zero order in CCl{sub 4} and first order in B{sub 12}, and the rate constant was measured from pH 7.3 to pH 10.3. The proposed rate-limiting step is the reduction of the stable trichloromethylcobalamin (CCl{sub 3}-Cbl) intermediate by titanium(III) citrate at alkaline pH and the sterically induced CCl{sub 3}-Cbl decomposition at neutral pH. The reaction kinetics can be described by a modified Michaelis-Menten model in the saturated regime. With hematin, only the pseudo-first-order rate constant was determined due to the significant deactivation of the coenzyme. The turnover number of hematin (molecules of CCl{sub 4} transformed/molecule of hematin deactivated) was 27 at pH 8.0 and 42 at pH 9.9. Vitamin B{sub 12} was a more stable and more effective catalyst (on a molar basis) than hematin with respect to CCl{sub 4}. Chloroform (CHCl{sub 3}) was the primary product in titanium(III) citrate solution, and the yield was a function of pH, Ti(III) concentration, and organic content regardless of whether a coenzyme was present or which coenzyme was used. Although B{sub 12} and hematin can both enhance the CCl{sub 4} transformation rate, they have little effect on the CHCl{sub 3} yield. Titanium(III) citrate, on the other hand, controls not only the transformation rate but also CHCl{sub 3} formation. 77 refs., 10 figs.

  11. Hepatoprotective effects of licochalcone B on carbon tetrachloride-induced liver toxicity in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Teng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The objective of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of licochalcone B (LCB in a mice model of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4-induced liver toxicity. Materials and Methods: Hepatotoxicity was induced in mice by a single subcutaneous injection (SC of CCl4. The LCB was administered orally once a day for seven days (PO as pretreatment at three doses of 1, 5, and 25 mg/kg/day. The levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD, malondialdehyde (MDA, glutathione (GSH, glutathione disulfide (GSSG, C-reactive protein (CRP, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST were analyzed by ELISA. The protein expression degrees of p38 mitogen activated protein kinases (p38 and nuclear factor-k-gene binding (NF-κB were assayed by western blotting. Results: CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity was manifested by an increase in the levels of ALT, AST, MDA, IL-6, CRP, and TNF-ɑ, and a decrease in the SOD level and GSH/GSSG ratio in the serum. The histopathological examination of the liver sections revealed necrosis and inflammatory reactions. Pretreatment with LCB decreased the levels of ALT, AST, MDA, GSSG, IL-6, CRP, TNF-ɑ, and the protein expression of p38 and NF-κB, increased the level of SOD and GSH, and normalized the hepatic histo-architecture. Conclusion: LCB protected the liver from CCl4-induced injury. Protection may be due to inhibition of p38 and NFκB signaling, which subsequently reduced inflammation in the liver.

  12. The effects of grape seed and colchicine on carbon tetrachloride induced hepatic damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atasever, Ayhan; Yaman, Duygu

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to determine the effects of grape seed and colchicine on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced hepatic damage and on some serum biochemical parameters. Sixty male Wistar albino rats (200-250 g) were randomly divided into six groups (ten rats/group) and included the control group the group were given isotonic sodium chloride (1 mL/kg b.w) intraperitonealy (i.p.), group 2 the group treated i.p. injection of CCl4 (1.0 mL/kg b.w) in corn oil twice in the first week, Groups 3 and 4 injected with CCl4 as described for group 2 and the rats were orally given (100 mg/kg b.w) GSE and i.p. injected (10 μg/rat) with colchicine for four weeks, respectively and groups 5 and 6 were the grape seed and colchicine control groups in which rats were orally given grape seed (100 mg/kg b.w) and i.p. injected with colchicine (10 μg/rat), respectively. Anorexia, weight loss, motionlessness and hepatic colour variation at necropsy were observed in groups 2, 3, and 4. Hyperemia, focal bleeding, fat degeneration, changes ranging from degenerative to necrotic, increase in connective tissue elements, pronounced in portal sites in particular, and infiltration of lymphoid series cell observed in the livers of the rats in group 2, treated with CCl4. Histological hepatic changes in the rats in group 3 and 4 were similar to those in group 2. The levels of serum total protein, albumin and globulin decreased in groups 2, 3, and 4, compared with groups 1, 5 and 6; aspartate transaminase (ALT) activities increased. The lowest alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities were in groups 4 and 5. We concluded that GSE and colchicine have not sufficient ameliorative effects to CCl4 induced acute hepatic damage.

  13. Hepatoprotective effects of Bupleurum exalatum extracts against carbon tetrachloride induced liver injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    s Roozbehi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Some of natural and synthetic products have antioxidant properties which protect the liver against the destructive factors. This study aimed to investigate the effect of Bupleurum exelatum (B. exalatum extracts on rat liver. Material and method: This experimental study was conducted at Yasouj University of Medical Sciences in 2013 on 50 healthy adult male Wistar rats. Animals were randomly divided into five equal groups: the normal group (receiving, olive oil, control and experiment groups receiving different dose of carbon tetrachloride and olive oil. The experiment group was given daily doses of 75, 150 and 300 mg per Kg of B. exalatum extract by gavage respectively. After two months, the liver enzymes, total protein, albumin and bilirubin in animal’s sera were measured. Data were analyzed by the SPSS software, using ANOVA and tuky-test. Result: The toxicant significantly (P < 0.05 increased the levels of ALT, AST, ALP, TB, DB, and decrease the level of TP and ALB. Oral administration of B. exalatum extracts showed a significant (P < 0.05 decrease in all the elevated serum and significant increase (P < 0.05 in TP and ALB levels at all usage doses. These results indicate the maximum recovery was observed in 300 mg/kg/day. The histopathological changes i.e. fatty changes, necrosis etc were partly or fully prevented in animals treated with the extracts. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the extract of B. exalatum possessed hepatoprotective activity, which could be linked to their phytochemical constituents and antioxidant activity this therefore requires further in-depth studies.

  14. Hepatoprotective effect of commercial herbal extracts on carbon tetrachloride-induced liver damage in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Cordero-Pérez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Various hepatoprotective herbal products from plants are available in Mexico, where up to 85% of patients with liver disease use some form of complementary and alternative medicine. However, only few studies have reported on the biological evaluation of these products. Objective : Using a model of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 -induced hepatotoxicity in rats, we evaluated the effects of commercial herbal extracts used most commonly in the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Mexico. Materials and Methods : The commercial products were identified through surveys in public areas. The effect of these products given with or without CCl4 in rats was evaluated by measuring the serum concentrations of aspartate amino transferase (AST and alanine amino transferase (ALT, and histopathological analysis. Legalon® was used as the standard drug. Results : The most commonly used herbal products were Hepatisan® capsules, Boldo capsules, Hepavida® capsules, Boldo infusion, and milk thistle herbal supplement (80% silymarin. None of the products tested was hepatotoxic according to transaminase and histological analyses. AST and ALT activities were significantly lower in the Hepavida+CCl4 -treated group as compared with the CCl4 -only group. AST and ALT activities in the silymarin, Hepatisan, and Boldo tea groups were similar to those in the CCl4 group. The CCl4 group displayed submassive confluent necrosis and mixed inflammatory infiltration. Both the Hepatisan+CCl4 and Boldo tea+CCl4 groups exhibited ballooning degeneration, inflammatory infiltration, and lytic necrosis. The silymarin+CCl4 group exhibited microvesicular steatosis. The Hepavida+CCl4 - and Legalon+CCL4 -treated groups had lower percentages of necrotic cells as compared with the CCl4 -treated group; this treatment was hepatoprotective against necrosis. Conclusion : Only Hepavida had a hepatoprotective effect.

  15. Restrictive model of compensated carbon tetrachloride-induced cirrhosis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean-Marc Regimbeau; David Fuks; Niaz Kohneh-Shahri; Benoit Terris; Olivier Soubrane

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To develop a simplified and quick protocol to induce cirrhosis and standardize models of partial liver resection in rats.METHODS: In Fischer F344 rats two modified protocols of phenobarbital-carbon tetrachloride (CCI4) (dilution 50%) gavage to induce cirrhosis (frequency adjusted according to weight, but each subsequent dose was systematically administered) were tested, i.e. the rapid and slow protocols. Prothrombin time (PT) and total bilirubin (TB) were also evaluated. Animals from the rapid group underwent 15% hepatectomy and animals from the slow group underwent 70% hepatectomy.RESULTS: Rapid protocol: This corresponded to 1 garage/4 d over 6 wk (mortality 30%). Mean PT was 35.2±2.8 s (normal: 14.5 s), and mean TB was 1.8±0.2mg/clL (normal: 0.1 mg/dL). Slow protocol: This corresponded to 1 gavage/6 d over 9 wk (mortality 10%).Mean PT was 11.8±0.2 s (normal: 14.5 s), and mean TB was 0.4 ± 0.04 mg/dL (normal: 0.1 mg/dL). Pathological analyses were performed in both protocols which showed persistent cirrhosis at 3 mo. Rat mortality in the rapid garage group who underwent 15% hepatectomy and in the slow garage group who underwent 70%hepatectomy was 50% and 70%, respectively.CONCLUSION: Our modified model is a simplified method to induce cirrhosis which is rapid (6 to 9 wk),efficient and stable up to 3 mo. Using this method, "Child Pugh A" or "Child Pugh BC" cirrhotic rats were obtained.Our models of cirrhosis and hepatectomy can be used in various situations focusing on postoperative survival.

  16. Hepatoprotective effect of Stachys pilifera ethanol extract in carbon tetrachloride-induce hepatotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahi Kokhdan, Esmaeel; Ahmadi, Kyomarth; Sadeghi, Heibatollah; Sadeghi, Hossein; Dadgary, Fahemeh; Danaei, Nazanin; Aghamaali, Mahmoud Reza

    2017-12-01

    Stachys pilifera Benth (Lamiaceae) has long been used to treat infectious diseases, respiratory and rheumatoid disorders in Iranian folk medicine. Antitumor and antioxidant activity of the plant have been reported. The study was designed to assess the hepatoprotective activity of ethanol extract of Stachys pilifera in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. The rats were randomly divided into six equal groups (n = 7). Group I was treated with normal saline; Group II received CCl4 (1 mL/kg. i.p., twice a week) for 60 consecutive days; Groups III, IV and V were given CCl4 plus Stachys pilifera (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg/d,p.o.); Group VI received the extract (400 mg/kg/d, p.o.). Histopathological analysis and measurement of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), malondialdehyde (MDA), total protein (TP) and albumin (ALB) were performed. CCl4 caused a significant increase in the serum levels of AST, ALT, ALP and MDA as well as decreased ALB, and TP serum levels (p < 0.001). The extract (200 and 400 mg/kg/d) significantly normalized the CCl4-elevated levels of ALT, AST, ALP and MDA (p < 0.001). The extract (200 and 400 mg/kg/d) also increased the serum levels of TP compared to CCl4 group (p< 0.01). The extract (200 and 400 mg/kg/d) also decreased the histological injuries (inflammation and fatty degeneration) by CCl4. The results revealed that the Stachys pilifera extract could provide considerable protection against CCl4 hepatotoxicity in rats that may be related to its antioxidant properties.

  17. Hydrate bearing clayey sediments: Formation and gas production concepts

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Jaewon

    2016-06-20

    Hydro-thermo-chemo and mechanically coupled processes determine hydrate morphology and control gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments. Force balance, together with mass and energy conservation analyses anchored in published data provide robust asymptotic solutions that reflect governing processes in hydrate systems. Results demonstrate that hydrate segregation in clayey sediments results in a two-material system whereby hydrate lenses are surrounded by hydrate-free water-saturated clay. Hydrate saturation can reach ≈2% by concentrating the excess dissolved gas in the pore water and ≈20% from metabolizable carbon. Higher hydrate saturations are often found in natural sediments and imply methane transport by advection or diffusion processes. Hydrate dissociation is a strongly endothermic event; the available latent heat in a reservoir can sustain significant hydrate dissociation without triggering ice formation during depressurization. The volume of hydrate expands 2-to-4 times upon dissociation or CO2single bondCH4 replacement. Volume expansion can be controlled to maintain lenses open and to create new open mode discontinuities that favor gas recovery. Pore size is the most critical sediment parameter for hydrate formation and gas recovery and is controlled by the smallest grains in a sediment. Therefore any characterization must carefully consider the amount of fines and their associated mineralogy.

  18. Mechanism of Enhanced Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Based TiO2 Films Treated by Titanium Tetrachloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾隆月; 戴松元; 王孔嘉; 潘旭; 史成武; 郭力

    2004-01-01

    Performance of dye-sensitized solar cells can be improved by treating the nanoporous TiO2 films with titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) aqueous solution. We explore the reason why the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells is enhanced by this method. It is found that the effect of TiCl4 treatment not only reduces the films surface area and improves the electronic contact, but also enhances the binding of N719 with the TiO2 films surface.

  19. Full molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water and carbon tetrachloride for two-dimensional Raman spectroscopy in the frequency domain

    CERN Document Server

    Jo, Ju-Yeon; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Frequency-domain two-dimensional Raman signals, which are equivalent to coherent two-dimensional Raman scattering (COTRAS) signals, for liquid water and carbon tetrachloride were calculated using an equilibrium-nonequilibrium hybrid MD simulation algorithm. We elucidate mechanisms governing the 2D signal pro?les involving anharmonic mode-mode coupling and the nonlinearities of the polarizability for the intermolecular and intramolecular vibrational modes. The predicted signal pro?les and intensities can be utilized to analyze recently developed single-beam 2D spectra, whose signals are generated from a coherently controlled pulse, allowing the single-beam measurement to be carried out more efficiently.

  20. Protective Effect of the Persian Gulf brittle star Ophiocoma Erinaceus extract on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 induced liver damage in adult male Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Soheili

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim:  Brittle star possess  bioactive compounds which confer the wound healing capacity and regenerative potency of damaged  arms and organisms to this creature. The aim of the current study was to assess the   protective  effect  of  the  star extract on liver damages induced by carbon tetrachloride in adult male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 32 adult male rats were randomly divided into 4 equal groups: control, Sham exposed, experimental 1 (treated with %25 extract and experimental 2 (treated with %50 extract of star Ophiocoma Erinaceus. The control group received no treatment. The sham exposed groups received carbon tetrachloride .(50% in olive oil .0.5 ml/kg for 7 days. The experimental groups firstly received carbon tetrachloride, then received %25, %50 brittle star extract as intragastric for 7 days. Finally, the animals were sacrificed, and their bodies and livers were weighed. Then, the livers sections were prepared and were examined by means of light microscope. Finally, the obtained  quantitative data was analyzed using SPSS (V; 20, Mini Tab software, ANOVA, and Tukey. at the significant level of P<0.001. Results: Carbon tetrachloride significantly decreased the rats’ body weight, but it increased their livers weight (P<0.001. Histopathological evaluations showed .extensive liver damage. On the other hand, treatment with brittle star extract .ncreased liver weight, reduced. body weight and significantly altered other induced changes by carbon tetrachloride on liver structure such as hepatocytes number, Kupffer cells, and arteritis, which indicated  the improvement of damaged liver tissue (P<0.001. Conclusion: It was found that brittle star extract can exert protective effects on  liver damages induced by carbon tetrachloride on male Wistar rat.

  1. Foam drilling in natural gas hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Na

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The key problem of foam drilling in natural gas hydrate is prediction of characteristic parameters of bottom hole. The simulation shows that when the well depth increases, the foam mass number reduces and the pressure increases. At the same depth, pressure in drill string is always higher than annulus. The research findings provide theoretical basis for safety control.

  2. Alkali binding in hydrated Portland cement paste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, W.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2010-01-01

    The alkali-binding capacity of C–S–H in hydrated Portland cement pastes is addressed in this study. The amount of bound alkalis in C–S–H is computed based on the alkali partition theories firstly proposed by Taylor (1987) and later further developed by Brouwers and Van Eijk (2003). Experimental data

  3. A positron annihilation study of hydrated DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warman, J. M.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1986-01-01

    Positron annihilation measurements are reported for hydrated DNA as a function of water content and as a function of temperature (20 to -180.degree. C) for samples containing 10 and 50% wt of water. The ortho-positronium mean lifetime and its intensity show distinct variations with the degree...

  4. Hydration of protein–RNA recognition sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Amita; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the role of water molecules in 89 protein–RNA complexes taken from the Protein Data Bank. Those with tRNA and single-stranded RNA are less hydrated than with duplex or ribosomal proteins. Protein–RNA interfaces are hydrated less than protein–DNA interfaces, but more than protein–protein interfaces. Majority of the waters at protein–RNA interfaces makes multiple H-bonds; however, a fraction do not make any. Those making H-bonds have preferences for the polar groups of RNA than its partner protein. The spatial distribution of waters makes interfaces with ribosomal proteins and single-stranded RNA relatively ‘dry’ than interfaces with tRNA and duplex RNA. In contrast to protein–DNA interfaces, mainly due to the presence of the 2′OH, the ribose in protein–RNA interfaces is hydrated more than the phosphate or the bases. The minor groove in protein–RNA interfaces is hydrated more than the major groove, while in protein–DNA interfaces it is reverse. The strands make the highest number of water-mediated H-bonds per unit interface area followed by the helices and the non-regular structures. The preserved waters at protein–RNA interfaces make higher number of H-bonds than the other waters. Preserved waters contribute toward the affinity in protein–RNA recognition and should be carefully treated while engineering protein–RNA interfaces. PMID:25114050

  5. Binding Hydrated Anions with Hydrophobic Pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokkalingam, Punidha; Shraberg, Joshua; Rick, Steven W; Gibb, Bruce C

    2016-01-13

    Using a combination of isothermal titration calorimetry and quantum and molecular dynamics calculations, we demonstrate that relatively soft anions have an affinity for hydrophobic concavity. The results are consistent with the anions remaining partially hydrated upon binding, and suggest a novel strategy for anion recognition.

  6. Obsidian Hydration Dating in the Undergraduate Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manche, Emanuel P.; Lakatos, Stephen

    1986-01-01

    Provides an overview of obsidian hydration dating for the instructor by presenting: (1) principles of the method; (2) procedures; (3) applications; and (4) limitations. The theory of the method and one or more laboratory exercises can be easily introduced into the undergraduate geology curriculum. (JN)

  7. Obsidian Hydration Dating in the Undergraduate Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manche, Emanuel P.; Lakatos, Stephen

    1986-01-01

    Provides an overview of obsidian hydration dating for the instructor by presenting: (1) principles of the method; (2) procedures; (3) applications; and (4) limitations. The theory of the method and one or more laboratory exercises can be easily introduced into the undergraduate geology curriculum. (JN)

  8. [Terminal phase hydration, pain and delirium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heick, A.

    2009-01-01

    Hydration of the terminal patient may relieve confusion and complaints of "dry mouth". But it may worsen oedema of the brain, lungs, and extremities, worsen terminal rattling and cause a need for frequent changing of diapers. The decision of whether and how to treat a dying patient with fluids...

  9. Acoustic Determination of Methane Hydrate Disssociation Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    centered- cubic orientation which forms naturally in deep oceans from biogenic gases. It is worth not- ing that this molecular geometry can trap great...until January 2010. At that time, the hydrates were packed in a dewar with liquid nitrogen and shipped from the storage fa- cility at the Naval Research

  10. Hydration of Acetylene: A 125th Anniversary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Dmitry A.; Shevchenko, Sergey M.

    2007-01-01

    The year 2006 is the 125th anniversary of a chemical reaction, the discovery of which by Mikhail Kucherov had a profound effect on the development of industrial chemistry in the 19-20th centuries. This was the hydration of alkynes catalyzed by mercury ions that made possible industrial production of acetaldehyde from acetylene. Historical…

  11. Hydration dynamics near a model protein surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-09-01

    The evolution of water dynamics from dilute to very high concentration solutions of a prototypical hydrophobic amino acid with its polar backbone, N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA), is studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation for both the completely deuterated and completely hydrogenated leucine monomer. We observe several unexpected features in the dynamics of these biological solutions under ambient conditions. The NALMA dynamics shows evidence of de Gennes narrowing, an indication of coherent long timescale structural relaxation dynamics. The translational water dynamics are analyzed in a first approximation with a jump diffusion model. At the highest solute concentrations, the hydration water dynamics is significantly suppressed and characterized by a long residential time and a slow diffusion coefficient. The analysis of the more dilute concentration solutions takes into account the results of the 2.0M solution as a model of the first hydration shell. Subtracting the first hydration layer based on the 2.0M spectra, the translational diffusion dynamics is still suppressed, although the rotational relaxation time and residential time are converged to bulk-water values. Molecular dynamics analysis shows spatially heterogeneous dynamics at high concentration that becomes homogeneous at more dilute concentrations. We discuss the hydration dynamics results of this model protein system in the context of glassy systems, protein function, and protein-protein interfaces.

  12. Anaerobic oxidation of methane above gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, NE Pacific Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treude, T.; Boetius, A.; Knittel, K.;

    2003-01-01

    At Hydrate Ridge (HR), Cascadia convergent margin, surface sediments contain massive gas hydrates formed from methane that ascends together with fluids along faults from deeper reservoirs. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), mediated by a microbial consortium of archaea and sulfate-reducing...... bacteria, generates high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide in the surface sediments. The production of sulfide supports chemosynthetic communities that gain energy from sulfide oxidation. Depending on fluid flow, the surface communities are dominated either by the filamentous sulfur bacteria Beggiatoa...

  13. Modeling DNA hydration: comparison of calculated and experimental hydration properties of nuclic acid bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltev, V I; Malenkov, G G; Gonzalez, E J; Teplukhin, A V; Rein, R; Shibata, M; Miller, J H

    1996-02-01

    Hydration properties of individual nucleic acid bases were calculated and compared with the available experimental data. Three sets of classical potential functions (PF) used in simulations of nucleic acid hydration were juxtaposed: (i) the PF developed by Poltev and Malenkov (PM), (ii) the PF of Weiner and Kollman (WK), which together with Jorgensen's TIP3P water model are widely used in the AMBER program, and (iii) OPLS (optimized potentials for liquid simulations) developed by Jorgensen (J). The global minima of interaction energy of single water molecules with all the natural nucleic acid bases correspond to the formation of two water-base hydrogen bonds (water bridging of two hydrophilic atoms of the base). The energy values of these minima calculated via PM potentials are in somewhat better conformity with mass-spectrometric data than the values calculated via WK PF. OPLS gave much weaker water-base interactions for all compounds considered, thus these PF were not used in further computations. Monte Carlo simulations of the hydration of 9-methyladenine, 1-methyluracil and 1-methylthymine were performed in systems with 400 water molecules and periodic boundary conditions. Results of simulations with PM potentials give better agreement with experimental data on hydration energies than WK PF. Computations with PM PF of the hydration energy of keto and enol tautomers of 9-methylguanine can account for the shift in the tautomeric equilibrium of guanine in aqueous media to a dominance of the keto form in spite of nearly equal intrinsic stability of keto and enol tautomers. The results of guanine hydration computations are discussed in relation to mechanisms of base mispairing errors in nucleic acid biosynthesis. The data presented in this paper along with previous results on simulation of hydration shell structures in DNA duplex grooves provide ample evidence for the advantages of PM PF in studies of nucleic-acid hydration.

  14. Direct measurement of methane hydrate composition along the hydrate equilibrium boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    The composition of methane hydrate, namely nW for CH 4??nWH2O, was directly measured along the hydrate equilibrium boundary under conditions of excess methane gas. Pressure and temperature conditions ranged from 1.9 to 9.7 MPa and 263 to 285 K. Within experimental error, there is no change in hydrate composition with increasing pressure along the equilibrium boundary, but nW may show a slight systematic decrease away from this boundary. A hydrate stoichiometry of n W = 5.81-6.10 H2O describes the entire range of measured values, with an average composition of CH4??5.99(??0.07) H2O along the equilibrium boundary. These results, consistent with previously measured values, are discussed with respect to the widely ranging values obtained by thermodynamic analysis. The relatively constant composition of methane hydrate over the geologically relevant pressure and temperature range investigated suggests that in situ methane hydrate compositions may be estimated with some confidence. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  15. Clathrate Hydrates for Thermal Energy Storage in Buildings: Overview of Proper Hydrate-Forming Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Castellani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing energy costs are at the origin of the great progress in the field of phase change materials (PCMs. The present work aims at studying the application of clathrate hydrates as PCMs in buildings. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline structures in which guest molecules are enclosed in the crystal lattice of water molecules. Clathrate hydrates can form also at ambient pressure and present a high latent heat, and for this reason, they are good candidates for being used as PCMs. The parameter that makes a PCM suitable to be used in buildings is, first of all, a melting temperature at about 25 °C. The paper provides an overview of groups of clathrate hydrates, whose physical and chemical characteristics could meet the requirements needed for their application in buildings. Simulations with a dynamic building simulation tool are carried out to evaluate the performance of clathrate hydrates in enhancing thermal comfort through the moderation of summer temperature swings and, therefore, in reducing energy consumption. Simulations suggest that clathrate hydrates have a potential in terms of improvement of indoor thermal comfort and a reduction of energy consumption for cooling. Cooling effects of 0.5 °C and reduced overheating hours of up to 1.1% are predicted.

  16. MORPHOLOGY OF METHANE HYDRATE HOST SEDIMENTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JONES,K.W.; FENG,H.; TOMOV,S.; WINTER,W.J.; EATON,M.; MAHAJAN,D.

    2004-12-01

    Results from simulated experiments in several laboratories show that host sediments influence hydrate formation in accord with known heterogeneity of host sediments at sites of gas hydrate occurrence (1). For example, in Mackenzie Delta, NWT Canada (Mallik 2L-38 well), coarser-grained units (pore-filling model) are found whereas in the Gulf of Mexico, the found hydrate samples do not appear to be lithologically controlled. We have initiated a systematic study of sediments, initially focusing on samples from various depths at a specific site, to establish a correlation with hydrate occurrence (or variations thereof) to establish differences in their microstructure, porosity, and other associated properties. The synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) set-up at the X-27A tomography beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory was used as a tool to study sediments from Blake Ridge at three sub bottom depths of 0.2, 50, and 667 meters. Results from the tomographic analysis of the deepest sample (667 m) are presented here to illustrate how tomography can be used to obtain new insights into the structures of methane hydrate host sediments. The investigation shows the internal grain/pore space resolution in the microstructure and a 3-D visualization of the connecting pathways obtained following data segmentation into pore space and grains within the sediment sample. The analysis gives the sample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity, as well. An earlier report on the experimental program has been given by Mahajan et al. (2).

  17. China's Research on Non-conventional Energy Resources- Gas Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu Ming; Ma Jianguo

    2002-01-01

    @@ Methane exists in ice-like formations called gas hydrate. Hydrate traps methane molecules inside a cage of frozen water. The magnitude of this previously unknown global storehouse of methane is truly staggering and has raised serious inquiry into the possibility of using methane hydrate as a substitute source of energy for oil and conventional natural gas. According to the estimation by PGC, gas hydrate deposits amount to 7.6 × 1018m3 and contain more than twice as much organic carbon as all the world's coal, oil and non-hydrate natural gas combined.

  18. Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Riedel, M.; Boswell, R.; Presley, J.; Kumar, P.; Sathe, A.; Sethi, A.; Lall, M.; ,

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a naturally occurring “ice-like” combination of natural gas and water that has the potential to serve as an immense resource of natural gas from the world’s oceans and polar regions. However, gas-hydrate recovery is both a scientific and a technical challenge and much remains to be learned about the geologic, engineering, and economic factors controlling the ultimate energy resource potential of gas hydrate. The amount of natural gas contained in the world’s gas-hydrate accumulations is enormous, but these estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 2,800 to 8,000,000 trillion cubic meters of gas. By comparison, conventional natural gas accumulations (reserves and undiscovered, technically recoverable resources) for the world are estimated at approximately 440 trillion cubic meters. Gas recovery from gas hydrate is hindered because the gas is in a solid form and because gas hydrate commonly occurs in remote Arctic and deep marine environments. Proposed methods of gas recovery from gas hydrate generally deal with disassociating or “melting” in situ gas hydrate by heating the reservoir beyond the temperature of gas-hydrate formation, or decreasing the reservoir pressure below hydrate equilibrium. The pace of energy-related gas hydrate assessment projects has accelerated over the past several years.

  19. Solid state interconversion between anhydrous norfloxacin and its hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongcharoen, Wanchai; Byrn, Stephen R; Sutanthavibul, Narueporn

    2008-01-01

    This work is focused on characterizing and evaluating the solid state interconversion of norfloxacin (NF) hydrates. Four stoichiometric NF hydrates, dihydrate, hemipentahydrate, trihydrate, pentahydrate and a disordered NF state, were generated by various methods and characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD), thermal analysis and Karl Fisher titrimetry. XRPD patterns of all NF hydrates exhibited crystalline structures. NF hydrate conversion was studied with respect to mild elevated temperature and various degrees of moisture levels. NF hydrates transformed to anhydrous NF Form A after gentle heating at 60 degrees C for 48 h except dihydrate and trihydrate where mixture in XRPD patterns between anhydrous NF Form A and former structures existed. Desiccation of NF hydrates at 0% RH for 7 days resulted in only partial removal of water molecules from the hydrated structures. The hydrated transitional phase and the disordered NF state were obtained from the incomplete dehydration of NF hydrates after thermal treatment and pentahydrate NF after desiccation, respectively. Anhydrous NF Form A and NF hydrates transformed to pentahydrate NF when exposed to high moisture environment except dihydrate. In conclusion, surrounding moisture levels, temperatures and the duration of exposure strongly influenced the interconversion pathways and stoichiometry of anhydrous NF and its hydrates. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. The in vivo toxicity of carbon tetrachloride and carrageenan on heart microsomes: analysis by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, A M; Perromat, A; Deleris, G

    2001-09-01

    We investigated the sensitivity of rat heart microsomes to free radical attack using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. This physico-chemical method seemed a valuable technique: quite sensitive to changes in the vibrational spectra. The spectral variations observed between normal and treated rats were in great part due to reactive oxygen species that led to changes in protein conformation involving beta-sheets, aggregation of proteins, and modification of protein synthesis. Carrageenan-induced inflammation slightly enhanced the total lipid content; rearrangement of acyl chains and accumulation of cholesterol esters and phospholipids also occurred in the treated rats. Carbon tetrachloride induced a decrease in both lipid and protein contents. The level of glucidic substrates was diminished with carbon tetrachloride and enhanced with carrageenan; these changes were due to metabolic interactions between cell components and drugs. FT-IR spectroscopy provided an accurate means to monitor, in rat heart, the in vivo effects of inflammatory and peroxidative damages, to discriminate and classify the affected cells, and to correlate the findings with known physiological and biochemical data in close relationship with metabolic disruptions induced by the two xenobiotics.