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Sample records for hydrated elastin myoglobin

  1. Reversible and irreversible conformational transitions in myoglobin: role of hydrated amino acid ionic liquid.

    Sankaranarayanan, Kamatchi; Sathyaraj, Gopal; Nair, B U; Dhathathreyan, A

    2012-04-12

    Hydrated phenylalanine ionic liquid (Phe-IL) has been used to solubilize myoglobin (Mb). Structural stability of Mb in Phe-IL analyzed using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that for low levels of hydration of Phe-IL there is a large red shift in the fluorescence emission wavelength and the protein transforms to complete β sheet from its native helical conformation. Rehydration or dilution reverses the β sheet to an α helix which on aging organizes to micrometer-sized fibrils. At concentrations higher than 200 μM, the protein changes from β to a more random coiled structure. Organization of the protein in Phe-IL in a Langmuir film at the air/water interface has been investigated using the surface pressure-molecular area isotherm and shows nearly the same surface tension for both pure Mb and Mb in Phe-IL. Scanning electron microscopy of the films of Mb in Phe-IL transferred using the Langmuir-Blodgett film technique show layered morphology. This study shows that the conformation of Mb is completely reversible going from β → helix → β sheet up to 200 μM of Phe-IL. Similar surface tension values for Mb in water and in Phe-IL suggests that direct ion binding interactions with the protein coupled with the change in local viscosity from the IL seems to not only alter the secondary structure of individual proteins but also drives the self-assembly of the protein molecules leading finally to fibril formation.

  2. Myoglobin urine test

    Urine myoglobin; Heart attack - myoglobin urine test; Myositis - myoglobin urine test; Rhabdomyolysis - myoglobin urine test ... The test involves only normal urination, which should cause no discomfort.

  3. Measurement of the exchange rate of waters of hydration in elastin by 2D T{sub 2}-T{sub 2} correlation nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Sun Cheng; Boutis, Gregory S, E-mail: gboutis@brooklyn.cuny.edu [Brooklyn College, Department of Physics, 2900 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11210 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    We report on a direct measurement of the exchange rate of waters of hydration in elastin by T{sub 2}-T{sub 2} exchange spectroscopy. The exchange rates in bovine nuchal ligament elastin and aortic elastin at temperatures near, below and at the physiological temperature are reported here. Using an inverse Laplace transform (ILT) algorithm, we are able to identify four components in the relaxation times. While three of the components are in good agreement with previous measurements that used multi-exponential fitting, the ILT algorithm distinguishes a fourth component having relaxation times close to that of free water and is identified as water between fibers. With the aid of scanning electron microscopy, a model is proposed that allows for the application of a two-site exchange analysis between any two components for the determination of exchange rates between reservoirs. The results of the measurements support a model (described by Urry and Parker 2002 J. Muscle Res. Cell Motil. 23 543-59) wherein the net entropy of waters of hydration should increase with increasing temperature in the inverse temperature transition.

  4. Measurement of the exchange rate of waters of hydration in elastin by 2D T2-T2 correlation nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Sun Cheng; Boutis, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    We report on a direct measurement of the exchange rate of waters of hydration in elastin by T 2 -T 2 exchange spectroscopy. The exchange rates in bovine nuchal ligament elastin and aortic elastin at temperatures near, below and at the physiological temperature are reported here. Using an inverse Laplace transform (ILT) algorithm, we are able to identify four components in the relaxation times. While three of the components are in good agreement with previous measurements that used multi-exponential fitting, the ILT algorithm distinguishes a fourth component having relaxation times close to that of free water and is identified as water between fibers. With the aid of scanning electron microscopy, a model is proposed that allows for the application of a two-site exchange analysis between any two components for the determination of exchange rates between reservoirs. The results of the measurements support a model (described by Urry and Parker 2002 J. Muscle Res. Cell Motil. 23 543-59) wherein the net entropy of waters of hydration should increase with increasing temperature in the inverse temperature transition.

  5. Measurement of the Exchange Rate of Waters of Hydration in Elastin by 2D T(2)-T(2) Correlation Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Sun, Cheng; Boutis, Gregory S

    2011-02-28

    We report on the direct measurement of the exchange rate of waters of hydration in elastin by T(2)-T(2) exchange spectroscopy. The exchange rates in bovine nuchal ligament elastin and aortic elastin at temperatures near, below and at the physiological temperature are reported. Using an Inverse Laplace Transform (ILT) algorithm, we are able to identify four components in the relaxation times. While three of the components are in good agreement with previous measurements that used multi-exponential fitting, the ILT algorithm distinguishes a fourth component having relaxation times close to that of free water and is identified as water between fibers. With the aid of scanning electron microscopy, a model is proposed allowing for the application of a two-site exchange analysis between any two components for the determination of exchange rates between reservoirs. The results of the measurements support a model (described elsewhere [1]) wherein the net entropy of bulk waters of hydration should increase upon increasing temperature in the inverse temperature transition.

  6. Myoglobin blood test

    Serum myoglobin; Heart attack - myoglobin blood test; Myositis - myoglobin blood test; Rhabdomyolysis - myoglobin blood test ... too high, it can damage the kidneys. This test is ordered when your health care provider suspects ...

  7. Interfacial hydration, dynamics and electron transfer: multi-scale ET modeling of the transient [myoglobin, cytochrome b5] complex.

    Keinan, Shahar; Nocek, Judith M; Hoffman, Brian M; Beratan, David N

    2012-10-28

    Formation of a transient [myoglobin (Mb), cytochrome b(5) (cyt b(5))] complex is required for the reductive repair of inactive ferri-Mb to its functional ferro-Mb state. The [Mb, cyt b(5)] complex exhibits dynamic docking (DD), with its cyt b(5) partner in rapid exchange at multiple sites on the Mb surface. A triple mutant (Mb(3M)) was designed as part of efforts to shift the electron-transfer process to the simple docking (SD) regime, in which reactive binding occurs at a restricted, reactive region on the Mb surface that dominates the docked ensemble. An electrostatically-guided brownian dynamics (BD) docking protocol was used to generate an initial ensemble of reactive configurations of the complex between unrelaxed partners. This ensemble samples a broad and diverse array of heme-heme distances and orientations. These configurations seeded all-atom constrained molecular dynamics simulations (MD) to generate relaxed complexes for the calculation of electron tunneling matrix elements (T(DA)) through tunneling-pathway analysis. This procedure for generating an ensemble of relaxed complexes combines the ability of BD calculations to sample the large variety of available conformations and interprotein distances, with the ability of MD to generate the atomic level information, especially regarding the structure of water molecules at the protein-protein interface, that defines electron-tunneling pathways. We used the calculated T(DA) values to compute ET rates for the [Mb(wt), cyt b(5)] complex and for the complex with a mutant that has a binding free energy strengthened by three D/E → K charge-reversal mutations, [Mb(3M), cyt b(5)]. The calculated rate constants are in agreement with the measured values, and the mutant complex ensemble has many more geometries with higher T(DA) values than does the wild-type Mb complex. Interestingly, water plays a double role in this electron-transfer system, lowering the tunneling barrier as well as inducing protein interface

  8. Fabricated Elastin.

    Yeo, Giselle C; Aghaei-Ghareh-Bolagh, Behnaz; Brackenreg, Edwin P; Hiob, Matti A; Lee, Pearl; Weiss, Anthony S

    2015-11-18

    The mechanical stability, elasticity, inherent bioactivity, and self-assembly properties of elastin make it a highly attractive candidate for the fabrication of versatile biomaterials. The ability to engineer specific peptide sequences derived from elastin allows the precise control of these physicochemical and organizational characteristics, and further broadens the diversity of elastin-based applications. Elastin and elastin-like peptides can also be modified or blended with other natural or synthetic moieties, including peptides, proteins, polysaccharides, and polymers, to augment existing capabilities or confer additional architectural and biofunctional features to compositionally pure materials. Elastin and elastin-based composites have been subjected to diverse fabrication processes, including heating, electrospinning, wet spinning, solvent casting, freeze-drying, and cross-linking, for the manufacture of particles, fibers, gels, tubes, sheets and films. The resulting materials can be tailored to possess specific strength, elasticity, morphology, topography, porosity, wettability, surface charge, and bioactivity. This extraordinary tunability of elastin-based constructs enables their use in a range of biomedical and tissue engineering applications such as targeted drug delivery, cell encapsulation, vascular repair, nerve regeneration, wound healing, and dermal, cartilage, bone, and dental replacement. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Myoglobin solvent structure at different temperatures

    Daniels, B.V.; Korszun, Z.R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Schoenborn, B.P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The structure of the solvent surrounding myoglobin crystals has been analyzed using neutron diffraction data, and the results indicate that the water around the protein is not disordered, but rather lies in well-defined hydration shells. We have analyzed the structure of the solvent surrounding the protein by collecting neutron diffraction data at four different temperatures, namely, 80, 130, 180, and 240K. Relative Wilson Statistics applied to low resolution data showed evidence of a phase transition in the region of 180K. A plot of the liquidity factor, B{sub sn}, versus distance from the protein surface begins with a high plateau near the surface of the protein and drops to two minima at distances from the protein surface of about 2.35{Angstrom} and 3.85{Angstrom}. Two distinct hydration shells are observed. Both hydration shells are observed to expand as the temperature is increased.

  10. Myoglobin solvent structure at different temperatures

    Daniels, B.V.; Korszun, Z.R.; Schoenborn, B.P.

    1994-01-01

    The structure of the solvent surrounding myoglobin crystals has been analyzed using neutron diffraction data, and the results indicate that the water around the protein is not disordered, but rather lies in well-defined hydration shells. We have analyzed the structure of the solvent surrounding the protein by collecting neutron diffraction data at four different temperatures, namely, 80, 130, 180, and 240K. Relative Wilson Statistics applied to low resolution data showed evidence of a phase transition in the region of 180K. A plot of the liquidity factor, B sn , versus distance from the protein surface begins with a high plateau near the surface of the protein and drops to two minima at distances from the protein surface of about 2.35 Angstrom and 3.85 Angstrom. Two distinct hydration shells are observed. Both hydration shells are observed to expand as the temperature is increased

  11. Understanding water: Molecular dynamics simulations of solubilized and crystallized myoglobin

    Wei Gu; Garcia, A.E.; Schoenborn, B.P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on CO myoglobin to evaluate the stability of the bound water molecules as determined in a neutron diffraction analysis. The myoglobin structure derived from the neutron analysis provided the starting coordinate set used in the simulations. The simulations show that only a few water molecules are tightly bound to protein atoms, while most solvent molecules are labile, breaking and reforming hydrogen bonds. Comparison between myoglobin in solution and in a single crystal highlighted some of the packing effects on the solvent structure and shows that water solvent plays an indispensable role in protein dynamics and structural stability. The described observations explain some of the differences in the experimental results of protein hydration as observed in NMR, neutron and X-ray diffraction studies.

  12. Understanding water: Molecular dynamics simulations of solubilized and crystallized myoglobin

    Wei Gu; Garcia, A.E.; Schoenborn, B.P.

    1994-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on CO myoglobin to evaluate the stability of the bound water molecules as determined in a neutron diffraction analysis. The myoglobin structure derived from the neutron analysis provided the starting coordinate set used in the simulations. The simulations show that only a few water molecules are tightly bound to protein atoms, while most solvent molecules are labile, breaking and reforming hydrogen bonds. Comparison between myoglobin in solution and in a single crystal highlighted some of the packing effects on the solvent structure and shows that water solvent plays an indispensable role in protein dynamics and structural stability. The described observations explain some of the differences in the experimental results of protein hydration as observed in NMR, neutron and X-ray diffraction studies

  13. Elastin in the Liver

    Jiri Kanta

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A characteristic feature of liver cirrhosis is the accumulation of large amounts of connective tissue with the prevailing content of type I collagen. Elastin is a minor connective tissue component in normal liver but it is actively synthesized by hepatic stellate cells and portal fibroblasts in diseased liver. The accumulation of elastic fibers in later stages of liver fibrosis may contribute to the decreasing reversibility of the disease with advancing time. Elastin is formed by polymerization of tropoelastin monomers. It is an amorphous protein highly resistant to the action of proteases that forms the core of elastic fibers. Microfibrils surrounding the core are composed of fibrillins that bind a number of proteins involved in fiber formation. They include microfibril-associated glycoproteins (MAGPs, microfibrillar-associated proteins (MFAPs and fibulins. Lysyl oxidase (LOX and lysyl oxidase-like proteins (LOXLs are responsible for tropoelastin cross-linking and polymerization. TGF-β complexes attached to microfibrils release this cytokine and influence the behavior of the cells in the neighborhood. The role of TGF-β as the main profibrotic cytokine in the liver is well-known and the release of the cytokines of TGF-β superfamily from their storage in elastic fibers may affect the course of fibrosis. Elastic fibres are often studied in the tissues where they provide elasticity and resilience but their role is no longer viewed as purely mechanical. Tropoelastin, elastin polymer and elastin peptides resulting from partial elastin degradation influence fibroblastic and inflammatory cells as well as angiogenesis. A similar role may be performed by elastin in the liver. This article reviews the results of the research of liver elastic fibers on the backgound of the present knowledge of elastin biochemistry and physiology. The regulation of liver elastin synthesis and degradation may be important for the outcome of liver fibrosis.

  14. Picosecond thermometer in the amide I band of myoglobin

    Austin, R.H.; Xie, A.; Meer, L. van der

    2005-01-01

    The amide I and II bands in myoglobin show a heterogeneous temperature dependence, with bands at 6.17 and 6.43 mu m which are more intense at low temperatures. The amide I band temperature dependence is on the long wavelength edge of the band, while the short wavelength side has almost...... can be used to determine the time it takes vibrational energy to flow into the hydration shell. We determine that vibrational energy flow to the hydration shell from the amide I takes approximately 20 ps to occur....

  15. Myoglobin chemistry and meat color.

    Suman, Surendranath P; Joseph, Poulson

    2013-01-01

    Consumers rely heavily on fresh meat color as an indicator of wholesomeness at the point of sale, whereas cooked color is exploited as an indicator of doneness at the point of consumption. Deviations from the bright cherry-red color of fresh meat lead to product rejection and revenue loss. Myoglobin is the sarcoplasmic heme protein primarily responsible for the meat color, and the chemistry of myoglobin is species specific. The mechanistic interactions between myoglobin and multiple extrinsic and intrinsic factors govern the color of raw as well as cooked meats. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the current research in meat color and how the findings are applied in the meat industry. Characterizing the fundamental basis of myoglobin's interactions with biomolecules in postmortem skeletal muscles is necessary to interpret the chemistry of meat color phenomena and to engineer innovative processing strategies to minimize meat discoloration-induced revenue loss to the agricultural economy.

  16. Radioimmunoassay for human myoglobin

    Kondo, Akira

    1981-01-01

    1 A new radioimmunoassay (RIA) for human myoglobin (Mb) using two antibody technique was developed as a microassay of Mb. This RIA is characterized as follows; 1) Radioiodination of human Mb was successfully done for the first time by chloramine T method, which yielded Iabelled Mb with high specific activities ranging 40 - 60 μCi/μg. 2) Affinity chromatography was used to obtain purified anti-human Mb antibody, which improved the sensitivity of the RIA remarkably, and excluded the effects of serum and urine. 2 The sensitivity of the RIA was 1 ng/ml in sera and 2 ng/ml in urine. The average recovery was 92.7%. Both intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation were below 10%. 3 With this method, Mb purified from skeletal and cardiac muscles was shown to have same immunological nature. 4 Serum concentrations of Mb in normal adults were 13.1 +- 6.1 ng/ml (mean +- S.D.) with a range of 1 - 28 ng/ml. No sex difference was observed. Urinary Mb Ievels in normal adults were less than 4 ng/ml and 24-hour urinary excretions were less than 6 μg. With this method, serum and urinary Mb concentrations were determined in patients with various disorders such as myopathies and myocardial disorders and with anesthesia. Serum Mb concentrations were revealed to be elevated to 50000 ng/ml in malignant hyperthermia, 4000 ng/ml in acute myocardial infarction, 1000 ng/ml in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and 4000 ng/ml in polymyositis. Urinary Mb level was elevated when serum Mb rose to 2000 - 3000 ng/ml. 5 In order to apply RIA of Mb in daily clinical practices, time needed for the assay was shortened by separation of free and antibody-bound Mb by the polyethylene glycol method immediately after incubation was performed at 37 0 C for 2 hours. (author)

  17. Radioimmunoassay for human myoglobin

    Kondo, A. (Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1981-04-01

    1 A new radioimmunoassay (RIA) for human myoglobin (Mb) using two antibody technique was developed as a microassay of Mb. This RIA is characterized as follows; 1) Radioiodination of human Mb was successfully done for the first time by chloramine T method, which yielded Iabelled Mb with high specific activities ranging 40 - 60 ..mu..Ci/..mu..g. 2) Affinity chromatography was used to obtain purified anti-human Mb antibody, which improved the sensitivity of the RIA remarkably, and excluded the effects of serum and urine. 2 The sensitivity of the RIA was 1 ng/ml in sera and 2 ng/ml in urine. The average recovery was 92.7%. Both intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation were below 10%. 3 With this method, Mb purified from skeletal and cardiac muscles was shown to have same immunological nature. 4 Serum concentrations of Mb in normal adults were 13.1 +- 6.1 ng/ml (mean +- S.D.) with a range of 1 - 28 ng/ml. No sex difference was observed. Urinary Mb Ievels in normal adults were less than 4 ng/ml and 24-hour urinary excretions were less than 6 ..mu..g. With this method, serum and urinary Mb concentrations were determined in patients with various disorders such as myopathies and myocardial disorders and with anesthesia. Serum Mb concentrations were revealed to be elevated to 50000 ng/ml in malignant hyperthermia, 4000 ng/ml in acute myocardial infarction, 1000 ng/ml in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and 4000 ng/ml in polymyositis. Urinary Mb level was elevated when serum Mb rose to 2000 - 3000 ng/ml. 5 In order to apply RIA of Mb in daily clinical practices, time needed for the assay was shortened by separation of free and antibody-bound Mb by the polyethylene glycol method immediately after incubation was performed at 37/sup 0/C for 2 hours.

  18. Ferroelectric switching of elastin

    Liu, Yuanming; Cai, Hong-Ling; Zelisko, Matthew; Wang, Yunjie; Sun, Jinglan; Yan, Fei; Ma, Feiyue; Wang, Peiqi; Chen, Qian Nataly; Zheng, Hairong; Meng, Xiangjian; Sharma, Pradeep; Zhang, Yanhang; Li, Jiangyu

    2014-01-01

    Ferroelectricity has long been speculated to have important biological functions, although its very existence in biology has never been firmly established. Here, we present compelling evidence that elastin, the key ECM protein found in connective tissues, is ferroelectric, and we elucidate the molecular mechanism of its switching. Nanoscale piezoresponse force microscopy and macroscopic pyroelectric measurements both show that elastin retains ferroelectricity at 473 K, with polarization on the order of 1 μC/cm2, whereas coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations predict similar polarization with a Curie temperature of 580 K, which is higher than most synthetic molecular ferroelectrics. The polarization of elastin is found to be intrinsic in tropoelastin at the monomer level, analogous to the unit cell level polarization in classical perovskite ferroelectrics, and it switches via thermally activated cooperative rotation of dipoles. Our study sheds light onto a long-standing question on ferroelectric switching in biology and establishes ferroelectricity as an important biophysical property of proteins. This is a critical first step toward resolving its physiological significance and pathological implications. PMID:24958890

  19. Radioimmunoassay of serum myoglobin in neuromuscular diseases

    Askmark, H; Osterman, P O; Roxin, L E; Venge, P [University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1981-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay of serum myoglobin was performed in 85 patients with muscular symptoms. Elevated levels were found in 93% of patients with myogenic myopathy, in 54% with myasthenia gravis and in 50% with neurogenic myopathy. All 11 patients with polymyositis had elevated myoglobin concentrations. In six of seven patients with polymyositis, who were followed up with repeated determinations, a clear relationship between myoglobin levels and clinical course was found. In general serum myoglobin seemed to be a more sensitive indicator of muscle disease than creatine kinase.

  20. Radioimmunoassay of serum myoglobin in neuromuscular diseases

    Askmark, H.; Osterman, P.O.; Roxin, L.-E.; Venge, P.

    1981-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay of serum myoglobin was performed in 85 patients with muscular symptoms. Elevated levels were found in 93% of patients with myogenic myopathy, in 54% with myasthenia gravis and in 50% with neurogenic myopathy. All 11 patients with polymyositis had elevated myoglobin concentrations. In six of seven patients with polymyositis, who were followed up with repeated determinations, a clear relationship between myoglobin levels and clinical course was found. In general serum myoglobin seemed to be a more sensitive indicator of muscle disease than creatine kinase. (author)

  1. Computational smart polymer design based on elastin protein mutability.

    Tarakanova, Anna; Huang, Wenwen; Weiss, Anthony S; Kaplan, David L; Buehler, Markus J

    2017-05-01

    Soluble elastin-like peptides (ELPs) can be engineered into a range of physical forms, from hydrogels and scaffolds to fibers and artificial tissues, finding numerous applications in medicine and engineering as "smart polymers". Elastin-like peptides are attractive candidates as a platform for novel biomaterial design because they exhibit a highly tunable response spectrum, with reversible phase transition capabilities. Here, we report the design of the first virtual library of elastin-like protein models using methods for enhanced sampling to study the effect of peptide chemistry, chain length, and salt concentration on the structural transitions of ELPs, exposing associated molecular mechanisms. We describe the behavior of the local molecular structure under increasing temperatures and the effect of peptide interactions with nearest hydration shell water molecules on peptide mobility and propensity to exhibit structural transitions. Shifts in the magnitude of structural transitions at the single-molecule scale are explained from the perspective of peptide-ion-water interactions in a library of four unique elastin-like peptide systems. Predictions of structural transitions are subsequently validated in experiment. This library is a valuable resource for recombinant protein design and synthesis as it elucidates mechanisms at the single-molecule level, paving a feedback path between simulation and experiment for smart material designs, with applications in biomedicine and diagnostic devices. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Expression and Purification of Sperm Whale Myoglobin

    Miller, Stephen; Indivero, Virginia; Burkhard, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    We present a multiweek laboratory exercise that exposes students to the fundamental techniques of bacterial expression and protein purification through the preparation of sperm whale myoglobin. Myoglobin, a robust oxygen-binding protein, contains a single heme that gives the protein a reddish color, making it an ideal subject for the teaching…

  3. Molecular-level characterization of elastin-like constructs and human aortic elastin

    Heinz, Andrea; Schräder, Christoph U; Baud, Stéphanie

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the structures of two elastin-like constructs, one composed of a cross-linked elastin-like polypeptide and the other one of cross-linked tropoelastin, and native aortic elastin. The structures of the insoluble materials and human aortic elastin were investigated...... quantification revealed that the cross-linking degree of the two in vitro cross-linked materials was significantly lower than that of native elastin. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed, based on molecular species identified in the samples, to follow the formation of elastin cross-links. The results...... provide evidence for the significance of the GVGTP hinge region of domain 23 for the formation of elastin cross-links. Overall, this work provides important insight into structural similarities and differences between elastin-like constructs and native elastin. Furthermore, it represents a step toward...

  4. Circulating elastin peptides, role in vascular pathology.

    Robert, L; Labat-Robert, J

    2014-12-01

    The atherosclerotic process starts with the degradation of elastic fibers. Their presence was demonstrated in the circulation as well as several of their biological properties elucidated. We described years ago a procedure to obtain large elastin peptides by organo-alkaline hydrolysis, κ-elastin. This method enabled also the preparation of specific antibodies used to determine elastin peptides, as well as anti-elastin antibodies in body fluids and tissue extracts. Elastin peptides were determined in a large number of human blood samples. Studies were carried out to explore their pharmacological properties. Similar recent studies by other laboratories confirmed our findings and arose new interest in circulating elastin peptides for their biological activities. This recent trend justified the publication of a review of the biological and pathological activities of elastin peptides demonstrated during our previous studies, subject of this article. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Riboflavin photosensitized oxidation of myoglobin.

    Grippa, Juliana M; de Zawadzki, Andressa; Grossi, Alberto B; Skibsted, Leif H; Cardoso, Daniel R

    2014-02-05

    The reaction of the fresh meat pigment oxymyoglobin, MbFe(II)O₂, and its oxidized form metmyoglobin, MbFe(III), with triplet-state riboflavin involves the pigment protein, which is oxidatively cleaved or dimerized as shown by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The overall rate constant for oxidation of MbFe(II)O₂ by ³Rib is (3.0 ± 0.5) × 10⁹ L·mol⁻¹·s⁻¹ and (3.1 ± 0.4) × 10⁹ L·mol⁻¹·s⁻¹ for MbFe(III) in phosphate buffer of pH 7.4 at 25 °C as determined by laser flash photolysis. The high rates are rationalized by ground state hydrophobic interactions as detected as static quenching of fluorescence from singlet-excited state riboflavin by myoglobins using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and a Stern-Volmer approach. Binding of riboflavin to MbFe(III) has K(a) = (1.2 ± 0.2) × 10⁴ mol·L⁻¹ with ΔH° = -112 ± 22 kJ·mol⁻¹ and ΔS° = -296 ± 75 J·mol⁻¹·K⁻¹. For meat, riboflavin is concluded to be a photosensitizer for protein oxidation but not for discoloration.

  6. Myoglobin production in emperor penguins.

    Ponganis, P J; Welch, T J; Welch, L S; Stockard, T K

    2010-06-01

    Increased oxygen storage is essential to the diving capacities of marine mammals and seabirds. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this adaptation are unknown. Myoglobin (Mb) and Mb mRNA concentrations were analyzed in emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) adults and chicks with spectrophotometric and RNase protection assays to evaluate production of their large Mb-bound O(2) stores. Mean pectoral Mb concentration and Mb mRNA content increased throughout the pre-fledging period and were 15-fold and 3-fold greater, respectively, in adults than in 3.5 month old chicks. Mean Mb concentration in 5.9 month old juveniles was 2.7+/-0.4 g 100 g(-1) muscle (44% that of wild adults), and in adults that had been captive all their lives it was 3.7+/-0.1 g 100 g(-1) muscle. The Mb and Mb mRNA data are consistent with regulation of Mb production at the level of transcription as in other animals. Significant Mb and Mb mRNA production occurred in chicks and young juveniles even without any diving activity. The further increase in adult Mb concentrations appears to require the exercise/hypoxia of diving because Mb concentration in captive, non-diving adults only reached 60% of that of wild adults. The much greater relative increase in Mb concentration than in Mb mRNA content between young chicks and adults suggests that there is not a simple 1:1 relationship between Mb mRNA content and Mb concentration. Nutritional limitation in young chicks and post-transcriptional regulation of Mb concentration may also be involved.

  7. Prolyl hydroxylation in elastin is not random.

    Schmelzer, Christian E H; Nagel, Marcus B M; Dziomba, Szymon; Merkher, Yulia; Sivan, Sarit S; Heinz, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prolyl and lysine hydroxylation in elastin from different species and tissues. Enzymatic digests of elastin samples from human, cattle, pig and chicken were analyzed using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics tools. It was confirmed at the protein level that elastin does not contain hydroxylated lysine residues regardless of the species. In contrast, prolyl hydroxylation sites were identified in all elastin samples. Moreover, the analysis of the residues adjacent to prolines allowed the determination of the substrate site preferences of prolyl 4-hydroxylase. It was found that elastins from all analyzed species contain hydroxyproline and that at least 20%-24% of all proline residues were partially hydroxylated. Determination of the hydroxylation degrees of specific proline residues revealed that prolyl hydroxylation depends on both the species and the tissue, however, is independent of age. The fact that the highest hydroxylation degrees of proline residues were found for elastin from the intervertebral disc and knowledge of elastin arrangement in this tissue suggest that hydroxylation plays a biomechanical role. Interestingly, a proline-rich domain of tropoelastin (domain 24), which contains several repeats of bioactive motifs, does not show any hydroxyproline residues in the mammals studied. The results show that prolyl hydroxylation is not a coincidental feature and may contribute to the adaptation of the properties of elastin to meet the functional requirements of different tissues. The study for the first time shows that prolyl hydroxylation is highly regulated in elastin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Elastin as a biomaterial for tissue engineering.

    Daamen, W.F.; Veerkamp, J.H.; Hest, J.C.M. van; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van

    2007-01-01

    Biomaterials based upon elastin and elastin-derived molecules are increasingly investigated for their application in tissue engineering. This interest is fuelled by the remarkable properties of this structural protein, such as elasticity, self-assembly, long-term stability, and biological activity.

  9. Myocardial myoglobin release after acute myocardial infarction

    Robinson, P S; Saltissi, S; Coltart, D J; Croft, D N [Saint Thomas' Hospital, London (UK)

    1980-03-01

    The magnitude and time course of myoglobin release from the myocardium following infarction was assessed by radioimmunoassay. The assay showed acceptable precision over a working range from 50 to 750 ng cm/sup -3/, provided careful control of the assay temperature was maintained. The use of this radioimmunoassay as an early diagnostic test for infarction and as a potential measure of the extent of necrosis is considered and comparison made with the release of CK-MB, the myocardial specific isoenzyme of creatine kinase. Of the twenty patients studied with myocardial infarction, all had elevated levels of serum myoglobin including those admitted within 3 hours of the onset of pain. In contrast, CK-MB was not detected in the serum within 5 hours of the onset of pain. Peak serum levels of myoglobin (mean 852 +- 365 ng cm/sup -3/) and CK-MB (mean 71 +- 25 mIU cm/sup -3/) were detected at 8-16 hours and 20-24 hours respectively after the onset of pain. A comparison of peak serum levels of myoglobin and CK-MB showed a good correlation (r = 0.84).

  10. Conformational change of spin labelled myoglobin

    Wajnberg, E.; Ribeiro, P.C.; Nascimento, O.R.; Bemski, G.

    1978-01-01

    A conformational change of spin labelled myoglobin have been followed by measuring the spin label's (isothiocyanate) correlation time for temperatures between 18 0 C and 44 0 C. The correlation time was calculated from Electrom Paramagnetic Ressonance Spectra using the components of the espectroscopic and hiperfine tensors obtained by fitting the powder spectra using Lefebvre and Maruani's program- [pt

  11. Prolyl hydroxylation in elastin is not random

    Schmelzer, Christian E H; Nagel, Marcus B M; Dziomba, Szymon

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate the prolyl and lysine hydroxylation in elastin from different species and tissues. METHODS: Enzymatic digests of elastin samples from human, cattle, pig and chicken were analyzed using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics tools. RESULTS: It was confirmed...... at the protein level that elastin does not contain hydroxylated lysine residues regardless of the species. In contrast, prolyl hydroxylation sites were identified in all elastin samples. Moreover, the analysis of the residues adjacent to prolines allowed the determination of the substrate site preferences...... of prolyl 4-hydroxylase. It was found that elastins from all analyzed species contain hydroxyproline and that at least 20%-24% of all proline residues were partially hydroxylated. Determination of the hydroxylation degrees of specific proline residues revealed that prolyl hydroxylation depends on both...

  12. Isolation of intact elastin fibers devoid of microfibrils.

    Daamen, W.F.; Hafmans, T.G.M.; Veerkamp, J.H.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van

    2005-01-01

    Purification protocols for elastin generally result in greatly damaged elastin fibers and this likely influences the biological response. We here describe a novel protocol for the isolation of elastin whereby the fibers stay intact, and introduce the term "elastin fiber" for intact elastic fibers

  13. Aluminum Chloride Pretreatment of Elastin Inhibits Elastolysis by Matrix Metalloproteinases and Leads to Inhibition of Elastin-Oriented Calcification

    Bailey, Michael; Xiao, Hui; Ogle, Matthew; Vyavahare, Naren

    2001-01-01

    Calcification of elastin occurs in many pathological cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis. We have previously shown that purified elastin when subdermally implanted in rats undergoes severe calcification and aluminum chloride (AlCl3) pretreatment of elastin inhibits calcification. In the present study we investigated whether matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) binding to elastin and elastin degradation is prevented by AlCl3 pretreatment. Subdermal implantation of AlCl3-pretreated elas...

  14. Reactions of metal-substituted myoglobins with excess electrons studied by pulse radiolysis and low-temperature gamma-radiolysis

    Miki, Hideho; Nakajima, Atushi; Ogasawara, Masaaki; Tamura, Mamoru

    1990-01-01

    Reactions of metal-substituted myoglobins with excess electrons in electron-pulse-irradiated aqueous solutions at room temperature and γ-irradiated aqueous matrices at 77 K were studied for the purpose of probing the functional role of heme iron. The rate constants for the reactions of various myoglobins with hydrated electrons were not much different from each other, and were close to those of diffusion-controlled reactions. In contrast, the reduction rates of myoglobins with dithionite depended markedly on the kind of central metals in the myoglobins. The difference was interpreted in terms of Marcus' theory for electron-transfer reactions. Effects of the 6-coordinate structure of the cobalt(III) species on the reaction with dithionite was also discussed. The steady-state optical-absorption measurements of γ-irradiated matrices containing cobaltimyoglobin at 77 K demonstrated the reduction of cobalt(III) species by excess electrons produced by the action of ionizing radiation. It was shown, by electron-spin resonance spectroscopy, that a 6-coordinated cobalt(II) species produced at 77 K transformed to a 5-coordinate one at higher temperatures, as reported previously. However, structural relaxation was not observed by optical spectroscopy either in the solutions or in the low-temperature matrices. It was concluded, therefore, that the intermediate 6-coordinate cobalt(II) species gave an optical absorption spectrum which was indistinguishable from that of the relaxed 5-coordinate cobalt(II) species. (author)

  15. Clinical usefulness of radioimmune measurement of serum myoglobin

    Ruibal, A.; Sabria, M.; Rey, C.; Fraile, M.; Foz, M.; Domenech-Torne, F.M.

    1983-01-01

    In order to ascertain the behaviour in different muscular diseases, as well as its potential clinical usefulness, we have determined by radioimmunoassay the seric levels of myoglobin in 212 patients with different muscular diseases. Our results led us to the following: 1) The myoglobin determination is an early marker and very useful during the first 24 hours in I.A.M.; 2) The myoglobin determination is useful in diagnostic of Duchenne's and Steinert's disease; 3) In healthy carriers of Duchenne's disease and limb-girdle myopathy, total CK was better than myoglobin as a biochemical marker; 4) Higher increases of seric myoglobin were shown in non-trained subjects after exercice. Then, the myoglobin determination may become a wide field of application for sport medicine

  16. The zinc-myoglobin relationships in porcine muscles

    Fogd Joergensen, P.; Wegger, I.

    1976-01-01

    Zinc and myoglobin content in muscles from pigs were studied under various conditions. Zinc concentration was considerably higher in red than in white muscles. In muscles, where the metabolic pattern changes from glycolytic to oxidative during the period from birth to weaning, a simultaneous increase in zinc content was seen. A significant positive correlation exists between myoglobin and zinc content under normal conditions. However, while myoglobin concentration decreases due to iron deficiency anaemia no changes occur in zinc content. It is concluded that no functional link seems to exist between zinc metabolism and myoglobin synthesis in porcine muscles. (author)

  17. The role of myoglobin degradation in nephrotoxicity after rhabdomyolysis.

    Zorova, Ljubava D; Pevzner, Irina B; Chupyrkina, Anastasia A; Zorov, Savva D; Silachev, Denis N; Plotnikov, Egor Y; Zorov, Dmitry B

    2016-08-25

    The fate of myoglobin in renal cells was explored in an animal model of rhabdomyolysis known as the pathology highly related to oxidative stress resulting in impairment of renal functioning. The working hypothesis was that the proper degradation of myoglobin in rhabdomyolytic kidney can activate the reparative processes in the tissue. We found that incubation of myoglobin with kidney cells causes its accumulation in the cytoplasm. In rhabdomyolytic rats, the level of heme and free iron in cytoplasm and mitochondria of kidney cells is remarkably increased while inhibition of proteolysis results in further elevation of myoglobin content in the renal tissue. Heme oxygenase and ferritin levels were found to be increased in the kidney tissue at rhabdomyolysis and simulating conditions performed by i/v injection of myoglobin. In addition, the level of peroxidized lipids was high in rhabdomyolytic kidney and became even higher after inhibition of proteolysis by aprotinin. Elevated levels of carbonylated proteins were also observed after rhabdomyolysis, however, if prior to induction of rhabdomyolysis the injection of myoglobin was done, the level of carbonylated proteins dropped versus unprimed kidney tissue thus affording protection to the kidney against oxidative stress. Injection of myoglobin to the rat results in impairment of renal functioning and inhibition of myoglobin degradation in the rhabdomyolytic animal aggravates acute renal failure, demonstrating that degradation of myoglobin is somehow beneficial although it may result in undesired release of free iron which can participate in toxic redox cycling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Diagnostic strategies using myoglobin measurement in myocardial infarction.

    Plebani, M; Zaninotto, M

    1998-04-06

    Myoglobin, a low molecular-weight heme protein (17800 D) present in both cardiac and skeletal muscle, is an old test with new perspectives. Advantages and disadvantages of myoglobin determination are well known. Myoglobin is the earliest known, commercially available, biochemical marker of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and its rapid kinetics make it an early, good marker of reperfusion. However, since myoglobin is present in both skeletal and cardiac muscle, any damage to these muscle types results in its release into blood. Serum myoglobin levels are falsely elevated in conditions unrelated to AMI as skeletal muscle and neuromuscular disorders, renal failure, intramuscular injection, strenuous exercise, and after several toxins and drugs intake. New strategies for myoglobin measurement may resolve this limitation. These strategies include both the combined measurement of myoglobin and a skeletal specific marker (carbonic anhydrase III) or a cardiac specific marker (troponin I), as well as the myoglobin evaluation on serial samples. In particular, the diagnostic algorithm based on the combined measurement of myoglobin and troponin I, assuring a satisfactory analytical turnaround time, significantly improves the diagnostic efficiency of laboratory assessment of suspected AMI patients, allowing the successive monitoring of coronary reperfusion.

  19. Fingerprinting Desmosine-Containing Elastin Peptides

    Schräder, Christoph U.; Heinz, Andrea; Majovsky, Petra; Schmelzer, Christian E. H.

    2015-05-01

    Elastin is a vital protein of the extracellular matrix of jawed vertebrates and provides elasticity to numerous tissues. It is secreted in the form of its soluble precursor tropoelastin, which is subsequently cross-linked in the course of the elastic fiber assembly. The process involves the formation of the two tetrafunctional amino acids desmosine (DES) and isodesmosine (IDES), which are unique to elastin. The resulting high degree of cross-linking confers remarkable properties, including mechanical integrity, insolubility, and long-term stability to the protein. These characteristics hinder the structural elucidation of mature elastin. However, MS2 data of linear and cross-linked peptides released by proteolysis can provide indirect insights into the structure of elastin. In this study, we performed energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation experiments of DES, IDES, their derivatives, and DES-/IDES-containing peptides to determine characteristic product ions. It was found that all investigated compounds yielded the same product ion clusters at elevated collision energies. Elemental composition determination using the exact masses of these ions revealed molecular formulas of the type CxHyN, suggesting that the pyridinium core of DES/IDES remains intact even at relatively high collision energies. The finding of these specific product ions enabled the development of a similarity-based scoring algorithm that was successfully applied on LC-MS/MS data of bovine elastin digests for the identification of DES-/IDES-cross-linked peptides. This approach facilitates the straightforward investigation of native cross-links in elastin.

  20. Regulation of elastin synthesis in developing sheep nuchal ligament by elastin mRNA levels

    Davidson, J.M.; Smith, K.; Shibahara, S.; Tolstoshev, P.; Crystal, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    Levels of elastin production in explant culture of fetal sheep nuchal ligament and corresponding levels of translatable elastin mRNA were determined in parallel studies during a period of rapid growth of the embryo. The identity of the explant culture and cell-free proucts was confirmed by peptide mapping, immunoprecipitation, and the characteristic lack of histidine and methionine. Elastin production was quantitated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and radioimmune precipitation. The translation products could be labeled with methionine only when NH 2 -terminally donated as f-Met-tRNA/sup Met//sub f/. Explant cultures showed a large rise in elastin production from 70 days after conception to 150 days after conception. Cell free translation of RNA demonstrated a parallel in elastin mRNA levels and in elastin mRNA per cell. It appears, therefore, that the marked emphasis the differentiating muchal ligament places on elastin production is modulated, at least in part, by the quantities of available elastin in mRNA

  1. Biophysical characterization of a de novo elastin

    Greenland, Kelly Nicole

    Natural human elastin is found in tissue such as the lungs, arteries, and skin. This protein is formed at birth with no mechanism present to repair or supplement the initial quantity formed. As a result, the functionality and durability of elastin's elasticity is critically important. To date, the mechanics of this ability to stretch and recoil is not fully understood. This study utilizes de novo protein design to create a small library of simplistic versions of elastin-like proteins, demonstrate the elastin-like proteins, maintain elastin's functionality, and inquire into its structure using solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Elastin is formed from cross-linked tropoelastin. Therefore, the first generation of designed proteins consisted of one protein that utilized homogony of interspecies tropoelastin by using three common domains, two hydrophobic and one cross-linking domains. Basic modifications were made to open the hydrophobic region and also to make the protein easier to purify and characterize. The designed protein maintained its functionality, self-aggregating as the temperature increased. Uniquely, the protein remained self-aggregated as the temperature returned below the critical transition temperature. Self-aggregation was additionally induced by increasing salt concentrations and by modifying the pH. The protein appeared to have little secondary structure when studied with solution NMR. These results fueled a second generation of designed elastin-like proteins. This generation contained variations designed to study the cross-linking domain, one specific hydrophobic domain, and the effect of the length of the elastin-like protein. The cross-linking domain in one variation has been significantly modified while the flanking hydrophobic domains have remained unchanged. This characterization of this protein will answer questions regarding the specificity of the homologous nature of the cross-linking domain of tropoelastin across species. A second

  2. Microcontact imprinted surface plasmon resonance sensor for myoglobin detection

    Osman, Bilgen; Uzun, Lokman; Beşirli, Necati; Denizli, Adil

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we prepared surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor using the molecular imprinting technique for myoglobin detection in human serum. For this purpose, we synthesized myoglobin imprinted poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-L-tryptophan methyl ester) [poly(HEMA-MATrp)] nanofilm on the surface of SPR sensor. We also synthesized non-imprinted poly(HEMA-MATrp) nanofilm without myoglobin for the control experiments. The SPR sensor was characterized with contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and ellipsometry. We investigated the effectiveness of the sensor using the SPR system. We evaluated the ability of SPR sensor to sense myoglobin with myoglobin solutions (pH 7.4, phosphate buffer) in different concentration range and in the serum taken from a patient with acute myocardial infarction. We found that the Langmuir adsorption model was the most suitable for the sensor system. The detection limit was 87.6 ng/mL. In order to show the selectivity of the SPR sensor, we investigated the competitive detection of myoglobin, lysozyme, cytochrome c and bovine serum albumin. The results showed that the SPR sensor has high selectivity and sensitivity for myoglobin. - Highlights: • Micro-contact imprinted surface plasmon resonance sensor. • Real-time myoglobin detection in the serum taken from a patient with acute myocardial infarction • Reproducible results for consecutive myoglobin solution supplement • LOD and LOQ values of the SPR sensor were determined to be 26.3 and 87.6 ng/mL. • The SPR sensor has potential for myoglobin sensing during acute MI cases

  3. Comparison of five procedures for the purification of insoluble elastin.

    Daamen, W.F.; Hafmans, T.G.M.; Veerkamp, J.H.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van

    2001-01-01

    Elastin is an insoluble, highly cross-linked protein, providing elasticity to organs like lung. aorta, and ligaments. Despite its remarkable mechanical properties. elastin has found little use as a biomaterial. Purification of intact elastin from elastic fibres presents a major challenge, among

  4. Interaction between fatty acid and the elastin network

    Vreeswijk, van J.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the interaction between salts of fatty acids (FAS) and elastin. Absorption of fatty acids in elastin may affect the elasticity of elastin-containing tissue. Such phenomena could, for instance, be of relevance for the understanding of the

  5. GABA promotes elastin synthesis and elastin fiber formation in normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs).

    Uehara, Eriko; Hokazono, Hideki; Hida, Mariko; Sasaki, Takako; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu; Matsuo, Noritaka

    2017-06-01

    The multiple physiological effects of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as a functional food component have been recently reported. We previously reported that GABA upregulated the expression of type I collagen in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs), and that oral administration of GABA significantly increased skin elasticity. However, details of the regulatory mechanism still remain unknown. In this study, we further examined the effects of GABA on elastin synthesis and elastin fiber formation in HDFs. Real-time PCR indicated that GABA significantly increased the expression of tropoelastin transcript in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, the expression of fibrillin-1, fibrillin-2, and fibulin-5/DANCE, but not lysyl oxidase and latent transforming factor-β-binding protein 4, were also significantly increased in HDFs. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that treatment with GABA dramatically increased the formation of elastic fibers in HDFs. Taken together, our results showed that GABA improves skin elasticity in HDFs by upregulating elastin synthesis and elastin fiber formation.

  6. Soluble elastin peptides in cardiovascular homeostasis: Foe or ally.

    Qin, Zhenyu

    2015-05-01

    Elastin peptides, also known as elastin-derived peptides or elastokines, are soluble polypeptides in blood and tissue. The blood levels of elastin peptides are usually low but can increase during cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysm and diabetes with vascular complications. Generally, elastin peptides are derived from the degradation of insoluble elastic polymers. The biological activities of elastin peptides are bidirectional, e.g., a pro-inflammatory effect on monocyte migration induction vs. a protective effect on vasodilation promotion. However, recent in vivo studies have demonstrated that elastin peptides promote the formation of atherosclerotic plaques in hypercholesterolemic mice and induce hyperglycemia and elevations in plasma lipid levels in fasted mice. More important, the detrimental effects induced by elastin peptides can be largely inhibited by genetic or pharmacological blockade of the elastin receptor complex or by neutralization of an antibody against elastin peptides. These studies indicate new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases by targeting elastin peptide metabolism. Therefore, the goal of this review is to summarize current knowledge about elastin peptides relevant to cardiovascular pathologies to further delineate their potential application in cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Myoglobin-Catalyzed Olefination of Aldehydes.

    Tyagi, Vikas; Fasan, Rudi

    2016-02-12

    The olefination of aldehydes constitutes a most valuable and widely adopted strategy for constructing carbon-carbon double bonds in organic chemistry. While various synthetic methods have been made available for this purpose, no biocatalysts are known to mediate this transformation. Reported herein is that engineered myoglobin variants can catalyze the olefination of aldehydes in the presence of α-diazoesters with high catalytic efficiency (up to 4,900 turnovers) and excellent E diastereoselectivity (92-99.9 % de). This transformation could be applied to the olefination of a variety of substituted benzaldehydes and heteroaromatic aldehydes, also in combination with different alkyl α-diazoacetate reagents. This work provides a first example of biocatalytic aldehyde olefination and extends the spectrum of synthetically valuable chemical transformations accessible using metalloprotein-based catalysts. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Radioimmunoassay of plasma myoglobin concentrations in normal persons

    Milanov, S.; Milkov, V. (Meditsinska Akademiya, Sofia (Bulgaria). Nauchen Inst. po Rentgenologiya i Radiobiologiya)

    1982-01-01

    Plasma myoglobin concentrations by radioimmunoassay in 53 normal persons (29 women and 24 men) with ages ranging from 19 to 76 years. The average values for myoglobin concentrations in the plasma of 29 women, aged 19 to 76 years, are 4a.09 +- 4.51 ng/ml, while in 24 healthy men, aged 20 to 74 years, they are 54.39 +-4.68 ng/ml. The obtained results for the plasma myoglobin level in men are higher than the ones recorded in women at statistical significance p<0.05. In the group under study the plasma myoglobin values disclose also age-related differences, although lacking statistical significance (p>0.10).

  9. Met-myoglobin formation, accumulation, degradation, and myoglobin oxygenation monitoring based on multiwavelength attenuance measurement in porcine meat

    Nguyen, Thien; Phan, Kien Nguyen; Lee, Jee-Bum; Kim, Jae Gwan

    2016-05-01

    We propose a simple, rapid, and nondestructive method to investigate formation, accumulation, and degradation of met-myoglobin (met-Mb) and myoglobin oxygenation from the interior of porcine meat. For the experiment, color photos and attenuance spectra of porcine meat (well-bled muscle, fat, and mixed) were collected daily to perform colorimetric analysis and to obtain the differences of attenuance between 578 and 567 nm (A578-A567) and between 615 and 630 nm (A630-A615), respectively. Oxy-, deoxy-, and met-myoglobin concentration changes over storage time were also calculated using Beer-Lamberts' law with reflectance intensities at 557, 582, and 630 nm. The change of A578-A567 was well matched with the change of myoglobin oxygenation, and the change of A630-A615 corresponded well with the formation and degradation of met-Mb. In addition, attenuation differences, A578-A567 and A630-A615, were able to show the formation of met-Mb earlier than colorimetric analysis. Therefore, the attenuance differences between wavelengths can be indicators for estimating myoglobin oxygenation and met-Mb formation, accumulation, and degradation, which enable us to design a simple device to monitor myoglobin activities in porcine meat.

  10. Gas hydrates

    Ramprasad, T.

    , not all of them are white like snow. Some hydrates from the deep Gulf of Mexico are richly colored in shades of yellow, orange, or even red. The ice-like masses are beautiful, and contrast with the dull gray of deep sea muds. Hydrates from the Blake... volcanoes and associated gas hydrates: Marine Geology, v. 167, p. 29-42. Milkov, A.V. and R. Sassen, 2001a, Estimate of gas hydrate resource, northwestern Gulf of Mexico continental slope: Marine Geology, v. 179, pp. 71-83. Milkov, A.V., Sassen, R...

  11. Degradation of tropoelastin and skin elastin by neprilysin

    Mora Huertas, Angela C.; Schmelzer, Christian E. H.; Luise, Chiara

    2018-01-01

    was to investigate the degradation of fibrillar skin elastin by neprilysin and the influence of the donor's age on the degradation process using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics approaches. The results showed that cleavage by neprilysin is dependent on previous damage of elastin. While neprilysin does not cleave...... young and intact skin elastin well, it degrades elastin fibers from older donors, which may further promote aging processes. With regards to the cleavage behavior of neprilysin, a strong preference for Gly at P1 was found, while Gly, Ala and Val were well accepted at P1' upon cleavage of tropoelastin...... and skin elastin. The results of the study indicate that the progressive release of bioactive elastin peptides by neprilysin upon skin aging may enhance local tissue damage and accelerate extracellular matrix aging processes....

  12. Molecular-level insights into aging processes of skin elastin

    Mora Huertas, Angela C; Schmelzer, Christian E H; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Skin aging is characterized by different features including wrinkling, atrophy of the dermis and loss of elasticity associated with damage to the extracellular matrix protein elastin. The aim of this study was to investigate the aging process of skin elastin at the molecular level by evaluating...... the influence of intrinsic (chronological aging) and extrinsic factors (sun exposure) on the morphology and susceptibility of elastin towards enzymatic degradation. Elastin was isolated from biopsies derived from sun-protected or sun-exposed skin of differently aged individuals. The morphology of the elastin...... pronounced in sun-exposed tissue. Marker peptides were identified, which showed an age-related increase or decrease in their abundances and provide insights into the progression of the aging process of elastin fibers. Strong age-related cleavage occurs in hydrophobic tropoelastin domains 18, 20, 24 and 26...

  13. The Effect of Static Stretch on Elastin Degradation in Arteries

    Chow, Ming-Jay; Choi, Myunghwan; Yun, Seok Hyun; Zhang, Yanhang

    2013-01-01

    Previously we have shown that gradual changes in the structure of elastin during an elastase treatment can lead to important transition stages in the mechanical behavior of arteries [1]. However, in vivo arteries are constantly being loaded due to systolic and diastolic pressures and so understanding the effects of loading on the enzymatic degradation of elastin in arteries is important. With biaxial tensile testing, we measured the mechanical behavior of porcine thoracic aortas digested with a mild solution of purified elastase (5 U/mL) in the presence of a static stretch. Arterial mechanical properties and biochemical composition were analyzed to assess the effects of mechanical stretch on elastin degradation. As elastin is being removed, the dimensions of the artery increase by more than 20% in both the longitude and circumference directions. Elastin assays indicate a faster rate of degradation when stretch was present during the digestion. A simple exponential decay fitting confirms the time constant for digestion with stretch (0.11±0.04 h−1) is almost twice that of digestion without stretch (0.069±0.028 h−1). The transition from J-shaped to S-shaped stress vs. strain behavior in the longitudinal direction generally occurs when elastin content is reduced by about 60%. Multiphoton image analysis confirms the removal/fragmentation of elastin and also shows that the collagen fibers are closely intertwined with the elastin lamellae in the medial layer. After removal of elastin, the collagen fibers are no longer constrained and become disordered. Release of amorphous elastin during the fragmentation of the lamellae layers is observed and provides insights into the process of elastin degradation. Overall this study reveals several interesting microstructural changes in the extracellular matrix that could explain the resulting mechanical behavior of arteries with elastin degradation. PMID:24358135

  14. Elastin in large artery stiffness and hypertension

    Wagenseil, Jessica E.; Mecham, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Large artery stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), is correlated with high blood pressure and may be a causative factor in essential hypertension. The extracellular matrix components, specifically the mix of elastin and collagen in the vessel wall, determine the passive mechanical properties of the large arteries. Elastin is organized into elastic fibers in the wall during arterial development in a complex process that requires spatial and temporal coordination of numerous proteins. The elastic fibers last the lifetime of the organism, but are subject to proteolytic degradation and chemical alterations that change their mechanical properties. This review discusses how alterations in the amount, assembly, organization or chemical properties of the elastic fibers affect arterial stiffness and blood pressure. Strategies for encouraging or reversing alterations to the elastic fibers are addressed. Methods for determining the efficacy of these strategies, by measuring elastin amounts and arterial stiffness, are summarized. Therapies that have a direct effect on arterial stiffness through alterations to the elastic fibers in the wall may be an effective treatment for essential hypertension. PMID:22290157

  15. Myoglobin Expression in Chelonia mydas Brain, Heart and Liver Tissues

    RINI PUSPITANINGRUM

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the underpinning physiology and biochemistry of animals is essential to properly understand the impact of anthropogenic changes and natural catastrophes upon the conservation of endangered species. An observation on the tissue location of the key respiratory protein, myoglobin, now opens up new opportunities for understanding how hypoxia tolerance impacts on diving lifestyle in turtles. The respiratory protein, myoglobin has functions other than oxygen binding which are involved in hypoxia tolerance, including metabolism of reactive oxygen species and of the vascular function by metabolism of nitric oxide. Our work aims to determine whether myoglobin expression in the green turtle exists in multiple non muscle tissues and to confirm the hypothesis that reptiles also have a distributed myoglobin expression which is linked to the hypoxiatolerant trait. This initial work in turtle hatch Chelonia mydas confirms the presence of myoglobin transcriptin brain, heart and liver tissues. Furthermore, it will serve as a tool for completing the sequence and generating an in situ hybridization probe for verifying of cell location in expressing tissues.

  16. Myoglobin Expression in Chelonia mydas Brain, Heart and Liver Tissues

    RINI PUSPITANINGRUM

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the underpinning physiology and biochemistry of animals is essential to properly understand the impact of anthropogenic changes and natural catastrophes upon the conservation of endangered species. An observation on the tissue location of the key respiratory protein, myoglobin, now opens up new opportunities for understanding how hypoxia tolerance impacts on diving lifestyle in turtles. The respiratory protein, myoglobin has functions other than oxygen binding which are involved in hypoxia tolerance, including metabolism of reactive oxygen species and of the vascular function by metabolism of nitric oxide. Our work aims to determine whether myoglobin expression in the green turtle exists in multiple non muscle tissues and to confirm the hypothesis that reptiles also have a distributed myoglobin expression which is linked to the hypoxia-tolerant trait. This initial work in turtle hatch Chelonia mydas confirms the presence of myoglobin transcriptin brain, heart and liver tissues. Furthermore, it will serve as a tool for completing the sequence and generating an in situ hybridization probe for verifying of cell location in expressing tissues.

  17. Elastin as a self-organizing biomaterial: use of recombinantly expressed human elastin polypeptides as a model for investigations of structure and self-assembly of elastin.

    Keeley, Fred W; Bellingham, Catherine M; Woodhouse, Kimberley A

    2002-02-28

    Elastin is the major extracellular matrix protein of large arteries such as the aorta, imparting characteristics of extensibility and elastic recoil. Once laid down in tissues, polymeric elastin is not subject to turnover, but is able to sustain its mechanical resilience through thousands of millions of cycles of extension and recoil. Elastin consists of ca. 36 domains with alternating hydrophobic and cross-linking characteristics. It has been suggested that these hydrophobic domains, predominantly containing glycine, proline, leucine and valine, often occurring in tandemly repeated sequences, are responsible for the ability of elastin to align monomeric chains for covalent cross-linking. We have shown that small, recombinantly expressed polypeptides based on sequences of human elastin contain sufficient information to self-organize into fibrillar structures and promote the formation of lysine-derived cross-links. These cross-linked polypeptides can also be fabricated into membrane structures that have solubility and mechanical properties reminiscent of native insoluble elastin. Understanding the basis of the self-organizational ability of elastin-based polypeptides may provide important clues for the general design of self-assembling biomaterials.

  18. Myoglobin structure and function: A multiweek biochemistry laboratory project.

    Silverstein, Todd P; Kirk, Sarah R; Meyer, Scott C; Holman, Karen L McFarlane

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a multiweek laboratory project in which students isolate myoglobin and characterize its structure, function, and redox state. The important laboratory techniques covered in this project include size-exclusion chromatography, electrophoresis, spectrophotometric titration, and FTIR spectroscopy. Regarding protein structure, students work with computer modeling and visualization of myoglobin and its homologues, after which they spectroscopically characterize its thermal denaturation. Students also study protein function (ligand binding equilibrium) and are instructed on topics in data analysis (calibration curves, nonlinear vs. linear regression). This upper division biochemistry laboratory project is a challenging and rewarding one that not only exposes students to a wide variety of important biochemical laboratory techniques but also ties those techniques together to work with a single readily available and easily characterized protein, myoglobin. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. Cardiac Troponin I, Creatine Phosphokinase and Myoglobine Levels in Preeclampsia

    Ahmet Kale

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate minor myocardial injury in preeclamptic pregnancies by serum markers of cardiac troponin-I, creatine phosphokinase and myoglobine. Group I consisted of 45 preeclamptic pregnancies, Group 2 consisted of uncomplicated pregnancies. The groups were compared for maternal age, parity, mean troponin–I, creatine phosphokinase and myoglobine values. Student-t test were used in statistical analyses. Significance was accepted as p<0.05. Cardiac troponin-I levels were statistically significantly higher in preeclamptic pregnancies (0,97 ± 0,11ng/ml than control groups (0,12 ± 0.09 ng/ml (p<0.001. No statistically significant difference was found with mean levels of creatine phosphokinase and myoglobin levels between two groups. Higher values of troponin-I’in preeclamptic patients is thought to be a result of myocardial injury and associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension.

  20. ESR studies of heat denaturation in Cu myoglobin complexes

    Louro, S.R.W.; Ribeiro, S.C.; Bemski, G.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is made on the behaviour of Cu2 + and Fe3 + in copper doped myoglobin, subjected to heat treatment. ESR is observed at X-band. The amplitude of the g = 5.9 line of the high spin F 3 + in met-myoglobin is studied as a function of the temperature of the heat treatment, the pH and the length of time of exposure to the heat treatment. These experiments are performed for both the pure protein and for the copper-myoglobin complex, at pH between 5 and 8.5. Results concerning the decrease of the amplitude of Fe 3+ high spin signal are discussed in comparison with Hollocher's results in hemoglobin. The Cu spectra obtained are interpreted, with the aid of a computer program, Kivelson and Neiman's results being used to analyse the authors data

  1. High-level expression and deuteration of sperm whale myoglobin: A study of its solvent structure by X-ray and neutron diffraction methods

    Shu, F. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Ramakrishnan, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Schoenborn, B.P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Neutron diffraction has become one of the best ways to study light atoms, such as hydrogens. Hydrogen however has a negative coherent scattering factor, and a large incoherent scattering factor, while deuterium has virtually no incoherent scattering, but a large positive coherent scattering factor. Beside causing high background due to its incoherent scattering, the negative coherent scattering of hydrogen tends to cancel out the positive contribution from other atoms in a neutron density map. Therefore a fully deuterated sample will yield better diffraction data with stronger density in the hydrogen position. On this basis, a sperm whale myoglobin gene modified to include part of the A cII protein gene has been cloned into the T7 expression system. Milligram amounts of fully deuterated holo-myoglobin have been obtained and used for crystallization. The synthetic sperm whale myoglobin crystallized in P2{sub 1} space group isomorphous with the native protein crystal. A complete X-ray diffraction dataset at 1.5{Angstrom} has been collected. This X-ray dataset, and a neutron data set collected previously on a protonated carbon-monoxymyoglobin crystal have been used for solvent structure studies. Both X-ray and neutron data have shown that there are ordered hydration layers around the protein surface. Solvent shell analysis on the neutron data further has shown that the first hydration layer behaves differently around polar and apolar regions of the protein surface. Finally, the structure of per-deuterated myoglobin has been refined using all reflections to a R factor of 17%.

  2. High-level expression and deuteration of sperm whale myoglobin: A study of its solvent structure by X-ray and neutron diffraction methods

    Shu, F.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Schoenborn, B.P.

    1994-01-01

    Neutron diffraction has become one of the best ways to study light atoms, such as hydrogens. Hydrogen however has a negative coherent scattering factor, and a large incoherent scattering factor, while deuterium has virtually no incoherent scattering, but a large positive coherent scattering factor. Beside causing high background due to its incoherent scattering, the negative coherent scattering of hydrogen tends to cancel out the positive contribution from other atoms in a neutron density map. Therefore a fully deuterated sample will yield better diffraction data with stronger density in the hydrogen position. On this basis, a sperm whale myoglobin gene modified to include part of the A cII protein gene has been cloned into the T7 expression system. Milligram amounts of fully deuterated holo-myoglobin have been obtained and used for crystallization. The synthetic sperm whale myoglobin crystallized in P2 1 space group isomorphous with the native protein crystal. A complete X-ray diffraction dataset at 1.5 Angstrom has been collected. This X-ray dataset, and a neutron data set collected previously on a protonated carbon-monoxymyoglobin crystal have been used for solvent structure studies. Both X-ray and neutron data have shown that there are ordered hydration layers around the protein surface. Solvent shell analysis on the neutron data further has shown that the first hydration layer behaves differently around polar and apolar regions of the protein surface. Finally, the structure of per-deuterated myoglobin has been refined using all reflections to a R factor of 17%

  3. Elastin binds to a multifunctional 67-kilodalton peripheral membrane protein

    Mecham, R.P.; Hinek, A.; Entwistle, R.; Wrenn, D.S.; Griffin, G.L.; Senior, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Elastin binding proteins from plasma membranes of elastin-producing cells were isolated by affinity chromatography on immobilized elastin peptides. Three proteins of 67, 61, and 55 kDa were released from the elastin resin by guanidine/detergent, soluble elastin peptides, synthetic peptide VGVAPG, or galactoside sugars, but not by synthetic RGD-containing peptide or sugars not related to galactose. All three proteins incorporated radiolabel upon extracellular iodination and contained [ 3 H]leucine following metabolic labeling, confirming that each is a synthetic product of the cell. The 67-kDa protein could be released from the cell surface with lactose-containing buffers, whereas solubilization of the 61- and 55-kDa components required the presence of detergent. Although all three proteins were retained on elastin affinity columns, the 61- and 55-kDa components were retained only in the presence of 67-kDa protein, suggesting that the 67-kDa protein binds elastin and the 61- and 55-kDa proteins bind to the 67-kDa protein. The authors propose that the 67-, 61-, and 55-kDa proteins constitute an elastin-receptor complex that forms a transmembrane link between the extracellular matrix and the intracellular compartment

  4. Adherence of B16-F10 melanoma cells to elastin

    Zetter, B.R.; Netland, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    B16-F10 melanoma cells selectivity colonize lung tissue in vivo. The authors have previously shown that these cells adhere preferentially to lung tissue in vitro. To quantify the binding of B16-F10 cells to isolated components of lung tissue, the authors devised a dot-blot cell adhesion assay. Samples were absorbed to 4 mm dots of nylon based paper under non-denaturing conditions, blocked with albumin or hemoglobin, and incubated with radiolabelled cells for 30 min. at 4 0 C. 125 -I labelled B16-F10 cells demonstrated a dose dependent binding to mouse lung elastin. Autoradiography and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that cells localized preferentially to the elastin dots. The melanoma cells bound more strongly to elastin relative to laminin, fibronectin, collagen types I and IV or heparan sulfate. Neither elastin-associated microfibrillar protein nor fragments of elastin produced by alkali or acid treatment demonstrated significant binding activity for these cells. The findings demonstrate that in addition to its unique mechanical properties that confer elasticity to tissues, elastin can also function as a cell adhesion molecule. The localization of elastin in the lung and its adhesive properties reported here suggest that elastin may facilitate the arrest and eventual colonization of circulating B16-F10 melanoma cells in the mouse lung

  5. Chloral Hydrate

    ... if you are allergic to chloral hydrate, aspirin, tartrazine (a yellow dye in some processed foods and ... in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature, away from excess ...

  6. Acquired Localized Cutis Laxa due to Increased Elastin Turnover

    Nygaard, Rie Harboe; Maynard, Scott; Schjerling, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cutis laxa is a rare disease characterized by abnormal skin wrinkling and laxity, due to decreased elastin synthesis or structural extracellular matrix defects. We have explored elastin metabolism in a case of adult onset cutis laxa localized to the upper body of a woman. For this purpose, we...... obtained skin biopsies from affected and unaffected skin areas of the patient and analyzed these with microscopy, polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and cell culture experiments. Skin from the affected area lacked elastin fibers in electron microscopy but had higher mRNA expression of elastin...... and total RNA. Levels of an apparent tropoelastin degradation product were higher in the affected area. Fibroblast cultures from the affected area were able to produce elastin and showed higher proliferation and survival after oxidative and UVB stress compared to fibroblasts from the unaffected area...

  7. Cues for cellular assembly of vascular elastin networks

    Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar R.

    Elastin, a structural protein distributed in the extracellular matrix of vascular tissues is critical to the maintenance of vascular mechanics, besides regulation of cell-signaling pathways involved in injury response and morphogenesis. Thus, congenital absence or disease-mediated degradation of vascular elastin and its malformation within native vessels due to innately poor elastin synthesis by adult vascular cells compromise vascular homeostasis. Current elastin regenerative strategies using tissue engineering principles are limited by the progressive destabilization of tropoelastin mRNA expression in adult vascular cells and the unavailability of scaffolds that can provide cellular cues necessary to up-regulate elastin synthesis and regenerate faithful mimics of native elastin. Since our earlier studies demonstrated the elastogenic utility of hyaluronan (HA)-based cues, we have currently sought to identify a unique set of culture conditions based on HA fragments (0.756-2000 kDa), growth factors (TGF-beta1, IGF-1) and other biomolecules (Cu2+ ions, LOX), which will together enhance synthesis, crosslinking, maturation and fibrous elastin matrix formation by adult SMCs, under both healthy and inflammatory conditions. It was observed that TGF-beta1 (1 ng/mL) together with HA oligomers (0.2 microg/mL) synergistically suppressed SMC proliferation, enhanced tropoelastin (8-fold) and matrix elastin synthesis (5.5-fold), besides improving matrix yield (4.5-fold), possibly by increasing production and activity of lysyl oxidase (LOX). Though addition of IGF-1 alone did not offer any advantage, HA fragments (20-200 kDa) in the presence of IGF-1 stimulated tropoelastin and soluble elastin synthesis more than 2.2-fold, with HMW HA contributing for ˜5-fold increase in crosslinked matrix elastin synthesis. Similarly, 0.1 M of Cu2+ ions, alone or together with HA fragments stimulated synthesis of tropoelastin (4-fold) and crosslinked matrix elastin (4.5-fold), via increases in

  8. Effect of glucose on the biomechanical function of arterial elastin.

    Wang, Yunjie; Zeinali-Davarani, Shahrokh; Davis, Elaine C; Zhang, Yanhang

    2015-09-01

    Elastin is essential to provide elastic support for blood vessels. As a remarkably long-lived protein, elastin can suffer from cumulative effects of exposure to biochemical damages, which can greatly compromise its biomechanical properties. Non-enzymatic glycation is one of the main mechanisms of aging and its effect is magnified in diabetic patients. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of glucose on mechanical properties of isolated porcine aortic elastin. Elastin samples were incubated in 2 M glucose solution and were allowed to equilibrate for 4, 7, 14, 21 or 28 days at 37 °C. Equibiaxial tensile tests were performed to study the changes of elastic properties of elastin due to glycation. Significant decreases in tissue dimension were observed after 7 days glucose incubation. Elastin samples treated for 14, 21 or 28 days demonstrate a significant increase in hysteresis in the stress-stretch curves, indicating a greater energy loss due to glucose treatment. Both the longitudinal and the circumferential directions show significant increases in tangent modulus with glucose treatment, however only significant increases are observed after 7 days for the circumferential direction. An eight-chain statistical mechanics based microstructural model was used to study the hyperelastic and orthotropic behavior of the glucose-treated elastin and the material parameters were estimated using a nonlinear least squares method. Material parameters in the model were related to elastin density and fiber orientation, and, hence, the possible microstructural changes in glucose-treated elastin. Estimated material parameters show a general increasing trend in elastin density per unit volume with glucose incubation. The simulation results also indicate that more elastic fibers are aligned in the longitudinal and circumferential directions, rather than in the radial direction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular-level insights into aging processes of skin elastin.

    Mora Huertas, Angela C; Schmelzer, Christian E H; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Heyroth, Frank; Heinz, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Skin aging is characterized by different features including wrinkling, atrophy of the dermis and loss of elasticity associated with damage to the extracellular matrix protein elastin. The aim of this study was to investigate the aging process of skin elastin at the molecular level by evaluating the influence of intrinsic (chronological aging) and extrinsic factors (sun exposure) on the morphology and susceptibility of elastin towards enzymatic degradation. Elastin was isolated from biopsies derived from sun-protected or sun-exposed skin of differently aged individuals. The morphology of the elastin fibers was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Mass spectrometric analysis and label-free quantification allowed identifying differences in the cleavage patterns of the elastin samples after enzymatic digestion. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis were used to visualize differences between the samples and to determine the contribution of extrinsic and intrinsic aging to the proteolytic susceptibility of elastin. Moreover, the release of potentially bioactive peptides was studied. Skin aging is associated with the decomposition of elastin fibers, which is more pronounced in sun-exposed tissue. Marker peptides were identified, which showed an age-related increase or decrease in their abundances and provide insights into the progression of the aging process of elastin fibers. Strong age-related cleavage occurs in hydrophobic tropoelastin domains 18, 20, 24 and 26. Photoaging makes the N-terminal and central parts of the tropoelastin molecules more susceptible towards enzymatic cleavage and, hence, accelerates the age-related degradation of elastin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  10. A biomaterial composed of collagen and solubilized elastin enhances angiogenesis and elastic fiber formation without calcification.

    Daamen, W.F.; Nillesen, S.T.M.; Wismans, P.G.P.; Reinhardt, D.; Hafmans, T.G.M.; Veerkamp, J.H.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van

    2008-01-01

    Elastin is the prime protein in elastic tissues that contributes to elasticity of, for example, lung, aorta, and skin. Upon injury, elastic fibers are not readily replaced, which hampers tissue regeneration. Incorporation of solubilized elastin (hydrolyzed insoluble elastin fibers or elastin

  11. Myoglobin Structure and Function: A Multiweek Biochemistry Laboratory Project

    Silverstein, Todd P.; Kirk, Sarah R.; Meyer, Scott C.; Holman, Karen L. McFarlane

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a multiweek laboratory project in which students isolate myoglobin and characterize its structure, function, and redox state. The important laboratory techniques covered in this project include size-exclusion chromatography, electrophoresis, spectrophotometric titration, and FTIR spectroscopy. Regarding protein structure,…

  12. A hydrogen-donating monohydroxamate scavenges ferryl myoglobin radicals

    Cooper, C E; Green, E S; Rice-Evans, C A

    1994-01-01

    The addition of 25 microM hydrogen peroxide to 20 microM metmyoglobin produces ferryl (FeIV = O) myoglobin. Optical spectroscopy shows that the ferryl species reaches a maximum concentration (60-70% of total haem) after 10 minutes and decays slowly (hours). Low temperature EPR spectroscopy of the...

  13. Immobilization of myoglobin in sodium alginate composite membranes

    Katia Cecília de Souza Figueiredo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe immobilization of myoglobin in sodium alginate films was investigated with the aim of evaluating the protein stability in an ionic polymeric matrix. Myoglobin was chosen due to the resemblance to each hemoglobin tetramer. Sodium alginate, being a natural polysaccharide, was selected as the polymeric matrix because of its chemical structure and film-forming ability. To improve the mechanical resistance of sodium alginate films, the polymer was deposited over the surface of a cellulose acetate support by means of ultrafiltration. The ionic crosslink of sodium alginate was investigated by calcium ions. Composite membrane characterization comprised water swelling tests, water flux, SEM images and UV-visible spectroscopy. The electrostatic interaction between the protein and the polysaccharide did not damage the UV-visible pattern of native myoglobin. A good affinity between sodium alginate and cellulose acetate was observed. The top layer of the dense composite membrane successfully immobilized Myoglobin, retaining the native UV-visible pattern for two months.

  14. Insights into the degradation of human elastin by matrilysin-1

    Heinz, Andrea; Taddese, Samuel; Sippl, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Human matrilysin-1 (MMP-7) is one of the most potent elastases besides macrophage elastase in the family of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). It has been reported to provide macrophages with the highest elastinolytic capacity and plays key roles in diseases such as emphysema and cancer. Describin...... into the degradation of human elastin by MMP-7 and may aid in the development of approaches to treat elastin-degrading diseases.......Human matrilysin-1 (MMP-7) is one of the most potent elastases besides macrophage elastase in the family of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). It has been reported to provide macrophages with the highest elastinolytic capacity and plays key roles in diseases such as emphysema and cancer. Describing...... the enzymatic turnover of matrix components helps to understand the molecular basis of disease processes. Hence, in this work, the cleavage behavior of MMP-7 with respect to its natural substrate human elastin was investigated using mass spectrometric (MS) techniques and molecular modeling. Elastin peptides...

  15. Broadband diffuse optical characterization of elastin for biomedical applications.

    Konugolu Venkata Sekar, Sanathana; Beh, Joo Sin; Farina, Andrea; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Pifferi, Antonio; Taroni, Paola

    2017-10-01

    Elastin is a key structural protein of dynamic connective tissues widely found in the extracellular matrix of skin, arteries, lungs and ligaments. It is responsible for a range of diseases related to aging of biological tissues. The optical characterization of elastin can open new opportunities for its investigation in biomedical studies. In this work, we present the absorption spectra of elastin using a broadband (550-1350nm) diffuse optical spectrometer. Distortions caused by fluorescence and finite bandwidth of the laser source on estimated absorption were effectively accounted for in measurements and data analysis and compensated. A comprehensive summary and comparison between collagen and elastin is presented, highlighting distinct features for its accurate quantification in biological applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of brachytherapy on gene expressions of elastin and elastase

    Li Junming; Zhou Jingqun; Hu Bin; Li Shuguo

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of brachytherapy on the gene expressions of elastin and elastase in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Methods: Rat VSMCs cultured in DMEM containing 10% FBS were irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays at 0, 7, 14, 28 Gy respectively. Then mRNA levels of elastin and elastase were determined by reverse transcription competitive PCR(RT-PCR). Results: Brachytherapy inhibited the expressions of elastase. Elastase mRNA decreased 25.3% and 50.1% in VSMC irradiated with 14, 28 Gy, respectively (P<0.05). The elastin mRNA level increased 80.7% and 102.3% in VSMC irradiated with 14, 25 Gy, respectively (P<0.05). Conclusion: Brachytherapy inhabits the expressions of elastase and increased elastin in VSMC cells

  17. Does human leukocyte elastase degrade intact skin elastin?

    Schmelzer, Christian E H; Jung, Michael C; Wohlrab, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the susceptibility of intact fibrillar human elastin to human leukocyte elastase and cathepsin G. Elastin is a vital protein of the extracellular matrix of vertebrates, and provides exceptional properties including elasticity and tensile strength to many tissues...... and organs, including the aorta, lung, cartilage, elastic ligaments and skin, and is thus critical for their long-term function. Mature elastin is an insoluble and extremely durable protein that undergoes very little turnover, but sustained exposure to proteases may lead to irreversible and severe damage......, and thus to functional loss of the elastic fiber network. Hence, it is a key issue to understand which enzymes actually initiate elastolysis under certain pathological conditions or during intrinsic aging. In this paper, we provide a complete workflow for isolation of pure and intact elastin from very...

  18. Liberation of Desmosine and Isodesmosine as Amino Acids from Insoluble Elastin by Elastolytic Proteases

    Umeda, Hideyuki; Aikawa, Masanori; Libby, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The development of atherosclerotic lesions and abdominal aortic aneurysms involves degradation and loss of extracellular matrix components, such as collagen and elastin. Releases of the elastin cross-links desmosine (DES) and isodesmosine (IDE) may reflect elastin degradation in cardiovascular diseases. This study investigated the production of soluble elastin cross-linking structures by proteinases implicated in arterial diseases. Recombinant MMP-12 and neutrophil elastase liberated DES and IDE as amino acids from insoluble elastin. DES and IDE were also released from insoluble elastin exposed to monocyte/macrophage cell lines or human primary macrophages derived from peripheral blood monocytes. Elastin oxidized by reactive oxygen species (ROS) liberated more unconjugated DES and IDE than did non-oxidized elastin when incubated with MMP-12 or neutrophil elastase. These results support the exploration of free DES and IDE as biomarkers of elastin degradation. PMID:21726534

  19. Extraction and characterization of elastin from poultry skin

    Nadalian, Mehdi; Yusop, Salma Mohamad; Mustapha, Wan Aida Wan; Babji, Abdul Salam [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Azman, Mohd Azri [Strategic Livestock Research Centre, Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute, MARDI Headquarters, 43400, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    Poultry by-products have a great economic potential that need to be exploited. Poultry skin could be utilized to produce elastin, which is often incorporated in the production of functional food or medicine due to its antioxidative properties. This study was conducted to determine the physicochemical and microstructural characteristics of elastins isolated from broiler and spent hen skin. Analyses including proximate and amino acid composition along with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were carried out. In this study, elastin was successfully extracted from broiler and spent hen skin using three successive solvents extract of NaCl, acetone and NaOH respectively. It was apparent that the fat content of extracted elastin from broiler skin was higher (P < 0.05) than spent hen’s, with both samples recording less than 1% fat. Moreover, broiler skin elastin also had a higher protein content (68.3%) than spent hen’s (67.8%). Both skin sources contained glycine as the major amino acid (19–20%), followed by glutamic acid, proline, alanine and arginine. The results of TEM indicated that the use of collagenase enzyme or further purification efforts should be incorporated along with the extraction methods used because of the presence of collagen and other debris in the resultant elastin.

  20. Electrospun polydioxanone-elastin blends: potential for bioresorbable vascular grafts

    Sell, S A [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); McClure, M J [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Barnes, C P [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Knapp, D C [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Walpoth, B H [University Hospital, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Simpson, D G [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States); Bowlin, G L [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    An electrospun cardiovascular graft composed of polydioxanone (PDO) and elastin has been designed and fabricated with mechanical properties to more closely match those of native arterial tissue, while remaining conducive to tissue regeneration. PDO was chosen to provide mechanical integrity to the prosthetic, while elastin provides elasticity and bioactivity (to promote regeneration in vitro/in situ). It is the elastic nature of elastin that dominates the low-strain mechanical response of the vessel to blood flow and prevents pulsatile energy from being dissipated as heat. Uniaxial tensile and suture retention tests were performed on the electrospun grafts to demonstrate the similarities of the mechanical properties between the grafts and native vessel. Dynamic compliance measurements produced values that ranged from 1.2 to 5.6%/100 mmHg for a set of three different mean arterial pressures. Results showed the 50:50 ratio to closely mimic the compliance of native femoral artery, while grafts that contained less elastin exceeded the suture retention strength of native vessel. Preliminary cell culture studies showed the elastin-containing grafts to be bioactive as cells migrated through their full thickness within 7 days, but failed to migrate into pure PDO scaffolds. Electrospinning of the PDO and elastin-blended composite into a conduit for use as a small diameter vascular graft has extreme potential and warrants further investigation as it thus far compares favorably to native vessel.

  1. Extraction and characterization of elastin from poultry skin

    Nadalian, Mehdi; Yusop, Salma Mohamad; Mustapha, Wan Aida Wan; Babji, Abdul Salam; Azman, Mohd Azri

    2013-01-01

    Poultry by-products have a great economic potential that need to be exploited. Poultry skin could be utilized to produce elastin, which is often incorporated in the production of functional food or medicine due to its antioxidative properties. This study was conducted to determine the physicochemical and microstructural characteristics of elastins isolated from broiler and spent hen skin. Analyses including proximate and amino acid composition along with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were carried out. In this study, elastin was successfully extracted from broiler and spent hen skin using three successive solvents extract of NaCl, acetone and NaOH respectively. It was apparent that the fat content of extracted elastin from broiler skin was higher (P < 0.05) than spent hen’s, with both samples recording less than 1% fat. Moreover, broiler skin elastin also had a higher protein content (68.3%) than spent hen’s (67.8%). Both skin sources contained glycine as the major amino acid (19–20%), followed by glutamic acid, proline, alanine and arginine. The results of TEM indicated that the use of collagenase enzyme or further purification efforts should be incorporated along with the extraction methods used because of the presence of collagen and other debris in the resultant elastin

  2. Elastin in the human intervertebral disk. A histological and biochemical study comparing it with elastin in the human yellow ligament.

    Mikawa, Y; Hamagami, H; Shikata, J; Yamamuro, T

    1986-01-01

    The elastic fiber and elastin in the human yellow ligament and intervertebral disk were studied histologically and biochemically. The elastic fiber in the human intervertebral disk, which until now had not been clearly identified microscopically, was observed clearly. We found the distribution of the elastic fiber in the intervertebral disk to be very sparse and irregular, and its diameter was small, being about one-tenth of that found in the yellow ligament. The elastin contents of the yellow ligament and intervertebral disk were 46.7% +/- 0.9% and 1.7% +/- 0.2% respectively (mean +/- SE) of the total dry weight. The amino acid composition of elastin in the yellow ligament is similar to that of other tissue, as reported in the literature; however, that found in the intervertebral disk is significantly different. It would appear, therefore, that the elastin in the intervertebral disk is of a different type from that found elsewhere.

  3. Enhancing the electrochemical response of myoglobin with carbon nanotube electrodes.

    Esplandiu, M J; Pacios, M; Cyganek, L; Bartroli, J; del Valle, M

    2009-09-02

    In this paper, the electrochemical behavior of different myoglobin-modified carbon electrodes is evaluated. In particular, the performance of voltammetric biosensors made of forest-like carbon nanotubes, carbon nanotube composites and graphite composites is compared by monitoring mainly the electrocatalytic reduction of H(2)O(2) by myoglobin and their corresponding electroanalytical characteristics. Graphite composites showed the worst electroanalytical performance, exhibiting a small linear range, a limit of detection (LOD) of 9 x 10(-5) M and low sensitivity. However, it was found that the electrochemical response was enhanced with the use of carbon nanotube-based electrodes with LOD up to 5 x 10(-8) M, higher sensitivities and wider linear range response. On the one hand, in the case of the CNT epoxy composite, the improvement in the response can be mainly attributed to its more porous surface which allows the immobilization of higher amounts of the electroactive protein. On the other hand, in the case of the forest-like CNT electrodes, the enhancement is due to an increase in the electron transfer kinetics. These findings encourage the use of myoglobin-modified carbon nanotube electrodes as potential (bio)sensors of H(2)O(2) or O(2) in biology, microbiology and environmental fields.

  4. Introduction of gold nanoparticles into myoglobin-Nafion film for direct electrochemistry application.

    Xie, Wenting; Kong, Linlin; Kan, Meixiu; Han, Dongmei; Wang, Xueji; Zhang, Hui-Min

    2010-10-01

    An effective myoglobin-Nafion film is prepared by introducing gold nanoparticles in through a simple procedure by ion-exchange combined with electrochemical reduction. Gold nanoparticles are highly dispersed in myoglobin-Nafion film with an average size of 2.3 +/- 0.2 nm. The electrochemical behavior of myoglobin entrapped in the film has been carefully investigated with cyclic voltammetry. The results show that the introduction of gold nanoparticles into myoglobin-Nafion film makes the direct electron transfer of myoglobin efficient. A pair of well-defined redox peaks for myoglobin heme Fe(II)/Fe(III) is observed with a formal potential of -0.150 V in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.0). The electrochemical parameters of myoglobin in the composite film are further calculated with the results of the electron-transfer rate constant (k(s)) as 0.93 s(-1) and the charge transfer coefficient (alpha) as 0.69. The experimental results also demonstrate that the immobilized myoglobin retains its electrocatalytic activity for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide and the catalytic reduction peak of myoglobin appear in a linear relationship with H2O2 concentration in the range of 10.0-235.0 microM with correlation coefficient of 0.9970. Thus fabricated Au/Mb/Nafion electrode should give a new approach for developing redox protein or enzyme-based biosensors.

  5. Procyanidins-crosslinked aortic elastin scaffolds with distinctive anti-calcification and biological properties.

    Wang, Xiaoya; Zhai, Wanyin; Wu, Chengtie; Ma, Bing; Zhang, Jiamin; Zhang, Hongfeng; Zhu, Ziyan; Chang, Jiang

    2015-04-01

    Elastin, a main component of decellularized extracellular matrices and elastin-containing materials, has been used for tissue engineering applications due to their excellent biocompatibility. However, elastin is easily calcified, leading to the decrease of life span for elastin-based substitutes. How to inhibit the calcification of elastin-based scaffolds, but maintain their good biocompatibility, still remains significantly challenging. Procyanidins (PC) are a type of natural polyphenols with crosslinking ability. To investigate whether pure elastin could be crosslinked by PC with anti-calcification effect, PC was first used to crosslink aortic elastin. Results show that PC can crosslink elastin and effectively inhibit elastin-initiated calcification. Further experiments reveal the possible mechanisms for the anti-calcification of PC crosslinking including (1) inhibiting inflammation cell attachment, and secretion of inflammatory factors such as MMPs and TNF-α, (2) preventing elastin degradation by elastase, and (3) direct inhibition of mineral nucleation in elastin. Moreover, the PC-crosslinked aortic elastin maintains natural structure with high pore volume (1111 μL/g), large pore size (10-300 μm) and high porosity (75.1%) which facilitates recellularization of scaffolds in vivo, and displays excellent hemocompatibility, anti-thrombus and anti-inflammatory potential. The advantages of PC-crosslinked porous aortic elastin suggested that it can serve as a promising scaffold for tissue engineering. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Skin hydration and hydrating products].

    Duplan, H; Nocera, T

    2018-05-01

    One of the skin's principal functions is to protect the body against its environment by maintaining an effective epidermal barrier, not only against external factors, but also to prevent water loss from the body. Indeed, water homeostasis is vital for the normal physiological functioning of skin. Hydration levels affect not only visible microscopic parameters such as the suppleness and softness of skin, but also molecular parameters, enzyme activities and cellular signalling within the epidermis. The body is continually losing some of its water, but this phenomenon is limited and the optimal hydration gradient in skin is ensured via a set of sophisticated regulatory processes that rely on the functional and dynamic properties of the uppermost level of the skin consisting of the stratum corneum. The present article brings together data recently acquired in the fields of skin hydration and the characterisation of dehydrated or dry skin, whether through study of the regulatory processes involved or as a result of changes in the techniques used for in situ measurement, and thus in optimisation of management. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Elastin distribution in the normal uterus, uterine leiomyomas, adenomyosis and adenomyomas: a comparison.

    Zheng, Wei-Qiang; Ma, Rong; Zheng, Jian-Ming; Gong, Zhi-Jing

    2006-04-01

    To describe the histologic distribution of elastin in the nonpregnant human uterus, uterine leiomyomas, adenomyosis and adenomyomas. Uteri were obtained from women undergoing hysterectomy for benign conditions, including 26 cases of uterine leiomyomas, 24 cases of adenomyosis, 18 adenomyomas and 6 cases of autopsy specimens. Specific histochemical staining techniques were employed in order to demonstrate the distribution of elastin. The distribution of elastin components in the uterus was markedly uneven and showed a decreasing gradient from outer to inner myometrium. No elastin was present within leiomyomas, adenomyomas or adenomyosis. The distribution of elastin may help explain the normal function of the myometrium in labor. It implies that the uneven distribution of elastin components and absence of elastin within leiomyomas, adenomyomas and adenomyosis could be of some clinical significance. The altered elastin distribution in disease states may help explain such symptoms as dysmenorrhea in uterine endometriosis.

  8. Neonatal hyper- and hypothyroidism alter the myoglobin gene expression program in adulthood.

    Souza, K de Picoli; Nunes, M T

    2014-08-01

    Myoglobin acts as an oxygen store and a reactive oxygen species acceptor in muscles. We examined myoglobin mRNA in rat cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles during the first 42 days of life and the impact of transient neonatal hypo- and hyperthyroidism on the myoglobin gene expression pattern. Cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles of Wistar rats at 7-42 days of life were quickly removed, and myoglobin mRNA was determined by Northern blot analysis. Rats were treated with propylthiouracil (5-10 mg/100 g) and triiodothyronine (0.5-50 µg/100 g) for 5, 15, or 30 days after birth to induce hypo- and hyperthyroidism and euthanized either just after treatment or at 90 days. During postnatal (P) days 7-28, the ventricle myoglobin mRNA remained unchanged, but it gradually increased in skeletal muscle (12-fold). Triiodothyronine treatment, from days P0-P5, increased the skeletal muscle myoglobin mRNA 1.5- to 4.5-fold; a 2.5-fold increase was observed in ventricle muscle, but only when triiodothyronine treatment was extended to day P15. Conversely, hypothyroidism at P5 markedly decreased (60%) ventricular myoglobin mRNA. Moreover, transient hyperthyroidism in the neonatal period increased ventricle myoglobin mRNA (2-fold), and decreased heart rate (5%), fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30%) and body weight (20%) in adulthood. Transient hypothyroidism in the neonatal period also permanently decreased fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30%) and body weight (14%). These results indicated that changes in triiodothyronine supply in the neonatal period alter the myoglobin expression program in ventricle and skeletal muscle, leading to specific physiological repercussions and alterations in other parameters in adulthood.

  9. Neonatal hyper- and hypothyroidism alter the myoglobin gene expression program in adulthood

    Picoli Souza, K. de; Nunes, M.T.

    2014-01-01

    Myoglobin acts as an oxygen store and a reactive oxygen species acceptor in muscles. We examined myoglobin mRNA in rat cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles during the first 42 days of life and the impact of transient neonatal hypo- and hyperthyroidism on the myoglobin gene expression pattern. Cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles of Wistar rats at 7-42 days of life were quickly removed, and myoglobin mRNA was determined by Northern blot analysis. Rats were treated with propylthiouracil (5-10 mg/100 g) and triiodothyronine (0.5-50 µg/100 g) for 5, 15, or 30 days after birth to induce hypo- and hyperthyroidism and euthanized either just after treatment or at 90 days. During postnatal (P) days 7-28, the ventricle myoglobin mRNA remained unchanged, but it gradually increased in skeletal muscle (12-fold). Triiodothyronine treatment, from days P0-P5, increased the skeletal muscle myoglobin mRNA 1.5- to 4.5-fold; a 2.5-fold increase was observed in ventricle muscle, but only when triiodothyronine treatment was extended to day P15. Conversely, hypothyroidism at P5 markedly decreased (60%) ventricular myoglobin mRNA. Moreover, transient hyperthyroidism in the neonatal period increased ventricle myoglobin mRNA (2-fold), and decreased heart rate (5%), fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30%) and body weight (20%) in adulthood. Transient hypothyroidism in the neonatal period also permanently decreased fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30%) and body weight (14%). These results indicated that changes in triiodothyronine supply in the neonatal period alter the myoglobin expression program in ventricle and skeletal muscle, leading to specific physiological repercussions and alterations in other parameters in adulthood

  10. Neonatal hyper- and hypothyroidism alter the myoglobin gene expression program in adulthood

    Picoli Souza, K. de [Faculdade de Ciências Biológicas e Ambientais, Universidade Federal da Grande Dourados, Dourados, MS (Brazil); Nunes, M.T. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-06-24

    Myoglobin acts as an oxygen store and a reactive oxygen species acceptor in muscles. We examined myoglobin mRNA in rat cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles during the first 42 days of life and the impact of transient neonatal hypo- and hyperthyroidism on the myoglobin gene expression pattern. Cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles of Wistar rats at 7-42 days of life were quickly removed, and myoglobin mRNA was determined by Northern blot analysis. Rats were treated with propylthiouracil (5-10 mg/100 g) and triiodothyronine (0.5-50 µg/100 g) for 5, 15, or 30 days after birth to induce hypo- and hyperthyroidism and euthanized either just after treatment or at 90 days. During postnatal (P) days 7-28, the ventricle myoglobin mRNA remained unchanged, but it gradually increased in skeletal muscle (12-fold). Triiodothyronine treatment, from days P0-P5, increased the skeletal muscle myoglobin mRNA 1.5- to 4.5-fold; a 2.5-fold increase was observed in ventricle muscle, but only when triiodothyronine treatment was extended to day P15. Conversely, hypothyroidism at P5 markedly decreased (60%) ventricular myoglobin mRNA. Moreover, transient hyperthyroidism in the neonatal period increased ventricle myoglobin mRNA (2-fold), and decreased heart rate (5%), fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30%) and body weight (20%) in adulthood. Transient hypothyroidism in the neonatal period also permanently decreased fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30%) and body weight (14%). These results indicated that changes in triiodothyronine supply in the neonatal period alter the myoglobin expression program in ventricle and skeletal muscle, leading to specific physiological repercussions and alterations in other parameters in adulthood.

  11. Neonatal hyper- and hypothyroidism alter the myoglobin gene expression program in adulthood

    K. de Picoli Souza

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Myoglobin acts as an oxygen store and a reactive oxygen species acceptor in muscles. We examined myoglobin mRNA in rat cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles during the first 42 days of life and the impact of transient neonatal hypo- and hyperthyroidism on the myoglobin gene expression pattern. Cardiac ventricle and skeletal muscles of Wistar rats at 7-42 days of life were quickly removed, and myoglobin mRNA was determined by Northern blot analysis. Rats were treated with propylthiouracil (5-10 mg/100 g and triiodothyronine (0.5-50 µg/100 g for 5, 15, or 30 days after birth to induce hypo- and hyperthyroidism and euthanized either just after treatment or at 90 days. During postnatal (P days 7-28, the ventricle myoglobin mRNA remained unchanged, but it gradually increased in skeletal muscle (12-fold. Triiodothyronine treatment, from days P0-P5, increased the skeletal muscle myoglobin mRNA 1.5- to 4.5-fold; a 2.5-fold increase was observed in ventricle muscle, but only when triiodothyronine treatment was extended to day P15. Conversely, hypothyroidism at P5 markedly decreased (60% ventricular myoglobin mRNA. Moreover, transient hyperthyroidism in the neonatal period increased ventricle myoglobin mRNA (2-fold, and decreased heart rate (5%, fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30% and body weight (20% in adulthood. Transient hypothyroidism in the neonatal period also permanently decreased fast muscle myoglobin mRNA (30% and body weight (14%. These results indicated that changes in triiodothyronine supply in the neonatal period alter the myoglobin expression program in ventricle and skeletal muscle, leading to specific physiological repercussions and alterations in other parameters in adulthood.

  12. The unfolding effects on the protein hydration shell and partial molar volume: a computational study.

    Del Galdo, Sara; Amadei, Andrea

    2016-10-12

    In this paper we apply the computational analysis recently proposed by our group to characterize the solvation properties of a native protein in aqueous solution, and to four model aqueous solutions of globular proteins in their unfolded states thus characterizing the protein unfolded state hydration shell and quantitatively evaluating the protein unfolded state partial molar volumes. Moreover, by using both the native and unfolded protein partial molar volumes, we obtain the corresponding variations (unfolding partial molar volumes) to be compared with the available experimental estimates. We also reconstruct the temperature and pressure dependence of the unfolding partial molar volume of Myoglobin dissecting the structural and hydration effects involved in the process.

  13. Aortic microcalcification is associated with elastin fragmentation in Marfan syndrome.

    Wanga, Shaynah; Hibender, Stijntje; Ridwan, Yanto; van Roomen, Cindy; Vos, Mariska; van der Made, Ingeborg; van Vliet, Nicole; Franken, Romy; van Riel, Luigi Amjg; Groenink, Maarten; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Mulder, Barbara Jm; de Vries, Carlie Jm; Essers, Jeroen; de Waard, Vivian

    2017-11-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a connective tissue disorder in which aortic rupture is the major cause of death. MFS patients with an aortic diameter below the advised limit for prophylactic surgery (elastin fragments play a causal role in aortic calcification in MFS, and that microcalcification serves as a marker for aortic disease severity. To address this hypothesis, we analysed MFS patient and mouse aortas. MFS patient aortic tissue showed enhanced microcalcification in areas with extensive elastic lamina fragmentation in the media. A causal relationship between medial injury and microcalcification was revealed by studies in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs); elastin peptides were shown to increase the activity of the calcification marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and reduce the expression of the calcification inhibitor matrix GLA protein in human SMCs. In murine Fbn1 C1039G/+ MFS aortic SMCs, Alpl mRNA and activity were upregulated as compared with wild-type SMCs. The elastin peptide-induced ALP activity was prevented by incubation with lactose or a neuraminidase inhibitor, which inhibit the elastin receptor complex, and a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1/2 inhibitor, indicating downstream involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. Histological analyses in MFS mice revealed macrocalcification in the aortic root, whereas the ascending aorta contained microcalcification, as identified with the near-infrared fluorescent bisphosphonate probe OsteoSense-800. Significantly, microcalcification correlated strongly with aortic diameter, distensibility, elastin breaks, and phosphorylated ERK1/2. In conclusion, microcalcification co-localizes with aortic elastin degradation in MFS aortas of humans and mice, where elastin-derived peptides induce a calcification process in SMCs via the elastin receptor complex and ERK1/2 activation. We propose microcalcification as a novel imaging marker to monitor local elastin degradation and

  14. Serological assessment of neutrophil elastase activity on elastin during lung ECM remodeling.

    Kristensen, Jacob H; Karsdal, Morten A; Sand, Jannie Mb; Willumsen, Nicholas; Diefenbach, Claudia; Svensson, Birte; Hägglund, Per; Oersnes-Leeming, Diana J

    2015-05-03

    During the pathological destruction of lung tissue, neutrophil elastase (NE) degrades elastin, one of the major constituents of lung parenchyma. However there are no non-invasive methods to quantify NE degradation of elastin. We selected specific elastin fragments generated by NE for antibody generation and developed an ELISA assay (EL-NE) for the quantification of NE-degraded elastin. Monoclonal antibodies were developed against 10 NE-specific cleavage sites on elastin. One EL-NE assay was tested for analyte stability, linearity and intra- and inter-assay variation. The NE specificity was demonstrated using elastin cleaved in vitro with matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), cathepsin G (CatG), NE and intact elastin. Clinical relevance was assessed by measuring levels of NE-generated elastin fragments in serum of patients diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, n = 10) or lung cancer (n = 40). Analyte recovery of EL-NE for human serum was between 85% and 104%, the analyte was stable for four freeze/thaw cycles and after 24 h storage at 4°C. EL-NE was specific for NE-degraded elastin. Levels of NE-generated elastin fragments for elastin incubated in the presence of NE were 900% to 4700% higher than those seen with CatG or MMP incubation or in intact elastin. Serum levels of NE-generated elastin fragments were significantly increased in patients with IPF (137%, p = 0.002) and in patients with lung cancer (510%, p elastin. The EL-NE assay was able to specifically quantify NE-degraded elastin in serum. Serum levels of NE-degraded elastin might be used to detect excessive lung tissue degradation in lung cancer and IPF.

  15. Monoclonal anti-elastin antibody labelled with technetium-99m

    Oliveira, Marcia B.N. de; Silva, Claudia R. da; Araujo, Adriano C. de; Bernardo Filho, Mario; Porto, Luis Cristovao M.S.; Gutfilen, Bianca; Souza, J.E.Q.; Frier, Malcolm

    1999-01-01

    Technetium-99m ( 99m Tc) is widely employed in nuclear medicine due to its desirable physical, chemical and biological properties. Moreover, it is easily available and normally is inexpensive. A reducing agent is necessary to label cells and molecules with 99m Tc and stannous chloride (Sn C L 2 ) is usually employed. Elastin is the functional protein component of the elastic fiber and it is related with some diseases such as arteriosclerosis, pulmonary emphysema and others. The present study refers to the preparation of the 99m Tc labeled monoclonal anti-elastin antibody. The monoclonal antibody was incubated with an excess of 2-iminothiolane. The free thiol groups created, were capable of binding with the reduced technetium. Labeling was an exchange reaction with 99m Tc-glucoheptonate. The labeled preparation was left at 4 deg C for one hour. Then, it was passed through a Sephadex G50 column. Various fractions were collected and counted. A peak corresponding to the radiolabeled antibody was obtained. Stability studies of the labelled anti-elastin were performed at 0,3 6, 24 hours, at both 4 deg C or room temperature. The biodistribution pattern of the 99m Tc-anti-elastin was studied in healthy male Swiss mice. The immunoreactivity was also determined. An useful labeled-anti-elastin was obtained to future immunoscintigraphic investigations. (author)

  16. Molecular modeling of protein materials: case study of elastin

    Tarakanova, Anna; Buehler, Markus J

    2013-01-01

    Molecular modeling of protein materials is a quickly growing area of research that has produced numerous contributions in fields ranging from structural engineering to medicine and biology. We review here the history and methods commonly employed in molecular modeling of protein materials, emphasizing the advantages for using modeling as a complement to experimental work. We then consider a case study of the protein elastin, a critically important ‘mechanical protein’ to exemplify the approach in an area where molecular modeling has made a significant impact. We outline the progression of computational modeling studies that have considerably enhanced our understanding of this important protein which endows elasticity and recoil to the tissues it is found in, including the skin, lungs, arteries and the heart. A vast collection of literature has been directed at studying the structure and function of this protein for over half a century, the first molecular dynamics study of elastin being reported in the 1980s. We review the pivotal computational works that have considerably enhanced our fundamental understanding of elastin's atomistic structure and its extraordinary qualities—focusing on two in particular: elastin's superb elasticity and the inverse temperature transition—the remarkable ability of elastin to take on a more structured conformation at higher temperatures, suggesting its effectiveness as a biomolecular switch. Our hope is to showcase these methods as both complementary and enriching to experimental approaches that have thus far dominated the study of most protein-based materials. (topical review)

  17. Elastin hydrolysate derived from fish enhances proliferation of human skin fibroblasts and elastin synthesis in human skin fibroblasts and improves the skin conditions.

    Shiratsuchi, Eri; Nakaba, Misako; Yamada, Michio

    2016-03-30

    Recent studies have shown that certain peptides significantly improve skin conditions, such as skin elasticity and the moisture content of the skin of healthy woman. This study aimed to investigate the effects of elastin hydrolysate on human skin. Proliferation and elastin synthesis were evaluated in human skin fibroblasts exposed to elastin hydrolysate and proryl-glycine (Pro-Gly), which is present in human blood after elastin hydrolysate ingestion. We also performed an ingestion test with elastin hydrolysate in humans and evaluated skin condition. Elastin hydrolysate and Pro-Gly enhanced the proliferation of fibroblasts and elastin synthesis. Maximal proliferation response was observed at 25 ng mL(-1) Pro-Gly. Ingestion of elastin hydrolysate improved skin condition, such as elasticity, number of wrinkles, and blood flow. Elasticity improved by 4% in the elastin hydrolysate group compared with 2% in the placebo group. Therefore, elastin hydrolysate activates human skin fibroblasts and has beneficial effects on skin conditions. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Serological assessment of neutrophil elastase activity on elastin during lung ECM remodeling

    Kristensen, Jacob Hull; Karsdal, Morten A.; Sand, Jannie M. B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: During the pathological destruction of lung tissue, neutrophil elastase (NE) degrades elastin, one of the major constituents of lung parenchyma. However there are no non-invasive methods to quantify NE degradation of elastin. We selected specific elastin fragments generated by NE for ...

  19. Bridging the gap between chemistry, physiology, and evolution: Quantifying the functionality of sperm whale myoglobin mutants

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2011-01-01

    This work merges a large set of previously reported thermochemical data for myoglobin (Mb) mutants with a physiological model of O2-transport and -storage. The model allows a quantification of the functional proficiency of myoglobin (Mb) mutants under various physiological conditions, i.e. O2-con...

  20. Synthesis of iron nanoparticles from hemoglobin and myoglobin

    Sayyad, Arshad S; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Balakrishnan, Kaushik; Ci, Lijie; Kabbani, Ahmad T; Vajtai, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Stable iron nanoparticles have been synthesized from naturally occurring and abundant Fe-containing bio-precursors, namely hemoglobin and myoglobin. The formation of stable iron nanoparticles was achieved through a one-pot, single-phase chemical reduction approach. The reduction of iron ions present in the bio-precursors was carried out at room temperature and avoids the use of harsh chemical reagents. The size distribution of the product falls into the narrow 2–5 nm range and the particles were found to be crystalline. This method can be a valuable synthetic approach for producing bio-conjugated nanoparticle systems for biological applications. (paper)

  1. Positively selected sites in cetacean myoglobins contribute to protein stability

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Kepp, Kasper P

    2013-01-01

    Since divergence ∼50 Ma ago from their terrestrial ancestors, cetaceans underwent a series of adaptations such as a ∼10-20 fold increase in myoglobin (Mb) concentration in skeletal muscle, critical for increasing oxygen storage capacity and prolonging dive time. Whereas the O2-binding affinity...... between Mb folding stability and protein abundance, suggesting that a selection pressure for stability acts proportionally to higher expression. We also identify a major divergence event leading to the common ancestor of whales, during which major stabilization occurred. Most of the positively selected...

  2. Ligand and proton exchange dynamics in recombinant human myoglobin mutants.

    Lambright, D G; Balasubramanian, S; Boxer, S G

    1989-05-05

    Site-specific mutants of human myoglobin have been prepared in which lysine 45 is replaced by arginine (K45R) and aspartate 60 by glutamate (D60E), in order to examine the influence of these residues and their interaction on the dynamics of the protein. These proteins were studied by a variety of methods, including one and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, exchange kinetics for the distal and proximal histidine NH protons as a function of pH in the met cyano forms, flash photolysis of the CO forms, and ligand replacement kinetics. The electronic absorption and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the CO forms of these proteins are virtually identical, indicating that the structure of the heme pocket is unaltered by these mutations. There are, however, substantial changes in the dynamics of both CO binding and proton exchange for the mutant K45R, whereas the mutant D60E exhibits behavior indistinguishable from the reference human myoglobin. K45R has a faster CO bimolecular recombination rate and slower CO off-rate relative to the reference. The kinetics for CO binding are independent of pH (6.5 to 10) as well as ionic strength (0 to 1 M-NaCl). The exchange rate for the distal histidine NH is substantially lower for K45R than the reference, whereas the proximal histidine NH exchange rate is unaltered. The exchange behavior of the human proteins is similar to that reported for a comparison of the exchange rates for myoglobins having lysine at position 45 with sperm whale myoglobin, which has arginine at this position. This indicates that the differences in exchange rates reflects largely the Lys----Arg substitution. The lack of a simple correlation for the CO kinetics with this substitution means that these are sensitive to other factors as well. Specific kinetic models, whereby substitution of arginine for lysine at position 45 can affect ligand binding dynamics, are outlined. These experiments demonstrate that a relatively

  3. Value of radioimmunologic myoglobin determination in skeletal muscle disorders

    Kiessling, W.R.; Beckmann, R.

    1981-12-01

    Using a sensitive radioimmunoassay (RIA) serum myoglobin (Mb) was measured in healthy controls, patients with skeletal muscle disorders (polymyositis, different types of progressive muscular dystrophy, hypokalemic myopathy and myopathy due to cortisone treatment) and as well in definite as possible carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, DMD. The results indicate that Mb is a useful parameter in the assessment of muscle cell damage. Moreover, definite DMD-carriers had hypermyoglobine in 70% and in two of twenty possible DMD-carriers (all had normal CK activities) Mb was found to be markedly increased. The usefulness of an additional Mb determination in the detection of DMD-carriers is discussed.

  4. Design of an elastin-layered dermal regeneration template.

    Mithieux, Suzanne M; Weiss, Anthony S

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach for the production of tunable quantities of elastic fibers. We also show that exogenous tropoelastin is rate-limiting for elastin synthesis regardless of the age of the dermal fibroblast donor. Additionally, we provide a strategy to further enhance synthesis by older cells through the application of conditioned media. We show that this approach delivers an elastin layer on one side of the leading dermal repair template for contact with the deep dermis in order to deliver prefabricated elastic fibers to a physiologically appropriate site during subsequent surgery. This system is attractive because it provides for the first time a viable path for sufficient, histologically detectable levels of patient elastin into full-thickness wound sites that have until now lacked this elastic underlayer. The scars of full thickness wounds typically lack elasticity. Elastin is essential for skin elasticity and is enriched in the deep dermis. This paper is significant because it shows that: (1) we can generate elastic fibers in tunable quantities, (2) tropoelastin is the rate-limiting component in elastin synthesis in vitro, (3) we can generate elastin fibers regardless of donor age, (4) we describe a novel approach to further increase the numbers and thickness of elastic fibers for older donors, (5) we improve on Integra Dermal Regeneration Template and generate a new hybrid biomaterial intended to subsequently surgically deliver these elastic fibers, (6) the elastic fiber layer is presented on the side of Integra that is intended for delivery into its physiologically appropriate site i.e. the deep dermis. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of exercise on serum levels of myoglobin measured by radioimmunoassay.

    Sabriá, M; Ruibal, A; Rey, C; Foz, M; Domenech, F M

    1983-01-01

    To determine the influence of exercise on serum levels of myoglobin, serum levels of this protein were determined by RIA in 90 healthy men, divided as follows: (1) Basal control (no exercise) 25 cases; (2) Moderate exercise (after subject had been working for 12 h in Medicine Emergency Service) 19 cases, and (3) Intensive exercise: (a) football professional (45-min match) 10 cases; (b) football amateur (45-min match) 10 cases; (c) basketball professional (45-min match) 10 cases, and (d) basketball professional (90-min training) 16 cases. Our results led us to the following conclusions. (1) Moderate exercise, such as the usual daily work, does not modify myoglobin levels; (2) Myoglobin serum levels after exercise increase in nearly all individuals. They are higher in untrained people; (3) There seems to be a correlation between exercise intensity and increase of myoglobin serum levels, and (4) The detection of serum myoglobin by RIA may have a wide field of application for sport medicine.

  6. Influence of exercise on serum levels of myoglobin measured by radioimmunoassay

    Sabria, M.; Rey, C.; Foz, M.; Ruibal, A.; Domenech, F.M.

    1983-01-01

    To determine the influence of exercise on serum levels of myoglobin, serum levels of this protein were determined by RIA in 90 healthy men, divided as follows: (1) Basal control (no exercise) 25 cases; (2) Moderate exercise (after subject had been working for 12 h in Medicine Emergency Service) 19 cases, and (3) Intensive exercise: (a) football professional (45-min match) 10 cases; (b) football amateur (45-min match) 10 cases; (c) basketball professional (45-min match) 10 cases, and (d) basketball professional (90-min training) 16 cases. Our results led us to the following conclusions. (1) Moderate exercise, such as the usual daily work, does not modify myoglobin levels; (2) Myoglobin serum levels after exercise increase in nearly all individuals. They are higher in untrained people; (3) There seems to be a correlation between exercise intensity and increase of myoglobin serum levels, and (4) The detection of serum myoglobin by RIA may have a wide field of application for sport medicine. (orig.)

  7. Influence of exercise on serum levels of myoglobin measured by radioimmunoassay

    Sabria, M; Rey, C; Foz, M; Ruibal, A; Domenech, F M

    1983-04-01

    To determine the influence of exercise on serum levels of myoglobin, serum levels of this protein were determined by RIA in 90 healthy men, divided as follows: (1) Basal control (no exercise) 25 cases; (2) Moderate exercise (after subject had been working for 12 h in Medicine Emergency Service) 19 cases, and (3) Intensive exercise: (a) football professional (45-min match) 10 cases; (b) football amateur (45-min match) 10 cases; (c) basketball professional (45-min match) 10 cases, and (d) basketball professional (90-min training) 16 cases. Our results led us to the following conclusions. (1) Moderate exercise, such as the usual daily work, does not modify myoglobin levels; (2) Myoglobin serum levels after exercise increase in nearly all individuals. They are higher in untrained people; (3) There seems to be a correlation between exercise intensity and increase of myoglobin serum levels, and (4) The detection of serum myoglobin by RIA may have a wide field of application for sport medicine.

  8. Preparation of alpha-elastin nanoparticles by gamma irradiation

    Fujimoto, Mari [Department of Biological Science, Graduate school of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8570 (Japan); Okamoto, Kouji [Department of Bioscience and Bioinformatics, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Iizuka, Fukuoka 820-8502 (Japan); Furuta, Masakazu [Department of Biological Science, Graduate school of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8570 (Japan)], E-mail: mfuruta@b.s.osakafu-u.ac.jp

    2009-12-15

    Nanoparticles were prepared by utilizing the thermosensitive aggregation of alpha-elastin and gamma ray crosslinking. Three different heating process, 'Slow heating', 'Fast heating', and 'Heat shock', were applied for the aggregation of the alpha-elastin and examined to yield nanoparticles by gamma rays crosslinking. As a result, only 'Slow heating' process yielded nanoparticles with diameters of about ca. 300 nm above cloud point (CP) and about ca. 100 nm below CP, and a narrow size distribution above 1.0 mg/ml concentration (exclude 1.0 mg/ml)

  9. Preparation of alpha-elastin nanoparticles by gamma irradiation

    Fujimoto, Mari; Okamoto, Kouji; Furuta, Masakazu

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles were prepared by utilizing the thermosensitive aggregation of alpha-elastin and gamma ray crosslinking. Three different heating process, 'Slow heating', 'Fast heating', and 'Heat shock', were applied for the aggregation of the alpha-elastin and examined to yield nanoparticles by gamma rays crosslinking. As a result, only 'Slow heating' process yielded nanoparticles with diameters of about ca. 300 nm above cloud point (CP) and about ca. 100 nm below CP, and a narrow size distribution above 1.0 mg/ml concentration (exclude 1.0 mg/ml).

  10. Effects of ionizing radiation on nitric oxide myoglobin

    Kamarei, A.R.; Karel, M.

    1983-01-01

    Bovine nitric oxide myoglobin (NOMb) was irradiated with 40-4000 krad of γ-radiation, and the effects on the haem studied using absorption spectroscopy and electron spin resonance (e.s.r.) spectroscopy. The results show the following behaviour: (a) The bright red colour of NOMb changes to brown upon irradiation. This is similar to changes observed in radiation sterilized, nitrite-containing meats. (b) NOMb becomes progressively denitrosylated, with met-myoglobin (metMb) as the immediate product. (c) Upon increasing doses of radiation (up to 800 krad) at O 0 C parallel to NOMb denitrosylation, metMb is gradually converted, by water radiolytic products, to other products, believed to be ferromyoglobin and ferrimyoglobin peroxide. A minor quantity of 'choleglobin-type' pigments may also be formed at the highest doses. (d) Freezing of NOMb has a substantial protective effect against radiation. (e) Native bovine NOMb behaves as a pentaco-ordinate (hfs of 3 peaks with equal intensity); the bond between iron and Nsub(epsilon) is thus dramatically stretched and weakened. (f) Using a thermal energy analyser, no NO could be detected over irradiated NOMb solution, indicating rapid reaction of NO liberated from NOMb by radiation, with radiolytic products of water. (author)

  11. Salt effects on ionization equilibria of histidines in myoglobin.

    Kao, Y H; Fitch, C A; Bhattacharya, S; Sarkisian, C J; Lecomte, J T; García-Moreno E, B

    2000-09-01

    The salt dependence of histidine pK(a) values in sperm whale and horse myoglobin and in histidine-containing peptides was measured by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. Structure-based pK(a) calculations were performed with continuum methods to test their ability to capture the effects of solution conditions on pK(a) values. The measured pK(a) of most histidines, whether in the protein or in model compounds, increased by 0.3 pH units or more between 0.02 M and 1.5 M NaCl. In myoglobin two histidines (His(48) and His(36)) exhibited a shallower dependence than the average, and one (His(113)) showed a steeper dependence. The (1)H-NMR data suggested that the salt dependence of histidine pK(a) values in the protein was determined primarily by the preferential stabilization of the charged form of histidine with increasing salt concentrations rather than by screening of electrostatic interactions. The magnitude and salt dependence of interactions between ionizable groups were exaggerated in pK(a) calculations with the finite-difference Poisson-Boltzmann method applied to a static structure, even when the protein interior was treated with arbitrarily high dielectric constants. Improvements in continuum methods for calculating salt effects on pK(a) values will require explicit consideration of the salt dependence of model compound pK(a) values used for reference in the calculations.

  12. Investigation of water-soluble elastin as a multifunctional cosmetic material: Moisturizing and whitening effects.

    Inoue, Asako; Hikima, Tomohiro; Taniguchi, Suguru; Nose, Takeru; Maeda, Iori

    Elastin and collagen are extracellular matrix proteins that are widely distributed in the body. Although elastin essentially functions as a skin moisturizer, there have been few reports on its other fundamental chemical and biological functions. In this study, we investigated the moisturizing and whitening (tyrosinase inhibition) effects of elastin to examine its usefulness as a cosmetic material. Water-soluble hot alkali pig aorta (HAPA)-elastin was prepared from pig aorta using the hot alkali method. HAPA-elastin showed a widely distributed molecular weight and had a coacervation property that mediated reversible self-assembly of its molecules with increasing temperature. Amino acid analysis of HAPA-elastin showed a high content (81.5%) of hydrophobic amino acids such as Gly, Ala, Val, and Pro. Des (desmosine) and Ide (isodesmosine), which are characteristic amino acids of elastin, accounted for more than 0.4% of the total amino acid content. HAPA-elastin showed a moisture-retaining property. The water content of skin samples treated with and without HAPA-elastin was 77.2% ± 7.8% and 49.4% ± 10.1%, respectively. HAPA-elastin also inhibited tyrosinase activity by 11.3% ± 3.9%. The results obtained indicate that elastin has a useful function as a cosmetic material.

  13. Quantitative comparison of structure and dynamics of elastin following three isolation schemes by 13C solid state NMR and MALDI mass spectrometry.

    Papaioannou, A; Louis, M; Dhital, B; Ho, H P; Chang, E J; Boutis, G S

    2015-05-01

    Methods for isolating elastin from fat, collagen, and muscle, commonly used in the design of artificial elastin based biomaterials, rely on exposing tissue to harsh pH levels and temperatures that usually denature many proteins. At present, a quantitative measurement of the modifications to elastin following isolation from other extracellular matrix constituents has not been reported. Using magic angle spinning (13)C NMR spectroscopy and relaxation methodologies, we have measured the modification in structure and dynamics following three known purification protocols. Our experimental data reveal that the (13)C spectra of the hydrated samples appear remarkably similar across the various purification methods. Subtle differences in the half maximum widths were observed in the backbone carbonyl suggesting possible structural heterogeneity across the different methods of purification. Additionally, small differences in the relative signal intensities were observed between purified samples. Lyophilizing the samples results in a reduction of backbone motion and reveals additional differences across the purification methods studied. These differences were most notable in the alanine motifs indicating possible changes in cross-linking or structural rigidity. The measured correlation times of glycine and proline moieties are observed to also vary considerably across the different purification methods, which may be related to peptide bond cleavage. Lastly, the relative concentration of desmosine cross-links in the samples quantified by MALDI mass spectrometry is reported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Vascular nanomedicine: Site specific delivery of elastin stabilizing therapeutics to damaged arteries

    Sinha, Aditi

    Elastin, a structural protein in the extra-cellular matrix, plays a critical role in the normal functioning of blood vessels. Apart from performing its primary function of providing resilience to arteries, it also plays major role in regulating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, response to injury, and morphogenesis. Medial arterial calcification (MAC) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are two diseases where the structural and functional integrity of elastin is severely compromised. Although the clinical presentation of MAC and AAA differ, they have one common underlying causative mechanism---pathological degradation of elastin. Hence prevention of elastin degradation in the early stages of MAC and AAA can mitigate, partially if not wholly, the fatal consequences of both the diseases. The work presented here is motivated by the overwhelming statistics of people afflicted by elastin associated cardiovascular diseases and the unavailability of cure for the same. Overall goal of our research is to understand role of elastin degradation in cardiovascular diseases and to develop a targeted vascular drug delivery system that is minimally invasive, biodegradable, and non-toxic, that prevents elastin from degradation. Our hope is that such treatment will also help regenerate elastin, thereby providing a multi-fold treatment option for elasto-degenerative vascular diseases. For this purpose, we have first confirmed the combined role of degraded elastin and hyperglycemia in the pathogenesis of MAC. We have shown that in the absence of degraded elastin and TGF-beta1 (abundantly present in diabetic arteries) vascular smooth muscle cells maintain their homeostatic state, regardless of environmental glucose concentrations. However simultaneous exposure to glucose, elastin peptides and TGF-beta1 causes the pathological transgenesis of vascular cells to osteoblast-like cells. We show that plant derived polyphenols bind to vascular elastin with great affinity resulting in

  15. Elastin aging and lipid oxidation products in human aorta

    Kamelija Zarkovic

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Vascular aging is associated with structural and functional modifications of the arteries, and by an increase in arterial wall thickening in the intima and the media, mainly resulting from structural modifications of the extracellular matrix (ECM components. Among the factors known to accumulate with aging, advanced lipid peroxidation end products (ALEs are a hallmark of oxidative stress-associated diseases such as atherosclerosis. Aldehydes generated from the peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA, (4-hydroxynonenal, malondialdehyde, acrolein, form adducts on cellular proteins, leading to a progressive protein dysfunction with consequences in the pathophysiology of vascular aging. The contribution of these aldehydes to ECM modification is not known. This study was carried out to investigate whether aldehyde-adducts are detected in the intima and media in human aorta, whether their level is increased in vascular aging, and whether elastin fibers are a target of aldehyde-adduct formation. Immunohistological and confocal immunofluorescence studies indicate that 4-HNE-histidine-adducts accumulate in an age-related manner in the intima, media and adventitia layers of human aortas, and are mainly expressed in smooth muscle cells. In contrast, even if the structure of elastin fiber is strongly altered in the aged vessels, our results show that elastin is not or very poorly modified by 4-HNE. These data indicate a complex role for lipid peroxidation and in particular for 4-HNE in elastin homeostasis, in the vascular wall remodeling during aging and atherosclerosis development.

  16. Processing and characterization of α-elastin electrospun membranes

    Araujo, J.; Padrão, J.; Silva, J. P.; Dourado, F.; Correia, D. M.; Botelho, G.; Gomez Ribelles, J. L.; Lanceros-Méndez, S.; Sencadas, V.

    2014-06-01

    Elastin isolated from fresh bovine ligaments was dissolved in a mixture of 1,1,1,3,3,3-Hexafluoro-2-propanol and water were electrospun into fiber membranes under different processing conditions. Fiber mats of randomly and aligned fibers were obtained with fixed and rotating ground collectors and fibrils were composed by thin ribbons whose width depends on electrospinning conditions; fibrils with 721 nm up to 2.12 μm width were achieved. After cross-linking with glutaraldehyde, α-elastin can uptake as much as 1700 % of PBS solution and a slight increase on fiber thickness was observed. The glass transition temperature of electrospun fiber mats was found to occur at ˜80 °C. Moreover, α-Elastin showed to be a perfect elastomeric material, and no mechanical hysteresis was found in cycle mechanical measurements. The elastic modulus obtained for random and aligned fibers mats in a PBS solution was 330±10 kPa and 732±165 kPa, respectively. Finally, the electrospinning and cross-linking process does not inhibit MC-3T3-E1 cell adhesion. Cell culture results showed good cell adhesion and proliferation in the cross-linked elastin fiber mats.

  17. Electrospinning of collagen and elastin for tissue engineering applications

    Buttafoco, L.; Kolkman, N.G.; Engbers-Buijtenhuijs, P.; Poot, Andreas A.; Dijkstra, Pieter J.; Vermes, I.; Feijen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Meshes of collagen and/or elastin were successfully prepared by means of electrospinning from aqueous solutions. Flow rate, applied electric field, collecting distance and composition of the starting solutions determined the morphology of the obtained fibres. Addition of PEO (Mw=8×106) and NaCl was

  18. A cytokine axis regulates elastin formation and degradation

    Sproul, Erin P.; Argraves, W. Scott

    2013-01-01

    Underlying the dynamic regulation of tropoelastin expression and elastin formation in development and disease are transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms that have been the focus of much research. Of particular importance is the cytokine–governed elastin regulatory axis in which the pro-elastogenic activities of transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFβ1) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) are opposed by anti-elastogenic activities of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF/FGF-2), heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF), EGF, PDGF-BB, TGFα, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and noncanonical TGFβ1 signaling. A key mechanistic feature of the regulatory axis is that cytokines influence elastin formation through effects on the cell cycle involving control of cyclin–cyclin dependent kinase complexes and activation of the Ras/MEK/ERK signaling pathway. In this article we provide an overview of the major cytokines/growth factors that modulate elastogenesis and describe the underlying molecular mechanisms for their action on elastin production. PMID:23160093

  19. Matrix ageing and vascular impacts: focus on elastin fragmentation.

    Duca, Laurent; Blaise, Sébastien; Romier, Béatrice; Laffargue, Muriel; Gayral, Stéphanie; El Btaouri, Hassan; Kawecki, Charlotte; Guillot, Alexandre; Martiny, Laurent; Debelle, Laurent; Maurice, Pascal

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of death worldwide and represent a major problem of public health. Over the years, life expectancy has considerably increased throughout the world, and the prevalence of CVD is inevitably rising with the growing ageing of the population. The normal process of ageing is associated with progressive deterioration in structure and function of the vasculature, commonly called vascular ageing. At the vascular level, extracellular matrix (ECM) ageing leads to molecular alterations in long half-life proteins, such as elastin and collagen, and have critical effects on vascular diseases. This review highlights ECM alterations occurring during vascular ageing with a specific focus on elastin fragmentation and also the contribution of elastin-derived peptides (EDP) in age-related vascular complications. Moreover, current and new pharmacological strategies aiming at minimizing elastin degradation, EDP generation, and associated biological effects are discussed. These strategies may be of major relevance for preventing and/or delaying vascular ageing and its complications. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Aliphatic semisynthetic amino terminal variants of myoglobin: enrichment with carbon-13, determination and interpretation of terminal pK values and motions

    Busch, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of a series of myoglobins substituted in the amino terminal residue to provide variation in the aliphatic nature of the side chain and enrichment in 13 C was accomplished by semisynthetic methods. The replacements of valine, the native first residue, included 13 C enriched glycine, alanine, valine, leucine, and isoleucine. The products were extensively characterized and found to be virtually indistinguishable by most physical methods. 13 C NMR spectroscopy showed significant differences in the amino terminal pK value, ranging from 7.72 for myoglobin to 7.15 for myoglobin. Consideration of the electrostatic effects of the charge array indicated a balance of interactions at this site not significantly altered by variations in the side chain. By examination of the crystal structure, consideration of earlier work regarding the interactions of the side chain of Leu-2, and data regarding the motions of the terminal residue, it was concluded that the interaction of the side chain of the first residue with the hydrophobic cluster formed primarily by close contact of invariant residues Leu-2 and Leu-137 was the primary cause for the reduction in the terminal pK values seen for the larger aliphatics. By restricting the freedom of the residue, this interaction limits the available hydration volume, and consequently favors the unprotonated form of the amine. The concurrent observation of both functional elements in the series of α amino terminal residues brings out the interrelated consequences for the two categories of solvent interactions controlling structural and functional properties in a graded way

  1. Clinical significance of myoglobinuria and serum myoglobin in heroin-addicted patients

    Chen Xuehong; Zhong Ganping; Zhang Lan; Liu Jiangyan

    2001-01-01

    The authors study the relationship between myoglobinuria and acute rhabdomyolysis in heroin-addicted patients. The levels of myoglobin in serum and urine were determined by RIA in 106 heroin-addicted patients and 30 healthy volunteers who were selected as the controls. The levels of myoglobin in serum and urine increased significantly in heroin-addicted patients in 3 days after giving up heroin, and gradually decreased in 2 weeks but still higher than the levels of the controls (P 0.05). Urine myoglobin detection is a simple and effective method to find out acute rhabdomyolysis derived from heroin addiction early

  2. Detection of myoglobin desaturation in Mirounga angustirostris during apnea.

    Ponganis, Paul J; Kreutzer, Ulrike; Sailasuta, Napapon; Knower, Torre; Hurd, Ralph; Jue, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    1H NMR solution-state study of elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) myoglobin (Mb) and hemoglobin (Hb) establishes the temperature-dependent chemical shifts of the proximal histidyl N(delta)H signal, which reflects the respective intracellular and vascular PO2 in vivo. Both proteins exist predominantly in one major isoform and do not exhibit any conformational heterogeneity. The Mb and Hb signals are detectable in M. angustirostris tissue in vivo. During eupnea M. angustirostris muscle maintains a well-saturated MbO2. However, during apnea, the deoxymyoglobin proximal histidyl N(delta)H signal becomes visible, reflecting a declining tissue PO2. The study establishes a firm methodological basis for using NMR to investigate the metabolic responses during sleep apnea of the elephant seal and to secure insights into oxygen regulation in diving mammals.

  3. Picosecond transient absorption study of photodissociated carboxy hemoglobin and myoglobin

    Janes, S.M.; Dalickas, G.A.; Eaton, W.A.; Hochstrasser, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    The optical transient absorption spectra at 30 ps and 6.5 ns after photolysis are compared for both carboxy hemoglobin (HbCO) and carboxy myoglobin (MbCO). Both 355- and 532-nm excitation pulses were used. In all cases the shapes of the optical difference spectra thus generated are stationary over the complete time-scale studied. The photolysis spectra for MbCO are not significantly different from the equilibrium difference spectra generated on the same picosecond spectrometer when measured to an accuracy of +/- 0.5 nm. In addition, spectral parameters for delegated HbCO generated on the same spectrometer but detected by two different techniques, either by a Vidicon detector or point by point with photomultiplier tubes, are reported; the results are different from some of the previously reported picosecond experiments

  4. Elastin Fiber Accumulation in Liver Correlates with the Development of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Yasui, Yutaka; Abe, Tokiya; Kurosaki, Masayuki; Higuchi, Mayu; Komiyama, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Tsubasa; Hayashi, Tsuguru; Kuwabara, Konomi; Takaura, Kenta; Nakakuki, Natsuko; Takada, Hitomi; Tamaki, Nobuharu; Suzuki, Shoko; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Kaoru; Itakura, Jun; Takahashi, Yuka; Hashiguchi, Akinori; Sakamoto, Michiie; Izumi, Namiki

    2016-01-01

    The fibrosis stage, which is evaluated by the distribution pattern of collagen fibers, is a major predictor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) for patients with hepatitis C. Meanwhile, the role of elastin fibers has not yet been elucidated. The present study was conducted to determine the significance of quantifying both collagen and elastin fibers. We enrolled 189 consecutive patients with hepatitis C and advanced fibrosis. Using Elastica van Gieson-stained whole-slide images of pretreatment liver biopsies, collagen and elastin fibers were evaluated pixel by pixel (0.46 μm/pixel) using an automated computational method. Consequently, fiber amount and cumulative incidences of HCC within 3 years were analyzed. There was a significant correlation between collagen and elastin fibers, whereas variation in elastin fiber was greater than in collagen fiber. Both collagen fiber (p = 0.008) and elastin fiber (p elastin fiber (p = 0.002) in addition to higher collagen fiber (p = 0.05) showed significantly higher incidences of HCC. With regard to elastin fiber, this difference remained significant in F3 patients. Furthermore, for patients with a higher collagen fiber amount, higher elastin was a significant predictor for HCC development (p = 0.02). Computational analysis is a novel technique for quantification of fibers with the added value of conventional staging. Elastin fiber is a predictor for the development of HCC independently of collagen fiber and F stage.

  5. Alternative Splicing and Tissue-specific Elastin Misassembly Act as Biological Modifiers of Human Elastin Gene Frameshift Mutations Associated with Dominant Cutis Laxa*

    Sugitani, Hideki; Hirano, Eiichi; Knutsen, Russell H.; Shifren, Adrian; Wagenseil, Jessica E.; Ciliberto, Christopher; Kozel, Beth A.; Urban, Zsolt; Davis, Elaine C.; Broekelmann, Thomas J.; Mecham, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Elastin is the extracellular matrix protein in vertebrates that provides elastic recoil to blood vessels, the lung, and skin. Because the elastin gene has undergone significant changes in the primate lineage, modeling elastin diseases in non-human animals can be problematic. To investigate the pathophysiology underlying a class of elastin gene mutations leading to autosomal dominant cutis laxa, we engineered a cutis laxa mutation (single base deletion) into the human elastin gene contained in a bacterial artificial chromosome. When expressed as a transgene in mice, mutant elastin was incorporated into elastic fibers in the skin and lung with adverse effects on tissue function. In contrast, only low levels of mutant protein incorporated into aortic elastin, which explains why the vasculature is relatively unaffected in this disease. RNA stability studies found that alternative exon splicing acts as a modifier of disease severity by influencing the spectrum of mutant transcripts that survive nonsense-mediated decay. Our results confirm the critical role of the C-terminal region of tropoelastin in elastic fiber assembly and suggest tissue-specific differences in the elastin assembly pathway. PMID:22573328

  6. Studies on the optical absorption of copper-dopped myoglobin: conformational changes

    Lamy, M.T.M.

    1976-03-01

    Optical absorption changes in the visible and near U.V. spectrum of myoglobin molecules are observed when copper ions are added to the macromolecule. The heme optical transitions are investigated through a theoretical simulation of the optical absorption spectrum. A study of the absorption band in the region of 700 nm associated with the copper - myoglobin complexes indicated the existence of two kinds of metal-protein complexes: one associated with the six or eitht first added copper ions and the other related with the higher concentrations. Conformational changes caused by thermal treatment are studied in myoglobin water solutions and solutions containing copper ions. The phenomenon named pre-denaturation is observed through the optical absorption at 245 nm. It is shown that interactions between myoglobin molecules occur in the pre-denaturation phenomenon. (Author) [pt

  7. Artificial Hydration and Nutrition

    ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ... Your Health Resources Healthcare Management Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Share Print Patients who ...

  8. Renal myoglobin in drug addicts: occurrence and significance in a postmortem study

    Kock, Kirsten Friis; Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese

    1994-01-01

    In a 3-year period (1989–1991) a non-selected, consecutive series of 62 deaths in drug addicts was autopsied at the Forensic Institute in Odense. The kidney sections from these addicts were examined for the presence of renal myoglobin using immunohistochemical methods. A reference group consisting......, immobilization, hypovolemia). In sufficient amounts, renal myoglobin may be of importance as a cause of death or a contributing factor to death in both drug addicts and non-addicts....

  9. High-performance liquid chromatographic quantitation of desmosine plus isodesmosine in elastin and whole tissue hydrolysates

    Soskel, N.T.

    1987-01-01

    Quantitation of desmosine and isodesmosine, the major crosslinks in elastin, has been of interest because of their uniqueness and use as markers of that protein. Accurate measurement of these crosslinks may allow determination of elastin degradation in vivo and elastin content in tissues, obviating lengthy extraction procedures. We have developed a method of quantitating desmosine plus isodesmosine in hydrolysates of tissue and insoluble elastin using high-performance liquid chromatographic separation and absorbance detection that is rapid (21-35 min) and sensitive (accurate linearity from 100 pmol to 5 nmol). This method has been used to quantitate desmosines in elastin from bovine nuchal ligament and lung and in whole aorta from hamsters. The ability to completely separate [ 3 H]lysine from desmosine plus isodesmosine allows the method to be used to study incorporation of lysine into crosslinks in elastin

  10. Comparison of Creatine Kinase Activity and Myoglobin Blood Level in Acute Myocardial Infarction Patients

    Sabaheta Hasić

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate and compare the relative increase of serum myoglobin level and total creatine kinase(CK activity in acute myocardial infarction (AMI patients (n=36. We measured serial changes in total CK activity and myoglobin serum level in three-time periods (6-9 hours, 24 hours and 6-7 days from chest pains onset. Myoglobin peaked during the first 6-9 hours but total CK reached its peak activity after 24 hours from AMI symptoms onset. Results of this study showed that as non-specific cardiac marker myoglobin had better sensitivity and earlier rise in serum than total CK activity in AMI patients. Rapid kinetic of myoglobin level is important for its utility as marker for re-infarction diagnosis. Early myoglobin increase in serum is important for early triage of AMI patients and early "ruling out" of AMI diagnosis if there is no evidence of its elevation in circulation.

  11. Transmural variation in elastin fiber orientation distribution in the arterial wall.

    Yu, Xunjie; Wang, Yunjie; Zhang, Yanhang

    2018-01-01

    The complex three-dimensional elastin network is a major load-bearing extracellular matrix (ECM) component of an artery. Despite the reported anisotropic behavior of arterial elastin network, it is usually treated as an isotropic material in constitutive models. Our recent multiphoton microscopy study reported a relatively uniform elastin fiber orientation distribution in porcine thoracic aorta when imaging from the intima side (Chow et al., 2014). However it is questionable whether the fiber orientation distribution obtained from a small depth is representative of the elastin network structure in the arterial wall, especially when developing structure-based constitutive models. To date, the structural basis for the anisotropic mechanical behavior of elastin is still not fully understood. In this study, we examined the transmural variation in elastin fiber orientation distribution in porcine thoracic aorta and its association with elastin anisotropy. Using multi-photon microscopy, we observed that the elastin fibers orientation changes from a relatively uniform distribution in regions close to the luminal surface to a more circumferential distribution in regions that dominate the media, then to a longitudinal distribution in regions close to the outer media. Planar biaxial tensile test was performed to characterize the anisotropic behavior of elastin network. A new structure-based constitutive model of elastin network was developed to incorporate the transmural variation in fiber orientation distribution. The new model well captures the anisotropic mechanical behavior of elastin network under both equi- and nonequi-biaxial loading and showed improvements in both fitting and predicting capabilities when compared to a model that only considers the fiber orientation distribution from the intima side. We submit that the transmural variation in fiber orientation distribution is important in characterizing the anisotropic mechanical behavior of elastin network and

  12. Mechanical contribution of lamellar and interlamellar elastin along the mouse aorta.

    Clark, T E; Lillie, M A; Vogl, A W; Gosline, J M; Shadwick, R E

    2015-10-15

    The mechanical properties of aortic elastin vary regionally, but the microstructural basis for this variation is unknown. This study was designed to identify the relative contributions of lamellar and interlamellar elastin to circumferential load bearing in the mouse thoracic and abdominal aortas. Forces developed in uniaxial tests of samples of fresh and autoclaved aorta were correlated with elastin content and morphology obtained from histology and multiphoton laser scanning microscopy. Autoclaving should render much of the interlamellar elastin mechanically incompetent. In autoclaved tissue force per unit sample width correlated with lamellar elastin content (P≪0.001) but not total elastin content. In fresh tissue at low strain where elastin dominates the mechanical response, forces were higher than in the autoclaved tissue, but force did not correlate with total elastin content. Therefore although interlamellar elastin likely contributed to the stiffness in the fresh aorta, its contribution appeared not in proportion to its quantity. In both fresh and autoclaved tissue, elastin stiffness consistently decreased along the abdominal aorta, a key area for aneurysm development, and this difference could not be fully accounted for on the basis of either lamellar or total elastin content. These findings are relevant to the development of mathematical models of arterial mechanics, particularly for mouse models of arterial diseases involving elastic tissue. In microstructural based models the quantity of each mural constituent determines its contribution to the total response. This study shows elastin's mechanical response cannot necessarily be accounted for on the basis of fibre quantity, orientation, and modulus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Measurement of MMP-9 and -12 degraded elastin (ELM) provides unique information on lung tissue degradation

    Skjøt-Arkil, Helene; Clausen, Rikke E; Nguyen, Quoc Hai Trieu

    2012-01-01

    Elastin is an essential component of selected connective tissues that provides a unique physiological elasticity. Elastin may be considered a signature protein of lungs where matrix metalloprotease (MMP) -9-and -12, may be considered the signature proteases of the macrophages, which in part...... are responsible for tissue damage during disease progression. Thus, we hypothesized that a MMP-9/-12 generated fragment of elastin may be a relevant biochemical maker for lung diseases....

  14. Induction and regulation of murine emphysema by elastin peptides.

    Sellami, Mehdi; Meghraoui-Kheddar, Aïda; Terryn, Christine; Fichel, Caroline; Bouland, Nicole; Diebold, Marie-Daniele; Guenounou, Moncef; Héry-Huynh, Stéphanie; Le Naour, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Emphysema is the major component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). During emphysema, elastin breakdown in the lung tissue originates from the release of large amounts of elastase by inflammatory cells. Elevated levels of elastin-derived peptides (EP) reflect massive pulmonary elastin breakdown in COPD patients. Only the EP containing the GXXPG conformational motif with a type VIII β-turn are elastin receptor ligands inducing biological activities. In addition, the COOH-terminal glycine residue of the GXXPG motif seems a prerequisite to the biological activity. In this study, we endotracheally instilled C57BL/6J mice with GXXPG EP and/or COOH-terminal glycine deleted-EP whose sequences were designed by molecular dynamics and docking simulations. We investigated their effect on all criteria associated with the progression of murine emphysema. Bronchoalveolar lavages were recovered to analyze cell profiles by flow cytometry and lungs were prepared to allow morphological and histological analysis by immunostaining and confocal microscopy. We observed that exposure of mice to EP elicited hallmark features of emphysema with inflammatory cell accumulation associated with increased matrix metalloproteinases and desmosine expression and of remodeling of parenchymal tissue. We also identified an inactive COOH-terminal glycine deleted-EP that retains its binding-activity to EBP and that is able to inhibit the in vitro and in vivo activities of emphysema-inducing EP. This study demonstrates that EP are key actors in the development of emphysema and that they represent pharmacological targets for an alternative treatment of emphysema based on the identification of EP analogous antagonists by molecular modeling studies. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Elastin aging and lipid oxidation products in human aorta.

    Zarkovic, Kamelija; Larroque-Cardoso, Pauline; Pucelle, Mélanie; Salvayre, Robert; Waeg, Georg; Nègre-Salvayre, Anne; Zarkovic, Neven

    2015-01-01

    Vascular aging is associated with structural and functional modifications of the arteries, and by an increase in arterial wall thickening in the intima and the media, mainly resulting from structural modifications of the extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Among the factors known to accumulate with aging, advanced lipid peroxidation end products (ALEs) are a hallmark of oxidative stress-associated diseases such as atherosclerosis. Aldehydes generated from the peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), (4-hydroxynonenal, malondialdehyde, acrolein), form adducts on cellular proteins, leading to a progressive protein dysfunction with consequences in the pathophysiology of vascular aging. The contribution of these aldehydes to ECM modification is not known. This study was carried out to investigate whether aldehyde-adducts are detected in the intima and media in human aorta, whether their level is increased in vascular aging, and whether elastin fibers are a target of aldehyde-adduct formation. Immunohistological and confocal immunofluorescence studies indicate that 4-HNE-histidine-adducts accumulate in an age-related manner in the intima, media and adventitia layers of human aortas, and are mainly expressed in smooth muscle cells. In contrast, even if the structure of elastin fiber is strongly altered in the aged vessels, our results show that elastin is not or very poorly modified by 4-HNE. These data indicate a complex role for lipid peroxidation and in particular for 4-HNE in elastin homeostasis, in the vascular wall remodeling during aging and atherosclerosis development. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Circulating Anti-Elastin Antibody Levels and Arterial Disease Characteristics: Associations with Arterial Stiffness and Atherosclerosis.

    Lee, Seung-Hyun; Shin, Kihyuk; Park, Sungha; Kang, Seok-Min; Choi, Donghoon; Lee, Seung-Hyo; Lee, Sang-Hak

    2015-11-01

    Elastin is a major arterial structural protein, and elastin-derived peptides are related to arterial change. We previously reported on a novel assay developed using aortic elastin peptides; however, its clinical implications remain unclear. In this study, we assessed whether anti-elastin antibody titers reflect the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) or its characteristics. We included 174 CAD patients and 171 age- and sex-matched controls. Anti-elastin antibody titers were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Parameters of arterial stiffness, including the augmentation index (AI) and heart-to-femoral pulse wave velocity (hfPWV), were measured non-invasively. The clinical and angiographic characteristics of CAD patients were also evaluated. Associations between anti-elastin levels and vascular characteristics were examined by linear regression analysis. The median blood level of anti-elastin was significantly lower in the CAD group than in the controls [197 arbitrary unit (a.u.) vs. 63 a.u., pelastin were significantly lower in men and in subjects with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, or high hfPWV. Nevertheless, anti-elastin levels were not dependent on atherothrombotic events or the angiographic severity of CAD. In a multivariate analysis, male sex (β=-0.38, pelastin levels. Lower levels of anti-elastin are related to CAD. The association between antibody titers and CAD is linked to arterial stiffness rather than the advancement of atherosclerosis.

  17. Elastin structure and its involvement in skin photoageing.

    Weihermann, A C; Lorencini, M; Brohem, C A; de Carvalho, C M

    2017-06-01

    Skin aging is a complex process that may be caused by factors that are intrinsic and extrinsic to the body. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation represents one of the main sources of skin damage over the years and characterizes a process known as photoaging. Among the changes that affect cutaneous tissue with age, the loss of elastic properties caused by changes in elastin production, increased degradation and/or processing produces a substantial impact on tissue esthetics and health. The occurrence of solar elastosis is one of the main markers of cutaneous photoaging and is characterized by disorganized and non-functional deposition of elastic fibers. The occurrence of UV radiation-induced alternative splicing of the elastin gene, which leads to inadequate synthesis of the proteins required for the correct assembly of elastic fibers, is a potential explanation for this phenomenon. Innovative studies have been fundamental for the elucidation of rarely explored photoaging mechanisms and have enabled the identification of effective therapeutic alternatives such as cosmetic products. This review addresses cutaneous photoaging and the changes that affect elastin in this process. © 2016 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  18. Modifications of hemoglobin and myoglobin by Maillard reaction products (MRPs.

    Aristos Ioannou

    Full Text Available High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC coupled with a Fraction Collector was employed to isolate Maillard reaction products (MRPs formed in model systems comprising of asparagine and monosaccharides in the 60-180°C range. The primary MRP which is detected at 60°C is important for Acrylamide content and color/aroma development in foods and also in the field of food biotechnology for controlling the extent of the Maillard reaction with temperature. The discrete fractions of the reaction products were reacted with Hemoglobin (Hb and Myoglobin (Mb at physiological conditions and the reaction adducts were monitored by UV-vis and Attenuated Total Reflection-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectrophotometry. The UV-vis kinetic profiles revealed the formation of a Soret transition characteristic of a low-spin six-coordinated species and the ATR-FTIR spectrum of the Hb-MRP and Mb-MRP fractions showed modifications in the protein Amide I and II vibrations. The UV-vis and the FTIR spectra of the Hb-MRPs indicate that the six-coordinated species is a hemichrome in which the distal E7 Histidine is coordinated to the heme Fe and blocks irreversibly the ligand binding site. Although the Mb-MRPs complex is a six-coordinated species, the 1608 cm-1 FTIR band characteristic of a hemichrome was not observed.

  19. Methylglyoxal-induced modification causes aggregation of myoglobin

    Banerjee, Sauradipta; Maity, Subhajit; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2016-02-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins by Maillard reaction, known as glycation, is thought to be the root cause of different complications, particularly in diabetes mellitus and age-related disorders. Methylglyoxal (MG), a reactive α-oxoaldehyde, increases in diabetic condition and reacts with proteins to form advanced glycation end products (AGEs) following Maillard-like reaction. We have investigated the in vitro effect of MG (200 μM) on the monomeric heme protein myoglobin (Mb) (100 μM) in a time-dependent manner (7 to 18 days incubation at 25 °C). MG induces significant structural alterations of the heme protein, including heme loss, changes in tryptophan fluorescence, decrease of α-helicity with increased β-sheet content etc. These changes occur gradually with increased period of incubation. Incubation of Mb with MG for 7 days results in formation of the AGE adducts: carboxyethyllysine at Lys-16, carboxymethyllysine at Lys-87 and carboxyethyllysine or pyrraline-carboxymethyllysine at Lys-133. On increasing the period of incubation up to 14 days, additional AGEs namely, carboxyethyllysine at Lys-42 and hydroimidazolone or argpyrimidine at Arg-31 and Arg-139 have been detected. MG also induces aggregation of Mb, which is clearly evident with longer period of incubation (18 days), and appears to have amyloid nature. MG-derived AGEs may thus have an important role as the precursors of protein aggregation, which, in turn, may be associated with physiological complications.

  20. Modifications of hemoglobin and myoglobin by Maillard reaction products (MRPs).

    Ioannou, Aristos; Varotsis, Constantinos

    2017-01-01

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with a Fraction Collector was employed to isolate Maillard reaction products (MRPs) formed in model systems comprising of asparagine and monosaccharides in the 60-180°C range. The primary MRP which is detected at 60°C is important for Acrylamide content and color/aroma development in foods and also in the field of food biotechnology for controlling the extent of the Maillard reaction with temperature. The discrete fractions of the reaction products were reacted with Hemoglobin (Hb) and Myoglobin (Mb) at physiological conditions and the reaction adducts were monitored by UV-vis and Attenuated Total Reflection-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometry. The UV-vis kinetic profiles revealed the formation of a Soret transition characteristic of a low-spin six-coordinated species and the ATR-FTIR spectrum of the Hb-MRP and Mb-MRP fractions showed modifications in the protein Amide I and II vibrations. The UV-vis and the FTIR spectra of the Hb-MRPs indicate that the six-coordinated species is a hemichrome in which the distal E7 Histidine is coordinated to the heme Fe and blocks irreversibly the ligand binding site. Although the Mb-MRPs complex is a six-coordinated species, the 1608 cm-1 FTIR band characteristic of a hemichrome was not observed.

  1. Crosstalk between nitrite, myoglobin and reactive oxygen species to regulate vasodilation under hypoxia.

    Matthias Totzeck

    Full Text Available The systemic response to decreasing oxygen levels is hypoxic vasodilation. While this mechanism has been known for more than a century, the underlying cellular events have remained incompletely understood. Nitrite signaling is critically involved in vessel relaxation under hypoxia. This can be attributed to the presence of myoglobin in the vessel wall together with other potential nitrite reductases, which generate nitric oxide, one of the most potent vasodilatory signaling molecules. Questions remain relating to the precise concentration of nitrite and the exact dose-response relations between nitrite and myoglobin under hypoxia. It is furthermore unclear whether regulatory mechanisms exist which balance this interaction. Nitrite tissue levels were similar across all species investigated. We then investigated the exact fractional myoglobin desaturation in an ex vivo approach when gassing with 1% oxygen. Within a short time frame myoglobin desaturated to 58±12%. Given that myoglobin significantly contributes to nitrite reduction under hypoxia, dose-response experiments using physiological to pharmacological nitrite concentrations were conducted. Along all concentrations, abrogation of myoglobin in mice impaired vasodilation. As reactive oxygen species may counteract the vasodilatory response, we used superoxide dismutase and its mimic tempol as well as catalase and ebselen to reduce the levels of reactive oxygen species during hypoxic vasodilation. Incubation of tempol in conjunction with catalase alone and catalase/ebselen increased the vasodilatory response to nitrite. Our study shows that modest hypoxia leads to a significant nitrite-dependent vessel relaxation. This requires the presence of vascular myoglobin for both physiological and pharmacological nitrite levels. Reactive oxygen species, in turn, modulate this vasodilation response.

  2. How different oxidation states of crystalline myoglobin are influenced by X-rays.

    Hersleth, Hans-Petter; Andersson, K Kristoffer

    2011-06-01

    X-ray induced radiation damage of protein crystals is well known to occur even at cryogenic temperatures. Redox active sites like metal sites seem especially vulnerable for these radiation-induced reductions. It is essential to know correctly the oxidation state of metal sites in protein crystal structures to be able to interpret the structure-function relation. Through previous structural studies, we have tried to characterise and understand the reactions between myoglobin and peroxides. These reaction intermediates are relevant because myoglobin is proposed to take part as scavenger of reactive oxygen species during oxidative stress, and because these intermediates are similar among the haem peroxidases and oxygenases. We have in our previous studies shown that these different myoglobin states are influenced by the X-rays used. In this study, we have in detail investigated the impact that X-rays have on these different oxidation states of myoglobin. An underlying goal has been to find a way to be able to determine mostly unreduced states. We have by using single-crystal light absorption spectroscopy found that the different oxidation states of myoglobin are to a different extent influenced by the X-rays (e.g. ferric Fe(III) myoglobin is faster reduced than ferryl Fe(IV)═O myoglobin). We observe that the higher oxidation states are not reduced to normal ferrous Fe(II) or ferric Fe(III) states, but end up in some intermediate and possibly artificial states. For ferric myoglobin, it seems that annealing of the radiation-induced/reduced state can reversibly more or less give the starting point (ferric myoglobin). Both scavengers and different dose-rates might influence to which extent the different states are affected by the X-rays. Our study shows that it is essential to do a time/dose monitoring of the influence X-rays have on each specific redox-state with spectroscopic techniques like single-crystal light absorption spectroscopy. This will determine to which

  3. Dimerization effects on coacervation property of an elastin-derived synthetic peptide (FPGVG)5.

    Suyama, Keitaro; Taniguchi, Suguru; Tatsubo, Daiki; Maeda, Iori; Nose, Takeru

    2016-04-01

    Elastin, a core protein of the elastic fibers, exhibits the coacervation (temperature-dependent reversible association/dissociation) under physiological conditions. Because of this characteristic, elastin and elastin-derived peptides have been considered to be useful as base materials for developing various biomedical products, skin substitutes, synthetic vascular grafts, and drug delivery systems. Although elastin-derived polypeptide (Val-Pro-Gly-Val-Gly)n also has been known to demonstrate coacervation property, a sufficiently high (VPGVG)n repetition number (n>40) is required for coacervation. In the present study, a series of elastin-derived peptide (Phe-Pro-Gly-Val-Gly)5 dimers possessing high coacervation potential were newly developed. These novel dimeric peptides exhibited coacervation at significantly lower concentrations and temperatures than the commonly used elastin-derived peptide analogs; this result suggests that the coacervation ability of the peptides is enhanced by dimerization. Circular dichroism (CD) measurements indicate that the dimers undergo similar temperature-dependent and reversible conformational changes when coacervation occurs. The molecular dynamics calculation results reveal that the sheet-turn-sheet motif involving a type II β-turn-like structure commonly observed among the dimers and caused formation of globular conformation of them. These synthesized peptide dimers may be useful not only as model peptides for structural analysis of elastin and elastin-derived peptides, but also as base materials for developing various temperature-sensitive biomedical and industrial products. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells expressing elastin alleviates pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Jin, Minfei; Chen, Ying; Zhou, Yun; Mei, Yan; Liu, Wei; Pan, Chenhao; Hua, Xiaolin

    2016-04-05

    Pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) is a group of clinical conditions including stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP). The abnormality of collagen and elastin metabolism in pelvic connective tissues is implicated in SUI and POP. To reconstitute the connective tissues with normal distribution of collagen and elastin, we transduced elastin to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC). Elastin-expressing BMSCs were then differentiated to fibroblasts using bFGF, which produced collagen and elastin. To achieve the sustained release of bFGF, we formulated bFGF in poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NP). In an in vitro cell culture system of 7 days, when no additional bFGF was administrated, the initial PLGA-loaded bFGF NP induced prolonged production of collagen and elastin from elastin-expressing BMSCs. In vivo, co-injection of PLGA-loaded bFGF NP and elastin-expressing BMSCs into the PFD rats significantly improved the outcome of urodynamic tests. Together, these results provided an efficient model of connective tissue engineering using BMSC and injectable PLGA-loaded growth factors. Our results provided the first instance of a multidisciplinary approach, combining both stem cell and nanoparticle technologies, for the treatment of PFD.

  5. Levels of circulating MMP-7 degraded elastin are elevated in pulmonary disorders.

    Kristensen, J H; Larsen, L; Dasgupta, B; Brodmerkel, C; Curran, M; Karsdal, M A; Sand, J M B; Willumsen, N; Knox, A J; Bolton, C E; Johnson, S R; Hägglund, P; Svensson, B; Leeming, D J

    2015-11-01

    Elastin is a signature protein of the lungs. Matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) is important in lung defence mechanisms and degrades elastin. However, MMP-7 activity in regard to elastin degradation has never been quantified serologically in patients with lung diseases. An assay for the quantification of MMP-7 generated elastin fragments (ELM7) was therefore developed to investigate MMP-7 derived elastin degradation in pulmonary disorders such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and lung cancer. Monoclonal antibodies (mABs) were raised against eight carefully selected MMP-7 cleavage sites on elastin. After characterisation and validation of the mABs, one mAB targeting the ELM7 fragment was chosen. ELM7 fragment levels were assessed in serum samples from patients diagnosed with IPF (n=123, baseline samples, CTgov reg. NCT00786201), and lung cancer (n=40) and compared with age- and sex-matched controls. The ELM7 assay was specific towards in vitro MMP-7 degraded elastin and the ELM7 neoepitope but not towards other MMP-7 derived elastin fragments. Serum ELM7 levels were significantly increased in IPF (113%, pelastin fragments can be quantified in serum and may reflect pathological lung tissue turnover in several important lung diseases. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of Elastin Digestion on the Quasi-static Tensile Response of Medial Collateral Ligament

    Henninger, Heath B.; Underwood, Clayton J.; Romney, Steven J.; Davis, Grant L.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Elastin is a structural protein that provides resilience to biological tissues. We examined the contributions of elastin to the quasi-static tensile response of porcine medial collateral ligament through targeted disruption of the elastin network with pancreatic elastase. Elastase concentration and treatment time were varied to determine a dose response. Whereas elastin content decreased with increasing elastase concentration and treatment time, the change in peak stress after cyclic loading reached a plateau above 1 U/ml elastase and 6 hr treatment. For specimens treated with 2 U/ml elastase for 6 hr, elastin content decreased approximately 35%. Mean peak tissue strain after cyclic loading (4.8%, p≥0.300), modulus (275 MPa, p≥0.114) and hysteresis (20%, p≥0.553) were unaffected by elastase digestion, but stress decreased significantly after treatment (up to 2 MPa, p≤0.049). Elastin degradation had no effect on failure properties, but tissue lengthened under the same pre-stress. Stiffness in the linear region was unaffected by elastase digestion, suggesting that enzyme treatment did not disrupt collagen. These results demonstrate that elastin primarily functions in the toe region of the stress-strain curve, yet contributes load support in the linear region. The increase in length after elastase digestion suggests that elastin may pre-stress and stabilize collagen crimp in ligaments. PMID:23553827

  7. On the mechanical role of de novo synthesized elastin in the urinary bladder wall

    Wognum, Silvia; Schmidt, David E.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    The urinary bladder wall (UBW), which is composed of smooth muscle, collagen, and elastin, undergoes profound remodeling in response to changes in mechanical loading resulting from various pathologies. In our laboratory, we have observed the production of fibrillar elastin in the extracellular

  8. Elastin cross-linking in the skin from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Ono, S.; Yamauchi, M.

    1994-01-01

    Two cross-links unique to elastin, desmosine and isodesmosine were measured and compared in skin tissue (left upper arm) from 10 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and from seven age-matched controls. The contents of desmosine and isodesmosine were significantly decreased (p elastin is affected in ALS.

  9. Levels of circulating MMP-7 degraded elastin are elevated in pulmonary disorders

    Kristensen, J.H.; Larsen, L.; Dasgupta, B.

    2015-01-01

    for the quantification of MMP-7 generated elastin fragments (ELM7) was therefore developed to investigate MMP-7 derived elastin degradation in pulmonary disorders such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and lung cancer. Design and methods:  Monoclonal antibodies (mABs) were raised against eight carefully selected...

  10. Gas hydrate in nature

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2018-01-17

    Gas hydrate is a naturally occurring, ice-like substance that forms when water and gas combine under high pressure and at moderate temperatures. Methane is the most common gas present in gas hydrate, although other gases may also be included in hydrate structures, particularly in areas close to conventional oil and gas reservoirs. Gas hydrate is widespread in ocean-bottom sediments at water depths greater than 300–500 meters (m; 984–1,640 feet [ft]) and is also present in areas with permanently frozen ground (permafrost). Several countries are evaluating gas hydrate as a possible energy resource in deepwater or permafrost settings. Gas hydrate is also under investigation to determine how environmental change may affect these deposits.

  11. Radioimmunoassay of serum myoglobin and its signifance for diagnosis and therapy of musculoskeletal diseases

    Kiessling, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    A commercial test kit for radioimmunologic proof of myoglobin in serum was tested with regard to its specificty, sensitivity, precision, reproducibility, recovery and use in the diagnosis and therapy of musculoskeletal diseases. In the serum of 164 healthy control persons (age: 2-79 years) the individual myoglobin concentrations ranged from 4 to 60 ng/ml. Among 300 patients with muscular diseases extreme myoglobinaemia in acute rhabdomyolysis, polymyositis and dermatomyositis and different progressive muscular dystrophies could be detected. Slightly increased myoglobin concentrations could be proved in a number of patient with amyotrophic lateral sklerosis, neural muscular atrophy and in all cases of spinal muscular atrophy of the Kugelberg-Welander type. Confirmed DMD patients exhibited in about 80% of the cases hypermyoglobinaemia, and about 11% of 43 possible DMD patients showed an increase in myoglobin. Taking acute rhabdomyolysis and myositis as an example, it was found that myoglobin correlates well with the clinical course of these diseases and permits safe inferences as to the efficiency of the therapy chosen. (orig./MG) [de

  12. Synthetic food additive dye "Tartrazine" triggers amorphous aggregation in cationic myoglobin.

    Al-Shabib, Nasser Abdulatif; Khan, Javed Masood; Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Ali, Mohd Sajid; Al-Senaidy, Abdulrahman M; Alsenaidy, Mohammad A; Husain, Fohad Mabood; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A

    2017-05-01

    Protein aggregation, a characteristic of several neurodegenerative diseases, displays vast conformational diversity from amorphous to amyloid-like aggregates. In this study, we have explored the interaction of tartrazine with myoglobin protein at two different pHs (7.4 and 2.0). We have utilized various spectroscopic techniques (turbidity, Rayleigh light scattering (RLS), intrinsic fluorescence, Congo Red and far-UV CD) along with microscopy techniques i.e. atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to characterize the tartrazine-induced aggregation in myoglobin. The results showed that higher concentrations of tartrazine (2.0-10.0mM) induced amorphous aggregation in myoglobin at pH 2.0 via electrostatic interactions. However, tartrazine was not able to induce aggregation in myoglobin at pH 7.4; because of strong electrostatic repulsion between myoglobin and tartrazine at this pH. The tartrazine-induced amorphous aggregation process is kinetically very fast, and aggregation occurred without the formation of a nucleus. These results proposed that the electrostatic interaction is responsible for tartrazine-induced amorphous aggregation. This study may help in the understanding of mechanistic insight of aggregation by tartrazine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hydration and temperature interdependence of protein picosecond dynamics.

    Lipps, Ferdinand; Levy, Seth; Markelz, A G

    2012-05-14

    We investigate the nature of the solvent motions giving rise to the rapid temperature dependence of protein picoseconds motions at 220 K, often referred to as the protein dynamical transition. The interdependence of picoseconds dynamics on hydration and temperature is examined using terahertz time domain spectroscopy to measure the complex permittivity in the 0.2-2.0 THz range for myoglobin. Both the real and imaginary parts of the permittivity over the frequency range measured have a strong temperature dependence at >0.27 h (g water per g protein), however the permittivity change is strongest for frequencies 1 THz, and 0.27 h for frequencies <1 THz. The data are consistent with the dynamical transition solvent fluctuations requiring only clusters of ~5 water molecules, whereas the enhancement of lowest frequency motions requires a fully spanning water network. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2012

  14. Gas hydrate nucleation

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  15. Gas hydrate nucleation

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  16. Elastins from patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome and healthy individuals differ on the molecular level

    Heinz, Andrea; Huertas, Angela C Mora; Schräder, Christoph U

    2016-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a congenital disorder, which involves the heterozygous deletion of the elastin gene and other genes on chromosome 7. Clinical symptoms that are associated with hemizygosity of the essential extracellular matrix protein elastin include premature aging of the skin...... and supravalvular aortic stenosis. However, only little is known about the molecular basis of structural abnormalities in the connective tissue of WBS patients. Therefore, for the first time this study aimed to systematically characterize and compare the structure and amount of elastin present in skin and aortic...... tissue from WBS patients and healthy individuals. Elastin fibers were isolated from tissue biopsies, and it was found that skin of WBS patients contains significantly less elastin compared to skin of healthy individuals. Scanning electron microscopy and mass spectrometric measurements combined...

  17. Myoglobin oxygen affinity in aquatic and terrestrial birds and mammals.

    Wright, Traver J; Davis, Randall W

    2015-07-01

    Myoglobin (Mb) is an oxygen binding protein found in vertebrate skeletal muscle, where it facilitates intracellular transport and storage of oxygen. This protein has evolved to suit unique physiological needs in the muscle of diving vertebrates that express Mb at much greater concentrations than their terrestrial counterparts. In this study, we characterized Mb oxygen affinity (P50) from 25 species of aquatic and terrestrial birds and mammals. Among diving species, we tested for correlations between Mb P50 and routine dive duration. Across all species examined, Mb P50 ranged from 2.40 to 4.85 mmHg. The mean P50 of Mb from terrestrial ungulates was 3.72±0.15 mmHg (range 3.70-3.74 mmHg). The P50 of cetaceans was similar to terrestrial ungulates ranging from 3.54 to 3.82 mmHg, with the exception of the melon-headed whale, which had a significantly higher P50 of 4.85 mmHg. Among pinnipeds, the P50 ranged from 3.23 to 3.81 mmHg and showed a trend for higher oxygen affinity in species with longer dive durations. Among diving birds, the P50 ranged from 2.40 to 3.36 mmHg and also showed a trend of higher affinities in species with longer dive durations. In pinnipeds and birds, low Mb P50 was associated with species whose muscles are metabolically active under hypoxic conditions associated with aerobic dives. Given the broad range of potential globin oxygen affinities, Mb P50 from diverse vertebrate species appears constrained within a relatively narrow range. High Mb oxygen affinity within this range may be adaptive for some vertebrates that make prolonged dives. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Fluorescence, aggregation properties and FT-IR microspectroscopy of elastin and collagen fibers.

    Vidal, Benedicto de Campos

    2014-10-01

    Histological and histochemical observations support the hypothesis that collagen fibers can link to elastic fibers. However, the resulting organization of elastin and collagen type complexes and differences between these materials in terms of macromolecular orientation and frequencies of their chemical vibrational groups have not yet been solved. This study aimed to investigate the macromolecular organization of pure elastin, collagen type I and elastin-collagen complexes using polarized light DIC-microscopy. Additionally, differences and similarities between pure elastin and collagen bundles (CB) were investigated by Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy. Although elastin exhibited a faint birefringence, the elastin-collagen complex aggregates formed in solution exhibited a deep birefringence and formation of an ordered-supramolecular complex typical of collagen chiral structure. The FT-IR study revealed elastin and CB peptide NH groups involved in different types of H-bonding. More energy is absorbed in the vibrational transitions corresponding to CH, CH2 and CH3 groups (probably associated with the hydrophobicity demonstrated by 8-anilino-1-naphtalene sulfonic acid sodium salt [ANS] fluorescence), and to νCN, δNH and ωCH2 groups of elastin compared to CB. It is assumed that the α-helix contribution to the pure elastin amide I profile is 46.8%, whereas that of the B-sheet is 20% and that unordered structures contribute to the remaining percentage. An FT-IR profile library reveals that the elastin signature within the 1360-1189cm(-1) spectral range resembles that of Conex-Toray aramid fibers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. The myoglobin of Emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri): amino acid sequence and functional adaptation to extreme conditions.

    Tamburrini, M; Romano, M; Giardina, B; di Prisco, G

    1999-02-01

    In the framework of a study on molecular adaptations of the oxygen-transport and storage systems to extreme conditions in Antarctic marine organisms, we have investigated the structure/function relationship in Emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) myoglobin, in search of correlation with the bird life style. In contrast with previous reports, the revised amino acid sequence contains one additional residue and 15 differences. The oxygen-binding parameters seem well adapted to the diving behaviour of the penguin and to the environmental conditions of the Antarctic habitat. Addition of lactate has no major effect on myoglobin oxygenation over a large temperature range. Therefore, metabolic acidosis does not impair myoglobin function under conditions of prolonged physical effort, such as diving.

  20. Elastin receptor (S-gal) occupancy by elastin peptides modulates T-cell response during murine emphysema.

    Meghraoui-Kheddar, Aïda; Pierre, Alexandre; Sellami, Mehdi; Audonnet, Sandra; Lemaire, Flora; Le Naour, Richard

    2017-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema are associated with increased elastin peptides (EP) production because of excessive breakdown of lung connective tissue. We recently reported that exposure of mice to EP elicited hallmark features of emphysema. EP effects are largely mediated through a receptor complex that includes the elastin-binding protein spliced-galactosidase (S-gal). In previous studies, we established a correlation between cytokine production and S-gal protein expression in EP-treated immune cells. In this study, we investigated the S-gal-dependent EP effects on T-helper (Th) and T-cytotoxic (Tc) responses during murine EP-triggered pulmonary inflammation. C57BL/6J mice were endotracheally instilled with the valine-glycine-valine-alanine-proline-glycine (VGVAPG) elastin peptide, and, 21 days after treatment, local and systemic T-lymphocyte phenotypes were analyzed at cytokine and transcription factor expression levels by multicolor flow cytometry. Exposure of mice to the VGVAPG peptide resulted in a significant increase in the proportion of the CD4 + and CD8 + T cells expressing the cytokines IFN-γ or IL-17a and the transcription factors T-box expressed in T cells or retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-γt (RORγt) without effects on IL-4 and Gata-binding protein 3 to DNA sequence [A/T]GATA[A/G] expression. These effects were maximized when each T-cell subpopulation was challenged ex vivo with EP, and they were inhibited in vivo when an analogous peptide antagonizing the EP/S-gal interactions was instilled together with the VGVAPG peptide. This study demonstrates that, during murine emphysema, EP-S-gal interactions contribute to a Th-1 and Th-17 proinflammatory T-cell response combined with a Tc-1 response. Our study also highlights the S-gal receptor as a putative pharmacological target to modulate such an immune response. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Elastin Degradation by Cathepsin V Requires Two Exosites*

    Du, Xin; Chen, Nelson L. H.; Wong, Andre; Craik, Charles S.; Brömme, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsin V is a highly effective elastase and has been implicated in physiological and pathological extracellular matrix degradation. However, its mechanism of action remains elusive. Whereas human cathepsin V exhibits a potent elastolytic activity, the structurally homologous cathepsin L, which shares a 78% amino acid sequence, has only a minimal proteolytic activity toward insoluble elastin. This suggests that there are distinct structural domains that play an important role in elastinolysis. In this study, a total of 11 chimeras of cathepsins V and L were generated to identify elastin-binding domains in cathepsin V. Evaluation of these chimeras revealed two exosites contributing to the elastolytic activity of cathepsin V that are distant from the active cleft of the protease and are located in surface loop regions. Replacement of exosite 1 or 2 with analogous residues from cathepsin L led to a 75 and 43% loss in the elastolytic activity, respectively. Replacement of both exosites yielded a non-elastase variant similar to that of cathepsin L. Identification of these exosites may contribute to the design of inhibitors that will only affect the elastolytic activity of cysteine cathepsins without interfering with other physiological protease functions. PMID:24121514

  2. Development of Tissue-Engineered Ligaments: Elastin Promotes Regeneration of the Rabbit Medial Collateral Ligament.

    Hirukawa, Masaki; Katayama, Shingo; Sato, Tatsuya; Yamada, Masayoshi; Kageyama, Satoshi; Unno, Hironori; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Miura, Yoshihiro; Shiratsuchi, Eri; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Keiichi; Horiuchi, Takashi

    2017-12-21

    When ligaments are injured, reconstructive surgery is sometimes required to restore function. Methods of reconstructive surgery include transplantation of an artificial ligament and autotransplantation of a tendon. However, these methods have limitations related to the strength of the bone-ligament insertion and biocompatibility of the transplanted tissue after surgery. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new reconstruction methods and pursue the development of artificial ligaments. Elastin is a major component of elastic fibers and ligaments. However, the role of elastin in ligament regeneration has not been described. Here, we developed a rabbit model of a medial collateral ligament (MCL) rupture and treated animal knees with exogenous elastin [100 µg/(0.5 mL·week)] for 6 or 12 weeks. Elastin treatment increased gene expression and protein content of collagen and elastin (gene expression, 6-fold and 42-fold, respectively; protein content, 1.6-fold and 1.9-fold, respectively), and also increased the elastic modulus of MCL increased with elastin treatment (2-fold) compared with the controls. Our data suggest that elastin is involved in the regeneration of damaged ligaments. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Elastin overexpression by cell-based gene therapy preserves matrix and prevents cardiac dilation

    Li, Shu-Hong; Sun, Zhuo; Guo, Lily; Han, Mihan; Wood, Michael F G; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Alex Vitkin, I; Weisel, Richard D; Li, Ren-Ke

    2012-01-01

    After a myocardial infarction, thinning and expansion of the fibrotic scar contribute to progressive heart failure. The loss of elastin is a major contributor to adverse extracellular matrix remodelling of the infarcted heart, and restoration of the elastic properties of the infarct region can prevent ventricular dysfunction. We implanted cells genetically modified to overexpress elastin to re-establish the elastic properties of the infarcted myocardium and prevent cardiac failure. A full-length human elastin cDNA was cloned, subcloned into an adenoviral vector and then transduced into rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). In vitro studies showed that BMSCs expressed the elastin protein, which was deposited into the extracellular matrix. Transduced BMSCs were injected into the infarcted myocardium of adult rats. Control groups received either BMSCs transduced with the green fluorescent protein gene or medium alone. Elastin deposition in the infarcted myocardium was associated with preservation of myocardial tissue structural integrity (by birefringence of polarized light; P elastin showed the greatest functional improvement (P elastin in the infarcted heart preserved the elastic structure of the extracellular matrix, which, in turn, preserved diastolic function, prevented ventricular dilation and preserved cardiac function. This cell-based gene therapy provides a new approach to cardiac regeneration. PMID:22435995

  4. High-contrast multimodel nonlinear optical imaging of collagen and elastin

    Zhuo, S M [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Science and Technology for Medicine (Fujian Normal University), Ministry of Education, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Chen, J X [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Science and Technology for Medicine (Fujian Normal University), Ministry of Education, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Luo, T S [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Science and Technology for Medicine (Fujian Normal University), Ministry of Education, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Chen, H L [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Science and Technology for Medicine (Fujian Normal University), Ministry of Education, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Zhao, J J [Department of Skin, Affiliated Xiehe Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350001 (China)

    2007-07-15

    Collagen and elastin, as the major components in the extracellular matrix (ECM), are intrinsic indicators of physiological and pathological states. Here, we have developed a high-contrast multimodel nonlinear optical imaging technique to imaging collagen and elastin by detecting simultaneously two photon-excited fluorescence (TPEF) from elastin and second-harmonic generation (SHG) from collagen. Our results show that this technique can obtain a high-contrast TPEF/SHG image in human dermis and permit direct visualization of collagen and elastin. It was shown that the technique can provide collagen and elastin structural information to determine collagen and elastin fibril orientation and distribution and acquire some morphometric properties. It was found that the in-depth TPEF/SHG imaging and 3-D reconstruction of TPEF/SHG images can extract more collagen and elastin structural and biochemical information. The study results suggest that the high-contrast multimodel nonlinear imaging provides a powerful tool to study ECM intrinsic components and has the potential to provide more important information for the diagnosis of tissue.

  5. Elastin Is Differentially Regulated by Pressure Therapy in a Porcine Model of Hypertrophic Scar.

    Carney, Bonnie C; Liu, Zekun; Alkhalil, Abdulnaser; Travis, Taryn E; Ramella-Roman, Jessica; Moffatt, Lauren T; Shupp, Jeffrey W

    Beneficial effects of pressure therapy for hypertrophic scars have been reported, but the mechanisms of action are not fully understood. This study evaluated elastin and its contribution to scar pliability. The relationship between changes in Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) scores of pressure-treated scars and differential regulation of elastin was assessed. Hypertrophic scars were created and assessed weekly using VSS and biopsy procurement. Pressure treatment began on day 70 postinjury. Treated scars were compared with untreated shams. Treatment lasted 2 weeks, through day 84, and scars were assessed weekly through day 126. Transcript and protein levels of elastin were quantified. Pressure treatment resulted in lower VSS scores compared with sham-treated scars. Pliability (VSSP) was a key contributor to this difference. At day 70 pretreatment, VSSP = 2. Without treatment, sham-treated scars became less pliable, while pressure-treated scars became more pliable. The percentage of elastin in scars at day 70 was higher than in uninjured skin. Following treatment, the percentage of elastin increased and continued to increase through day 126. Untreated sham scars did not show a similar increase. Quantification of Verhoeff-Van Gieson staining corroborated the findings and immunofluorescence revealed the alignment of elastin fibers. Pressure treatment results in increased protein level expression of elastin compared with sham-untreated scars. These findings further characterize the extracellular matrix's response to the application of pressure as a scar treatment, which will contribute to the refinement of rehabilitation practices and ultimately improvements in functional and psychosocial outcomes for patients.

  6. High-contrast multimodel nonlinear optical imaging of collagen and elastin

    Zhuo, S M; Chen, J X; Luo, T S; Chen, H L; Zhao, J J

    2007-01-01

    Collagen and elastin, as the major components in the extracellular matrix (ECM), are intrinsic indicators of physiological and pathological states. Here, we have developed a high-contrast multimodel nonlinear optical imaging technique to imaging collagen and elastin by detecting simultaneously two photon-excited fluorescence (TPEF) from elastin and second-harmonic generation (SHG) from collagen. Our results show that this technique can obtain a high-contrast TPEF/SHG image in human dermis and permit direct visualization of collagen and elastin. It was shown that the technique can provide collagen and elastin structural information to determine collagen and elastin fibril orientation and distribution and acquire some morphometric properties. It was found that the in-depth TPEF/SHG imaging and 3-D reconstruction of TPEF/SHG images can extract more collagen and elastin structural and biochemical information. The study results suggest that the high-contrast multimodel nonlinear imaging provides a powerful tool to study ECM intrinsic components and has the potential to provide more important information for the diagnosis of tissue

  7. Insights into the role of elastin in vocal fold health and disease

    Moore, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    Elastic fibers are large, complex and surprisingly poorly understood extracellular matrix (ECM) macromolecules. The elastin fiber, generated from a single human gene - elastin (ELN), is a self assembling integral protein that endows critical mechanic proprieties to elastic tissues and organs such as the skin, lungs, and arteries. The biology of elastic fibers is complex because they have multiple components, a tightly regulated developmental deposition, a multi-step hierarchical assembly and unique biomechanical functions. Elastin is present in vocal folds, where it plays a pivotal role in the quality of phonation. This review article provides an overview of the genesis of elastin and its wide- ranging structure and function. Specific distribution within the vocal fold lamina propria across the lifespan in normal and pathological states and its contribution to vocal fold biomechanics will be examined. Elastin and elastin-derived molecules are increasingly investigated for their application in tissue engineering. The properties of various elastin– based materials will be discussed and their current and future applications evaluated. A new level of understanding of the biomechanical properties of vocal fold elastin composites and their molecular basis should lead to new strategies for elastic fiber repair and regeneration in aging and disease. PMID:21708449

  8. Elastin is a key regulator of outward remodeling in arteriovenous fistulas.

    Wong, C Y; Rothuizen, T C; de Vries, M R; Rabelink, T J; Hamming, J F; van Zonneveld, A J; Quax, P H A; Rotmans, J I

    2015-04-01

    Maturation failure is the major limitation of arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) as hemodialysis access conduits. Indeed, 30-50% of AVFs fail to mature due to intimal hyperplasia and insufficient outward remodeling. Elastin has emerged as an important determinant of vascular remodeling. Here the role of elastin in AVF remodeling in elastin haplodeficient (eln(+/-)) mice undergoing AVF surgery has been studied. Unilateral AVFs between the branch of the jugular vein and carotid artery in an end to side manner were created in wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 (n = 11) and in eln(+/-) mice (n = 9). Animals were killed at day 21 and the AVFs were analyzed histologically and at an mRNA level using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Before AVF surgery, a marked reduction in elastin density in the internal elastic lamina (IEL) of eln(+/-) mice was observed. AVF surgery resulted in fragmentation of the venous internal elastic lamina in both groups while the expression of the tropoelastin mRNA was 53% lower in the eln(+/-) mice than in WT mice (p elastin has an important role in vascular remodeling following AVF creation, in which a lower amount of elastin results in enhanced outward remodeling. Interventions targeting elastin degradation might be a viable option in order to improve AVF maturation. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Measurement of MMP-9 and -12 degraded elastin (ELM) provides unique information on lung tissue degradation

    2012-01-01

    Background Elastin is an essential component of selected connective tissues that provides a unique physiological elasticity. Elastin may be considered a signature protein of lungs where matrix metalloprotease (MMP) -9-and -12, may be considered the signature proteases of the macrophages, which in part are responsible for tissue damage during disease progression. Thus, we hypothesized that a MMP-9/-12 generated fragment of elastin may be a relevant biochemical maker for lung diseases. Methods Elastin fragments were identified by mass-spectrometry and one sequence, generated by MMP-9 and -12 (ELN-441), was selected for monoclonal antibody generation and used in the development of an ELISA. Soluble and insoluble elastin from lung was cleaved in vitro and the time-dependent release of fragments was assessed in the ELN-441 assay. The release of ELN-441 in human serum from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (n = 10) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) (n = 29) were compared to healthy matched controls (n = 11). Results The sequence ELN-441 was exclusively generated by MMP-9 and -12 and was time-dependently released from soluble lung elastin. ELN-441 levels were 287% higher in patients diagnosed with COPD (p elastin. This fragment was elevated in serum from patients with the lung diseases IPF and COPD, however these data needs to be validated in larger clinical settings. PMID:22818364

  10. Chromosomal mapping of quantitative trait loci controlling elastin content in rat aorta.

    Gauguier, Dominique; Behmoaras, Jacques; Argoud, Karène; Wilder, Steven P; Pradines, Christelle; Bihoreau, Marie Thérèse; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Jacob, Marie Paule

    2005-03-01

    Extracellular matrix molecules such as elastin and collagens provide mechanical support to the vessel wall. In addition to its structural role, elastin is a regulator that maintains homeostasis through biologic signaling. Genetically determined minor modifications in elastin and collagen in the aorta could influence the onset and evolution of arterial pathology, such as hypertension and its complications. We previously demonstrated that the inbred Brown Norway (BN) rat shows an aortic elastin deficit in both abdominal and thoracic segments, partly because of a decrease in tropoelastin synthesis when compared with the LOU rat, that elastin gene polymorphisms in these strains do not significantly account for. After a genome-wide search for quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing the aortic elastin, collagen, and cell protein contents in an F2 population derived from BN and LOU rats, we identified on chromosomes 2 and 14, 3 QTL specifically controlling elastin levels, and a further highly significant QTL on chromosome 17 linked to the level of cell proteins. We also mapped 3 highly significant QTL linked to body weight (on chromosomes 1 and 3) and heart weight (on chromosome 1) in the cross. This study demonstrates the polygenic control of the content of key components of the arterial wall. Such information represents a first step in understanding possible mechanisms involved in dysregulation of these parameters in arterial pathology.

  11. Collagen and elastin cross-linking is altered during aberrant late lung development associated with hyperoxia.

    Mižíková, Ivana; Ruiz-Camp, Jordi; Steenbock, Heiko; Madurga, Alicia; Vadász, István; Herold, Susanne; Mayer, Konstantin; Seeger, Werner; Brinckmann, Jürgen; Morty, Rory E

    2015-06-01

    Maturation of the lung extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in the formation of alveolar gas exchange units. A key step in ECM maturation is cross-linking of collagen and elastin, which imparts stability and functionality to the ECM. During aberrant late lung development in bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) patients and animal models of BPD, alveolarization is blocked, and the function of ECM cross-linking enzymes is deregulated, suggesting that perturbed ECM cross-linking may impact alveolarization. In a hyperoxia (85% O2)-based mouse model of BPD, blunted alveolarization was accompanied by alterations to lung collagen and elastin levels and cross-linking. Total collagen levels were increased (by 63%). The abundance of dihydroxylysinonorleucine collagen cross-links and the dihydroxylysinonorleucine-to-hydroxylysinonorleucine ratio were increased by 11 and 18%, respectively, suggestive of a profibrotic state. In contrast, insoluble elastin levels and the abundance of the elastin cross-links desmosine and isodesmosine in insoluble elastin were decreased by 35, 30, and 21%, respectively. The lung collagen-to-elastin ratio was threefold increased. Treatment of hyperoxia-exposed newborn mice with the lysyl oxidase inhibitor β-aminopropionitrile partially restored normal collagen levels, normalized the dihydroxylysinonorleucine-to-hydroxylysinonorleucine ratio, partially normalized desmosine and isodesmosine cross-links in insoluble elastin, and partially restored elastin foci structure in the developing septa. However, β-aminopropionitrile administration concomitant with hyperoxia exposure did not improve alveolarization, evident from unchanged alveolar surface area and alveoli number, and worsened septal thickening (increased by 12%). These data demonstrate that collagen and elastin cross-linking are perturbed during the arrested alveolarization of developing mouse lungs exposed to hyperoxia. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Elastin governs the mechanical response of medial collateral ligament under shear and transverse tensile loading.

    Henninger, Heath B; Valdez, William R; Scott, Sara A; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2015-10-01

    Elastin is a highly extensible structural protein network that provides near-elastic resistance to deformation in biological tissues. In ligament, elastin is localized between and along the collagen fibers and fascicles. When ligament is stretched along the primary collagen axis, elastin supports a relatively high percentage of load. We hypothesized that elastin may also provide significant load support under elongation transverse to the primary collagen axis and shear along the collagen axis. Quasi-static transverse tensile and shear material tests were performed to quantify the mechanical contributions of elastin during deformation of porcine medial collateral ligament. Dose response studies were conducted to determine the level of elastase enzymatic degradation required to produce a maximal change in the mechanical response. Maximal changes in peak stress occurred after 3h of treatment with 2U/ml porcine pancreatic elastase. Elastin degradation resulted in a 60-70% reduction in peak stress and a 2-3× reduction in modulus for both test protocols. These results demonstrate that elastin provides significant resistance to elongation transverse to the collagen axis and shear along the collagen axis while only constituting 4% of the tissue dry weight. The magnitudes of the elastin contribution to peak transverse and shear stress were approximately 0.03 MPa, as compared to 2 MPa for axial tensile tests, suggesting that elastin provides a highly anisotropic contribution to the mechanical response of ligament and is the dominant structural protein resisting transverse and shear deformation of the tissue. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of gamma radiation on tissue elastin content and serum elastolytic activity in rats

    Drozdz, M.; Olczyk, K.; Piwowarczyk, B.; Stawiarska, B.

    1981-01-01

    The elastin content of aorta, heart, skin and lungs as well as the serum elastolytic activity were determined in rats exposed to radiation. It was found that a single irradiation of rats with gamma rays (500 r) caused a decrease of the elastin content in all examined tissues. The serum elastolytic activity in the irradiated rats was increased. It is suggested that elastin degradation following radiation may be caused by changes in its molecular structure and possibly, due to increased serum elastolytic activity. (author)

  14. Moyamoya disease and artery tortuosity as rare phenotypes in a patient with an elastin mutation.

    Ishiwata, Tsukasa; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Shigeta, Ayako; Yokota, Hajime; Tsushima, Kenji; Terada, Jiro; Sakao, Seiichiro; Morisaki, Hiroko; Morisaki, Takayuki; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2016-07-01

    Sporadic and familial elastin mutations can occur in large vessel stenosis such as supravalvular aortic stenosis and narrowing of the descending aorta. However, there are very few reports regarding the arteriopathy of cerebral, pulmonary or abdominal arteries in elastin mutations. We herein report the case of a Japanese female patient presenting with multiple arteriopathy including moyamoya disease, a tortuosity of abdominal arteries and pulmonary hypertension due to peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis. This case suggests the possible progression of cerebral arteriopathy including moyamoya disease in patients with elastin mutations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years.

  16. Myoglobins: the link between discoloration and lipid oxidation in muscle and meat

    Jens K. S. Møller

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic metabolism changes rapidly to glycolysis post-mortem resulting in a pH-decrease during the transformation of muscle in to meat affecting ligand binding and redox potential of the heme iron in myoglobin, the meat pigment. The "inorganic chemistry" of meat involves (i redox-cycling between iron(II, iron(III, and iron(IV/protein radicals; (ii ligand exchange processes; and (iii spin-equilibra with a change in coordination number for the heme iron. In addition to the function of myoglobin for oxygen storage, new physiological roles of myoglobin are currently being discovered, which notably find close parallels in the processes in fresh meat and nitrite-cured meat products. Myoglobin may be characterized as a bioreactor for small molecules like O2, NO, CO, CO2, H2O, and HNO with importance in bio-regulation and in protection against oxidative stress in vivo otherwise affecting lipids in membranes. Many of these processes may be recognised as colour changes in fresh meat and cured meat products under different atmospheric conditions, and could also be instructive for teaching purposes.

  17. Electrochemical Aptasensor for Myoglobin-Specific Recognition Based on Porphyrin Functionalized Graphene-Conjugated Gold Nanocomposites

    Guojuan Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a novel electrochemical aptasensor was developed for sensitive and selective detection of myoglobin based on meso-tetra (4-carboxyphenyl porphyrin-functionalized graphene-conjugated gold nanoparticles (TCPP–Gr/AuNPs. Due to its good electric conductivity, large specific surface area, and excellent mechanical properties, TCPP–Gr/AuNPs can act as an enhanced material for the electrochemical detection of myoglobin. Meanwhile, it provides an effective matrix for immobilizing myoglobin-binding aptamer (MbBA. The electrochemical aptasensor has a sensitive response to myoglobin in a linear range from 2.0 × 10−11 M to 7.7 × 10−7 M with a detection limit of 6.7 × 10−12 M (S/N = 3. Furthermore, the method has the merits of high sensitivity, low price, and high specificity. Our work will supply new horizons for the diagnostic applications of graphene-based materials in biomedicine and biosensors.

  18. Aggregation and conformational stability evaluation of myoglobin in the presence of ionic surfactant

    Mohammad A. Alsenaidy

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Sodium lauroyl sarcosinate (SLS is frequently used for the solubilization of inclusion bodies in vitro due to its structural similarity to lipid plasma membrane. There are many factors that could influence protein aggregation propensity, including overall protein surface charge and hydrophobicity. Here, the aggregation pathway of myoglobin protein was studied under different conditions (pH 3.5 and 7.4 in the presence of varying concentrations of SLS to evaluate the underlying forces dictating protein aggregation. Data obtained from Rayleigh light scattering, ThT binding assay, and far-UV CD indicated that SLS have different effects on the protein depending on its concentration and environmental conditions. In the presence of low concentrations of SLS (0.05–0.1 mM, no aggregation was detected at both pH conditions tested. Whereas, as we reach higher SLS concentrations (0.5–10.0 mM, myoglobin started forming larger-sized aggregates at pH 3.5 and not pH 7.4. These results suggest that electrostatics interactions as well as hydrophobic forces play an important role in SLS-induced myoglobin aggregation. Keywords: Sodium lauroyl sarcosinate, Surfactant, Myoglobin, Protein aggregation, Amorphous aggregates, pH

  19. Photoexcitation dynamics of nitric oxide bound ferric myoglobin probed by femtosecond IR spectroscopy

    Park Jaehun

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved vibrational spectra show that photolysis quantum yield of NO bound ferric myoglobin is smaller than 0.86, the deligated NO geminately rebinds with subnanosecond time scale, and the rebinding kinetics depends on protein conformation.

  20. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  1. Cancer Nano technology Using Elastin-Like Polypeptides

    Siti Najila Mohd Janib

    2014-01-01

    Despite progress in understanding cancer biology, this knowledge has not translated into comparable advances in the clinic. Two fundamental problems currently stalling the efficient treatment of cancer have been detecting cancer early enough for successful treatment and avoiding excessive toxicity to normal tissues. In view of this, cancer still remains one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide, affecting over 10 million new patients every year. Clearly the development of novel approaches for early detection and treatment of cancer is urgently needed to increase patient survival. Recently, nano technology-based systems have emerged as novel therapeutic modalities for cancer treatment. Tiny man made nanoparticles, much smaller than a virus, are being developed to package, transport, and deliver imaging and therapeutic agents. Co-inclusion of these agents, into nano carriers might be advantageous because they increase solubility of hydrophobic drugs, enhance permeability across physiological barriers, alter drug biodistribution, increase local bioavailability and reduce side effects. Initial findings have been promising and nanoparticles have been shown to deliver therapeutic agents to target cells and effect tumor growth. To this end our lab is investigating a class of biodegradable and biocompatible polymers known as elastin-like polypeptides (ELP). Elastin like polypeptide is a bio polymer derived from the structural motif found in mammalian elastin protein and has a sequence dependent transition temperature that can be used as nano carriers to treat diseases. ELPs are characterized by the pentameric repeat VPGXG, where X can be any amino acid. All functional ELPs undergo inverse phase transition whereby below its transition temperature, they exist in a solubilized form while above its transition temperature they undergo phase separation which leads to their aggregation in solution. This process is reversible. Phase transition can also be triggered by other

  2. Factors correlating with significant differences between X-ray structures of myoglobin

    Rashin, Alexander A.; Domagalski, Marcin J.; Zimmermann, Michael T.; Minor, Wladek; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Jernigan, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Conformational differences between myoglobin structures are studied. Most structural differences in whale myoglobin beyond the uncertainty threshold can be correlated with a few specific structural factors. There are always exceptions and a search for additional factors is needed. The results might have serious implications for biological insights from conformational differences. Validation of general ideas about the origins of conformational differences in proteins is critical in order to arrive at meaningful functional insights. Here, principal component analysis (PCA) and distance difference matrices are used to validate some such ideas about the conformational differences between 291 myoglobin structures from sperm whale, horse and pig. Almost all of the horse and pig structures form compact PCA clusters with only minor coordinate differences and outliers that are easily explained. The 222 whale structures form a few dense clusters with multiple outliers. A few whale outliers with a prominent distortion of the GH loop are very similar to the cluster of horse structures, which all have a similar GH-loop distortion apparently owing to intermolecular crystal lattice hydrogen bonds to the GH loop from residues near the distal histidine His64. The variations of the GH-loop coordinates in the whale structures are likely to be owing to the observed alternative intermolecular crystal lattice bond, with the change to the GH loop distorting bonds correlated with the binding of specific ‘unusual’ ligands. Such an alternative intermolecular bond is not observed in horse myoglobins, obliterating any correlation with the ligands. Intermolecular bonds do not usually cause significant coordinate differences and cannot be validated as their universal cause. Most of the native-like whale myoglobin structure outliers can be correlated with a few specific factors. However, these factors do not always lead to coordinate differences beyond the previously determined uncertainty

  3. Factors correlating with significant differences between X-ray structures of myoglobin

    Rashin, Alexander A., E-mail: alexander-rashin@hotmail.com [BioChemComp Inc., 543 Sagamore Avenue, Teaneck, NJ 07666 (United States); Iowa State University, 112 Office and Lab Bldg, Ames, IA 50011-3020 (United States); Domagalski, Marcin J. [University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Avenue, Jordan Hall, Room 4223, Charlottesville, VA 22908 (United States); Zimmermann, Michael T. [Iowa State University, 112 Office and Lab Bldg, Ames, IA 50011-3020 (United States); Minor, Wladek [University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Avenue, Jordan Hall, Room 4223, Charlottesville, VA 22908 (United States); Chruszcz, Maksymilian [University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Avenue, Jordan Hall, Room 4223, Charlottesville, VA 22908 (United States); University of South Carolina, 631 Sumter Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Jernigan, Robert L. [Iowa State University, 112 Office and Lab Bldg, Ames, IA 50011-3020 (United States); BioChemComp Inc., 543 Sagamore Avenue, Teaneck, NJ 07666 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Conformational differences between myoglobin structures are studied. Most structural differences in whale myoglobin beyond the uncertainty threshold can be correlated with a few specific structural factors. There are always exceptions and a search for additional factors is needed. The results might have serious implications for biological insights from conformational differences. Validation of general ideas about the origins of conformational differences in proteins is critical in order to arrive at meaningful functional insights. Here, principal component analysis (PCA) and distance difference matrices are used to validate some such ideas about the conformational differences between 291 myoglobin structures from sperm whale, horse and pig. Almost all of the horse and pig structures form compact PCA clusters with only minor coordinate differences and outliers that are easily explained. The 222 whale structures form a few dense clusters with multiple outliers. A few whale outliers with a prominent distortion of the GH loop are very similar to the cluster of horse structures, which all have a similar GH-loop distortion apparently owing to intermolecular crystal lattice hydrogen bonds to the GH loop from residues near the distal histidine His64. The variations of the GH-loop coordinates in the whale structures are likely to be owing to the observed alternative intermolecular crystal lattice bond, with the change to the GH loop distorting bonds correlated with the binding of specific ‘unusual’ ligands. Such an alternative intermolecular bond is not observed in horse myoglobins, obliterating any correlation with the ligands. Intermolecular bonds do not usually cause significant coordinate differences and cannot be validated as their universal cause. Most of the native-like whale myoglobin structure outliers can be correlated with a few specific factors. However, these factors do not always lead to coordinate differences beyond the previously determined uncertainty

  4. The action of neutrophil serine proteases on elastin and its precursor

    Heinz, Andrea; Jung, Michael C; Jahreis, Günther

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the degradation of the natural substrates tropoelastin and elastin by the neutrophil-derived serine proteases human leukocyte elastase (HLE), proteinase 3 (PR3) and cathepsin G (CG). Focus was placed on determining their cleavage site specificities using mass...... spectrometric techniques. Moreover, the release of bioactive peptides from elastin by the three proteases was studied. Tropoelastin was comprehensively degraded by all three proteases, whereas less cleavage occurred in mature cross-linked elastin. An analysis of the cleavage site specificities of the three...... proteases in tropoelastin and elastin revealed that HLE and PR3 similarly tolerate hydrophobic and/or aliphatic amino acids such as Ala, Gly and Val at P(1), which are also preferred by CG. In addition, CG prefers the bulky hydrophobic amino acid Leu and accepts the bulky aromatic amino acids Phe and Tyr...

  5. In vitro cross-linking of elastin peptides and molecular characterization of the resultant biomaterials

    Heinz, Andrea; Ruttkies, Christoph K H; Jahreis, Günther

    2013-01-01

    -link desmosine or isodesmosine was unexpected, however, could be confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry and molecular dynamics simulations. CONCLUSIONS: The study demonstrated that it is possible to produce biopolymers containing polyfunctional cross-links characteristic of mature elastin from small elastin......BACKGROUND: Elastin is a vital protein and the major component of elastic fibers which provides resilience to many vertebrate tissues. Elastin's structure and function are influenced by extensive cross-linking, however, the cross-linking pattern is still unknown. METHODS: Small peptides containing...... and the insoluble polymers, after digestion with pancreatic elastase or trypsin, were furthermore comprehensively characterized on the molecular level using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. RESULTS: MS(2) data was used to develop the software PolyLinX, which is able to sequence not only linear and bifunctionally...

  6. Elastin-Like Recombinamers As Smart Drug Delivery Systems.

    Arias, F Javier; Santos, Mercedes; Ibanez-Fonseca, Arturo; Pina, Maria Jesus; Serrano, Sofía

    2018-02-19

    Drug delivery systems that are able to control the release of bioactive molecules and designed to carry drugs to target sites are of particular interest for tissue therapy. Moreover, systems comprising materials that can respond to environmental stimuli and promote self-assembly and higher order supramolecular organization are especially useful in the biomedical field. Objetive: This review focuses on biomaterials suitable for this purpose and that include elastin-like recombinamers (ELRs), a class of proteinaceous polymers bioinspired by natural elastin, designed using recombinant technologies. The self-assembly and thermoresponsive behaviour of these systems, along with their biodegradability, biocompatibility and well-defined composition as a result of their tailormade design, make them particularly attractive for controlled drug delivery. ELR-based delivery systems that allow targeted delivery are reviewed, especially ELR-drug recombinant fusion constructs, ELR-drug systems chemically bioconjugated in their monomeric and soluble forms, and drug encapsulation by nanoparticle-forming ELRs. Subsequently, the review focuses on those drug carriers in which smart release is triggered by pH or temperature with a particular focus on cancer treatments. Systems for controlled drug release based on depots and hydrogels that act as both a support and reservoir in which drugs can be stored will be described, and their applications in drug delivery discussed. Finally, smart drug-delivery systems not based on ELRs, including those comprising proteins, synthetic polymers and non-polymeric systems, will also be briefly discussed. Several different constructions based on ELRs are potential candidates for controlled drug delivery to be applied in advanced biomedical treatments. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Induction of protein body formation in plant leaves by elastin-like polypeptide fusions

    Joensuu Jussi J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elastin-like polypeptides are synthetic biopolymers composed of a repeating pentapeptide 'VPGXG' sequence that are valuable for the simple non-chromatographic purification of recombinant proteins. In addition, elastin-like polypeptide fusions have been shown to enhance the accumulation of a range of different recombinant proteins in plants, thus addressing the major limitation of plant-based expression systems, which is a low production yield. This study's main objectives were to determine the general utility of elastin-like polypeptide protein fusions in various intracellular compartments and to elucidate elastin-like polypeptide's mechanism of action for increasing recombinant protein accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum of plants. Results The effect of elastin-like polypeptide fusions on the accumulation of green fluorescent protein targeted to the cytoplasm, chloroplasts, apoplast, and endoplasmic reticulum was evaluated. The endoplasmic reticulum was the only intracellular compartment in which an elastin-like polypeptide tag was shown to significantly enhance recombinant protein accumulation. Interestingly, endoplasmic reticulum-targeted elastin-like polypeptide fusions induced the formation of a novel type of protein body, which may be responsible for elastin-like polypeptide's positive effect on recombinant protein accumulation by excluding the heterologous protein from normal physiological turnover. Although expressed in the leaves of plants, these novel protein bodies appeared similar in size and morphology to the prolamin-based protein bodies naturally found in plant seeds. The elastin-like polypeptide-induced protein bodies were highly mobile organelles, exhibiting various dynamic patterns of movement throughout the cells, which were dependent on intact actin microfilaments and a functional actomyosin motility system. Conclusion An endoplasmic reticulum-targeted elastin-like polypeptide fusion approach

  8. Remote Exosites of the Catalytic Domain of Matrix Metalloproteinase-12 Enhance Elastin Degradation┼

    Fulcher, Yan G.; Van Doren, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    How does matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12 or metalloelastase) degrade elastin with high specific activity? NMR suggested soluble elastin to cover surfaces of MMP-12 far from its active site. Two of these surfaces have been found, by mutagenesis guided by the BINDSIght approach, to affect degradation and affinity for elastin substrates but not a small peptide substrate. Main exosite 1 has been extended out to Asp124 that binds calcium. Novel exosite 2 comprises residues from the II–III loop and β-strand I near the back of the catalytic domain. The high exposure of these distal exosites may make them accessible to elastin made more flexible by partial hydrolysis. Importantly, combination of a lesion at each of exosites 1 and 2 and active site decreased catalytic competence towards soluble elastin by 13- to 18-fold to the level of MMP-3, homologue and poor elastase. Double mutant cycle analysis of conservative mutations of Met156 (exosite 2) and either Asp124 (exosite 1) or Ile180 (active site) had additive effects. Compared to polar substitutions observed in other MMPs, Met156 enhanced affinity and Ile180 kcat for soluble elastin. Both residues detracted from the higher folding stability with polar mutations. This resembles the trend in enzymes of an inverse relationship between folding stability and activity. Restoring Asp124 from combination mutants enhanced kcat for soluble elastin. In elastin degradation, exosites 1 and 2 contributed independently of each other and Ile180 at the active site, but with partial coupling to Ala182 near the active site. The concept of weak, separated interactions coalescing somewhat independently can be extended to this proteolytic digestion of a protein from fibrils. PMID:21967233

  9. Fibril Formation by pH and Temperature Responsive Silk-Elastin Block Copolymers

    Golinska, M.D.; Pham, T.T.H.; Werten, M.W.T.; Wolf, de F.A.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Gucht, van der J.

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we study the self-assembly of two silk-elastin-like proteins: one is a diblock S24E40 composed of 24 silk-like (S) repeats and 40 elastin-like (E) repeats; the other is a triblock S12C4E40, in which the S and E blocks are separated by a random coil block (C4). Upon lowering the pH,

  10. Proline-poor hydrophobic domains modulate the assembly and material properties of polymeric elastin.

    Muiznieks, Lisa D; Reichheld, Sean E; Sitarz, Eva E; Miao, Ming; Keeley, Fred W

    2015-10-01

    Elastin is a self-assembling extracellular matrix protein that provides elasticity to tissues. For entropic elastomers such as elastin, conformational disorder of the monomer building block, even in the polymeric form, is essential for elastomeric recoil. The highly hydrophobic monomer employs a range of strategies for maintaining disorder and flexibility within hydrophobic domains, particularly involving a minimum compositional threshold of proline and glycine residues. However, the native sequence of hydrophobic elastin domain 30 is uncharacteristically proline-poor and, as an isolated polypeptide, is susceptible to formation of amyloid-like structures comprised of stacked β-sheet. Here we investigated the biophysical and mechanical properties of multiple sets of elastin-like polypeptides designed with different numbers of proline-poor domain 30 from human or rat tropoelastins. We compared the contributions of these proline-poor hydrophobic sequences to self-assembly through characterization of phase separation, and to the tensile properties of cross-linked, polymeric materials. We demonstrate that length of hydrophobic domains and propensity to form β-structure, both affecting polypeptide chain flexibility and cross-link density, play key roles in modulating elastin mechanical properties. This study advances the understanding of elastin sequence-structure-function relationships, and provides new insights that will directly support rational approaches to the design of biomaterials with defined suites of mechanical properties. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Assessment of Myocardial Remodeling Using an Elastin/Tropoelastin Specific Agent with High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Protti, Andrea; Lavin, Begoña; Dong, Xuebin; Lorrio, Silvia; Robinson, Simon; Onthank, David; Shah, Ajay M; Botnar, Rene M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Well-defined inflammation, proliferation, and maturation phases orchestrate the remodeling of the injured myocardium after myocardial infarction (MI) by controlling the formation of new extracellular matrix. The extracellular matrix consists mainly of collagen but also fractions of elastin. It is thought that elastin is responsible for maintaining elastic properties of the myocardium, thus reducing the risk of premature rupture. An elastin/tropoelastin-specific contrast agent (Gd-...

  12. Surface characterization of collagen/elastin based biomaterials for tissue regeneration

    Skopinska-Wisniewska, J.; Sionkowska, A.; Kaminska, A.; Kaznica, A.; Jachimiak, R.; Drewa, T.

    2009-01-01

    Collagen and elastin are the main proteins of extracellular matrix. Collagen plays a crucial role in tensile strength of tissues, whereas elastin provides resilience to many organs. Both biopolymers are readily available and biocompatible. These properties point out that collagen and elastin are good components of materials for many potential medical applications. The surface properties of biomaterials play an important role in biomedicine as the majority of biological reactions occur on the surface of implanted materials. One of the methods of surface modification is UV-irradiation. The exposition of the biomaterial on ultraviolet light can alterate surface properties of the materials, their chemical stability, swelling properties and mechanical properties as well. The aim of our work was to study the surface properties and biocompatibility of new collagen/elastin based biomaterials and consideration of the influence of ultraviolet light on these properties. The surface properties of collagen/elastin based biomaterials modified by UV-irradiation were studied using the technique of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measurements. On the basis of the results the surface free energy and its polar component was calculated using Owens-Wendt method. To assess the biological performance of films based on collagen, elastin and their blends, the response of 3T3 cell was investigated. It was found that the surface of collagen/elastin film is enriched in less polar component - collagen. Exposition on UV light increases polarity of collagen/elastin based films, due to photooxidation process. The AFM images have shown that topography and roughness of the materials had been also affected by UV-irradiation. The changes in surface properties influence on interaction between the material's surface and cells. The investigation of 3T3 cells grown on films based on collagen, elastin and their blends, leads to the conclusion that higher content of elastin in biomaterial

  13. Surface characterization of collagen/elastin based biomaterials for tissue regeneration

    Skopinska-Wisniewska, J., E-mail: joanna@chem.uni.torun.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Gagarin 7, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Sionkowska, A.; Kaminska, A. [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Gagarin 7, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Kaznica, A.; Jachimiak, R.; Drewa, T. [Collegium Medicum, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Karlowicz 24, 85-092 Bydgoszcz (Poland)

    2009-07-15

    Collagen and elastin are the main proteins of extracellular matrix. Collagen plays a crucial role in tensile strength of tissues, whereas elastin provides resilience to many organs. Both biopolymers are readily available and biocompatible. These properties point out that collagen and elastin are good components of materials for many potential medical applications. The surface properties of biomaterials play an important role in biomedicine as the majority of biological reactions occur on the surface of implanted materials. One of the methods of surface modification is UV-irradiation. The exposition of the biomaterial on ultraviolet light can alterate surface properties of the materials, their chemical stability, swelling properties and mechanical properties as well. The aim of our work was to study the surface properties and biocompatibility of new collagen/elastin based biomaterials and consideration of the influence of ultraviolet light on these properties. The surface properties of collagen/elastin based biomaterials modified by UV-irradiation were studied using the technique of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measurements. On the basis of the results the surface free energy and its polar component was calculated using Owens-Wendt method. To assess the biological performance of films based on collagen, elastin and their blends, the response of 3T3 cell was investigated. It was found that the surface of collagen/elastin film is enriched in less polar component - collagen. Exposition on UV light increases polarity of collagen/elastin based films, due to photooxidation process. The AFM images have shown that topography and roughness of the materials had been also affected by UV-irradiation. The changes in surface properties influence on interaction between the material's surface and cells. The investigation of 3T3 cells grown on films based on collagen, elastin and their blends, leads to the conclusion that higher content of elastin in

  14. Brachytherapy Using Elastin-Like Polypeptides with (131)I Inhibit Tumor Growth in Rabbits with VX2 Liver Tumor.

    Liu, Xinpei; Shen, Yiming; Zhang, Xuqian; Lin, Rui; Jia, Qiang; Chang, Yixiang; Liu, Wenge; Liu, Wentian

    2016-10-01

    Brachytherapy is a targeted type of radiotherapy utilized in the treatment of cancers. Elastin-like polypeptides are a unique class of genetically engineered peptide polymers that have several attractive properties for brachytherapy. To explore the feasibility and application of brachytherapy for VX2 liver tumor using elastin-like polypeptides with (131)I so as to provide reliable experimental evidence for a new promising treatment of liver cancer. Elastin-like polypeptide as carrier was labeled with (131)I using the iodogen method. Ten eligible rabbits with VX2 liver tumor were randomly divided into the treatment group (n = 5) and control group (n = 5). The treatment group received brachytherapy using elastin-like polypeptide with (131)I, and in the control group, elastin-like polypeptide was injected into the VX2 liver tumor as a control. Periodic biochemical and imaging surveillances were required to assess treatment efficacy. The stability of elastin-like polypeptide with (131)I in vitro was maintained at over 96.8 % for 96 h. Biochemistry and imaging indicated brachytherapy using elastin-like polypeptide with (131)I for liver tumor can improve liver function and inhibit tumor growth (P Elastin-like polypeptide can be an ideal carrier of (131)I and have high labeling efficiency, radiochemical purity and stability. Brachytherapy using elastin-like polypeptide with (131)I for liver tumor is a useful therapy that possesses high antitumor efficacy advantages.

  15. Mechanistic Insights into Elastin Degradation by Pseudolysin, the Major Virulence Factor of the Opportunistic Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Yang, Jie; Zhao, Hui-Lin; Ran, Li-Yuan; Li, Chun-Yang; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Su, Hai-Nan; Shi, Mei; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Pseudolysin is the most abundant protease secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and is the major extracellular virulence factor of this opportunistic human pathogen. Pseudolysin destroys human tissues by solubilizing elastin. However, the mechanisms by which pseudolysin binds to and degrades elastin remain elusive. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of action of pseudolysin on elastin binding and degradation by biochemical assay, microscopy and site-directed mutagenesis. Pseudolysin bound to bovine elastin fibers and preferred to attack peptide bonds with hydrophobic residues at the P1 and P1’ positions in the hydrophobic domains of elastin. The time-course degradation processes of both bovine elastin fibers and cross-linked human tropoelastin by pseudolysin were further investigated by microscopy. Altogether, the results indicate that elastin degradation by pseudolysin began with the hydrophobic domains on the fiber surface, followed by the progressive disassembly of macroscopic elastin fibers into primary structural elements. Moreover, our site-directed mutational results indicate that five hydrophobic residues in the S1-S1’ sub-sites played key roles in the binding of pseudolysin to elastin. This study sheds lights on the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:25905792

  16. Temperature-sensitive elastin-mimetic dendrimers: Effect of peptide length and dendrimer generation to temperature sensitivity.

    Kojima, Chie; Irie, Kotaro; Tada, Tomoko; Tanaka, Naoki

    2014-06-01

    Dendrimers are synthetic macromolecules with unique structure, which are a potential scaffold for peptides. Elastin is one of the main components of extracellular matrix and a temperature-sensitive biomacromolecule. Previously, Val-Pro-Gly-Val-Gly peptides have been conjugated to a dendrimer for designing an elastin-mimetic dendrimer. In this study, various elastin-mimetic dendrimers using different length peptides and different dendrimer generations were synthesized to control the temperature dependency. The elastin-mimetic dendrimers formed β-turn structure by heating, which was similar to the elastin-like peptides. The elastin-mimetic dendrimers exhibited an inverse phase transition, largely depending on the peptide length and slightly depending on the dendrimer generation. The elastin-mimetic dendrimers formed aggregates after the phase transition. The endothermal peak was observed in elastin-mimetic dendrimers with long peptides, but not with short ones. The peptide length and the dendrimer generation are important factors to tune the temperature dependency on the elastin-mimetic dendrimer. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate

  18. The structure and dynamics of the Fe-CO bond in myoglobin

    Rovira, Carme

    2003-01-01

    This paper is a review of our recent work on the structure and dynamics of the Fe-CO bond in carbonmonoxy myoglobin (MbCO), performed using density functional theory, Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approaches. The results of these investigations have served to shed light onto one of the long standing questions in myoglobin research: whether the protein discriminates the CO ligand with respect to O 2 by distorting the FeCO bond. The calculations show that both in the gas phase and in the protein the Fe-CO bond is essentially linear and therefore exclude the hypothesis that the CO in MbCO is sterically hindered. In contrast, hydrogen bonding between the O 2 ligand and the His64 residue easily explains the protein discrimination for CO

  19. Deficient Circumferential Growth Is the Primary Determinant of Aortic Obstruction Attributable to Partial Elastin Deficiency.

    Jiao, Yang; Li, Guangxin; Korneva, Arina; Caulk, Alexander W; Qin, Lingfeng; Bersi, Matthew R; Li, Qingle; Li, Wei; Mecham, Robert P; Humphrey, Jay D; Tellides, George

    2017-05-01

    Williams syndrome is characterized by obstructive aortopathy attributable to heterozygous loss of ELN , the gene encoding elastin. Lesions are thought to result primarily from excessive smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and consequent medial expansion, although an initially smaller caliber and increased stiffness of the aorta may contribute to luminal narrowing. The relative contributions of such abnormalities to the obstructive phenotype had not been defined. We quantified determinants of luminal stenosis in thoracic aortas of Eln -/- mice incompletely rescued by human ELN . Moderate obstruction was largely because of deficient circumferential growth, most prominently of ascending segments, despite increased axial growth. Medial thickening was evident in these smaller diameter elastin-deficient aortas, with medial area similar to that of larger diameter control aortas. There was no difference in cross-sectional SMC number between mutant and wild-type genotypes at multiple stages of postnatal development. Decreased elastin content was associated with medial fibrosis and reduced aortic distensibility because of increased structural stiffness but preserved material stiffness. Elastin-deficient SMCs exhibited greater contractile-to-proliferative phenotypic modulation in vitro than in vivo. We confirmed increased medial collagen without evidence of increased medial area or SMC number in a small ascending aorta with thickened media of a Williams syndrome subject. Deficient circumferential growth is the predominant mechanism for moderate obstructive aortic disease resulting from partial elastin deficiency. Our findings suggest that diverse aortic manifestations in Williams syndrome result from graded elastin content, and SMC hyperplasia causing medial expansion requires additional elastin loss superimposed on ELN haploinsufficiency. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Arterial extracellular matrix: a mechanobiological study of the contributions and interactions of elastin and collagen.

    Chow, Ming-Jay; Turcotte, Raphaël; Lin, Charles P; Zhang, Yanhang

    2014-06-17

    The complex network structure of elastin and collagen extracellular matrix (ECM) forms the primary load bearing components in the arterial wall. The structural and mechanobiological interactions between elastin and collagen are important for properly functioning arteries. Here, we examined the elastin and collagen organization, realignment, and recruitment by coupling mechanical loading and multiphoton imaging. Two-photon excitation fluorescence and second harmonic generation methods were performed with a multiphoton video-rate microscope to capture real time changes to the elastin and collagen structure during biaxial deformation. Enzymatic removal of elastin was performed to assess the structural changes of the remaining collagen structure. Quantitative analysis of the structural changes to elastin and collagen was made using a combination of two-dimensional fast Fourier transform and fractal analysis, which allows for a more complete understanding of structural changes. Our study provides new quantitative evidence, to our knowledge on the sequential engagement of different arterial ECM components in response to mechanical loading. The adventitial collagen exists as large wavy bundles of fibers that exhibit fiber engagement after 20% strain. The medial collagen is engaged throughout the stretching process, and prominent elastic fiber engagement is observed up to 20% strain after which the engagement plateaus. The fiber orientation distribution functions show remarkably different changes in the ECM structure in response to mechanical loading. The medial collagen shows an evident preferred circumferential distribution, however the fiber families of adventitial collagen are obscured by their waviness at no or low mechanical strains. Collagen fibers in both layers exhibit significant realignment in response to unequal biaxial loading. The elastic fibers are much more uniformly distributed and remained relatively unchanged due to loading. Removal of elastin produces

  1. Detection of Myoglobin with an Open-Cavity-Based Label-Free Photonic Crystal Biosensor.

    Zhang, Bailin; Tamez-Vela, Juan Manuel; Solis, Steven; Bustamante, Gilbert; Peterson, Ralph; Rahman, Shafiqur; Morales, Andres; Tang, Liang; Ye, Jing Yong

    2013-01-01

    The label-free detection of one of the cardiac biomarkers, myoglobin, using a photonic-crystal-based biosensor in a total-internal-reflection configuration (PC-TIR) is presented in this paper. The PC-TIR sensor possesses a unique open optical microcavity that allows for several key advantages in biomolecular assays. In contrast to a conventional closed microcavity, the open configuration allows easy functionalization of the sensing surface for rapid biomolecular binding assays. Moreover, the properties of PC structures make it easy to be designed and engineered for operating at any optical wavelength. Through fine design of the photonic crystal structure, biochemical modification of the sensor surface, and integration with a microfluidic system, we have demonstrated that the detection sensitivity of the sensor for myoglobin has reached the clinically significant concentration range, enabling potential usage of this biosensor for diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. The real-time response of the sensor to the myoglobin binding may potentially provide point-of-care monitoring of patients and treatment effects.

  2. Roles of the creatine kinase system and myoglobin in maintaining energetic state in the working heart

    Beard Daniel A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The heart is capable of maintaining contractile function despite a transient decrease in blood flow and increase in cardiac ATP demand during systole. This study analyzes a previously developed model of cardiac energetics and oxygen transport to understand the roles of the creatine kinase system and myoglobin in maintaining the ATP hydrolysis potential during beat-to-beat transient changes in blood flow and ATP hydrolysis rate. Results The theoretical investigation demonstrates that elimination of myoglobin only slightly increases the predicted range of oscillation of cardiac oxygenation level during beat-to-beat transients in blood flow and ATP utilization. In silico elimination of myoglobin has almost no impact on the cytoplasmic ATP hydrolysis potential (ΔGATPase. In contrast, disabling the creatine kinase system results in considerable oscillations of cytoplasmic ADP and ATP levels and seriously deteriorates the stability of ΔGATPase in the beating heart. Conclusion The CK system stabilizes ΔGATPase by both buffering ATP and ADP concentrations and enhancing the feedback signal of inorganic phosphate in regulating mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation.

  3. Size Polymorphism in Alleles of the Myoglobin Gene from Biomphalaria Mollusks

    Marcelo M. Santoro

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introns are common among all eukaryotes, while only a limited number of introns are found in prokaryotes. Globin and globin-like proteins are widely distributed in nature, being found even in prokaryotes and a wide range of patterns of intron-exon have been reported in several eukaryotic globin genes. Globin genes in invertebrates show considerable variation in the positions of introns; globins can be found without introns, with only one intron or with three introns in different positions. In this work we analyzed the introns in the myoglobin gene from Biomphalaria glabrata, B. straminea and B. tenagophila. In the Biomphalaria genus, the myoglobin gene has three introns; these were amplified by PCR and analyzed by PCR-RFLP. Results showed that the size (number or nucleotides and the nucleotide sequence of the coding gene of the myoglobin are variable in the three species. We observed the presence of size polymorphisms in intron 2 and 3; this characterizes a homozygous/heterozygous profile and it indicates the existence of two alleles which are different in size in each species of Biomphalaria. This polymorphism could be explored for specific identification of Biomphalaria individuals.

  4. A rapid method for myoglobin radioimmunoanalysis as a diagnostic tool in myocardial infarction

    Grachev, M.A.; Matveev, L.E.; Pressman, E.K.; Roschke, V.V.

    1982-01-01

    Stone et al. have elaborated a RIA-method for the determination of myoglobin, and found that increase of its concentration in serum is a reliable criterion for the diagnosis of myocardial infarction. However, the test took 24-28 h. Subsequently, the time of the analysis has been reduced to 5-6 h. Recently, a rapid method for the determination of myoglobin has been proposed based upon the use of antiserum immobilized on a powdered carrier. This method takes a little more than 1 h. The procedure according to Roxin et al. is fast due to its non-equilibrium character; after the incubation (30 min) the reaction of the antigen with the immobilized antibody still remains far from equilibrium. It is generally believed that non-equilibrium RIA procedures are less convenient than equilibrium ones for practical clinical applications. According to the RIA procedure proposed here, the time saving compared with the established methods is achieved by using relatively-high concentrations of radioactive myoglobin of moderate specific radioactivity. Under these conditions, the kinetic plateau is reached in 15-20 min. Hence, the total time of the analysis to obtain a standard curve and results for five unknown sera is 55 min. Therefore, the method becomes more useful as a guide in the treatment of myocardial infarction. (Auth.)

  5. Light Scattering Characterization of Elastin-Like Polypeptide Trimer Micelles

    Tsuper, Ilona; Terrano, Daniel; Maraschky, Adam; Holland, Nolan; Streletzky, Kiril

    The elastin-like polypeptides (ELP) nanoparticles are composed of three-armed star polypeptides connected by a negatively charged foldon. Each of the three arms extending from the foldon domain includes 20 repeats of the (GVGVP) amino acid sequence. The ELP polymer chains are soluble at room temperature and become insoluble at the transition temperature (close to 50 ° C), forming micelles. The size and shape of the micelle are dependent on the temperature and the pH of the solution, and on the concentration of the phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The depolarized dynamic light scattering (DDLS) was employed to study the structure and dynamics of micelles at 62 ° C. The solution was maintained at an approximate pH level of 7.3 - 7.5, while varying PBS concentration. At low salt concentrations (60 mM) displayed an apparent elongation of the micelles evident by a significant VH signal, along with a surge in the apparent Rh. A model of micelle growth (and potential elongation) with increase in salt concentration is considered.

  6. Development of elastin-like recombinamer films with antimicrobial activity

    Costa, André; Machado, Raul; Ribeiro, Artur

    2015-01-01

    In the present work we explored the ABP-CM4 peptide properties from Bombyx mori for the creation of biopolymers with broad antimicrobial activity. An antimicrobial recombinant protein-based polymer (rPBP) was designed by cloning the DNA sequence coding for ABP-CM4 in frame with the N......-terminus of the elastin-like recombinamer consisting of 200 repetitions of the pentamer VPAVG, here named A200. The new rPBP, named CM4-A200, was purified via a simplified nonchromatographic method, making use of the thermoresponsive behavior of the A200 polymer. ABP-CM4 peptide was also purified through...... the incorporation of a formic acid cleavage site between the peptide and the A200 sequence. In soluble state the antimicrobial activity of both CM4-A200 polymer and ABP-CM4 peptide was poorly effective. However, when the CM4-A200 polymer was processed into free-standing films high antimicrobial activity against...

  7. Aspartic acid racemisation in purified elastin from arteries as basis for age estimation.

    Dobberstein, R C; Tung, S-M; Ritz-Timme, S

    2010-07-01

    Aspartic acid racemisation (AAR) results in an age-dependent accumulation of D: -aspartic acid in durable human proteins and can be used as a basis for age estimation. Routinely, age estimation based on AAR is performed by analysis of dentine. However, in forensic practise, teeth are not always available. Non-dental tissues for age estimation may be suitable for age estimation based on AAR if they contain durable proteins that can be purified and analysed. Elastin is such a durable protein. To clarify if purified elastin from arteries is a suitable sample for biochemical age estimation, AAR was determined in purified elastin from arteries from individuals of known age (n = 68 individuals, including n = 15 putrefied corpses), considering the influence of different stages of atherosclerosis and putrefaction on the AAR values. AAR was found to increase with age. The relationship between AAR and age was good enough to serve as basis for age estimation, but worse than known from dentinal proteins. Intravital and post-mortem degradation of elastin may have a moderate effect on the AAR values. Age estimation based on AAR in purified elastin from arteries may be a valuable additional tool in the identification of unidentified cadavers, especially in cases where other methods cannot be applied (e.g., no available teeth and body parts).

  8. Tyrosinase-Mediated Construction of a Silk Fibroin/Elastin Nanofiber Bioscaffold.

    Hong, Yanqing; Zhu, Xueke; Wang, Ping; Fu, Haitian; Deng, Chao; Cui, Li; Wang, Qiang; Fan, Xuerong

    2016-04-01

    Elastin has characteristics of elasticity, biological activity, and mechanical stability. In the present work, tyrosinase-mediated construction of a bioscaffold with silk fibroin and elastin was carried out, aiming at developing a novel medical biomaterial. The efficiency of enzymatic oxidation of silk fibroin and the covalent reaction between fibroin and elastin were examined by spectrophotometry, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The properties of composite air-dried and nanofiber scaffolds were investigated. The results reveal that elastin was successfully bonded to silk fibroins, resulting in an increase in molecular weight of fibroin proteins. ATR-FTIR spectra indicated that tyrosinase treatment impacted the conformational structure of fibroin-based membrane. The thermal behaviors and mechanical properties of the tyrosinase-treated scaffolds were also improved compared with the untreated group. NIH/3T3 cells exhibited optimum densities when grown on the nanofiber scaffold, implying that the nanofiber scaffold has enhanced biocompatibility compared to the air-dried scaffold. A biological nanofiber scaffold constructed from tyrosinase-treated fibroin and elastin could potentially be utilized in biomedical applications.

  9. Oxygenation decreases elastin secretion from rat ductus arteriosus smooth muscle cells.

    Kawakami, Shoji; Minamisawa, Susumu

    2015-08-01

    The ductus arteriosus (DA), a fetal arterial connection between the main pulmonary artery and the descending aorta, normally closes immediately after birth. The oxygen concentration in the blood rises after birth, and in the DA this increase in oxygen concentration causes functional closure, which is induced by smooth muscle contraction. Previous studies have demonstrated that hypoxia and/or oxygenation affect vascular remodeling of various vessels. Therefore, we hypothesized that the rise in oxygen concentration would affect the vascular structure of the DA due to production of proteins secreted from DA smooth muscle cells (SMC). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to comprehensively investigate the secreted proteins in the supernatant of rat DA SMC harvested under hypoxic conditions (1% oxygen) or under normoxic conditions (21% oxygen). We found that the rise in oxygen concentration reduced the secretion of elastin from DA SMC. On reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, the expression of elastin mRNA was not significantly changed in DA SMC from hypoxic to normoxic conditions. Given that elastin forms internal elastic lamina and elastic fibers in the vascular muscle layers, and that a rise in oxygen concentration reduced the secretion of elastin, this suggests that the rise in blood oxygen concentration after birth reduces the secretion of elastin, and therefore may play a role in DA structural remodeling after birth. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  10. Ultrasonic delineation of aortic microstructure: The relative contribution of elastin and collagen to aortic elasticity

    Marsh, Jon N.; Takiuchi, Shin; Lin, Shiow Jiuan; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2004-05-01

    Aortic elasticity is an important factor in hemodynamic health, and compromised aortic compliance affects not only arterial dynamics but also myocardial function. A variety of pathologic processes (e.g., diabetes, Marfan's syndrome, hypertension) can affect aortic elasticity by altering the microstructure and composition of the elastin and collagen fiber networks within the tunica media. Ultrasound tissue characterization techniques can be used to obtain direct measurements of the stiffness coefficients of aorta by measurement of the speed of sound in specific directions. In this study we sought to define the contributions of elastin and collagen to the mechanical properties of aortic media by measuring the magnitude and directional dependence of the speed of sound before and after selective isolation of either the collagen or elastin fiber matrix. Formalin-fixed porcine aortas were sectioned for insonification in the circumferential, longitudinal, or radial direction and examined using high-frequency (50 MHz) ultrasound microscopy. Isolation of the collagen or elastin fiber matrices was accomplished through treatment with NaOH or formic acid, respectively. The results suggest that elastin is the primary contributor to aortic medial stiffness in the unloaded state, and that there is relatively little anisotropy in the speed of sound or stiffness in the aortic wall.

  11. Study of human lung elastin degradation by different elastases using high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Barroso, Begona; Abello, Nicolas; Bischoff, Rainer

    2006-01-01

    Elastin is a structural insoluble protein which gives elasticity to tissues and organs. Although its hydrophobic and highly cross-linked nature makes it a very durable polymer, degradation of elastin in relation with several pathological conditions, such as pulmonary emphysema, has been documented.

  12. Neutrophil elastase-induced elastin degradation mediates macrophage influx and lung injury in 60% O2-exposed neonatal rats.

    Masood, Azhar; Yi, Man; Belcastro, Rosetta; Li, Jun; Lopez, Lianet; Kantores, Crystal; Jankov, Robert P; Tanswell, A Keith

    2015-07-01

    Neutrophil (PMNL) influx precedes lung macrophage (LM) influx into the lung following exposure of newborn pups to 60% O2. We hypothesized that PMNL were responsible for the signals leading to LM influx. This was confirmed when inhibition of PMNL influx with a CXC chemokine receptor-2 antagonist, SB-265610, also prevented the 60% O2-dependent LM influx, LM-derived nitrotyrosine formation, and pruning of small arterioles. Exposure to 60% O2 was associated with increased lung contents of neutrophil elastase and α-elastin, a marker of denatured elastin, and a decrease in elastin fiber density. This led us to speculate that neutrophil elastase-induced elastin fragments were the chemokines that led to a LM influx into the 60% O2-exposed lung. Inhibition of neutrophil elastase with sivelestat or elafin attenuated the LM influx. Sivelestat also attenuated the 60% O2-induced decrease in elastin fiber density. Daily injections of pups with an antibody to α-elastin prevented the 60% O2-dependent LM influx, impaired alveologenesis, and impaired small vessel formation. This suggests that neutrophil elastase inhibitors may protect against neonatal lung injury not only by preventing structural elastin degradation, but also by blocking elastin fragment-induced LM influx, thus preventing tissue injury from LM-derived peroxynitrite formation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Multiphoton microscopy observations of 3D elastin and collagen fiber microstructure changes during pressurization in aortic media.

    Sugita, Shukei; Matsumoto, Takeo

    2017-06-01

    Elastin and collagen fibers play important roles in the mechanical properties of aortic media. Because knowledge of local fiber structures is required for detailed analysis of blood vessel wall mechanics, we investigated 3D microstructures of elastin and collagen fibers in thoracic aortas and monitored changes during pressurization. Using multiphoton microscopy, autofluorescence images from elastin and second harmonic generation signals from collagen were acquired in media from rabbit thoracic aortas that were stretched biaxially to restore physiological dimensions. Both elastin and collagen fibers were observed in all longitudinal-circumferential plane images, whereas alternate bright and dark layers were observed along the radial direction and were recognized as elastic laminas (ELs) and smooth muscle-rich layers (SMLs), respectively. Elastin and collagen fibers are mainly oriented in the circumferential direction, and waviness of collagen fibers was significantly higher than that of elastin fibers. Collagen fibers were more undulated in longitudinal than in radial direction, whereas undulation of elastin fibers was equibiaxial. Changes in waviness of collagen fibers during pressurization were then evaluated using 2-dimensional fast Fourier transform in mouse aortas, and indices of waviness of collagen fibers decreased with increases in intraluminal pressure. These indices also showed that collagen fibers in SMLs became straight at lower intraluminal pressures than those in EL, indicating that SMLs stretched more than ELs. These results indicate that deformation of the aorta due to pressurization is complicated because of the heterogeneity of tissue layers and differences in elastic properties of ELs, SMLs, and surrounding collagen and elastin.

  14. Elastin and Mechanics of Pig Pericardial Resistance Arteries (pPRA)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Leurgans, Thomas; Rosenstand, Kristoffer

    Resistance arteries are remodeled in hypertension and diabetes. Elastin was reported to play a role herein. The parietal pericardium is opened during cardio-thoracic surgeries and might be a valuable biopsy for research in cardio-vascular diseases. We tested the hypothesis that resistance arteries...... can be isolated from the pericardium to study the micro-architecture of elastin and vascular wall mechanics. The pericardium of pigs served to test the hypothesis. pPRAs were microdissected. Their structure was examined using multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy. Diameter......-tension and pressure-diameter-length relationships were recorded in myographs. Findings are compared to rodent mesenteric resistance arteries and –basilar arteries (rMRA, rBA) with comparable lumen diameter (±300µm at 100mmHg). pPRA have no clear external elastic lamina (present in rMRA, but not rBA), scant elastin...

  15. Chemical hydrogels based on a hyaluronic acid-graft-α-elastin derivative as potential scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Palumbo, Fabio Salvatore; Pitarresi, Giovanna; Fiorica, Calogero; Rigogliuso, Salvatrice; Ghersi, Giulio; Giammona, Gaetano

    2013-01-01

    In this work hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized with ethylenediamine (EDA) has been employed to graft α-elastin. In particular a HA-EDA derivative bearing 50 mol% of pendant amino groups has been successfully employed to produce the copolymer HA-EDA-g-α-elastin containing 32% w/w of protein. After grafting with α-elastin, remaining free amino groups reacted with ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (EGDGE) for producing chemical hydrogels, proposed as scaffolds for tissue engineering. Swelling degree, resistance to chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis, as well as preliminary biological properties of HA-EDA-g-α-elastin/EGDGE scaffold have been evaluated and compared with a HA-EDA/EGDGE scaffold. The presence of α-elastin grafted to HA-EDA improves attachment, viability and proliferation of primary rat dermal fibroblasts and human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells. Biological performance of HA-EDA-g-α-elastin/EGDGE scaffold resulted comparable to that of a commercial collagen type I sponge (Antema®), chosen as a positive control. - Highlights: ► Hyaluronic acid (HA) has been functionalized with ethylenediamine (EDA). ► Amino groups of HA-EDA allow the reaction with α-elastin and ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (EGDGE). ► Chemical scaffolds of HA-EDA-graft-α-elastin/EGDGE have been characterized. ► The presence of α-elastin affects porosity, swelling and enzymatic degradation of scaffolds. ► The presence of α-elastin improves attachment, viability and proliferation of fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells

  16. Chemical hydrogels based on a hyaluronic acid-graft-α-elastin derivative as potential scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Palumbo, Fabio Salvatore [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari e Biomolecolari, Sezione di Chimica e Tecnologie Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Via Archirafi 32, 90123, Palermo (Italy); Pitarresi, Giovanna, E-mail: giovanna.pitarresi@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari e Biomolecolari, Sezione di Chimica e Tecnologie Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Via Archirafi 32, 90123, Palermo (Italy); Institute of Biophysics at Palermo, Italian National Research Council, Via Ugo La Malfa 153, 90146 Palermo (Italy); Fiorica, Calogero [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari e Biomolecolari, Sezione di Chimica e Tecnologie Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Via Archirafi 32, 90123, Palermo (Italy); Rigogliuso, Salvatrice; Ghersi, Giulio [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari e Biomolecolari, Sezione di Biologia Cellulare, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze ed. 16, 90128, Palermo (Italy); Giammona, Gaetano [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari e Biomolecolari, Sezione di Chimica e Tecnologie Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Via Archirafi 32, 90123, Palermo (Italy); IBIM-CNR, Via Ugo La Malfa 153, 90146 Palermo (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    In this work hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized with ethylenediamine (EDA) has been employed to graft α-elastin. In particular a HA-EDA derivative bearing 50 mol% of pendant amino groups has been successfully employed to produce the copolymer HA-EDA-g-α-elastin containing 32% w/w of protein. After grafting with α-elastin, remaining free amino groups reacted with ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (EGDGE) for producing chemical hydrogels, proposed as scaffolds for tissue engineering. Swelling degree, resistance to chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis, as well as preliminary biological properties of HA-EDA-g-α-elastin/EGDGE scaffold have been evaluated and compared with a HA-EDA/EGDGE scaffold. The presence of α-elastin grafted to HA-EDA improves attachment, viability and proliferation of primary rat dermal fibroblasts and human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells. Biological performance of HA-EDA-g-α-elastin/EGDGE scaffold resulted comparable to that of a commercial collagen type I sponge (Antema®), chosen as a positive control. - Highlights: ► Hyaluronic acid (HA) has been functionalized with ethylenediamine (EDA). ► Amino groups of HA-EDA allow the reaction with α-elastin and ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (EGDGE). ► Chemical scaffolds of HA-EDA-graft-α-elastin/EGDGE have been characterized. ► The presence of α-elastin affects porosity, swelling and enzymatic degradation of scaffolds. ► The presence of α-elastin improves attachment, viability and proliferation of fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells.

  17. Elastin-like polypeptides: A strategic fusion partner for biologics.

    Yeboah, Agnes; Cohen, Rick I; Rabolli, Charles; Yarmush, Martin L; Berthiaume, Francois

    2016-08-01

    Elastin-like peptides (ELPs) are derivatives of tropoelastin with a unique property that allows them to stay soluble below a certain critical temperature but reversibly form aggregates above that temperature. Since they are derived from tropoelastin, ELPs are biocompatible, non-toxic, and non-immunogenic. The unique properties of ELPs have made them a desirable class of fusion tags used in several biomedical applications including targeted drug delivery and enhancing the half-life of protein drugs. The most significant property of an ELP is that when fused to other proteins, the phase transition property of the ELP is maintained, and the target protein can be purified using the thermally driven property of the ELP. The ELP tag purification process is simple and inexpensive, and involves cycling the protein above and below the transition temperature of the ELP fusion followed by centrifugation to obtain the desired protein, without any need for chromatography. Consequently, using ELPs as a purification tag should be potentially interesting to biopharmaceutical companies who spend a significant percentage of their manufacturing costs on expensive protein purification techniques such as chromatography and filtration. However, ELP tags have not yet been used for commercial protein purification due to some challenges of translating this technique, which has been demonstrated mostly in academic laboratories, to a biotechnology manufacturing environment. The article first reviews the state-of-the-art in protein "ELPylation," and discusses some applications which have benefitted from using ELP as a fusion tag. Then, the article discusses the main advantages of using ELP as a purification tag, and evaluates the remaining hurdles for its implementation in industrial protein production. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1617-1627. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Historical methane hydrate project review

    Collett, Timothy; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Frye, Matt; Goldberg, Dave; Husebo, Jarle; Koh, Carolyn; Malone, Mitch; Shipp, Craig; Torres, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In 1995, U.S. Geological Survey made the first systematic assessment of the volume of natural gas stored in the hydrate accumulations of the United States. That study, along with numerous other studies, has shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world greatly exceeds the volume of known conventional gas resources. However, gas hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of gas hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various gas hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural gas hydrates, and (5) analyzing the effects of methane hydrate on drilling safety.Methane hydrates are naturally occurring crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid water-­‐lattice holds gas molecules in a cage-­‐like structure. The gas and water becomes a solid under specific temperature and pressure conditions within the Earth, called the hydrate stability zone. Other factors that control the presence of methane hydrate in nature include the source of the gas included within the hydrates, the physical and chemical controls on the migration of gas with a sedimentary basin containing methane hydrates, the availability of the water also included in the hydrate structure, and the presence of a suitable host sediment or “reservoir”. The geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrates have become collectively known as the “methane hydrate petroleum system”, which has become the focus of numerous hydrate research programs.Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated

  19. Application of three-dimensional reduced graphene oxide-gold composite modified electrode for direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of myoglobin

    Shi, Fan; Xi, Jingwen; Hou, Fei; Han, Lin; Li, Guangjiu; Gong, Shixing; Chen, Chanxing; Sun, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a three-dimensional (3D) reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and gold (Au) composite was synthesized by electrodeposition and used for the electrode modification with carbon ionic liquid electrode (CILE) as the substrate electrode. Myoglobin (Mb) was further immobilized on the surface of 3D RGO–Au/CILE to obtain an electrochemical sensing platform. Direct electrochemistry of Mb on the modified electrode was investigated with a pair of well-defined redox waves appeared on cyclic voltammogram, indicating the realization of direct electron transfer of Mb with the modified electrode. The results can be ascribed to the presence of highly conductive 3D RGO–Au composite on the electrode surface that accelerate the electron transfer rate between the electroactive center of Mb and the electrode. The Mb modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity to the reduction of trichloroacetic acid in the concentration range from 0.2 to 36.0 mmol/L with the detection limit of 0.06 mmol/L (3σ). - Graphical abstract: Direct electrochemistry of myoglobin was realized on a three-dimensional reduced graphene oxide and gold nanocomposite modified carbon ionic liquid electrode. - Highlights: • A three-dimensional reduced graphene oxide and gold composite was synthesized by electrodeposition. • Myoglobin was immobilized on the modified electrode to obtain an electrochemical sensor. • Direct electrochemistry of myoglobin was realized on the modified electrode. • The myoglobin modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic reduction to trichloroacetic acid.

  20. Elastin-derived peptides are new regulators of insulin resistance development in mice

    Blaise, Sébastien; Romier, Béatrice; Kawecki, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    . In the current study, we show that elastin-derived peptides (EDPs) may be involved in the development of insulin resistance (IRES) in mice. In chow-fed mice, acute or chronic intravenous injections of EDPs induced hyperglycemic effects associated with glucose uptake reduction and IRES in skeletal muscle, liver......, and adipose tissue. Based on in vivo, in vitro, and in silico approaches, we propose that this IRES is due to interaction between the insulin receptor (IR) and the neuraminidase-1 subunit of the elastin receptor complex triggered by EDPs. This interplay was correlated with decreased sialic acid levels...

  1. Neutrophil elastase and elastin-derived peptides in BAL fluid and emphysematous changes on CT scans

    Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Nishimura, Masaharu; Yoshioka, Aya; Takeyabu, Kimihiro; Miyamoto, Kenji; Kawakami, Yoshikazu

    1996-01-01

    We examined the relationship between neutrophil elastase, elastin-derived peptides in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and the development of pulmonary emphysema. The level of neutrophil elastase was higher in asymptomatic current smokers with emphysematous changes on computed tomographic scans than in current smokers without emphysematous changes, and was found to be correlated with the level of elastin-derived peptides in BAL fluid. Subjects with high levels of neutrophil elastase in BAL fluid had faster annual declines in FEV 1 . We conclude that the level of neutrophil elastase in BAL fluid can be used to differentiate asymptomatic cigarette smokers who are at risk for pulmonary emphysema from those who are not. (author)

  2. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates.

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C Mark; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-12-07

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  3. Formation of submarine gas hydrates

    Soloviev, V.; Ginsburg, G.D. (Reserch Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources of the Ocean ' ' VNII Okeangeologia' ' , St. Petersburg (Russian Federation))

    1994-03-01

    Submarine gas hydrates have been discoverd in the course of deep-sea drilling (DSDP and ODP) and bottom sampling in many offshore regions. This paper reports on expeditions carried out in the Black, Caspian and Okhotsk Seas. Gas hydrate accumulations were discovered and investigated in all these areas. The data and an analysis of the results of the deep-sea drilling programme suggest that the infiltration of gas-bearing fluids is a necessary condition for gas hydrate accumulation. This is confirmed by geological observations at three scale levels. Firstly, hydrates in cores are usually associated with comparatively coarse-grained, permeable sediments as well as voids and fractures. Secondly, hydrate accumulations are controlled by permeable geological structures, i.e. faults, diapirs, mud volcanos as well as layered sequences. Thirdly, in the worldwide scale, hydrate accumulations are characteristic of continental slopes and rises and intra-continental seas where submarine seepages also are widespread. Both biogenic and catagenic gas may occur, and the gas sources may be located at various distances from the accumulation. Gas hydrates presumably originate from water-dissolved gas. The possibility of a transition from dissolved gas into hydrate is confirmed by experimental data. Shallow gas hydrate accumulations associated with gas-bearing fluid plumes are the most convenient features for the study of submarine hydrate formation in general. These accumulations are known from the Black, Caspian and Okhotsk Seas, the Gulf of Mexico and off northern California. (au) (24 refs.)

  4. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  5. Dehydration behaviour of hydrates

    Dette, S.S.; Stelzer, T.; Jones, M.J.; Ulrich, J. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Zentrum fuer Ingenieurwissenschaften, Verfahrenstechnik/TVT, 06099 Halle (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Immersing a crystalline solvate in a suitable anti-solvent can induce phase transformation to solvent-free solid phase. In certain cases the solvent-mediated phase transition results in the generation of hollow, tubular structures. Both the tube dimensions of sodium-2-keto-L-gulonate anhydrate (skga) and the dehydration kinetics of sodium-2-keto-L-gulonate monohydrate (skgm) can be modified by the antisolvent employed. An explanation for the variable dehydration behaviour of skgm in the antisolvents is presented here. Furthermore, other crystalline hydrates were dehydrated in dry methanol. Providing an operational window can be found, any hydrate material could possibly find use in the production of tubes (micro- or nanotubes for different applications). The experimental conditions selected (dry methanol as antisolvent, dehydration temperature at 25 C) for the dehydration did not lead to the anhydrate tube growth for all hydrates investigated. Based upon the results presented here a first hypothesis is presented to explain this effect. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Electron paramagnetic resonance in myoglobin single crystals doped with Cu(II) : conformational changes

    Nascimento, O.R.

    1976-03-01

    Single crystals of sperm whale met-Myoglobin were doped with Cu (II) by immersion in a saturaded solution of NH 3 (SO 4 ) containing diluted Cu (SO 4 ).Two isotropic EPR spectra with different parameters and three anisotropic EPR spectra corresponding to three distinct types of Cu(II) : Mb complexes were identified. A fitting of the angular variation of the EPR spectrum of one of the complexes named here Cu(II)A : Mb was done using a spin Hamiltonian with axial symmetry calculated up to second order which gave the EPR hyperfine parameters.A study of the thermal variation of the complex Cu (II)A : Mb EPR spectrum in the temperature range of 25 0 C to 55 0 C allowed an identification of a conformational variation of the molecule the spectrum evolved from the anisotropic to isotropic spectrum with different parameters. A model of the Cu(II)A : Mb complex is proposed to explain the conformational change of the molecule by means of EPR spectra before and after thermal treatment. The isotropic spectrum obtained with the crystal at 55 0 C presents the EPR parameters very similar to the same parameters obtained with the Cu (II) : Mb complex in aqueous solution at 77 0 K, whereas the isotropic spectra parameters obtained with the dried crystal are quite different. It was possible to identify two different tertiary structures of the myoglobin molecule : one corresponding to the molecule in the crystal at 55 0 C and other to the dry crystal. A slight difference in the crystalline and solution structure of the myoglobin mollecule is observed. (Author) [pt

  7. Endogenous myoglobin in human breast cancer is a hallmark of luminal cancer phenotype.

    Kristiansen, G; Rose, M; Geisler, C; Fritzsche, F R; Gerhardt, J; Lüke, C; Ladhoff, A-M; Knüchel, R; Dietel, M; Moch, H; Varga, Z; Theurillat, J-P; Gorr, T A; Dahl, E

    2010-06-08

    We aimed to clarify the incidence and the clinicopathological value of non-muscle myoglobin (Mb) in a large cohort of non-invasive and invasive breast cancer cases. Matched pairs of breast tissues from 10 patients plus 17 breast cell lines were screened by quantitative PCR for Mb mRNA. In addition, 917 invasive and 155 non-invasive breast cancer cases were analysed by immunohistochemistry for Mb expression and correlated to clinicopathological parameters and basal molecular characteristics including oestrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha)/progesteron receptor (PR)/HER2, fatty acid synthase (FASN), hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), HIF-2alpha, glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX). The spatial relationship of Mb and ERalpha or FASN was followed up by double immunofluorescence. Finally, the effects of estradiol treatment and FASN inhibition on Mb expression in breast cancer cells were analysed. Myoglobin mRNA was found in a subset of breast cancer cell lines; in microdissected tumours Mb transcript was markedly upregulated. In all, 71% of tumours displayed Mb protein expression in significant correlation with a positive hormone receptor status and better prognosis. In silico data mining confirmed higher Mb levels in luminal-type breast cancer. Myoglobin was also correlated to FASN, HIF-2alpha and CAIX, but not to HIF-1alpha or GLUT1, suggesting hypoxia to participate in its regulation. Double immunofluorescence showed a cellular co-expression of ERalpha or FASN and Mb. In addition, Mb levels were modulated on estradiol treatment and FASN inhibition in a cell model. We conclude that in breast cancer, Mb is co-expressed with ERalpha and co-regulated by oestrogen signalling and can be considered a hallmark of luminal breast cancer phenotype. This and its possible new role in fatty acid metabolism may have fundamental implications for our understanding of Mb in solid tumours.

  8. Myocyte specific overexpression of myoglobin impairs angiogenesis after hind-limb ischemia.

    Hazarika, Surovi; Angelo, Michael; Li, Yongjun; Aldrich, Amy J; Odronic, Shelley I; Yan, Zhen; Stamler, Jonathan S; Annex, Brian H

    2008-12-01

    In preclinical models of peripheral arterial disease the angiogenic response is typically robust, though it can be impaired in conditions such as hypercholesterolemia and diabetes where the endothelium is dysfunctional. Myoglobin (Mb) is expressed exclusively in striated muscle cells. We hypothesized that myocyte specific overexpression of myoglobin attenuates ischemia-induced angiogenesis even in the presence of normal endothelium. Mb overexpressing transgenic (MbTg, n=59) and wild-type (WT, n=56) C57Bl/6 mice underwent unilateral femoral artery ligation/excision. Perfusion recovery was monitored using Laser Doppler. Ischemia-induced changes in muscle were assessed by protein and immunohistochemistry assays. Nitrite/nitrate and protein-bound NO, and vasoreactivity was measured. Vasoreactivity was similar between MbTg and WT. In ischemic muscle, at d14 postligation, MbTg increased VEGF-A, and activated eNOS the same as WT mice but nitrate/nitrite were reduced whereas protein-bound NO was higher. MbTg had attenuated perfusion recovery at d21 (0.37+/-0.03 versus 0.47+/-0.02, P<0.05), d28 (0.40+/-0.03 versus 0.50+/-0.04, P<0.05), greater limb necrosis (65.2% versus 15%, P<0.001), a lower capillary density, and greater apoptosis versus WT. Increased Mb expression in myocytes attenuates angiogenesis after hind-limb ischemia by binding NO and reducing its bioavailability. Myoglobin can modulate the angiogenic response to ischemia even in the setting of normal endothelium.

  9. Vibrational dynamics of thiocyanate and selenocyanate bound to horse heart myoglobin

    Maj, Michał; Oh, Younjun; Park, Kwanghee; Lee, Jooyong; Cho, Minhaeng, E-mail: mcho@korea.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Kyung-Won [Department of Chemistry, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756, SouthKorea (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-21

    The structure and vibrational dynamics of SCN- and SeCN-bound myoglobin have been investigated using polarization-controlled IR pump-probe measurements and quantum chemistry calculations. The complexes are found to be in low and high spin states, with the dominant contribution from the latter. In addition, the Mb:SCN high spin complex exhibits a doublet feature in the thiocyanate stretch IR absorption spectra, indicating two distinct molecular conformations around the heme pocket. The binding mode of the high spin complexes was assigned to occur through the nitrogen atom, contrary to the binding through the sulfur atom that was observed in myoglobin derived from Aplysia Limacina. The vibrational energy relaxation process has been found to occur substantially faster than those of free SCN{sup −} and SeCN{sup −} ions and neutral SCN- and SeCN-derivatized molecules reported previously. This supports the N-bound configurations of MbNCS and MbNCSe, because S- and Se-bound configurations are expected to have significantly long lifetimes due to the insulation effect by heavy bridge atom like S and Se in such IR probes. Nonetheless, even though their lifetimes are much shorter than those of corresponding free ions in water, the vibrational lifetimes determined for MbNCS and MbNCSe are still fairly long compared to those of azide and cyanide myoglobin systems studied before. Thus, thiocyanate and selenocyanate can be good local probes of local electrostatic environment in the heme pocket. The globin dependence on binding mode and vibrational dynamics is also discussed.

  10. An improved UPLC method for the detection of undeclared horse meat addition by using myoglobin as molecular marker.

    Di Giuseppe, Antonella M A; Giarretta, Nicola; Lippert, Martina; Severino, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo

    2015-02-15

    In 2013, following the scandal of the presence of undeclared horse meat in various processed beef products across the Europe, several researches have been undertaken for the safety of consumer health. In this framework, an improved UPLC separation method has been developed to detect the presence of horse myoglobin in raw meat samples. The separation of both horse and beef myoglobins was achieved in only seven minutes. The methodology was improved by preparing mixtures with different composition percentages of horse and beef meat. By using myoglobin as marker, low amounts (0.50mg/0.50g, w/w; ∼0.1%) of horse meat can be detected and quantified in minced raw meat samples with high reproducibility and sensitivity, thus offering a valid alternative to conventional PCR techniques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficient reduction of Cys110 thiyl radical by glutathione in human myoglobin

    Nagao, Satoshi; Asami, Osamu; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Shun

    2011-01-01

    Human myoglobin (hMb) possesses a cysteine (Cys) residue which is rare among mammalian Mbs. To investigate the effects of this unique Cys residue at the amino acid position 110 (Cys110) on hMb reactions, we studied the reactions of wild type (WT) methMb and its alanine mutant at Cys110 (C110A) with H2O2, particularly in the presence of reduced glutathione (GSH) which is well known as a reducing agent. The formation rates of the ferryloxo (Fe(IV) = O) species by H2O2 under air were about the s...

  12. On the value of radioimmunologic myoglobin determination in skeletal muscle disorders

    Kiessling, W.R.; Beckmann, R.

    1981-01-01

    Using a sensitive radioimmunoassay (RIA) serum myoglobin (Mb) was measured in healthy controls, patients with skeletal muscle disorders (polymyositis, different types of progressive muscular dystrophy, hypokalemic myopathy and myopathy due to cortisone treatment) and as well in definite as possible carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, DMD. The results indicate that Mb is a useful parameter in the assessment of muscle cell damage. Moreover, definite DMD-carriers had hypermyoglobine in 70% and in two of twenty possible DMD-carriers (all had normal CK activities) Mb was found to be markedly increased. The usefulness of an additional Mb determination in the detection of DMD-carriers is discussed. (orig.) [de

  13. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  14. THERMODYNAMIC MODEL OF GAS HYDRATES

    Недоступ, В. И.; Недоступ, О. В.

    2015-01-01

    The interest to gas hydrates grows last years. Therefore working out of reliable settlement-theoretical methods of definition of their properties is necessary. The thermodynamic model of gas hydrates in which the central place occupies a behaviour of guest molecule in cell is described. The equations of interaction of molecule hydrate formative gas with cell are received, and also an enthalpy and energy of output of molecule from a cell are determined. The equation for calculation of thermody...

  15. Phase separation and mechanical properties of an elastomeric biomaterial from spider wrapping silk and elastin block copolymers.

    Muiznieks, Lisa D; Keeley, Fred W

    2016-10-01

    Elastin and silk spidroins are fibrous, structural proteins with elastomeric properties of extension and recoil. While elastin is highly extensible and has excellent recovery of elastic energy, silks are particularly strong and tough. This study describes the biophysical characterization of recombinant polypeptides designed by combining spider wrapping silk and elastin-like sequences as a strategy to rationally increase the strength of elastin-based materials while maintaining extensibility. We demonstrate a thermo-responsive phase separation and spontaneous colloid-like droplet formation from silk-elastin block copolymers, and from a 34 residue disordered region of Argiope trifasciata wrapping silk alone, and measure a comprehensive suite of tensile mechanical properties from cross-linked materials. Silk-elastin materials exhibited significantly increased strength, toughness, and stiffness compared to an elastin-only material, while retaining high failure strains and low energy loss upon recoil. These data demonstrate the mechanical tunability of protein polymer biomaterials through modular, chimeric recombination, and provide structural insights into mechanical design. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 693-703, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A wrinkle in flight: the role of elastin fibres in the mechanical behaviour of bat wing membranes.

    Cheney, Jorn A; Konow, Nicolai; Bearnot, Andrew; Swartz, Sharon M

    2015-05-06

    Bats fly using a thin wing membrane composed of compliant, anisotropic skin. Wing membrane skin deforms dramatically as bats fly, and its three-dimensional configurations depend, in large part, on the mechanical behaviour of the tissue. Large, macroscopic elastin fibres are an unusual mechanical element found in the skin of bat wings. We characterize the fibre orientation and demonstrate that elastin fibres are responsible for the distinctive wrinkles in the surrounding membrane matrix. Uniaxial mechanical testing of the wing membrane, both parallel and perpendicular to elastin fibres, is used to distinguish the contribution of elastin and the surrounding matrix to the overall membrane mechanical behaviour. We find that the matrix is isotropic within the plane of the membrane and responsible for bearing load at high stress; elastin fibres are responsible for membrane anisotropy and only contribute substantially to load bearing at very low stress. The architecture of elastin fibres provides the extreme extensibility and self-folding/self-packing of the wing membrane skin. We relate these findings to flight with membrane wings and discuss the aeromechanical significance of elastin fibre pre-stress, membrane excess length, and how these parameters may aid bats in resisting gusts and preventing membrane flutter. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy to Quantify Collagen and Elastin in an In Vitro Model of Extracellular Matrix Degradation in Aorta

    Cheheltani, Rabee; McGoverin, Cushla M.; Rao, Jayashree; Vorp, David A.; Kiani, Mohammad F.; Pleshko, N.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key component and regulator of many biological tissues including aorta. Several aortic pathologies are associated with significant changes in the composition of the matrix, especially in the content, quality and type of aortic structural proteins, collagen and elastin. The purpose of this study was to develop an infrared spectroscopic methodology that is comparable to biochemical assays to quantify collagen and elastin in aorta. Enzymatically degraded porcine aorta samples were used as a model of ECM degradation in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). After enzymatic treatment, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of the aortic tissue were acquired by an infrared fiber optic probe (IFOP) and FTIR imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS). Collagen and elastin content were quantified biochemically and partial least squares (PLS) models were developed to predict collagen and elastin content in aorta based on FTIR spectra. PLS models developed from FT-IRIS spectra were able to predict elastin and collagen content of the samples with strong correlations (RMSE of validation = 8.4% and 11.1% of the range respectively), and IFOP spectra were successfully used to predict elastin content (RMSE = 11.3% of the range). The PLS regression coefficients from the FT-IRIS models were used to map collagen and elastin in tissue sections of degraded porcine aortic tissue as well as a human AAA biopsy tissue, creating a similar map of each component compared to histology. These results support further application of FTIR spectroscopic techniques for evaluation of AAA tissues. PMID:24761431

  18. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to quantify collagen and elastin in an in vitro model of extracellular matrix degradation in aorta.

    Cheheltani, Rabee; McGoverin, Cushla M; Rao, Jayashree; Vorp, David A; Kiani, Mohammad F; Pleshko, Nancy

    2014-06-21

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key component and regulator of many biological tissues including aorta. Several aortic pathologies are associated with significant changes in the composition of the matrix, especially in the content, quality and type of aortic structural proteins, collagen and elastin. The purpose of this study was to develop an infrared spectroscopic methodology that is comparable to biochemical assays to quantify collagen and elastin in aorta. Enzymatically degraded porcine aorta samples were used as a model of ECM degradation in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). After enzymatic treatment, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of the aortic tissue were acquired by an infrared fiber optic probe (IFOP) and FTIR imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS). Collagen and elastin content were quantified biochemically and partial least squares (PLS) models were developed to predict collagen and elastin content in aorta based on FTIR spectra. PLS models developed from FT-IRIS spectra were able to predict elastin and collagen content of the samples with strong correlations (RMSE of validation = 8.4% and 11.1% of the range respectively), and IFOP spectra were successfully used to predict elastin content (RMSE = 11.3% of the range). The PLS regression coefficients from the FT-IRIS models were used to map collagen and elastin in tissue sections of degraded porcine aortic tissue as well as a human AAA biopsy tissue, creating a similar map of each component compared to histology. These results support further application of FTIR spectroscopic techniques for evaluation of AAA tissues.

  19. Thermo-responsive human α-elastin self-assembled nanoparticles for protein delivery.

    Kim, Jae Dong; Jung, Youn Jae; Woo, Chang Hee; Choi, Young Chan; Choi, Ji Suk; Cho, Yong Woo

    2017-01-01

    Self-assembled nanoparticles based on PEGylated human α-elastin were prepared as a potential vehicle for sustained protein delivery. The α-elastin was extracted from human adipose tissue and modified with methoxypolyethyleneglycol (mPEG) to control particle size and enhance the colloidal stability. The PEGylated human α-elastin showed sol-to-particle transition with a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of 25°C-40°C in aqueous media. The PEGylated human α-elastin nanoparticles (PhENPs) showed a narrow size distribution with an average diameter of 330±33nm and were able to encapsulate significant amounts of insulin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) upon simple mixing at low temperature in water and subsequent heating to physiological temperature. The release profiles of insulin and BSA showed sustained release for 72h. Overall, the thermo-responsive self-assembled PhENPs provide a useful tool for a range of protein delivery and tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantification of aortic and cutaneous elastin and collagen morphology in Marfan syndrome by multiphoton microscopy.

    Cui, Jason Z; Tehrani, Arash Y; Jett, Kimberly A; Bernatchez, Pascal; van Breemen, Cornelis; Esfandiarei, Mitra

    2014-09-01

    In a mouse model of Marfan syndrome, conventional Verhoeff-Van Gieson staining displays severe fragmentation, disorganization and loss of the aortic elastic fiber integrity. However, this method involves chemical fixatives and staining, which may alter the native morphology of elastin and collagen. Thus far, quantitative analysis of fiber damage in aorta and skin in Marfan syndrome has not yet been explored. In this study, we have used an advanced noninvasive and label-free imaging technique, multiphoton microscopy to quantify fiber fragmentation, disorganization, and total volumetric density of aortic and cutaneous elastin and collagen in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome. Aorta and skin samples were harvested from Marfan and control mice aged 3-, 6- and 9-month. Elastin and collagen were identified based on two-photon excitation fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation signals, respectively, without exogenous label. Measurement of fiber length indicated significant fragmentation in Marfan vs. control. Fast Fourier transform algorithm analysis demonstrated markedly lower fiber organization in Marfan mice. Significantly reduced volumetric density of elastin and collagen and thinner skin dermis were observed in Marfan mice. Cutaneous content of elastic fibers and thickness of dermis in 3-month Marfan resembled those in the oldest control mice. Our findings of early signs of fiber degradation and thinning of skin dermis support the potential development of a novel non-invasive approach for early diagnosis of Marfan syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanical, structural, and dynamical modifications of cholesterol exposed porcine aortic elastin.

    Bilici, Kubra; Morgan, Steven W; Silverstein, Moshe C; Wang, Yunjie; Sun, Hyung Jin; Zhang, Yanhang; Boutis, Gregory S

    2016-11-01

    Elastin is a protein of the extracellular matrix that contributes significantly to the elasticity of connective tissues. In this study, we examine dynamical and structural modifications of aortic elastin exposed to cholesterol by NMR spectroscopic and relaxation methodologies. Macroscopic measurements are also presented and reveal that cholesterol treatment may cause a decrease in the stiffness of tissue. 2 H NMR relaxation techniques revealed differences between the relative populations of water that correlate with the swelling of the tissue following cholesterol exposure. 13 C magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy and relaxation methods indicate that cholesterol treated aortic elastin is more mobile than control samples. Molecular dynamics simulations on a short elastin repeat VPGVG in the presence of cholesterol are used to investigate the energetic and entropic contributions to the retractive force, in comparison to the same peptide in water. Peptide stiffness is observed to reduce following cholesterol exposure due to a decrease in the entropic force. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The coupled bio-chemo-electro-mechanical behavior of glucose exposed arterial elastin

    Zhang, Yanhang; Li, Jiangyu; Boutis, Gregory S

    2017-01-01

    Elastin, the principle protein component of the elastic fiber, is a critical extracellular matrix (ECM) component of the arterial wall providing structural resilience and biological signaling essential in vascular morphogenesis and maintenance of mechanical homeostasis. Pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases have been associated with alterations of elastin. As a long-lived ECM protein that is deposited and organized before adulthood, elastic fibers can suffer from cumulative effects of biochemical exposure encountered during aging and/or disease, which greatly compromise their mechanical function. This review article covers findings from recent studies of the mechanical and structural contribution of elastin to vascular function, and the effects of biochemical degradation. Results from diverse experimental methods including tissue-level mechanical characterization, fiber-level nonlinear optical imaging, piezoelectric force microscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance are reviewed. The intriguing coupled bio-chemo-electro-mechanical behavior of elastin calls for a multi-scale and multi-physical understanding of ECM mechanics and mechanobiology in vascular remodeling. (topical review)

  3. Small Artery Elastin Distribution and Architecture-Focus on Three Dimensional Organization.

    Hill, Michael A; Nourian, Zahra; Ho, I-Lin; Clifford, Philip S; Martinez-Lemus, Luis; Meininger, Gerald A

    2016-11-01

    The distribution of ECM proteins within the walls of resistance vessels is complex both in variety of proteins and structural arrangement. In particular, elastin exists as discrete fibers varying in orientation across the adventitia and media as well as often resembling a sheet-like structure in the case of the IEL. Adding to the complexity is the tissue heterogeneity that exists in these structural arrangements. For example, small intracranial cerebral arteries lack adventitial elastin while similar sized arteries from skeletal muscle and intestinal mesentery exhibit a complex adventitial network of elastin fibers. With regard to the IEL, several vascular beds exhibit an elastin sheet with punctate holes/fenestrae while in others the IEL is discontinuous and fibrous in appearance. Importantly, these structural patterns likely sub-serve specific functional properties, including mechanosensing, control of external forces, mechanical properties of the vascular wall, cellular positioning, and communication between cells. Of further significance, these processes are altered in vascular disorders such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus where there is modification of ECM. This brief report focuses on the three-dimensional wall structure of small arteries and considers possible implications with regard to mechanosensing under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Hydrogels for lung tissue engineering: Biomechanical properties of thin collagen-elastin constructs.

    Dunphy, Siobhán E; Bratt, Jessica A J; Akram, Khondoker M; Forsyth, Nicholas R; El Haj, Alicia J

    2014-10-01

    In this study, collagen-elastin constructs were prepared with the aim of producing a material capable of mimicking the mechanical properties of a single alveolar wall. Collagen has been used in a wide range of tissue engineering applications; however, due to its low mechanical properties its use is limited to non load-bearing applications without further manipulation using methods such as cross-linking or mechanical compression. Here, it was hypothesised that the addition of soluble elastin to a collagen hydrogel could improve its mechanical properties. Hydrogels made from collagen only and collagen plus varying amounts elastin were prepared. Young׳s modulus of each membrane was measured using the combination of a non-destructive indentation and a theoretical model previously described. An increase in Young׳s modulus was observed with increasing concentration of elastin. The use of non-destructive indentation allowed for online monitoring of the elastic moduli of cell-seeded constructs over 8 days. The addition of lung fibroblasts into the membrane increased the stiffness of the hydrogels further and cell-seeded collagen hydrogels were found to have a stiffness equal to the theoretical value for a single alveolar wall (≈5kPa). Through provision of some of the native extracellular matrix components of the lung parenchyma these scaffolds may be able to provide an initial building block toward the regeneration of new functional lung tissue. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hydroxyapatite and Calcified Elastin Induce Osteoblast-like Differentiation in Rat Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells

    Lei, Yang; Sinha, Aditi; Nosoudi, Nasim; Grover, Ankit; Vyavahare, Naren

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcification can be categorized into two different types. Intimal calcification related to atherosclerosis and elastin-specific medial arterial calcification (MAC). Osteoblast-like differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) has been shown in both types; however, how this relates to initiation of vascular calcification is unclear. We hypothesize that the initial deposition of hydroxyapatite-like mineral in MAC occurs on degraded elastin first and that causes osteogenic transformation of VSMCs. To test this, rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs) were cultured on hydroxyapatite crystals and calcified aortic elastin. Using RT-PCR and specific protein assays, we demonstrate that RASMCs lose their smooth muscle lineage markers like alpha smooth muscle actin (SMA) and myosin heavy chain (MHC) and undergo chondrogenic/osteogenic transformation. This is indicated by an increase in the expression of typical chondrogenic proteins such as aggrecan, collagen type II alpha 1(Col2a1) and bone proteins such as runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin (OCN). Furthermore, when calcified conditions are removed, cells return to their original phenotype. Our data supports the hypothesis that elastin degradation and calcification precedes VSMCs' osteoblast-like differentiation. PMID:24447384

  6. The coupled bio-chemo-electro-mechanical behavior of glucose exposed arterial elastin

    Zhang, Yanhang; Li, Jiangyu; Boutis, Gregory S.

    2017-04-01

    Elastin, the principle protein component of the elastic fiber, is a critical extracellular matrix (ECM) component of the arterial wall providing structural resilience and biological signaling essential in vascular morphogenesis and maintenance of mechanical homeostasis. Pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases have been associated with alterations of elastin. As a long-lived ECM protein that is deposited and organized before adulthood, elastic fibers can suffer from cumulative effects of biochemical exposure encountered during aging and/or disease, which greatly compromise their mechanical function. This review article covers findings from recent studies of the mechanical and structural contribution of elastin to vascular function, and the effects of biochemical degradation. Results from diverse experimental methods including tissue-level mechanical characterization, fiber-level nonlinear optical imaging, piezoelectric force microscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance are reviewed. The intriguing coupled bio-chemo-electro-mechanical behavior of elastin calls for a multi-scale and multi-physical understanding of ECM mechanics and mechanobiology in vascular remodeling.

  7. Knockdown of versican 1 blocks cigarette-induced loss of insoluble elastin in human lung fibroblasts.

    Xu, Lu-lu; Lu, Yun-tao; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Lian; Merrilees, Mervyn J; Qu, Jie-ming

    2015-08-15

    COPD lung is characterized by loss of alveolar elastic fibers and an increase in the chondroitin sulfate (CS) matrix proteoglycan versican V1 (V1). V1 is a known inhibitor of elastic fiber deposition and this study investigates the effects of knockdown of V1, and add-back of CS, on CCL-210 lung fibroblasts treated with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) as a model for COPD. CSE inhibited fibroblast proliferation, viability, tropoelastin synthesis, and elastin deposition, and increased V1 synthesis and secretion. V1 siRNA decreased V1 and constituent CS, did not affect tropoelastin production, but blocked the CSE-induced loss in insoluble elastin. Exogenous CS reduced insoluble elastin, even in the presence of V1 siRNA. These findings confirm that V1 and CS impair the assembly of tropoelastin monomers into insoluble fibers, and further demonstrate that specific knockdown of V1 alleviates the impaired assembly of elastin seen in cultures of pulmonary fibroblasts exposed to CSE, indicating a regulatory role for this protein in the pathophysiology of COPD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Modulated growth, stability and interactions of liquid-like coacervate assemblies of elastin

    Muiznieks, L.D.; Cirulis, J.T.; Reinhardt, D.P.; Wuite, G.J.L.; Pomes, R.; Keeley, F.W.

    2014-01-01

    Elastin self-assembles from monomers into polymer networks that display elasticity and resilience. The first major step in assembly is a liquid-liquid phase separation known as coacervation. This process represents a continuum of stages from initial phase separation to early growth of droplets by

  9. Longevity of elastin in human intervertebral disc as probed by the racemization of aspartic acid

    Sivan, Sarit-Sara; Van El, Benno; Merkher, Yulia

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aging and degeneration of human intervertebral disc (IVD) are associated with biochemical changes, including racemization and glycation. These changes can only be counteracted by protein turnover. Little is known about the longevity of IVD elastin in health or disease. Yet, such knowl...

  10. Elastin Based Cell-laden Injectable Hydrogels with Tunable Gelation, Mechanical and Biodegradation Properties

    Fathi, Ali; Mithieux, Suzanne M.; Wei, Hua; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Valtchev, Peter; Weiss, Anthony S.; Dehghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Injectable hydrogels made from extracellular matrix proteins such as elastin show great promise for various biomedical applications. Use of cytotoxic reagents, fixed gelling behavior, and lack of mechanical strength in these hydrogels are the main associated drawbacks. The aim of this study was to develop highly cytocompatible and injectable elastin-based hydrogels with alterable gelation characteristics, favorable mechanical properties and structural stability for load bearing applications. A thermoresponsive copolymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-polylactide-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-oligo(ethylene glycol)monomethyl ether methacrylate, was functionalized with succinimide ester groups by incorporating N-acryloxysuccinimide monomer. These ester groups were exploited to covalently bond this polymer, denoted as PNPHO, to different proteins with primary amine groups such as α-elastin in aqueous media. The incorporation of elastin through covalent bond formation with PNPHO promotes the structural stability, mechanical properties and live cell proliferation within the structure of hydrogels. Our results demonstrated that elastin-co-PNPHO solutions were injectable through fine gauge needles and converted to hydrogels in situ at 37 °C in the absence of any crosslinking reagent. By altering PNPHO content, the gelling time of these hydrogels can be finely tuned within the range of 2 to 15 min to ensure compatibility with surgical requirements. In addition, these hydrogels exhibited compression moduli in the range of 40 to 145 kPa, which are substantially higher than those of previously developed elastin-based hydrogels. These hydrogels were highly stable in the physiological environment with the evidence of 10 wt% mass loss in 30 days of incubation in a simulated environment. This class of hydrogels is in vivo bioabsorbable due to the gradual increase of the lower critical solution temperature of the copolymer to above 37 °C due to the cleavage of polylactide from

  11. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    Zhang, Lina; Yamauchi, Kazuo; Li, Zongjin; Zhang, Xixiang; Ma, Hongyan; Ge, Shenguang

    2017-01-01

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10

  12. Effect of gamma irradiation dose on the fabrication of α-elastin nanoparticles by gamma-ray crosslinking

    Fujimoto, Mari; Takeda, Mayuko; Okamoto, Kouji; Furuta, Masakazu

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles were prepared utilizing the thermosensitive aggregation of α-elastin and gamma-ray crosslinking. We investigated the effect of the α-elastin irradiation doses to verify the yield of crosslinked nanoparticles. Aqueous solution of α-elastin (10 mg/ml) was used for the aggregation on raising temperature above its cloudy point (CP), followed by gamma-ray crosslinking. A slow heating process (1.9 o C/min) effectively led to aggregation of polypeptide and irradiation with more than 15 kGy yielded stable crosslinked nanoparticles with diameters less than ca. 200 nm and a narrow size distribution.

  13. Effect of gamma irradiation dose on the fabrication of {alpha}-elastin nanoparticles by gamma-ray crosslinking

    Fujimoto, Mari; Takeda, Mayuko [Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8570 (Japan); Okamoto, Kouji [Department of Bioscience and Bioinformatics, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Iizuka, Fukuoka 820-8502 (Japan); Furuta, Masakazu, E-mail: mfuruta@b.s.osakafu-u.ac.j [Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8570 (Japan)

    2011-02-15

    Nanoparticles were prepared utilizing the thermosensitive aggregation of {alpha}-elastin and gamma-ray crosslinking. We investigated the effect of the {alpha}-elastin irradiation doses to verify the yield of crosslinked nanoparticles. Aqueous solution of {alpha}-elastin (10 mg/ml) was used for the aggregation on raising temperature above its cloudy point (CP), followed by gamma-ray crosslinking. A slow heating process (1.9 {sup o}C/min) effectively led to aggregation of polypeptide and irradiation with more than 15 kGy yielded stable crosslinked nanoparticles with diameters less than ca. 200 nm and a narrow size distribution.

  14. Diversity in the organization of elastin bundles and intramembranous muscles in bat wings.

    Cheney, Jorn A; Allen, Justine J; Swartz, Sharon M

    2017-04-01

    Unlike birds and insects, bats fly with wings composed of thin skin that envelops the bones of the forelimb and spans the area between the limbs, digits, and sometimes the tail. This skin is complex and unusual; it is thinner than typical mammalian skin and contains organized bundles of elastin and embedded skeletal muscles. These elements are likely responsible for controlling the shape of the wing during flight and contributing to the aerodynamic capabilities of bats. We examined the arrangement of two macroscopic architectural elements in bat wings, elastin bundles and wing membrane muscles, to assess the diversity in bat wing skin morphology. We characterized the plagiopatagium and dactylopatagium of 130 species from 17 families of bats using cross-polarized light imaging. This method revealed structures with distinctive relative birefringence, heterogeneity of birefringence, variation in size, and degree of branching. We used previously published anatomical studies and tissue histology to identify birefringent structures, and we analyzed their architecture across taxa. Elastin bundles, muscles, neurovasculature, and collagenous fibers are present in all species. Elastin bundles are oriented in a predominantly spanwise or proximodistal direction, and there are five characteristic muscle arrays that occur within the plagiopatagium, far more muscle than typically recognized. These results inform recent functional studies of wing membrane architecture, support the functional hypothesis that elastin bundles aid wing folding and unfolding, and further suggest that all bats may use these architectural elements for flight. All species also possess numerous muscles within the wing membrane, but the architecture of muscle arrays within the plagiopatagium varies among families. To facilitate present and future discussion of these muscle arrays, we refine wing membrane muscle nomenclature in a manner that reflects this morphological diversity. The architecture of the

  15. Gene expression levels of elastin and fibulin-5 according to differences between carotid plaque regions.

    Sivrikoz, Emre; Timirci-Kahraman, Özlem; Ergen, Arzu; Zeybek, Ümit; Aksoy, Murat; Yanar, Fatih; İsbir, Turgay; Kurtoğlu, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the gene expression levels of elastin and fibulin-5 according to differences between carotid plaque regions and to correlate it with clinical features of plaque destabilization. The study included 44 endarterectomy specimens available from operated symptomatic carotid artery stenoses. The specimens were separated according to anatomic location: internal carotid artery (ICA), external carotid artery (ECA) and common carotid artery (CCA), and then stored in liquid nitrogen. The amounts of cDNA for elastin and fibulin-5 were determined by Quantitative real-time PCR (Q-RT-PCR). Target gene copy numbers were normalized using hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT1) gene. The delta-delta CT method was applied for relative quantification. Q-RT-PCR data showed that relative fibulin-5 gene expression was increased in ICA plaque regions when compared to CCA regions but not reaching significance (p=0.061). At the same time, no differences were observed in elastin mRNA level between different anatomic plaque regions (p>0.05). Moreover, elastin and fibulin-5 mRNA expression and clinical parameters were compared in ICA plaques versus CCA and ECA regions, respectively. Up-regulation of elastin and fibulin-5 mRNA levels in ICA were strongly correlated with family history of cardiovascular disease when compared to CCA (p<0.05). Up-regulation of fibulin-5 in ICA was significantly associated with diabetes, and elevated triglycerides and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) when compared to ECA (p<0.05). The clinical significance is the differences between the proximal and distal regions of the lesion, associated with the ICA, CCA and ECA respectively, with increased fibulin-5 in the ICA region. Copyright © 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  16. Lung matrix and vascular remodeling in mechanically ventilated elastin haploinsufficient newborn mice

    Hilgendorff, Anne; Parai, Kakoli; Ertsey, Robert; Navarro, Edwin; Jain, Noopur; Carandang, Francis; Peterson, Joanna; Mokres, Lucia; Milla, Carlos; Preuss, Stefanie; Alcazar, Miguel Alejandre; Khan, Suleman; Masumi, Juliet; Ferreira-Tojais, Nancy; Mujahid, Sana; Starcher, Barry; Rabinovitch, Marlene

    2014-01-01

    Elastin plays a pivotal role in lung development. We therefore queried if elastin haploinsufficient newborn mice (Eln+/−) would exhibit abnormal lung structure and function related to modified extracellular matrix (ECM) composition. Because mechanical ventilation (MV) has been linked to dysregulated elastic fiber formation in the newborn lung, we also asked if elastin haploinsufficiency would accentuate lung growth arrest seen after prolonged MV of neonatal mice. We studied 5-day-old wild-type (Eln+/+) and Eln+/− littermates at baseline and after MV with air for 8–24 h. Lungs of unventilated Eln+/− mice contained ∼50% less elastin and ∼100% more collagen-1 and lysyl oxidase compared with Eln+/+ pups. Eln+/− lungs contained fewer capillaries than Eln+/+ lungs, without discernible differences in alveolar structure. In response to MV, lung tropoelastin and elastase activity increased in Eln+/+ neonates, whereas tropoelastin decreased and elastase activity was unchanged in Eln+/− mice. Fibrillin-1 protein increased in lungs of both groups during MV, more in Eln+/− than in Eln+/+ pups. In both groups, MV caused capillary loss, with larger and fewer alveoli compared with unventilated controls. Respiratory system elastance, which was less in unventilated Eln+/− compared with Eln+/+ mice, was similar in both groups after MV. These results suggest that elastin haploinsufficiency adversely impacts pulmonary angiogenesis and that MV dysregulates elastic fiber integrity, with further loss of lung capillaries, lung growth arrest, and impaired respiratory function in both Eln+/+ and Eln+/− mice. Paucity of lung capillaries in Eln+/− newborns might help explain subsequent development of pulmonary hypertension previously reported in adult Eln+/− mice. PMID:25539853

  17. Genetic Modifiers of Cardiovascular Phenotype Caused by Elastin Haploinsufficiency Act by Extrinsic Noncomplementation*

    Kozel, Beth A.; Knutsen, Russell H.; Ye, Li; Ciliberto, Christopher H.; Broekelmann, Thomas J.; Mecham, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    Elastin haploinsufficiency causes the cardiovascular complications associated with Williams-Beuren syndrome and isolated supravalvular aortic stenosis. Significant variability exists in the vascular pathology in these individuals. Using the Eln+/− mouse, we sought to identify the source of this variability. Following outcrossing of C57Bl/6J Eln+/−, two backgrounds were identified whose cardiovascular parameters deviated significantly from the parental strain. F1 progeny of the C57Bl/6J; Eln+/−x129X1/SvJ were more hypertensive and their arteries less compliant. In contrast, Eln+/− animals crossed to DBA/2J were protected from the pathologic changes associated with elastin insufficiency. Among the crosses, aortic elastin and collagen content did not correlate with quantitative vasculopathy traits. Quantitative trait locus analysis performed on F2 C57; Eln+/−x129 intercrosses identified highly significant peaks on chromosome 1 (LOD 9.7) for systolic blood pressure and on chromosome 9 (LOD 8.7) for aortic diameter. Additional peaks were identified that affect only Eln+/−, including a region upstream of Eln on chromosome 5 (LOD 4.5). Bioinformatic analysis of the quantitative trait locus peaks revealed several interesting candidates, including Ren1, Ncf1, and Nos1; genes whose functions are unrelated to elastic fiber assembly, but whose effects may synergize with elastin insufficiency to predispose to hypertension and stiffer blood vessels. Real time RT-PCR studies show background-specific increased expression of Ncf1 (a subunit of the NOX2 NAPDH oxidase) that parallel the presence of increased oxidative stress in Eln+/− aortas. This finding raises the possibility that polymorphisms in genes affecting the generation of reactive oxygen species alter cardiovascular function in individuals with elastin haploinsufficiency through extrinsic noncomplementation. PMID:22049077

  18. Motions and electrostatic interactions in natural and semisynthetic myoglobins: a carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance study

    Maskalick, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    It is expected that the internal motions of amino acid side chains and protein backbone segments influence and are in turn affected by charge-charge and related interactions, steric constraints, hydrophobic forces, and hydrogen bonding. As an initial test of this theory 13 C-enriched glycine, alanine, and isoleucine have been substituted for the amino terminal valine of sperm whale myoglobin using semisynthetic techniques. 13 C-NMR has been used to analyze the motions of the side chain and the protonation state of the alpha amino group as a function of pH. The addition of a single methyl group to the side chain can alter the alpha amino pK value by as much as 0.3 pH units indicating a delicately balanced set of change-charge interactions between the alpha amino group and the rest of the protein. Further evidence in support of the state theory was found upon examination of the internal motions of seven of nine isoleucine vectors. These motions were extracted from natural abundance 13 C-NMR relaxation data. The results suggest a strong possibility that concerted motions are important. Also, an increase in temperature from 32 0 C to 52 0 C leads to an electrostatically driven tightening of the myoglobin structure as evidenced by no significant increase in motion amplitude of most of the vectors

  19. Aerobic dive limits of seals with mutant myoglobin using combined thermochemical and physiological data

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Davis, Randall W.; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated model of convective O2-transport, aerobic dive limits (ADL), and thermochemical data for oxygen binding to mutant myoglobin (Mb), used to quantify the impact of mutations in Mb on the dive limits of Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii). We find that wild-type ...... that such conditions are mostly selected upon in seals. The model is capable of roughly quantifying the physiological impact of single-protein mutations and thus bridges an important gap between animal physiology and molecular (protein) evolution.......This paper presents an integrated model of convective O2-transport, aerobic dive limits (ADL), and thermochemical data for oxygen binding to mutant myoglobin (Mb), used to quantify the impact of mutations in Mb on the dive limits of Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii). We find that wild-type Mb...... traits are only superior under specific behavioral and physiological conditions that critically prolong the ADL, action radius, and fitness of the seals. As an extreme example, the mutations in the conserved His-64 reduce ADL up to 14±2 min for routine aerobic dives, whereas many other mutations...

  20. Effect of fatty acid interaction on myoglobin oxygen affinity and triglyceride metabolism.

    Jue, Thomas; Simond, Gregory; Wright, Traver J; Shih, Lifan; Chung, Youngran; Sriram, Renuka; Kreutzer, Ulrike; Davis, Randall W

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested myoglobin (Mb) may have other cellular functions in addition to storing and transporting O 2 . Indeed, NMR experiments have shown that the saturated fatty acid (FA) palmitate (PA) can interact with myoglobin (Mb) in its ligated state (MbCO and MbCN) but does not interact with Mb in its deoxygenated state. The observation has led to the hypothesis that Mb can also serve as a fatty acid transporter. The present study further investigates fatty acid interaction with the physiological states of Mb using the more soluble but unsaturated fatty acid, oleic acid (OA). OA binds to MbCO but does not bind to deoxy Mb. OA binding to Mb, however, does not alter its O 2 affinity. Without any Mb, muscle has a significantly lower level of triglyceride (TG). In Mb knock-out (MbKO) mice, both heart and skeletal muscles have lower level of TG relative to the control mice. Training further decreases the relative TG in the MbKO skeletal muscle. Nevertheless, the absence of Mb and lower TG level in muscle does not impair the MbKO mouse performance as evidenced by voluntary wheel running measurements. The results support the hypothesis of a complex physiological role for Mb, especially with respect to fatty acid metabolism.

  1. Hydrate-CASM for modeling Methane Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    De La Fuente Ruiz, M.; Vaunat, J.; Marin Moreno, H.

    2017-12-01

    A clear understanding of the geomechanical behavior of methane hydrate-bearing sediments (MHBS) is crucial to assess the stability of the seafloor and submarine infrastructures to human and natural loading changes. Here we present the Hydrate-CASM, a new elastoplastic constitutive model to predict the geomechanical behavior of MHBS. Our model employs the critical state model CASM (Clay and Sand Model) because of its flexibility in describing the shape of the yield surface and its proven ability to predict the mechanical behavior of sands, the most commercially viable hydrate reservoirs. The model considers MHBS as a deformable elastoplastic continuum, and hydrate-related changes in the stress-strain behavior are predicted by a densification mechanism. The densification attributes the mechanical contribution of hydrate to; a reduction of the available void ratio; a decrease of the swelling line slope; and an increase of the volumetric yield stress. It is described by experimentally derived physical parameters except from the swelling slope coefficient that requires empirical calibration. The Hydrate-CASM is validated against published triaxial laboratory tests performed at different confinement stresses, hydrate saturations, and hydrate morphologies. During the validation, we focused on capturing the mechanical behavior of the host sediment and consider perturbations of the sediment's mechanical properties that could result from the sample preparation. Our model successfully captures the experimentally observed influence of hydrate saturation in the magnitude and trend of the stiffness, shear strength, and dilatancy of MHBS. Hence, we propose that hydrate-related densification changes might be a major factor controlling the geomechanical response of MHBS.

  2. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  3. Flow assurance intervention, hydrates remediation

    Mancini, Christopher S. [Oceaneering International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the issues of removing hydrates in sub sea flow lines and associated equipment with an Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) of opportunity and a multi-service-vessel (MSV). The paper is split into three topics: the equipment used with the ROV, assessing the interface points and handling fluids produced from drawing down the pressure. Each section is explained thoroughly and backed up with real world experience. The equipment section details information from actual jobs performed and why the particular components were utilized. The system is generally contained in an ROV mounted skid. Pumps are utilized to draw down the pressure inside the hydrated section of equipment, removing one of the three necessary components for hydrates formation. Once the section is pumped down, several options exist for handling the fluids pumped out of the system: pumping to surface, re-injection into the well, or injection into an operating flow line. This method of hydrates remediation is both economical and timely. Hydrate blockages form in low temperatures and high pressures. Reducing the pressure or increasing the temperature so the conditions lie to the right of the hydrate dissociation curve will slowly decompose the blockage. Depressurization and the use of MEG or methanol will give favorable conditions to remove the hydrate plug. Oceaneering has the capabilities to remove hydrates using the FRS in conjunction with an installation vessel to dispose of the gas and fluid removed from the flow line. Hydrate remediation techniques should be implemented into the initial design to reduce costs later. The cost of stopped production combined with the day rate for equipment needed for hydrate removal outweighs the costs if no technique is utilized. (author)

  4. Tracking evolution of myoglobin stability in cetaceans using experimentally calibrated computational methods that account for generic protein relaxation

    Holm, Jeppe; Dasmeh, Pouria; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) from land to water is one of the most spectacular events in mammal evolution. It has been suggested that selection for higher myoglobin stability (ΔG of folding) allowed whales to conquer the deep-diving niche. The stability of multi-si...

  5. IGF-1 attenuates hypoxia-induced atrophy but inhibits myoglobin expression in C2C12 skeletal muscle myotubes

    Peters, Eva L.; van der Linde, Sandra M.; Vogel, Ilse S.P.; Haroon, Mohammad; Offringa, Carla; de Wit, Gerard M.J.; Koolwijk, Pieter; van der Laarse, Willem J.; Jaspers, Richard T.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia is associated with muscle wasting and decreased oxidative capacity. By contrast, training under hypoxia may enhance hypertrophy and increase oxidative capacity as well as oxygen transport to the mitochondria, by increasing myoglobin (Mb) expression. The latter may be a feasible

  6. (R)-α-Lipoic acid inhibits fructose-induced myoglobin fructation and the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in vitro.

    Ghelani, Hardik; Razmovski-Naumovski, Valentina; Pragada, Rajeswara Rao; Nammi, Srinivas

    2018-01-15

    Fructose-mediated protein glycation (fructation) has been linked to an increase in diabetic and cardiovascular complications due to over consumption of high-fructose containing diets in recent times. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the protective effect of (R)-α-lipoic acid (ALA) against fructose-induced myoglobin fructation and the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in vitro. The anti-glycation activity of ALA was determined using the formation of AGEs fluorescence intensity, iron released from the heme moiety of myoglobin and the level of fructosamine. The fructation-induced myoglobin oxidation was examined using the level of protein carbonyl content and thiol group estimation. The results showed that co-incubation of myoglobin (1 mg/mL), fructose (1 M) and ALA (1, 2 and 4 mM) significantly inhibited the formation of AGEs during the 30 day study period. ALA markedly decreased the levels of fructosamine, which is directly associated with the reduction of AGEs formation. Furthermore, ALA significantly reduced free iron release from myoglobin which is attributed to the protection of myoglobin from fructose-induced glycation. The results also demonstrated a significant protective effect of ALA on myoglobin oxidative damages, as seen from decreased protein carbonyl content and increased protein thiols. These findings provide new insights into the anti-glycation properties of ALA and emphasize that ALA supplementation is beneficial in the prevention of AGEs-mediated diabetic and cardiovascular complications.

  7. Myoglobin Test

    ... article. Available online at http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/982711-overview. Accessed October 2011. See More See Less Ask a Laboratory Scientist Your questions will be answered by a laboratory ...

  8. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  9. Shifting Focus: From Hydration for Performance to Hydration for Health.

    Perrier, Erica T

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, literature on hydration biomarkers has evolved considerably - from (de)hydration assessment towards a more global definition of biomarkers of hydration in daily life. This shift in thinking about hydration markers was largely driven by investigating the differences that existed between otherwise healthy individuals whose habitual, ad-libitum drinking habits differ, and by identifying physiological changes in low-volume drinkers who subsequently increase their water intake. Aside from obvious differences in urinary volume and concentration, a growing body of evidence is emerging that links differences in fluid intake with small, but biologically significant, differences in vasopressin (copeptin), glomerular filtration rate, and markers of metabolic dysfunction or disease. Taken together, these pieces of the puzzle begin to form a picture of how much water intake should be considered adequate for health, and represent a shifting focus from hydration for performance, toward hydration for health outcomes. This narrative review outlines the key areas of research in which the global hydration process - including water intake, urinary hydration markers, and vasopressin - has been associated with health outcomes, focusing on kidney and metabolic endpoints. It will also provide a commentary on how various hydration biomarkers may be used in hydration for health assessment. Finally, if adequate water intake can play a role in maintaining health, how might we tell if we are drinking enough? Urine output is easily measured, and can take into account differences in daily physical activity, climate, dietary solute load, and other factors that influence daily water needs. Today, targets have been proposed for urine osmolality, specific gravity, and color that may be used by researchers, clinicians, and individuals as simple indicators of optimal hydration. However, there remain a large number of incomplete or unanswered research questions regarding the

  10. Simulation Studies of LCST-like Phase Transitions in Elastin-like Polypeptides (ELPs) and Conjugates of ELP with Rigid Macromolecules

    Condon, Joshua; Martin, Tyler; Jayaraman, Arthi

    We use atomistic (AA) and coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the thermodynamic driving forces governing lower critical solution temperature (LCST)-like phase transition exhibited by elastin-like peptides (ELPs) and conjugates of ELP with other macromolecules. In the AA simulations, we study ELP oligomers in explicit water, and mark the transition as the temperature at which they undergo a change in ``hydration'' state. While AA simulations are restricted to small systems of short ELPs and do not capture the chain aggregation observed in experiments of ELPs, they guide the phenomenological CG model development by highlighting the solvent induced polymer-polymer effective interactions with changing temperature. In the CG simulations, we capture the LCST polymer aggregation by increasing polymer-polymer effective attractive interactions in an implicit solvent. We examine the impact of conjugating a block of LCST polymer to another rigid unresponsive macromolecular block on the LCST-like transition. We find that when multiple LCST polymers are conjugated to a rigid polymer block, increased crowding of the LCST polymers shifts the onset of chain aggregation to smaller effective polymer-polymer attraction compared to the free LCST polymers. These simulation results provide guidance on the design of conjugated bio-mimetic thermoresponsive materials, and shape the fundamental understanding of the impact of polymer crowding on phase behavior in thermoresponsive LCST polymer systems.

  11. The temperature hydration kinetics

    Mircea Oroian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the hydration kinetics of lentil seeds (Lens culinaris in water at different temperatures (25, 32.5, 40, 55, 70 and 80 °C for assessing the adequacy of models for describing the absorption phenomena during soaking. The diffusion coefficient values were calculated using Fick’s model for spherical and hemispherical geometries and the values were in the range of 10−6 m2/s. The experimental data were fitted to Peleg, Sigmoidal, Weibull and Exponential models. The models adequacy was determined using regression coefficients (R2, root mean square error (RMSE and reduced chi-square (χ2. The Peleg model is the suitable one for predicting the experimental data. Temperature had a positive and significant effect on the water absorption capacities and absorption was an endothermic process.

  12. Chemical hydrogels based on a hyaluronic acid-graft-α-elastin derivative as potential scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Palumbo, Fabio Salvatore; Pitarresi, Giovanna; Fiorica, Calogero; Rigogliuso, Salvatrice; Ghersi, Giulio; Giammona, Gaetano

    2013-07-01

    In this work hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized with ethylenediamine (EDA) has been employed to graft α-elastin. In particular a HA-EDA derivative bearing 50 mol% of pendant amino groups has been successfully employed to produce the copolymer HA-EDA-g-α-elastin containing 32% w/w of protein. After grafting with α-elastin, remaining free amino groups reacted with ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (EGDGE) for producing chemical hydrogels, proposed as scaffolds for tissue engineering. Swelling degree, resistance to chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis, as well as preliminary biological properties of HA-EDA-g-α-elastin/EGDGE scaffold have been evaluated and compared with a HA-EDA/EGDGE scaffold. The presence of α-elastin grafted to HA-EDA improves attachment, viability and proliferation of primary rat dermal fibroblasts and human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells. Biological performance of HA-EDA-g-α-elastin/EGDGE scaffold resulted comparable to that of a commercial collagen type I sponge (Antema®), chosen as a positive control. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) engulf and regain elastin particles and do not respond to some stimuli of neutrophil (PMN) elastinolysis

    Tricomi, S.M.; Hyers, T.M.; Yu, S.Y.; Liao, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Elastin degradation by PMN and by PAM differs in the proteinases produced and in the method of cellular attack on the substrate. To further characterize the elastinolytic mechanisms of these two cells, 14 C-labelled bovine ligament elastin was dried onto 24-well culture plates and live cells were placed on the substrate in culture medium. Incubation times were 4 hours for PMN and 20 hours for PAM. Elastinolytic activity was determined by counting 14 C-elastin peptides in the supernatant. By lidocaine release of PAM from the surface, 14 C-elastin retained by the cell was measured. Studies on rabbit PAM showed that 40% of dpm remain associated with the cell at 20 hours. Transmission electron microscopy of human PAM confirmed that PAM can engulf and retain elastin particles at 4 and 24 hours of incubation when in close contact with the substrate. Of the number of dpm released by PMN in 4 hours, PAM in 20 hours released only 23% of that number into supernatant and retained 17% closely associated with the cell after lidocaine treatment. Platelet factor 4, a protein released by platelets upon aggregation which stimulates activity of PMN elastase on elastin, was shown to enhance elastinolysis by whole PMN by 57% at 10 μg/ml in this assay. Platelet factor 4 did not enhance elastinolysis by PAM at concentrations up to 100 μg/ml

  14. Elastin density: Link between histological and biomechanical properties of vaginal tissue in women with pelvic organ prolapse?

    de Landsheere, Laurent; Brieu, Mathias; Blacher, Silvia; Munaut, Carine; Nusgens, Betty; Rubod, Chrystèle; Noel, Agnès; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Nisolle, Michelle; Cosson, Michel

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to correlate histological and biomechanical characteristics of the vaginal wall in women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Tissue samples were collected from the anterior [point Ba; POP Questionnaire (POP-Q)] and/or posterior (point Bp; POP-Q) vaginal wall of 15 women who underwent vaginal surgery for POP. Both histological and biomechanical assessments were performed from the same tissue samples in 14 of 15 patients. For histological assessment, the density of collagen and elastin fibers was determined by combining high-resolution virtual imaging and computer-assisted digital image analysis. For biomechanical testing, uniaxial tension tests were performed to evaluate vaginal tissue stiffness at low (C0) and high (C1) deformation rates. Biomechanical testing highlights the hyperelastic behavior of the vaginal wall. At low strains (C0), vaginal tissue appeared stiffer when elastin density was low. We found a statistically significant inverse relationship between C0 and the elastin/collagen ratio (p = 0.048) in the lamina propria. However, at large strain levels (C1), no clear relationship was observed between elastin density or elastin/collagen ratio and stiffness, likely reflecting the large dispersion of the mechanical behavior of the tissue samples. Histological and biomechanical properties of the vaginal wall vary from patient to patient. This study suggests that elastin density deserves consideration as a relevant factor of vaginal stiffness in women with POP.

  15. Development of short and highly potent self-assembling elastin-derived pentapeptide repeats containing aromatic amino acid residues.

    Taniguchi, Suguru; Watanabe, Noriko; Nose, Takeru; Maeda, Iori

    2016-01-01

    Tropoelastin is the primary component of elastin, which forms the elastic fibers that make up connective tissues. The hydrophobic domains of tropoelastin are thought to mediate the self-assembly of elastin into fibers, and the temperature-mediated self-assembly (coacervation) of one such repetitive peptide sequence (VPGVG) has been utilized in various bio-applications. To elucidate a mechanism for coacervation activity enhancement and to develop more potent coacervatable elastin-derived peptides, we synthesized two series of peptide analogs containing an aromatic amino acid, Trp or Tyr, in addition to Phe-containing analogs and tested their functional characteristics. Thus, position 1 of the hydrophobic pentapeptide repeat of elastin (X(1)P(2)G(3)V(4)G(5)) was substituted by Trp or Tyr. Eventually, we acquired a novel, short Trp-containing elastin-derived peptide analog (WPGVG)3 with potent coacervation ability. From the results obtained during this process, we determined the importance of aromaticity and hydrophobicity for the coacervation potency of elastin-derived peptide analogs. Generally, however, the production of long-chain synthetic polypeptides in quantities sufficient for commercial use remain cost-prohibitive. Therefore, the identification of (WPGVG)3, which is a 15-mer short peptide consisting simply of five natural amino acids and shows temperature-dependent self-assembly activity, might serve as a foundation for the development of various kinds of biomaterials. Copyright © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Physiological regulation of extracellular matrix collagen and elastin in the arterial wall of rats by noradrenergic tone and angiotensin II.

    Dab, Houcine; Kacem, Kamel; Hachani, Rafik; Dhaouadi, Nadra; Hodroj, Wassim; Sakly, Mohsen; Randon, Jacques; Bricca, Giampiero

    2012-03-01

    The interactions between the effects of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and angiotensin II (ANG II) on vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis were determined in rats. The mRNA and protein content of collagen I, collagen III and elastin in the abdominal aorta (AA) and femoral artery (FA) was investigated in Wistar-Kyoto rats treated for 5 weeks with guanethidine, a sympathoplegic, losartan, an ANG II AT1 receptor (AT1R) blocker, or both. The effects of noradrenaline (NE) and ANG II on collagen III and elastin mRNA, and the receptor involved, were tested in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Guanethidine increased collagen types I and III and decreased elastin, while losartan had an opposite effect, although without effect on collagen III. The combination of treatments abrogated changes induced by simple treatment with collagen I and elastin, but increased collagen III mRNA in AA and not in FA. NE stimulated collagen III mRNA via β receptors and elastin via α1 and α2 receptors. ANG II stimulated collagen III but inhibited elastin mRNA via AT1R. Overall, SNS and ANG II exert opposite and antagonistic effects on major components of ECM in the vascular wall. This may be of relevance for the choice of a therapeutic strategy in vascular diseases.

  17. Alcohol cosurfactants in hydrate antiagglomeration.

    York, J Dalton; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2008-08-28

    Because of availability, as well as economical and environmental considerations, natural gas is projected to be the premium fuel of the 21st century. Natural gas production involves risk of the shut down of onshore and offshore operations because of blockage from hydrates formed from coproduced water and hydrate-forming species in natural gas. Industry practice has been usage of thermodynamic inhibitors such as alcohols often in significant amounts, which have undesirable environmental and safety impacts. Thermodynamic inhibitors affect bulk-phase properties and inhibit hydrate formation. An alternative is changing surface properties through usage of polymers and surfactants, effective at 0.5 to 3 weight % of coproduced water. One group of low dosage hydrate inhibitors (LDHI) are kinetic inhibitors, which affect nucleation rate and growth. A second group of LDHI are antiagglomerants, which prevent agglomeration of small hydrate crystallites. Despite great potential, work on hydrate antiagglomeration is very limited. This work centers on the effect of small amounts of alcohol cosurfactant in mixtures of two vastly different antiagglomerants. We use a model oil, water, and tetrahydrofuran as a hydrate-forming species. Results show that alcohol cosurfactants may help with antiagglomeration when traditional antiagglomerants alone are ineffective. Specifically, as low as 0.5 wt. % methanol cosurfactant used in this study is shown to be effective in antiagglomeration. Without the cosurfactant there will be agglomeration independent of the AA concentration. To our knowledge, this is the first report of alcohol cosurfactants in hydrate antiagglomerants. It is also shown that a rhamnolipid biosurfactant is effective down to only 0.5 wt. % in such mixtures, yet a quaternary ammonium chloride salt, i. e., quat, results in hydrate slurries down to 0.01 wt. %. However, biochemical surfactants are less toxic and biodegradable, and thus their use may prove beneficial even if at

  18. Modelling the autoxidation of myoglobin in fresh meat under modified atmosphere packing conditions

    Tofteskov, Jon; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Bailey, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    pigment concentration data is obtained, but only by substantially increasing the value of the oxygen consumption rate. Application of the model to meat stored at 5 °C shows that the metmyoglobin layer forms under the surface over a time scale of 24 h; The metmyoglobin layer forms deeper inside the meat......Modified atmosphere packing (MAP) is a technique to increase the shelf life of fresh meat. Continuing development of MAP requires better understanding of the physical and chemical processes taking place, in particular the diffusion of oxygen and its reaction with myoglobin. We model these processes...... proportional to the logarithm of the headspace oxygen partial pressure, thus improving the colour appearance of the meat....

  19. MiR-29-mediated elastin down-regulation contributes to inorganic phosphorus-induced osteoblastic differentiation in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Sudo, Ryo; Sato, Fumiaki; Azechi, Takuya; Wachi, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Vascular calcification increases the risk of cardiovascular mortality. We previously reported that expression of elastin decreases with progression of inorganic phosphorus (Pi)-induced vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification. However, the regulatory mechanisms of elastin mRNA expression during vascular calcification remain unclear. MicroRNA-29 family members (miR-29a, b and c) are reported to mediate elastin mRNA expression. Therefore, we aimed to determine the effect of miR-29 on elastin expression and Pi-induced vascular calcification. Calcification of human VSMCs was induced by Pi and evaluated measuring calcium deposition. Pi stimulation promoted Ca deposition and suppressed elastin expression in VSMCs. Knockdown of elastin expression by shRNA also promoted Pi-induced VSMC calcification. Elastin pre-mRNA measurements indicated that Pi stimulation suppressed elastin expression without changing transcriptional activity. Conversely, Pi stimulation increased miR-29a and miR-29b expression. Inhibition of miR-29 recovered elastin expression and suppressed calcification in Pi-treated VSMCs. Furthermore, over-expression of miR-29b promoted Pi-induced VSMC calcification. RT-qPCR analysis showed knockdown of elastin expression in VSMCs induced expression of osteoblast-related genes, similar to Pi stimulation, and recovery of elastin expression by miR-29 inhibition reduced their expression. Our study shows that miR-29-mediated suppression of elastin expression in VSMCs plays a pivotal role in osteoblastic differentiation leading to vascular calcification. © 2015 The Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Rapid Myoglobin Aggregation through Glucosamine-Induced α-Dicarbonyl Formation.

    Hrynets, Yuliya; Ndagijimana, Maurice; Betti, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    The extent of glycation and conformational changes of horse myoglobin (Mb) upon glycation with N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc), glucose (Glc) and glucosamine (GlcN) were investigated. Among tested sugars, the rate of glycation with GlcN was the most rapid as shown by MALDI and ESI mass spectrometries. Protein oxidation, as evaluated by the amount of carbonyl groups present on Mb, was found to increase exponentially in Mb-Glc conjugates over time, whereas in Mb-GlcN mixtures the carbonyl groups decreased significantly after maximum at 3 days of the reaction. The reaction between GlcN and Mb resulted in a significantly higher amount of α-dicarbonyl compounds, mostly glucosone and 3-deoxyglucosone, ranging from and 27 to 332 mg/L and from 14 to 304 mg/L, respectively. Already at 0.5 days, tertiary structural changes of Mb-GlcN conjugate were observed by altered tryptophan fluorescence. A reduction of metmyoglobin to deoxy-and oxymyoglobin forms was observed on the first day of reaction, coinciding with the greatest amount of glucosone produced. In contrast to native α-helical myoglobin, 41% of the glycated protein sequence was transformed into a β-sheet conformation, as determined by circular dichroism spectropolarimetry. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that Mb glycation with GlcN causes the formation of amorphous or fibrous aggregates, started already at 3 reaction days. These aggregates bind to an amyloid-specific dye thioflavin T. With the aid of α-dicarbonyl compounds and advanced products of reaction, this study suggests that the Mb glycation with GlcN induces the unfolding of an initially globular protein structure into amyloid fibrils comprised of a β-sheet structure.

  1. Temperature induced conformational transitions of elastin-like polypentapeptides studied by Raman and NMR spectroscopy

    Dybal, Jiří; Schmidt, Pavel; Kurková, Dana; Kříž, Jaroslav; Rodríguez-Cabello, J. C.; Alonso, M.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 16, 3-4 (2002), s. 251-255 ISSN 0712-4813 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/1320; GA AV ČR IAA4050208 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : quantum chemical calculations * elastin -like polypentapeptides * Raman spectra Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.567, year: 2002

  2. MicroRNA-181b Controls Atherosclerosis and Aneurysms Through Regulation of TIMP-3 and Elastin.

    Di Gregoli, Karina; Mohamad Anuar, Nur Najmi; Bianco, Rosaria; White, Stephen J; Newby, Andrew C; George, Sarah J; Johnson, Jason L

    2017-01-06

    Atherosclerosis and aneurysms are leading causes of mortality worldwide. MicroRNAs (miRs) are key determinants of gene and protein expression, and atypical miR expression has been associated with many cardiovascular diseases; although their contributory role to atherosclerotic plaque and abdominal aortic aneurysm stability are poorly understood. To investigate whether miR-181b regulates tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 expression and affects atherosclerosis and aneurysms. Here, we demonstrate that miR-181b was overexpressed in symptomatic human atherosclerotic plaques and abdominal aortic aneurysms and correlated with decreased expression of predicted miR-181b targets, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3, and elastin. Using the well-characterized mouse atherosclerosis models of Apoe - /- and Ldlr -/- , we observed that in vivo administration of locked nucleic acid anti-miR-181b retarded both the development and the progression of atherosclerotic plaques. Systemic delivery of anti-miR-181b in angiotensin II-infused Apoe -/- and Ldlr -/- mice attenuated aneurysm formation and progression within the ascending, thoracic, and abdominal aorta. Moreover, miR-181b inhibition greatly increased elastin and collagen expression, promoting a fibrotic response and subsequent stabilization of existing plaques and aneurysms. We determined that miR-181b negatively regulates macrophage tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 expression and vascular smooth muscle cell elastin production, both important factors in maintaining atherosclerotic plaque and aneurysm stability. Validation studies in Timp3 -/- mice confirmed that the beneficial effects afforded by miR-181b inhibition are largely tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 dependent, while also revealing an additional protective effect through elevating elastin synthesis. Our findings suggest that the management of miR-181b and its target genes provides therapeutic potential for limiting the progression of

  3. Generation of hydrogen peroxide in the developing rat heart: the role of elastin metabolism

    Wilhelm, J.; Ošťádalová, Ivana; Vytášek, R.; Vajner, L.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 358, 1-2 (2011), s. 215-220 ISSN 0300-8177 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0298 Program:GA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : rat heart * ontogenetic development * hydrogen peroxide * elastin * fluorescence Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 2.057, year: 2011

  4. Antibodies to elastin peptides in sera of Belgian Draught horses with chronic progressive lymphoedema.

    van Brantegem, L; de Cock, H E V; Affolter, V K; Duchateau, L; Hoogewijs, M K; Govaere, J; Ferraro, G L; Ducatelle, R

    2007-09-01

    Chronic progressive lymphoedema (CPL) is a recently recognised disease of the lymphatic system characterised by lesions in the skin of the lower legs in several draught horse breeds, including the Belgian Draught hourse. Clinical signs slowly progress and result in severe disfigurement of the limbs. Ideally, supportive treatment should be started early in the disease process. However early diagnosis and monitoring progression of CPL is still a challenge. Elastin changes, characterised by morphological alterations as well as increased desmosine levels, in the skin of the distal limbs of horses affected with CPL are probably associated with a marked release of elastin degradation products, which elicit production of circulating anti-elastin antibodies (AEAbs) in the serum. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of serum AEAbs may document elastin breakdown. An ELISA technique was used to evaluate levels of AEAbs in sera of 97 affected Belgian Draught horses that were clinically healthy except for possible skin lesions, associated with CPL in their distal limbs. The horses were divided into 5 groups according to the severity of these skin lesions: normal horses (Group 1, n = 36), horses with mild lesions (Group 2, n = 43), horses with moderate lesions (Group 3, n = 8), horses with severe lesions (Group 4, n = 10) and, as a control, healthy Warmblood horses, unaffected by the disease (Group 5, n = 83). Horses with clinical signs of CPL had significantly higher AEAb levels compared to clinically normal Belgian Draught horses and to healthy Warmblood horses. These levels correlated with severity of lesions. CPL in draught horses is associated with an increase of serum AEAbs. Evaluation of serum levels of AEAbs by ELISA might be a useful diagnostic aid for CPL. Pathological degradation of elastic fibres, resulting in deficient support of the distal lymphatics, is proposed as a contributing factor for CPL in Belgian Draught horses.

  5. The Elastin Receptor Complex: a unique matricellular receptor with high anti-tumoral potential

    Amandine eScandolera

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Elastin, one of the longest-lived proteins, confers elasticity to tissues with high mechanical constraints. During aging or pathophysiological conditions such as cancer progression, this insoluble polymer of tropoelastin undergoes an important degradation leading to the release of bioactive elastin-derived peptides (EDP, named elastokines. EDP exhibit several biological functions able to drive tumor development by regulating cell proliferation, invasion, survival, angiogenesis, and matrix metalloproteinase expression in various tumor and stromal cells. Although several receptors have been suggested to bind elastokines (αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrins, galectin-3, their main receptor remains the Elastin Receptor Complex (ERC. This heterotrimer comprises a peripheral subunit, named Elastin Binding Protein (EBP, associated to the Protective Protein/Cathepsin A (PPCA. The latter is bound to a membrane-associated protein called Neuraminidase-1 (Neu-1. The pro-tumoral effects of elastokines have been linked to their binding onto EBP. Additionally, Neu-1 sialidase activity is essential for their signal transduction. Consistently, EDP-EBP interaction and Neu-1 activity emerge as original anti-tumoral targets. Interestingly, besides its direct involvement in cancer progression, the ERC also regulates diabetes outcome and thrombosis, an important risk factor for cancer development and a vascular process highly increased in patients suffering from cancer. In this review, we will describe ERC and elastokines involvement in cancer development suggesting that this unique receptor would be a promising therapeutic target. We will also discuss the pharmacological concepts aiming at blocking its pro-tumoral activities. Finally, its emerging role in cancer-associated complications and pathologies such as diabetes and thrombotic events will be also considered.

  6. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  7. Elastin Cables Define the Axial Connective Tissue System in the Murine Lung.

    Wagner, Willi; Bennett, Robert D; Ackermann, Maximilian; Ysasi, Alexandra B; Belle, Janeil; Valenzuela, Cristian D; Pabst, Andreas; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A; Mentzer, Steven J

    2015-11-01

    The axial connective tissue system is a fiber continuum of the lung that maintains alveolar surface area during changes in lung volume. Although the molecular anatomy of the axial system remains undefined, the fiber continuum of the lung is central to contemporary models of lung micromechanics and alveolar regeneration. To provide a detailed molecular structure of the axial connective tissue system, we examined the extracellular matrix of murine lungs. The lungs were decellularized using a 24 hr detergent treatment protocol. Systematic evaluation of the decellularized lungs demonstrated no residual cellular debris; morphometry demonstrated a mean 39 ± 7% reduction in lung dimensions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrated an intact structural hierarchy within the decellularized lung. Light, fluorescence, and SEM of precision-cut lung slices demonstrated that alveolar duct structure was defined by a cable line element encased in basement membrane. The cable line element arose in the distal airways, passed through septal tips and inserted into neighboring blood vessels and visceral pleura. The ropelike appearance, collagenase resistance and anti-elastin immunostaining indicated that the cable was an elastin macromolecule. Our results indicate that the helical line element of the axial connective tissue system is composed of an elastin cable that not only defines the structure of the alveolar duct, but also integrates the axial connective tissue system into visceral pleura and peripheral blood vessels. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. In vitro myogenesis induced by human recombinant elastin-like proteins.

    D'Andrea, Paola; Scaini, Denis; Ulloa Severino, Luisa; Borelli, Violetta; Passamonti, Sabina; Lorenzon, Paola; Bandiera, Antonella

    2015-10-01

    Mammalian adult skeletal muscle has a limited ability to regenerate after injury, usage or trauma. A promising strategy for successful regenerative technology is the engineering of bio interfaces that mimic the characteristics of the extracellular matrix. Human elastin-like polypeptides (HELPs) have been synthesized as biomimetic materials that maintain some peculiar properties of the native protein. We developed a novel Human Elastin Like Polypeptide obtained by fusing the elastin-like backbone to a domain present in the α2 chain of type IV collagen, containing two RGD motives. We employed this peptide as adhesion substrate for C2C12 myoblasts and compared its effects to those induced by two other polypeptides of the HELP series. Myoblast adhered to all HELPs coatings, where they assumed morphology and cytoarchitecture that depended on the polypeptide structure. Adhesion to HELPs stimulated at a different extent cell proliferation and differentiation, the expression of Myosin Heavy Chain and the fusion of aligned fibers into multinucleated myotubes. Adhesion substrates significantly altered myotubes stiffness, measured by Atomic Force Microscopy, and differently affected the cells Ca(2+) handling capacity and the maturation of excitation-contraction coupling machinery, evaluated by Ca(2+) imaging. Overall, our findings indicate that the properties of HELP biopolymers can be exploited for dissecting the molecular connections underlying myogenic differentiation and for designing novel substrates for skeletal muscle regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Elastin-like polypeptides: the power of design for smart cell encapsulation.

    Bandiera, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Cell encapsulation technology is still a challenging issue. Innovative methodologies such as additive manufacturing, and alternative bioprocesses, such as cell therapeutic delivery, where cell encapsulation is a key tool are rapidly gaining importance for their potential in regenerative medicine. Responsive materials such as elastin-based recombinant expression products have features that are particularly attractive for cell encapsulation. They can be designed and tailored to meet desired requirements. Thus, they represent promising candidates for the development of new concept-based materials that can be employed in this field. Areas covered: An overview of the design and employment of elastin-like polypeptides for cell encapsulation is given to outline the state of the art. Special attention is paid to the design of the macromolecule employed as well as to the method of matrix formation and the biological system involved. Expert opinion: As a result of recent progress in regenerative medicine there is a compelling need for materials that provide specific properties and demonstrate defined functional features. Rationally designed materials that may adapt according to applied external stimuli and that are responsive to biological systems, such as elastin-like polypeptides, belong to this class of smart material. A run through the components described to date represents a good starting point for further advancement in this area. Employment of these components in cell encapsulation application will promote its advance toward 'smart cell encapsulation technology'.

  10. Controlling the porosity of collagen, gelatin and elastin biomaterials by ultrashort laser pulses

    Daskalova, A.; Nathala, Chandra S.R.; Bliznakova, I.; Stoyanova, E.; Zhelyazkova, A.; Ganz, T.; Lueftenegger, S.; Husinsky, W.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the structural investigation of self-organized micropores generated in thin gelatin, collagen, and collagen–elastin films after single and multishot irradiation with pulse durations ranging from 30–100 fs at 800 nm. We systematically studied the effect of laser parameters: laser energy, number of pulses, and pulse duration on the development of the micropores. This work showed that applying laser pulses at different rates significantly modified the thin film surface. The results clearly revealed that femtosecond laser treatment of thin films of biomaterials: gelatin, collagen and collagen–elastin, results in creation of micro/nanopores with different size of cavity formations. Experimentally, it is demonstrated that it is possible to influence the dimensions of the pore sizes, ranging from 100 nm to 2 μm by tuning the laser parameters. We are currently further exploring the possibility of structuring these biomaterials by applying a time delay between separate pulses. First results from cell culture experiments on laser created surface foam of collagen–elastin were successfully obtained, showing the potential of the method to cultivate cells on superficial porous substrates and the preferable selectivity of the cells to proliferate on the laser modified parts of the biopolymer substrate.

  11. High-yield recombinant expression and purification of marginally soluble, short elastin-like polypeptides.

    Bahniuk, Markian S; Alshememry, Abdullah K; Unsworth, Larry D

    2016-12-01

    The protocol described here is designed as an extension of existing techniques for creating elastin-like polypeptides. It allows for the expression and purification of elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) constructs that are poorly expressed or have very low transition temperatures. DNA concatemerization has been modified to reduce issues caused by methylation sensitivity and inefficient cloning. Linearization of the modified expression vector has been altered to greatly increase cleavage efficiency. The purification regimen is based upon using denaturing metal affinity chromatography to fully solubilize and, if necessary, pre-concentrate the target peptide before purification by inverse temperature cycling (ITC). This protocol has been used to express multiple leucine-containing elastin-like polypeptides, with final yields of 250-660 mg per liter of cells, depending on the specific construct. This was considerably greater than previously reported yields for similar ELPs. Due to the relative hydrophobicity of the tested constructs, even compared with commonly employed ELPs, conventional methods would not have been able to be purify these peptides.

  12. Double-hydrophobic elastin-like polypeptides with added functional motifs: Self-assembly and cytocompatibility.

    Le, Duc H T; Tsutsui, Yoko; Sugawara-Narutaki, Ayae; Yukawa, Hiroshi; Baba, Yoshinobu; Ohtsuki, Chikara

    2017-09-01

    We have recently developed a novel double-hydrophobic elastin-like triblock polypeptide called GPG, designed after the uneven distribution of two different hydrophobic domains found in elastin, an extracellular matrix protein providing elasticity and resilience to tissues. Upon temperature trigger, GPG undergoes a sequential self-assembling process to form flexible beaded nanofibers with high homogeneity and excellent dispersibility in water. Given that GPG might be a potential elastin-mimetic material, we sought to explore the biological activities of this block polypeptide. Besides GPG, several functionalized derivatives were also constructed by fusing functional motifs such as KAAK or KAAKGRGDS at the C-terminal of GPG. Although the added motifs affected the kinetics of fiber formation and β-sheet contents, all three GPGs assembled into beaded nanofibers at the physiological temperature. The resulting GPG nanofibers preserved their beaded structures in cell culture medium; therefore, they were coated on polystyrene substrates to study their cytocompatibility toward mouse embryonic fibroblasts, NIH-3T3. Among the three polypeptides, GPG having the cell-binding motif GRGDS derived from fibronectin showed excellent cell adhesion and cell proliferation properties compared to other conventional materials, suggesting its promising applications as extracellular matrices for mammalian cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2475-2484, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Controlling the porosity of collagen, gelatin and elastin biomaterials by ultrashort laser pulses

    Daskalova, A., E-mail: a_daskalova@code.bg [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72, Tsarigradsko Chaussee blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Nathala, Chandra S.R. [IAP, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Femtolasers Productions GmbH, Fernkorngasse10, 1100 Vienna (Austria); Bliznakova, I. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72, Tsarigradsko Chaussee blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Stoyanova, E. [IBIR, Department of Molecular Immunology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 73, Tzarigradsko Chaussee blvd., 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Zhelyazkova, A. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72, Tsarigradsko Chaussee blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Ganz, T. [Femtolasers Productions GmbH, Fernkorngasse10, 1100 Vienna (Austria); Lueftenegger, S.; Husinsky, W. [IAP, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-02-15

    We report on the structural investigation of self-organized micropores generated in thin gelatin, collagen, and collagen–elastin films after single and multishot irradiation with pulse durations ranging from 30–100 fs at 800 nm. We systematically studied the effect of laser parameters: laser energy, number of pulses, and pulse duration on the development of the micropores. This work showed that applying laser pulses at different rates significantly modified the thin film surface. The results clearly revealed that femtosecond laser treatment of thin films of biomaterials: gelatin, collagen and collagen–elastin, results in creation of micro/nanopores with different size of cavity formations. Experimentally, it is demonstrated that it is possible to influence the dimensions of the pore sizes, ranging from 100 nm to 2 μm by tuning the laser parameters. We are currently further exploring the possibility of structuring these biomaterials by applying a time delay between separate pulses. First results from cell culture experiments on laser created surface foam of collagen–elastin were successfully obtained, showing the potential of the method to cultivate cells on superficial porous substrates and the preferable selectivity of the cells to proliferate on the laser modified parts of the biopolymer substrate.

  14. Multiscale mechanical integrity of human supraspinatus tendon in shear after elastin depletion.

    Fang, Fei; Lake, Spencer P

    2016-10-01

    Human supraspinatus tendon (SST) exhibits region-specific nonlinear mechanical properties under tension, which have been attributed to its complex multiaxial physiological loading environment. However, the mechanical response and underlying multiscale mechanism regulating SST behavior under other loading scenarios are poorly understood. Furthermore, little is known about the contribution of elastin to tendon mechanics. We hypothesized that (1) SST exhibits region-specific shear mechanical properties, (2) fiber sliding is the predominant mode of local matrix deformation in SST in shear, and (3) elastin helps maintain SST mechanical integrity by facilitating force transfer among collagen fibers. Through the use of biomechanical testing and multiphoton microscopy, we measured the multiscale mechanical behavior of human SST in shear before and after elastase treatment. Three distinct SST regions showed similar stresses and microscale deformation. Collagen fiber reorganization and sliding were physical mechanisms observed as the SST response to shear loading. Measures of microscale deformation were highly variable, likely due to a high degree of extracellular matrix heterogeneity. After elastase treatment, tendon exhibited significantly decreased stresses under shear loading, particularly at low strains. These results show that elastin contributes to tendon mechanics in shear, further complementing our understanding of multiscale tendon structure-function relationships. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Three dimensional microstructural network of elastin, collagen, and cells in Achilles tendons.

    Pang, Xin; Wu, Jian-Ping; Allison, Garry T; Xu, Jiake; Rubenson, Jonas; Zheng, Ming-Hao; Lloyd, David G; Gardiner, Bruce; Wang, Allan; Kirk, Thomas Brett

    2017-06-01

    Similar to most biological tissues, the biomechanical, and functional characteristics of the Achilles tendon are closely related to its composition and microstructure. It is commonly reported that type I collagen is the predominant component of tendons and is mainly responsible for the tissue's function. Although elastin has been found in varying proportions in other connective tissues, previous studies report that tendons contain very small quantities of elastin. However, the morphology and the microstructural relationship among the elastic fibres, collagen, and cells in tendon tissue have not been well examined. We hypothesize the elastic fibres, as another fibrillar component in the extracellular matrix, have a unique role in mechanical function and microstructural arrangement in Achilles tendons. It has been shown that elastic fibres present a close connection with the tenocytes. The close relationship of the three components has been revealed as a distinct, integrated and complex microstructural network. Notably, a "spiral" structure within fibril bundles in Achilles tendons was observed in some samples in specialized regions. This study substantiates the hierarchical system of the spatial microstructure of tendon, including the mapping of collagen, elastin and tenocytes, with 3-dimensional confocal images. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1203-1214, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Intracranial arteries in individuals with the elastin gene hemideletion of Williams syndrome.

    Wint, D P; Butman, J A; Masdeu, J C; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Mervis, C B; Sarpal, D; Morris, C A; Berman, K F

    2014-01-01

    Williams syndrome, a rare genetic disorder with a striking neurobehavioral profile characterized by extreme sociability and impaired visuospatial construction abilities, is caused by a hemideletion that includes the elastin gene, resulting in frequent supravavular aortic stenosis and other stenotic arterial lesions. Strokes have been reported in Williams syndrome. Although the extracranial carotid artery has been studied in a sample of patients with Williams syndrome, proximal intracranial arteries have not. Using MRA, we studied the intracranial vessels in 27 participants: 14 patients with Williams syndrome (age range, 18-44 years; mean age, 27.3 ± 9.1; 43% women) and 13 healthy control participants with similar age and sex distribution (age range, 22-52 years; mean age, 33.4 ± 7.6; 46% women). All participants with Williams syndrome had hemideletions of the elastin gene. Blinded to group allocation or to any other clinical data, a neuroradiologist determined the presence of intracranial vascular changes in the 2 groups. The Williams syndrome group and the healthy control group had similar patency of the proximal intracranial arteries, including the internal carotid and vertebral arteries; basilar artery; and stem and proximal branches of the anterior cerebral artery, MCA, and posterior cerebral arteries. The postcommunicating segment of the anterior cerebral artery was longer in the Williams syndrome group. Despite the elastin haploinsufficiency, the proximal intracranial arteries in Williams syndrome preserve normal patency.

  17. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of dermal elastin of draught horses with chronic progressive lymphoedema.

    De Cock, H E V; Van Brantegem, L; Affolter, V K; Oosterlinck, M; Ferraro, G L; Ducatelle, R

    2009-01-01

    Chronic progressive lymphoedema (CPL) in horses, a disease of certain draught breeds, is associated with altered elastin metabolism. The characteristic lesions are seen in the skin of the lower (distal) limbs. This study was based on horses of susceptible breeds, with and without CPL, and on horses of a non-susceptible breed. Skin samples were obtained for examination from the neck (considered a non-affected region) and from the distal limb. The skin lesions were characterized histologically and the dermal elastic fibres were evaluated morphologically and quantitatively. In all horses the mean elastin concentrations were highest in the superficial dermis, gradually decreasing in the mid-dermis and deep dermis. As compared with horses of a non-susceptible breed, affected horses had increased amounts of dermal elastin in both the distal limb and neck, while non-affected horses of a susceptible breed had decreased amounts. The findings support an earlier hypothesis that CPL of horses is a generalized disease. Reduced efficiency of the elastic network in supporting the dermal lymphatics may explain the development of CPL.

  18. Elastin: a possible genetic biomarker for more severe ligament injuries in elite soccer. A pilot study

    Artells, Rosa; Pruna, Ricard; Dellal, Alexandre; Maffulli, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The study of new genetic biomarkers in genes related to connective tissue repair and regeneration may help to identify individuals with greater predisposition to injury, who may benefit from targeted preventive measures, and those who require longer recovery time following a muscle, ligament or tendon injury. The present study investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms of the Elastin gene could be related to MCL injury. Methods 60 top class football players were studied to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms for the Elastin (ELN) gene using Allelic Discrimination analysis. Each player was followed for 7 seasons, and each MCL injury was noted. Results Ligament injury rate, severity and recovery time are related to specific genotypes observed in the elastin gene, especially the ELN-AA (16 MCL) and the ELN-AG (3 MCL). Players with the ELN-GG genotype sustained no MCL injury during the 7 seasons of the study. Conclusions The identification of polymorphisms in the ELN gene may be used as a novel tool to better define an athlete’s genotype, and help to plan training and rehabilitation programmes to prevent or minimize MCL ligament injuries, and optimize the therapeutic and rehabilitation process after soft tissue injuries, and manage the workloads during trainings and matches. PMID:27900291

  19. Hydration water and microstructure in calcium silicate and aluminate hydrates

    Fratini, Emiliano; Ridi, Francesca; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Baglioni, Piero

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the state of the hydration water and the microstructure development in a cement paste is likely to be the key for the improvement of its ultimate strength and durability. In order to distinguish and characterize the reacted and unreacted water, the single-particle dynamics of water molecules in hydrated calcium silicates (C 3 S, C 2 S) and aluminates (C 3 A, C 4 AF) were studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering, QENS. The time evolution of the immobile fraction represents the hydration kinetics and the mobile fraction follows a non-Debye relaxation. Less sophisticated, but more accessible and cheaper techniques, like differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, and near-infrared spectroscopy, NIR, were validated through QENS results and they allow one to easily and quantitatively follow the cement hydration kinetics and can be widely applied on a laboratory scale to understand the effect of additives (i.e., superplasticizers, cellulosic derivatives, etc) on the thermodynamics of the hydration process. DSC provides information on the free water index and on the activation energy involved in the hydration process while the NIR band at 7000 cm -1 monitors, at a molecular level, the increase of the surface-interacting water. We report as an example the effect of two classes of additives widely used in the cement industry: superplasticizers, SPs, and cellulose derivatives. SPs interact at the solid surface, leading to a consistent increment of the activation energy for the processes of nucleation and growth of the hydrated phases. In contrast, the cellulosic additives do not affect the nucleation and growth activation energy, but cause a significant increment in the water availability: in other words the hydration process is more efficient without any modification of the solid/liquid interaction, as also evidenced by the 1 H-NMR. Additional information is obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultra small angle neutron scattering (USANS) and wide

  20. PNW cetacean muscle biochemistry - Muscle Myoglobin Content and Acid Buffering Capacity of Cetaceans from the Pacific Northwest to Assess Dive Capacity and the Development of Diving Capabilities

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project assesses the development of two important skeletal muscle adaptations for diving (enhanced myoglobin content and acid buffering capacities) in a range...

  1. Hydration dependent dynamics in RNA

    Olsen, Greg L.; Bardaro, Michael F.; Echodu, Dorothy C.; Drobny, Gary P.; Varani, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    The essential role played by local and collective motions in RNA function has led to a growing interest in the characterization of RNA dynamics. Recent investigations have revealed that even relatively simple RNAs experience complex motions over multiple time scales covering the entire ms-ps motional range. In this work, we use deuterium solid-state NMR to systematically investigate motions in HIV-1 TAR RNA as a function of hydration. We probe dynamics at three uridine residues in different structural environments ranging from helical to completely unrestrained. We observe distinct and substantial changes in 2 H solid-state relaxation times and lineshapes at each site as hydration levels increase. By comparing solid-state and solution state 13 C relaxation measurements, we establish that ns-μs motions that may be indicative of collective dynamics suddenly arise in the RNA as hydration reaches a critical point coincident with the onset of bulk hydration. Beyond that point, we observe smaller changes in relaxation rates and lineshapes in these highly hydrated solid samples, compared to the dramatic activation of motion occurring at moderate hydration

  2. Mechanism of gypsum hydration

    Pacheco, G.

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an hypothesis that the mechanism o f gypsum hydration and dehydration is performed through two simultaneous phenomena. In this study we try to clear up this phenomenon using chlorides as accelerators or a mixture of ethanol-methanol as retarders to carry out the gypsum setting. Natural Mexican gypsum samples and a hemihydrate prepared in the laboratory are used. The following analytical techniques are used: MO, DRX, DTA, TG and DTG. In agreement with the obtained results, it can be concluded: that colloid formation depends on the action of accelerators or retarders and the crystals are a consequence of the quantity of hemihydrate formed.

    En el mecanismo de hidratación y deshidratación del yeso existe la hipótesis de que éste se efectúa por dos fenómenos simultáneos. Este estudio intenta esclarecer estos fenómenos, empleando: cloruros como aceleradores o mezcla etanol-metanol como retardadores para efectuar el fraguado del yeso. Se emplean muestras de yeso de origen natural mexicano y hemihydrate preparado en laboratorio; se utilizan técnicas analíticas: MO, DRX, DTA, TG y DTG. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos se puede deducir: que la formación del coloide depende de la acción de los agentes aceleradores o retardadores y que los cristales son consecuencia de la cantidad de hemihidrato formado.

  3. Insoluble elastin reduces collagen scaffold stiffness, improves viscoelastic properties, and induces a contractile phenotype in smooth muscle cells.

    Ryan, Alan J; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2015-12-01

    Biomaterials with the capacity to innately guide cell behaviour while also displaying suitable mechanical properties remain a challenge in tissue engineering. Our approach to this has been to utilise insoluble elastin in combination with collagen as the basis of a biomimetic scaffold for cardiovascular tissue engineering. Elastin was found to markedly alter the mechanical and biological response of these collagen-based scaffolds. Specifically, during extensive mechanical assessment elastin was found to reduce the specific tensile and compressive moduli of the scaffolds in a concentration dependant manner while having minimal effect on scaffold microarchitecture with both scaffold porosity and pore size still within the ideal ranges for tissue engineering applications. However, the viscoelastic properties were significantly improved with elastin addition with a 3.5-fold decrease in induced creep strain, a 6-fold increase in cyclical strain recovery, and with a four-parameter viscoelastic model confirming the ability of elastin to confer resistance to long term deformation/creep. Furthermore, elastin was found to result in the modulation of SMC phenotype towards a contractile state which was determined via reduced proliferation and significantly enhanced expression of early (α-SMA), mid (calponin), and late stage (SM-MHC) contractile proteins. This allows the ability to utilise extracellular matrix proteins alone to modulate SMC phenotype without any exogenous factors added. Taken together, the ability of elastin to alter the mechanical and biological response of collagen scaffolds has led to the development of a biomimetic biomaterial highly suitable for cardiovascular tissue engineering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of Myocardial Remodeling Using an Elastin/Tropoelastin Specific Agent with High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI).

    Protti, Andrea; Lavin, Begoña; Dong, Xuebin; Lorrio, Silvia; Robinson, Simon; Onthank, David; Shah, Ajay M; Botnar, Rene M

    2015-08-13

    Well-defined inflammation, proliferation, and maturation phases orchestrate the remodeling of the injured myocardium after myocardial infarction (MI) by controlling the formation of new extracellular matrix. The extracellular matrix consists mainly of collagen but also fractions of elastin. It is thought that elastin is responsible for maintaining elastic properties of the myocardium, thus reducing the risk of premature rupture. An elastin/tropoelastin-specific contrast agent (Gd-ESMA) was used to image tropoelastin and mature elastin fibers for in vivo assessment of extracellular matrix remodeling post-MI. Gd-ESMA enhancement was studied in a mouse model of myocardial infarction using a 7 T MRI scanner and results were compared to those achieved after injection of a nonspecific control contrast agent, gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). In the infarcted tissue, Gd-ESMA uptake (measured as R1 relaxation rate) steadily increased from day 3 to day 21 as a result of the synthesis of elastin/tropoelastin. R1 values were in good agreement with histological findings. A similar R1 behavior was observed in the remote myocardium. No mature cross-linked elastin was found at any time point. In contrast, Gd-DTPA uptake was only observed in the infarct with no changes in R1 values between 3 and 21 days post-MI. We demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo imaging of extracellular matrix remodeling post-MI using a tropoelastin/elastin binding MR contrast agent, Gd-ESMA. We found that tropoelastin is the main contributor to the increased MRI signal at late stages of MI where its augmentation in areas of infarction was in good agreement with the R1 increase. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  5. Impact of elastin incorporation into electrochemically aligned collagen fibers on mechanical properties and smooth muscle cell phenotype.

    Nguyen, Thuy-Uyen; Bashur, Chris A; Kishore, Vipuil

    2016-03-17

    Application of tissue-engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs) for the replacement of small-diameter arteries is limited due to thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. Previous studies have attempted to address the limitations of TEVGs by developing scaffolds that mimic the composition (collagen and elastin) of native arteries to better match the mechanical properties of the graft with the native tissue. However, most existing scaffolds do not recapitulate the aligned topography of the collagen fibers found in native vessels. In the current study, based on the principles of isoelectric focusing, two different types of elastin (soluble and insoluble) were incorporated into highly oriented electrochemically aligned collagen (ELAC) fibers and the effect of elastin incorporation on the mechanical properties of the ELAC fibers and smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype was investigated. The results indicate that elastin incorporation significantly decreased the modulus of ELAC fibers to converge upon that of native vessels. Further, a significant increase in yield strain and decrease in Young's modulus was observed on all fibers post SMC culture compared with before the culture. Real-time polymerase chain reaction results showed a significant increase in the expression of α-smooth muscle actin and calponin on ELAC fibers with insoluble elastin, suggesting that incorporation of insoluble elastin induces a contractile phenotype in SMCs after two weeks of culture on ELAC fibers. Immunofluorescence results showed that calponin expression increased with time on all fibers. In conclusion, insoluble elastin incorporated ELAC fibers have the potential to be used for the development of functional TEVGs for the repair and replacement of small-diameter arteries.

  6. Reconsideration on Hydration of Sodium Ion: From Micro-Hydration to Bulk Hydration

    Yongquan, Zhou; Chunhui, Fang; Yan, Fang; Fayan, Zhu; Haiwen, Ge; Hongyan, Liu

    2017-12-01

    Micro hydration structures of the sodium ion, [Na(H2O) n ]+, n = 1-12, were probed by density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level in both gaseous and aqueous phase. The predicted equilibrium sodium-oxygen distance of 0.240 nm at the present level of theory. The four-, five- and six-coordinated cluster can transform from each other at the ambient condition. The analysis of the successive water binding energy and natural charge population (NBO) on Na+ clearly shows that the influence of Na+ on the surrounding water molecules goes beyond the first hydration shell with the hydration number of 6. The Car-Parrinello molecular dynamic simulation shows that only the first hydration sphere can be found, and the hydration number of Na+ is 5.2 and the hydration distance ( r Na-O) is 0.235 nm. All our simulations mentioned in the present paper show an excellent agreement with the diffraction result from X-ray scattering study.

  7. A high yield process for hydrate formation

    Giavarini, C.; Maccioni, F. [Univ. of Roma La Sapienza, Roma (Italy). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Due to the large quantities of natural gas stored in deep ocean hydrates, hydrate reservoirs are a substantial energy resource. Hydrates concentrate methane by as much as a factor of 164. As such, several natural gas transportation and storage systems using gas hydrates have been studied, and many of them are nearing practical use. In these systems, the hydrate is produced as a slurry by a spray process at approximately 7 megapascal (MPa), and then shaped into pellets. The use of a spray process, instead of a conventional stirred vessel is necessary in order to reach high hydrate concentrations in the hydrate-ice system. This paper presented a new procedure to produce a bulk of concentrated methane hydrate in a static traditional reactor at moderate pressure, controlling pressure and temperature in the interval between ice melting and the hydrate equilibrium curve. This paper discussed the experimental procedure which included formation of methane hydrate at approximately 5 MPa and 2 degrees Celsius in a reaction calorimeter at a volume of two liters. Results were also discussed. It was concluded that the procedure seemed suitable for the development of a gas hydrate storage and transport technology. It was found that the spray procedure took more time, but could be sped up and made continuous by using two vessels, one for hydrate formation and the other for hydrate concentration. The advantage was the production of a concentrated hydrate, using a simpler equipment and working at lower pressures respect to the spray process. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  8. The Nernst equation applied to oxidation-reduction reactions in myoglobin and hemoglobin. Evaluation of the parameters.

    Saroff, Harry A

    Analyses of the binding of oxygen to monomers such as myoglobin employ the Mass Action equation. The Mass Action equation, as such, is not directly applicable for the analysis of the binding of oxygen to oligomers such as hemoglobin. When the binding of oxygen to hemoglobin is analyzed, models incorporating extensions of mass action are employed. Oxidation-reduction reactions of the heme group in myoglobin and hemoglobin involve the binding and dissociation of electrons. This reaction is described with the Nernst equation. The Nernst equation is applicable only to a monomeric species even if the number of electrons involved is greater than unity. To analyze the oxidation-reduction reaction in a molecule such as hemoglobin a model is required which incorporates extensions of the Nernst equation. This communication develops models employing the Nernst equation for oxidation-reduction reactions analogous to those employed for hemoglobin in the analysis of the oxygenation (binding of oxygen) reaction.

  9. The roles of tissue nitrate reductase activity and myoglobin in securing nitric oxide availability in deeply hypoxic crucian carp

    Hansen, Marie Niemann; Lundberg, Jon O; Filice, Mariacristina

    2016-01-01

    . We also tested whether liver, muscle and heart tissue possess nitrate reductase activity that supplies nitrite to the tissues during severe hypoxia. Crucian carp exposed to deep hypoxia (1nitrite in red musculature to more than double the value in normoxic fish......In mammals, treatment with low doses of nitrite has a cytoprotective effect in ischemia/reperfusion events, as a result of nitric oxide formation and S-nitrosation of proteins. Interestingly, anoxia-tolerant lower vertebrates possess an intrinsic ability to increase intracellular nitrite...... concentration during anoxia in tissues with high myoglobin and mitochondria content, such as the heart. Here, we tested the hypothesis that red and white skeletal muscles develop different nitrite levels in crucian carp exposed to deep hypoxia and assessed whether this correlates with myoglobin concentration...

  10. Moessbauer spectroscopic evidence on the heme binding to the proximal histidine in unfolded carbonmonoxy myoglobin by guanidine hydrochloride

    Harami, Taikan, E-mail: harami.taikan@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Kitao, Shinji; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro [Kyoto University, Research Reactor Institute (Japan); Mitsui, Takaya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    The unfolded heme structure in myoglobin is controversial because of no chance of direct X-ray structure analyses. The unfolding of carbonmonoxy myoglobin (MbCO) by guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) was studied by the Moessbauer spectroscopy. The spectra show the presence of a sort of spectrum in the unfolded MbCO, independent on the concentration of GdnHCl from 1 to 6 M and the increase of the fraction of unfolded MbCO, depending on the GdnHCl concentration. The isomer shift of the iron of heme in the unfolded MbCO was identified to be different from that of the native MbCO as the globin structure in Mb collapses under the unfolded conditions. This result and the existing related Moessbauer data proved that the heme in the unfolded MbCO may remain coordinated to the proximal histidine.

  11. Pentagalloyl glucose increases elastin deposition, decreases reactive oxygen species and matrix metalloproteinase activity in pulmonary fibroblasts under inflammatory conditions.

    Parasaram, Vaideesh; Nosoudi, Nasim; Chowdhury, Aniqa; Vyavahare, Naren

    2018-04-30

    Emphysema is characterized by degradation of lung alveoli that leads to poor airflow in lungs. Irreversible elastic fiber degradation by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity leads to loss of elasticity and drives the progression of this disease. We investigated if a polyphenol, pentagalloyl glucose (PGG) can increase elastin production in pulmonary fibroblasts. We also studied the effect of PGG treatment in reducing MMP activity and ROS levels in cells. We exposed rat pulmonary fibroblasts to two different types of inflammatory environments i.e., tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and cigarette smoke extract (CSE) to mimic the disease. Parameters like lysyl oxidase (LOX) and elastin gene expression, MMP-9 activity in the medium, lysyl oxidase (LOX) activity and ROS levels were studied to assess the effect of PGG on pulmonary fibroblasts. CSE inhibited lysyl oxidase (LOX) enzyme activity that resulted in a decreased elastin formation. Similarly, TNF-α treated cells showed less elastin in the cell layers. Both these agents caused increase in MMP activity and ROS levels in cells. However, when supplemented with PGG treatment along with these two inflammatory agents, we saw a significant increase in elastin deposition, reduction in both MMP activity and ROS levels. Thus PGG, which has anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant properties coupled with its ability to aid in elastic fiber formation, can be a multifunctional drug to potentially arrest the progression of emphysema. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.

    1999-01-01

    and experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6......Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations...

  13. Storage capacity of hydrogen in gas hydrates

    Tsuda, Takaaki; Ogata, Kyohei; Hashimoto, Shunsuke; Sugahara, Takeshi; Sato, Hiroshi; Ohgaki, Kazunari

    2010-01-01

    The storage capacity of H 2 in the THF, THT, and furan hydrates was studied by p-V-T measurements. We confirmed that the storage and release processes of H 2 in all hydrates could be performed reversibly by pressure swing without destroying of hydrate cages. H 2 absorption in both THT and furan hydrates is much faster than THF hydrate in spite of same unit-cell structure. On the other hand, the storage amounts of H 2 are coincident in the all additive hydrates and would reach at about 1.0 mass% asymptotically.

  14. Amphitrite ornata Dehaloperoxidase (DHP): Investigations of Structural Factors That Influence the Mechanism of Halophenol Dehalogenation Using ;Peroxidase-like; Myoglobin Mutants and ;Myoglobin-like; DHP Mutants

    Du, Jing; Huang, Xiao; Sun, Shengfang; Wang, Chunxue; Lebioda, Lukasz; Dawson, John H. (SC)

    2012-05-14

    Dehaloperoxidase (DHP), discovered in the marine terebellid polychaete Amphitrite ornata, is the first heme-containing globin with a peroxidase activity. The sequence and crystal structure of DHP argue that it evolved from an ancient O{sub 2} transport and storage globin. Thus, DHP retains an oxygen carrier function but also has the ability to degrade halophenol toxicants in its living environment. Sperm whale myoglobin (Mb) in the ferric state has a peroxidase activity {approx}10 times lower than that of DHP. The catalytic activity enhancement observed in DHP appears to have been generated mainly by subtle changes in the positions of the proximal and distal histidine residues that appeared during DHP evolution. Herein, we report investigations into the mechanism of action of DHP derived from examination of 'peroxidase-like' Mb mutants and 'Mb-like' DHP mutants. The dehalogenation ability of wild-type Mb is augmented in the peroxidase-like Mb mutants (F43H/H64L, G65T, and G65I Mb) but attenuated in the Mb-like T56G DHP variant. X-ray crystallographic data show that the distal His residues in G65T Mb and G65I are positioned {approx}0.3 and {approx}0.8 {angstrom}, respectively, farther from the heme iron compared to that in the wild-type protein. The H93K/T95H double mutant Mb with the proximal His shifted to the 'DHP-like' position has an increased peroxidase activity. In addition, a better dehaloperoxidase (M86E DHP) was generated by introducing a negative charge near His89 to enhance the imidazolate character of the proximal His. Finally, only minimal differences in dehalogenation activities are seen among the exogenous ligand-free DHP, the acetate-bound DHP, and the distal site blocker L100F DHP mutant. Thus, we conclude that binding of halophenols in the internal binding site (i.e., distal cavity) is not essential for catalysis. This work provides a foundation for a new structure-function paradigm for peroxidases and for the

  15. Amphitrite ornata dehaloperoxidase (DHP): investigations of structural factors that influence the mechanism of halophenol dehalogenation using "peroxidase-like" myoglobin mutants and "myoglobin-like" DHP mutants.

    Du, Jing; Huang, Xiao; Sun, Shengfang; Wang, Chunxue; Lebioda, Lukasz; Dawson, John H

    2011-09-27

    Dehaloperoxidase (DHP), discovered in the marine terebellid polychaete Amphitrite ornata, is the first heme-containing globin with a peroxidase activity. The sequence and crystal structure of DHP argue that it evolved from an ancient O(2) transport and storage globin. Thus, DHP retains an oxygen carrier function but also has the ability to degrade halophenol toxicants in its living environment. Sperm whale myoglobin (Mb) in the ferric state has a peroxidase activity ∼10 times lower than that of DHP. The catalytic activity enhancement observed in DHP appears to have been generated mainly by subtle changes in the positions of the proximal and distal histidine residues that appeared during DHP evolution. Herein, we report investigations into the mechanism of action of DHP derived from examination of "peroxidase-like" Mb mutants and "Mb-like" DHP mutants. The dehalogenation ability of wild-type Mb is augmented in the peroxidase-like Mb mutants (F43H/H64L, G65T, and G65I Mb) but attenuated in the Mb-like T56G DHP variant. X-ray crystallographic data show that the distal His residues in G65T Mb and G65I are positioned ∼0.3 and ∼0.8 Å, respectively, farther from the heme iron compared to that in the wild-type protein. The H93K/T95H double mutant Mb with the proximal His shifted to the "DHP-like" position has an increased peroxidase activity. In addition, a better dehaloperoxidase (M86E DHP) was generated by introducing a negative charge near His89 to enhance the imidazolate character of the proximal His. Finally, only minimal differences in dehalogenation activities are seen among the exogenous ligand-free DHP, the acetate-bound DHP, and the distal site blocker L100F DHP mutant. Thus, we conclude that binding of halophenols in the internal binding site (i.e., distal cavity) is not essential for catalysis. This work provides a foundation for a new structure-function paradigm for peroxidases and for the molecular evolution of the dual-function enzyme DHP.

  16. Physiological and endocrino-metabolic factors affecting serum myoglobin levels assayed by a radioimmunological method

    Clerico, A.; Giampietro, O.; Del Chicca, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    Only recently with the introduction of accurate and sensitive RIA methods it has been possible to detect significant amounts of myoglobin (M) in human sera. We studied serum M levels by a RIA in normal subjects and athletes with different age, sex and muscle mass, at rest and in different hours of the day, and after physical training, in hypothyroid and acromegalic patients before and after therapy, with the aim to evidentiate the possible factors affecting serum M levels. We used for M assay a very sensitive RIA method. We studied 62 normal adult persons (32 men and 30 women, 16-62 years of age), 93 children (0-12 year old), 15 neonates and 9 athletes. In addition, in 21 normal adult subjects (11 men, 10 women) circadian profiles of M concentrations were studied at rest. A significant circadian rhythm was found in 18 out 21 subjects studied, with higher M levels in the morning hours. Children showed low M concentrations (10.8 - 6.1 ng/ml), while in neonates higher M levels were found. Adult men showed significantly higher M levels (26.2 +- 10.3 ng/ml) than women (19.1 +- 7.3 ng/ml) at 8-10 a.m. A significant correlation between body mass and M levels was found in nonobese-adult men, women and athletes (r=0.7195, n=60, p<0.001) at 8-10 a.m. This correlation was also clearly evident at every hour of the day in the 21 subjects studied for circadian profiles. Myoglobin levels greatly increased after physical training. In 6 of 10 hypothyroid patients M was cleary elevated before substitutive therapy; a significant inverse correlation was found between serum M levels and circulating peripheral (free and total) thyroid hormones. Before treatment, in all acromegalics basal M levels were found to be slightly higher than normal, with significant circadian rhythm, as in normals. In addition, a 'biphasic' pattern of M levels in relation to the behaviour of serum GH concentrations was observed. (Author)

  17. Molecular characterization of Clonorchis sinensis secretory myoglobin: Delineating its role in anti-oxidative survival

    2014-01-01

    Background Clonorchiasis is a globally important, neglected food-borne disease caused by Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis), and it is highly related to cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. Increased molecular evidence has strongly suggested that the adult worm of C. sinensis continuously releases excretory-secretory proteins (ESPs), which play important roles in the parasite-host interactions, to establish successful infection and ensure its own survival. Myoglobin, a hemoprotein, is present in high concentrations in trematodes and ESPs. To further understand the biological function of CsMb and its putative roles in the interactions of C. sinensis with its host, we explored the molecular characterization of CsMb in this paper. Methods We expressed CsMb and its mutants in E. coli BL21 and identified its molecular characteristics using bioinformatics analysis and experimental approaches. Reverse transcription PCR analysis was used to measure myoglobin transcripts of C. sinensis with different culture conditions. The peroxidase activity of CsMb was confirmed by spectrophotometry. We co-cultured RAW264.7 cells with recombinant CsMb (rCsMb), and we then measured the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) in addition to the mRNA levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and Mn superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in activated RAW264.7 cells. Results In the in vitro culture of adult worms, the transcripts of CsMb increased with the increase of oxygen content. Oxidative stress conditions induced by H2O2 increased the levels of CsMb transcripts in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, CsMb catalyzed oxidation reactions in the presence of H2O2, and amino acid 34 of CsMb played an essential role in its reaction with H2O2. In addition, CsMb significantly reduced H2O2 and NO levels in LPS-activated macrophages, and CsMb downregulated iNOS and SOD expression in activated macrophages. Conclusion The present study

  18. First steps towards tissue engineering of small-diameter blood vessels: preparation of flat scaffolds of collagen and elastin by means of freeze drying

    Buttafoco, L.; Engbers-Buijtenhuijs, P.; Poot, Andreas A.; Dijkstra, Pieter J.; Daamen, W.F.; van Kuppevelt, T.H.; Vermes, I.; Feijen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Porous scaffolds composed of collagen or collagen and elastin were prepared by freeze drying at temperatures between -18 and -196°C. All scaffolds had a porosity of 90-98% and a homogeneous distribution of pores. Freeze drying at -18°C afforded collagen and collagen/elastin matrices with average

  19. Elephantiasis, elastin, and chronic wound healing: 19th century and contemporary viewpoints relevant to hypotheses concerning lymphedema, leprosy, erysipelas, and psoriasis--review and reflections.

    Ryan, T J

    2009-03-01

    Both wound healing and lymphedema have fibrosis of the skin in common. They also share destruction of elastin by elastases from neutrophils as a significant feature. These are not new observations, and the writings of Unna and Kaposi are recalled. The contemporary observations on elastin by Gerli and his team are discussed in the light of these much earlier opinions.

  20. Gas hydrates forming and decomposition conditions analysis

    А. М. Павленко

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of gas hydrates has been defined; their brief description has been given; factors that affect the formation and decomposition of the hydrates have been reported; their distribution, structure and thermodynamic conditions determining the gas hydrates formation disposition in gas pipelines have been considered. Advantages and disadvantages of the known methods for removing gas hydrate plugs in the pipeline have been analyzed, the necessity of their further studies has been proved. In addition to the negative impact on the process of gas extraction, the hydrates properties make it possible to outline the following possible fields of their industrial use: obtaining ultrahigh pressures in confined spaces at the hydrate decomposition; separating hydrocarbon mixtures by successive transfer of individual components through the hydrate given the mode; obtaining cold due to heat absorption at the hydrate decomposition; elimination of the open gas fountain by means of hydrate plugs in the bore hole of the gushing gasser; seawater desalination, based on the hydrate ability to only bind water molecules into the solid state; wastewater purification; gas storage in the hydrate state; dispersion of high temperature fog and clouds by means of hydrates; water-hydrates emulsion injection into the productive strata to raise the oil recovery factor; obtaining cold in the gas processing to cool the gas, etc.

  1. Electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of myoglobin immobilized in sulfonated graphene oxide and Nafion films.

    Chen, Guiying; Sun, Hong; Hou, Shifeng

    2016-06-01

    In this study, sulfonated graphene oxide (SGO) was synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was used to make Mb-SGO-Nafion composite films by coating myoglobin (Mb) on the glassy carbon electrodes (GCE). Positions of the Soret absorption bands suggested that Mb retained its native conformation in the films. Mb-SGO-Nafion film modified electrode showed a pair of well-defined and nearly reversible cyclic voltammetry peaks at around -0.39 V versus saturated calomel electrode (SCE) in pH 7.0 buffers, characteristic of heme Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couples. Electrochemical parameters such as electron transfer rate constant (ks) and formal potential (E(o')) were estimated by fitting the data of square-wave voltammetry with nonlinear regression analysis. Experimental data demonstrated that the electron transfer between Mb and electrode was greatly facilitated and showed good electrocatalytic properties toward various substrates, such as H2O2 and NaNO2, with significant lowering of reduction overpotential. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of myoglobin immobilized on zirconia/multi-walled carbon nanotube nanocomposite

    Liang, Ruping; Deng, Minqiang; Cui, Sanguan; Chen, Hong [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Advanced Study, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Qiu, Jianding, E-mail: jdqiu@ncu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Advanced Study, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Zirconia/multi-walled carbon nanotube (ZrO{sub 2}/MWCNT) nanocomposite was prepared by hydrothermal treatment of MWCNTs in ZrOCl{sub 2}.8H{sub 2}O aqueous solution. The morphology and structure of the synthesized ZrO{sub 2}/MWCNT nanocomposite were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. It was found that ZrO{sub 2} nanoparticles homogeneously distributed on the sidewall of MWCNTs. Myoglobin (Mb), as a model protein to investigate the nanocomposite, was immobilized on ZrO{sub 2}/MWCNT nanocomposite. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and electrochemical measurements showed that the nanocomposite could retain the bioactivity of the immobilized Mb to a large extent. The Mb immobilized in the composite showed excellent direct electrochemistry and electrocatalytic activity to the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The linear response range of the biosensor to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration was from 1.0 to 116.0 {mu}M with the limit of detection of 0.53 {mu}M (S/N = 3). The ZrO{sub 2}/MWCNT nanocomposite provided a good biocompatible matrix for protein immobilization and biosensors preparation.

  3. Elastic neutron scattering of dry and rehydrated trehalose coated carboxy-myoglobin

    Librizzi, Fabio; Vitrano, Eugenio [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Astronomiche and CNISM, Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy); Paciaroni, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Perugia, INFM-CRS SOFT and CEMIN - Centro di Eccellenza per i Materiali Innovativi e Nanostrutturati, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Cordone, Lorenzo [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Astronomiche and CNISM, Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy)], E-mail: cordone@fisica.unipa.it

    2008-04-18

    We report here a comparison between the hydrogen atoms mean square displacements measured by elastic neutron scattering on trehalose coated carboxy-myoglobin, at ILL on the backscattering spectrometers IN13 and IN16. An inconsistency is observed when comparing the mean square displacements measured on the two spectrometer, on samples of identical composition, since they resulted of larger amplitude on IN13 (either in condition of drought or after overnight rehydration under 75% D{sub 2}O atmosphere), notwithstanding the lower time window accessible on this instrument with respect to IN16. Such inconsistency disappears when the data obtained on this last spectrometer are analyzed in two separate ranges of the exchanged wave vector q. The analysis of the data collected on IN13 in terms of the two-well model [W. Doster, S. Cusak, W. Petry, Nature 337 (1989) 754] gives relevant information on the enthalpy and entropy values involved in the interconversion among substates in dry and rehydrated trehalose coated protein samples.

  4. Roles of Glutamates and Metal ions in a Rationally Designed Nitric Oxide Reductase Based on Myoglobin

    Y Lin; N Yeung; Y Gao; K Miner; S Tian; H Robinson; Y Lu

    2011-12-31

    A structural and functional model of bacterial nitric oxide reductase (NOR) has been designed by introducing two glutamates (Glu) and three histidines (His) in sperm whale myoglobin. X-ray structural data indicate that the three His and one Glu (V68E) residues bind iron, mimicking the putative FeB site in NOR, while the second Glu (I107E) interacts with a water molecule and forms a hydrogen bonding network in the designed protein. Unlike the first Glu (V68E), which lowered the heme reduction potential by {approx}110 mV, the second Glu has little effect on the heme potential, suggesting that the negatively charged Glu has a different role in redox tuning. More importantly, introducing the second Glu resulted in a {approx}100% increase in NOR activity, suggesting the importance of a hydrogen bonding network in facilitating proton delivery during NOR reactivity. In addition, EPR and X-ray structural studies indicate that the designed protein binds iron, copper, or zinc in the FeB site, each with different effects on the structures and NOR activities, suggesting that both redox activity and an intermediate five-coordinate heme-NO species are important for high NOR activity. The designed protein offers an excellent model for NOR and demonstrates the power of using designed proteins as a simpler and more well-defined system to address important chemical and biological issues.

  5. Determination of myoglobin based on its enzymatic activity by stopped-flow spectrophotometry

    Zheng, Qi; Liu, Zhihong; Cai, Ruxiu

    2005-04-01

    A new method has been developed for the determination of myoglobin (Mb) based on its enzymatic activity for the oxidation of o-phenylenediamine (OPDA) with hydrogen peroxide. Stopped-flow spectrophotometry was used to study the kinetic behavior of the oxidation reaction. The catalytic activity of Mb was compared to other three kinds of catalyst. The time dependent absorbance of the reaction product, 2,3-diamimophenazine (DAPN), at a wavelength of 426 nm was recorded. The initial reaction rate obtained at 40 °C was found to be proportional to the concentration of Mb in the range of 1.0 × 10 -6 to 4.0 × 10 -9 mol L -1. The detection limit of Mb was found to be 9.93 × 10 -10 mol L -1. The relative standard deviations were within 5% for the determination of different concentrations of Mb. Excess of bovine serum albumin (BSA), Ca(II), Mg(II), Cu(II), glucose, caffeine, lactose and uric acid did not interfere.

  6. Myoglobin plasma level related to muscle mass and fiber composition: a clinical marker of muscle wasting?

    Weber, Marc-André; Kinscherf, Ralf; Krakowski-Roosen, Holger; Aulmann, Michael; Renk, Hanna; Künkele, Annette; Edler, Lutz; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hildebrandt, Wulf

    2007-08-01

    Progressive muscle wasting is a central feature of cancer-related cachexia and has been recognized as a determinant of poor prognosis and quality of life. However, until now, no easily assessable clinical marker exists that allows to predict or to track muscle wasting. The present study evaluated the potential of myoglobin (MG) plasma levels to indicate wasting of large locomotor muscles and, moreover, to reflect the loss of MG-rich fiber types, which are most relevant for daily performance. In 17 cancer-cachectic patients (weight loss 22%) and 27 age- and gender-matched healthy controls, we determined plasma levels of MG and creatine kinase (CK), maximal quadriceps muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) by magnetic resonance imaging, muscle morphology and fiber composition in biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle, body cell mass (BCM) by impedance technique as well as maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2)max). In cachectic patients, plasma MG, muscle CSA, BCM, and VO(2)max were 30-35% below control levels. MG showed a significant positive correlation to total muscle CSA (r = 0.65, p max as an important functional readout. CK plasma levels appear to be less reliable because prolonged increases are observed in even subclinical myopathies or after exercise. Notably, cancer-related muscle wasting was not associated with increases in plasma MG or CK in this study.

  7. Graphene-CNT nanohybrid aptasensor for label free detection of cardiac biomarker myoglobin.

    Kumar, Vinod; Shorie, Munish; Ganguli, Ashok K; Sabherwal, Priyanka

    2015-10-15

    We report a label free electrochemical detection of cardiac bio-marker myoglobin (Mb) on aptamer functionalized rGO/CNT nanostructured electrodes by measuring its direct electron transfer (DET). Configured as a highly responsive aptasensor, the newly developed biosensing platform exhibits synergistic effect of the nano-hybrid functional construct by combining good electrical properties and the facile chemical functionality of nanohybrid for the compatible bio-interface development. The specific anti-Mb aptamer was generated by five iterative SELEX (Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) rounds, showing high senstivity (KD ~65 pM). The aptamer functionalized rGO/CNT nanostructured electrodes demonstrated a significant increase in signal response with a detection limit of ~0.34 ng/mL in the dynamic response range between 1 ng/mL and 4 µg/mL for Mb. The newly developed DET assay format presents a promising candidate in point-of-care diagnosis for routine screening of Mb in patient's samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Initiating fibro-proliferation through interfacial interactions of myoglobin colloids with collagen in solution.

    Dhanasekaran, Madhumitha; Dhathathreyan, Aruna

    2017-08-01

    This work examines fibro-proliferation through interaction of myoglobin (Mb), a globular protein with collagen, an extracellular matrix fibrous protein. Designed colloids of Mb at pH 4.5 and 7.5 have been mixed with collagen solution at pH 7.5 and 4.5 in different concentrations altering their surface charges. For the Mb colloids, 100-200nm sizes have been measured from Transmission electron micrographs and zeta sizer. CD spectra shows a shift to beta sheet like structure for the protein in the colloids. Interaction at Mb/Collagen interface studied using Dilational rheology, Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and Differential Scanning calorimetry show that the perturbation is not only by the charge compensation arising from the difference in pH of the colloids and collagen, but also by the organized assembly of collagen at that particular pH. Results demonstrate that positive Mb colloids at pH 4.5, having more% of entrained water stabilize the collagen fibrils (pH 7.5) around them. Ensuing dehydration leads to effective cross-linking and inherently anisotropic growth of fibrils/fibres of collagen. In the case of Mb colloids at pH 7.5, the fibril formation seems to supersede the clustering of Mb suggesting that the fibro-proliferation is both pH and hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance dependent at the interface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Endurance training facilitates myoglobin desaturation during muscle contraction in rat skeletal muscle.

    Takakura, Hisashi; Furuichi, Yasuro; Yamada, Tatsuya; Jue, Thomas; Ojino, Minoru; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Iwase, Satoshi; Hojo, Tatsuya; Izawa, Tetsuya; Masuda, Kazumi

    2015-03-24

    At onset of muscle contraction, myoglobin (Mb) immediately releases its bound O2 to the mitochondria. Accordingly, intracellular O2 tension (PmbO2) markedly declines in order to increase muscle O2 uptake (mVO2). However, whether the change in PmbO2 during muscle contraction modulates mVO2 and whether the O2 release rate from Mb increases in endurance-trained muscles remain unclear. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to determine the effect of endurance training on O2 saturation of Mb (SmbO2) and PmbO2 kinetics during muscle contraction. Male Wistar rats were subjected to a 4-week swimming training (Tr group; 6 days per week, 30 min × 4 sets per day) with a weight load of 2% body mass. After the training period, deoxygenated Mb kinetics during muscle contraction were measured using near-infrared spectroscopy under hemoglobin-free medium perfusion. In the Tr group, the VmO2peak significantly increased by 32%. Although the PmbO2 during muscle contraction did not affect the increased mVO2 in endurance-trained muscle, the O2 release rate from Mb increased because of the increased Mb concentration and faster decremental rate in SmbO2 at the maximal twitch tension. These results suggest that the Mb dynamics during muscle contraction are contributing factors to faster VO2 kinetics in endurance-trained muscle.

  10. Elastic neutron scattering of dry and rehydrated trehalose coated carboxy-myoglobin

    Librizzi, Fabio; Vitrano, Eugenio; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Cordone, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    We report here a comparison between the hydrogen atoms mean square displacements measured by elastic neutron scattering on trehalose coated carboxy-myoglobin, at ILL on the backscattering spectrometers IN13 and IN16. An inconsistency is observed when comparing the mean square displacements measured on the two spectrometer, on samples of identical composition, since they resulted of larger amplitude on IN13 (either in condition of drought or after overnight rehydration under 75% D 2 O atmosphere), notwithstanding the lower time window accessible on this instrument with respect to IN16. Such inconsistency disappears when the data obtained on this last spectrometer are analyzed in two separate ranges of the exchanged wave vector q. The analysis of the data collected on IN13 in terms of the two-well model [W. Doster, S. Cusak, W. Petry, Nature 337 (1989) 754] gives relevant information on the enthalpy and entropy values involved in the interconversion among substates in dry and rehydrated trehalose coated protein samples

  11. Isolation of heat-tolerant myoglobin from Asian swamp eel Monopterus albus.

    Chotichayapong, Chatrachatchaya; Wiengsamut, Kittipong; Chanthai, Saksit; Sattayasai, Nison; Tamiya, Toru; Kanzawa, Nobuyuki; Tsuchiya, Takahide

    2012-10-01

    Myoglobin from Asian swamp eel Monopterus albus was purified from fish muscle using salt fractionation followed by column chromatography and molecular filtration. The purified Mb of 0.68 mg/g wet weight of muscle was determined for its molecular mass by MALDI-TOF-MS to be 15,525.18 Da. Using isoelectric focusing technique, the purified Mb showed two derivatives with pI of 6.40 and 7.12. Six peptide fragments of this protein identified by LC-MS/MS were homologous to Mbs of sea raven Hemitripterus americanus, yellowfin tuna Thunnus albacores, blue marlin Makaira nigicans, common carp Cyprinus carpio, and goldfish Carassius auratus. According to the Mb denaturation, the swamp eel Mb had thermal stability higher than walking catfish Clarias batrachus Mb and striped catfish Pangasius hypophthalmus Mb, between 30 and 60 (°)C. For the thermal stability of Mb, the swamp eel Mb showed a biphasic behavior due to the O(2) dissociation and the heme orientation disorder, with the lowest increase in both Kd(f) and Kd(s). The thermal sensitivity of swamp eel Mb was lower than those of the other Mbs for both of fast and slow reaction stages. These results suggest that the swamp eel Mb globin structure is thermally stable, which is consistent with heat-tolerant behavior of the swamp eel particularly in drought habitat.

  12. Nutritional profiling of Eurasian woodcock meat: chemical composition and myoglobin characterization.

    Landi, Nicola; Ragucci, Sara; Di Giuseppe, Antonella Ma; Russo, Rosita; Poerio, Elia; Severino, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo

    2018-04-10

    Meat from birds is a rich source of proteins for the human diet. In this framework, Eurasian woodcock (Scolopax rusticola L.), a medium-small wading bird hunted as game in many Eurasian countries, is considered one of the best meats for culinary purposes. Since the nutritional composition of Eurasian woodcock meat has not yet been reported, we decided to determine the nutritional profile of S. rusticola meat. Macronutrient components (proteins, lipids and fatty acids) were determined, as well as free and total amino acids, and compared with those of the common pheasant. Eurasian woodcock meat contains high levels of proteins and essential amino acids. The levels of unsaturated fatty acids represent a great contribution to the total lipid amount. Among polyunsaturated fatty acids, linoleic acid (C18:2, n-6) is the major essential fatty acid. Finally, we report the characterization of myoglobin (Mb) from Eurasian woodcock. The data revealed that meat from this bird could be a good source of quality raw proteins because of its amino acid composition, and it had a low lipid content. On the other hand, Mb characterization might be of benefit to the meat industry, by providing useful information for the determination of species-specific differences in meat from birds. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Functional properties of myoglobins from five whale species with different diving capacities.

    Helbo, Signe; Fago, Angela

    2012-10-01

    Whales show an exceptionally wide range of diving capabilities and many express high amounts of the O(2) carrier protein myoglobin (Mb) in their muscle tissues, which increases their aerobic diving capacity. Although previous studies have mainly focused on the muscle Mb concentration and O(2) carrying capacity as markers of diving behavior in whales, it still remains unexplored whether whale Mbs differ in their O(2) affinities and nitrite reductase and peroxidase enzymatic activities, all functions that could contribute to differences in diving capacities. In this study, we have measured the functional properties of purified Mbs from five toothed whales and two baleen whales and have examined their correlation with average dive duration. Results showed that some variation in functional properties exists among whale Mbs, with toothed whale Mbs having higher O(2) affinities and nitrite reductase activities (similar to those of horse Mb) compared with baleen whale Mbs. However, these differences did not correlate with average dive duration. Instead, a significant correlation was found between whale Mb concentration and average duration and depth of dives, and between O(2) affinity and nitrite reductase activity when including horse Mb. Despite the fact that the functional properties showed little species-specific differences in vitro, they may still contribute to enhancing diving capacity as a result of the increased muscle Mb concentration found in extreme divers. In conclusion, Mb concentration rather than specific functional reactivities may support whale diving performance.

  14. Kinetics and mechanisms of photoinduced electron-transfer reaction of zinc myoglobin

    Tsukahara, Keiichi; Asami, Satoko; Okada, Mihoko; Sakurai, Takeshi.

    1994-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer (ET) between zinc myoglobin (ZnPPMb) and a variety of quenchers, such as hexacyanoferrate(III)([Fe(CN) 6 ] 3- ) and hexaammineruthenium(III)(Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ] 3+ ions, cationic viologens, copper(II) protein (stellacyanin), and metmyoglobins, has been studied in aqueous degassed solutions. The excited triplet state of ZnPPMb( * ZnPPMb) was quenched by [Fe(CN) 6 ] 3- in a self-associated complex. Both quenching rate constant and formation constant of the self-associated complex decrease with increasing ionic strengths. The thermal backward ET reaction for this system was not observed; it is most likely that the backward ET step is much faster than the quenching reaction. All of the cationic quenchers examined in this work did not form a self-associated complex with * ZnPPMb, and the intermolecular quenching occurred. The thermal backward ET reaction was observed for these cationic quenchers. Not only photoinduced ET but also thermal backward ET reactions were insensitive to the driving force of the reactions, suggesting that the reactions are controlled by conformational changes in ZnPPMb. The quenching rate constants increase with increasing ionic strength for the cationic quenchers. The effects of poly-L-lysine hydrochloride, sodium poly-L-glutamate, and sodium cyclo-hexaphosphate were also examined. The active site of the * ZnPPMb toward both anionic and cationic quenchers is assumed to be the positively charged site near the heme pocket. (author)

  15. A hierarchy of functionally important relaxations within myoglobin based on solvent effects, mutations and kinetic model.

    Dantsker, David; Samuni, Uri; Friedman, Joel M; Agmon, Noam

    2005-06-01

    Geminate CO rebinding in myoglobin is studied for two viscous solvents, trehalose and sol-gel (bathed in 100% glycerol) at several temperatures. Mutations in key distal hemepocket residues are used to eliminate or enhance specific relaxation modes. The time-resolved data are analyzed with a modified Agmon-Hopfield model which is capable of providing excellent fits in cases where a single relaxation mode is dominant. Using this approach, we determine the relaxation rate constants of specific functionally important modes, obtaining also their Arrhenius activation energies. We find a hierarchy of distal pocket modes controlling the rebinding kinetics. The "heme access mode" (HAM) is responsible for the major slow-down in rebinding. It is a solvent-coupled cooperative mode which restricts ligand return from the xenon cavities. Bulky side-chains, like those His64 and Trp29 (in the L29W mutant), operate like overdamped pendulums which move over and block the binding site. They may be either unslaved (His64) or moderately slaved (Trp29) to the solvent. Small side-chain relaxations, most notably of leucines, are revealed in some mutants (V68L, V68A). They are conjectured to facilitate inter-cavity ligand motion. When all relaxations are arrested (H64L in trehalose), we observe pure inhomogeneous kinetics with no temperature dependence, suggesting that proximal relaxation is not a factor on the investigated timescale.

  16. Fabrication of graphene–platinum nanocomposite for the direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of myoglobin

    Sun, Wei, E-mail: swyy26@hotmail.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hainan Normal University, Haikou 571158 (China); College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Li, Linfang [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Lei, Bingxin [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hainan Normal University, Haikou 571158 (China); Li, Tongtong; Ju, Xiaomei; Wang, Xiuzheng; Li, Guangjiu [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Sun, Zhenfan [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hainan Normal University, Haikou 571158 (China)

    2013-05-01

    In this paper a platinum (Pt) nanoparticle decorated graphene (GR) nanosheet was synthesized and used for the investigation on direct electrochemistry of myoglobin (Mb). By integrating GR–Pt nanocomposite with Mb on the surface of carbon ionic liquid electrode (CILE), a new electrochemical biosensor was fabricated. UV-Vis absorption and FT-IR spectra indicated that Mb remained its native structure in the nanocomposite film. Electrochemical behaviors of Nafion/Mb–GR–Pt/CILE were investigated with a pair of well-defined redox peak appeared, which indicated that direct electron transfer of Mb was realized on the underlying electrode with the usage of the GR–Pt nanocomposite. The fabricated electrode showed good electrocatalytic activity to the reduction of trichloroacetic acid in the linear range from 0.9 to 9.0 mmol/L with the detection limit as 0.32 mmol/L (3σ), which showed potential application for fabricating novel electrochemical biosensors and bioelectronic devices. - Highlights: ► The GR–Pt nanocomposite was synthesized and employed for the fabrication of electrochemical biosensor. ► Direct electrochemistry of Mb in the nanocomposite was realized. ► The prepared biosensor exhibited excellent electrochemical response to the reduction of TCA.

  17. Fabrication of graphene-platinum nanocomposite for the direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of myoglobin.

    Sun, Wei; Li, Linfang; Lei, Bingxin; Li, Tongtong; Ju, Xiaomei; Wang, Xiuzheng; Li, Guangjiu; Sun, Zhenfan

    2013-05-01

    In this paper a platinum (Pt) nanoparticle decorated graphene (GR) nanosheet was synthesized and used for the investigation on direct electrochemistry of myoglobin (Mb). By integrating GR-Pt nanocomposite with Mb on the surface of carbon ionic liquid electrode (CILE), a new electrochemical biosensor was fabricated. UV-Vis absorption and FT-IR spectra indicated that Mb remained its native structure in the nanocomposite film. Electrochemical behaviors of Nafion/Mb-GR-Pt/CILE were investigated with a pair of well-defined redox peak appeared, which indicated that direct electron transfer of Mb was realized on the underlying electrode with the usage of the GR-Pt nanocomposite. The fabricated electrode showed good electrocatalytic activity to the reduction of trichloroacetic acid in the linear range from 0.9 to 9.0 mmol/L with the detection limit as 0.32 mmol/L (3σ), which showed potential application for fabricating novel electrochemical biosensors and bioelectronic devices. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  19. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na 2 SO 4 –H 2 O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions

  20. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    Zhang, Lina

    2017-05-13

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10 was conducted for tricalcium silicate (C3S) to interpret long-term hydration process and investigate the formation, structure and properties of C-S-H. Based on results from XRD, IR, SEM, NMR and so forth, loose and dense clusters of C-S-H with analogous C/S ratio were obtained along with the corresponding chemical formulae proposed as Ca5Si4O13∙6.2H2O. Crystalline structure inside C-S-H was observed by TEM, which was allocated at the foil-like proportion as well as the edge of wrinkles of the product. The long-term hydration process of C3S in dilute suspension could be sketchily described as migration of calcium hydroxide and in-situ growth of C-S-H with equilibrium silicon in aqueous solution relatively constant and calcium varied.

  1. Impacts of Hydrate Distribution on the Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Properties of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Dai, S.; Seol, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In general, hydrate makes the sediments hydraulically less conductive, thermally more conductive, and mechanically stronger; yet the dependency of these physical properties on hydrate saturation varies with hydrate distribution and morphology. Hydrate distribution in sediments may cause the bulk physical properties of their host sediments varying several orders of magnitude even with the same amount of hydrate. In natural sediments, hydrate morphology is inherently governed by the burial depth and the grain size of the host sediments. Compare with patchy hydrate, uniformly distributed hydrate is more destructive to fluid flow, yet leads to higher gas and water permeability during hydrate dissociation due to the easiness of forming percolation paths. Water and hydrate have similar thermal conductivity values; the bulk thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments depends critically on gas-phase saturation. 60% of gas saturation may result in evident thermal conductivity drop and hinder further gas production. Sediments with patchy hydrate yield lower stiffness than that with cementing hydrate but higher stiffness than that with pore filling and loading bearing hydrate. Besides hydrate distribution, the stress state and loading history also play an important role in the mechanical behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments.

  2. Impaired elastin deposition in Fstl1-/- lung allograft under the renal capsule.

    Yan Geng

    Full Text Available Lung alveolar development in late gestation is a process important to postnatal survival. Follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1 is a matricellular protein of the Bmp antagonist class, which is involved in the differentiation/maturation of alveolar epithelial cells during saccular stage of lung development. This study investigates the role of Fstl1 on elastin deposition in mesenchyme and subsequent secondary septation in the late gestation stage of terminal saccular formation. To this aim, we modified the renal capsule allograft model for lung organ culture by grafting diced E15.5 distal lung underneath the renal capsule of syngeneic host and cultured up to 7 days. The saccular development of the diced lung allografts, as indicated by the morphology, epithelial and vascular developments, occurred in a manner similar to that in utero. Fstl1 deficiency caused atelectatic phenotype companied by impaired epithelial differentiation in D3 Fstl1(-/- lung allografts, which is similar to that of E18.5 Fstl1(-/- lungs, supporting the role of Fstl1 during saccular stage. Inhibition of Bmp signaling by intraperitoneal injection of dorsomorphin in the host mice rescued the pulmonary atelectasis of D3 Fstl1(-/- allografts. Furthermore, a marked reduction in elastin expression and deposition was observed in walls of air sacs of E18.5 Fstl1(-/- lungs and at the tips of the developing alveolar septae of D7 Fstl1(-/- allografts. Thus, in addition to its role on alveolar epithelium, Fstl1 is crucial for elastin expression and deposition in mesenchyme during lung alveologenesis. Our data demonstrates that the modified renal capsule allograft model for lung organ culture is a robust and efficient technique to increase our understanding of saccular stage of lung development.

  3. Polymorphisms in the human tropoelastin gene modify in vitro self-assembly and mechanical properties of elastin-like polypeptides.

    David He

    Full Text Available Elastin is a major structural component of elastic fibres that provide properties of stretch and recoil to tissues such as arteries, lung and skin. Remarkably, after initial deposition of elastin there is normally no subsequent turnover of this protein over the course of a lifetime. Consequently, elastic fibres must be extremely durable, able to withstand, for example in the human thoracic aorta, billions of cycles of stretch and recoil without mechanical failure. Major defects in the elastin gene (ELN are associated with a number of disorders including Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS, Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS and autosomal dominant cutis laxa (ADCL. Given the low turnover of elastin and the requirement for the long term durability of elastic fibres, we examined the possibility for more subtle polymorphisms in the human elastin gene to impact the assembly and long-term durability of the elastic matrix. Surveys of genetic variation resources identified 118 mutations in human ELN, 17 being non-synonymous. Introduction of two of these variants, G422S and K463R, in elastin-like polypeptides as well as full-length tropoelastin, resulted in changes in both their assembly and mechanical properties. Most notably G422S, which occurs in up to 40% of European populations, was found to enhance some elastomeric properties. These studies reveal that even apparently minor polymorphisms in human ELN can impact the assembly and mechanical properties of the elastic matrix, effects that over the course of a lifetime could result in altered susceptibility to cardiovascular disease.

  4. Prophylactic effects of elastin peptide derived from the bulbus arteriosus of fish on vascular dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Takemori, Kumiko; Yamamoto, Ei; Ito, Hiroyuki; Kometani, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prophylactic effects of an elastin peptide derived from the bulbus arteriosus of bonitos and prolylglycine (PG), a degradation product of elastin peptide, on vascular dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Male 15-week-old SHR/Izm rats were fed without (control group) or with elastin peptide (1 g/kg body weight) for 5 weeks (EP group), or were infused via an osmotic mini-pump for 4 weeks with PG (PG group) or saline (control group). Using thoracic aortas, we assessed endothelial changes by scanning electron microscopy. Vascular reactivity (contraction and relaxation) and pressure-induced distension was compared. mRNA production levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were investigated by real-time-polymerase chain reaction. Aortas of the EP group displayed limited endothelial damage compared with that in the control group. Under treatment of SHRs with elastin peptide, the effect of phenylephrine returned closer to the normal level observed in normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY/Izm) rats. mRNA production of eNOS (but not ICAM-1) was greater in the EP group than in the control group. Endothelial damage was suppressed and pressure-induced vascular distension was greater in the PG group than in the corresponding control group. These results suggest that elastin peptide from bonitos elicits prophylactic affects hypertension-associated vascular dysfunction by targeting the eNOS signaling pathway. PG may be a key mediator of the beneficial effects of elastin peptide. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthetic ligands of the elastin receptor induce elastogenesis in human dermal fibroblasts via activation of their IGF-1 receptors.

    Qa'aty, Nour; Vincent, Matthew; Wang, Yanting; Wang, Andrew; Mitts, Thomas F; Hinek, Aleksander

    2015-12-01

    We have previously reported that a mixture of peptides obtained after chemical or enzymatic degradation of bovine elastin, induced new elastogenesis in human skin. Now, we investigated the elastogenic potential of synthetic peptides mimicking the elastin-derived, VGVAPG sequence, IGVAPG sequence that we found in the rice bran, and a similar peptide, VGVTAG that we identified in the IGF-1-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1). We now demonstrate that treatment with each of these xGVxxG peptides (recognizable by the anti-elastin antibody), up-regulated the levels of elastin-encoding mRNA, tropoelastin protein, and the deposition of new elastic fibers in cultures of human dermal fibroblasts and in cultured explants of human skin. Importantly, we found that such induction of new elastogenesis may involve two parallel signaling pathways triggered after activation of IGF-1 receptor. In the first one, the xGVxxG peptides interact with the cell surface elastin receptor, thereby causing the downstream activation of the c-Src kinase and a consequent cross-activation of the adjacent IGF-1R, even in the absence of its principal ligand. In the second pathway their hydrophobic association with the N-terminal domain (VGVTAG) of the serum-derived IGFBP-1 induces conformational changes of this IGF-1 chaperone allowing for the release of its cargo and a consequent ligand-specific phosphorylation of IGF-1R. We present a novel, clinically relevant mechanism in which products of partial degradation of dermal elastin may stimulate production of new elastic fibers by dermal fibroblasts. Our findings particularly encourage the use of biologically safe synthetic xGVxxG peptides for regeneration of the injured or aged human skin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Lysyl Oxidase Induces Vascular Oxidative Stress and Contributes to Arterial Stiffness and Abnormal Elastin Structure in Hypertension: Role of p38MAPK.

    Martínez-Revelles, Sonia; García-Redondo, Ana B; Avendaño, María S; Varona, Saray; Palao, Teresa; Orriols, Mar; Roque, Fernanda R; Fortuño, Ana; Touyz, Rhian M; Martínez-González, Jose; Salaices, Mercedes; Rodríguez, Cristina; Briones, Ana M

    2017-09-01

    Vascular stiffness, structural elastin abnormalities, and increased oxidative stress are hallmarks of hypertension. Lysyl oxidase (LOX) is an elastin crosslinking enzyme that produces H 2 O 2 as a by-product. We addressed the interplay between LOX, oxidative stress, vessel stiffness, and elastin. Angiotensin II (Ang II)-infused hypertensive mice and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) showed increased vascular LOX expression and stiffness and an abnormal elastin structure. Mice over-expressing LOX in vascular smooth muscle cells (TgLOX) exhibited similar mechanical and elastin alterations to those of hypertensive models. LOX inhibition with β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) attenuated mechanical and elastin alterations in TgLOX mice, Ang II-infused mice, and SHR. Arteries from TgLOX mice, Ang II-infused mice, and/or SHR exhibited increased vascular H 2 O 2 and O 2 .- levels, NADPH oxidase activity, and/or mitochondrial dysfunction. BAPN prevented the higher oxidative stress in hypertensive models. Treatment of TgLOX and Ang II-infused mice and SHR with the mitochondrial-targeted superoxide dismutase mimetic mito-TEMPO, the antioxidant apocynin, or the H 2 O 2 scavenger polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-catalase) reduced oxidative stress, vascular stiffness, and elastin alterations. Vascular p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) activation was increased in Ang II-infused and TgLOX mice and this effect was prevented by BAPN, mito-TEMPO, or PEG-catalase. SB203580, the p38MAPK inhibitor, normalized vessel stiffness and elastin structure in TgLOX mice. We identify LOX as a novel source of vascular reactive oxygen species and a new pathway involved in vascular stiffness and elastin remodeling in hypertension. LOX up-regulation is associated with enhanced oxidative stress that promotes p38MAPK activation, elastin structural alterations, and vascular stiffness. This pathway contributes to vascular abnormalities in hypertension. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27

  7. Tuning Thermoresponsive Properties of Cationic Elastin-like Polypeptides by Varying Counterions and Side-Chains.

    Petitdemange, Rosine; Garanger, Elisabeth; Bataille, Laure; Bathany, Katell; Garbay, Bertrand; Deming, Timothy J; Lecommandoux, Sébastien

    2017-05-17

    We report the synthesis of methionine-containing recombinant elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) of different lengths that contain periodically spaced methionine residues. These ELPs were chemoselectively alkylated at all methionine residues to give polycationic derivatives. Some of these samples were found to possess solubility transitions in water, where the temperature of these transitions varied with ELP concentration, nature of the methionine alkylating group, and nature of the sulfonium counterions. These studies show that introduction and controlled spacing of methionine sulfonium residues into ELPs can be used as a means both to tune their solubility transition temperatures in water using a variety of different parameters and to introduce new side-chain functionality.

  8. Is Br2 hydration hydrophobic?

    Alcaraz-Torres, A; Gamboa-Suárez, A; Bernal-Uruchurtu, M I

    2017-02-28

    The spectroscopic properties of bromine in aqueous systems suggest it can behave as either hydrophilic or hydrophobic solute. In small water clusters, the halogen bond and the hydrogen-halogen interaction are responsible for its specific way of binding. In water hydrates, it is efficiently hosted by two different cages forming the crystal structure and it has been frequently assumed that there is little or no interaction between the guest and the host. Bromine in liquid solution poses a challenging question due to its non-negligible solubility and the large blue shift measured in its absorption spectra. Using a refined semi-empirical force field, PM3-PIF, we performed a Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics study of bromine in liquid water. Here we present a detailed study in which we retrieved the most representative hydration structures in terms of the most frequent positions around bromine and the most common water orientations. Albeit being an approximate description of the total hydration phenomenon, it captures the contribution of the leading molecular interactions in form of the recurrent structures. Our findings confirm that the spectroscopic signature is mainly caused by the closest neighbors. The dynamics of the whole first hydration shell strongly suggests that the external molecules in that structure effectively isolate the bulk from the presence of bromine. The solvation structure fluctuates from a hydrophilic to a hydrophobic-like environment along the studied trajectory.

  9. Hydration modeling of calcium sulphates

    de Korte, A.C.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Al-Mattarneh, Hashem; Mustapha, Kamal N.; Nuruddin, Muhd Fadhil

    2008-01-01

    The CEMHYD3D model has been extended at the University of Twente in the last ten years [1,2]. At present the cement hydration model is extended for the use of gypsum. Although gypsum was present in the model already, the model was not suitable for high contents of gypsum and did not include the

  10. The association of elastin gene variants with two angiographic subtypes of polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy.

    Suiho Yanagisawa

    Full Text Available To compare the association of elastin (ELN gene variants between two different angiographic phenotypes of polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV.We included 411 treatment-naïve PCV patients and 350 controls in the present study. PCV was classified into two phenotypes (152 Type 1 and 259 Type 2 according to the presence or absence of feeding vessels found in indocyanine-green angiography. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the ELN region including rs868005, rs884843, rs2301995, rs13239907 and rs2856728 were genotyped using TaqMan Genotyping Assays.In the allelic association analyses, rs868005 showed the strongest association with Type 2 PCV (allelic odds ratio 1.56; p = 7.4x10(-6, while no SNP was significantly associated with Type 1 PCV. Genotype association analyses revealed the significant association of rs868005 with Type 2 PCV in log additive model and predominant model (odds ratio 1.75; p = 1.5x10(-6 and odds ratio 1.60; p = 0.0044, respectively, but not with Type 1 PCV. These findings were further corroborated by another control group in the literature.There may be significantly different associations in genetic variants of elastin between two angiographic phenotypes of PCV.

  11. Modulated growth, stability and interactions of liquid-like coacervate assemblies of elastin.

    Muiznieks, Lisa D; Cirulis, Judith T; van der Horst, Astrid; Reinhardt, Dieter P; Wuite, Gijs J L; Pomès, Régis; Keeley, Fred W

    2014-06-01

    Elastin self-assembles from monomers into polymer networks that display elasticity and resilience. The first major step in assembly is a liquid-liquid phase separation known as coacervation. This process represents a continuum of stages from initial phase separation to early growth of droplets by coalescence and later "maturation" leading to fiber formation. Assembly of tropoelastin-rich globules is on pathway for fiber formation in vivo. However, little is known about these intermediates beyond their size distribution. Here we investigate the contribution of sequence and structural motifs from full-length tropoelastin and a set of elastin-like polypeptides to the maturation of coacervate assemblies, observing their growth, stability and interaction behavior, and polypeptide alignment within matured globules. We conclude that maturation is driven by surface properties, leading to stabilization of the interface between the hydrophobic interior and aqueous solvent, potentially through structural motifs, and discuss implications for droplet interactions in fiber formation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Observed gas hydrate morphologies in marine sediment

    Holland, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Roberts, J.; Druce, M. [Geotek Ltd., Daventry, Northamptonshire (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    The morphology of gas hydrate in marine sediments determines the basic physical properties of the sediment-hydrate matrix and provides information regarding the formation of gas hydrate deposits, and the nature of the disruption that will occur on dissociation. Small-scale morphology is useful in estimating the concentrations of gas hydrate from geophysical data. It is also important for predicting their response to climate change or commercial production. Many remote techniques for gas hydrate detection and quantification depend on hydrate morphology. In this study, morphology of gas hydrate was examined in HYACINTH pressure cores from recent seagoing expeditions. Visual and infrared observations from non-pressurized cores were also used. The expeditions and pressure core analysis were described in detail. This paper described the difference between two types of gas hydrate morphologies, notably pore-filling and grain-displacing. Last, the paper addressed the impact of hydrate morphology. It was concluded that a detailed morphology of gas hydrate is an essential component for a full understanding of the past, present, and future of any gas hydrate environment. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Seismic reflections associated with submarine gas hydrates

    Andreassen, K

    1996-12-31

    Gas hydrates are often suggested as a future energy resource. This doctoral thesis improves the understanding of the concentration and distribution of natural submarine gas hydrates. The presence of these hydrates are commonly inferred from strong bottom simulating reflection (BSR). To investigate the nature of BSR, this work uses seismic studies of hydrate-related BSRs at two different locations, one where gas hydrates are accepted to exist and interpreted to be very extensive (in the Beaufort Sea), the other with good velocity data and downhole logs available (offshore Oregon). To ascertain the presence of free gas under the BSR, prestack offset data must supplement near-vertical incidence seismic data. A tentative model for physical properties of sediments partially saturated with gas hydrate and free gas is presented. This model, together with drilling information and seismic data containing the BSR beneath the Oregon margin and the Beaufort Sea, made it possible to better understand when to apply the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) method to constrain BSR gas hydrate and gas models. Distribution of natural gas hydrates offshore Norway and Svalbard is discussed and interpreted as reflections from the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, overlying sediments containing free gas. Gas hydrates inferred to exist at the Norwegian-Svalbard continental margin correlate well with Cenozoic depocenters, and the associated gas is assumed to be mainly biogenic. Parts of that margin have a high potential for natural gas hydrates of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. 235 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Seismic reflections associated with submarine gas hydrates

    Andreassen, K.

    1995-12-31

    Gas hydrates are often suggested as a future energy resource. This doctoral thesis improves the understanding of the concentration and distribution of natural submarine gas hydrates. The presence of these hydrates are commonly inferred from strong bottom simulating reflection (BSR). To investigate the nature of BSR, this work uses seismic studies of hydrate-related BSRs at two different locations, one where gas hydrates are accepted to exist and interpreted to be very extensive (in the Beaufort Sea), the other with good velocity data and downhole logs available (offshore Oregon). To ascertain the presence of free gas under the BSR, prestack offset data must supplement near-vertical incidence seismic data. A tentative model for physical properties of sediments partially saturated with gas hydrate and free gas is presented. This model, together with drilling information and seismic data containing the BSR beneath the Oregon margin and the Beaufort Sea, made it possible to better understand when to apply the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) method to constrain BSR gas hydrate and gas models. Distribution of natural gas hydrates offshore Norway and Svalbard is discussed and interpreted as reflections from the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, overlying sediments containing free gas. Gas hydrates inferred to exist at the Norwegian-Svalbard continental margin correlate well with Cenozoic depocenters, and the associated gas is assumed to be mainly biogenic. Parts of that margin have a high potential for natural gas hydrates of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. 235 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Influence of fluorosurfactants on hydrate formation rates

    Kim, C.U.; Jeong, K.E.; Chae, H.J.; Jeong, S.Y. [Korea Reasearch Inst. of Chemical Technology, Alternative Chemicals/Fuel Research Center, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates, or clathrates, are ice-like solids that forms when natural gas is in contact with liquid water or ice under high pressure and low temperature. There is significant interest in studying the storage and transportation of gas in the form of hydrates. However, a critical problem impacting the industrial application of gas hydrates for storage and transportation of natural gas is the slow formation rate of natural gas hydrate. Researchers have previously reported on the promotion effect of some additives on gas hydrate formation and hydrate gas content. Fluorosurfactants are significantly superior to nonfluorinated surfactants in wetting action, as well as stability in harsh environments, both thermal and chemical. This paper discussed an experimental investigation into the effects of fluorosurfactants with different ionic types on the formation of methane hydrate. The surfactants used were FSN-100 of DuPont Zonyl as non-ionic surfactant and FC-143 of DuPont as anionic surfactant. The paper discussed the experimental apparatus for methane hydrate formation. It also discussed hydrate formation kinetics and the series of hydrate formation experiments that were conducted in the presence of fluorosurfactants. Last, the paper explored the results of the study. It was concluded that anionic fluorosurfactant of FC-143 had a better promoting effect on methane hydrate formation compared with nonionic surfactant of FSN-100. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  16. Towards a "Golden Standard" for computing globin stability: Stability and structure sensitivity of myoglobin mutants.

    Kepp, Kasper P

    2015-10-01

    Fast and accurate computation of protein stability is increasingly important for e.g. protein engineering and protein misfolding diseases, but no consensus methods exist for important proteins such as globins, and performance may depend on the type of structural input given. This paper reports benchmarking of six protein stability calculators (POPMUSIC 2.1, I-Mutant 2.0, I-Mutant 3.0, CUPSAT, SDM, and mCSM) against 134 experimental stability changes for mutations of sperm-whale myoglobin. Six different high-resolution structures were used to test structure sensitivity that may impair protein calculations. The trend accuracy of the methods decreased as I-Mutant 2.0 (R=0.64-0.65), SDM (R=0.57-0.60), POPMUSIC2.1 (R=0.54-0.57), I-Mutant 3.0 (R=0.53-0.55), mCSM (R=0.35-0.47), and CUPSAT (R=0.25-0.48). The mean signed errors increased as SDMMean absolute errors increased as I-Mutant 2.0

  17. Clay-chitosan-gold nanoparticle nanohybrid: Preparation and application for assembly and direct electrochemistry of myoglobin

    Zhao Xiaojuan; Mai Zhibin; Kang Xinhuang; Dai Zong; Zou Xiaoyong

    2008-01-01

    A biocompatible nanohybrid material (clay/AuCS) based on clay, chitosan and gold nanoparticles was explored. The material could provide a favorable microenvironment for proteins to realize the direct electron transfer on glassy carbon electrodes (GCE). Myoglobin (Mb), as a model protein to investigate the nanohybrid, was immobilized between the clay/AuCS film and another clay layer. Mb in the system exhibited a pair of well-defined and quasi-reversible redox peaks at -0.160 V (vs. saturated Ag/AgCl electrode) in 0.1 M PBS (pH 7.0), corresponding to its heme Fe III /Fe II redox couples. UV-vis spectrum suggested that Mb retained its native conformation in the system. Basal plane spacing of clay obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that there was an intercalation-exfoliation-restacking process among Mb, AuCS and clay during the modified film drying. Excellent biocatalytic activity of Mb in the modified system was exemplified by the reduction of hydrogen peroxide and nitrite. The linear range of H 2 O 2 determination was from 3.9 x 10 -5 to 3.0 x 10 -3 M with a detection limit of 7.5 μM based on the signal to noise ratio of 3. The kinetic parameters such as α (charge transfer coefficient), k s (electron transfer rate constant) and K m (Michaelis-Menten constant) were evaluated to be 0.55, 2.66 ± 0.15 s -1 and 5.10 mM, respectively

  18. Mode of bindings of zinc oxide nanoparticles to myoglobin and horseradish peroxidase: A spectroscopic investigations

    Mandal, Gopa; Bhattacharya, Sudeshna; Ganguly, Tapan

    2011-07-01

    The interactions between two heme proteins myoglobin (HMb) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are investigated by using UV-vis absorption, steady state fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, FT-IR, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and circular dichroism (CD) techniques under physiological condition of pH˜7.4. The presence of mainly static mode in fluorescence quenching mechanism of HMb and HRP by ZnO nanoparticle indicates the possibility of formation of ground state complex. The processes of bindings of ZnO nanoparticles with the two proteins are spontaneous molecular interaction procedures. In both cases hydrogen bonding plays a major role. The circular dichroism (CD) spectra reveal that a helicity of the proteins is reduced by increasing ZnO nanoparticle concentration although the α-helical structures of HMb and HRP retain their identity. On binding to the ZnO nanoparticles the secondary structure of HRP molecules (or HMb molecules) remains unchanged while there is a substantial change in the environment of the tyrosin active site in case of HRP molecules and tryptophan active site in case of HMb molecules. Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) was applied for the investigation the structure of HRP adsorbed in the environment of nanoparticles on the silicon and on the bare silicon. HRP molecules adsorb and aggregate on the mica with ZnO nanoparticle. The aggregation indicates an attractive interaction among the adsorbed molecules. The molecules are randomly distributed on the bare silicon wafer. The adsorption of HRP in the environment of ZnO nanoparticle changes drastically the domains due to a strong interaction between HRP and ZnO nanoparticles. Similar situation is observed in case of HMb molecules. These findings demonstrate the efficacy of biomedical applications of ZnO nanoparticles as well as in elucidating their mechanisms of action as drugs in both human and plant systems.

  19. Myoglobin as a prognostic indicator for outcome in dogs with gastric dilatation-volvulus.

    Adamik, Katja N; Burgener, Iwan A; Kovacevic, Alan; Schulze, Sebastian P; Kohn, Barbara

    2009-06-01

    To determine whether myoglobin (Mb) is a useful prognostic indicator for outcome and to investigate any relationship between Mb and mortality in dogs with gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV). Prospective study. Veterinary teaching hospital. Seventy-two dogs with GDV. Blood sampling. Mb levels were measured at the time of diagnosis (Mbt0), 24 hours (Mbt1), and 48 hours (Mbt2) after signs of GDV were recognized. Fifty-seven dogs survived (group I) and 15 dogs did not survive (group II). Mbt0 differed significantly between groups (P=0.04). Mbt0 in group I ranged from 700 ng/mL (n=57, median 74 ng/mL), and in group II from 34 to >700 ng/mL (n=15, median 238 ng/mL). Analysis of a receiver operating characteristic curve of Mbt0 suggested that the best single cutpoint would be 168 ng/mL (sensitivity 60.0%, specificity 84.2%). Fifty percent of dogs with Mbt0>168 ng/mL were euthanized, while 88.9% with Mbt0700 ng/mL (n=55, median 123 ng/mL), and Mbt1 in group II ranged from 131 to 643 ng/mL (n=7, median 343 ng/mL) (P=0.006). Mbt2 in group I ranged from 30 to 597 ng/mL (n=54, median 101 ng/mL), and in group II from 141 to >700 ng/mL (n=8, median 203 ng/mL) (P=0.02). In this study, Mbt0 is a moderately sensitive and specific prognostic indicator. Almost 90% of the dogs below the cutpoint survived to discharge, whereas 50% with Mbt0 above the cutpoint did not survive.

  20. Increased oxidative metabolism and myoglobin expression in zebrafish muscle during chronic hypoxia

    Richard T. Jaspers

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Fish may be extremely hypoxia resistant. We investigated how muscle fibre size and oxidative capacity in zebrafish (Danio rerio adapt during severe chronic hypoxia. Zebrafish were kept for either 3 or 6 weeks under chronic constant hypoxia (CCH (10% air/90%N2 saturated water. We analyzed cross-sectional area (CSA, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH activity, capillarization, myonuclear density, myoglobin (Mb concentration and Mb mRNA expression of high and low oxidative muscle fibres. After 3 weeks of CCH, CSA, SDH activity, Mb concentration, capillary and myonuclear density of both muscle fibre types were similar as under normoxia. In contrast, staining intensity for Mb mRNA of hypoxic high oxidative muscle fibres was 94% higher than that of normoxic controls (P<0.001. Between 3 and 6 weeks of CCH, CSA of high and low oxidative muscle fibres increased by 25 and 30%, respectively. This was similar to normoxic controls. Capillary and myonuclear density were not changed by CCH. However, in high oxidative muscle fibres of fish maintained under CCH, SDH activity, Mb concentration as well as Mb mRNA content were higher by 86%, 138% and 90%, respectively, than in muscle fibres of fish kept under normoxia (P<0.001. In low oxidative muscle fibres, SDH activity, Mb and Mb mRNA content were not significantly changed. Under normoxia, the calculated interstitial oxygen tension required to prevent anoxic cores in muscle fibres (PO2crit of high oxidative muscle fibres was between 1.0 and 1.7 mmHg. These values were similar at 3 and 6 weeks CCH. We conclude that high oxidative skeletal muscle fibres of zebrafish continue to grow and increase oxidative capacity during CCH. Oxygen supply to mitochondria in these fibres may be facilitated by an increased Mb concentration, which is regulated by an increase in Mb mRNA content per myonucleus.

  1. Details of the Collagen and Elastin Architecture in the Human Limbal Conjunctiva, Tenon's Capsule and Sclera Revealed by Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Park, Choul Yong; Marando, Catherine M; Liao, Jason A; Lee, Jimmy K; Kwon, Jiwon; Chuck, Roy S

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the architecture and distribution of collagen and elastin in human limbal conjunctiva, Tenon's capsule, and sclera. The limbal conjunctiva, Tenon's capsule, and sclera of human donor corneal buttons were imaged with an inverted two-photon excited fluorescence microscope. No fixation process was necessary. The laser (Ti:sapphire) was tuned at 850 nm for two-photon excitation. Backscatter signals of second harmonic generation (SHG) and autofluorescence (AF) were collected through a 425/30-nm and a 525/45-nm emission filter, respectively. Multiple, consecutive, and overlapping (z-stack) images were acquired. Collagen signals were collected with SHG, whereas elastin signals were collected with AF. The size and density of collagen bundles varied widely depending on depth: increasing from conjunctiva to sclera. In superficial image planes, collagen bundles were image planes (episclera and superficial sclera), collagen bundles were thicker (near 100 μm in width) and densely packed. Comparatively, elastin fibers were thinner and sparse. The orientation of elastin fibers was independent of collagen fibers in superficial layers; but in deep sclera, elastin fibers wove through collagen interbundle gaps. At the limbus, both collagen and elastin fibers were relatively compact and were distributed perpendicular to the limbal annulus. Two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy has enabled us to understand in greater detail the collagen and elastin architecture of the human limbal conjunctiva, Tenon's capsule, and sclera.

  2. Fusion protein-based biofilm fabrication composed of recombinant azurin–myoglobin for dual-level biomemory application

    Lee, Taek [Research Institute for Basic Science, Sogang University, Heukseok-dong, Dongjak-gu, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yong-Ho; Yoon, Jinho [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University, Heukseok-dong, Dongjak-gu, 35 Baekbeom-ro (Sinsu-dong), Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Junhong [School of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Heukseok-dong, Dongjak-gu, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jeong-Woo, E-mail: jwchoi@sogang.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University, Heukseok-dong, Dongjak-gu, 35 Baekbeom-ro (Sinsu-dong), Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We developed the fusion protein-based biofilm on the inorganic surface. • For making the fusion protein, the recombinant azurin and the myoglobin was conjugated by the native chemical ligation method. • The developed fusion protein shows unique electrochemical property. • The proposed fusion protein biofilm appears to be a good method for dual-level biomemory device. - Abstract: In the present study, a fusion protein-based biofilm composed of a recombinant azurin–myoglobin (Azu-Myo) has been developed and confirmed its original electrochemical property for dual-level biomemory device application. For this purpose, the azurin was modified with cysteine residues for direct immobilization and conjugation. Then, the recombinant azurin was conjugated with the myoglobin via a sulfo-SMCC bifunctional linker using the chemical ligation method (CLM). The SDS-PAGE and UV–vis spectroscopy were performed to examine the fusion protein conjugates. The prepared Azu-Myo fusion protein was self-assembled onto Au substrate for the biofilm fabrication. Then, the atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to confirm the immobilization and the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was carried out to the surface analysis. Also, the cyclic voltammetry (CV) was carried out to observe an electrochemical property of fabricated biofilm. As a result, the two pair of redox potential values was obtained for dual-level biomemory device application. Then, the dual-level biomemory function was verified by the multi-potential chronoamperometry (MPCA). The results indicate a new fabrication method and material combination for advances in bioelectronic device development.

  3. Fusion protein-based biofilm fabrication composed of recombinant azurin–myoglobin for dual-level biomemory application

    Lee, Taek; Chung, Yong-Ho; Yoon, Jinho; Min, Junhong; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We developed the fusion protein-based biofilm on the inorganic surface. • For making the fusion protein, the recombinant azurin and the myoglobin was conjugated by the native chemical ligation method. • The developed fusion protein shows unique electrochemical property. • The proposed fusion protein biofilm appears to be a good method for dual-level biomemory device. - Abstract: In the present study, a fusion protein-based biofilm composed of a recombinant azurin–myoglobin (Azu-Myo) has been developed and confirmed its original electrochemical property for dual-level biomemory device application. For this purpose, the azurin was modified with cysteine residues for direct immobilization and conjugation. Then, the recombinant azurin was conjugated with the myoglobin via a sulfo-SMCC bifunctional linker using the chemical ligation method (CLM). The SDS-PAGE and UV–vis spectroscopy were performed to examine the fusion protein conjugates. The prepared Azu-Myo fusion protein was self-assembled onto Au substrate for the biofilm fabrication. Then, the atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to confirm the immobilization and the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was carried out to the surface analysis. Also, the cyclic voltammetry (CV) was carried out to observe an electrochemical property of fabricated biofilm. As a result, the two pair of redox potential values was obtained for dual-level biomemory device application. Then, the dual-level biomemory function was verified by the multi-potential chronoamperometry (MPCA). The results indicate a new fabrication method and material combination for advances in bioelectronic device development

  4. Small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans associated with mature insoluble elastin serve as binding sites for galectins.

    Itoh, Aiko; Nonaka, Yasuhiro; Ogawa, Takashi; Nakamura, Takanori; Nishi, Nozomu

    2017-11-01

    We previously reported that galectin-9 (Gal-9), an immunomodulatory animal lectin, could bind to insoluble collagen preparations and exerted direct cytocidal effects on immune cells. In the present study, we found that mature insoluble elastin is capable of binding Gal-9 and other members of the human galectin family. Lectin blot analysis of a series of commercial water-soluble elastin preparations, PES-(A) ~ PES-(E), revealed that only PES-(E) contained substances recognized by Gal-9. Gal-9-interacting substances in PES-(E) were affinity-purified, digested with trypsin and then analyzed by reversed-phase HPLC. Peptide fragments derived from five members of the small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan family, versican, lumican, osteoglycin/mimecan, prolargin, and fibromodulin, were identified by N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis. The results indicate that Gal-9 and possibly other galectins recognize glycans attached to small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans associated with insoluble elastin and also indicate the possibility that mature insoluble elastin serves as an extracellular reservoir for galectins.

  5. Deposition of insoluble elastin by pulmonary fibroblasts from patients with COPD is increased by treatment with versican siRNA.

    Wu, Lian; Zhang, Jing; Qu, Jie Ming; Bai, Chun-Xue; Merrilees, Mervyn J

    2017-01-01

    A reduced content of alveolar elastic fibers is a key feature of COPD lung. Despite continued elastogenic potential by alveolar fibroblasts in the lung affected by COPD, repair of elastic fibers does not take place, which is due to increased levels of the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan versican that inhibits the assembly of tropoelastin into fibers. In this study, primary pulmonary fibroblast cell lines from COPD and non-COPD patients were treated with a small interfering RNA (siRNA) against versican to determine if knockdown of versican could restore the deposition of insoluble elastin. Versican siRNA treatment reduced versican expression and secretion by pulmonary fibroblasts from both COPD and non-COPD patients ( P elastin in the COPD cell cultures ( P elastin (tropoelastin) in either the COPD or non-COPD cell cultures, supporting a role for versican in inhibiting assembly but not synthesis of tropoelastin. These results suggest that removal or knockdown of versican may be a possible therapeutic strategy for increasing deposition of insoluble elastin and stimulating repair of elastic fibers in COPD lung.

  6. Circulating Elastin Fragments Are Not Affected by Hepatic, Renal and Hemodynamic Changes, But Reflect Survival in Cirrhosis with TIPS.

    Nielsen, M J; Lehmann, J; Leeming, D J; Schierwagen, R; Klein, S; Jansen, C; Strassburg, C P; Bendtsen, F; Møller, S; Sauerbruch, T; Karsdal, M A; Krag, A; Trebicka, J

    2015-11-01

    Progressive fibrosis increases hepatic resistance and causes portal hypertension with complications. During progressive fibrosis remodeling and deposition of collagens and elastin occur. Elastin remodeling is crucially involved in fibrosis progression in animal models and human data. This study investigated the association of circulating elastin with the clinical outcome in cirrhotic patients with severe portal hypertension receiving transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt (TIPS). We analyzed portal and hepatic venous samples of 110 cirrhotic patients obtained at TIPS insertion and 2 weeks later. The circulating levels of elastin fragments (ELM) were determined using specific monoclonal ELISA. The relationship of ELM with clinical short-time follow-up and long-term outcome was investigated. Circulating levels of ELM showed a gradient across the liver before TIPS with higher levels in the hepatic vein. Interestingly, the circulating ELM levels remained unchanged after TIPS. The circulating levels of ELM in portal and hepatic veins correlated with platelet counts and inversely with serum sodium. Hepatic venous levels of ELM were higher in CHILD C compared to CHILD A and B and were associated with the presence of ascites. Patients with high levels of ELM in the hepatic veins before TIPS showed poorer survival. In multivariate analysis ELM levels in the hepatic veins and MELD were independent predictors of mortality in these patients. This study demonstrated that circulating levels of ELM are not associated with hemodynamic changes, but might reflect fibrosis remodeling and predict survival in patients with severe portal hypertension receiving TIPS independently of MELD.

  7. Tissue response of defined collagen-elastin scaffolds in young and adult rats with special attention to calcification

    Daamen, WF; Nillesen, STM; Hafmans, T; Veerkamp, JH; van Luyn, MJA; van Kuppevelt, TH

    Collagen-elastin scaffolds may be valuable biomaterials for tissue engineering because they combine tensile strength with elasticity. In this study, the tissue response to and the calcification of these scaffolds were evaluated. In particular, the hypothesis was tested that calcification, a common

  8. Circulating Elastin Fragments Are Not Affected by Hepatic, Renal and Hemodynamic Changes, But Reflect Survival in Cirrhosis with TIPS

    Nielsen, M J; Lehmann, J; Leeming, D J

    2015-01-01

    at TIPS insertion and 2 weeks later. The circulating levels of elastin fragments (ELM) were determined using specific monoclonal ELISA. The relationship of ELM with clinical short-time follow-up and long-term outcome was investigated. RESULTS: Circulating levels of ELM showed a gradient across the liver...

  9. Imaging and modeling of acute pressure-induced changes of collagen and elastin microarchitectures in pig and human resistance arteries

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Leurgans, Thomas M; Spronck, Bart

    2017-01-01

    digestions were applied to evaluate the loadbearing roles of collagen and elastin, respectively. The incremental elastic modulus linearly related to the straightness of adventitial collagen fibers circumferentially and longitudinally (both R(2)≥0.99), while there was a nonlinear relationship to the internal...

  10. Preparation of Photocrosslinked Fish Elastin Polypeptide/Microfibrillated Cellulose Composite Gels with Elastic Properties for Biomaterial Applications

    Shinya Yano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photocrosslinked hydrogels reinforced by microfibrillated cellulose (MFC were prepared from a methacrylate-functionalized fish elastin polypeptide and MFC dispersed in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO. First, a water-soluble elastin peptide with a molecular weight of ca. 500 g/mol from the fish bulbus arteriosus was polymerized by N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC, a condensation reagent, and then modified with 2-isocyanatoethyl methacrylate (MOI to yield a photocrosslinkable fish elastin polypeptide. The product was dissolved in DMSO and irradiated with UV light in the presence of a radical photoinitiator. We obtained hydrogels successfully by substitution of DMSO with water. The composite gel with MFC was prepared by UV irradiation of the photocrosslinkable elastin polypeptide mixed with dispersed MFC in DMSO, followed by substitution of DMSO with water. The tensile test of the composite gels revealed that the addition of MFC improved the tensile properties, and the shape of the stress–strain curve of the composite gel became more similar to the typical shape of an elastic material with an increase of MFC content. The rheology measurement showed that the elastic modulus of the composite gel increased with an increase of MFC content. The cell proliferation test on the composite gel showed no toxicity.

  11. Effect of pore size and cross-linking of a novel collagen-elastin dermal substitute on wound healing

    Boekema, B.K.H.L.; Vlig, M.; Damink, L.O.; Middelkoop, E.; Eummelen, L.; Buhren, A.V.; Ulrich, M.M.W.

    2014-01-01

    Collagen-elastin (CE) scaffolds are frequently used for dermal replacement in the treatment of full-thickness skin defects such as burn wounds. But little is known about the optimal pore size and level of cross-linking. Different formulations of dermal substitutes with unidirectional pores were

  12. Human elastin polypeptides improve the biomechanical properties of three-dimensional matrices through the regulation of elastogenesis.

    Boccafoschi, Francesca; Ramella, Martina; Sibillano, Teresa; De Caro, Liberato; Giannini, Cinzia; Comparelli, Roberto; Bandiera, Antonella; Cannas, Mario

    2015-03-01

    The replacement of diseased tissues with biological substitutes with suitable biomechanical properties is one of the most important goal in tissue engineering. Collagen represents a satisfactory choice for scaffolds. Unfortunately, the lack of elasticity represents a restriction to a wide use of collagen for several applications. In this work, we studied the effect of human elastin-like polypeptide (HELP) as hybrid collagen-elastin matrices. In particular, we studied the biomechanical properties of collagen/HELP scaffolds considering several components involved in ECM remodeling (elastin, collagen, fibrillin, lectin-like receptor, metalloproteinases) and cell phenotype (myogenin, myosin heavy chain) with particular awareness for vascular tissue engineering applications. Elastin and collagen content resulted upregulated in collagen-HELP matrices, even showing an improved structural remodeling through the involvement of proteins to a ECM remodeling activity. Moreover, the hybrid matrices enhanced the contractile activity of C2C12 cells concurring to improve the mechanical properties of the scaffold. Finally, small-angle X-ray scattering analyses were performed to enable a very detailed analysis of the matrices at the nanoscale, comparing the scaffolds with native blood vessels. In conclusion, our work shows the use of recombinant HELP, as a very promising complement able to significantly improve the biomechanical properties of three-dimensional collagen matrices in terms of tensile stress and elastic modulus. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Temperature- and pH-dependent effect of lactate on in vitro redox stability of red meat myoglobins.

    Nair, M N; Suman, S P; Li, S; Ramanathan, R; Mancini, R A

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the influence of lactate on in vitro redox stability and thermostability of beef, horse, pork, and sheep myoglobins. Lactate (200 mM) had no effect (P>0.05) on redox stability at physiological (pH7.4, 37°C) and meat (pH 5.6, 4°C) conditions. However, lactate increased (Pmeat conditions was species-specific (Pmeat condition suggests that the color stability of lactate-enhanced fresh meat is not due to direct interactions between the ingredient and the heme protein. © 2013.

  14. Resonance surface enhanced Raman optical activity of myoglobin as a result of optimized resonance surface enhanced Raman scattering conditions

    Abdali, Salim; Johannessen, Christian; Nygaard, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    at single molecule level. The results of this work, using silver nanoparticles and a laser excitation of 532 nm, became only feasible when the concentrations of nanoparticles, aggregation agent NaCl and the studied molecule were optimized in a series of systematic optimization steps. The spectral analysis...... has shown that the SERS effect behaves consequently, depending on the concentration ratio of each component, i.e., myoglobin, Ag colloids and NaCl. Accordingly, it is shown here that SERS intensity has its maximum at certain concentration of these components, whereas below or above this value...

  15. The contribution of vascular smooth muscle, elastin and collagen on the passive mechanics of porcine carotid arteries

    Kochová, P; Cimrman, R; Kuncová, J; Švíglerová, J; Miklíková, M; Liška, V; Tonar, Z

    2012-01-01

    The main components responsible for the mechanical behavior of the arterial wall are collagen, elastin, and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the medial layer. We determined the structural and mechanical changes in porcine carotid arteries after administration of Triton® X-100, elastase, and collagenase using the inflation–deflation test. The arteries were intraluminarly pressurized from 0 to 200 mmHg, and the outer diameter of the artery was measured. The pressure–strain elastic modulus was determined based on the pressure/diameter ratio. The intima–media thickness, wall thickness, thickness of the tunica adventitia layer, and the area fractions of SMCs, elastin, and collagen within the arterial wall (A A (SMC/elastin/collagen, wall)) were measured using stereological methods. The relative changes in the relevant components of the treated samples were as follows: the decrease in A A (SMC, wall) after administration of Triton® X-100 was 11% ± 7%, the decrease in A A (elastin, wall) after administration of elastase was 40% ± 22%, and the decrease in A A (collagen, wall) after the application of collagenase was 51% ± 22%. The Triton® X-100 treatment led to a decrease in the SMC content that was associated with enlargement of the arterial wall (outer diameter) for pressures up to 120 mmHg, and with mechanical stiffening of the arterial wall at higher pressures. Elastase led to a decrease in the elastin content that was associated with enlargement of the arterial wall, but not with stiffening or softening. Collagenase led to a decrease in collagen content that was associated with a change in the stiffness of the arterial wall, although the exact contribution of mechanical loading and the duration of treatment (enlargement) could not be quantified. (paper)

  16. Deposition of insoluble elastin by pulmonary fibroblasts from patients with COPD is increased by treatment with versican siRNA

    Wu L

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lian Wu,1,2 Jing Zhang,3 Jie Ming Qu,4 Chun-xue Bai,3 Mervyn J Merrilees5 1Department of Community and Health Services, Unitec, 2Department of Pharmacology & Clinical Pharmacology, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 3Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 4Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 5Department of Anatomy and Medical Imaging, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand Abstract: A reduced content of alveolar elastic fibers is a key feature of COPD lung. Despite continued elastogenic potential by alveolar fibroblasts in the lung affected by COPD, repair of elastic fibers does not take place, which is due to increased levels of the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan versican that inhibits the assembly of tropoelastin into fibers. In this study, primary pulmonary fibroblast cell lines from COPD and non-COPD patients were treated with a small interfering RNA (siRNA against versican to determine if knockdown of versican could restore the deposition of insoluble elastin. Versican siRNA treatment reduced versican expression and secretion by pulmonary fibroblasts from both COPD and non-COPD patients (P<0.01 and significantly increased deposition of insoluble elastin in the COPD cell cultures (P<0.05. The treatment, however, did not significantly affect production of soluble elastin (tropoelastin in either the COPD or non-COPD cell cultures, supporting a role for versican in inhibiting assembly but not synthesis of tropoelastin. These results suggest that removal or knockdown of versican may be a possible therapeutic strategy for increasing deposition of insoluble elastin and stimulating repair of elastic fibers in COPD lung. Keywords: pulmonary fibroblasts, COPD, elastin, versican

  17. Fire extinction utilizing carbon dioxide hydrate

    Hatakeyama, T.; Aida, E.; Yokomori, T.; Ohmura, R.; Ueda, T. [Keio Univ., Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Clathrate hydrates formed with nonflammable gases may be suitable for use as fire extinguishing agents because dissociation of the hydrates results in the temperature decrease in the combustion field and the nonflammable gases released from the dissociated hydrates prevent the supply of the oxygen to the combustion field. This paper discussed experiments in which ordinary ice and dry ice were used to evaluate the performance of CO{sub 2} hydrate as a fire extinguishing agent. The paper described the apparatus and procedure for the preparation of CO{sub 2} hydrate crystals. A schematic of the reactor to form CO{sub 2} hydrate and a photograph of CO{sub 2} hydrate crystal formed in the study were also presented. Other illustrations, photographs, and tables that were presented included a schematic diagram of the experimental apparatus used for the flame extinction experiments; a photograph of CO{sub 2} hydrate powder; sequential video graphs of the flame extinction by the supply of CO{sub 2} hydrate crystals to the methanol pool flame and the relevant illustration; and heat of CO{sub 2} hydrate dissociation, water vaporization and sublimation of dry ice. It was concluded that the critical mass of the CO{sub 2} hydrate required to extinguish a flame was much less than that of ordinary ice, indicating the superiority of CO{sub 2} hydrate to the ice. In addition, the experiments also revealed that the size of the CO{sub 2} hydrate particles had a significant effect on the performance of flame extinction. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  18. Experimental methods in cryogenic spectroscopy: Stark effect measurements in substituted myoglobin

    Moran, Bradley M.

    Dawning from well-defined tertiary structure, the active regions of enzymatic proteins exist as specifically tailored electrostatic microenvironments capable of facilitating chemical interaction. The specific influence these charge distributions have on ligand binding dynamics, and their impact on specificity, reactivity, and biological functionality, have yet to be fully understood. A quantitative determination of these intrinsic fields would offer insight towards the mechanistic aspects of protein functionality. This work seeks to investigate the internal molecular electric fields that are present at the oxygen binding site of myoglobin. Experiments are performed at 1 K on samples located within a glassy matrix, using the high-resolution technique spectral hole-burning. The internal electric field distributions can be explored by implementing a unique mathematical treatment for analyzing the effect that externally applied electric fields have on the spectral hole profiles. Precise control of the light field, the temperature, and the externally applied electric field at the site of the sample is crucial. Experimentally, the functionality of custom cryogenic temperature confocal scanning microscope was extended to allow for collection of imaging and spectral data with the ability to modulate the polarization of the light at the sample. Operation of the instrumentation was integrated into a platform allowing for seamless execution of input commands with high temporal inter-instrument resolution for collection of data streams. For the regulated control and cycling of the sample temperature. the thermal characteristics of the research Dewar were theoretically modeled to systematically predict heat flows throughout the system. A high voltage feedthrough for delivering voltages of up to 5000 V to the sample as positioned within the Dewar was developed. The burning of spectral holes with this particular experimental setup is highly repeatable. The quantum mechanical

  19. Electrochemical detection of cardiac biomarker myoglobin using polyphenol as imprinted polymer receptor.

    Ribeiro, J A; Pereira, C M; Silva, A F; Sales, M Goreti F

    2017-08-15

    An electrochemical biosensor was developed by merging the features of Molecular Imprinting technique and Screen-Printed Electrode (SPE) for the simple and fast screening of cardiac biomarker myoglobin (Myo) in point-of-care (POC). The MIP artificial receptor for Myo was prepared by electrooxidative polymerization of phenol (Ph) on a AuSPE in the presence of Myo as template molecule. The choice of the most effective protein extraction procedure from the various extraction methods tested (mildly acidic/basic solutions, pure/mixed organic solvents, solutions containing surfactants and enzymatic digestion methods), and the optimization of the thickness of the polymer film was carefully undertaken in order to improve binding characteristics of Myo to the imprinted polymer receptor and increase the sensitivity of the MIP biosensor. The film thickness was optimized by adjusting scan rate and the number of cycles during cyclic voltammetric electropolymerization of Ph. The thickness of the polyphenol nanocoating of only few nanometres (∼4.4 nm), and similar to the protein diameter, brought in significant improvements in terms of sensor sensitivity. The binding affinity of MIP receptor film was estimated by fitting the experimental data to Freundlich isotherm and a ∼8 fold increase in the binding affinity of Myo to the imprinted polymer (K F = 0.119 ± 0.002 ng -1  mL) when compared to the non-imprinted polymer (K F  = 0.015 ± 0.002 ng -1  mL) which demonstrated excellent (re)binding affinity for the imprinted protein. The incubation of the Myo MIP receptor modified electrode with increasing concentration of protein (from 0.001 ng mL -1 to 100 μg mL -1 ) resulted in a decrease of the ferro/ferricyanide redox current. LODs of 2.1 and 14 pg mL -1 were obtained from calibration curves built in neutral buffer and diluted artificial serum, respectively, using SWV technique, enabling the detection of the protein biomarker at clinically relevant levels. The

  20. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...... prehydration may occur. In the report both theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during water vapour exposure is nucleation controlled....

  1. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate–saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate–bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  2. Exploring the Properties of Genetically Engineered Silk-Elastin-Like Protein Films.

    Machado, Raul; da Costa, André; Sencadas, Vitor; Pereira, Ana Margarida; Collins, Tony; Rodríguez-Cabello, José Carlos; Lanceros-Méndez, Senentxu; Casal, Margarida

    2015-12-01

    Free standing films of a genetically engineered silk-elastin-like protein (SELP) were prepared using water and formic acid as solvents. Exposure to methanol-saturated air promoted the formation of aggregated β-strands rendering aqueous insolubility and improved the mechanical properties leading to a 10-fold increase in strain-to-failure. The films were optically clear with resistivity values similar to natural rubber and thermally stable up to 180 °C. Addition of glycerol showed to enhance the flexibility of SELP/glycerol films by interacting with SELP molecules through hydrogen bonding, interpenetrating between the polymer chains and granting more conformational freedom. This detailed characterization provides cues for future and unique applications using SELP based biopolymers. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Elastin and collagen fibre microstructure of the human aorta in ageing and disease: a review

    Tsamis, Alkiviadis; Krawiec, Jeffrey T.; Vorp, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Aortic disease is a significant cause of death in developed countries. The most common forms of aortic disease are aneurysm, dissection, atherosclerotic occlusion and ageing-induced stiffening. The microstructure of the aortic tissue has been studied with great interest, because alteration of the quantity and/or architecture of the connective fibres (elastin and collagen) within the aortic wall, which directly imparts elasticity and strength, can lead to the mechanical and functional changes associated with these conditions. This review article summarizes the state of the art with respect to characterization of connective fibre microstructure in the wall of the human aorta in ageing and disease, with emphasis on the ascending thoracic aorta and abdominal aorta where the most common forms of aortic disease tend to occur. PMID:23536538

  4. Effect of Sequence Blockiness on the Morphologies of Surface-grafted Elastin-like Polypeptides

    Albert, Julie; Sintavanon, Kornkanok; Mays, Robin; MacEwan, Sarah; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Genzer, Jan

    2014-03-01

    The inter- and intra- molecular interactions among monomeric units of copolymers and polypeptides depend strongly on monomer sequence distribution and dictate the phase behavior of these species both in solution and on surfaces. To study the relationship between sequence and phase behavior, we have designed a series of elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) with controlled monomer sequences that mimic copolymers with various co-monomer sequence distributions and attached them covalently to silicon substrates from buffer solutions at temperatures below and above the bulk ELPs' lower critical solution temperatures (LCSTs). The dependence of ELP grafting density on solution temperature was examined by ellipsometry and the resultant surface morphologies were examined in air and under water with atomic force microscopy. Depositions performed above the LCST resulted in higher grafting densities and greater surface roughness of ELPs relative to depositions carried out below the LCST. In addition, we are using gradient substrates to examine the effect of ELP grafting density on temperature responsiveness.

  5. Elastin-like polypeptides: Therapeutic applications for an emerging class of nanomedicines.

    Despanie, Jordan; Dhandhukia, Jugal P; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F; MacKay, J Andrew

    2016-10-28

    Elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) constitute a genetically engineered class of 'protein polymers' derived from human tropoelastin. They exhibit a reversible phase separation whereby samples remain soluble below a transition temperature (T t ) but form amorphous coacervates above T t . Their phase behavior has many possible applications in purification, sensing, activation, and nanoassembly. As humanized polypeptides, they are non-immunogenic, substrates for proteolytic biodegradation, and can be decorated with pharmacologically active peptides, proteins, and small molecules. Recombinant synthesis additionally allows precise control over ELP architecture and molecular weight, resulting in protein polymers with uniform physicochemical properties suited to the design of multifunctional biologics. As such, ELPs have been employed for various uses including as anti-cancer agents, ocular drug delivery vehicles, and protein trafficking modulators. This review aims to offer the reader a catalogue of ELPs, their various applications, and potential for commercialization across a broad spectrum of fields. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Cutis laxa: reduced elastin gene expression in skin fibroblast cultures as determined by hybridizations with a homologous cDNA and an exon 1-specific oligonucleotide

    Olsen, D.R.; Fazio, M.J.; Shamban, A.T.; Rosenbloom, J.; Uitto, J.

    1988-01-01

    Fibroblast cultures were established from six patients with cutis laxa, and elastin gene expression was analyzed by RNA hybridizations with a 2.5-kilobase human elastin cDNA or an exon 1-specific 35-base oligomer. Northern analyses using either probe detected mRNA transcripts of ∼ 3.5 kilobases, and no qualitative difference between the control and cutis laxa mRNAs was detected. However, quantitation of the elastin mRNA abundance by slot blot hybridizations revealed markedly reduced levels in all cutis laxa cell strains. Assuming equal translational activity of the control and cutix laxa mRNAs, the reduced mRNA levels could result in diminished elastin production, providing an explanation for the paucity of elastic fibers in the skin and other tissues in cutis laxa

  7. An Outlook on Biothermodynamics: Needs, Problems, and New Developments. I. Stability and Hydration of Proteins

    Keller, Jürgen U.

    2008-12-01

    The application of concepts, principles, and methods of thermodynamics of equilibria and processes to bioengineering systems has led to a new and growing field: engineering biothermodynamics. This article, which is meant as the first in a series, gives an outline of basic aspects, changes, and actual examples in this field. After a few introductory remarks, the basic concepts and laws of thermodynamics extended to systems with internal variables, which serve as models for biofluids and other biosystems, are given. The method of thermodynamics is then applied to the problem of thermal stability of aqueous protein solutions, especially to that of myoglobin solutions. After this, the phenomenon of hydration of proteins by adsorption and intrusion of water molecules is considered. Several other phenomena like the adsorption of proteins on solid surfaces or cell membranes and their temperature and pressure-related behavior represented by an equation of state, or the thermodynamics of bacterial solutions including chemical reactions like wine fermentation, etc., will be presented in Parts II and III of this article.

  8. Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review

    Gabitto, Jorge [Prairie View A& M University; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Methane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 1016?m3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detected by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed.

  9. Accelerated hydration of high silica cements

    Walker, Colin; Yui, Mikazu

    2012-01-01

    Current Japanese designs for high level radioactive waste (HLW) repositories anticipate the use of both bentonite (buffer and backfill material) and cement based materials. Using hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) as a grouting material is undesirable because the associated high pH buffer will have an undisputed detrimental effect on the performance of the bentonite buffer and backfill and of the host rock by changing its porosity. Instead, hydrated low pH cement (LopHC) grouting materials are being developed to provide a pH inferior or equal to 11 to reduce these detrimental effects. LopHC grouting materials use mixtures of superfine OPC (SOPC) clinker and silica fume (SF), and are referred as high silica cements (HSC). The focus of the present study was to identify the development of the unhydrated and hydrated mineral assemblage and the solution chemistry during the hydration of HSC. Since hydration experiments of cementitious materials are notably slow, a ball mill was used to accelerate hydration. This was done for two reasons. Firstly, to develop a method to rapidly hydrate cement based materials without the need for higher temperatures (which can alter the mineral assemblage), and secondly, to ensure that the end point of hydration was reached in a reasonable time frame and so to realize the final mineralogy and solution chemistry of hydrated HSC

  10. Microstructure of natural hydrate host sediments

    Jones, K.W.; Kerkar, P.B.; Mahajan, D.; Lindquist, W.B.; Feng, H.

    2007-01-01

    There is worldwide interest in the study of natural gas hydrate because of its potential impact on world energy resources, control on seafloor stability, significance as a drilling hazard and probable impact on climate as a reservoir of a major greenhouse gas. Gas hydrates can (a) be free floating in the sediment matrix (b) contact, but do not cement, existing sediment grains, or (c) actually cement and stiffen the bulk sediment. Seismic surveys, often used to prospect for hydrates over a large area, can provide knowledge of the location of large hydrate concentrations because the hydrates within the sediment pores modify seismic properties. The ability to image a sample at the grain scale and to determine the porosity, permeability and seismic profile is of great interest since these parameters can help in determining the location of hydrates with certainty. We report here on an investigation of the structure of methane hydrate sediments at the grain-size scale using the synchrotron radiation-based computed microtomography (CMT) technique. Work has started on the measurements of the changes occurring as tetrahydrofuran hydrate, a surrogate for methane hydrate, is formed in the sediment

  11. Enzymatic cross-linking of human recombinant elastin (HELP) as biomimetic approach in vascular tissue engineering.

    Bozzini, Sabrina; Giuliano, Liliana; Altomare, Lina; Petrini, Paola; Bandiera, Antonella; Conconi, Maria Teresa; Farè, Silvia; Tanzi, Maria Cristina

    2011-12-01

    The use of polymers naturally occurring in the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a promising strategy in regenerative medicine. If compared to natural ECM proteins, proteins obtained by recombinant DNA technology have intrinsic advantages including reproducible macromolecular composition, sequence and molecular mass, and overcoming the potential pathogens transmission related to polymers of animal origin. Among ECM-mimicking materials, the family of recombinant elastin-like polymers is proposed for drug delivery applications and for the repair of damaged elastic tissues. This work aims to evaluate the potentiality of a recombinant human elastin-like polypeptide (HELP) as a base material of cross-linked matrices for regenerative medicine. The cross-linking of HELP was accomplished by the insertion of cross-linking sites, glutamine and lysine, in the recombinant polymer and generating ε-(γ-glutamyl) lysine links through the enzyme transglutaminase. The cross-linking efficacy was estimated by infrared spectroscopy. Freeze-dried cross-linked matrices showed swelling ratios in deionized water (≈2500%) with good structural stability up to 24 h. Mechanical compression tests, performed at 37°C in wet conditions, in a frequency sweep mode, indicated a storage modulus of 2/3 kPa, with no significant changes when increasing number of cycles or frequency. These results demonstrate the possibility to obtain mechanically resistant hydrogels via enzymatic crosslinking of HELP. Cytotoxicity tests of cross-linked HELP were performed with human umbilical vein endothelial cells, by use of transwell filter chambers for 1-7 days, or with its extracts in the opportune culture medium for 24 h. In both cases no cytotoxic effects were observed in comparison with the control cultures. On the whole, the results suggest the potentiality of this genetically engineered HELP for regenerative medicine applications, particularly for vascular tissue regeneration.

  12. Electrospun silk-elastin-like fibre mats for tissue engineering applications

    Machado, Raul; Da Costa, André; Padrão, Jorge; Gomes, Andreia; Casal, Margarida; Sencadas, Vitor; Costa, Carlos M; Lanceros-Méndez, Senentxu; Garcia-Arévalo, Carmen; Rodríguez-Cabello, José Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Protein-based polymers are present in a wide variety of organisms fulfilling structural and mechanical roles. Advances in protein engineering and recombinant DNA technology allow the design and production of recombinant protein-based polymers (rPBPs) with an absolute control of its composition. Although the application of recombinant proteins as biomaterials is still an emerging technology, the possibilities are limitless and far superior to natural or synthetic materials, as the complexity of the structural design can be fully customized. In this work, we report the electrospinning of two new genetically engineered silk-elastin-like proteins (SELPs) consisting of alternate silk- and elastin-like blocks. Electrospinning was performed with formic acid and aqueous solutions at different concentrations without addition of further agents. The size and morphology of the electrospun structures was characterized by scanning electron microscopy showing its dependence on the concentration and solvent used. Treatment with methanol-saturated air was employed to stabilize the structure and promote water insolubility through a time-dependent conversion of random coils into β-sheets (FTIR). The resultant methanol-treated electrospun mats were characterized for swelling degree (570–720%), water vapour transmission rate (1083 g/m 2 /day) and mechanical properties (modulus of elasticity ∼126 MPa). Furthermore, the methanol-treated SELP fibre mats showed no cytotoxicity and were able to support adhesion and proliferation of normal human skin fibroblasts. Adhesion was characterized by a filopodia-mediated mechanism. These results demonstrate that SELP fibre mats can provide promising solutions for the development of novel biomaterials suitable for tissue engineering applications. (paper)

  13. Elastin-like Polypeptide Linkers for Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    Ott, Wolfgang; Jobst, Markus A; Bauer, Magnus S; Durner, Ellis; Milles, Lukas F; Nash, Michael A; Gaub, Hermann E

    2017-06-27

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is by now well established as a standard technique in biophysics and mechanobiology. In recent years, the technique has benefitted greatly from new approaches to bioconjugation of proteins to surfaces. Indeed, optimized immobilization strategies for biomolecules and refined purification schemes are being steadily adapted and improved, which in turn has enhanced data quality. In many previously reported SMFS studies, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was used to anchor molecules of interest to surfaces and/or cantilever tips. The limitation, however, is that PEG exhibits a well-known trans-trans-gauche to all-trans transition, which results in marked deviation from standard polymer elasticity models such as the worm-like chain, particularly at elevated forces. As a result, the assignment of unfolding events to protein domains based on their corresponding amino acid chain lengths is significantly obscured. Here, we provide a solution to this problem by implementing unstructured elastin-like polypeptides as linkers to replace PEG. We investigate the suitability of tailored elastin-like polypeptides linkers and perform direct comparisons to PEG, focusing on attributes that are critical for single-molecule force experiments such as linker length, monodispersity, and bioorthogonal conjugation tags. Our results demonstrate that by avoiding the ambiguous elastic response of mixed PEG/peptide systems and instead building the molecular mechanical systems with only a single bond type with uniform elastic properties, we improve data quality and facilitate data analysis and interpretation in force spectroscopy experiments. The use of all-peptide linkers allows alternative approaches for precisely defining elastic properties of proteins linked to surfaces.

  14. 3D silicon doped hydroxyapatite scaffolds decorated with Elastin-like Recombinamers for bone regenerative medicine.

    Vila, Mercedes; García, Ana; Girotti, Alessandra; Alonso, Matilde; Rodríguez-Cabello, Jose Carlos; González-Vázquez, Arlyng; Planell, Josep A; Engel, Elisabeth; Buján, Julia; García-Honduvilla, Natalio; Vallet-Regí, María

    2016-11-01

    The current study reports on the manufacturing by rapid prototyping technique of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds based on silicon substituted hydroxyapatite with Elastin-like Recombinamers (ELRs) functionalized surfaces. Silicon doped hydroxyapatite (Si-HA), with Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 5.7 (SiO 4 ) 0.3 (OH) 1.7 h 0.3 nominal formula, was surface functionalized with two different types of polymers designed by genetic engineering: ELR-RGD that contain cell attachment specific sequences and ELR-SN A 15/RGD with both hydroxyapatite and cells domains that interact with the inorganic phase and with the cells, respectively. These hybrid materials were subjected to in vitro assays in order to clarify if the ELRs coating improved the well-known biocompatible and bone regeneration properties of calcium phosphates materials. The in vitro tests showed that there was a total and homogeneous colonization of the 3D scaffolds by Bone marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (BMSCs). In addition, the BMSCs were viable and able to proliferate and differentiate into osteoblasts. Bone tissue engineering is an area of increasing interest because its main applications are directly related to the rising life expectancy of the population, which promotes higher rates of several bone pathologies, so innovative strategies are needed for bone tissue regeneration therapies. Here we use the rapid prototyping technology to allow moulding ceramic 3D scaffolds and we use different bio-polymers for the functionalization of their surfaces in order to enhance the biological response. Combining the ceramic material (silicon doped hydroxyapatite, Si-HA) and the Elastin like Recombinamers (ELRs) polymers with the presence of the integrin-mediate adhesion domain alone or in combination with SNA15 peptide that possess high affinity for hydroxyapatite, provided an improved Bone marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (BMSCs) differentiation into osteoblastic linkage. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier

  15. A dietary supplement improves facial photoaging and skin sebum, hydration and tonicity modulating serum fibronectin, neutrophil elastase 2, hyaluronic acid and carbonylated proteins.

    Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Laurino, Carmen; Palmieri, Beniamino; Iannitti, Tommaso

    2015-03-01

    Excessive exposure to the sun can cause severe photoaging as early as the second decade of life resulting in a loss of physiological elastic fiber functions. We designed a first study to assess differences in facial skin pH, sebum, elasticity, hydration and tonicity and serum levels of fibronectin, elastin, neutrophil elastase 2, hyaluronic acid and carbonylated proteins between patients affected by facial photoaging and healthy controls. In a second study we tested the hypothesis that a dietary supplement would improve facial photoaging, also promoting changes in the above mentioned skin and serum parameters. In the first study we enrolled 30 women [age: 47.5 ± 1.6 years (mean ± standard error of the mean)] affected by moderate facial photoaging (4 cm ≤ Visual Analogue Scale (VAS)Skin Tester was used to analyze differences in facial skin parameters between patients affected by facial photoaging and healthy controls. Skin Tester was also used to assess the effect of VISCODERM Pearls on facial skin parameters and compared with placebo 2 weeks after the end of treatment. Serum levels of fibronectin, elastin, neutrophil elastase 2, hyaluronic acid and carbonylated proteins were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in the first cohort of patients affected by facial photoaging and healthy controls and, at baseline and 2 weeks after the end of treatment, in the second cohort of patients who underwent treatment with VISCODERM Pearls and placebo. VAS photoaging score was higher in patients affected by photoaging, if compared with healthy controls (p hydration and tonicity were decreased in patients affected by photoaging, if compared with healthy controls (all p hydration and tonicity were increased in the active treatment group vs. placebo (p skin hydration, tonicity and elasticity and increased skin pH and sebum. Treatment with the dietary supplement VISCODERM Pearls significantly improved VAS photoaging score and skin hydration, sebum and tonicity 2 weeks

  16. Application of empirical hydration distribution functions around polar atoms for assessing hydration structures of proteins

    Matsuoka, Daisuke; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Empirical distribution functions of water molecules in protein hydration are made. ► The functions measure how hydrogen-bond geometry in hydration deviate from ideal. ► The functions assess experimentally identified hydration structures of protein. - Abstract: To quantitatively characterize hydrogen-bond geometry in local hydration structures of proteins, we constructed a set of empirical hydration distribution functions (EHDFs) around polar protein atoms in the main and side chains of 11 types of hydrophilic amino acids (D. Matsuoka, M. Nakasako, Journal of Physical Chemistry B 113 (2009) 11274). The functions are the ensemble average of possible hydration patterns around the polar atoms, and describe the anisotropic deviations from ideal hydrogen bond geometry. In addition, we defined probability distribution function of hydration water molecules (PDFH) over the hydrophilic surface of a protein as the sum of EHDFs of solvent accessible polar protein atoms. The functions envelop most of hydration sites identified in crystal structures of proteins (D. Matsuoka, M. Nakasako, Journal of Physical Chemistry B 114 (2010) 4652). Here we propose the application of EHDFs and PDFHs for assessing crystallographically identified hydration structures of proteins. First, hydration water molecules are classified with respect to the geometry in hydrogen bonds in referring EHDFs. Difference Fourier electron density map weighted by PDFH of protein is proposed to identify easily density peaks as candidates of hydration water molecules. A computer program implementing those ideas was developed and used for assessing hydration structures of proteins

  17. Waters of Hydration of Cupric Hydrates: A Comparison between Heating and Absorbance Methods

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2011-01-01

    The empirical formulas of four cupric hydrates are determined by measuring the absorbance in aqueous solution. The Beer-Lambert Law is verified by constructing a calibration curve of absorbance versus known Cu[superscript 2+](aq) concentration. A solution of the unknown hydrate is prepared by using 0.2-0.3 g of hydrate, and water is added such…

  18. Hydration in soccer: a review

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. The rates that carbohydrate and water are absorbed by the organism are limited by the rates of gastric emptying and intestinal absorption. The composition of drinks offered to the players should be influenced by the relative importance of the need of supplying carbohydrates or water; it should be remembered that the depletion of carbohydrate can result in fatigue and decrease of performance, but it is not usually a life-threatening condition. The addition of carbohydrate in these drinks increases the concentrations of blood glucose, increases the use of external fuel through the increase of the glucose oxidation in the muscles and it spares muscle glycogen. So, the ingestion of carbohydrate before and during the exercise can delay the emergence of fatigue and increase the players' performance. Several tactics can be used to avoid dehydration, like hyperhydration before exercise and player's acclimatization. The ideal situation to restore the player's fluid losses is between the sessions of exercises. Since soccer is a sport with quite peculiar characteristics related to hydration, the players should be concerned and educated about the importance of fluid ingestion before, during and after the exercise.

  19. Clinical evaluation of the CARDIAC STATus, a rapid immunochromatographic assay for simultaneous detection of elevated concentrations of CK-MB and myoglobin in whole blood

    Schouten, Y.; de Winter, R. J.; Gorgels, J. P.; Koster, R. W.; Adams, R.; Sanders, G. T.

    1998-01-01

    We studied the performance of the CARDIAC STATus, a new rapid, easy to perform qualitative whole blood bedside test for detection of elevated CK-MB and myoglobin in the emergency room. Blood samples from 182 consecutive patients with chest pain were drawn on admission and at five and seven hours

  20. What Is the True Color of Fresh Meat? A Biophysical Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Investigating the Effects of Ligand Binding on Myoglobin Using Optical, EPR, and NMR Spectroscopy

    Linenberger, Kimberly; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Crowder, Michael W.; McCarrick, Robert; Lorigan, Gary A.; Tierney, David L.

    2011-01-01

    With an increased focus on integrated upper-level laboratories, we present an experiment integrating concepts from inorganic, biological, and physical chemistry content areas. Students investigate the effects of ligand strength on the spectroscopic properties of the heme center in myoglobin using UV-vis, [superscript 1]H NMR, and EPR…

  1. Gas Hydrates | Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys

    Preliminary Report - Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrates, Volume 204 Initial Report Mallik 2002 GSC Bulletin 585 : Scientific results from the Mallik 2002 gas hydrate production well program Offshore gas hydrate sample

  2. Measurement of cross-linked elastin synthesis in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis using a highly sensitive assay for desmosine and isodesmosine

    Cantor, J.O.; Osman, M.; Keller, S.; Cerreta, J.M.; Mandl, I.; Turino, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Cross-linked elastin synthesis was measured in the intratracheal bleomycin model of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis by incorporation of 14C-lysine into the elastin-specific crosslinks, desmosine and isodesmosine. Detection of the labeled crosslinks was facilitated by development of a highly sensitive assay utilizing thin-layer electrophoresis. The results indicate that crosslinked elastin synthesis is significantly elevated from controls (p less than 0.05) at 1 to 3 weeks after exposure to bleomycin and returns to normal by 5 weeks. The increases in labeled elastin synthesis are not directly related to changes in either total lung protein synthesis or the pool size of the 14C-lysine. In comparison with collagen and glycosaminoglycan synthesis in this model of lung injury, maximal increases in cross-linked elastin formation occur later, but overlap with the elevated synthesis of these other connective tissue components. The marked increase from normal in cross-linked elastin synthesis in this model suggests that this tissue component is an important part of the fibrotic response of the pulmonary parenchyma and may play a role in the observed alterations in lung structure and function

  3. Simulation and Characterization of Methane Hydrate Formation

    Dhakal, S.; Gupta, I.

    2017-12-01

    The ever rising global energy demand dictates human endeavor to explore and exploit new and innovative energy sources. As conventional oil and gas reserves deplete, we are constantly looking for newer sources for sustainable energy. Gas hydrates have long been discussed as the next big energy resource to the earth. Its global occurrence and vast quantity of natural gas stored is one of the main reasons for such interest in its study and exploration. Gas hydrates are solid crystalline substances with trapped molecules of gas inside cage-like crystals of water molecules. Gases such as methane, ethane, propane and carbon dioxide can form hydrates but in natural state, methane hydrates are the most common. Subsurface geological conditions with high pressure and low temperature favor the formation and stability of gas hydrates. While the occurrence and potential of gas hydrates as energy source has long been studied, there are still gaps in knowledge, especially in the quantitative research of gas hydrate formation and reservoir characterization. This study is focused on exploring and understanding the geological setting in which gas hydrates are formed and the subsequent changes in rock characteristics as they are deposited. It involves the numerical simulation of methane gas flow through fault to form hydrates. The models are representative of the subsurface geologic setting of Gulf of Mexico with a fault through layers of shale and sandstone. Hydrate formation simulated is of thermogenic origin. The simulations are conducted using TOUGH+HYDRATE, a numerical code developed at the Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory for modeling multiphase flow through porous medium. Simulation results predict that as the gas hydrates form in the pores of the model, the porosity, permeability and other rock properties are altered. Preliminary simulation results have shown that hydrates begin to form in the fault zone and gradually in the sandstone layers. The increase in hydrate

  4. Formation rate of natural gas hydrate

    Mork, Marit

    2002-07-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 deg C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted to hydrate. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by gas injection rate and pressure. The effect of stirring rate is less significant and subcooling has no observable effect on the formation rate. Hydrate crystal concentration and gas composition do not influence the hydrate formation rate. Observations of produced hydrate crystals indicate that the crystals are elongated, about 5 micron in diameter and 10 micron long. Analysis of the results shows that the rate of hydrate formation is dominated by gas-liquid mass transfer. A mass transfer model, the bubble-to-crystal model, was developed for the hydrate formation rate in a continuous stirred tank reactor, given in terms of concentration driving force and an overall mass transfer coefficient. The driving force is the difference between the gas concentration at the gas-liquid interface and at the hydrate crystal surface. These concentrations correspond to the solubility of gas in water at experimental temperature and pressure and the solubility of gas at hydrate equilibrium temperature and experimental pressure, respectively. The overall mass transfer coefficient is expressed in terms of superficial gas velocity and impeller power consumption, parameters commonly used in study of stirred tank reactors. Experiments and modeling show that the stirred tank reactor has a considerable potential for increased production capacity. However, at higher hydrate production rates the

  5. Structure-function paradigm in human myoglobin: how a single-residue substitution affects NO reactivity at low pO2.

    Scorciapino, Mariano Andrea; Spiga, Enrico; Vezzoli, Alessandra; Mrakic-Sposta, Simona; Russo, Rosaria; Fink, Bruno; Casu, Mariano; Gussoni, Maristella; Ceccarelli, Matteo

    2013-05-22

    This work is focused on the two more expressed human myoglobin isoforms. In the literature, their different overexpression in high-altitude natives was proposed to be related to alternative/complementary functions in hypoxia. Interestingly, they differ only at residue-54, lysine or glutamate, which is external and far from the main binding site. In order to ascertain whether these two almost identical myoglobins might exert different functions and to contribute to a deeper understanding about myoglobin's oxygen-level dependent functioning, they have been compared with respect to dynamics, heme electronic structure, and NO reactivity at different O2 levels. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was employed to investigate the electronic structure of the nitrosyl-form, obtaining fundamental clues about a different bond interaction between the heme-iron and the proximal histidine and highlighting striking differences in NO reactivity, especially at a very low pO2. The experimental results well matched with the information provided by molecular dynamics simulations, which showed a significantly different dynamics for the two proteins only in the absence of O2. The single mutation differentiating the two myoglobins resulted in strongly affecting the plasticity of the CD-region (C-helix-loop-D-helix), whose fluctuations, being coupled to the solvent, were found to be correlated with the dynamics of the distal binding site. In the absence of O2, on the one hand a significantly different probability for the histidine-gate opening has been shown by MD simulations, and on the other a different yield of myoglobin-NO formation was experimentally observed through EPR.

  6. Free energy of hydration of niobium oxide

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Some of the glasses being formulated by SRTC researchers contain niobium oxide. In this report, the free energy of hydration of the oxide is calculated from the free energies of formation of the oxide, the hydroxide, and water. This value can be used in calculations of the free energy of hydration of glasses containing niobium

  7. Investigations into surfactant/gas hydrate relationship

    Rogers, Rudy; Zhang, Guochang; Dearman, Jennifer; Woods, Charles [Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Gas hydrates have unique physical properties portending useful industrial applications of gas storage, gas separation, or water desalination. When gas hydrates were found in the early 1990s to occur naturally and abundantly in seafloors, three other primary interests and concerns emerged: potential new energy source, climate threat from their greenhouse gases, and seafloor instabilities. This paper presents research showing how anionic synthetic surfactants helped develop an industrial gas hydrate storage process for natural gas and how naturally-occurring in-situ anionic biosurfactants influence the formation and placement of gas hydrates in ocean sediments. The catalytic effects, mechanisms, and surface specificities imparted by synthetic surfactants in the gas storage process and imparted by biosurfactants in porous media are discussed. The Bacillus subtilis bacterium that is indigenous to gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico was cultured in the laboratory. Its biosurfactant was separated and found to catalyze gas hydrates in porous media. The experiments indicate that seafloor-biosurfactants can be produced rapidly in-situ to achieve threshold concentrations whereby hydrates are promoted. The biosurfactants accumulate and promote hydrate formation on specific mineral surfaces such as sodium montmorillonite. (author)

  8. 75 FR 9886 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    2010-03-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane... the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential...

  9. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  10. Multicomponent modelling of Portland cement hydration reactions

    Ukrainczyk, N.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    The prospect of cement and concrete technologies depends on more in depth understanding of cement hydration reactions. Hydration reaction models simulate the development of the microstructures that can finally be used to estimate the cement based material properties that influence performance and

  11. Acute Myocardial Infarction and Pulmonary Diseases Result in Two Different Degradation Profiles of Elastin as Quantified by Two Novel ELISAs

    Skjøt-Arkil, Helene; Clausen, Rikke E; Rasmussen, Lars M

    2013-01-01

    and ELM-2 ELISAs was evaluated in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), no AMI, high coronary calcium, or low coronary calcium. The serological release of ELM-2 in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) was compared to controls. RESULTS......BACKGROUND: Elastin is a signature protein of the arteries and lungs, thus it was hypothesized that elastin is subject to enzymatic degradation during cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. The aim was to investigate if different fragments of the same protein entail different information associated...... and no correlation was observed between ELM-2 and ELM. ELM-2 was not elevated in the COPD and IPF patients and was not correlated to ELM. ELM was shown to be correlated with smoking habits (ppulmonary diseases...

  12. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the

  13. Experimental Setup to Characterize Bentonite Hydration Processes

    Bru, A.; Casero, D.; Pastor, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    We present an experimental setup to follow-up the hydration process of a bentonite. Clay samples, of 2 cm x 12 cm x 12 cm, were made and introduced in a Hele-Shaw cell with two PMM windows and two steel frames. In hydration experiments, a fluid enters by an orifice in the frame, located both at the top and the bottom of the cell, to perform hydration in both senses. To get a uniform hydration we place a diffuser near the orifice. Volume influxes in hydration cells are registered in time. The evolution of the developed interface was recorded on a videotape. The video cameras was fixed to a holder so that the vertical direction in the monitor was the same as the direction of the larger extension of the cell. (Author) 6 refs

  14. Volume of hydration in terminal cancer patients.

    Bruera, E; Belzile, M; Watanabe, S; Fainsinger, R L

    1996-03-01

    In this retrospective study we reviewed the volume and modality of hydration of consecutive series of terminal cancer patients in two different settings. In a palliative care unit 203/290 admitted patients received subcutaneous hydration for 12 +/- 8 days at a daily volume of 1015 +/- 135 ml/day. At the cancer center, 30 consecutive similar patients received intravenous hydration for 11.5 +/- 5 days (P > 0.2) but at a daily volume of 2080 +/- 720 ml/day (P palliative care unit patients required discontinuation of hydration because of complications. Hypodermoclysis was administered mainly as a continuous infusion, an overnight infusion, or in one to three 1-h boluses in 62 (31%), 98 (48%) and 43 (21%) patients, respectively. Our findings suggest that, in some settings, patients may be receiving excessive volumes of hydration by less comfortable routes such as the intravenous route. Increased education and research in this area are badly needed.

  15. Hydration shells exchange charge with their protein

    Abitan, Haim; Lindgård, Per-Anker; Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2010-01-01

    . In our experiments, the amplitude of an ultrasonic pressure wave is gradually increased (0–20 atm) while we simultaneously measure the Raman spectra from the hydrated protein (β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme). We detected two types of spectral changes: first, up to 70% increase in the intensity......Investigation of the interaction between a protein and its hydration shells is an experimental and theoretical challenge. Here, we used ultrasonic pressure waves in aqueous solutions of a protein to explore the conformational states of the protein and its interaction with its hydration shells...... the presence of an ultrasonic pressure, a protein and its hydration shells are in thermodynamic and charge equilibrium, i.e. a protein and its hydration shells exchange charges. The ultrasonic wave disrupts these equilibria which are regained within 30–45 min after the ultrasonic pressure is shut off....

  16. Thermoresponsive self-assembly of short elastin-like polypentapeptides and their poly(ethylene glycol) derivatives

    Pechar, Michal; Brus, Jiří; Kostka, Libor; Koňák, Čestmír; Urbanová, Martina; Šlouf, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2007), s. 56-69 ISSN 1616-5187 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/05/2255; GA AV ČR IAA100500501 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : elastin -like peptides * self-assembly * poly(ethylene glycol) Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.831, year: 2007

  17. Role of Matrix Metalloproteinases-1 and -2 in Interleukin-13–Suppressed Elastin in Airway Fibroblasts in Asthma

    Slade, David; Church, Tony D.; Francisco, Dave; Heck, Karissa; Sigmon, R. Wesley; Ghio, Michael; Murillo, Anays; Firszt, Rafael; Lugogo, Njira L.; Que, Loretta; Sunday, Mary E.; Kraft, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Elastin synthesis and degradation in the airway and lung parenchyma contribute to airway mechanics, including airway patency and elastic recoil. IL-13 mediates many features of asthma pathobiology, including airway remodeling, but the effects of IL-13 on elastin architecture in the airway wall are not known. We hypothesized that IL-13 modulates elastin expression in airway fibroblasts from subjects with allergic asthma. Twenty-five subjects with mild asthma (FEV1, 89 ± 3% predicted) and 30 normal control subjects (FEV1, 102 ± 2% predicted) underwent bronchoscopy with endobronchial biopsy. Elastic fibers were visualized in airway biopsy specimens using Weigert’s resorcin-fuchsin elastic stain. Airway fibroblasts were exposed to IL-13; a pan-matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor (GM6001); specific inhibitors to MMP-1, -2, -3, and -8; and combinations of IL-13 with MMP inhibitors in separate conditions in serum-free media for 48 hours. Elastin (ELN) expression as well as MMP secretion and activity were quantified. Results of this study show that elastic fiber staining of airway biopsy tissue was significantly associated with methacholine PC20 (i.e., the provocative concentration of methacholine resulting in a 20% fall in FEV1 levels) in patients with asthma. IL-13 significantly suppressed ELN expression in asthmatic airway fibroblasts as compared with normal control fibroblasts. The effect of IL-13 on ELN expression was significantly correlated with postbronchodilator FEV1/FVC in patients with asthma. MMP inhibition significantly stimulated ELN expression in patients with asthma as compared with normal control subjects. Specific inhibition of MMP-1 and MMP-2, but not MMP-3 or MMP-8, reversed the IL-13–induced suppression of ELN expression. In asthma, MMP-1 and MMP-2 mediate IL-13–induced suppression of ELN expression in airway fibroblasts. PMID:26074138

  18. Role of Matrix Metalloproteinases-1 and -2 in Interleukin-13-Suppressed Elastin in Airway Fibroblasts in Asthma.

    Ingram, Jennifer L; Slade, David; Church, Tony D; Francisco, Dave; Heck, Karissa; Sigmon, R Wesley; Ghio, Michael; Murillo, Anays; Firszt, Rafael; Lugogo, Njira L; Que, Loretta; Sunday, Mary E; Kraft, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Elastin synthesis and degradation in the airway and lung parenchyma contribute to airway mechanics, including airway patency and elastic recoil. IL-13 mediates many features of asthma pathobiology, including airway remodeling, but the effects of IL-13 on elastin architecture in the airway wall are not known. We hypothesized that IL-13 modulates elastin expression in airway fibroblasts from subjects with allergic asthma. Twenty-five subjects with mild asthma (FEV1, 89 ± 3% predicted) and 30 normal control subjects (FEV1, 102 ± 2% predicted) underwent bronchoscopy with endobronchial biopsy. Elastic fibers were visualized in airway biopsy specimens using Weigert's resorcin-fuchsin elastic stain. Airway fibroblasts were exposed to IL-13; a pan-matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor (GM6001); specific inhibitors to MMP-1, -2, -3, and -8; and combinations of IL-13 with MMP inhibitors in separate conditions in serum-free media for 48 hours. Elastin (ELN) expression as well as MMP secretion and activity were quantified. Results of this study show that elastic fiber staining of airway biopsy tissue was significantly associated with methacholine PC20 (i.e., the provocative concentration of methacholine resulting in a 20% fall in FEV1 levels) in patients with asthma. IL-13 significantly suppressed ELN expression in asthmatic airway fibroblasts as compared with normal control fibroblasts. The effect of IL-13 on ELN expression was significantly correlated with postbronchodilator FEV1/FVC in patients with asthma. MMP inhibition significantly stimulated ELN expression in patients with asthma as compared with normal control subjects. Specific inhibition of MMP-1 and MMP-2, but not MMP-3 or MMP-8, reversed the IL-13-induced suppression of ELN expression. In asthma, MMP-1 and MMP-2 mediate IL-13-induced suppression of ELN expression in airway fibroblasts.

  19. Acute Myocardial Infarction and Pulmonary Diseases Result in Two Different Degradation Profiles of Elastin as Quantified by Two Novel ELISAs.

    Helene Skjøt-Arkil

    Full Text Available Elastin is a signature protein of the arteries and lungs, thus it was hypothesized that elastin is subject to enzymatic degradation during cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. The aim was to investigate if different fragments of the same protein entail different information associated to two different diseases and if these fragments have the potential of being diagnostic biomarkers.Monoclonal antibodies were raised against an identified fragment (the ELM-2 neoepitope generated at the amino acid position '552 in elastin by matrix metalloproteinase (MMP -9/-12. A newly identified ELM neoepitope was generated by the same proteases but at amino acid position '441. The distribution of ELM-2 and ELM, in human arterial plaques and fibrotic lung tissues were investigated by immunohistochemistry. A competitive ELISA for ELM-2 was developed. The clinical relevance of the ELM and ELM-2 ELISAs was evaluated in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI, no AMI, high coronary calcium, or low coronary calcium. The serological release of ELM-2 in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF was compared to controls.ELM and ELM-2 neoepitopes were both localized in diseased carotid arteries and fibrotic lungs. In the cardiovascular cohort, ELM-2 levels were 66% higher in serum from AMI patients compared to patients with no AMI (p<0.01. Levels of ELM were not significantly increased in these patients and no correlation was observed between ELM-2 and ELM. ELM-2 was not elevated in the COPD and IPF patients and was not correlated to ELM. ELM was shown to be correlated with smoking habits (p<0.01.The ELM-2 neoepitope was related to AMI whereas the ELM neoepitope was related to pulmonary diseases. These results indicate that elastin neoepitopes generated by the same proteases but at different amino acid sites provide different tissue-related information depending on the disease in question.

  20. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of collagen and elastin in annulus fibrosus of the physiologic and scoliotic intervertebral discs.

    Kobielarz, Magdalena; Szotek, Sylwia; Głowacki, Maciej; Dawidowicz, Joanna; Pezowicz, Celina

    2016-09-01

    The biophysical properties of the annulus fibrosus of the intervertebral disc are determined by collagen and elastin fibres. The progression of scoliosis is accompanied by a number of pathological changes concerning these structural proteins. This is a major cause of dysfunction of the intervertebral disc. The object of the study were annulus fibrosus samples excised from intervertebral discs of healthy subjects and patients treated surgically for scoliosis in the thoracolumbar or lumbar spine. The research material was subjected to structural analysis by light microscopy and quantitative analysis of the content of collagen types I, II, III and IV as well as elastin by immunoenzymatic test (ELISA). A statistical analysis was conducted to assess the impact of the sampling site (Mann-Whitney test, α=0.05) and scoliosis (Wilcoxon matched pairs test, α=0.05) on the obtained results. The microscopic studies conducted on scoliotic annulus fibrosus showed a significant architectural distortion of collagen and elastin fibres. Quantitative biochemical assays demonstrated region-dependent distribution of only collagen types I and II in the case of healthy intervertebral discs whereas in the case of scoliotic discs region-dependent distribution concerned all examined proteins of the extracellular matrix. Comparison of scoliotic and healthy annulus fibrosus revealed a significant decrease in the content of collagen type I and elastin as well as a slight increase in the proportion of collagen types III and IV. The content of collagen type II did not differ significantly between both groups. The observed anomalies are a manifestation of degenerative changes affecting annulus fibrosus of the intervertebral disc in patients suffering from scoliosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated

  2. One-stage reconstruction of soft tissue defects with the sandwich technique: Collagen-elastin dermal template and skin grafts

    Uwe Wollina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : A full-thickness soft tissue defect closure often needs complex procedures. The use of dermal templates can be helpful in improving the outcome. Objective : The objective was to evaluate a sandwich technique combining the dermal collagen-elastin matrix with skin grafts in a one-stage procedure. Materials and Methods : Twenty-three patients with 27 wounds were enrolled in this prospective single-centre observational study. The mean age was 74.8 ± 17.2 years. Included were full-thickness defects with exposed bone, cartilage and/ or tendons. The dermal collagen-elastin matrix was applied onto the wound bed accomplished by skin transplants, i.e. ′sandwich′ transplantation. In six wounds, the transplants were treated with intermittent negative pressure therapy. Results : The size of defects was ≤875 cm 2 . The use of the dermal template resulted in a complete and stable granulation in 100% of wounds. Seventeen defects showed a complete closure and 19 achieved a complete granulation with an incomplete closure. There was a marked pain relief. No adverse events were noted due to the dermal template usage. Conclusions : Sandwich transplantation with the collagen-elastin matrix is a useful tool when dealing with full-thickness soft tissue defects with exposed bone, cartilage or tendons.

  3. Alternative splicing of human elastin mRNA indicated by sequence analysis of cloned genomic and complementary DNA

    Indik, Z.; Yeh, H.; Ornstein-goldstein, N.; Sheppard, P.; Anderson, N.; Rosenbloom, J.C.; Peltonen, L.; Rosenbloom, J.

    1987-01-01

    Poly(A) + RNA, isolated from a single 7-mo fetal human aorta, was used to synthesize cDNA by the RNase H method, and the cDNA was inserted into λgt10. Recombinant phage containing elastin sequences were identified by hybridization with cloned, exon-containing fragments of the human elastin gene. Three clones containing inserts of 3.3, 2.7, and 2.3 kilobases were selected for further analysis. Three overlapping clones containing 17.8 kilobases of the human elastin gene were also isolated from genomic libraries. Complete sequence analysis of the six clones demonstrated that: (i) the cDNA encompassed the entire translated portion of the mRNA encoding 786 amino acids, including several unusual hydrophilic amino acid sequences not previously identified in porcine tropoelastin, (ii) exons encoding either hydrophobic or crosslinking domains in the protein alternated in the gene, and (iii) a great abundance of Alu repetitive sequences occurred throughout the introns. The data also indicated substantial alternative splicing of the mRNA. These results suggest the potential for significant variation in the precise molecular structure of the elastic fiber in the human population

  4. Zinc-Substituted Myoglobin Is a Naturally Occurring Photo-antimicrobial Agent with Potential Applications in Food Decontamination.

    Delcanale, Pietro; Montali, Chiara; Rodríguez-Amigo, Beatriz; Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Bruno, Stefano; Bianchini, Paolo; Diaspro, Alberto; Agut, Montserrat; Nonell, Santi; Viappiani, Cristiano

    2016-11-16

    Zinc-substituted myoglobin (ZnMb) is a naturally occurring photosensitizer that generates singlet oxygen with a high quantum yield. Using a combination of photophysical and fluorescence imaging techniques, we demonstrate the interaction of ZnMb with Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Escherichia coli. An efficient antibacterial action against S. aureus was observed, with a reduction up to 99.9999% in the number of colony-forming units, whereas no sizable effect was detected against E. coli. Because ZnMb is known to form during the maturation of additive-free not-cooked cured ham, the use of this protein as a built-in photodynamic agent may constitute a viable method for the decontamination of these food products from Gram-positive bacteria.

  5. MWCNT-cysteamine-Nafion modified gold electrode based on myoglobin for determination of hydrogen peroxide and nitrite.

    Canbay, Erhan; Şahin, Berika; Kıran, Müge; Akyilmaz, Erol

    2015-02-01

    In this work, a novel amperometric biosensor of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was developed based on the immobilization of myoglobin (Mb) on the surface of the multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) -Nafion-cysteamine (CA) modified gold electrode (Au) and its electrocatalytic activity was used for the determination of nitrite (NO2(-)). In the optimization studies, the best MWCNT and myoglobin amount were investigated. It was discovered at the experiments for the optimization of the working conditions that the buffer at this study as 50.0mM, pH7.0 phosphate buffer (PBS) and working temperature as 30°C for the H2O2 biosensor. It was determined at the characterization studies on the biosensor that linear results are obtained between the ranges of 0.1μM to 70.0μM for H2O2 concentration and 1-250μM for NO2(-). The reproducibility of the biosensor was determined both H2O2 and nitrite. From the experiments, average value, standard deviation (SD) and coefficients of variation (CV%) were calculated to be 10.02±0.43μM, and 4.29% for 10.0μM H2O2 (n=6) and 52.0±2.1μM, and 3.89% for 50.0μM nitrite (n=8), respectively. At the same time the sample was analyzed for NO2(-) in drinking and mineral waters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a

  7. Can hydrate dissolution experiments predict the fate of a natural hydrate system?

    Hester, K.C.; Peltzer, E.T.; Dunk, R.M.; Walz, P.M.; Brewer, P.G. [Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Inst., Moss Landing, CA (United States); Dendy Sloan, E. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Hydrate Research

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates are naturally occurring compounds found in permafrost regions and in oceans. In the natural environment, sufficient temperature and pressure conditions for hydrate formation exist over a significant portion of the ocean. However, in addition to pressure and temperature, the chemical potential of the gas in the hydrate must be equal to the surrounding waters. If the concentration of the gas in surrounding water is under-saturated with respect to the gas in the hydrate, the hydrate will dissolve to drive the system towards chemical equilibrium. This paper presented a dissolution study of exposed hydrate from outcrops at Barkley Canyon, located off Vancouver Island, British Columbia. A previous field experiment on synthetic methane hydrate samples had demonstrated that mass transfer controlled dissolution in under-saturated seawater. However, seafloor hydrate outcrops have been shown to have significant longevity compared to expected dissolution rates based upon convective boundary layer diffusion calculations. An in-situ dissolution experiment was performed on two distinct natural hydrate fabrics in order to help resolve this apparent disconnect between the dissolution rates of synthetic and natural hydrate. The paper presented a map of Barkley Canyon and discussed the field measurements and methods for the study. Exposed outcrops of gas hydrates were cored using a specially constructed stainless steel coring device and a hydraulic ram was located inside the corer. Hydrate samples were cored directly using the a manipulator arm and then injected into a sampling cell. The hydrate was then added to an open mesh exposure container, which allowed for exposure to ambient benthic currents with minimal disturbance. As well, in order to observe the slow dissolution of the hydrate in seawater at Barkley Canyon, time-lapse photography was employed. Last, the paper presented the results of the hydrate fabric porosities and hydrate dissolution rates. It was

  8. Bio-inspired synthesis of hybrid silica nanoparticles templated from elastin-like polypeptide micelles

    Han, Wei; MacEwan, Sarah R.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; López, Gabriel P.

    2015-07-01

    The programmed self-assembly of block copolymers into higher order nanoscale structures offers many attractive attributes for the development of new nanomaterials for numerous applications including drug delivery and biosensing. The incorporation of biomimetic silaffin peptides in these block copolymers enables the formation of hybrid organic-inorganic materials, which can potentially enhance the utility and stability of self-assembled nanostructures. We demonstrate the design, synthesis and characterization of amphiphilic elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) diblock copolymers that undergo temperature-triggered self-assembly into well-defined spherical micelles. Genetically encoded incorporation of the silaffin R5 peptide at the hydrophilic terminus of the diblock ELP leads to presentation of the silaffin R5 peptide on the coronae of the micelles, which results in localized condensation of silica and the formation of near-monodisperse, discrete, sub-100 nm diameter hybrid ELP-silica particles. This synthesis method, can be carried out under mild reaction conditions suitable for bioactive materials, and will serve as the basis for the development and application of functional nanomaterials. Beyond silicification, the general strategies described herein may also be adapted for the synthesis of other biohybrid nanomaterials as well.The programmed self-assembly of block copolymers into higher order nanoscale structures offers many attractive attributes for the development of new nanomaterials for numerous applications including drug delivery and biosensing. The incorporation of biomimetic silaffin peptides in these block copolymers enables the formation of hybrid organic-inorganic materials, which can potentially enhance the utility and stability of self-assembled nanostructures. We demonstrate the design, synthesis and characterization of amphiphilic elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) diblock copolymers that undergo temperature-triggered self-assembly into well

  9. Biomimetic collagen/elastin meshes for ventral hernia repair in a rat model.

    Minardi, Silvia; Taraballi, Francesca; Wang, Xin; Cabrera, Fernando J; Van Eps, Jeffrey L; Robbins, Andrew B; Sandri, Monica; Moreno, Michael R; Weiner, Bradley K; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2017-03-01

    Ventral hernia repair remains a major clinical need. Herein, we formulated a type I collagen/elastin crosslinked blend (CollE) for the fabrication of biomimetic meshes for ventral hernia repair. To evaluate the effect of architecture on the performance of the implants, CollE was formulated both as flat sheets (CollE Sheets) and porous scaffolds (CollE Scaffolds). The morphology, hydrophylicity and in vitro degradation were assessed by SEM, water contact angle and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. The stiffness of the meshes was determined using a constant stretch rate uniaxial tensile test, and compared to that of native tissue. CollE Sheets and Scaffolds were tested in vitro with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (h-BM-MSC), and finally implanted in a rat ventral hernia model. Neovascularization and tissue regeneration within the implants was evaluated at 6weeks, by histology, immunofluorescence, and q-PCR. It was found that CollE Sheets and Scaffolds were not only biomechanically sturdy enough to provide immediate repair of the hernia defect, but also promoted tissue restoration in only 6weeks. In fact, the presence of elastin enhanced the neovascularization in both sheets and scaffolds. Overall, CollE Scaffolds displayed mechanical properties more closely resembling those of native tissue, and induced higher gene expression of the entire marker genes tested, associated with de novo matrix deposition, angiogenesis, adipogenesis and skeletal muscles, compared to CollE Sheets. Altogether, this data suggests that the improved mechanical properties and bioactivity of CollE Sheets and Scaffolds make them valuable candidates for applications of ventral hernia repair. Due to the elevated annual number of ventral hernia repair in the US, the lack of successful grafts, the design of innovative biomimetic meshes has become a prime focus in tissue engineering, to promote the repair of the abdominal wall, avoid recurrence. Our meshes (Coll

  10. Expression and Purification of Neurotrophin-Elastin-Like Peptide Fusion Proteins for Neural Regeneration.

    Johnson, Tamina; Koria, Piyush

    2016-04-01

    Neural injuries such as spinal cord injuries, traumatic brain injuries, or nerve transection injuries pose a major health problem. Neurotrophins such as nerve growth factor (NGF) or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been shown to improve the outcome of neural injuries in several pre-clinical models, but their use in clinics is limited by the lack of a robust delivery system that enhances their bioavailability and half-life. We describe two fusion proteins comprising NGF or BDNF fused with elastin-like peptides (ELPs). The aim of this study was to investigate the biological activity of neurotrophin-ELP (N-ELP) fusion proteins via in vitro culture models. NGF and BDNF were cloned in front of an elastin-like polypeptide sequence V40C2. These proteins were expressed in bacteria as inclusion bodies. These fusion proteins underwent solubilization via 8 M urea and purification via inverse transition cycling (ITC). We measured the particle size and the effect of temperature on precipitated particles using dynamic light scattering (DLS). We used western blot analysis to confirm the specificity of NGF-ELP to tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) antibody and to confirm the specificity of BDNF-ELP to TrkB antibody. PC12 cells were used to perform a neurite outgrowth assay to determine the biological activity of NGF-ELP. Bioactivity of BDNF-ELP was ascertained via transfecting human epithelial kidney (HEK 293-T) cells to express the TrkB receptor. The proteins were successfully purified to high homogeneity by exploiting the phase transition property of ELPs and urea, which solubilize inclusion bodies. Using PC12 neurite outgrowth assay, we further demonstrated that the biological activity of NGF was retained in the fusion. Similarly, BDNF-ELP phosphorylated the TrkB receptor, suggesting the biological activity of BDNF was also retained in the fusion. We further show that owing to the phase transition property of ELPs in the fusion, these proteins self-assembled into

  11. Hydration Properties of Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag (GGBS Under Different Hydration Environments

    Shuhua LIU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The hydration properties of various cementitious materials containing Ground Granulated Blast-furnace Slag (GGBS, two alkali-activated slag cements (AAS-1 and AAS-2 in which sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide act as alkaline activators respectively, supersulfated cement (SSC and slag Portland cement(PSC, are compared with ordinary Portland cement (OPC to investigate the effect of activating environment on the hydration properties in this study by determining the compressive strength of the pastes, the hydration heat of binders within 96 hours, and the hydration products at age of 28 days. The results show that C-S-H gels are the main hydrated products for all cementitious systems containing GGBS. Ca(OH2 is the hydration products of OPC and PSC paste. However, ettringite and gypsum crystals instead of Ca(OH2 are detected in SSC paste. Additionally, tobermorite, a crystalline C-S-H, and calcite are hydrated products in AAS-1. Tobermorite, cowlesite and calcite are hydrated products of AAS-2 as well. Based on strength results, AAS-1 paste exhibits the highest compressive strength followed by POC, PSC, SSC in order at all testing ages and AAS-2 give the lowest compressive strength except for the early age at 3 days, which is higher than SSC but still lower than PSC. From hydration heat analysis, alkalinity in the reaction solution is a vital factor influencing the initial hydration rate and the initial hydration rate from higher to lower is AAS-2, AAS-1, OPC, PSC and SSC. Although AAS possesses a faster reaction rate in the initial hours, cumulative hydration heat of AAS is comparably lower than that of OPC, but higher than those of PSC and SSC in turn, which indicates that the hydration heat of clinkers is much higher than that of slag.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.14934

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ modulates MMP-2 secretion and elastin expression in human dermal fibroblasts exposed to ultraviolet B radiation.

    Ham, Sun Ah; Yoo, Taesik; Hwang, Jung Seok; Kang, Eun Sil; Paek, Kyung Shin; Park, Chankyu; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Do, Jeong Tae; Seo, Han Geuk

    2014-10-01

    Changes in skin connective tissues mediated by ultraviolet (UV) radiation have been suggested to cause the skin wrinkling normally associated with premature aging of the skin. Recent investigations have shown that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) δ plays multiple biological roles in skin homeostasis. We attempted to investigate whether PPARδ modulates elastin protein levels and secretion of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 in UVB-irradiated human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) and mouse skin. These studies were undertaken in primary HDFs or HR-1 hairless mice using Western blot analyses, small interfering (si)RNA-mediated gene silencing, and Fluorescence microscopy. In HDFs, UVB irradiation induced increased secretion of MMP-2 and reduced levels of elastin. Activation of PPARδ by GW501516, a ligand specific for PPARδ, markedly attenuated UVB-induced MMP-2 secretion with a concomitant increase in the level of elastin. These effects were reduced by the presence of siRNAs against PPARδ or treatment with GSK0660, a specific inhibitor of PPARδ. Furthermore, GW501516 elicited a dose- and time-dependent increase in the expression of elastin. Modulation of MMP-2 secretion and elastin levels by GW501516 was associated with a reduction in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in HDFs exposed to UVB. Finally, in HR-1 hairless mice, administration of GW501516 significantly reduced UVB-induced MMP-2 expression with a concomitant increase in elastin levels, and these effects were significantly reduced by the presence of GSK0660. Our results suggest that PPARδ-mediated modulation of MMP-2 secretion and elastin expression may contribute to the maintenance of skin integrity by inhibiting ROS generation. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Calcium and magnesium silicate hydrates

    Lothenbach, B.; L'Hopital, E.; Nied, D.; Achiedo, G.; Dauzeres, A.

    2015-01-01

    Deep geological disposals are planed to discard long-lived intermediate-level and high-level radioactive wastes. Clay-based geological barriers are expected to limit the ingress of groundwater and to reduce the mobility of radioelements. In the interaction zone between the cement and the clay based material alteration can occur. Magnesium silicate hydrates (M-S-H) have been observed due to the reaction of magnesium sulfate containing groundwater with cements or in the interaction zone between low-pH type cement and clays. M-S-H samples synthesized in the laboratory showed that M-S-H has a variable composition within 0.7 ≤ Mg/Si ≤ 1.5. TEM/EDS analyses show an homogeneous gel with no defined structure. IR and 29 Si NMR data reveal a higher polymerization degree of the silica network in M-S-H compared to calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H). The presence of mainly Q 3 silicate tetrahedrons in M-S-H indicates a sheet like or a triple-chain silica structure while C-S-H is characterised by single chain-structure. The clear difference in the silica structure and the larger ionic radius of Ca 2+ (1.1 Angstrom) compared to Mg 2+ (0.8 Angstrom) make the formation of an extended solid solution between M-S-H and C-S-H gel improbable. In fact, the analyses of synthetic samples containing both magnesium and calcium in various ratios indicate the formation of separate M-S-H and C-S-H gels with no or very little uptake of magnesium in CS-H or calcium in M-S-H

  14. Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate

    George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

    2011-12-31

    This project seeks to understand regional differences in gas hydrate systems from the perspective of as an energy resource, geohazard, and long-term climate influence. Specifically, the effort will: (1) collect data and conceptual models that targets causes of gas hydrate variance, (2) construct numerical models that explain and predict regional-scale gas hydrate differences in 2-dimensions with minimal 'free parameters', (3) simulate hydrocarbon production from various gas hydrate systems to establish promising resource characteristics, (4) perturb different gas hydrate systems to assess potential impacts of hot fluids on seafloor stability and well stability, and (5) develop geophysical approaches that enable remote quantification of gas hydrate heterogeneities so that they can be characterized with minimal costly drilling. Our integrated program takes advantage of the fact that we have a close working team comprised of experts in distinct disciplines. The expected outcomes of this project are improved exploration and production technology for production of natural gas from methane hydrates and improved safety through understanding of seafloor and well bore stability in the presence of hydrates. The scope of this project was to more fully characterize, understand, and appreciate fundamental differences in the amount and distribution of gas hydrate and how this would affect the production potential of a hydrate accumulation in the marine environment. The effort combines existing information from locations in the ocean that are dominated by low permeability sediments with small amounts of high permeability sediments, one permafrost location where extensive hydrates exist in reservoir quality rocks and other locations deemed by mutual agreement of DOE and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations were Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location was Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the project was to understand

  15. The effect of a collagen-elastin matrix on adhesion formation after flexor tendon repair in a rabbit model.

    Wichelhaus, Dagmar Alice; Beyersdoerfer, Sascha Tobias; Gierer, Philip; Vollmar, Brigitte; Mittlmeier, Th

    2016-07-01

    The outcome of flexor tendon surgery is negatively affected by the formation of adhesions which can occur during the healing of the tendon repair. In this experimental study, we sought to prevent adhesion formation by wrapping a collagen-elastin scaffold around the repaired tendon segment. In 28 rabbit hind legs, the flexor tendons of the third and fourth digits were cut and then repaired using a two-strand suture technique on the fourth digit and a four-strand technique on the third digit. Rabbits were randomly assigned to study and control groups. In the control group, the operation ended by closing the tendon sheath and the skin. In the study group, a collagen-elastin scaffold was wrapped around the repaired tendon segment in both digits. After 3 and 8 weeks, the tendons were harvested and processed histologically. The range of motion of the digits and the gap formation between the repaired tendon ends were measured. The formation of adhesions, infiltration of leucocytes and extracellular inflammatory response were quantified. At the time of tendon harvesting, all joints of the operated toes showed free range of motion. Four-strand core sutures lead to significantly less diastasis between the repaired tendon ends than two-strand core suture repairs. The collagen-elastin scaffold leads to greater gapping after 3 weeks compared to the controls treated without the matrix. Within the tendons treated with the collagen-elastin matrix, a significant boost of cellular and extracellular inflammation could be stated after 3 weeks which was reflected by a higher level of CAE positive cells and more formation of myofibroblasts in the αSMA stain in the study group. The inflammatory response subsided gradually and significantly until the late stage of the study. Both the cellular and extracellular inflammatory response was emphasized with the amount of material used for the repair. The use of a collagen-elastin matrix cannot be advised for the prevention of adhesion

  16. Basics of development of gas hydrate deposits

    Makogon, Yuri F.; Holditch, Stephen A.; Makogon, Taras Y.

    2005-07-01

    Natural gas hydrate deposits could possibly be an important energy resource during this century. However, many problems associated with producing these deposits must first be solved. The industry must develop new technologies to produce the gas, to forecast possible tectonic cataclysms in regions of gas hydrate accumulations, and to prevent damage to the environment. These global issues must be addressed by every company or country who wants to produce gas hydrate deposits. Cooperative research between industry and universities can lead to technology breakthroughs in coming years. This paper reviews the Messoyakha field and the Blake Ridge and Nankai areas to explain a methodology for estimating how much gas might be producible from gas hydrate deposits (GHDs) under various conditions. The Messoyakha field is located on land, while the Blake Ridge and Nankai areas are offshore. Messoyakha is the first and the only GHD where gas production from hydrates has reached commercial flow rates. The Blake Ridge GHD has been studied for 20 years and 11 wells have been drilled to collect gas-hydrate samples. The potential resources of gas (gas in place) from Blake Ridge is estimated at 37.7Oe10{sup 12} m{sup 3} (1.330 Tcf) in hydrate form and 19.3Oe10{sup 12}m{sup 3} (681 Bcf) [5] in free gas. To estimate how much of the potential resource can be produced we need a thorough understanding of both the geologic and the thermodynamic characteristics of the formations. (Author)

  17. Gas hydrate exploration activities in Korea

    Keun-Pil Park, K.P. [Korea Inst. of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Gas Hydrate R and D Organization, Ministry of Knowledge Economy, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Korea's first gas hydrate research project was launched in 1996 to study the gas hydrate potential in the Ulleung Basin of the East Sea. It involved a series of laboratory experiments followed by a preliminary offshore seismic survey and regional reconnaissance geophysical and marine geological surveys. The bottom simulating reflector (BSR) was interpreted to show wide area distribution in the southern part of the Ulleung Basin, and its average burial depth was 187 m below the sea floor in the East Sea. A three-phase 10-year National Gas Hydrate Development Program was launched in 2004 to estimate the potential reserves in the East Sea. It will involve drilling to identify natural gas hydrates and to determine the most optimized production methods. Drilling sites were proposed based on five indicators that imply gas hydrate occurrence, notably BSR, gas vent, enhanced seismic reflection, acoustic blanking and gas seeping structure. The UBGH-X-01 gas hydrate expedition in the East Sea Ulleung Basin involved 5 logging while drilling (LWD) surveys at three high priority sites. One wire line logging was implemented at the site of the UBGH09. A total 334 m of non-pressurized conventional cores and 16 pressure cores were obtained in late 2007. The UBGH-X-01 was successfully completed, recovering many natural samples of gas hydrate from 3 coring sites in the East Sea. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2009-12-09

    Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

  19. Supramolecular Organization of Nonstoichiometric Drug Hydrates: Dapsone

    Braun, Doris E.; Griesser, Ulrich J.

    2018-01-01

    The observed moisture- and temperature dependent transformations of the dapsone (4,4′-diaminodiphenyl sulfone, DDS) 0. 33-hydrate were correlated to its structure and the number and strength of the water-DDS intermolecular interactions. A combination of characterization techniques was used, including thermal analysis (hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis), gravimetric moisture sorption/desorption studies and variable humidity powder X-ray diffraction, along with computational modeling (crystal structure prediction and pair-wise intermolecular energy calculations). Depending on the relative humidity the hydrate contains between 0 and 0.33 molecules of water per molecule DDS. The crystal structure is retained upon dehydration indicating that DDS hydrate shows a non-stoichiometric (de)hydration behavior. Unexpectedly, the water molecules are not located in structural channels but at isolated-sites of the host framework, which is counterintuitively for a hydrate with non-stoichiometric behavior. The water-DDS interactions were estimated to be weaker than water-host interactions that are commonly observed in stoichiometric hydrates and the lattice energies of the isomorphic dehydration product (hydrate structure without water molecules) and (form III) differ only by ~1 kJ mol−1. The computational generation of hypothetical monohydrates confirms that the hydrate with the unusual DDS:water ratio of 3:1 is more stable than a feasible monohydrate structure. Overall, this study highlights that a deeper understanding of the formation of hydrates with non-stoichiometric behavior requires a multidisciplinary approach including suitable experimental and computational methods providing a firm basis for the development and manufacturing of high quality drug products. PMID:29520359

  20. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    D. Archer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release as much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  1. Ligand exchange reactions of the heme group in hemoglobin and myoglobin as studied by pulse radiolysis

    Raap, I.A.

    1978-01-01

    In this thesis, the kinetic aspects of the ligand exchange reactions of hemoglobin are studied using the pulse radiolysis technique, in particular, the reactions of hydrated electrons with methemoglobin. A hitherto unobserved transient state of the heme group is observed which appears immediately after the rapid reduction process. The absorption spectrum of this new species has the characteristics of a ferrous low-spin state and can therefore be ascribed to the formation of a hemochrome non-equilibrium state. The subsequent relaxation of this intermediate structure into a deoxy-conformation is dependent on the amount of proton activity in the solution and on the presence of organic and inorganic phosphate anions. The final absorption spectrum of the heme group is shown to correspond to a ferrous high-spin state in the relaxed quaternary conformation. This is in agreement with the kinetics observen the binding of carbon monoxide and oxygen to partially reduced methemoglobin. At reduction degrees of methemoglobin as well as of valncy 8ybrids where there is an important contribution from species with two reduced subunits, the binding of carbon monoxide to hemoglobin occurs with on-rate constants characteristic for the tensed quaternary conformation. It is argued that this conformational change of hemoglobin (the R-to-T transition) takes place very rapidly, which suggests the participation of an activated relaxed conformation. In addition, it is found that there is a distinct heterogeneity in the binding of oxygen to partially reduced methemoglobin even at low degrees of reduction

  2. Tapping methane hydrates for unconventional natural gas

    Ruppel, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    Methane hydrate is an icelike form of concentrated methane and water found in the sediments of permafrost regions and marine continental margins at depths far shallower than conventional oil and gas. Despite their relative accessibility and widespread occurrence, methane hydrates have never been tapped to meet increasing global energy demands. With rising natural gas prices, production from these unconventional gas deposits is becoming economically viable, particularly in permafrost areas already being exploited for conventional oil and gas. This article provides an overview of gas hydrate occurrence, resource assessment, exploration, production technologies, renewability, and future challenges.

  3. On the electrolytic generation of hydrated electron

    Ghosh Mazumdar, A.S.; Guha, S.N.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations on the electrolytic generation of hydrated electron in oxygenated as well as oxygen-free solutions at different pH were undertaken. Since sup(-e)aq is known to react rapidly with O 2 yielding the transient O 2 - ion, the latter was looked for through its interaction with phosphite ions resulting in their oxidation near the cathode. It appears from the results that in electrolytic processes, the primary electron (esup(-)sub(cathode)) probably reacts directly with reactive solutes like oxygen, bypassing the hydration step. Data obtained in oxygen-free solutions, however, support the possible formation of hydrated electron at least in alkaline solutions. (author)

  4. Photoreactive elastin-like proteins for use as versatile bioactive materials and surface coatings.

    Raphel, Jordan; Parisi-Amon, Andreina; Heilshorn, Sarah

    2012-10-07

    Photocrosslinkable, protein-engineered biomaterials combine a rapid, controllable, cytocompatible crosslinking method with a modular design strategy to create a new family of bioactive materials. These materials have a wide range of biomedical applications, including the development of bioactive implant coatings, drug delivery vehicles, and tissue engineering scaffolds. We present the successful functionalization of a bioactive elastin-like protein with photoreactive diazirine moieties. Scalable synthesis is achieved using a standard recombinant protein expression host followed by site-specific modification of lysine residues with a heterobifunctional N-hydroxysuccinimide ester-diazirine crosslinker. The resulting biomaterial is demonstrated to be processable by spin coating, drop casting, soft lithographic patterning, and mold casting to fabricate a variety of two- and three-dimensional photocrosslinked biomaterials with length scales spanning the nanometer to millimeter range. Protein thin films proved to be highly stable over a three-week period. Cell-adhesive functional domains incorporated into the engineered protein materials were shown to remain active post-photo-processing. Human adipose-derived stem cells achieved faster rates of cell adhesion and larger spread areas on thin films of the engineered protein compared to control substrates. The ease and scalability of material production, processing versatility, and modular bioactive functionality make this recombinantly engineered protein an ideal candidate for the development of novel biomaterial coatings, films, and scaffolds.

  5. Sequence Directionality Dramatically Affects LCST Behavior of Elastin-Like Polypeptides.

    Li, Nan K; Roberts, Stefan; Quiroz, Felipe Garcia; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Yingling, Yaroslava G

    2018-04-30

    Elastin-like polypeptides (ELP) exhibit an inverse temperature transition or lower critical solution temperature (LCST) transition phase behavior in aqueous solutions. In this paper, the thermal responsive properties of the canonical ELP, poly(VPGVG), and its reverse sequence poly(VGPVG) were investigated by turbidity measurements of the cloud point behavior, circular dichroism (CD) measurements, and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to gain a molecular understanding of mechanism that controls hysteretic phase behavior. It was shown experimentally that both poly(VPGVG) and poly(VGPVG) undergo a transition from soluble to insoluble in aqueous solution upon heating above the transition temperature ( T t ). However, poly(VPGVG) resolubilizes upon cooling below its T t , whereas the reverse sequence, poly(VGPVG), remains aggregated despite significant undercooling below the T t . The results from MD simulations indicated that a change in sequence order results in significant differences in the dynamics of the specific residues, especially valines, which lead to extensive changes in the conformations of VPGVG and VGPVG pentamers and, consequently, dissimilar propensities for secondary structure formation and overall structure of polypeptides. These changes affected the relative hydrophilicities of polypeptides above T t , where poly(VGPVG) is more hydrophilic than poly(VPGVG) with more extended conformation and larger surface area, which led to formation of strong interchain hydrogen bonds responsible for stabilization of the aggregated phase and the observed thermal hysteresis for poly(VGPVG).

  6. Temperature-dependent morphology of hybrid nanoflowers from elastin-like polypeptides

    Ghosh, Koushik; Balog, Eva Rose M.; Sista, Prakash; Williams, Darrick J.; Martinez, Jennifer S., E-mail: jenm@lanl.gov, E-mail: rcrocha@lanl.gov; Rocha, Reginaldo C., E-mail: jenm@lanl.gov, E-mail: rcrocha@lanl.gov [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Kelly, Daniel [Chemistry Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    We report a method for creating hybrid organic-inorganic “nanoflowers” using calcium or copper ions as the inorganic component and a recombinantly expressed elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) as the organic component. Polypeptides provide binding sites for the dynamic coordination with metal ions, and then such noncovalent complexes become nucleation sites for primary crystals of metal phosphates. We have shown that the interaction between the stimuli-responsive ELP and Ca{sup 2+} or Cu{sup 2+}, in the presence of phosphate, leads to the growth of micrometer-sized particles featuring nanoscale patterns shaped like flower petals. The morphology of these flower-like composite structures is dependent upon the temperature of growth and has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The composition of nanoflowers has also been analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The temperature-dependent morphologies of these hybrid nanostructures, which arise from the controllable phase transition of ELPs, hold potential for morphological control of biomaterials in emerging applications such as tissue engineering and biocatalysis.

  7. Temperature-dependent morphology of hybrid nanoflowers from elastin-like polypeptides

    Koushik Ghosh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a method for creating hybrid organic-inorganic “nanoflowers” using calcium or copper ions as the inorganic component and a recombinantly expressed elastin-like polypeptide (ELP as the organic component. Polypeptides provide binding sites for the dynamic coordination with metal ions, and then such noncovalent complexes become nucleation sites for primary crystals of metal phosphates. We have shown that the interaction between the stimuli-responsive ELP and Ca2+ or Cu2+, in the presence of phosphate, leads to the growth of micrometer-sized particles featuring nanoscale patterns shaped like flower petals. The morphology of these flower-like composite structures is dependent upon the temperature of growth and has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The composition of nanoflowers has also been analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The temperature-dependent morphologies of these hybrid nanostructures, which arise from the controllable phase transition of ELPs, hold potential for morphological control of biomaterials in emerging applications such as tissue engineering and biocatalysis.

  8. Subarachnoid hemorrhage: tests of association with apolipoprotein E and elastin genes

    Sauerbeck Laura

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apolipoprotein E (APOE and elastin (ELN are plausible candidate genes involved in the pathogenesis of stroke. We tested for association of variants in APOE and ELN with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in a population-based study. We genotyped 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on APOE and 10 SNPs on ELN in a sample of 309 Caucasian individuals, of whom 107 are SAH cases and 202 are age-, race-, and gender-matched controls from the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky region. Associations were tested at genotype, allele, and haplotype levels. A genomic control analysis was performed to check for spurious associations resulting from population substructure. Results At the APOE locus, no individual SNP was associated with SAH after correction for multiple comparisons. Haplotype analysis revealed significant association of the major haplotype (Hap1 in APOE with SAH (p = 0.001. The association stemmed from both the 5' promoter and the 3' region of the APOE gene. APOE ε2 and ε 4 were not significantly associated with SAH. No association was observed for ELN at genotype, allele, or haplotype level and our study failed to confirm previous reports of ELN association with aneurysmal SAH. Conclusion This study suggests a role of the APOE gene in the etiology of aneurysmal SAH.

  9. Elastin-like polypeptide switches: A design strategy to detect multimeric proteins.

    Dhandhukia, Jugal P; Brill, Dab A; Kouhi, Aida; Pastuszka, Martha K; MacKay, J Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Elastin-Like Polypeptides (ELPs) reversibly phase separate in response to changes in temperature, pressure, concentration, pH, and ionic species. While powerful triggers, biological microenvironments present a multitude of more specific biological cues, such as antibodies, cytokines, and cell-surface receptors. To develop better biosensors and bioresponsive drug carriers, rational strategies are required to sense and respond to these target proteins. We recently reported that noncovalent association of two ELP fusion proteins to a "chemical inducer of dimerization" small molecule (1.5 kDa) induces phase separation at physiological temperatures. Having detected a small molecule, here we present the first evidence that ELP multimerization can also detect a much larger (60 kDa) protein target. To demonstrate this strategy, ELPs were biotinylated at their amino terminus and mixed with tetrameric streptavidin. At a stoichiometric ratio of [4:1], two to three biotin-ELPs associate with streptavidin into multimeric complexes with an apparent K d of 5 nM. The increased ELP density around a streptavidin core strongly promotes isothermal phase separation, which was tuned to occur at physiological temperature. This phase separation reverses upon saturation with excess streptavidin, which only favors [1:1] complexes. Together, these findings suggest that ELP association with multimeric biomolecules is a viable strategy to deliberately engineer ELPs that respond to multimeric protein substrates. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  10. EMILIN2 (Elastin microfibril interface located protein, potential modifier of thrombosis

    Hoover-Plow Jane L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elastin microfibril interface located protein 2 (EMILIN2 is an extracellular glycoprotein associated with cardiovascular development. While other EMILIN proteins are reported to play a role in elastogenesis and coagulation, little is known about EMILIN2 function in the cardiovascular system. The objective of this study was to determine whether EMILIN2 could play a role in thrombosis. Results EMILIN2 mRNA was expressed in 8 wk old C57BL/6J mice in lung, heart, aorta and bone marrow, with the highest expression in bone marrow. In mouse cells, EMILIN2 mRNA expression in macrophages was higher than expression in endothelial cells and fibroblasts. EMILIN2 was identified with cells and extracellular matrix by immunohistochemistry in the carotid and aorta. After carotid ferric chloride injury, EMILIN2 was abundantly expressed in the thrombus and inhibition of EMILIN2 increased platelet de-aggregation after ADP-stimulated platelet aggregation. Conclusions These results suggest EMILIN2 could play a role in thrombosis as a constituent of the vessel wall and/or a component of the thrombus.

  11. Using elastin protein to develop highly efficient air cathodes for lithium-O2 batteries

    Guo, Guilue; Ang, Huixiang; Tan, Huiteng; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Yuanyuan; Fong, Eileen; Yan, Qingyu; Yao, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Transition metal-nitrogen/carbon (M-N/C, M = Fe, Co) catalysts are synthesized using environmentally friendly histidine-tag-rich elastin protein beads, metal sulfate and water soluble carbon nanotubes followed by post-annealing and acid leaching processes. The obtained catalysts are used as cathode materials in lithium-O 2 batteries. It has been discovered that during discharge, Li 2 O 2 nanoparticles first nucleate and grow around the bead-decorated CNT regions (M-N/C centres) and coat on the catalysts at a high degree of discharge. The Fe-N/C catalyst-based cathodes deliver a capacity of 12 441 mAh g −1 at a current density of 100 mA g −1 . When they were cycled at a limited capacity of 800 mAh g −1 at current densities of 200 or 400 mA g −1 , these cathodes showed stable charge voltages of ∼3.65 or 3.90 V, corresponding to energy efficiencies of ∼71.2 or 65.1%, respectively. These results are considerably superior to those of the cathodes based on bare annealed CNTs, which prove that the Fe-N/C catalysts developed here are promising for use in non-aqueous lithium-O 2 battery cathodes. (paper)

  12. Double network physical gels from elastin-like polypeptide block copolymers: nanoscale control of thermoresponsive reinforcement

    Glassman, Matthew; Olsen, Bradley

    2014-03-01

    Triblock copolymers with associative protein midblocks and thermoresponsive endblocks form shear thinning hydrogels with a low yield stress at low temperatures, but can be reinforced by a self-assembled network of the endblock aggregates. Here, we compare the use of bioengineered elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) to synthetic poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) as endblocks to control the self-assembly of the reinforcing network. The temperature dependence of the mechanics of these hydrogels is a strong function of the domain size and morphology in the endblock network. Despite the architectural similarities, triblock ELP fusions and PNIPAM bioconjugates exhibit distinct reinforcement maxima at fixed block composition and polymer concentration, and these differences can be attributed to the nanostructural features of the two systems. Furthermore, in ELP fusions, the amino acid sequence can be readily modified to manipulate the solvation kinetics of the endblock domains. Finally, various endblocks have been combined to form triblock terpolymer hydrogels, demonstrating how the choice of thermoresponsive blocks can be used to tune the reinforcement of shear thinning hydrogels.

  13. Structural and interaction parameters of thermosensitive native α-elastin biohybrid microgel

    Balaceanu, Andreea; Singh, Smriti; Demco, Dan E.; Möller, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The structural and water interaction parameters for native, α-elastin biohybrid microgel crosslinked with hydrophilic and hydrophobic crosslinkers are obtained from the volume phase transition temperature behaviour, 1H high-resolution magic-angle sample spinning transverse magnetization relaxation NMR, and modified Flory-Rehner swelling theory. Firstly, considering a homogeneous morphology the number of subchains in the biohybrid microgel, the residual water in deswollen state as a function of crosslink density and the temperature dependence of the Flory biopolymer-water interaction parameters are reported for the biohybrid microgels prepared with hydrophilic (PEG-DGE) and hydrophobic (BS3) crosslinkers. The Flory-Rehner classical approach is subsequently modified taking into account the heterogeneities observed by NMR transverse relaxation measurements. Two differently mobile regions are determined, a hydrophobic domain and a crosslinking domain with relative reduced mobility. For the first time, the influence of chain mobility on the Flory interaction parameter is investigated through a modified Flory state equation. The contributions of amino-acids located in the hydrophobic and crosslinking domains in the polypeptide sequence are separated while analyzing the biopolymer-water interaction.

  14. Using elastin protein to develop highly efficient air cathodes for lithium-O2 batteries

    Guo, Guilue; Yao, Xin; Ang, Huixiang; Tan, Huiteng; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Yuanyuan; Fong, Eileen; Yan, Qingyu

    2016-01-01

    Transition metal-nitrogen/carbon (M-N/C, M = Fe, Co) catalysts are synthesized using environmentally friendly histidine-tag-rich elastin protein beads, metal sulfate and water soluble carbon nanotubes followed by post-annealing and acid leaching processes. The obtained catalysts are used as cathode materials in lithium-O2 batteries. It has been discovered that during discharge, Li2O2 nanoparticles first nucleate and grow around the bead-decorated CNT regions (M-N/C centres) and coat on the catalysts at a high degree of discharge. The Fe-N/C catalyst-based cathodes deliver a capacity of 12 441 mAh g-1 at a current density of 100 mA g-1. When they were cycled at a limited capacity of 800 mAh g-1 at current densities of 200 or 400 mA g-1, these cathodes showed stable charge voltages of ˜3.65 or 3.90 V, corresponding to energy efficiencies of ˜71.2 or 65.1%, respectively. These results are considerably superior to those of the cathodes based on bare annealed CNTs, which prove that the Fe-N/C catalysts developed here are promising for use in non-aqueous lithium-O2 battery cathodes.

  15. Proliferative activity of elastin-like-peptides depends on charge and phase transition.

    Yuan, Yuan; Koria, Piyush

    2016-03-01

    Elastin-like-peptides (ELPs) are stimulus-responsive protein-based polymers and are attractive biomaterials due to their biocompatibility and unique properties. This study shows that in addition to their physical properties, ELPs have biological activities that are conducive to tissue regeneration. Specifically, we found that ELPs induce fibroblast proliferation via cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG). Furthermore, our data suggests that ELP based materials with differential proliferative potential can be designed by controlling the interaction of ELPs with HSPGs by incorporating either hydrophobic or positively charged residues within the ELP sequence. Fibroblast proliferation is important for granulation tissue formation which is important in chronic wounds as well as in healing of other tissues. The customizable biological activity of ELPs coupled with their unique physical properties will enable us to design novel, sustainable and cost effective therapies for different tissue regeneration applications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 697-706, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Toughening of Thermoresponsive Arrested Networks of Elastin-Like Polypeptides To Engineer Cytocompatible Tissue Scaffolds.

    Glassman, Matthew J; Avery, Reginald K; Khademhosseini, Ali; Olsen, Bradley D

    2016-02-08

    Formulation of tissue engineering or regenerative scaffolds from simple bioactive polymers with tunable structure and mechanics is crucial for the regeneration of complex tissues, and hydrogels from recombinant proteins, such as elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs), are promising platforms to support these applications. The arrested phase separation of ELPs has been shown to yield remarkably stiff, biocontinuous, nanostructured networks, but these gels are limited in applications by their relatively brittle nature. Here, a gel-forming ELP is chain-extended by telechelic oxidative coupling, forming extensible, tough hydrogels. Small angle scattering indicates that the chain-extended polypeptides form a fractal network of nanoscale aggregates over a broad concentration range, accessing moduli ranging from 5 kPa to over 1 MPa over a concentration range of 5-30 wt %. These networks exhibited excellent erosion resistance and allowed for the diffusion and release of encapsulated particles consistent with a bicontinuous, porous structure with a broad distribution of pore sizes. Biofunctionalized, toughened networks were found to maintain the viability of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in 2D, demonstrating signs of osteogenesis even in cell media without osteogenic molecules. Furthermore, chondrocytes could be readily mixed into these gels via thermoresponsive assembly and remained viable in extended culture. These studies demonstrate the ability to engineer ELP-based arrested physical networks on the molecular level to form reinforced, cytocompatible hydrogel matrices, supporting the promise of these new materials as candidates for the engineering and regeneration of stiff tissues.

  17. Micellar Self-Assembly of Recombinant Resilin-/Elastin-Like Block Copolypeptides.

    Weitzhandler, Isaac; Dzuricky, Michael; Hoffmann, Ingo; Garcia Quiroz, Felipe; Gradzielski, Michael; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2017-08-14

    Reported here is the synthesis of perfectly sequence defined, monodisperse diblock copolypeptides of hydrophilic elastin-like and hydrophobic resilin-like polypeptide blocks and characterization of their self-assembly as a function of structural parameters by light scattering, cryo-TEM, and small-angle neutron scattering. A subset of these diblock copolypeptides exhibit lower critical solution temperature and upper critical solution temperature phase behavior and self-assemble into spherical or cylindrical micelles. Their morphologies are dictated by their chain length, degree of hydrophilicity, and hydrophilic weight fraction of the ELP block. We find that (1) independent of the length of the corona-forming ELP block there is a minimum threshold in the length of the RLP block below which self-assembly does not occur, but that once that threshold is crossed, (2) the RLP block length is a unique molecular parameter to independently tune self-assembly and (3) increasing the hydrophobicity of the corona-forming ELP drives a transition from spherical to cylindrical morphology. Unlike the self-assembly of purely ELP-based block copolymers, the self-assembly of RLP-ELPs can be understood by simple principles of polymer physics relating hydrophilic weight fraction and polymer-polymer and polymer-solvent interactions to micellar morphology, which is important as it provides a route for the de novo design of desired nanoscale morphologies from first principles.

  18. Silk-elastin-like protein polymer matrix for intraoperative delivery of an oncolytic vaccinia virus.

    Price, Daniel L; Li, Pingdong; Chen, Chun-Hao; Wong, Danni; Yu, Zhenkun; Chen, Nanhai G; Yu, Yong A; Szalay, Aladar A; Cappello, Joseph; Fong, Yuman; Wong, Richard J

    2016-02-01

    Oncolytic viral efficacy may be limited by the penetration of the virus into tumors. This may be enhanced by intraoperative application of virus immediately after surgical resection. Oncolytic vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 was delivered in silk-elastin-like protein polymer (SELP) in vitro and in vivo in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell line 8505c in nude mice. GLV-1h68 in SELP infected and lysed anaplastic thyroid cancer cells in vitro equally as effectively as in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and at 1 week retains a thousand fold greater infectious plaque-forming units. In surgical resection models of residual tumor, GLV-1h68 in SELP improves tumor control and shows increased viral β-galactosidase expression as compared to PBS. The use of SELP matrix for intraoperative oncolytic viral delivery protects infectious viral particles from degradation, facilitates sustained viral delivery and transgene expression, and improves tumor control. Such optimization of methods of oncolytic viral delivery may enhance therapeutic outcomes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Elastin-like-polypeptide based fusion proteins for osteogenic factor delivery in bone healing.

    McCarthy, Bryce; Yuan, Yuan; Koria, Piyush

    2016-07-08

    Modern treatments of bone injuries and diseases are becoming increasingly dependent on the usage of growth factors to stimulate bone growth. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), a potent osteogenic inductive protein, exhibits promising results in treatment models, but recently has had its practical efficacy questioned due to the lack of local retention, ectopic bone formation, and potentially lethal inflammation. Where a new delivery technique of the BMP-2 is necessary, here we demonstrate the viability of an elastin-like peptide (ELP) fusion protein containing BMP-2 for delivery of the BMP-2. This fusion protein retains the performance characteristics of both the BMP-2 and ELP. The fusion protein was found to induce osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells as evidenced by the production of alkaline phosphatase and extracellular calcium deposits in response to treatment by the fusion protein. Retention of the ELPs inverse phase transition property has allowed for expression of the fusion protein within a bacterial host (such as Escherichia coli) and easy and rapid purification using inverse transition cycling. The fusion protein formed self-aggregating nanoparticles at human-body temperature. The data collected suggests the viability of these fusion protein nanoparticles as a dosage-efficient and location-precise noncytotoxic delivery vehicle for BMP-2 in bone treatment. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1029-1037, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  20. Experimental Investigation of Effect on Hydrate Formation in Spray Reactor

    Jianzhong Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of reaction condition on hydrate formation were conducted in spray reactor. The temperature, pressure, and gas volume of reaction on hydrate formation were measured in pure water and SDS solutions at different temperature and pressure with a high-pressure experimental rig for hydrate formation. The experimental data and result reveal that additives could improve the hydrate formation rate and gas storage capacity. Temperature and pressure can restrict the hydrate formation. Lower temperature and higher pressure can promote hydrate formation, but they can increase production cost. So these factors should be considered synthetically. The investigation will promote the advance of gas storage technology in hydrates.

  1. Gas hydrate concentration and characteristics within Hydrate Ridge inferred from multicomponent seismic reflection data

    Kumar, Dhananjay; Sen, Mrinal K.; Bangs, Nathan L.

    2007-12-01

    A seismic experiment composed of streamer and ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) surveys was conducted in the summer of 2002 at southern Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon, to map the gas hydrate distribution within the hydrate stability zone. Gas hydrate concentrations within the reservoir can be estimated with P wave velocity (Vp); however, we can further constrain gas hydrate concentrations using S wave velocity (Vs), and use Vs through its relationship to Vp (Vp/Vs) to reveal additional details such as gas hydrate form within the matrix (i.e., hydrate cements the grains, becomes part of the matrix frame or floats in pore space). Both Vp and Vs can be derived simultaneously by inverting multicomponent seismic data. In this study, we use OBS data to estimate seismic velocities where both gas hydrate and free gas are present in the shallow sediments. Once Vp and Vs are estimated, they are simultaneously matched with modeled velocities to estimate the gas hydrate concentration. We model Vp using an equation based on a modification of Wood's equation that incorporates an appropriate rock physics model and Vs using an empirical relation. The gas hydrate concentration is estimated to be up to 7% of the rock volume, or 12% of the pore space. However, Vp and Vs do not always fit the model simultaneously. Vp can vary substantially more than Vs. Thus we conclude that a model, in which higher concentrations of hydrate do not affect shear stiffness, is more appropriate. Results suggest gas hydrates form within the pore space of the sediments and become part of the rock framework in our survey area.

  2. A Hydrate Database: Vital to the Technical Community

    D Sloan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates may contain more energy than all the combined other fossil fuels, causing hydrates to be a potentially vital aspect of both energy and climate change. This article is an overview of the motivation, history, and future of hydrate data management using a CODATA vehicle to connect international hydrate databases. The basis is an introduction to the Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML to connect various hydrate databases. The accompanying four articles on laboratory hydrate data by Smith et al., on field hydrate data by L?wner et al., on hydrate modeling by Wang et al., and on construction of a Chinese gas hydrate system by Xiao et al. provide details of GHML in their respective areas.

  3. Mechanistic Insight into the Elastin Degradation Process by the Metalloprotease Myroilysin from the Deep-Sea Bacterium Myroides profundi D25

    Yang, Jie; Zhao, Hui-Lin; Tang, Bai-Lu; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Su, Hai-Nan; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Song, Xiao-Yan; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Xie, Bin-Bin; Weiss, Anthony S.; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Elastases have been widely studied because of their important uses as medicine and meat tenderizers. However, there are relatively few studies on marine elastases. Myroilysin, secreted by Myroides profundi D25 from deep-sea sediment, is a novel elastase. In this study, we examined the elastin degradation mechanism of myroilysin. When mixed with insoluble bovine elastin, myroilysin bound hydrophobically, suggesting that this elastase may interact with the hydrophobic domains of elastin. Consistent with this, analysis of the cleavage pattern of myroilysin on bovine elastin and recombinant tropoelastin revealed that myroilysin preferentially cleaves peptide bonds with hydrophobic residues at the P1 and/or P1′ positions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of cross-linked recombinant tropoelastin degraded by myroilysin showed preferential damages of spherules over cross-links, as expected for a hydrophobic preference. The degradation process of myroilysin on bovine elastin fibres was followed by light microscopy and SEM, revealing that degradation begins with the formation of crevices and cavities at the fibre surface, with these openings increasing in number and size until the fibre breaks into small pieces, which are subsequently fragmented. Our results are helpful for developing biotechnological applications for myroilysin. PMID:25793427

  4. Evaluation of a biomimetic 3D substrate based on the Human Elastin-like Polypeptides (HELPs) model system for elastolytic activity detection.

    Corich, Lucia; Busetti, Marina; Petix, Vincenzo; Passamonti, Sabina; Bandiera, Antonella

    2017-08-10

    Elastin is a fibrous protein that confers elasticity to tissues such as skin, arteries and lung. It is extensively cross-linked, highly hydrophobic and insoluble. Nevertheless, elastin can be hydrolysed by bacterial proteases in infectious diseases, resulting in more or less severe tissue damage. Thus, development of substrates able to reliably and specifically detect pathogen-secreted elastolytic activity is needed to improve the in vitro evaluation of the injury that bacterial proteases may provoke. In this work, two human biomimetic elastin polypeptides, HELP and HELP1, as well as the matrices derived from HELP, have been probed as substrates for elastolytic activity detection. Thirty strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from cystic fibrosis patients were analyzed in parallel with standard substrates, to detect proteolytic and elastolytic activity. Results point to the HELP-based 3D matrix as an interesting biomimetic model of elastin to assess bacterial elastolytic activity in vitro. Moreover, this model substrate enables to further elucidate the mechanism underlying elastin degradation at molecular level, as well as to develop biomimetic material-based devices responsive to external stimuli. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of solvent concentration and composition on protein dynamics: 13C MAS NMR studies of elastin in glycerol-water mixtures.

    Demuth, Dominik; Haase, Nils; Malzacher, Daniel; Vogel, Michael

    2015-08-01

    We use (13)C CP MAS NMR to investigate the dependence of elastin dynamics on the concentration and composition of the solvent at various temperatures. For elastin in pure glycerol, line-shape analysis shows that larger-scale fluctuations of the protein backbone require a minimum glycerol concentration of ~0.6 g/g at ambient temperature, while smaller-scale fluctuations are activated at lower solvation levels of ~0.2 g/g. Immersing elastin in various glycerol-water mixtures, we observe at room temperature that the protein mobility is higher for lower glycerol fractions in the solvent and, thus, lower solvent viscosity. When decreasing the temperature, the elastin spectra approach the line shape for the rigid protein at 245 K for all studied samples, indicating that the protein ceases to be mobile on the experimental time scale of ~10(-5) s. Our findings yield evidence for a strong coupling between elastin fluctuations and solvent dynamics and, hence, such interaction is not restricted to the case of protein-water mixtures. Spectral resolution of different carbon species reveals that the protein-solvent couplings can, however, be different for side chain and backbone units. We discuss these results against the background of the slaving model for protein dynamics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Is cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes associated with serum levels of MMP-2, LOX, and the elastin degradation products ELM and ELM-2?

    Rørdam Preil, Simone; Faarvang Thorsen, Anne-Sofie; Christiansen, Anne Lindegaard

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) is a significant risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). In a previous microarray study of internal mammary arteries from patients with and without T2DM, we observed several elastin-related genes with altered mRNA-expression i......BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) is a significant risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). In a previous microarray study of internal mammary arteries from patients with and without T2DM, we observed several elastin-related genes with altered m......RNA-expression in diabetic patients, namely matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), lysyl oxidase (LOX) and elastin itself. In this study we investigate whether the serum concentrations of elastin-related proteins correlate to signs of CVD in patients with T2DM. METHODS: Blood samples from 302 type 2 diabetic patients were...... analysed for MMP-2, LOX, and the elastin degradation products ELM and ELM2. The results were investigated for correlations to signs of CVD in different vascular territories, as determined by myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, carotid artery thickness and ankle-brachial blood pressure index. RESULTS: T2DM...

  7. Exogenous origin of hydration on asteroid (16) Psyche: the role of hydrated asteroid families

    Avdellidou, C.; Delbo', M.; Fienga, A.

    2018-04-01

    Asteroid (16) Psyche, which for a long time was the largest M-type with no detection of hydration features in its spectrum, was recently discovered to have a weak 3-μm band and thus it was eventually added to the group of hydrated asteroids. Its relatively high density, in combination with the high radar albedo, led researchers to classify the asteroid as a metallic object. It is believed that it is possibly a core of a differentiated body, a remnant of `hit-and-run' collisions. The detection of hydration is, in principle, inconsistent with a pure metallic origin for this body. Here, we consider the scenario in which the hydration on its surface is exogenous and was delivered by hydrated impactors. We show that impacting asteroids that belong to families whose members have the 3-μm band can deliver hydrated material to Psyche. We developed a collisional model with which we test all dark carbonaceous asteroid families, which contain hydrated members. We find that the major source of hydrated impactors is the family of Themis, with a total implanted mass on Psyche of the order of ˜1014 kg. However, the hydrated fraction could be only a few per cent of the implanted mass, as the water content in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, the best analogue for the Themis asteroid family, is typically a few per cent of their mass.

  8. Oceanic hydrates: more questions than answers

    Laherrere, Jean

    2000-01-01

    Methane hydrates create problems by blocking pipelines and casing; they are also accused of contributing to environmental problems (e.g. global warming). Methane hydrates are also found in permafrost areas and in oceanic sediments where the necessary temperature and pressure for stability occur. Claims for the widespread occurrence in thick oceanic deposits are unfounded: apparently indirect evidence from seismic reflectors, seismic hydrocarbon indicators, logs and free samples is unreliable. At one time, hydrate was seen as a static, biogenic, continuous, huge resource but that view is changing to one of a dynamic, overpressurised, discontinuous and unreliable resource. Only Japan and India are currently showing any serious interest in hydrates. Academic research has raised more questions than answers. It is suggested that more hard exploratory evidence rather than theoretical study is required

  9. Vibrational dynamics of hydration water in amylose

    Cavatorta, F; Albanese, G; Angelini, N

    2002-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamical properties of hydration water associated with amylose helices, based on low-temperature vibrational spectra collected using the TOSCA inelastic spectrometer at ISIS. The structural constraints of the polysaccharidic chains favour the formation of a high-density structure for water, which has been suggested by Imberty and Perez on the basis of conformational analysis. According to this model, hydration water can only enter the pores formed by six adjacent helices and completely fills the pores at a hydration level of about 0.27-g water/g dry amylose. Our measurements show that the dynamical behaviour of hydration water is similar to that observed in high-density amorphous ice. (orig.)

  10. Separation of water through gas hydrate formation

    Boch Andersen, Torben; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goal...... of the project was to formulate an alternative separation concept, which can replace the traditional water evaporation process in the sugar production. Work with the separation concept showed that gas hydrates can be used for water separation. The process is not suitable for sugar production because of large...... volumes and the needs for high pressure. The process could be interesting for concentration of heat sensitive, high value products...

  11. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  12. ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrate Production Test

    Schoderbek, David [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Farrell, Helen [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Howard, James [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Raterman, Kevin [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Silpngarmlert, Suntichai [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Martin, Kenneth [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Smith, Bruce [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Klein, Perry [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-06-30

    Work began on the ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrates Production Test (DOE award number DE-NT0006553) on October 1, 2008. This final report summarizes the entire project from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013.

  13. Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations

    Jeffrey Savidge

    2008-10-31

    The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

  14. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  15. Supramolecular Organization of Nonstoichiometric Drug Hydrates: Dapsone

    Doris E. Braun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The observed moisture- and temperature dependent transformations of the dapsone (4,4′-diaminodiphenyl sulfone, DDS 0. 33-hydrate were correlated to its structure and the number and strength of the water-DDS intermolecular interactions. A combination of characterization techniques was used, including thermal analysis (hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis, gravimetric moisture sorption/desorption studies and variable humidity powder X-ray diffraction, along with computational modeling (crystal structure prediction and pair-wise intermolecular energy calculations. Depending on the relative humidity the hydrate contains between 0 and 0.33 molecules of water per molecule DDS. The crystal structure is retained upon dehydration indicating that DDS hydrate shows a non-stoichiometric (dehydration behavior. Unexpectedly, the water molecules are not located in structural channels but at isolated-sites of the host framework, which is counterintuitively for a hydrate with non-stoichiometric behavior. The water-DDS interactions were estimated to be weaker than water-host interactions that are commonly observed in stoichiometric hydrates and the lattice energies of the isomorphic dehydration product (hydrate structure without water molecules and (form III differ only by ~1 kJ mol−1. The computational generation of hypothetical monohydrates confirms that the hydrate with the unusual DDS:water ratio of 3:1 is more stable than a feasible monohydrate structure. Overall, this study highlights that a deeper understanding of the formation of hydrates with non-stoichiometric behavior requires a multidisciplinary approach including suitable experimental and computational methods providing a firm basis for the development and manufacturing of high quality drug products.

  16. Preservation of methane hydrate at 1 atm

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    A "pressure-release" method that enables reproducible bulk preservation of pure, porous, methane hydrate at conditions 50 to 75 K above its equilibrium T (193 K) at 1 atm is refined. The amount of hydrate preserved by this method appears to be greatly in excess of that reported in the previous citations, and is likely the result of a mechanism different from ice shielding.

  17. Studies on meat color, myoglobin content, enzyme activities, and genes associated with oxidative potential of pigs slaughtered at different growth stages

    Yu, Qin Ping; Feng, Ding Yuan; Xiao, Juan; Wu, Fan; He, Xiao Jun; Xia, Min Hao; Dong, Tao; Liu, Yi Hua; Tan, Hui Ze; Zou, Shi Geng; Zheng, Tao; Ou, Xian Hua; Zuo, Jian Jun

    2017-01-01

    Objective This experiment investigated meat color, myoglobin content, enzyme activities, and expression of genes associated with oxidative potential of pigs slaughtered at different growth stages. Methods Sixty 4-week-old Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire pigs were assigned to 6 replicate groups, each containing 10 pigs. One pig from each group was sacrificed at day 35, 63, 98, and 161 to isolate longissimus dorsi and triceps muscles. Results Meat color scores were higher in pigs at 35 d than those at 63 d and 98 d (pMeat color scores were correlated to the proportion of oxymyoglobin (r = 0.59, pmeat color, myoglobin content, enzyme activities, and genes associated with oxidative potential varied at different stages. PMID:28728400

  18. Proteomic based approach for characterizing 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal induced oxidation of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and goat (Capra hircus) meat myoglobins

    Maheswarappa, Naveena B.; Rani, K. Usha; Kumar, Y. Praveen; Kulkarni, Vinayak V.; Rapole, Srikanth

    2016-01-01

    Background Myoglobin (Mb) is a sarcoplasmic heme protein primarily responsible for meat color and its chemistry is species specific. 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is a cytotoxic lipid derived aldehyde detected in meat and was reported to covalently adduct with nucleophilic histidine residues of Mb and predispose it to greater oxidation. However, no literature is available on characterization of lipid oxidation induced oxidation of Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and goat (Capra hircus) myo...

  19. In Situ Raman Analyses of Natural Gas and Gas Hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon

    Peltzer, E. T.; White, S. N.; Dunk, R. M.; Brewer, P. G.; Sherman, A. D.; Schmidt, K.; Hester, K. C.; Sloan, E. D.

    2004-12-01

    During a July 2004 cruise to Hydrate Ridge, Oregon, MBARI's sea-going laser Raman spectrometer was used to obtain in situ Raman spectra of natural gas hydrates and natural gas venting from the seafloor. This was the first in situ analysis of gas hydrates on the seafloor. The hydrate spectra were compared to laboratory analyses performed at the Center for Hydrate Research, Colorado School of Mines. The natural gas spectra were compared to MBARI gas chromatography (GC) analyses of gas samples collected at the same site. DORISS (Deep Ocean Raman In Situ Spectrometer) is a laboratory model laser Raman spectrometer from Kaiser Optical Systems, Inc modified at MBARI for deployment in the deep ocean. It has been successfully deployed to depths as great as 3600 m. Different sampling optics provide flexibility in adapting the instrument to a particular target of interest. An immersion optic was used to analyze natural gas venting from the seafloor at South Hydrate Ridge ( ˜780 m depth). An open-bottomed cube was placed over the vent to collect the gas. The immersion optic penetrated the side of the cube as did a small heater used to dissociate any hydrate formed during sample collection. To analyze solid hydrates at both South and North Hydrate Ridge ( ˜590 m depth), chunks of hydrate were excavated from the seafloor and collected in a glass cylinder with a mesh top. A stand-off optic was used to analyze the hydrate inside the cylinder. Due to the partial opacity of the hydrate and the small focal volume of the sampling optic, a precision underwater positioner (PUP) was used to focus the laser spot onto the hydrate. PUP is a stand-alone system with three degrees-of-freedom, capable of moving the DORISS probe head with a precision of 0.1 mm. In situ Raman analyses of the gas indicate that it is primarily methane. This is verified by GC analyses of samples collected from the same site. Other minor constituents (such as CO2 and higher hydrocarbons) are present but may be in

  20. Dual stimuli-sensitive dendrimers: Photothermogenic gold nanoparticle-loaded thermo-responsive elastin-mimetic dendrimers.

    Fukushima, Daichi; Sk, Ugir Hossain; Sakamoto, Yasuhiro; Nakase, Ikuhiko; Kojima, Chie

    2015-08-01

    Dendrimers are synthetic macromolecules with unique structures that can work as nanoplatforms for both photothermogenic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and thermosensitive elastin-like peptides (ELPs) with valine-proline-glycine-valine-glycine (VPGVG) repeats. In this study, photothermogenic AuNPs were loaded into thermo-responsive elastin-mimetic dendrimers (dendrimers conjugating ELPs at their periphery) to produce dual stimuli-sensitive nanoparticles. Polyamidoamine G4 dendrimers were modified with acetylated VPGVG and (VPGVG)2, and the resulting materials were named ELP1-den and ELP2-den, respectively. The AuNPs were prepared by the reduction of Au ions using a dendrimer-nanotemplated method. The AuNP-loaded elastin-mimetic dendrimers exhibited photothermal properties. ELP1-den and ELP2-den showed similar temperature-dependent changes in their conformations. Phase transitions were observed at around 55°C and 35°C for the AuNP-loaded ELP1-den and AuNP-loaded ELP2-den, respectively, but not for the corresponding PEGylated dendrimer. In contrast to the AuNP-loaded PEGylated dendrimer, AuNP-loaded ELP2-den readily associated with cells and induced efficient photocytotoxicity at 37°C. The cell association and the photocytotoxicity properties of AuNP-loaded ELP2-den could be controlled by temperature. These results therefore suggest that dual stimuli-sensitive dendrimer nanoparticles of this type could be used for photothermal therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Structure of the Elastin-Contractile Units in the Thoracic Aorta and How Genes That Cause Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections Disrupt This Structure.

    Karimi, Ashkan; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2016-01-01

    The medial layer of the aorta confers elasticity and strength to the aortic wall and is composed of alternating layers of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and elastic fibres. The SMC elastin-contractile unit is a structural unit that links the elastin fibres to the SMCs and is characterized by the following: (1) layers of elastin fibres that are surrounded by microfibrils; (2) microfibrils that bind to the integrin receptors in focal adhesions on the cell surface of the SMCs; and (3) SMC contractile filaments that are linked to the focal adhesions on the inner side of the membrane. The genes that are altered to cause thoracic aortic aneurysms and aortic dissections encode proteins involved in the structure or function of the SMC elastin-contractile unit. Included in this gene list are the genes encoding protein that are structural components of elastin fibres and microfibrils, FBN1, MFAP5, ELN, and FBLN4. Also included are genes that encode structural proteins in the SMC contractile unit, including ACTA2, which encodes SMC-specific α-actin and MYH11, which encodes SMC-specific myosin heavy chain, along with MYLK and PRKG1, which encode kinases that control SMC contraction. Finally, mutations in the gene encoding the protein linking integrin receptors to the contractile filaments, FLNA, also predispose to thoracic aortic disease. Thus, these data suggest that functional SMC elastin-contractile units are important for maintaining the structural integrity of the aorta. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The influence of Na2O on the hydration of C3A II. Suspension hydration

    Spierings, G.A.C.M.; Stein, H.N.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of Na2O on the hydration of C3A was studied in suspensions from the start of the reaction onwards. The heat evolution rate in very early stages of the hydration, measured at varying NaOH concentrations, and SEM, indicate that at NaOH concentrations larger then 0.1 M the reaction

  3. Distinguishing between hydrated, partially hydrated or unhydrated clinker in hardened concrete using microscopy

    Valcke, S.L.A.; Rooij, M.R. de; Visser, J.H.M.; Nijland, T.G.

    2010-01-01

    Hydration of clinker particles is since long a topic of interest in both designing and optimizing cement composition and its quantity used in concrete. The interest for carefully observing and also quantifying the type or stage of clinker hydration in hardened cement paste is twofold. Firstly, the

  4. Methane hydrate dissociation using inverted five-spot water flooding method in cubic hydrate simulator

    Li, Gang; Li, Xiao-Sen; Li, Bo; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The combination forms of the hydrate dissociation methods in different well systems are divided into 6 main patterns. Dissociation processes of methane hydrate in porous media using the inverted five-spot water flooding method (Pattern 4) are investigated by the experimental observation and numerical simulation. In situ methane hydrate is synthesized in the Cubic Hydrate Simulator (CHS), a 5.832-L cubic reactor. A center vertical well is used as the hot water injection well, while the four vertical wells at the corner are the gas and water production wells. The gas production begins simultaneously with the hot water injection, while after approximately 20 min of compression, the water begins to be produced. One of the common characteristics of the inverted five-spot water flooding method is that both the gas and water production rates decrease with the reduction of the hydrate dissociation rate. The evaluation of the energy efficiency ratio might indicate the inverted five-spot water flooding as a promising gas producing method from the hydrate reservoir. - Highlights: • A three-dimensional 5.8-L cubic pressure vessel is developed. • Gas production of hydrate using inverted five-spot flooding method is studied. • Water/gas production rate and energy efficiency ratio are evaluated. • Temperature distributions of numerical simulation and experiment agree well. • Hydrate dissociation process is a moving boundary problem in this study

  5. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  6. Controlling the Size and Shape of the Elastin-Like Polypeptide based Micelles

    Streletzky, Kiril; Shuman, Hannah; Maraschky, Adam; Holland, Nolan

    Elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) trimer constructs make reliable environmentally responsive micellar systems because they exhibit a controllable transition from being water-soluble at low temperatures to aggregating at high temperatures. It has been shown that depending on the specific details of the ELP design (length of the ELP chain, pH and salt concentration) micelles can vary in size and shape between spherical micelles with diameter 30-100 nm to elongated particles with an aspect ratio of about 10. This makes ELP trimers a convenient platform for developing potential drug delivery and bio-sensing applications as well as for understanding micelle formation in ELP systems. Since at a given salt concentration, the headgroup area for each foldon should be constant, the size of the micelles is expected to be proportional to the volume of the linear ELP available per foldon headgroup. Therefore, adding linear ELPs to a system of ELP-foldon should result in changes of the micelle volume allowing to control micelle size and possibly shape. The effects of addition of linear ELPs on size, shape, and molecular weight of micelles at different salt concentrations were studied by a combination of Dynamic Light Scattering and Static Light Scattering. The initial results on 50 µM ELP-foldon samples (at low salt) show that Rh of mixed micelles increases more than 5-fold as the amount of linear ELP raised from 0 to 50 µM. It was also found that a given mixture of linear and trimer constructs has two temperature-based transitions and therefore displays three predominant size regimes.

  7. Light Scattering Study of Mixed Micelles Made from Elastin-Like Polypeptide Linear Chains and Trimers

    Terrano, Daniel; Tsuper, Ilona; Maraschky, Adam; Holland, Nolan; Streletzky, Kiril

    Temperature sensitive nanoparticles were generated from a construct (H20F) of three chains of elastin-like polypeptides (ELP) linked to a negatively charged foldon domain. This ELP system was mixed at different ratios with linear chains of ELP (H40L) which lacks the foldon domain. The mixed system is soluble at room temperature and at a transition temperature (Tt) will form swollen micelles with the hydrophobic linear chains hidden inside. This system was studied using depolarized dynamic light scattering (DDLS) and static light scattering (SLS) to determine the size, shape, and internal structure of the mixed micelles. The mixed micelle in equal parts of H20F and H40L show a constant apparent hydrodynamic radius of 40-45 nm at the concentration window from 25:25 to 60:60 uM (1:1 ratio). At a fixed 50 uM concentration of the H20F, varying H40L concentration from 5 to 80 uM resulted in a linear growth in the hydrodynamic radius from about 11 to about 62 nm, along with a 1000-fold increase in VH signal. A possible simple model explaining the growth of the swollen micelles is considered. Lastly, the VH signal can indicate elongation in the geometry of the particle or could possibly be a result from anisotropic properties from the core of the micelle. SLS was used to study the molecular weight, and the radius of gyration of the micelle to help identify the structure and morphology of mixed micelles and the tangible cause of the VH signal.

  8. Bat wing biometrics: using collagen–elastin bundles in bat wings as a unique individual identifier

    Hooper, Sarah E.; Womack, Kathryn M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The ability to recognize individuals within an animal population is fundamental to conservation and management. Identification of individual bats has relied on artificial marking techniques that may negatively affect the survival and alter the behavior of individuals. Biometric systems use biological characteristics to identify individuals. The field of animal biometrics has expanded to include recognition of individuals based upon various morphologies and phenotypic variations including pelage patterns, tail flukes, and whisker arrangement. Biometric systems use 4 biologic measurement criteria: universality, distinctiveness, permanence, and collectability. Additionally, the system should not violate assumptions of capture–recapture methods that include no increased mortality or alterations of behavior. We evaluated whether individual bats could be uniquely identified based upon the collagen–elastin bundles that are visible with gross examination of their wings. We examined little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus), northern long-eared bats (M. septentrionalis), big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), and tricolored bats (Perimyotis subflavus) to determine whether the “wing prints” from the bundle network would satisfy the biologic measurement criteria. We evaluated 1,212 photographs from 230 individual bats comparing week 0 photos with those taken at weeks 3 or 6 and were able to confirm identity of individuals over time. Two blinded evaluators were able to successfully match 170 individuals in hand to photographs taken at weeks 0, 3, and 6. This study suggests that bats can be successfully re-identified using photographs taken at previous times. We suggest further evaluation of this methodology for use in a standardized system that can be shared among bat conservationists. PMID:29674784

  9. Bat wing biometrics: using collagen-elastin bundles in bat wings as a unique individual identifier.

    Amelon, Sybill K; Hooper, Sarah E; Womack, Kathryn M

    2017-05-29

    The ability to recognize individuals within an animal population is fundamental to conservation and management. Identification of individual bats has relied on artificial marking techniques that may negatively affect the survival and alter the behavior of individuals. Biometric systems use biological characteristics to identify individuals. The field of animal biometrics has expanded to include recognition of individuals based upon various morphologies and phenotypic variations including pelage patterns, tail flukes, and whisker arrangement. Biometric systems use 4 biologic measurement criteria: universality, distinctiveness, permanence, and collectability. Additionally, the system should not violate assumptions of capture-recapture methods that include no increased mortality or alterations of behavior. We evaluated whether individual bats could be uniquely identified based upon the collagen-elastin bundles that are visible with gross examination of their wings. We examined little brown bats ( Myotis lucifugus ), northern long-eared bats ( M. septentrionalis ), big brown bats ( Eptesicus fuscus ), and tricolored bats ( Perimyotis subflavus ) to determine whether the "wing prints" from the bundle network would satisfy the biologic measurement criteria. We evaluated 1,212 photographs from 230 individual bats comparing week 0 photos with those taken at weeks 3 or 6 and were able to confirm identity of individuals over time. Two blinded evaluators were able to successfully match 170 individuals in hand to photographs taken at weeks 0, 3, and 6. This study suggests that bats can be successfully re-identified using photographs taken at previous times. We suggest further evaluation of this methodology for use in a standardized system that can be shared among bat conservationists.

  10. Enhanced elastin synthesis and maturation in human vascular smooth muscle tissue derived from induced-pluripotent stem cells.

    Eoh, Joon H; Shen, Nian; Burke, Jacqueline A; Hinderer, Svenja; Xia, Zhiyong; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Gerecht, Sharon

    2017-04-01

    Obtaining vascular smooth muscle tissue with mature, functional elastic fibers is a key obstacle in tissue-engineered blood vessels. Poor elastin secretion and organization leads to a loss of specialization in contractile smooth muscle cells, resulting in over proliferation and graft failure. In this study, human induced-pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were differentiated into early smooth muscle cells, seeded onto a hybrid poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate/poly (l-lactide) (PEGdma-PLA) scaffold and cultured in a bioreactor while exposed to pulsatile flow, towards maturation into contractile smooth muscle tissue. We evaluated the effects of pulsatile flow on cellular organization as well as elastin expression and assembly in the engineered tissue compared to a static control through immunohistochemistry, gene expression and functionality assays. We show that culturing under pulsatile flow resulted in organized and functional hiPSC derived smooth muscle tissue. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed hiPSC-smooth muscle tissue with robust, well-organized cells and elastic fibers and the supporting microfibril proteins necessary for elastic fiber assembly. Through qRT-PCR analysis, we found significantly increased expression of elastin, fibronectin, and collagen I, indicating the synthesis of necessary extracellular matrix components. Functionality assays revealed that hiPSC-smooth muscle tissue cultured in the bioreactor had an increased calcium signaling and contraction in response to a cholinergic agonist, significantly higher mature elastin content and improved mechanical properties in comparison to the static control. The findings presented here detail an effective approach to engineering elastic human vascular smooth muscle tissue with the functionality necessary for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Obtaining robust, mature elastic fibers is a key obstacle in tissue-engineered blood vessels. Human induced-pluripotent stem cells have

  11. Hydration of urea and alkylated urea derivatives

    Kaatze, Udo

    2018-01-01

    Compressibility data and broadband dielectric spectra of aqueous solutions of urea and some of its alkylated derivatives have been evaluated to yield their numbers Nh of hydration water molecules per molecule of solute. Nh values in a broad range of solute concentrations are discussed and are compared to hydration numbers of other relevant molecules and organic ions. Consistent with previous results, it is found that urea differs from other solutes in its unusually small hydration number, corresponding to just one third of the estimated number of nearest neighbor molecules. This remarkable hydration behavior is explained by the large density φH of hydrogen bonding abilities offered by the urea molecule. In terms of currently discussed models of reorientational motions and allied dynamics in water and related associating liquids, the large density φH causes a relaxation time close to that of undisturbed water with most parts of water encircling the solute. Therefore only a small part of disturbed ("hydration") water is left around each urea molecule. Adding alkyl groups to the basic molecule leads to Nh values which, within the series of n-alkylurea derivatives, progressively increase with the number of methyl groups per solute. With n-butylurea, Nh from dielectric spectra, in conformity with many other organic solutes, slightly exceeds the number of nearest neighbors. Compared to such Nh values, hydration numbers from compressibility data are substantially smaller, disclosing incorrect assumptions in the formula commonly used to interpret the experimental compressibilities. Similar to other series of organic solutes, effects of isomerization have been found with alkylated urea derivatives, indicating that factors other than the predominating density φH of hydrogen bond abilities contribute also to the hydration properties.

  12. Hydrates on tap: scientists say natural gas hydrates may be tough nut to crack

    Mahoney, J.

    2001-12-01

    Gas hydrates are methane molecules trapped in cages of water molecules, yielding a substance with a slushy, sherbet-like consistency. Drilling for hydrates is similar to conventional oil and gas drilling, however, the secret to economic production still remains hidden. Hydrates exist in abundance in such places as deep ocean floor and below ground in some polar regions. The real challenge lies in producing gas from this resource, inasmuch as there is no existing technology for production of gas specifically from methane hydrates. This paper describes an international research program, involving a five-country partnership to spud the first of three wells into the permafrost of the Mackenzie River Delta in the Northwest Territories. The project, worth about $15 million, has brought together public funding and expertise from Japan, Germany, India as well as the Canadian and US Geological Surveys and the US Dept. of Energy in an effort to gain information on the production response of gas hydrates. The operator of the project is Japan Petroleum Exploration Company of Canada, a subsidiary of Japan National Oil Corporation. Since Japan is poor in domestic hydrocarbon resources, but is surrounded by deep water that contains potential for gas hydrates, Japan has a great deal riding on the success of this project. Germany and the United States are also very much interested. Current thinking is that gas is in contact with the hydrates and that it should be possible to develop a free gas reservoir as if it were a conventional deposit. As the free gas is drawn off, the pressure is reduced on the hydrates in contact with it , the hydrates dissociate from the gas and replenish the conventional reservoir. So far this is still only a theory, but it appears to be a sensible approach to hydrate production. 1 photo.

  13. Cathodic detection of H2O2 based on nanopyramidal gold surface with enhanced electron transfer of myoglobin.

    Xia, Peipei; Liu, Haiqing; Tian, Yang

    2009-04-15

    Direct and reversible electron transfer of myoglobin (Mb), for the first time, is achieved at nanopyramidal gold surface, which was fabricated by one-step electrodeposition, with redox formal potential of 0.21+/-0.01 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) and an apparent heterogeneous electron-transfer rate constant (k(s)) of 1.6+/-0.2 s(-1). Electrochemical investigation indicates that Mb is stably confined on the nanopyramidal gold surface and maintains electrocatalytic activity toward hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). The facilitated electron transfer combined with the intrinsic catalytical activity of Mb substantially construct the third-generation biosensor for H(2)O(2). The positive redox potential of Mb at the nanostructured gold electrode gives a strong basis for determination of H(2)O(2) with high selectivity. Besides this advantage, the present biosensor also exhibits quick response time, broad linear range, and good sensitivity. The dynamic detection linear range is from 1 microM to 1.4 mM with a detection limit of 0.5 microM at 3sigma. The striking analytical performance of the present biosensor, as well as the biocompatibility of gold nanostructures provided a potential for continuous, on-line detection of H(2)O(2) in the biological system.

  14. Ontogenetic changes in skeletal muscle fiber type, fiber diameter and myoglobin concentration in the Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris

    Colby eMoore

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris (NES are known to be deep, long-duration divers and to sustain long-repeated patterns of breath-hold, or apnea. Some phocid dives remain within the bounds of aerobic metabolism, accompanied by physiological responses inducing lung compression, bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction. Current data suggest an absence of type IIb fibers in pinniped locomotory musculature. To date, no fiber type data exist for NES, a consummate deep diver. In this study, NES were biopsied in the wild. Ontogenetic changes in skeletal muscle were revealed through succinate dehydrogenase (SDH based fiber typing. Results indicated a predominance of uniformly shaped, large type I fibers and elevated myoglobin (Mb concentrations in the longissimus dorsi (LD muscle of adults. No type II muscle fibers were detected in any adult sampled. This was in contrast to the juvenile animals that demonstrated type II myosin in Western Blot analysis, indicative of an ontogenetic change in skeletal muscle with maturation. These data support previous hypotheses that the absence of type II fibers indicates reliance on aerobic metabolism during dives, as well as a depressed metabolic rate and low energy locomotion. We also suggest that the lack of type IIb fibers (adults may provide a protection against ischemia reperfusion (IR injury in vasoconstricted peripheral skeletal muscle.

  15. Electron Transfer of Myoglobin Immobilized in Au Electrodes Modified with a RAFT PMMA-Block-PDMAEMA Polymer

    Carla N. Toledo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myoglobin was immobilized with poly(methyl methacrylate-block-poly[(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate]PMMA-block-PDMAEMA polymer synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer t