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Sample records for hydrated collagen ii

  1. Hydration dynamics of the collagen triple helix by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melacini, G; Bonvin, A M; Goodman, M; Boelens, R; Kaptein, R

    2000-07-28

    The hydration of the collagen-like Ac-(Gly-Pro-Hyp)(6)-NH(2) triple-helical peptide in solution was investigated using an integrated set of high-resolution NMR hydration experiments, including different recently developed exchange-network editing methods. This approach was designed to explore the hydration dynamics in the proximity of labile groups, such as the hydroxyproline hydroxyl group, and revealed that the first shell of hydration in collagen-like triple helices is kinetically labile with upper limits for water molecule residence times in the nanosecond to sub-nanosecond range. This result is consistent with a "hopping" hydration model in which solvent molecules are exchanged in and out of solvation sites at a rate that is not directly correlated to the degree of site localization. The hopping model thus reconciles the dynamic view of hydration revealed by NMR with the previously suggested partially ordered semi-clathrate-like cylinder of hydration. In addition, the nanosecond to sub-nanosecond upper limits for water molecule residence times imply that hydration-dehydration events are not likely to be the rate-limiting step for triple helix self-recognition, complementing previous investigations on water dynamics in collagen fibers. This study has also revealed labile proton features expected to facilitate the characterization of the structure and folding of triple helices in collagen peptides.

  2. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  3. Nanomechanical mapping of hydrated rat tail tendon collagen I fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Samuel J; Quigley, Andrew S; Clegg, Charlotte; Kreplak, Laurent

    2014-10-21

    Collagen fibrils play an important role in the human body, providing tensile strength to connective tissues. These fibrils are characterized by a banding pattern with a D-period of 67 nm. The proposed origin of the D-period is the internal staggering of tropocollagen molecules within the fibril, leading to gap and overlap regions and a corresponding periodic density fluctuation. Using an atomic force microscope high-resolution modulus maps of collagen fibril segments, up to 80 μm in length, were acquired at indentation speeds around 10(5) nm/s. The maps revealed a periodic modulation corresponding to the D-period as well as previously undocumented micrometer scale fluctuations. Further analysis revealed a 4/5, gap/overlap, ratio in the measured modulus providing further support for the quarter-staggered model of collagen fibril axial structure. The modulus values obtained at indentation speeds around 10(5) nm/s are significantly larger than those previously reported. Probing the effect of indentation speed over four decades reveals two distinct logarithmic regimes of the measured modulus and point to the existence of a characteristic molecular relaxation time around 0.1 ms. Furthermore, collagen fibrils exposed to temperatures between 50 and 62°C and cooled back to room temperature show a sharp decrease in modulus and a sharp increase in fibril diameter. This is also associated with a disappearance of the D-period and the appearance of twisted subfibrils with a pitch in the micrometer range. Based on all these data and a similar behavior observed for cross-linked polymer networks below the glass transition temperature, we propose that collagen I fibrils may be in a glassy state while hydrated.

  4. Stabilization and anomalous hydration of collagen fibril under heating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasun G Gevorkian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type I collagen is the most common protein among higher vertebrates. It forms the basis of fibrous connective tissues (tendon, chord, skin, bones and ensures mechanical stability and strength of these tissues. It is known, however, that separate triple-helical collagen macromolecules are unstable at physiological temperatures. We want to understand the mechanism of collagen stability at the intermolecular level. To this end, we study the collagen fibril, an intermediate level in the collagen hierarchy between triple-helical macromolecule and tendon. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: When heating a native fibril sample, its Young's modulus decreases in temperature range 20-58°C due to partial denaturation of triple-helices, but it is approximately constant at 58-75°C, because of stabilization by inter-molecular interactions. The stabilization temperature range 58-75°C has two further important features: here the fibril absorbs water under heating and the internal friction displays a peak. We relate these experimental findings to restructuring of collagen triple-helices in fibril. A theoretical description of the experimental results is provided via a generalization of the standard Zimm-Bragg model for the helix-coil transition. It takes into account intermolecular interactions of collagen triple-helices in fibril and describes water adsorption via the Langmuir mechanism. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We uncovered an inter-molecular mechanism that stabilizes the fibril made of unstable collagen macromolecules. This mechanism can be relevant for explaining stability of collagen.

  5. Investigation of the effect of hydration on dermal collagen in ex vivo human skin tissue using second harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samatham, Ravikant; Wang, Nicholas K.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2016-02-01

    Effect of hydration on the dermal collagen structure in human skin was investigated using second harmonic generation microscopy. Dog ears from the Mohs micrographic surgery department were procured for the study. Skin samples with subject aged between 58-90 years old were used in the study. Three dimensional Multiphoton (Two-photon and backward SHG) control data was acquired from the skin samples. After the control measurement, the skin tissue was either soaked in deionized water for 2 hours (Hydration) or kept at room temperature for 2 hours (Desiccation), and SHG data was acquired. The data was normalized for changes in laser power and detector gain. The collagen signal per unit volume from the dermis was calculated. The desiccated skin tissue gave higher backward SHG compared to respective control tissue, while hydration sample gave a lower backward SHG. The collagen signal decreased with increase in hydration of the dermal collagen. Hydration affected the packing of the collagen fibrils causing a change in the backward SHG signal. In this study, the use of multiphoton microscopy to study the effect of hydration on dermal structure was demonstrated in ex vivo tissue.

  6. Enzymatic Breakdown of Type II Collagen in the Human Vitreous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deemter, Marielle; Pas, Hendri H.; Kuijer, Roel; van der Worp, Roelofje J.; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.; Los, Leonoor I.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE. To investigate whether enzymatic collagen breakdown is an active process in the human vitreous. METHODS. Human donor eyes were used for immunohistochemistry to detect the possible presence of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-induced type II collagen breakdown product col2-3/4C-short in

  7. Enzymatic Breakdown of Type II Collagen in the Human Vitreous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deemter, Marielle; Pas, Hendri H.; Kuijer, Roel; van der Worp, Roelofje J.; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.; Los, Leonoor I.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE. To investigate whether enzymatic collagen breakdown is an active process in the human vitreous. METHODS. Human donor eyes were used for immunohistochemistry to detect the possible presence of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-induced type II collagen breakdown product col2-3/4C-short in th

  8. Verification of simple hydration/dehydration methods to characterize multiple water compartments on tendon type 1 collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Ivan L; Short, Nicholas J; Fullerton, Gary D

    2007-06-01

    A molecular model of collagen hydration is used to validate centrifugal dehydration force (CDF) and re-hydration isotherm (RHI) methods to measure and characterize hydration compartments on bovine tendon. The CDF method assesses fluid flow rate from flexor and extensor tendons expressed in (g-water/g-dry mass-minute) and hydration capacity of compartments in (g-water/g-dry mass). Measured water compartment capacities agree with the molecular model of collagen hydration [Fullerton GD, Rahal A. Collagen structure: the molecular source of tendon magic angle effect. J Mag Reson Imag 2007;25:345-361; Fullerton GD, Amurao MR. Evidence that collagen and tendon have monolayer water coverage in the native state. Cell Biol Int 2006;30(1):56-65]. Native tendon hydration has monolayer coverage on collagen h(m)=1.6 g/g which divides into primary hydration on polar surfaces h(pp)=0.8 g/g and secondary hydration h(s)=0.8 g/g bridging over hydrophobic surfaces. Primary hydration is hydrogen bonded to collagen polar side chains h(psc)=0.54 g/g with small free energy or to the protein main chain hydration h(pmc)=0.26 g/g with greater free energy of binding. The CDF method replaces the more time consuming water proton NMR spin-lattice dehydration (NMR titration) method, confirms the presence of three non-bulk water compartments on collagen (h(pmc)=0.26 g/g, h(pp)=0.8 g/g and h(m)=1.6 g/g). This CDF method provides the most reproducible experimental measure of total tissue non-bulk water (TNBW). The re-hydration isotherm method, on the other hand, provides the most accurate measure of the Ramachandran water-bridge capacity h(Ra)=0.0656 g/g. The only equipment needed are: microfilterfuge tubes, a microcentrifuge capable of 14,000 x g or 4MPa, a vacuum drying oven, an accurate balance and curve fitting ability. The newly validated methods should be useful for characterizing multiple water compartments in biological and non-biological materials by allowing direct measurement of water

  9. Structural determinants of hydration, mechanics and fluid flow in freeze-dried collagen scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offeddu, G S; Ashworth, J C; Cameron, R E; Oyen, M L

    2016-09-01

    Freeze-dried scaffolds provide regeneration templates for a wide range of tissues, due to their flexibility in physical and biological properties. Control of structure is crucial for tuning such properties, and therefore scaffold functionality. However, the common approach of modeling these scaffolds as open-cell foams does not fully account for their structural complexity. Here, the validity of the open-cell model is examined across a range of physical characteristics, rigorously linking morphology to hydration and mechanical properties. Collagen scaffolds with systematic changes in relative density were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Micro-Computed Tomography and spherical indentation analyzed in a time-dependent poroelastic framework. Morphologically, all scaffolds were mid-way between the open- and closed-cell models, approaching the closed-cell model as relative density increased. Although pore size remained constant, transport pathway diameter decreased. Larger collagen fractions also produced greater volume swelling on hydration, although the change in pore diameter was constant, and relatively small at ∼6%. Mechanically, the dry and hydrated scaffold moduli varied quadratically with relative density, as expected of open-cell materials. However, the increasing pore wall closure was found to determine the time-dependent nature of the hydrated scaffold response, with a decrease in permeability producing increasingly elastic rather than viscoelastic behavior. These results demonstrate that characterizing the deviation from the open-cell model is vital to gain a full understanding of scaffold biophysical properties, and provide a template for structural studies of other freeze-dried biomaterials. Freeze-dried collagen sponges are three-dimensional microporous scaffolds that have been used for a number of exploratory tissue engineering applications. The characterization of the structure-properties relationships of these scaffolds is

  10. Effect of hydration on the stability of the collagen-like triple-helical structure of [4(R)-hydroxyprolyl-4(R)-hydroxyprolylglycine]10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Kazuki; Nishi, Yoshinori; Nakamura, Shota; Uchiyama, Susumu; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Nakazawa, Takashi; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2005-12-06

    X-ray analysis has been carried out on a crystal of the collagen model peptide (Hyp(R)-Hyp(R)-Gly)10 [where Hyp(R) is 4(R)-hydroxyproline] with 1.5 A resolution. The triple-helical structure of (Hyp(R)-Hyp(R)-Gly)10 has the same helical parameters and Rich and Crick II hydrogen bond patterns as those of other collagen model peptides. However, our full-length crystal structure revealed that almost all consecutive Hyp(R) residues take the up-up pucker in contrast to putative down-up puckering propensities of other collagen model peptides. The unique feature of thermodynamic parameters associated with the conformational transition of this peptide from triple helix to single coil is that both enthalpy and entropy changes of the transition are much smaller than those of other model peptides such as (Pro-Pro-Gly)10 and (Pro-Hyp(R)-Gly)10. To corroborate the precise structural information including main- and side-chain dihedral angles and intra- and interwater bridge networks, we estimated the degrees of hydration by comparing molecular volumes observed experimentally in solution to those calculated ones from the crystal structure. The results showed that the degree of hydration of (Hyp(R)-Hyp(R)-Gly)10 is comparable to that of (Pro-Hyp(R)-Gly)10 in the triple-helical state, but the former was more highly hydrated than (Pro-Hyp(R)-Gly)10 in the single-coil state. Because hydration reduces the enthalpy due to the formation of a hydrogen bond with a water molecule and diminishes the entropy due to the restriction of water molecules surrounding a peptide molecule, we concluded that the high thermal stability of (Hyp(R)-Hyp(R)-Gly)10 is able to be described by its high hydration in the single-coil state.

  11. Water-soluble undenatured type II collagen ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinari, Orie; Shiojima, Yoshiaki; Moriyama, Hiroyoshi; Shinozaki, Junichi; Nakane, Takahisa; Masuda, Kazuo; Bagchi, Manashi

    2013-11-01

    Earlier studies have reported the efficacy of type II collagen (C II) in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, a few studies have investigated the ability of the antigenic collagen to induce oral tolerance, which is defined as active nonresponse to an orally administered antigen. We hypothesized that water-soluble undenatured C II had a similar effect as C II in RA. The present study was designed to examine the oral administration of a novel, water-soluble, undenatured C II (commercially known as NEXT-II) on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. In addition, the underlying mechanism of NEXT-II was also identified. After a booster dose (collagen-Freund's complete adjuvant), mice were assigned to control CIA group, or NEXT-II treatment group, to which saline and NEXT-II were administered, respectively. The arthritis index in the NEXT-II group was significantly lower compared with the CIA group. Serum IL-6 levels in the NEXT-II group were significantly lower compared with the CIA group, while serum IL-2 level was higher. Furthermore, oral administration of NEXT-II enhanced the proportion of CD4+CD25+T (Treg) cells, and gene expressions of stimulated dendritic cells induced markers for regulatory T cells such as forkhead box p3 (Foxp3), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and CD25. These results demonstrated that orally administered water-soluble undenatured C II (NEXT-II) is highly efficacious in the suppression of CIA by inducing CD4+CD25+ Treg cells.

  12. Reaction of a hydrated electron with gentamycin and collagen -a pulse radiolysis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrucha, K. [Technical Univ., Lodz (Poland). Inst. of Applied Radiation Chemistry; Gora, L. [Worcester Poltechnic Inst., MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Doillon, C.J. [Laval Univ., Quebec, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Surgery]|[Saint-Francois d`Assise Hospital, Quebec (Canada)

    1996-01-01

    The reactions of a hydrated electron (e{sub aq}{sup -}) with aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamycin and collagen in aqueous medium at different pH have been investigated employing a pulse radiolysis technique. The pseudo-first order equation of reaction kinetics was used to give an accurate description of the decay of e{sub aq}{sup -} in gentamycin solutions. The rate constant of the e{sub aq}{sup -}decay in collagen solutions was high and reached 3.2 x 10{sup 10} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The rate constants for the reaction of the e{sub aq}{sup -}with gentamycin were found to be influenced by pH, decreasing with the deprotonation of the -NH{sub 3} groups, while for pH > pK{sub a} which for gentamycin is equal to 7.8, the rate constant was unchanged. These observations suggest that when the amino groups are protonated, reductive deamination occurs, but for unprotonated non-reactive amino groups, a radical anion is formed on the glycoside moiety. (Author).

  13. Hydration Study of Ordinary Portland Cement in the Presence of Lead(II) Oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Barbir, D.; Dabić, P.; Krolo, P.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of the addition of lead(II) oxide on hydration heat and specific conductivity of a CEM I Portland cement. The heat released during hydration was determined by differential microcalorimetry up to 48 hours of hydration and the specific conductivity by a digital conductometer. Thermogravimetric analysis was employed in the characterization of the cement structure. The hydration heat results show that the addition of lead(II) oxide affects the...

  14. Collagen Type II Enhances Chondrogenesis in Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells by Affecting Cell Shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, ZuFu; Doulabi, Behrouz Zandieh; Huang, ChunLing; Bank, Ruud A.; Helder, Marco N.

    2010-01-01

    Ideally, biomaterials have inductive properties, favoring specific lineage differentiation. For chondrogenic induction, these properties have been attributed to collagen type II. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether collagen type II favors c

  15. Collagen type II enhances chondrogenesis in adipose tissue-derived stem cells by affecting cell shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Z.; Doulabi, B.Z.; Huang, C.; Bank, R.A.; Helder, M.N.

    2010-01-01

    Ideally, biomaterials have inductive properties, favoring specific lineage differentiation. For chondrogenic induction, these properties have been attributed to collagen type II. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether collagen type II favors c

  16. Collagen Type II Enhances Chondrogenesis in Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells by Affecting Cell Shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, ZuFu; Doulabi, Behrouz Zandieh; Huang, ChunLing; Bank, Ruud A.; Helder, Marco N.

    Ideally, biomaterials have inductive properties, favoring specific lineage differentiation. For chondrogenic induction, these properties have been attributed to collagen type II. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether collagen type II favors

  17. Collagen type II enhances chondrogenesis in adipose tissue-derived stem cells by affecting cell shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Z.; Doulabi, B.Z.; Huang, C.; Bank, R.A.; Helder, M.N.

    2010-01-01

    Ideally, biomaterials have inductive properties, favoring specific lineage differentiation. For chondrogenic induction, these properties have been attributed to collagen type II. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether collagen type II favors

  18. Native type II collagen-induced arthritis in the rat. I. Incidence and humoral response to collagen.

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, K; Clague, R B; Shaw, M J; Holt, P J

    1980-01-01

    An acute inflammatory arthritis has been induced in 76% of rats injected intradermally with native bovine type II collagen emulsified in Freund's complete (CFA) or incomplete (ICFA) adjuvant. The arthritis became chronic in 14 out of 31 rats, and ear and tail lesions were noted in some rats. No arthritis was induced by native type I collagen, denatured type II collagen, rabbit IgG, or buffer alone injected intradermally with adjuvant. Using a solid-phase radioimmunoassay for serum antibodies ...

  19. Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy for Structure-II Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeya, Kei; Zhang, Caihong; Kawayama, Iwao

    2009-01-01

    For the nondestructive inspection of gas hydrates, terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) was applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate and propane hydrate. The absorption of propane hydrate monotonically increases with frequency, similar to the case of ice, while THF hydrate has a charact...

  20. Confocal Raman microscopy supported by optical clearing treatment of the skin—influence on collagen hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sdobnov, Anton Yu; Tuchin, Valery V.; Lademann, Juergen; E Darvin, Maxim

    2017-07-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) is employed to study the skin physiology, drug permeation and skin disease monitoring. In order to increase the depth of investigations, the effect of optical clearing was observed on porcine ear skin ex vivo. The optical clearing agents (OCAs) glycerol and iohexol (Omnipaque™) were applied to the porcine ear skin and investigated by CRM after 30 and 60 min of treatment. The extent of optical clearing by utilizing concentrations of 70% glycerol and 100% Omnipaque™ was evaluated. The intensity of the skin-related Raman peaks significantly increased starting from the depth 160 µm for Omnipaque™ and 40 µm for glycerol (p  ⩽  0.05) after 60 min of treatment. The OCAs’ influence on the collagen hydration in the deep-located dermis was investigated. Both OCAs induce skin dehydration, but the effect of glycerol treatment (30 min and 60 min) is stronger. The obtained results demonstrate that with increasing the treatment time, both glycerol and Omnipaque™ solutions improve the optical clearing of porcine skin making the deep-located dermal regions able for investigations. At the used concentrations and time intervals, glycerol is more effective than Omnipaque™. However, Omnipaque™ is more promising than glycerol for future in vivo applications as it is an already approved pharmaceutic substance without any known impact on the skin structure.

  1. Cartilage turnover reflected by metabolic processing of type II collagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmann, Karoline Natasja Stæhr; Wang, Jianxia; Hoielt, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    ). This is expected to originate primarily from remodeling of hyaline cartilage. A mouse monoclonal antibody (Mab) was raised in mouse, targeting specifically PIIBNP (QDVRQPG) and used in development of the assay. The specificity, sensitivity, 4-parameter fit and stability of the assay were tested. Levels of PIIBNP......The aim of this study was to enable measurement of cartilage formation by a novel biomarker of type II collagen formation. The competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) Pro-C2 was developed and characterized for assessment of the beta splice variant of type II procollagen (PIIBNP...

  2. Collagen binding specificity of the discoidin domain receptors: Binding sites on collagens II and III and molecular determinants for collagen IV recognition by DDR1

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Huifang; Raynal, Nicolas; Stathopoulos, Stavros; Myllyharju, Johanna; Farndale, Richard W.; Leitinger, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2 are cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by triple-helical collagen. While normal DDR signalling regulates fundamental cellular processes, aberrant DDR signalling is associated with several human diseases. We previously identified GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) as a major DDR2 binding site in collagens I–III, and located two additional DDR2 binding sites in collagen II. Here we extend these studies to the homologous DDR1 and the...

  3. Structure II gas hydrates found below the bottom-simulating reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganoni, M.; Cartwright, J. A.; Foschi, M.; Shipp, R. C.; Van Rensbergen, P.

    2016-06-01

    Gas hydrates are a major component in the organic carbon cycle. Their stability is controlled by temperature, pressure, water chemistry, and gas composition. The bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) is the primary seismic indicator of the base of hydrate stability in continental margins. Here we use seismic, well log, and core data from the convergent margin offshore NW Borneo to demonstrate that the BSR does not always represent the base of hydrate stability and can instead approximate the boundary between structure I hydrates above and structure II hydrates below. At this location, gas hydrate saturation below the BSR is higher than above and a process of chemical fractionation of the migrating free gas is responsible for the structure I-II transition. This research shows that in geological settings dominated by thermogenic gas migration, the hydrate stability zone may extend much deeper than suggested by the BSR.

  4. Collagen binding specificity of the discoidin domain receptors: binding sites on collagens II and III and molecular determinants for collagen IV recognition by DDR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huifang; Raynal, Nicolas; Stathopoulos, Stavros; Myllyharju, Johanna; Farndale, Richard W; Leitinger, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2 are cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by triple-helical collagen. While normal DDR signalling regulates fundamental cellular processes, aberrant DDR signalling is associated with several human diseases. We previously identified GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) as a major DDR2 binding site in collagens I-III, and located two additional DDR2 binding sites in collagen II. Here we extend these studies to the homologous DDR1 and the identification of DDR binding sites on collagen III. Using sets of overlapping triple-helical peptides, the Collagen II and Collagen III Toolkits, we located several DDR2 binding sites on both collagens. The interaction of DDR1 with Toolkit peptides was more restricted, with DDR1 mainly binding to peptides containing the GVMGFO motif. Triple-helical peptides containing the GVMGFO motif induced DDR1 transmembrane signalling, and DDR1 binding and receptor activation occurred with the same amino acid requirements as previously defined for DDR2. While both DDRs exhibit the same specificity for binding the GVMGFO motif, which is present only in fibrillar collagens, the two receptors display distinct preferences for certain non-fibrillar collagens, with the basement membrane collagen IV being exclusively recognised by DDR1. Based on our recent crystal structure of a DDR2-collagen complex, we designed mutations to identify the molecular determinants for DDR1 binding to collagen IV. By replacing five amino acids in DDR2 with the corresponding DDR1 residues we were able to create a DDR2 construct that could function as a collagen IV receptor.

  5. Effect of supramolecular organization of a cartilaginous tissue on thermal stability of collagen II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignat'eva, N. Yu.; Averkiev, S. V.; Lunin, V. V.; Grokhovskaya, T. E.; Obrezkova, M. V.

    2006-08-01

    The thermal stability of collagen II in various cartilaginous tissues was studied. It was found that heating a tissue of nucleus pulposus results in collagen II melting within a temperature range of 60-70°C; an intact tissue of hyaline cartilage (of nasal septum and cartilage endplates) is a thermally stable system, where collagen II is not denatured completely up to 100°C. It was found that partial destruction of glycosaminoglycans in hyaline cartilage leads to an increase in the degree of denaturation of collagen II upon heating, although a significant fraction remains unchanged. It was shown that electrostatic interactions of proteoglycans and collagen only slightly affect the thermal stability of collagen II in the tissues. Evidently, proteoglycan aggregates play a key role: they create topological hindrances for moving polypeptide chains, thereby reducing the configurational entropy of collagen macromolecules in the state of a random coil.

  6. Localization of type II collagen, long form alpha 1(IX) collagen, and short form alpha 1(IX) collagen transcripts in the developing chick notochord and axial skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiderski, R E; Solursh, M

    1992-06-01

    In this study we compare, by in situ hybridization, the spatial and temporal expression patterns of transcripts of avian type II collagen and the long and short forms of the (alpha 1) chain of type IX collagen during the development of the notochord and axial skeleton. We observed type II collagen and short form type IX collagen transcripts in the developing (stage 25-28) nonchondrogenic notochord. Conversely, long form type IX transcripts were not detectable in the notochord or perinotochordal sheath. Interestingly, all three transcripts colocalized in the developing chondrogenic vertebrae of the axial skeleton as well as in the chondrocranium and Meckel's cartilage. The expression of the short form of type IX collagen in these regions was more restricted than that of the long form. This report provides additional support for a complex regulatory pathway of cartilage marker gene expression in chondrogenic vs. nonchondrogenic tissues during avian embryogenesis.

  7. Analysis of a collagen II degradation protein C2C and a collagen II formation protein CP II in serum of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgallon, Conor P; Larsen, Scott; Wong, Alice; Yellowley, Clare

    2015-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is a major cause of chronic lameness in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in captivity worldwide. Radiology and other imaging technologies are of limited use in the early diagnosis of this condition in elephants. Collagen II is a major component of articular cartilage. The degradation and formation of collagen II can be monitored by the measurement of specific biomarkers in biologic fluids such as serum. It is possible that these biomarkers could also prove useful in identifying disease in elephants. In this study two commercially available immunoassays which measure a marker of collagen II degradation (C2C) and a marker of collagen II formation (CPII) were evaluated in Asian elephants. The ability of the assays to detect and measure C2C and CPII in the serum of Asian elephants was confirmed. Median serum concentration of C2C was 148 ng/L in nonlame elephants (n=33) and 91.2 ng/L in lame elephants (n=7). The difference was statistically significant (P=0.0002). Median serum concentration of CPII was 519.3 ng/L in nonlame elephants and 318.7 ng/L in lame elephants. The difference was also statistically significant (P=0.039). Whereas CPII concentrations in lame elephants mirrored findings from human and animal osteoarthritis studies, C2C concentrations did not. Further studies which evaluate these and other similar biomarkers are necessary to elucidate their usefulness in the diagnosis of osteoarthritis in proboscidae.

  8. Go natural and smarter: fenugreek as a hydration designer of collagen based biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanungo, Ivy; Fathima, Nishter Nishad; Jonnalagadda, Raghava Rao; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2015-01-28

    Collagen-based biomaterials have received considerable attention for smarter biomedical applications due to their inherent superior mechano-biological properties. However, accumulating evidence suggests that water, as a probe liquid bound in collagen, might be investigated to explore the influence of additives on the static and dynamic solvation behavior of collagen. The structure and dynamics of water near the surface/interface of collagen-fenugreek composites were demonstrated via circular dichroic spectroscopy, thermoporometry and impedimetric measurements to enlighten about the configuration-function relationship of collagen. Thermodynamic parameters of the composites signify the fenugreek concentration dependent structural robustness of collagen. Thermodynamic parameters such as free energies for unfolding, enthalpies, entropies and activation energies indicate that the residual structure modulates the stability of the denatured state up to 22 kcal mol(-1) and the parameters correlate with structural data for collagen complexed with fenugreek. The association constant of fenugreek is found to be 0.5807 M(-1). The binding of fenugreek influences rearrangement of the collagen-water network, resulting in the transition from a disordered (high entropy) unbound state to a structured (lower entropy) bound state. Fenugreek concentration plays a crucial role in shaping up the free energy that governs the folding, structure and stability of collagen. Dielectric data emphasize the effect of hydrophobic and hydrophilic clusters on the side chain motion constraints. The thermoporometry technique probes the pore size distributions of the composites. These methods provide insights into the role of excluded volume, chain stiffness and stability of a new collagen-galactomannan based composite, expanding its utility in "smart biomaterial applications".

  9. Type II collagen is transiently expressed during avian cardiac valve morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiderski, R E; Daniels, K J; Jensen, K L; Solursh, M

    1994-08-01

    We present new evidence of the temporal and spatial expression of type II collagen in the embryonic chick heart during the very early stages of its development. In particular, we emphasize the distribution of its mRNA and protein during valve formation. Type II collagen as well as several other fibrillar collagens (types I, III, and V) are present in stage 18 endocardial cushion mesenchymal cells. At stage 23, alpha 1 (II) collagen transcripts and the cognate polypeptide colocalize in the atrioventricular valves. As development proceeds, the relative abundance of alpha 1 (II) collagen transcripts decreases during the stages studied (stages 22 to 45; day 3.5 to day 19) as assayed by RNA blotting of extracts of whole hearts. Type II collagen protein was immunologically undetectable in stage 38 (day 12) hearts, although collagens I, III, and V persisted and localize in the valve regions, in the endothelial lining of the heart, and in the epicardium. In keeping with other observations of type II collagen expression in non-chondrogenic regions of a variety of vertebrate embryos, the avian heart also exhibits transient type II collagen expression.

  10. Type II collagen C2C epitope in human synovial fluid and serum after knee injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumahashi, N; Swärd, P; Larsson, S

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Investigate in a cross-sectional study time-dependent changes of synovial fluid type II collagen epitope C2C concentrations after knee injury and correlate to other joint injury biomarkers. METHODS: Synovial fluid samples were aspirated between 0 days and 7 years after injury (n = 235...... = 0.403, P collagen (r = 0.444, P = 0.003), ARGS-aggrecan (r = 0.337, P ... with an immediate and sustained local degradation of type II collagen....

  11. The response to estrogen deprivation on cartilage collagen degradation markers; CTX-II is unique compared to other markers of collagen turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Tabassi, Nadine; Sondergaard, Lene;

    2009-01-01

    rats receiving estrogen or not. Levels of PIIANP, a marker of type II collagen synthesis, were also measured in rats. Rat knee cartilage was analyzed for immunoreactivity of CTX-II and PIIANP and for type II collagen expression. RESULTS: As expected, urinary levels of CTX-II are significantly increased......ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The urinary level of type II collagen degradation marker CTX-II is increased in postmenopausal women and in ovariectomized rats, suggesting that estrogen deprivation induces cartilage breakdown. Here we investigate whether this response to estrogen holds true for other type...... II collagen turnover markers known to be affected in osteoarthritis, and whether it relates to its presence in specific areas of cartilage tissue. METHODS: The type II collagen degradation markers CTX-II and Helix-II were measured in body fluids of pre- and postmenopausal women and of ovariectomized...

  12. Identification of a mechanism of transformation of clathrate hydrate structures I to II or H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioki, Shuzo

    2012-07-01

    Binary mixed-gas hydrates including methane and other guest gases demonstrate a structural transition between the sI and sII phases. Under increasing pressure pure methane hydrate exhibits a phase transition first from sI to sII and then to sH. But the mechanism of the transformation from sI to sII or sH has not yet been identified. Recently, molecular dynamics simulations of methane hydrates suggest there may exist uncommon 15-hedral cages (5¹²6³), linking the sI and sII cages. In addition, xenon hydrate involving 15-hedral cages has been synthesized and named an hsI hydrate. Based on the hsI cages, we propose a mechanism for the transition of sI to sII or sH at atomic level resolution. The sI hydrate is first transformed to hsI, and hsI is further transformed to sII. Upon compression, hsI is transformed to sH owing to depletion of atomic layers. The mechanism of transformation speculated here calls for experimental verification.

  13. Kinetics of formation and dissociation of sII hydrogen clathrate hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, A.R.C. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Delft (Netherlands). Dept. of Physical Chemistry and Molecular Thermodynamics; Peters, C. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Delft (Netherlands). Dept. of Physical Chemistry and Molecular Thermodynamics]|[Delft Univ. of Technology, Delft (Netherlands). Dept. of Process and Energy Laboratory for Process Equipment; Zevenbergen, J. [TNO Defense, Security and Safety, Rijswijk (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    The potential for storing hydrogen in its molecular form in clathrate hydrates was investigated in order to explore the possibility of using these solids as a safe hydrogen storing method for the transportation sector. This paper presented experimental data on the kinetics of hydrogen clathrate hydrate formation, with particular reference to the formation and decomposition of the hydrate in a pressure range from 5.5 to 15.0 MPa. Experiments were performed for a binary system using hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and tetrahydrofuran (THF), which forms structures sII clathrate hydrate. Pressure was shown to have a strong influence on induction time, the rate of hydrate formation, the number of moles consumed and the temperature at which the gas hydrates are formed. The time required for the hydrate to be formed was lower for high pressures, and the temperature needed for the first crystals to appear was higher. The rate of hydrate formation was also higher when the driving forces increased. The number of moles of hydrogen entrapped in the solid phase increased as the experimental pressure increased, indicating that higher pressures are preferable for the formation of hydrogen clathrate hydrate. For a finite period of time, more hydrate was formed when the pressure was high. The results of this study may be useful in determining the viability of hydrogen clathrate hydrates as a storage medium in the transportation sector. The entrapment of hydrogen in clathrate hydrates may provide a clean and environmentally sound alternative to metal hydrides. In addition, it is a reversible process that avoids the need for a chemical reaction for hydrogen uptake and release. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs.

  14. Hydration dynamics of collagen/PVA composites: Thermoporometric and impedance analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanungo, Ivy; Fathima, N. Nishad; Rao, J. Raghava, E-mail: clrichem@mailcity.com; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2013-06-15

    Porous scaffolds like collagen/PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) composites have potential applications in the field of biomedical engineering. The pore properties and electrical behavior of collagen/PVA composite system were investigated by thermoporometry technique and electrochemical impedance analysis. The porous composites were crosslinked by less cytotoxic genipin due to the versatility in the crosslinking reactivity between the amino groups. Different physicochemical properties like rheological behavior, thermal stability of the protein and morphological changes of the composites were investigated as a function of PVA concentration by viscosity profile, temperature dependant circular dichroic spectroscopic studies, scanning electron microscopy. Bound water constrained within the pores of collagen/PVA composites seems to provide signatures for changes induced by amount of additives on the pore diameter and distribution in composite molecules. Impedance measurements of the composites in the frequency range of 10{sup −2} to 10{sup 5} Hz reveal that concentration of the additive and crosslinking significantly influence the permittivity of the composites. The tunable physicochemical properties help to gain insight for regulating cellular events for tissue and organ regeneration. - Highlights: • Additive and crosslinker influence pore size distribution of biocomposite. • Pore sizes are shifted to the lower nanometer range with increasing PVA concentration. • Additives influence reorientation of water near the peptide group of collagen. • Increase of tan δ values with the decrease of frequency indicates that the resistive component of biocomposites dominates.

  15. Research data supporting "Structural Determinants of Hydration, Mechanics and Fluid Flow in Collagen Scaffolds"

    OpenAIRE

    Offeddu, Giovanni S.; Ashworth, Jennifer C; Cameron, Ruth E.; Oyen, Michelle L.

    2016-01-01

    The following data files are provided: Summary of results: numerical values used to plot each figure in the manuscript, as well as single measurements for each parameter when applicable. Raw indentation data: the load vs. time curves obtained by spherical indentation for the dry and hydrated samples. CT Analysis: Ellipse fit data giving the pore size analysis for each condition, scaling analysis for calculation of percolation diameter, 3D analysis giving the specific surface area for each sam...

  16. Interaction of Lubricin with Collagen II Surfaces: Adsorption, Friction, and Normal Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Debby P.; Guilak, Farshid; Jay, Gregory; Zauscher, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    One of the major constituents of the synovial fluid that is thought to be responsible for chondroprotection and boundary lubrication is the glycoprotein lubricin (PRG4); however, the molecular mechanisms by which lubricin carries out its critical functions still remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that the interaction of lubricin with type II collagen, the main component of the cartilage extracellular matrix, results in enhanced tribological and wear properties. In this study, we examined: i) the molecular details by which lubricin interacts with type II collagen and how binding is related to boundary lubrication and adhesive interactions; and, ii) whether collagen structure can affect lubricin adsorption and its chondroprotective properties. We found that lubricin adsorbs strongly onto denatured, amorphous, and fibrillar collagen surfaces. Furthermore, we found large repulsive interactions between the collagen surfaces in presence of lubricin, which increased with increasing lubricin concentration. Lubricin attenuated the large friction and also the long-range adhesion between fibrillar collagen surfaces. Interestingly, lubricin adsorbed onto and mediated the frictional response between the denatured and native amorphous collagen surfaces equally and showed no preference on the supramolecular architecture of collagen. However, the coefficient of friction was lowest on fibrillar collagen in the presence of lubricin. We speculate that an important role of lubricin in mediating interactions at the cartilage surface is to attach to the cartilage surface and provide a protective coating that maintains the contacting surfaces in a sterically repulsive state. PMID:24406099

  17. Interaction of lubricin with type II collagen surfaces: adsorption, friction, and normal forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Debby P; Guilak, Farshid; Jay, Gregory D; Zauscher, Stefan

    2014-02-01

    One of the major constituents of the synovial fluid that is thought to be responsible for chondroprotection and boundary lubrication is the glycoprotein lubricin (PRG4); however, the molecular mechanisms by which lubricin carries out its critical functions still remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that the interaction of lubricin with type II collagen, the main component of the cartilage extracellular matrix, results in enhanced tribological and wear properties. In this study, we examined: (i) the molecular details by which lubricin interacts with type II collagen and how binding is related to boundary lubrication and adhesive interactions; and (ii) whether collagen structure can affect lubricin adsorption and its chondroprotective properties. We found that lubricin adsorbs strongly onto denatured, amorphous, and fibrillar collagen surfaces. Furthermore, we found large repulsive interactions between the collagen surfaces in presence of lubricin, which increased with increasing lubricin concentration. Lubricin attenuated the large friction and also the long-range adhesion between fibrillar collagen surfaces. Interestingly, lubricin adsorbed onto and mediated the frictional response between the denatured and native amorphous collagen surfaces equally and showed no preference on the supramolecular architecture of collagen. However, the coefficient of friction was lowest on fibrillar collagen in the presence of lubricin. We speculate that an important role of lubricin in mediating interactions at the cartilage surface is to attach to the cartilage surface and provide a protective coating that maintains the contacting surfaces in a sterically repulsive state.

  18. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Vlasic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work uses density functional theory (DFT to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane, at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  19. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2016-08-01

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  20. Adjuvant arthritis pretreatment with type II collagen and Mycobacterium butyricum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franch, A; Cassany, S; Castellote, C; Castell, M

    1992-11-01

    A treatment previous to adjuvant arthritis induction has been performed with type II collagen (CII) or Mycobacterium butyricum (Mb), which is the inducer of the pathology. Pretreatment was administered in two different ways: a) subcutaneously or intradermally 14 days before arthritis induction, and b) intravenously 3 days before induction. In order to relate the change in inflammation to the corresponding antigen immune response, serum antibodies and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) against CII or Mb were studied. Pretreatment with s.c. CII 14 days before induction produced slight protection against arthritis and significantly delayed its onset; systemic inflammation showed good positive correlation with anti-CII antibodies. The CII administered i.v. 3 days before arthritic challenge did not significantly modify the inflammatory process. The use of i.d. subarthritogenic doses of Mb 14 days before induction protected a high percentage of the animals from the posterior arthritic challenge; this protection was accompanied by high anti-Mb antibody titers and DTH reaction. When Mb was given i.v. 3 days before induction, a partial protection of inflammation was observed; arthritis was milder and its onset was delayed. These changes were accompanied by reduced humoral and cellular response to Mb.

  1. Identification and characterization of the human type II collagen gene (COL2A1).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.S.E. Cheah (Kathryn); N.G. Stoker; J.R. Griffin; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); E. Solomon

    1985-01-01

    textabstractThe gene contained in the human cosmid clone CosHcol1, previously designated an alpha 1(I) collagen-like gene, has now been identified. CosHcol1 hybridizes strongly to a single 5.9-kilobase mRNA species present only in tissue in which type II collagen is expressed. DNA sequence analysis

  2. Trypsin-mediated enzymatic degradation of type II collagen in the human vitreous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deemter, Marielle; Kuijer, Roel; Pas, Hendri Harm; van der Worp, Roelofje Jacoba; Hooymans, Johanna Martina Maria; Los, Leonoor Inge

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Aging of the vitreous body can result in sight-threatening pathology. One aspect of vitreous aging is liquefaction, which results from the vanishing of collagen fibrils. We investigated the possibility that trypsins are involved in vitreous type II collagen degradation. Methods: Immunohisto

  3. HYDRATION OF Cd(II): MOLECULAR DYNAMICS STUDY Ahmed M ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    predominantly the first hydration shell has been studied by MD method with ... weighted-histogram-analysis method (WHAM) [25-27] which is adopted in this study. ..... Gonzalez, C.; Head-Gordon, M.; Replogle, E.S.; Pople, J.A. Gaussian 98 ...

  4. The D2 period of collagen II contains a specific binding site for the human discoidin domain receptor, DDR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitinger, Birgit; Steplewski, Andrzej; Fertala, Andrzej

    2004-12-03

    The human discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), DDR1 and DDR2, are expressed widely and, uniquely among receptor tyrosine kinases, activated by the extracellular matrix protein collagen. This activation is due to a direct interaction of collagen with the DDR discoidin domain. Here, we localised a specific DDR2 binding site on the triple-helical region of collagen II. Collagen II was found to be a much better ligand for DDR2 than for DDR1. As expected, DDR2 binding to collagen II was dependent on triple-helical collagen and was mediated by the DDR2 discoidin domain. Collagen II served as a potent stimulator of DDR2 autophosphorylation, the first step in transmembrane signalling. To map the DDR2 binding site(s) on collagen II, we used recombinant collagen II variants with specific deletions of one of the four repeating D periods. We found that the D2 period of collagen II was essential for DDR2 binding and receptor autophosphorylation, whereas the D3 and D4 periods were dispensable. The DDR2 binding site on collagen II was further defined by recombinant collagen II-like proteins consisting predominantly of tandem repeats of the D2 or D4 period. The D2 construct, but not the D4 construct, mediated DDR2 binding and receptor autophosphorylation, demonstrating that the D2 period of collagen II harbours a specific DDR2 recognition site. The discovery of a site-specific interaction of DDR2 with collagen II gives novel insight into the nature of the interaction of collagen II with matrix receptors.

  5. Dissociation behavior of methane--ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Masato; Jin, Yusuke; Takahashi, Nobuo; Nagao, Jiro; Narita, Hideo

    2010-09-09

    Dissociation behavior of methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II at constant temperatures less than 223 K was studied with use of powder X-ray diffraction and solid-state (13)C NMR techniques. The diffraction patterns at temperatures less than 203 K showed both structures I and II simultaneously convert to Ih during the dissociation, but the diffraction pattern at temperatures greater than 208 K showed different dissociation behavior between structures I and II. Although the diffraction peaks from structure II decreased during measurement at constant temperatures greater than 208 K, those from structure I increased at the initial step of dissociation and then disappeared. This anomalous behavior of the methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II was examined by using the (13)C NMR technique. The (13)C NMR spectra revealed that the anomalous behavior results from the formation of ethane-rich structure I. The structure I hydrate formation was associated with the dissociation rate of the initial methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate.

  6. The response to oestrogen deprivation of the cartilage collagen degradation marker, CTX-II, is unique compared with other markers of collagen turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Tabassi, Nadine C B; Sondergaard, Lene V;

    2009-01-01

    The urinary level of the type II collagen degradation marker CTX-II is increased in postmenopausal women and in ovariectomised rats, suggesting that oestrogen deprivation induces cartilage breakdown. Here we investigate whether this response to oestrogen is also true for other type II collagen tu...... turnover markers known to be affected in osteoarthritis, and whether it relates to its presence in specific areas of cartilage tissue....

  7. Formation and properties of ice XVI obtained by emptying a type sII clathrate hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falenty, Andrzej; Hansen, Thomas C; Kuhs, Werner F

    2014-12-11

    Gas hydrates are ice-like solids, in which guest molecules or atoms are trapped inside cages formed within a crystalline host framework (clathrate) of hydrogen-bonded water molecules. They are naturally present in large quantities on the deep ocean floor and as permafrost, can form in and block gas pipelines, and are thought to occur widely on Earth and beyond. A natural point of reference for this large and ubiquitous family of inclusion compounds is the empty hydrate lattice, which is usually regarded as experimentally inaccessible because the guest species stabilize the host framework. However, it has been suggested that sufficiently small guests may be removed to leave behind metastable empty clathrates, and guest-free Si- and Ge-clathrates have indeed been obtained. Here we show that this strategy can also be applied to water-based clathrates: five days of continuous vacuum pumping on small particles of neon hydrate (of structure sII) removes all guests, allowing us to determine the crystal structure, thermal expansivity and limit of metastability of the empty hydrate. It is the seventeenth experimentally established crystalline ice phase, ice XVI according to the current ice nomenclature, has a density of 0.81 grams per cubic centimetre (making it the least dense of all known crystalline water phases) and is expected to be the stable low-temperature phase of water at negative pressures (that is, under tension). We find that the empty hydrate structure exhibits negative thermal expansion below about 55 kelvin, and that it is mechanically more stable and has at low temperatures larger lattice constants than the filled hydrate. These observations attest to the importance of kinetic effects and host-guest interactions in clathrate hydrates, with further characterization of the empty hydrate expected to improve our understanding of the structure, properties and behaviour of these unique materials.

  8. Glycosylation of type II collagen is of major importance for T cell tolerance and pathology in collagen-induced arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäcklund, Johan; Treschow, Alexandra; Bockermann, Robert;

    2002-01-01

    Type II collagen (CII) is a candidate cartilage-specific autoantigen, which can become post-translationally modified by hydroxylation and glycosylation. T cell recognition of CII is essential for the development of murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and also occurs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA......). The common denominator of murine CIA and human RA is the presentation of an immunodominant CII-derived glycosylated peptide on murine Aq and human DR4 molecules, respectively. To investigate the importance of T cell recognition of glycosylated CII in CIA development after immunization with heterologous CII......, we treated neonatal mice with different heterologous CII-peptides (non-modified, hydroxylated and galactosylated). Treatment with the galactosylated peptide (galactose at position 264) was superior in protecting mice from CIA. Protection was accompanied by a reduced antibody response to CII...

  9. The search for negative amplitude components in quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times: the example of 1H magnetization exchange in articular cartilage and hydrated collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantazzini, Paola; Galassi, Francesca; Bortolotti, Villiam; Brown, Robert J. S.; Vittur, Franco

    2011-06-01

    When inverting nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation data in order to obtain quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times for fluids in porous media, it is common practice to impose a non-negative (NN) constraint on the distributions. While this approach can be useful in reducing the effects of data distortion and/or preventing wild oscillations in the distributions, it may give misleading results in the presence of real negative amplitude components. Here, some examples of valid negative components for articular cartilage and hydrated collagen are given. Articular cartilage is a connective tissue, consisting mainly of collagen, proteoglycans and water, which can be considered, in many aspects, as a porous medium. Separate T1 relaxation data are obtained for low-mobility ('solid') macromolecular 1H and for higher-mobility ('liquid') 1H by the separation of these components in free induction decays, with α denoting the solid/liquid 1H ratio. When quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times (T1) of the solid and liquid signal components of cartilage or collagen are computed from experimental relaxation data without imposing the usual NN constraint, valid negative peaks may appear. The features of the distributions, in particular negative peaks, and the fact that peaks at longer times for macromolecular and water protons are at essentially the same T1, are interpreted as the result of a magnetization exchange between these two spin pools. For the only-slightly-hydrated collagen samples, with α>1, the exchange leads to small negative peaks at short T1 times for the macromolecular component. However, for the cartilage, with substantial hydration or for a strongly hydrated collagen sample, both with αLt1, the behavior is reversed, with a negative peak for water at short times. The validity of a negative peak may be accepted (dismissed) by a high (low) cost of NN in error of fit. Computed distributions for simulated data using observed signal

  10. Effects of collagen types II and X on the kinetics of crystallization of calcium phosphate in biomineralization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The effects of the components of cartilages matrix on the process of endochondral ossification and the kinetics of crystal growth of calcium phosphate have been studied in the presence of type II or X collagen. During the experiments, type I collagen was added as the seed material. FT-IR analysis shows that calcium phosphate crystallized on the surface of type I collagen was mainly hydroxyapatite. Both type II and X collagens could reduce the growth rate of calcium phosphate crystals, and the effect of type X collagen is more obvious. The reaction was in the fourth order in the presence of type II collagen. The results showed that type II or X collagen had the ability to make Ca2+ accumulate in the process of endochondral ossification, but has little effect on crystal growth and the product of biomineralization.

  11. Prdm5 Regulates Collagen Gene Transcription by Association with RNA Polymerase II in Developing Bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Giorgio Giacomo; Honnens de Lichtenberg, Kristian; Carrara, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    expressed in developing bones; and, by genome-wide mapping of Prdm5 occupancy in pre-osteoblastic cells, we uncover a novel and unique role for Prdm5 in targeting all mouse collagen genes as well as several SLRP proteoglycan genes. In particular, we show that Prdm5 controls both Collagen I transcription...... and fibrillogenesis by binding inside the Col1a1 gene body and maintaining RNA polymerase II occupancy. In vivo, Prdm5 loss results in delayed ossification involving a pronounced impairment in the assembly of fibrillar collagens. Collectively, our results define a novel role for Prdm5 in sustaining...

  12. Femtosecond Corneal Collagen Crosslinking in Treatment of Patients with Progressive Keratoconus Stages I–II

    OpenAIRE

    K.B. Letnikova; A.T. Khandjan; O.G. Oganesyan; A.V. Penkina; V.V. Neroyev

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to assess safety and efficacy of corneal collagen crosslinking technique using femtosecond laser for intrastromal pocket creation in patients with progressive keratoconus. Materials and Methods. Thirty-three patients (34 eyes) with progressive keratoconus stages I–II underwent femto-crosslinking of the corneal collagen. FEMTO LDV Z6 femtosecond laser was used to create an intrastromal pocket of 8.0 mm diameter and 140 μm depth. Normotonic riboflavin solution (...

  13. Type II Collagen and Gelatin from Silvertip Shark (Carcharhinus albimarginatus) Cartilage: Isolation, Purification, Physicochemical and Antioxidant Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Elango Jeevithan; Bin Bao; Yongshi Bu; Yu Zhou; Qingbo Zhao; Wenhui Wu

    2014-01-01

    Type II acid soluble collagen (CIIA), pepsin soluble collagen (CIIP) and type II gelatin (GII) were isolated from silvertip shark (Carcharhinus albimarginatus) cartilage and examined for their physicochemical and antioxidant properties. GII had a higher hydroxyproline content (173 mg/g) than the collagens and cartilage. CIIA, CIIP and GII were composed of two identical α1 and β chains and were characterized as type II. Amino acid analysis of CIIA, CIIP and GII indicated imino acid contents of...

  14. Neutron powder diffraction studies as a function of temperature of structure II hydrate formed from propane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawn, C.J.; Rondinone, A.J.; Chakoumakos, B.C.; Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Ishii, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction data confirm that hydrate samples synthesized with propane crystallize as structure type II hydrate. The structure has been modeled using rigid-body constraints to describe C3H8 molecules located in the eight larger polyhedral cavities of a deuterated host lattice. Data were collected at 12, 40, 100, 130, 160, 190, 220, and 250 K and used to calculate the thermal expansivity from the temperature dependence of the lattice parameters. The data collected allowed for full structural refinement of atomic coordinates and the atomic-displacement parameters.

  15. MT1-MMP and type II collagen specify skeletal stem cells and their bone and cartilage progeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabova, Ludmila; Yamada, Susan S; Wimer, Helen F

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal formation is dependent on timely recruitment of skeletal stem cells and their ensuing synthesis and remodeling of the major fibrillar collagens, type I collagen and type II collagen, in bone and cartilage tissues during development and postnatal growth. Loss of the major collagenolytic a...

  16. Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II logging-while-drilling data acquisition and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Wyung W.; Zyrianova, Margarita V.; Mrozewski, Stefan A.; Guerin, Gilles; Cook, Ann E.; Goldberg, Dave S.

    2012-01-01

    One of the objectives of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II (GOM JIP Leg II) was the collection of a comprehensive suite of logging-while-drilling (LWD) data within gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in order to make accurate estimates of the concentration of gas hydrates under various geologic conditions and to understand the geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate at each of the sites drilled during this expedition. The LWD sensors just above the drill bit provided important information on the nature of the sediments and the occurrence of gas hydrate. There has been significant advancements in the use of downhole well-logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrate in nature: From using electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gas hydrate occurrences in wells to where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. Recent integrated sediment coring and well-log studies have confirmed that electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data can yield accurate gas hydrate saturations in sediment grain supported (isotropic) systems such as sand reservoirs, but more advanced log analysis models are required to characterize gas hydrate in fractured (anisotropic) reservoir systems. In support of the GOM JIP Leg II effort, well-log data montages have been compiled and presented in this report which includes downhole logs obtained from all seven wells drilled during this expedition with a focus on identifying and characterizing the potential gas-hydrate-bearing sedimentary section in each of the wells. Also presented and reviewed in this report are the gas-hydrate saturation and sediment porosity logs for each of the wells as calculated from available downhole well logs.

  17. MT1-MMP and type II collagen specify skeletal stem cells and their bone and cartilage progeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabova, L.; Yamada, S.S.; Wimer, H.;

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal formation is dependent on timely recruitment of skeletal stem cells and their ensuing synthesis and remodeling of the major fibrillar collagens, type I collagen and type II collagen, in bone and cartilage tissues during development and postnatal growth. Loss of the major collagenolytic...... activity associated with the membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) results in disrupted skeletal development and growth in both cartilage and bone, where MT1-MMP is required for pericellular collagen dissolution. We show here that reconstitution of MT1-MMP activity in the type II collagen...

  18. Stimulation of reactive oxygen species and collagen synthesis by angiotensin II in cardiac fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijnen, Paul J; van Pelt, Jos F; Fagard, Robert H

    2012-02-01

    Superoxide anion generated by NAD(P)H-oxidase has an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and scavenging superoxide anion can be considered as a reasonable therapeutic strategy. In hypertensive heart diseases there is a mutual reinforcement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and angiotensin II (ANG II). ANG II increases the NAD(P)H-dependent superoxide anion production and the intracellular generation of ROS in cardiac fibroblasts and apocynin, a membrane NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor, abrogates this rise. ANG II also stimulates the collagen production, the collagen I and III content and mRNA expression in cardiac fibroblasts and apocynin abolishes this induction. In this review we demonstrate that scavenging superoxide anion by tempol or EUK-8 or administration of PEG-superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibits collagen production in cardiac fibroblasts. On the contrary increasing superoxide anion formation by inhibition of SOD stimulates collagen production. A vital role of SOD and the generated ROS can be suggested in the regulation and organization of collagen in cardiac fibroblasts. Specific pharmacological intervention with SOD mimetics can probably be an alternative approach for reducing myocardial fibrosis.

  19. Water proton configurations in structures I, II, and H clathrate hydrate unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Fumihito; Hiratsuka, Masaki; Ohmura, Ryo; Alavi, Saman; Sum, Amadeu K; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2013-03-28

    Position and orientation of water protons need to be specified when the molecular simulation studies are performed for clathrate hydrates. Positions of oxygen atoms in water are experimentally determined by X-ray diffraction analysis of clathrate hydrate structures, but positions of water hydrogen atoms in the lattice are disordered. This study reports a determination of the water proton coordinates in unit cell of structure I (sI), II (sII), and H (sH) clathrate hydrates that satisfy the ice rules, have the lowest potential energy configuration for the protons, and give a net zero dipole moment. Possible proton coordinates in the unit cell were chosen by analyzing the symmetry of protons on the hexagonal or pentagonal faces in the hydrate cages and generating all possible proton distributions which satisfy the ice rules. We found that in the sI and sII unit cells, proton distributions with small net dipole moments have fairly narrow potential energy spreads of about 1 kJ∕mol. The total Coulomb potential on a test unit charge placed in the cage center for the minimum energy∕minimum dipole unit cell configurations was calculated. In the sI small cages, the Coulomb potential energy spread in each class of cage is less than 0.1 kJ∕mol, while the potential energy spread increases to values up to 6 kJ∕mol in sH and 15 kJ∕mol in the sII cages. The guest environments inside the cages can therefore be substantially different in the sII case. Cartesian coordinates for oxygen and hydrogen atoms in the sI, sII, and sH unit cells are reported for reference.

  20. Characterizing Ni(II) hydration in aqueous solution using DFT and EXAFS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H Y; Fang, C H; Fang, Y; Zhou, Y Q; Ge, H W; Zhu, F Y; Sun, P C; Miao, J T

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, a detailed investigation of Ni(II) hydration in water solutions was carried out using density functional theory (DFT) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The hydrated characteristics of [Ni(H2O)n](2+) clusters, such as energy parameters, atomic charge distributions, and bond parameters, were explored using DFT with Becke's three-parameter exchange potential and the Lee-Yang-Parr correlation functional (B3LYP). DFT calculations indicated that the preferred structure of the first hydration shell of Ni(II) generally has a coordination number of six and is almost unaffected by the water molecules in the outer solvation shell, whereas the structure of the second solvation shell varies as the hydration proceeds. EXAFS measurements are reported for aqueous NiSO4 and Ni(NO3)2 solutions and the Ni(NO3)2·6H2O crystal. Analysis of the EXAFS spectra of these three systems using a multiparameter fitting procedure showed that, in each case, the first coordination shell consists of six water molecules with a Ni-O coordination distance of 2.04 Å, and that there is no Ni-S or Ni-N coordination in the first shell. There was no evidence of outer-shell SO4(2-) or NO3(-) ions substituting inner-sphere water molecules in NiSO4 and Ni(NO3)2. The characteristics of Ni(II) hydration obtained from DFT calculations agreed well with those obtained experimentally using EXAFS.

  1. Crystal structure and encapsulation dynamics of ice II-structured neon hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaohui; Zhu, Jinlong; Du, Shiyu; Xu, Hongwu; Vogel, Sven C; Han, Jiantao; Germann, Timothy C; Zhang, Jianzhong; Jin, Changqing; Francisco, Joseph S; Zhao, Yusheng

    2014-07-22

    Neon hydrate was synthesized and studied by in situ neutron diffraction at 480 MPa and temperatures ranging from 260 to 70 K. For the first time to our knowledge, we demonstrate that neon atoms can be enclathrated in water molecules to form ice II-structured hydrates. The guest Ne atoms occupy the centers of D2O channels and have substantial freedom of movement owing to the lack of direct bonding between guest molecules and host lattices. Molecular dynamics simulation confirms that the resolved structure where Ne dissolved in ice II is thermodynamically stable at 480 MPa and 260 K. The density distributions indicate that the vibration of Ne atoms is mainly in planes perpendicular to D2O channels, whereas their distributions along the channels are further constrained by interactions between adjacent Ne atoms.

  2. Effects of Oral Administration of Type II Collagen on Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentham, David E.; Dynesius-Trentham, Roselynn A.; Orav, E. John; Combitchi, Daniel; Lorenzo, Carlos; Sewell, Kathryn Lea; Hafler, David A.; Weiner, Howard L.

    1993-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory synovial disease thought to involve T cells reacting to an antigen within the joint. Type II collagen is the major protein in articular cartilage and is a potential autoantigen in this disease. Oral tolerization to autoantigens suppresses animal models of T cell-mediated autoimmune disease, including two models of rheumatoid arthritis. In this randomized, double-blind trial involving 60 patients with severe, active rheumatoid arthritis, a decrease in the number of swollen joints and tender joints occurred in subjects fed chicken type II collagen for 3 months but not in those that received a placebo. Four patients in the collagen group had complete remission of the disease. No side effects were evident. These data demonstrate clinical efficacy of an oral tolerization approach for rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Differential association of the N-propeptide of collagen IIA (PIIANP) and collagen II C-telopeptide (CTX-II) with synovitis and erosions in early and longstanding rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A F; Lottenburger, T; Lindegaard, H

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the N-terminal propeptide of collagen IIA (PIIANP) in early and established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to study the association with collagen II degradation assessed by its C-telopeptide (CTX-II), x-ray status and disease activity measures. METHODS: Two cohorts of RA......-ray progression (p=0.84). There was no correlation between PIIANP and CTX-II. CONCLUSION: Declining PIIANP with increasing RA duration and persistently increased CTX-II indicate that cartilage anabolic and degradative pathways are unbalanced from clinical RA onset. Furthermore, that collagen II depletion in RA...... is both mediated by anti-anabolic effects unassociated with synovitis (decreased PIIANP) and by excess collagen II degradation linked to synovitis (increased CTX-II)....

  4. Canine chondrocytes seeded in type I and type II collagen implants investigated in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehrer, S; Breinan, H A; Ramappa, A; Shortkroff, S; Young, G; Minas, T; Sledge, C B; Yannas, I V; Spector, M

    1997-01-01

    Synthetic and natural absorbable polymers have been used as vehicles for implantation of cells into cartilage defects to promote regeneration of the articular joint surface. Implants should provide a pore structure that allows cell adhesion and growth, and not provoke inflammation or toxicity when implanted in vivo. The scaffold should be absorbable and the degradation should match the rate of tissue regeneration. To facilitate cartilage repair the chemical structure and pore architecture of the matrix should allow the seeded cells to maintain the chondrocytic phenotype, characterized by synthesis of cartilage-specific proteins. We investigated the behavior of canine chondrocytes in two spongelike matrices in vitro: a collagen-glycosaminoglycan (GAG) copolymer produced from bovine hide consisting of type I collagen and a porous scaffold made of type II collagen by extraction of porcine cartilage. Canine chondrocytes were seeded on both types of matrices and cultured for 3 h, 7 days, and 14 days. The histology of chondrocyte-seeded implants showed a significantly higher percentage of cells with spherical morphology, consistent with chondrocytic morphology, in the type II sponge at each time point. Pericellular matrix stained for proteoglycans and for type II collagen after 14 days. Biochemical analysis of the cell seeded sponges for GAG and DNA content showed increases with time. At day 14 there was a significantly higher amount of DNA and GAG in the type II matrix. This is the first study that directly compares the behavior of chondrocytes in type I and type II collagen matrices. The type II matrix may be of value as a vehicle for chondrocyte implantation on the basis of the higher percentage of chondrocytes retaining spherical morphology and greater biosynthetic activity that was reflected in the greater increase of GAG content.

  5. Crosslinked type II collagen matrices: preparation, characterization, and potential for cartilage engineering.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, J.S.; Kraan, P.M. van der; Hafmans, T.G.M.; Kamp, J.; Buma, P.; Susante, J.L.C. van; Berg, W.B. van den; Veerkamp, J.H.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van

    2002-01-01

    The limited intrinsic repair capacity of articular cartilage has stimulated continuing efforts to develop tissue engineered analogues. Matrices composed of type II collagen and chondroitin sulfate (CS), the major constituents of hyaline cartilage, may create an appropriate environment for the genera

  6. Effect of Collagen Type I or Type II on Chondrogenesis by Cultured Human Articular Chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, M.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Vonk, L.A.; van Rijen, M.H.P.; Akrum, V.; Langeveld, D.; van Boxtel, A.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Creemers, L.B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Current cartilage repair procedures using autologous chondrocytes rely on a variety of carriers for implantation. Collagen types I and II are frequently used and valuable properties of both were shown earlier in vitro, although a preference for either was not demonstrated. Recently,

  7. Cartilage collagen type II seromarker patterns in axial spondyloarthritis and psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Heidi Lausten; Gudmann, Natasja Staehr; Christensen, Anne Friesgaard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the possible association between type II collagen turnover seromarkers and disease profile in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Outpatients with axial SpA (n = 110) or PsA (n = 101) underwent clinical examination including...

  8. Effect of Collagen Type I or Type II on Chondrogenesis by Cultured Human Articular Chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, M.; Saris, D.B.F.; Vonk, L.A.; Rijen, van M.H.P.; Akrum, V.; Langeveld, D.; Boxtel, van A.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Creemers, L.B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Current cartilage repair procedures using autologous chondrocytes rely on a variety of carriers for implantation. Collagen types I and II are frequently used and valuable properties of both were shown earlier in vitro, although a preference for either was not demonstrated. Recently, ho

  9. MT1-MMP and type II collagen specify skeletal stem cells and their bone and cartilage progeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabova, L.; Yamada, S.S.; Wimer, H.

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal formation is dependent on timely recruitment of skeletal stem cells and their ensuing synthesis and remodeling of the major fibrillar collagens, type I collagen and type II collagen, in bone and cartilage tissues during development and postnatal growth. Loss of the major collagenolytic...... activity associated with the membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) results in disrupted skeletal development and growth in both cartilage and bone, where MT1-MMP is required for pericellular collagen dissolution. We show here that reconstitution of MT1-MMP activity in the type II collagen......-expressing cells of the skeleton rescues not only diminished chondrocyte proliferation, but surprisingly, also results in amelioration of the severe skeletal dysplasia associated with MT1-MMP deficiency through enhanced bone formation. Consistent with this increased bone formation, type II collagen was identified...

  10. 2H and 13C NMR studies on the temperature-dependent water and protein dynamics in hydrated elastin, myoglobin and collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusceac, Sorin A; Vogel, Michael R; Herbers, Claudia R

    2010-01-01

    (2)H NMR spin-lattice relaxation and line-shape analyses are performed to study the temperature-dependent dynamics of water in the hydration shells of myoglobin, elastin, and collagen. The results show that the dynamical behaviors of the hydration waters are similar for these proteins when using comparable hydration levels of h=0.25-0.43. Since water dynamics is characterized by strongly nonexponential correlation functions, we use a Cole-Cole spectral density for spin-lattice relaxation analysis, leading to correlation times, which are in nice agreement with results for the main dielectric relaxation process observed for various proteins in the literature. The temperature dependence can roughly be described by an Arrhenius law, with the possibility of a weak crossover in the vicinity of 220 K. Near ambient temperatures, the results substantially depend on the exact shape of the spectral density so that deviations from an Arrhenius behavior cannot be excluded in the high-temperature regime. However, for the studied proteins, the data give no evidence for the existence of a sharp fragile-to-strong transition reported for lysozyme at about 220 K. Line-shape analysis reveals that the mechanism for the rotational motion of hydration waters changes in the vicinity of 220 K. For myoglobin, we observe an isotropic motion at high temperatures and an anisotropic large-amplitude motion at low temperatures. Both mechanisms coexist in the vicinity of 220 K. (13)C CP MAS spectra show that hydration results in enhanced elastin dynamics at ambient temperatures, where the enhancement varies among different amino acids. Upon cooling, the enhanced mobility decreases. Comparison of (2)H and (13)C NMR data reveals that the observed protein dynamics is slower than the water dynamics.

  11. Suppression of Carrageenan- and Collagen II-Induced Inflammation in Mice by Geranium Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available To obtain experimental evidence on the therapeutic efficacy of essential oils in aromatherapy for inflammatory diseases, we examined the effects of geranium oil on carrageenan-induced and collagen II-induced inflammation in mice, to assess acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activities of the oil. Single intraperitoneal injection of 5μL of geranium oil clearly suppressed the carrageenan-induced footpaw edema and increase in tissue myeloperoxidase activity, and repeated administration of the oil suppressed collagen-induced arthritis. These results revealed that geranium oil suppressed both acute and chronic inflammatory responses in mice

  12. Suppression of Carrageenan- and Collagen II-Induced Inflammation in Mice by Geranium Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naho Maruyama

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available To obtain experimental evidence on the therapeutic efficacy of essential oils in aromatherapy for inflammatory diseases, we examined the effects of geranium oil on carrageenan-induced and collagen II-induced inflammation in mice, to assess acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activities of the oil. Single intraperitoneal injection of 5 μL of geranium oil clearly suppressed the carrageenan-induced footpaw edema and increase in tissue myeloperoxidase activity, and repeated administration of the oil suppressed collagen-induced arthritis. These results revealed that geranium oil suppressed both acute and chronic inflammatory responses in mice.

  13. Biochemical markers of type II collagen breakdown and synthesis are positioned at specific sites in human osteoarthritic knee cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne-Christine Bay; Levin Andersen, Thomas; Charni-Ben Tabassi, N;

    2007-01-01

    as for type IIA N propeptide (PIIANP), a biochemical marker reflecting synthesis of type IIA collagen. RESULTS: Helix-II and CTX-II were detected in areas where collagen damage was reported previously, most frequently around chondrocytes, but also frequently in regions not previously investigated......OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether type II collagen turnover markers used for osteoarthritis (OA) activity evaluation in body fluids can be detected at the level of specific histological features of OA cartilage tissue, as well as how they relate with each other at this level. METHODS: Adjacent...... sections were obtained from full-depth cartilage biopsies from 32 OA knees. Immunohistochemistry was performed for Helix-II and CTX-II, which are type II collagen fragments originating from the triple helix and the telopeptide region, respectively, and believed to reflect distinct breakdown events, as well...

  14. The search for negative amplitude components in quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times: the example of {sup 1}H magnetization exchange in articular cartilage and hydrated collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantazzini, Paola; Galassi, Francesca [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Bortolotti, Villiam [Department of DICAM, University of Bologna, Viale del Risorgimento 2, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Brown, Robert J S [953 West Bonita Avenue, Claremont, CA 91711-4193 (United States); Vittur, Franco, E-mail: paola.fantazzini@unibo.it [Department of Life Sciences, University of Trieste, via Giorgeri 1, 24137 (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    When inverting nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation data in order to obtain quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times for fluids in porous media, it is common practice to impose a non-negative (NN) constraint on the distributions. While this approach can be useful in reducing the effects of data distortion and/or preventing wild oscillations in the distributions, it may give misleading results in the presence of real negative amplitude components. Here, some examples of valid negative components for articular cartilage and hydrated collagen are given. Articular cartilage is a connective tissue, consisting mainly of collagen, proteoglycans and water, which can be considered, in many aspects, as a porous medium. Separate T{sub 1} relaxation data are obtained for low-mobility ('solid') macromolecular {sup 1}H and for higher-mobility ('liquid') {sup 1}H by the separation of these components in free induction decays, with {alpha} denoting the solid/liquid {sup 1}H ratio. When quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times (T{sub 1}) of the solid and liquid signal components of cartilage or collagen are computed from experimental relaxation data without imposing the usual NN constraint, valid negative peaks may appear. The features of the distributions, in particular negative peaks, and the fact that peaks at longer times for macromolecular and water protons are at essentially the same T{sub 1}, are interpreted as the result of a magnetization exchange between these two spin pools. For the only-slightly-hydrated collagen samples, with {alpha}>1, the exchange leads to small negative peaks at short T{sub 1} times for the macromolecular component. However, for the cartilage, with substantial hydration or for a strongly hydrated collagen sample, both with {alpha}<<1, the behavior is reversed, with a negative peak for water at short times. The validity of a negative peak may be accepted (dismissed) by a high (low) cost of NN in error of fit

  15. Physics of soft hyaluronic acid-collagen type II double network gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Svetlana; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2015-03-01

    Many biological hydrogels are made up of multiple interpenetrating, charged components. We study the swelling, elastic diffusion, mechanical, and optical behaviors of 100 mol% ionizable hyaluronic acid (HA) and collagen type II fiber networks. Dilute, 0.05-0.5 wt% hyaluronic acid networks are extremely sensitive to solution salt concentration, but are stable at pH above 2. When swelled in 0.1M NaCl, single-network hyaluronic acid gels follow scaling laws relevant to high salt semidilute solutions; the elastic shear modulus G' and diffusion constant D scale with the volume fraction ϕ as G' ~ϕ 9 / 4 and D ~ϕ 3 / 4 , respectively. With the addition of a collagen fiber network, we find that the hyaluronic acid network swells to suspend the rigid collagen fibers, providing extra strength to the hydrogel. Results on swelling equilibria, elasticity, and collective diffusion on these double network hydrogels will be presented.

  16. Environmental regulation of type X collagen production by cultures of limb mesenchyme, mesectoderm, and sternal chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solursh, M; Jensen, K L; Reiter, R S; Schmid, T M; Linsenmayer, T F

    1986-09-01

    We have examined whether the production of hypertrophic cartilage matrix reflecting a late stage in the development of chondrocytes which participate in endochondral bone formation, is the result of cell lineage, environmental influence, or both. We have compared the ability of cultured limb mesenchyme and mesectoderm to synthesize type X collagen, a marker highly selective for hypertrophic cartilage. High density cultures of limb mesenchyme from stage 23 and 24 chick embryos contain many cells that react positively for type II collagen by immunohistochemistry, but only a few of these initiate type X collagen synthesis. When limb mesenchyme cells are cultured in or on hydrated collagen gels or in agarose (conditions previously shown to promote chondrogenesis in low density cultures), almost all initiate synthesis of both collagen types. Similarly, collagen gel cultures of limb mesenchyme from stage 17 embryos synthesize type II collagen and with some additional delay type X collagen. However, cytochalasin D treatment of subconfluent cultures on plastic substrates, another treatment known to promote chondrogenesis, induces the production of type II collagen, but not type X collagen. These results demonstrate that the appearance of type X collagen in limb cartilage is environmentally regulated. Mesectodermal cells from the maxillary process of stages 24 and 28 chick embryos were cultured in or on hydrated collagen gels. Such cells initiate synthesis of type II collagen, and eventually type X collagen. Some cells contain only type II collagen and some contain both types II and X collagen. On the other hand, cultures of mandibular processes from stage 29 embryos contain chondrocytes with both collagen types and a larger overall number of chondrogenic foci than the maxillary process cultures. Since the maxillary process does not produce cartilage in situ and the mandibular process forms Meckel's cartilage which does not hypertrophy in situ, environmental influences

  17. Adsorptive removal of Cu(II) from aqueous solutions using collagen-tannin resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Xia; Huang Xin [Department of Biomass Chemistry and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Liao Xuepin, E-mail: xpliao@scu.edu.cn [Department of Biomass Chemistry and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); National Engineering Laboratory for Clean Technology of Leather Manufacture, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Shi Bi, E-mail: shibi@scu.edu.cn [National Engineering Laboratory for Clean Technology of Leather Manufacture, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2011-02-28

    The collagen-tannin resin (CTR), as a novel adsorbent, was prepared via a reaction of collagen with black wattle tannin and aldehyde, and its adsorption properties to Cu(II) were systematically investigated, including pH effect, adsorption equilibrium, adsorption kinetics, and column adsorption. The adsorption capacity of Cu(II) on CTR was pH-dependent, and it increased with the increase of solution pH. The adsorption isotherms were well described by Langmuir isotherm model with correlating constant (R{sup 2}) higher than 0.99. The adsorption capacity determined at 303 K was high up to 0.26 mmol/g, which was close to the value (0.266 mmol/g) estimated from Langmuir equation. The adsorption capacity was increased with the increase of temperature, and thermodynamic calculations suggested that the adsorption of Cu(II) on CTR is an endothermic process. The adsorption kinetics were well fitted by the pseudo-second-order rate model. Further column studies suggested that CTR was effective for the removal of Cu(II) from solutions, and more than 99% of Cu(II) was desorbed from column using 0.1 mol/L HNO{sub 3} solution. The CTR column can be reused to adsorb Cu(II) without any loss of adsorption capacity.

  18. A metalloprotease secreted by the type II secretion system links Vibrio cholerae with collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bo R; Zielke, Ryszard A; Wierzbicki, Igor H; Mitchell, Kristie C; Withey, Jeffrey H; Sikora, Aleksandra E

    2015-03-01

    Vibrio cholerae is autochthonous to various aquatic niches and is the etiological agent of the life-threatening diarrheal disease cholera. The persistence of V. cholerae in natural habitats is a crucial factor in the epidemiology of cholera. In contrast to the well-studied V. cholerae-chitin connection, scarce information is available about the factors employed by the bacteria for the interaction with collagens. Collagens might serve as biologically relevant substrates, because they are the most abundant protein constituents of metazoan tissues and V. cholerae has been identified in association with invertebrate and vertebrate marine animals, as well as in a benthic zone of the ocean where organic matter, including collagens, accumulates. Here, we describe the characterization of the V. cholerae putative collagenase, VchC, encoded by open reading frame VC1650 and belonging to the subfamily M9A peptidases. Our studies demonstrate that VchC is an extracellular collagenase degrading native type I collagen of fish and mammalian origin. Alteration of the predicted catalytic residues coordinating zinc ions completely abolished the protein enzymatic activity but did not affect the translocation of the protease by the type II secretion pathway into the extracellular milieu. We also show that the protease undergoes a maturation process with the aid of a secreted factor(s). Finally, we propose that V. cholerae is a collagenovorous bacterium, as it is able to utilize collagen as a sole nutrient source. This study initiates new lines of investigations aiming to uncover the structural and functional components of the V. cholerae collagen utilization program.

  19. A Metalloprotease Secreted by the Type II Secretion System Links Vibrio cholerae with Collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bo R.; Zielke, Ryszard A.; Wierzbicki, Igor H.; Mitchell, Kristie C.; Withey, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is autochthonous to various aquatic niches and is the etiological agent of the life-threatening diarrheal disease cholera. The persistence of V. cholerae in natural habitats is a crucial factor in the epidemiology of cholera. In contrast to the well-studied V. cholerae-chitin connection, scarce information is available about the factors employed by the bacteria for the interaction with collagens. Collagens might serve as biologically relevant substrates, because they are the most abundant protein constituents of metazoan tissues and V. cholerae has been identified in association with invertebrate and vertebrate marine animals, as well as in a benthic zone of the ocean where organic matter, including collagens, accumulates. Here, we describe the characterization of the V. cholerae putative collagenase, VchC, encoded by open reading frame VC1650 and belonging to the subfamily M9A peptidases. Our studies demonstrate that VchC is an extracellular collagenase degrading native type I collagen of fish and mammalian origin. Alteration of the predicted catalytic residues coordinating zinc ions completely abolished the protein enzymatic activity but did not affect the translocation of the protease by the type II secretion pathway into the extracellular milieu. We also show that the protease undergoes a maturation process with the aid of a secreted factor(s). Finally, we propose that V. cholerae is a collagenovorous bacterium, as it is able to utilize collagen as a sole nutrient source. This study initiates new lines of investigations aiming to uncover the structural and functional components of the V. cholerae collagen utilization program. PMID:25561716

  20. Hg(II) removal from aqueous solution by bayberry tannin-immobilized collagen fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Liao, Xuepin; Shi, Bi

    2009-10-30

    A novel adsorbent was prepared by immobilizing barberry tannin (BT) onto collagen fiber, which was found effective to remove Hg(II) from aqueous solution. The bayberry tannin-immobilized collagen fiber (BTICF) shows high adsorption capacity to Hg(II) in a wide pH range of 4.0-9.0, and a maximum adsorption capacity (198.49 mg/g) was reached at pH 7.0 and 303 K when the initial concentration of Hg(II) was 200.0 mg/L. The adsorption isothermal and kinetic data were well fitted by the Langmuir equation and the pseudo-first-order rate equation, respectively. The adsorption mechanism of BTICF to Hg(II) was proved to follow a chelating reaction. The BTICF can be easily regenerated with 0.1M lactic acid after adsorption process and recycled at least 4 times without the loss of adsorption capacity. These facts indicate that BTICF can be used as a low-cost adsorbent for effective removal of Hg(II) from aqueous solutions.

  1. Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddon, M.; Burrows, M.; Ferreira, S. A.; Dazzi, F.; Apperley, J. F.; Bradshaw, A.; Brand, D. D.; Czernuszka, J.; Gentleman, E.

    2017-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of pain and disability and is often associated with the degeneration of articular cartilage. Lesions to the articular surface, which are thought to progress to OA, have the potential to be repaired using tissue engineering strategies; however, it remains challenging to instruct cell differentiation within a scaffold to produce tissue with appropriate structural, chemical and mechanical properties. We aimed to address this by driving progenitor cells to adopt a chondrogenic phenotype through the tailoring of scaffold composition and physical properties. Monomeric type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds, which avoid potential immunogenicity associated with fibrillar collagens, were fabricated with and without chondroitin sulfate (CS) and their ability to stimulate the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that cells produced abundant collagen type-II on type-II scaffolds and collagen type-I on type-I scaffolds. Gene expression analyses indicated that the addition of CS – which was released from scaffolds quickly – significantly upregulated expression of type II collagen, compared to type-I and pure type-II scaffolds. We conclude that collagen type-II and CS can be used to promote a more chondrogenic phenotype in the absence of growth factors, potentially providing an eventual therapy to prevent OA.

  2. Protective effect of niacinamide on interleukin-1beta-induced annulus fibrosus type II collagen degeneration in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Deyu; Yang, Shuhua; Shao, Zengwu; Wang, Hong; Xiong, Xiaoqian

    2007-02-01

    The protective effect of niacinamide on interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)-induced annulus fibrosus (AF) type II collagen degeneration in vitro and the mechanism were investigated. Chiba's intervertebral disc (IVD) culture models in rabbits were established and 48 IVDs from 12 adult Japanese white rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups: normal control group, niacinamide-treated group, type II collagen degneration group (IL-1beta) and treatment group (niacinamide+IL-1beta). After culture for one week, AFs were collected for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cysteine containing aspartate specific protease-3 (Caspase-3) and type II collagen immunohistochemical examination, and type II collagen reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that rate of iNOS positive staining AF cells in the 4 groups was 17.6%, 10.9%, 73.9% and 19.3% respectively. The positive rate in treatment group was significantly lower than in the type II collagen degeneration group (Pniacinamide could effectively inhibit IL-1beta stimulated increase of iNOS and Caspase-3 in AF, and alleviate IL-1beta-caused destruction and synthesis inhibition of type II collagen. Niacinamide is of potential for clinical treatment of IVD degeneration.

  3. Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddon, M; Burrows, M; Ferreira, S A; Dazzi, F; Apperley, J F; Bradshaw, A; Brand, D D; Czernuszka, J; Gentleman, E

    2017-03-03

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of pain and disability and is often associated with the degeneration of articular cartilage. Lesions to the articular surface, which are thought to progress to OA, have the potential to be repaired using tissue engineering strategies; however, it remains challenging to instruct cell differentiation within a scaffold to produce tissue with appropriate structural, chemical and mechanical properties. We aimed to address this by driving progenitor cells to adopt a chondrogenic phenotype through the tailoring of scaffold composition and physical properties. Monomeric type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds, which avoid potential immunogenicity associated with fibrillar collagens, were fabricated with and without chondroitin sulfate (CS) and their ability to stimulate the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that cells produced abundant collagen type-II on type-II scaffolds and collagen type-I on type-I scaffolds. Gene expression analyses indicated that the addition of CS - which was released from scaffolds quickly - significantly upregulated expression of type II collagen, compared to type-I and pure type-II scaffolds. We conclude that collagen type-II and CS can be used to promote a more chondrogenic phenotype in the absence of growth factors, potentially providing an eventual therapy to prevent OA.

  4. A new method for screening potential sII and sH hydrogen clathrate hydrate promoters with model potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankcombe, Terry J; Kroes, Geert-Jan

    2011-08-01

    A new predictive computational method for classifying clathrate hydrate promoter molecules is presented, based on the interaction energies between potential promoters and the water networks of sII and sH clathrates. The motivation for this work is identifying promoters for storing hydrogen compactly in clathrate hydrates. As a first step towards achieving this goal, we have developed a general method aimed at distinguishing between molecules that form sII clathrate hydrates and molecules that can-together with a weakly interacting help gas-form sH clathrate hydrates. The new computational method calculates differences in estimated formation energies of the sII and the sH clathrate hydrate. Model interaction potentials have been used, including the electrostatic interactions with newly calculated partial charges for all the considered potential promoter molecules. The methodology can discriminate between the clathrate structure types (sII or sH) formed by each potential promoter with good selectivity, i.e., better than achieved with a simple van der Waals diameter criterion.

  5. Prostaglandins in the perilymph of guinea pig with type II collagen induced ear diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, T.; Chiang, T.; Kitano, H.; Sudo, N.; Kim, S.Y.; Ha, S.; Woo, V.; Wolf, B.; Floyd, R.; Yoo, T.J.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have studied the prostaglandins (PGs) in the perilymph from guinea pig with type II collagen induced autoimmune ear disease. Hartly guinea pigs were immunized with type II collagen in CFA and auditory brain stem responses (ABR) were measured at 2, 3, 4, and 6 months after initial immunization perilymph was obtained and the levels of PGE2 and 6 keto-PGFl..cap alpha.. were measured by radioimmunoassays. Temporal bones were examined for the histopathologic changes. Immunized guinea pigs showed the evidence of hearing loss by ABR. The temporal bones showed the following changes: spiral ganglia degeneration, mild to moderate degree of degeneration in organ of Corti, infrequent very mild endolymphatic hydrops and labrynthitis. The perilymph from immunized animals contained about 5 times more PGE2 and about 3 times more 6 keto-PGFl..cap alpha.. than control animals. However, between these two groups, there was no difference in the CSF and sera levels of PGE2 and 6 keto-PGFl..cap alpha... Thus, this study suggests that these inflammatory mediators might be involved in the pathogenesis of collagen induced autoimmune inner ear disease.

  6. [Sorption characteristics of tea waste modified by hydrated ferric oxide toward Pb(II) in water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Shun-Li; Xue, Yao; Ma, Zhao-Zhao; Liu, Guo-Bin; Yu, Yan-Xia; Ma, Ming-Hai

    2014-10-01

    Hydrated ferric oxide was successfully impregnated onto tea waste by precipitation to obtain a new sorbent named HFO-TW, the adsorption characteristics of which toward Pb(II) in aqueous solution was investigated by evaluating the effects of pH value, contact time, coexisting ion, temperature, and initial concentration of Pb(II). The Pb(II) sorption onto HFO-TW was pH- dependent, and the higher pH value was more helpful for Pb(II) adsorption onto HFO-TW in the pH range of 2.5-7. Lead sorption speed was quick and could reach equilibrium within 100 min, and the kinetics curve could be fitted well by both pseudo-first and pseudo-second models. The related coefficient was 98.8%. HFO-TW exhibited highly selective lead retention and the adsorption capacity of Pb(II) onto HFO-TW was declined by only 12.1 mg · g(-1) and 8.1 mg · g(-1) in the presence of competing Ca(II), Mg(II) at 50 times of the target ion. In addition, Pb(II) sorption onto HFO-TW could be described satisfactorily by Langmuir model, and the maximal sorption capacity calculated by Langmuir equation was 89.43 mg · g(-1), which was much higher than the unmodified tea waste and other bio-sorbents. All the results validated that HFO-TW was a promising sorbent for removal of lead from waters.

  7. Coordination study of recombinant human-like collagen and zinc (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuan-Yuan; Fan, Dai-Di

    2011-10-01

    In the present investigation, the complex of recombinant human-like collagen (r-HLC) with zinc (II) has been synthesized in aqueous solution and was analyzed by UV-vis spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, thermo gravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. It can be concluded from UV-vis spectra that there exists interaction between r-HLC and zinc, and the complex is a new chemical compound different from pure r-HLC. In the complex of Zn, recombinant human-like collagen acts as ligand, linking the zinc ion via both groups of C dbnd O and N-H. Besides, the results of TG and DSC confirm that the complex was significantly different from ligand, and the former is more thermally stable in comparison with the latter. The results obtained from the current investigation are of crucial importance to understand the r-HLC-Zn complex and provide theoretical evidence for the further study.

  8. Are there autoantibodies reacting against citrullinated peptides derived from type I and type II collagens in patients with rheumatoid arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivula, M; Aman, S; Karjalainen, A; Hakala, M; Risteli, J

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the possible presence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of autoantibodies recognising citrullinated peptides derived from type I and II collagens. Methods: Firstly, the binding of four pairs of synthetic peptides (arginine-containing and artificially citrullinated forms) related to different regions of human type II collagen were tested with sera from 120 patients with RA and 81 controls. Secondly, two similar pairs of peptides related to the carboxy terminal telopeptides of the α1 and α2 chains of human type I collagen were tested. Results: 42–53% of the RA sera showed increased binding of arginine peptides related to type II collagen. However, 12 RA sera bound the citrullinated form of the α1(II) telopeptide more strongly than the corresponding arginine peptide. 20 RA sera bound the citrullinated carboxytelopeptide from the α1 chain of type I collagen (α1(I) telopeptide) more strongly than the respective arginine peptide. The correlation between the autoantibodies to type I and II collagen telopeptides was rs = 0.576, pAnti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) assay was positive in 71/120 (59%) patients with RA. An anti-CCP assay detects a different subgroup of antibodies than anti-telopeptide assays. However, both anti-telopeptide and anti-CCP antibodies were increased in patients with RA. Conclusion: Some patients with RA were identified whose sera contained antibodies that specifically bound citrullinated peptides related to the carboxy terminal telopeptides of the α1 and α2 chains of type I collagen and the α1 chains of type II collagen (sequences YYXA, FYXA, and YMXA, where X stands for citrulline). PMID:16162901

  9. Hydration profile and sweat loss perception of male and female division II basketball players during practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thigpen, Lauren K; Green, James M; OʼNeal, Eric K

    2014-12-01

    Hydration affects multiple aspects of basketball performance, but few investigations have examined the hydration profiles of collegiate basketball players. We examined multiday prepractice hydration status of 11 male and 11 female NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) Division II basketball players' sweat losses, fluid intake, and how accurately players estimated their sweat losses. Urine-specific gravity (USG) was spontaneously assessed before 2 practices. Sweat losses and fluid intakes were measured during a conditioning practice (CP) and sport-specific practice (SP). After practices, players filled 1,030 ml practice bottles to estimate their sweat losses. Urine-specific gravity between practices exhibited a moderate correlation (r = 0.54; p = 0.012) and were consistently high (17% of samples = USG >1.030) with no difference in mean USG between men (1.026 ± 0.004) and women (1.022 ± 0.008). Athletes' estimations of their sweat loss volumes between CP and the longer SP were strongly correlated (r = 0.88; p < 0.001). Estimation error was high (absolute error for both practices = 71 ± 52%) and error direction varied greatly within men. Women consistently underestimated sweat losses by 63 ± 28% and 65 ± 20% during CP and SP. Sweat losses during SP equaled 2,471 ± 495 ml and 1,910 ± 441 ml for men and women, respectively, but high practice fluid intake limited body mass losses to 1.1 ± 0.6% by the end of practice. It is plausible that hypohydration is related to poor conceptualization of sweat losses. Simulating the methodology of this study could help identify chronically hypohydrated athletes and be used to educate on between-practice fluid needs.

  10. Immunohistochemical findings type I and type II collagen in prenatal mouse mandibular condylar cartilage compared with the tibial anlage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, M; Suda, N; Tengan, T; Suzuki, S; Kuroda, T

    1998-07-01

    In growing animals the mandibular condylar cartilage serves not only as an articular but also as a growth cartilage, yet, condylar cartilage has some characteristic features that are not found in growth cartilage. For example, some reports suggest that type I collagen, which is not seen in the growth plate cartilage of long bones, is present in the extracellular matrix of condylar cartilage postnatally. Here, the condylar and limb bud cartilage of fetal mice was examined. The distribution of type I and type II collagen in condylar cartilage was already different from that in the limb bud at the first appearance of the cartilage. Type I collagen was demonstrated in the extracellular matrix of the condylar cartilage that first appeared on day 15 of gestation. However, the reaction for type II collagen was much weaker than that for type I collagen. On day 18 of gestation, type I collagen was still found throughout the cell layers but became gradually weaker with depth. Type II collagen was limited exclusively to the deeper layers at this stage. These findings are different from those in the limb bud cartilage, indicating a characteristic feature of the cells in the condylar cartilage present from the prenatal period.

  11. The type II collagen fragments Helix-II and CTX-II reveal different enzymatic pathways of human cartilage collagen degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charni-Ben Tabassi, N; Desmarais, S; Jensen, Anne-Christine Bay

    2008-01-01

    sections were then incubated for up to 84h in the presence or absence of E-64 and GM6001, inhibitors of cysteine proteases and MMPs, respectively. RESULTS: In vitro, Cats K, L and S generated large amount of Helix-II, but not CTX-II. Cat B generated CTX-II fragment, but destroyed Helix-II immunoreactivity...

  12. Induction of tolerance against the arthritogenic antigen with type-II collagen peptide-linked soluble MHC class II molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoon-Kyung; Jung, Sundo; Park, Se-Ho

    2016-01-01

    In murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), self-reactive T cells can recognize peptide antigens derived from type-II collagen (CII). Activation of T cells is an important mediator of autoimmune diseases. Thus, T cells have become a focal point of study to treat autoimmune diseases. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of recombinant MHC class II molecules in the regulation of antigen-specific T cells by using a self peptide derived from CII (CII260-274; IAGFKGEQGPKGEPG) linked to mouseI-Aq in a murine CIA model. We found that recombinant I-Aq/CII260-274 molecules could be recognized by CII-specific T cells and inhibit the same T cells in vitro. Furthermore, the development of CIA in mice was successfully prevented by in vivo injection of recombinant I-Aq/CII260-274 molecules. Thus, treatment with recombinant soluble MHC class II molecules in complex with an immunodominant self-peptide might offer a potential therapeutic for chronic inflammation in autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 331-336 PMID:26779996

  13. Type II collagen and gelatin from silvertip shark (Carcharhinus albimarginatus) cartilage: isolation, purification, physicochemical and antioxidant properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevithan, Elango; Bao, Bin; Bu, Yongshi; Zhou, Yu; Zhao, Qingbo; Wu, Wenhui

    2014-06-27

    Type II acid soluble collagen (CIIA), pepsin soluble collagen (CIIP) and type II gelatin (GII) were isolated from silvertip shark (Carcharhinus albimarginatus) cartilage and examined for their physicochemical and antioxidant properties. GII had a higher hydroxyproline content (173 mg/g) than the collagens and cartilage. CIIA, CIIP and GII were composed of two identical α1 and β chains and were characterized as type II. Amino acid analysis of CIIA, CIIP and GII indicated imino acid contents of 150, 156 and 153 amino acid residues per 1000 residues, respectively. Differing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of CIIA, CIIP and GII were observed, which suggested that the isolation process affected the secondary structure and molecular order of collagen, particularly the triple-helical structure. The denaturation temperature of GII (32.5 °C) was higher than that of CIIA and CIIP. The antioxidant activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals and the reducing power of CIIP was greater than that of CIIA and GII. SEM microstructure of the collagens depicted a porous, fibrillary and multi-layered structure. Accordingly, the physicochemical and antioxidant properties of type II collagens (CIIA, CIIP) and GII isolated from shark cartilage were found to be suitable for biomedical applications.

  14. Type II Collagen and Gelatin from Silvertip Shark (Carcharhinus albimarginatus Cartilage: Isolation, Purification, Physicochemical and Antioxidant Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elango Jeevithan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Type II acid soluble collagen (CIIA, pepsin soluble collagen (CIIP and type II gelatin (GII were isolated from silvertip shark (Carcharhinus albimarginatus cartilage and examined for their physicochemical and antioxidant properties. GII had a higher hydroxyproline content (173 mg/g than the collagens and cartilage. CIIA, CIIP and GII were composed of two identical α1 and β chains and were characterized as type II. Amino acid analysis of CIIA, CIIP and GII indicated imino acid contents of 150, 156 and 153 amino acid residues per 1000 residues, respectively. Differing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectra of CIIA, CIIP and GII were observed, which suggested that the isolation process affected the secondary structure and molecular order of collagen, particularly the triple-helical structure. The denaturation temperature of GII (32.5 °C was higher than that of CIIA and CIIP. The antioxidant activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals and the reducing power of CIIP was greater than that of CIIA and GII. SEM microstructure of the collagens depicted a porous, fibrillary and multi-layered structure. Accordingly, the physicochemical and antioxidant properties of type II collagens (CIIA, CIIP and GII isolated from shark cartilage were found to be suitable for biomedical applications.

  15. Structure and pathogenicity of antibodies specific for citrullinated collagen type II in experimental arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uysal, Hüseyin; Bockermann, Robert; Nandakumar, Kutty S

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies to citrulline-modified proteins have a high diagnostic value in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, their biological role in disease development is still unclear. To obtain insight into this question, a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies was generated against a major triple helical...... collagen type II (CII) epitope (position 359-369; ARGLTGRPGDA) with or without arginines modified by citrullination. These antibodies bind cartilage and synovial tissue, and mediate arthritis in mice. Detection of citrullinated CII from RA patients' synovial fluid demonstrates that cartilage-derived CII...

  16. Type XI Collagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yunyun

    2016-01-01

    Type XI collagen is a fibrillary collagen. Type XI collagen is broadly distributed in articular cartilage, testis, trachea, tendons, trabecular bone, skeletal muscle, placenta, lung, and the neoepithelium of the brain. Type XI collagen is able to regulate fibrillogenesis by maintaining the spacing...... and diameter of type II collagen fibrils, and a nucleator for the fibrillogenesis of collagen types I and II. Mutations in type XI collagen are associated with Stickler syndrome, Marshall syndrome, fibrochondrogenesis, otospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia deafness, and Weissenbacher–Zweymüller syndrome. Type XI...... collagen binds heparin, heparan sulfate, and dermatan sulfate. Currently there are no biomarkers for type XI collagen....

  17. Phase I (CATTS Theory), Phase II (Milne Point), Phase III (Hydrate Ridge)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-10-31

    This study introduces a new type of cumulative seismic attribute (CATT) which quantifies gas hydrates resources in Hydrate Ridge offshore Oregon. CATT is base on case-specific transforms that portray hydrated reservoir properties. In this study we used a theoretical rock physics model to correct measured velocity log data.

  18. Anti-type II collagen antibodies detection and avidity in patients with oligoarticular and polyarticular forms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Galber R; Fonseca, João E; Fujimura, Patricia T; Cunha-Junior, Jair P; Silva, Carlos H M; Mourão, Ana F; Canhão, Helena; Goulart, Luiz R; Gonçalves, João; Ueira-Vieira, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) refers to a heterogeneous group of illnesses that have in common the occurrence of chronic joint inflammation in children younger than 16 years of age. The diagnosis is made only on clinical assessment. The identification of antibody markers could improve the early diagnosis, optimizing the clinical management of patients. Type II collagen is one potential autoantigen that has been implicated in the process of arthritis development. The aims of our study were to investigate the occurrence of anti-type II collagen antibodies and also to determine the avidity of the antibody-antigen binding. Ninety-six patients with oligoarticular or polyarticular JIA, 13 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and 61 healthy controls (HC) were tested for anti-type II collagen antibodies by ELISA and avidity ELISA. Sensitivity and specificity were determined by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Forty-two JIA patients (44%) were positive for antibodies against type II collagen. Its detection was significantly higher in JIA patients than in AS patients (p=0.006) and HCs (ppolyarticular JIA, being its presence more prevalent in patients with early disease. It also demonstrates that JIA patients with active disease present antibodies with high avidity against type II collagen.

  19. Association of Cross Linked C-Telopeptide II Collagen and Hyaluronic Acid with Knee Osteoarthritis Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Butar Butar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study was carried out to investigate the association of Cross Linked C-Telopeptide Type I & II Collagen (CTX-I and II and hyaluronic acid (HA with knee osteoarthritis (OA severity. METHODS: Sixty menopause women with primary knee OA were enrolled in this study during their visits to the Outpatient Department. Patients with knee pain during weight bearing, active or passive range of motion, or tenderness with Kellgren-Lawrence (KL grade of more than I were included. Patients with injury, inflammatory and metabolic diseases were excluded. Patients were put in a 10-hour fasting prior to withdrawal of morning blood samples for examinations of HA, CTX-I, interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β, and high sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP level. Second void morning urine specimens were taken for CTXII assessment. HA, CTX-I and II levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: Sixty menopausal female patients were included in this study, 35 with KL grade II, 17 grade III, and 8 grade IV. Means of CTX-II were significantly different between subjects KL grade IV and III (p=0.021. Correlation of KL grade was significant with CTX-II (p=0.001, r=0.412 and HA (p=0.0411, r=0.269. KL grades were not significantly associated with CTX-I (p=0.8364, r=-0.0272; IL-1β (p=0.5773, r=0.0853 and hs-CRP (p=0.2625, r=0.1470. CONCLUSIONS: CTX-II and HA were associated with severity of knee OA, suggesting that CTX-II and HA can be used as marker for knee OA severity. KEYWORDS: CTX-II, hyaluronic acid, otestoarthritis, knee.

  20. Neocartilage formation from mesenchymal stem cells grown in type II collagen-hyaluronan composite scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hsi-Yi; Lin, Ting-Yu; Lin, Chen-Huan; Yen, B Linju; Tsai, Ching-Lin; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) collagen type II-hyaluronan (HA) composite scaffolds (CII-HA) which mimics the extracellular environment of natural cartilage were fabricated in this study. Rheological measurements demonstrated that the incorporation of HA increased the compression modulus of the scaffolds. An initial in vitro evaluation showed that scaffolds seeded with porcine chondrocytes formed cartilaginous-like tissue after 8 weeks, and HA functioned to promote the growth of chondrocytes into scaffolds. Placenta-derived multipotent cells (PDMC) and gingival fibroblasts (GF) were seeded on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), CII-HA films, and small intestinal submucosa (SIS) sheets for comparing their chondrogenesis differentiation potentials with those of adipose-derived adult stem cells (ADAS) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC). Among different cells, PDMC showed the greatest chondrogenic differentiation potential on both CII-HA films and SIS sheets upon TGF-β3 induction, followed by GF. This was evidenced by the up-regulation of chondrogenic genes (Sox9, aggrecan, and collagen type II), which was not observed for cells grown on TCPS. This finding suggested the essential role of substrate materials in the chondrogenic differentiation of PDMC and GF. Neocartilage formation was more obvious in both PDMC and GF cells plated on CII-HA composite scaffolds vs. 8-layer SIS at 28 days in vitro. Finally, implantation of PDMC/CII-HA constructs into NOD-SCID mice confirmed the formation of tissue-engineered cartilage in vivo.

  1. Inter-cage dynamics in structure I, II, and H fluoromethane hydrates as studied by NMR and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, Alondra Torres [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0R6 (Canada); Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Separation Technology Group, Den Dolech 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kroon, Maaike C. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Separation Technology Group, Den Dolech 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Peters, Cor J. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Separation Technology Group, Den Dolech 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); The Petroleum Institute, Chemical Engineering Department, P. O. Box 2533, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Moudrakovski, Igor L.; Ratcliffe, Christopher I.; Ripmeester, John A., E-mail: John.Ripmeester@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0R6 (Canada); Alavi, Saman [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2014-06-07

    Prospective industrial applications of clathrate hydrates as materials for gas separation require further knowledge of cavity distortion, cavity selectivity, and defects induction by guest-host interactions. The results presented in this contribution show that under certain temperature conditions the guest combination of CH{sub 3}F and a large polar molecule induces defects on the clathrate hydrate framework that allow intercage guest dynamics. {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts of a CH{sub 3}F/CH{sub 4}/TBME sH hydrate and a temperature analysis of the {sup 2}H NMR powder lineshapes of a CD{sub 3}F/THF sII and CD{sub 3}F/TBME sH hydrate, displayed evidence that the populations of CH{sub 4} and CH{sub 3}F in the D and D{sup ′} cages were in a state of rapid exchange. A hydrogen bonding analysis using molecular dynamics simulations on the TBME/CH{sub 3}F and TBME/CH{sub 4} sH hydrates showed that the presence of CH{sub 3}F enhances the hydrogen bonding probability of the TBME molecule with the water molecules of the cavity. Similar results were obtained for THF/CH{sub 3}F and THF/CH{sub 4} sII hydrates. The enhanced hydrogen bond formation leads to the formation of defects in the water hydrogen bonding lattice and this can enhance the migration of CH{sub 3}F molecules between adjacent small cages.

  2. Serum antibodies to type II collagen in rheumatoid arthritis: comparison of 6 immunological methods and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clague, R B; Firth, S A; Holt, P J; Skingle, J; Greenbury, C L; Webley, M

    1983-10-01

    A collaborative study of 75 selected patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) employing 6 different methods for the detection of antibodies to type II collagen showed highly significant correlations between all the assays. The radioimmunoassays showed a greater sensitivity than either the passive haemagglutination or immunofluorescent techniques, and when the native collagen molecule was heat-denatured a higher number of patients showed increased antibody levels. In 33 patients the measurement of serum antibody levels to human, bovine, and rat native type II collagen showed a lack of species specificity, indicating that heterologous collagens can be employed in these assays. A retrospective analysis of the clinical, laboratory, and radiological features in the 41 patients with raised antibody levels and the 34 patients with normal antibody levels showed very few differences, but there was a significantly lower incidence of subcutaneous nodules (24% versus 56%) in patients with raised antibody levels. This study emphasizes the need to standardize assays for the measurement of serum antibody levels to native type II collagen. More extensive studies will be required before the clinical significance of these antibodies can be fully established.

  3. The effects of proteoglycan and type II collagen on T1rho relaxation time of articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Won Seok; Yoo, Hye Jin; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja Young [Dept. of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    To evaluate the effects of proteoglycan and type II collagen within articular cartilage on T1rho relaxation time of articular cartilage. This study was exempted by the institutional and animal review boards, and informed consent was not required. Twelve porcine patellae were assigned to three groups of control, trypsin-treated (proteoglycan-degraded), or collagenase-treated (collagen-degraded). The T1rho images were obtained with a 3 tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner with a single loop coil. Statistical differences were detected by analysis of variance to evaluate the effects of the enzyme on T1rho relaxation time. Safranin-O was used to stain proteoglycan in the articular cartilage and immunohistochemical staining was performed for type II collagen. Mean T1rho values of the control, trypsin-treated, and collagenase-treated groups were 37.72 +/- 5.82, 57.53 +/- 8.24, and 45.08 +/- 5.31 msec, respectively (p < 0.001). Histology confirmed a loss of proteoglycan and type II collagen in the trypsin- and collagenase-treated groups. Degradation of proteoglycans and collagen fibers in the articular cartilage increased the articular cartilage T1rho value.

  4. The Rho family GEF Asef2 regulates cell migration in three dimensional (3D) collagen matrices through myosin II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Léolène; Yang, Lijie; Majumdar, Devi; Gao, Yandong; Shi, Mingjian; Brewer, Bryson M.; Li, Deyu; Webb, Donna J

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to a variety of physiological processes, including tissue development, homeostasis, and regeneration. Migration has been extensively studied with cells on 2-dimensional (2D) substrates, but much less is known about cell migration in 3D environments. Tissues and organs are 3D, which is the native environment of cells in vivo, pointing to a need to understand migration and the mechanisms that regulate it in 3D environments. To investigate cell migration in 3D environments, we developed microfluidic devices that afford a controlled, reproducible platform for generating 3D matrices. Using these devices, we show that the Rho family guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Asef2 inhibits cell migration in 3D type I collagen (collagen I) matrices. Treatment of cells with the myosin II (MyoII) inhibitor blebbistatin abolished the decrease in migration by Asef2. Moreover, Asef2 enhanced MyoII activity as shown by increased phosphorylation of serine 19 (S19). Furthermore, Asef2 increased activation of Rac, which is a Rho family small GTPase, in 3D collagen I matrices. Inhibition of Rac activity by treatment with the Rac-specific inhibitor NSC23766 abrogated the Asef2-promoted increase in S19 MyoII phosphorylation. Thus, our results indicate that Asef2 regulates cell migration in 3D collagen I matrices through a Rac-MyoII-dependent mechanism. PMID:25517435

  5. NATURAL GAS HYDRATES STORAGE PROJECT PHASE II. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ECONOMIC STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.E. Rogers

    1999-09-27

    DOE Contract DE-AC26-97FT33203 studied feasibility of utilizing the natural-gas storage property of gas hydrates, so abundantly demonstrated in nature, as an economical industrial process to allow expanded use of the clean-burning fuel in power plants. The laboratory work achieved breakthroughs: (1) Gas hydrates were found to form orders of magnitude faster in an unstirred system with surfactant-water micellar solutions. (2) Hydrate particles were found to self-pack by adsorption on cold metal surfaces from the micellar solutions. (3) Interstitial micellar-water of the packed particles were found to continue forming hydrates. (4) Aluminum surfaces were found to most actively collect the hydrate particles. These laboratory developments were the bases of a conceptual design for a large-scale process where simplification enhances economy. In the design, hydrates form, store, and decompose in the same tank in which gas is pressurized to 550 psi above unstirred micellar solution, chilled by a brine circulating through a bank of aluminum tubing in the tank employing gas-fired refrigeration. Hydrates form on aluminum plates suspended in the chilled micellar solution. A low-grade heat source, such as 110 F water of a power plant, circulates through the tubing bank to release stored gas. The design allows a formation/storage/decomposition cycle in a 24-hour period of 2,254,000 scf of natural gas; the capability of multiple cycles is an advantage of the process. The development costs and the user costs of storing natural gas in a scaled hydrate process were estimated to be competitive with conventional storage means if multiple cycles of hydrate storage were used. If more than 54 cycles/year were used, hydrate development costs per Mscf would be better than development costs of depleted reservoir storage; above 125 cycles/year, hydrate user costs would be lower than user costs of depleted reservoir storage.

  6. [Relation of intramyocardial collagen remodeling to the changes of myocardial systolic property and angiotensin II on the overtraining rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhen-Jun

    2002-02-01

    To investigate the relation of intramyocardial collagen (IMC) remodeling to the changes of myocardial systolic property (MSP) and angiotensin II (Ang II) on the overtraining rats. Morphologic remodeling of IMC and changes of contents of IMC and Ang II in myocardium local and circulation, and MSP in SD rat overtraining models were observed and determined by RM-6200 polygraph, Beckman-42 automatic biochemistry analyser, and gamma automatic radio-immunity analyzer and S-570 scanning electron microscope under the conditions. IMC forms a spatial three-dimensional network structure, consisting of collagenous fiber connection among myocardial bundles, cardiac muscle cell group, cardiac muscle cells, endocardium and capillary. There are some regularities in its interlacing. Overtraining could lead to over hyperplasia of IMC in myocardial bundles, cardiac muscle cell group, cardiac muscle cell, endocardium and capillary, and serious injury of MLSP. The relation closes to remodeling of IMC and MSP and Ang II on the overtraining.

  7. Suppression of collagen-induced arthritis by oral administration of transgenic rice seeds expressing altered peptide ligands of type II collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Mana; Wakasa, Yuhya; Tsuboi, Hiroto; Asashima, Hiromitsu; Hirota, Tomoya; Kondo, Yuya; Matsumoto, Isao; Takaiwa, Fumio; Sumida, Takayuki

    2014-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease associated with the recognition of self proteins secluded in arthritic joints. We previously reported that altered peptide ligands (APLs) of type II collagen (CII256-271) suppress the development of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). In this study, we generated transgenic rice expressing CII256-271 and APL6 contained in fusion proteins with the rice storage protein glutelin in the seed endosperm. These transgene products successfully and stably accumulated at high levels (7-24 mg/g seeds) in protein storage vacuoles (PB-II) of mature seeds. We examined the efficacy of these transgenic rice seeds by performing oral administration of the seeds to CIA model mice that had been immunized with CII. Treatment with APL6 transgenic rice for 14 days significantly inhibited the development of arthritis (based on clinical score) and delayed disease onset during the early phase of arthritis. These effects were mediated by the induction of IL-10 from CD4(+ ) CD25(-) T cells against CII antigen in splenocytes and inguinal lymph nodes (iLNs), and treatment of APL had no effect on the production of IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-2 or Foxp3(+) Treg cells. These findings suggest that abnormal immune suppressive mechanisms are involved in the therapeutic effect of rice-based oral vaccine expressing high levels of APLs of type II collagen on the autoimmune disease CIA, suggesting that the seed-based mucosal vaccine against CIA functions via a unique mechanism.

  8. Scientific Objectives of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Leg II Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, E. (Chevron); Latham, T. (Chevron); McConnell, D. (AOA Geophysics); Frye, M. (Minerals Management Service); Hunt, J. (Minerals Management Service); Shedd, W. (Minerals Management Service); Shelander, D. (Schlumberger); Boswell, R.M. (NETL); Rose, K.K. (NETL); Ruppel, C. (USGS); Hutchinson, D. (USGS); Collett, T. (USGS); Dugan, B. (Rice University); Wood, W. (Naval Research Laboratory)

    2008-05-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Methane Hydrate Joint Industry Project (JIP) has been performing research on marine gas hydrates since 2001 and is sponsored by both the JIP members and the U.S. Department of Energy. In 2005, the JIP drilled the Atwater Valley and Keathley Canyon exploration blocks in the Gulf of Mexico to acquire downhole logs and recover cores in silt- and clay-dominated sediments interpreted to contain gas hydrate based on analysis of existing 3-D seismic data prior to drilling. The new 2007-2009 phase of logging and coring, which is described in this paper, will concentrate on gas hydrate-bearing sands in the Alaminos Canyon, Green Canyon, and Walker Ridge protraction areas. Locations were selected to target higher permeability, coarser-grained lithologies (e.g., sands) that have the potential for hosting high saturations of gas hydrate and to assist the U.S. Minerals Management Service with its assessment of gas hydrate resources in the Gulf of Mexico. This paper discusses the scientific objectives for drilling during the upcoming campaign and presents the results from analyzing existing seismic and well log data as part of the site selection process. Alaminos Canyon 818 has the most complete data set of the selected blocks, with both seismic data and comprehensive downhole log data consistent with the occurrence of gas hydrate-bearing sands. Preliminary analyses suggest that the Frio sandstone just above the base of the gas hydrate stability zone may have up to 80% of the available sediment pore space occupied by gas hydrate. The proposed sites in the Green Canyon and Walker Ridge areas are also interpreted to have gas hydrate-bearing sands near the base of the gas hydrate stability zone, but the choice of specific drill sites is not yet complete. The Green Canyon site coincides with a 4-way closure within a Pleistocene sand unit in an area of strong gas flux just south of the Sigsbee Escarpment. The Walker Ridge site is characterized by a sand

  9. High-resolution structures of collagen-like peptides [(Pro-Pro-Gly)4-Xaa-Yaa-Gly-(Pro-Pro-Gly)4]: implications for triple-helix hydration and Hyp(X) puckering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Kenji; Hongo, Chizuru; Wu, Guanghan; Mizuno, Kazunori; Noguchi, Keiichi; Ebisuzaki, Shutoku; Tanaka, Yuji; Nishino, Norikazu; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2009-05-01

    Structures of (Pro-Pro-Gly)4-Xaa-Yaa-Gly-(Pro-Pro-Gly)4 (ppg9-XYG) where (Xaa, Yaa)=(Pro, Hyp), (Hyp, Pro) or (Hyp, Hyp) were analyzed at high resolution using synchrotron radiation. Molecular and crystal structures of these peptides are very similar to those of the (Pro-Pro-Gly)9 peptide. The results obtained in this study, together with those obtained from related compounds, indicated the puckering propensity of the Hyp in the X position: (1) Hyp(X) residues involved in the Hyp(X):Pro(Y) stacking pairs prefer the down-puckering conformation, as in ppg9-OPG, and ppg9-OOG; (2) Hyp(X) residues involved in the Hyp(X):Hyp(Y) stacking pairs prefer the up-puckering conformation if there is no specific reason to adopt the down-puckering conformation. Water molecules in these peptide crystals are classified into two groups, the 1st and 2nd hydration waters. Water molecules in the 1st hydration group have direct hydrogen bonds with peptide oxygen atoms, whereas those in the 2nd hydration group do not. Compared with globular proteins, the number of water molecules in the 2nd hydration shell of the ppg9-XYG peptides is very large, likely due to the unique rod-like molecular structure of collagen model peptides. In the collagen helix, the amino acid residues in the X and Y positions must protrude outside of the triple helix, which forces even the hydrophobic side chains, such as Pro, to be exposed to the surrounding water molecules. Therefore, most of the waters in the 2nd hydration shell are covering hydrophobic Pro side chains by forming clathrate structures.

  10. Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II logging-while-drilling data acquisition and anaylsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.; Zyrianova, Margarita V.; Mrozewski, Stefan A.; Guerin, Gilles; Cook, Ann E.; Goldberg, Dave S.

    2012-01-01

    One of the objectives of the Gulf of MexicoGasHydrateJointIndustryProjectLegII (GOM JIP LegII) was the collection of a comprehensive suite of logging-while-drilling (LWD) data within gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in order to make accurate estimates of the concentration of gashydrates under various geologic conditions and to understand the geologic controls on the occurrence of gashydrate at each of the sites drilled during this expedition. The LWD sensors just above the drill bit provided important information on the nature of the sediments and the occurrence of gashydrate. There has been significant advancements in the use of downhole well-logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gashydrate in nature: From using electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gashydrate occurrences in wells to where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gashydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gashydrates within various complex reservoir systems. Recent integrated sediment coring and well-log studies have confirmed that electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data can yield accurate gashydrate saturations in sediment grain supported (isotropic) systems such as sand reservoirs, but more advanced log analysis models are required to characterize gashydrate in fractured (anisotropic) reservoir systems. In support of the GOM JIP LegII effort, well-log data montages have been compiled and presented in this report which includes downhole logs obtained from all seven wells drilled during this expedition with a focus on identifying and characterizing the potential gas-hydrate-bearing sedimentary section in each of the wells. Also presented and reviewed in this report are the gas-hydrate saturation and sediment porosity logs for each of the wells as calculated from available downhole well logs.

  11. Direct measurement of the Mn(II) hydration state in metal complexes and metalloproteins through 17O NMR line widths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Eric M; Zhu, Jiang; Caravan, Peter

    2013-12-11

    Here we describe a simple method to estimate the inner-sphere hydration state of the Mn(II) ion in coordination complexes and metalloproteins. The line width of bulk H2(17)O is measured in the presence and absence of Mn(II) as a function of temperature, and transverse (17)O relaxivities are calculated. It is demonstrated that the maximum (17)O relaxivity is directly proportional to the number of inner-sphere water ligands (q). Using a combination of literature data and experimental data for 12 Mn(II) complexes, we show that this method provides accurate estimates of q with an uncertainty of ±0.2 water molecules. The method can be implemented on commercial NMR spectrometers working at fields of 7 T and higher. The hydration number can be obtained for micromolar Mn(II) concentrations. We show that the technique can be extended to metalloproteins or complex:protein interactions. For example, Mn(II) binds to the multimetal binding site A on human serum albumin with two inner-sphere water ligands that undergo rapid exchange (1.06 × 10(8) s(-1) at 37 °C). The possibility of extending this technique to other metal ions such as Gd(III) is discussed.

  12. Phenotypic characterization of type II collagen-induced arthritis in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hou-Pan; Li, Xin; Yu, Rong; Zeng, Guang; Yuan, Zhen-Yi; Wang, Wei; Huang, Hui-Yong; Cai, Xiong

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine a more specific, efficient and simple method for the induction of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. Different strains of rats were injected at the base of the tail with bovine type II collagen (CII) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). The onset and severity of arthritis were evaluated by clinical assessment. The established CIA model was analyzed using a comprehensive examination of clinical, hematological, histological and radiological parameters. The results demonstrated that Wistar rats were the most susceptible strain to CIA followed by Wistar Furth rats, with Sprague Dawley rats being the least susceptible. Following primary and booster immunization, female Wistar rats developed severe arthritis, with an incidence of >83% and low variability in clinical signs. The development of arthritis was accompanied by a significantly elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate compared with that in the control rats. The radiographic examination revealed bone matrix resorption, considerable soft tissue swelling, periosteal new bone formation and bone erosion in the arthritic joints of the CIA rats. Histopathologically, the synovial joints of CIA rats were characterized by synovial hyperplasia, pannus formation, marked cellular infiltration, bone and cartilage erosion and narrowing of the joint space. The administration of an intradermal injection of only 200 µg bovine CII emulsified in IFA at the base of the tail therefore leads to the successful development of a CIA rat model. This well-characterized CIA rat model could be specifically used to study the pathophysiology of human rheumatoid arthritis as well as to test and develop anti-arthritic agents for humans.

  13. Evaluation of anti-citrullinated type II collagen and anti-citrullinated vimentin antibodies in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence and significance of anti-citrullinated vimentin and anti-citrullinated type II collagen antibodies and elucidate their role in the disease process of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods Sera were obtained from 95 patients with various subtypes of JIA, 19 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, and 10 healthy children. Antibodies were measured in the sera against citrullinated and native type II collagen and vimentin (vim1-16 and vim 59-74) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Samples were compared to anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody and rheumatoid factor (RF) isotypes, and our previously measured anti-citrullinated fibrinogen and α-enolase antibodies on the same patient population, in addition to erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein. The relationship between the anti-citrullinated antibody profile and disease activity and joint damage were also investigated. Results Twenty-three JIA patients (24%) demonstrated reactivity to anti-citrullinated type II collagen. Ten JIA patients (10.5%) demonstrated reactivity to anti-citrullinated vimentin 1–16 antibodies and 7 (7.4%) to anti-citrullinated vimentin 59–74 antibodies. One IgM RF-positive polyarticular patient was positive for all 5 of the citrullinated autoantibodies tested. Thirty-seven different subsets of patients were identified based on their anti-citrullinated autoantibody and RF isotype profile. No significant associations were noted with anti-citrullinated type II collagen and anti-citrullinated vimentin antibodies with joint damage or disease activity. Anti-citrullinated vimentin 59–74 antibodies demonstrated the highest overall specificity at 89.7%, with anti-citrullinated vimentin 1–16 and anti-citrullinated type II collagen antibodies at 86.2%. Conclusion This study demonstrates that antibodies to multiple citrullinated epitopes are present in the sera of patients with various subtypes of JIA. It also

  14. [Experimental study on effects of acupoint application with Leima type II plaster on collagen-induced arthritis in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Fang, Jian-Qiao; Zhou, Ya-Feng

    2011-09-01

    To observe the therapeutic effect of acupoint application with Leima type II plaster on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and probe its mechanism. Bovine type II collagen was injected intradermally into the middle line of the back to induce CIA model with 48 Wistar rats. Then the rats were randomly divided into a model control group (group A), a matrix control group (group B), acupoint application group with plaster of low concentration (group C) and high concentration plaster group (group D), 12 rats in each group. Group C and group D were treated with low and high concentration of Leima type II plaster, and "Shenzhu" (GV 12), "Zhiyang" (GV 9) and "Mingmen" (GV 4) were selected, each application for about 15 hours, once each day for 30 days. Group B was used the same method of acupoint application except using non-drug matrix plaster, and group A was not given any treatment. The morphous and the histopathological changes of affection joint were observed. The paw edema volume after 30 days treatment in group C was significantly lower than that in group B (P plaster has a good therapeutic effect on CIA rats and the protective mechanism is related to the reduction of anti-type II collagen antibody level so as to carry out anti-inflammatory effect and immunosuppression.

  15. Changes and significance of IL-25 in chicken collagen II-induced experimental arthritis (CIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiwen, Wang; Zhaoliang, Su; Yinxia, Zhao; Siamak, Sandoghchian Shotorbani; Zhijun, Jiao; Yuan, Xue; Heng, Yang; Dong, Zheng; Yanfang, Liu; Pei, Shen; Shengjun, Wang; Qixiang, Shao; Xinxiang, Huang; Liwei, Lu; Huaxi, Xu

    2012-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease. It is a systemic inflammatory disease, characterized by chronic, symmetrical, multi-articular synovial arthritis. IL-25 (IL-17E) is a member of the recently emerged cytokine family (IL-17s), which is expressed in Th2 cells and bone marrow-derived mast cells. Unlike the other members of this family, IL-25 is capable of inducing Th2-associated cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) and also promotes the release of some pro-immune factors (IL-6 and IL-8). IL-25 is also a pleiotropic factor, which constitutes a tissue-specific pathological injury and chronic inflammation. In this study, we used chicken collagen II-induced experimental arthritis (CIA) model in DBA/1 mice to investigate the relationship between IL-25 and other inflammatory factors, revealing the possible mechanism in CIA. Our results showed that the expression level of IL-25 was enhanced in the late stage of CIA, and IL-17 was increased in the early stage of the disease. It is well known that IL-17 has a crucial role in the development of RA pathogenesis, and IL-25 plays a significant role in humoral immune. For reasons given above, we suggested that the IL-25 inhibited IL-17 expression to some extent, while enhancing the production of IL-4. It was confirmed that IL-25 not only regulated the cellular immune, but also involved the humoral immune in rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. RB1CC1 Protein Suppresses Type II Collagen Synthesis in Chondrocytes and Causes Dwarfism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Ichiro; Chano, Tokuhiro; Kita, Hiroko; Matsusue, Yoshitaka; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2011-01-01

    RB1-inducible coiled-coil 1 (RB1CC1) functions in various processes, such as cell growth, differentiation, senescence, apoptosis, and autophagy. The conditional transgenic mice with cartilage-specific RB1CC1 excess that were used in the present study were made for the first time by the Cre-loxP system. Cartilage-specific RB1CC1 excess caused dwarfism in mice without causing obvious abnormalities in endochondral ossification and subsequent skeletal development from embryo to adult. In vitro and in vivo analysis revealed that the dwarf phenotype in cartilaginous RB1CC1 excess was induced by reductions in the total amount of cartilage and the number of cartilaginous cells, following suppressions of type II collagen synthesis and Erk1/2 signals. In addition, we have demonstrated that two kinds of SNPs (T-547C and C-468T) in the human RB1CC1 promoter have significant influence on the self-transcriptional level. Accordingly, human genotypic variants of RB1CC1 that either stimulate or inhibit RB1CC1 transcription in vivo may cause body size variations. PMID:22049074

  17. Both Hyaluronan and Collagen Type II Keep Proteoglycan 4 (Lubricin) at the Cartilage Surface in a Condition That Provides Low Friction during Boundary Lubrication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majd, Sara Ehsani; Kuijer, Roel; Koewitsch, Alexander; Groth, Thomas; Schmidt, Tannin A.; Sharma, Prashant K.

    2014-01-01

    Wear resistant and ultralow friction in synovial joints is the outcome of a sophisticated synergy between the major macromolecules of the synovial fluid, e.g., hyaluronan (HA) and proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), with collagen type II fibrils and other non-collagenous macromolecules of the cartilage superfici

  18. Cross-linked type I and type II collagenous matrices for the repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects--a study in rabbits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buma, P.; Pieper, J.S.; Tienen, Tony van; Susante, J.L.C. van; Kraan, P.M. van der; Veerkamp, J.H.; Berg, W.B. van den; Veth, R.P.H.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van

    2003-01-01

    The physico-chemical properties of collagenous matrices may determine the tissue response after insertion into full-thickness articular cartilage defects. In this study, cross-linked type I and type II collagen matrices, with and without attached chondroitin sulfate, were implanted into full-thickne

  19. Evaluation of chondrocyte growth in the highly porous scaffolds made by fused deposition manufacturing (FDM) filled with type II collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Hung-Jen; Tseng, Ching-Shiow; Hsu, Shan-Hui; Tsai, Ching-Lin

    2009-06-01

    Highly porous poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering were fabricated in this study using the fused deposition manufacturing (FDM) process and were further modified by type II collagen. The average molecular weight of PLGA decreased to about 60% of the original value after the melt-extrusion process. Type II collagen exhibited sponge-like structure and filled the macroporous FDM scaffolds. An increase of the fiber spacing resulted in an increase of the porosity. The storage modulus of FDM scaffolds with a large fiber spacing was comparable to that of the native porcine articular cartilage. Although the FDM hybrid scaffolds were swollen in various extents after 28 days of in vitro culture, the seeded chondrocytes were well distributed in the interior of the scaffolds with a large fiber spacing and neocartilage was formed around the scaffolds. The study also suggested that a low processing temperature may be required to produce PLGA precision scaffolds using FDM.

  20. Kinetic effects of sulfur oxidation on catalytic nitrile hydration: nitrile hydratase insights from bioinspired ruthenium(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Davinder; Nguyen, Tho N; Grapperhaus, Craig A

    2014-12-01

    Kinetic investigations inspired by the metalloenzyme nitrile hydratase were performed on a series of ruthenium(II) complexes to determine the effect of sulfur oxidation on catalytic nitrile hydration. The rate of benzonitrile hydration was quantified as a function of catalyst, nitrile, and water concentrations. Precatalysts L(n)RuPPh3 (n = 1-3; L(1) = 4,7-bis(2'-methyl-2'-mercapto-propyl)-1-thia-4,7-diazacyclononane; L(2) = 4-(2'-methyl-2'-sulfinatopropyl)-7-(2'-methyl-2'-mercapto-propyl)-1-thia-4,7-diazacyclononane; L(3) = 4-(2'-methyl-2'-sulfinatopropyl)-7-(2'-methyl-2'-sulfenato-propyl)-1-thia-4,7-diazacyclononane) were activated by substitution of triphenylphosphine with substrate in hot dimethylformamide solution. Rate measurements are consistent with a dynamic equilibrium between inactive aqua (L(n)Ru-OH2) and active nitrile (L(n)Ru-NCR) derivatives with K = 21 ± 1, 9 ± 0.9, and 23 ± 3 for L(1) to L(3), respectively. Subsequent hydration of the L(n)Ru-NCR intermediate yields the amide product with measured hydration rate constants (k's) of 0.37 ± 0.01, 0.82 ± 0.07, and 1.59 ± 0.12 M(-1) h(-1) for L(1) to L(3), respectively. Temperature dependent studies reveal that sulfur oxidation lowers the enthalpic barrier by 27 kJ/mol, but increases the entropic barrier by 65 J/(mol K). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations (B3LYP/LanL2DZ (Ru); 6-31G(d) (all other atoms)) support a nitrile bound catalytic cycle with lowering of the reaction barrier as a consequence of sulfur oxidation through enhanced nitrile binding and attack of the water nucleophile through a highly organized transition state.

  1. Experimental and computational investigation of the sII binary He-THF hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Nikolaos I; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N; Stubos, Athanassios K; Martín, Angel; Rovetto, Laura J; Florusse, Louw J; Peters, Cor J

    2011-02-17

    The objective of this work is to study the binary He-THF hydrate with both experimental and theoretical approaches. Experimental data for the hydrate equilibrium at pressures up to 12.6 MPa are reported for the binary He-THF hydrate with stoichiometric THF composition (i.e., 5.56 mol % THF). These data are used to calibrate a thermodynamic model [J. Phys. Chem. C2009, 113, 422] for the prediction of hydrate equilibrium that is based on the van der Waals-Platteeuw statistical thermodynamic theory. Then this model is used to extrapolate the obtained experimental data to much higher pressures, and good agreement is observed with other available experimental data at pressures up to 150 MPa. This model is also capable of estimating the cavity occupancies for He and THF. The results show that the large cavities are completely occupied by THF molecules, whereas the small ones are partially occupied by He atoms. The He occupancy of the small cavities is less than 60%, even at high pressures (100 MPa). The occupancies predicted from this model are in close agreement with similar results from molecular simulations and a previously reported thermodynamic approach.

  2. Uncoupling of collagen II metabolism in newly diagnosed, untreated rheumatoid arthritis is linked to inflammation and antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Friesgaard; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Christgau, Stephan;

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the relationship between markers of collagen 11 synthesis and degradation with disease activity measures, autoantibodies, and radiographic outcomes in a 4-year protocol on patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who are naive to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs....... Methods. One hundred sixty patients with newly diagnosed, untreated RA entered the Cyclosporine, Methotrexate, Steroid in RA (CIMESTRA) trial. Disease activity and radiograph status were measured at baseline and 4 years. The N-terminal propeptide of collagen IIA (PIIANP) and the crosslinked C......-telopeptide of collagen II (CTX-II) were quantified at baseline by ELISA. PIIANP was also assayed at 2 and 4 years. Anticyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) was recorded at baseline. An uncoupling index for cartilage collagen metabolism was calculated from PHANP and CTX-II measurements. Results. PIIANP was low...

  3. Both hyaluronan and collagen type II keep proteoglycan 4 (lubricin) at the cartilage surface in a condition that provides low friction during boundary lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majd, Sara Ehsani; Kuijer, Roel; Köwitsch, Alexander; Groth, Thomas; Schmidt, Tannin A; Sharma, Prashant K

    2014-12-09

    Wear resistant and ultralow friction in synovial joints is the outcome of a sophisticated synergy between the major macromolecules of the synovial fluid, e.g., hyaluronan (HA) and proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), with collagen type II fibrils and other non-collagenous macromolecules of the cartilage superficial zone (SZ). This study aimed at better understanding the mechanism of PRG4 localization at the cartilage surface. We show direct interactions between surface bound HA and freely floating PRG4 using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Freely floating PRG4 was also shown to bind with surface bound collagen type II fibrils. Albumin, the most abundant protein of the synovial fluid, effectively blocked the adsorption of PRG4 with HA, through interaction with C and N terminals on PRG4, but not that of PRG4 with collagen type II fibrils. The above results indicate that collagen type II fibrils strongly contribute in keeping PRG4 in the SZ during cartilage articulation in situ. Furthermore, PRG4 molecules adsorbed very well on mimicked SZ of absorbed HA molecules with entangled collagen type II fibrils and albumin was not able to block this interaction. In this last condition PRG4 adsorption resulted in a coefficient of friction (COF) of the same order of magnitude as the COF of natural cartilage, measured with an atomic force microscope in lateral mode.

  4. Isotropic, anisotropic, and borehole washout analyses in Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II, Alaminos Canyon well 21-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung W.

    2012-01-01

    Through the use of three-dimensional seismic amplitude mapping, several gas hydrate prospects were identified in the Alaminos Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico. Two of the prospects were drilled as part of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Program Leg II in May 2009, and a suite of logging-while-drilling logs was acquired at each well site. Logging-while-drilling logs at the Alaminos Canyon 21–A site indicate that resistivities of approximately 2 ohm-meter and P-wave velocities of approximately 1.9 kilometers per second were measured in a possible gas-hydrate-bearing target sand interval between 540 and 632 feet below the sea floor. These values are slightly elevated relative to those measured in the hydrate-free sediment surrounding the sands. The initial well log analysis is inconclusive in determining the presence of gas hydrate in the logged sand interval, mainly because large washouts in the target interval degraded well log measurements. To assess gas-hydrate saturations, a method of compensating for the effect of washouts on the resistivity and acoustic velocities is required. To meet this need, a method is presented that models the washed-out portion of the borehole as a vertical layer filled with seawater (drilling fluid). Owing to the anisotropic nature of this geometry, the apparent anisotropic resistivities and velocities caused by the vertical layer are used to correct measured log values. By incorporating the conventional marine seismic data into the well log analysis of the washout-corrected well logs, the gas-hydrate saturation at well site AC21–A was estimated to be in the range of 13 percent. Because gas hydrates in the vertical fractures were observed, anisotropic rock physics models were also applied to estimate gas-hydrate saturations.

  5. Hydrogen-bond vibrational and energetic dynamical properties in sI and sII clathrate hydrates and in ice Ih: Molecular dynamics insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Somendra Nath; English, Niall J

    2015-10-21

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed on cubic (sI and sII) polymorphs of methane hydrate, and hexagonal ice (ice Ih), to study the dynamical properties of hydrogen-bond vibrations and hydrogen-bond self-energy. It was found that hydrogen-bond energies are greatest in magnitude in sI hydrates, followed by sII, and their energies are least in magnitude in ice Ih. This is consistent with recent MD-based findings on thermal conductivities for these various materials [N. J. English and J. S. Tse, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 015901 (2009)], in which the lower thermal conductivity of sI methane hydrate was rationalised in terms of more strained hydrogen-bond arrangements. Further, modes for vibration and energy-transfer via hydrogen bonds in sI hydrate were found to occur at higher frequencies vis-à-vis ice Ih and sII hydrate in both the water-librational and OH⋯H regions because of the more strained nature of hydrogen bonds therein.

  6. Calcitonin directly attenuates collagen type II degradation by inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase expression and activity in articular chondrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, B C; Wulf, H; Henriksen, K

    2006-01-01

    chain reaction (RT-PCR). In bovine articular cartilage explants, cartilage degradation was investigated by release of C-terminal telopeptides of collagen type II (CTX-II), induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) [20 ng/ml] and oncostatin M (OSM) [10 ng/ml], with salmon calcitonin [0.......0001-1 microM]. In vivo, cartilage degradation was investigated in ovariectomized (OVX) rats administered with oral calcitonin [2 mg/kg calcitonin] for 9 weeks. RESULTS: The calcitonin receptor was identified in articular chondrocytes by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Calcitonin concentration......-dependently increased cAMP levels in isolated chondrocytes. Explants cultured with TNF-alpha and OSM showed a 100-fold increase in CTX-II release compared to vehicle-treated controls (Pprotection...

  7. Clinical comparison of Bio-Oss plus 10% collagen with a bioabsorbable collagen barrier or coronally advanced flap in treatment of mandibular molars class II furcation defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radafshar G.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Furcation defects are one of the most challenging problems in periodontal therapy. Regenerative treatment significantly improves the prognosis of the involved teeth. The aim of this study was to compare Bio-Oss plus 10% collagen in combination with either a bioabsorbable collagen barrier (BO/GTR, or coronally advanced flap (BO/CF, in treating human mandibular class II furcation defects. "nMaterials and Methods: This clinical trial included 10 patients with 10 pairs of similar periodontal defects. Each defect was randomly assigned to treatment with BO/CF or BO/GTR. Following basic therapy, baseline measurements were recorded including probing pocket depth (PPD,closed horizontal probing depth (CHPD, clinical attachment level (CAL, and gingival margin position (CEJ-GM, together with plaque and gingival indices. Hard tissue measurements were performed during surgery to determine alveolar crestal height (CEJ-AC, and vertical and horizontal open probing depth (OVPD, OHPD.After 6 months, all sites were re-entered and soft and hard tissue measurements were recorded. "nResults: Both surgical procedures significantly reduced probing depth and improved clinical attachment levels, with no significant difference between groups. Gingival margin position (CEJ-GM, was improved in the BO/CF group (0.66±0.51 mm, p<0.05, but not statistically different from BO/GTR group in which remained relatively constant (0.00±0.81 mm. Vertical defect resolution was significant in each groups (BO/CF:3.17±1.47 mm, BO/GTR:3.33±0.51mm. Horizontal defect resolution was also significant with either procedure (BO/CF:3.67±1.31 mm, BO/GTR:3.80±1.83 mm, with no statistically significant difference between groups. Data were analyzed with wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests with p<0.05 as the level of significance. "nConclusion: Based on the results of this study, treatment of mandibular class II furcation defects with both procedures resulted in statistically

  8. Structure, dynamics, and hydration of a collagen model polypeptide, (L-prolyl-L-prolylglycyl)10, in aqueous media: a chemical equilibrium analysis of triple helix-to-single coil transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikata, Toshiyuki; Minakawa, Ayako; Okuyama, Kenji

    2009-10-29

    The structure, dynamics, and hydration behavior of a collagen model polypeptide, (L-prolyl-L-prolylglycyl)(10) (PPG10), were investigated in pure water and dilute acetic acid over a wide temperature range using broadband dielectric relaxation (DR) techniques that spanned frequencies from 1 kHz to 20 GHz. All samples showed pronounced dielectric dispersion with two major relaxation processes around 3 MHz and 20 GHz. Because DR measurements sensitively probe dipoles and their dynamics, the structures and ionization states of the carboxy and amino termini of aqueous PPG10 were precisely determined from the relaxation times and strengths in the 3 MHz frequency range. In solution, PPG10 formed mixtures of monodisperse rods as triple helices with lengths and diameters of 8.6 and 1.5 nm, respectively, and monomeric random coils with radii of approximately 1.4 nm. Ionization of the C-terminus was suppressed by the addition of acetic acid in both states. The fraction of random coils (f(coil)) was found to be a function of temperature (T) and the concentration of PPG10 (c). At low temperatures, small f(coil) values were found, which increased with temperature to reach f(coil) = 1 at approximately 60 degrees C, irrespective of c. This phenomenon, well-known as a triple helix-to-single coil transition, is discussed on the basis of the chemical reaction, (PPG10)(3) 3PPG10, with an equilibrium constant of K = 3(c/55.6)(2)f(coil)(3)(1 - f(coil))(-1). The standard enthalpy change evaluated from Arrhenius plots (ln K versus T(-1)) was found to change dramatically at the same transition temperature that was previously determined by using optical rotation experiments. The other major DR process, observed at approximately 20 GHz, was assigned to free and hydrated water molecules and used to determine the average hydration number (m) per PPG10. The m values for the triple helix and random coil state at 25 degrees C were evaluated to be m(th) = 60-70 and m(coil) = 250-270. The m

  9. Angiotensin II, Vasopressin, and Collagen-IV Expression in the Subfornical Organ in a Case of Syndrome of Inappropriate ADH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia M. Carmona-Calero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH is a disease characterized by hyponatremia and hyperosmolarity of urine where vasopressin and angiotensin II are implicated in the alteration of salt water balance and cardiovascular and blood pressure regulation. The aim of this study is to analyse the expression of substances related with cardiovascular and salt water regulation in the subfornical organ in a case of SIADH. Two brains, one taken from a 66-year-old man with SIADH and the other from a 63-year-old man without SIADH, were used. Immunohistochemical study was performed using anti-angiotensin II, anti-vasopressin, and anti-collagen-VI as primary antibodies. Angiotensin and vasopressin immunoreaction were found in neurons, in perivascular spaces, and in the ependymal layer in the subfornical organ in both cases. However, in the SIADH case, the angiotensin II and collagen-IV expression in the SFO were different suggesting this organ’s possible participation in the physiopathology of SIADH.

  10. C-type lectin-like domain and fibronectin-like type II domain of phospholipase A(2) receptor 1 modulate binding and migratory responses to collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Soichiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Yosuke; Fujioka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Takamitsu; Nakamura, Kazuto; Obata, Jun-ei; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka

    2015-03-24

    Phospholipase A2 receptor 1 (PLA2R) mediates collagen-dependent migration. The mechanisms by which PLA2R interacts with collagen remain unclear. We produced HEK293 cells expressing full-length wild-type PLA2R or a truncated PLA2R that lacks fibronectin-like type II (FNII) domains or several regions of C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD). We show that the CTLD1-2 as well as the FNII domain of PLA2R are responsible for binding to collagen and for collagen-dependent migration. Thus, multiple regions and domains of the extracellular portion of PLA2R participate in the responses to collagen. These data suggest a potentially new mechanism for PLA2R-mediated biological response beyond that of a receptor for secretory PLA2.

  11. Measured temperature and pressure dependence of Vp and Vs in compacted, polycrystalline sI methane and sII methane-ethane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgerud, M.B.; Waite, W.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Nur, A.

    2003-01-01

    We report on compressional- and shear-wave-speed measurements made on compacted polycrystalline sI methane and sII methane-ethane hydrate. The gas hydrate samples are synthesized directly in the measurement apparatus by warming granulated ice to 17??C in the presence of a clathrate-forming gas at high pressure (methane for sI, 90.2% methane, 9.8% ethane for sII). Porosity is eliminated after hydrate synthesis by compacting the sample in the synthesis pressure vessel between a hydraulic ram and a fixed end-plug, both containing shear-wave transducers. Wave-speed measurements are made between -20 and 15??C and 0 to 105 MPa applied piston pressure.

  12. Changes in Cytokines and Aggrecan ARGS Neoepitope in Synovial Fluid and Serum and in C-Terminal Crosslinking Telopeptide of Type II Collagen and N-Terminal Crosslinking Telopeptide of Type I Collagen in Urine Over Five Years After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Struglics, André; Larsson, Staffan; Kumahashi, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To prospectively monitor levels of proinflammatory cytokines and aggrecan ARGS neoepitope in synovial fluid and serum as well as levels of C-terminal crosslinking telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II) and N-terminal crosslinking telopeptide of type I collagen (NTX-I) in urine after...... of aggrecan and type II collagen. Cytokine levels remained increased up to 5 years after injury, indicative of extended local inflammation in the joint....

  13. Substitution of aspartic acid for glycine at position 310 in type II collagen produces achondrogenesis II, and substitution of serine at position 805 produces hypochondrogenesis: analysis of genotype-phenotype relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventure, J; Cohen-Solal, L; Ritvaniemi, P; Van Maldergem, L; Kadhom, N; Delezoide, A L; Maroteaux, P; Prockop, D J; Ala-Kokko, L

    1995-01-01

    Two different mutations were found in two unrelated probands with lethal chondrodysplasias, one with achondrogenesis type II and the other with the less severe phenotype of hypochondrogenesis. The mutations in the COL2A1 gene were identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of genomic DNA followed by dideoxynucleotide sequencing and restriction site analysis. The proband with achondrogenesis type II had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted aspartate for glycine at position 310 of the alpha 1(II) chain of type II procollagen. The proband with hypochondrogenesis had a heterozygous single-base mutation that substituted serine for glycine at position 805. Type II collagen extracted from cartilage from the probands demonstrated the presence of type I collagen and a delayed electrophoretic mobility, indicating post-translational overmodifications. Analysis of CNBr peptides showed that, in proband 1, the entire peptides were overmodified. Examination of chondrocytes cultured in agarose or alginate indicated that there was a delayed secretion of type II procollagen. In addition, type II collagen synthesized by cartilage fragments from the probands demonstrated a decreased thermal stability. The melting temperature of the type II collagen containing the aspartate-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 4 degrees C, and that of the collagen containing the serine-for-glycine substitution was reduced by 2 degrees C. Electron microscopy of the extracellular matrix from the chondrocyte cultures showed a decreased density of matrix and the presence of unusually short and thin fibrils. Our results indicate that glycine substitutions in the N-terminal region of the type II collagen molecule can produce more severe phenotypes than mutations in the C-terminal region. The aspartate-for-glycine substitution at position 310, which was associated with defective secretion and a probable increased degradation of collagen, is the most destabilizing

  14. Linkage of the gene that encodes the alpha 1 chain of type V collagen (COL5A1) to type II Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughlin, J; Irven, C; Hardwick, L J; Butcher, S; Walsh, S; Wordsworth, P; Sykes, B

    1995-09-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of heritable disorders of connective tissue with skin, ligaments and blood vessels being the main sites affected. The commonest variant (EDS II) exhibits an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance and is characterized by joint hypermobility, cigarette paper scars, lax skin and excessive bruising. As yet no gene has been linked to EDS II, nor has linkage been established to a specific region of the genome. However, several candidate genes encoding proteins of the extracellular matrix have been excluded. Using an intragenic simple sequence repeat polymorphism, we report linkage of the COL5A1 gene, which encodes the alpha 1(V) chain of type V collagen, to EDS II. A maximum LOD score (Zmax) for linkage of 8.3 at theta = 0.00 was generated for a single large pedigree.

  15. Persistence of collagen type II-specific T-cell clones in the synovial membrane of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Londei, M.; Savill, C.M.; Verhoef, A.; Brennan, F.; Leech, Z.A.; Feldmann, M. (Charing Cross Sunley Research Centre, London (England)); Duance, V. (Bristol Laboratory (England)); Maini, R.N. (Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, London (England))

    1989-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterized by T-cell infiltration of the synovium of joints. Analysis of the phenotype and antigen specificity of the infiltrating cells may thus provide insight into the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. T cells were cloned with interleukin 2, a procedure that selects for in vivo-activated cells. All clones had the CD4 CDW29 phenotype. Their antigen specificity was tested by using a panel of candidate joint autoantigens. Four of 17 reacted against autologous blood mononuclear cells. Two clones proliferated in response to collagen type II. After 21 months, another set of clones was derived from synovial tissue of the same joint. One of eight clones tested showed a strong proliferative response against collagen type II. The uncloned synovial T cells of a third operation from another joint also responded to collagen type II. The persistence of collagen type II-specific T cells in active rheumatoid joints over a period of 3 years suggests that collagen type II could be one of the autoantigens involved in perpetuating the inflammatory process in rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. Type II collagen-hyaluronan hydrogel – a step towards a scaffold for intervertebral disc tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Calderon

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc regeneration strategies based on stem cell differentiation in combination with the design of functional scaffolds is an attractive approach towards repairing/regenerating the nucleus pulposus. The specific aim of this study was to optimise a composite hydrogel composed of type II collagen and hyaluronic acid (HA as a carrier for mesenchymal stem cells. Hydrogel stabilisation was achieved by means of 1-ethyl-3(3-dimethyl aminopropyl carbodiimide (EDC and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS cross-linking. Optimal hydrogel properties were determined by investigating different concentrations of EDC (8mM, 24mM and 48mM. Stable hydrogels were obtained independent of the concentration of carbodiimide used. The hydrogels cross-linked by the lowest concentration of EDC (8mM demonstrated high swelling properties. Additionally, improved proliferation of seeded rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs and hydrogel stability levels in culture were observed with this 8mM cross-linked hydrogel. Results from this study indicate that EDC/NHS (8mM cross-linked type II collagen/HA hydrogel was capable of supporting viability of rMSCs, and furthermore their differentiation into a chondrogenic lineage. Further investigations should be conducted to determine its potential as scaffold for nucleus pulposus regeneration/repair.

  17. Development and application of a new Silent reporter system to quantitate the activity of enhancer elements in the type II Collagen Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kazuo; Shinomura, Tamayuki

    2016-07-01

    Type II collagen is a major component of cartilage, which provide structural stiffness to the tissue. As a sufficient amount of type II collagen is critical for maintaining the biomechanical properties of cartilage, its expression is tightly regulated in chondrocytes. Therefore, it is essential to elucidate in detail the transcriptional mechanism that controls expression of type II collagen, in particular by two enhancer elements we recently discovered. To systematically analyze and compare enhancer activities, we developed a novel reporter assay system that exploits site-specific integration of promoter and enhancer elements to activate a transcriptionally silent reporter gene. Using this system, we found that the enhancer elements have distinct characteristics, with one exhibiting additive effects and the other exhibiting synergistic effects when repeated in tandem.

  18. Reversal of tolerance induced by transplantation of skin expressing the immunodominant T cell epitope of rat type II collagen entitles development of collagen-induced arthritis but not graft rejection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäcklund, Johan; Treschow, Alexandra; Firan, Mihail

    2002-01-01

    collagen (CI), e.g. in skin, are tolerized against rat CII and resistant to CIA. In this study we transplanted skin from TSC transgenic mice onto non-transgenic CIA-susceptible littermates to investigate whether introduction of this epitope to a naïve immune system would lead to T cell priming and graft......Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is induced in H-2(q) mice after immunization with rat type II collagen (CII). The immunodominant T cell epitope on heterologous CII has been located to CII256-270. We have previously shown that TSC transgenic mice, which express the heterologous epitope in type I...... rejection or instead to tolerance and arthritis protection. Interestingly, TSC grafts were accepted and not even immunization of recipient mice with CII in adjuvant induced graft rejection. Instead, TSC skin recipients displayed a reduced T and B cell response to CII and were also protected from arthritis...

  19. Modeling the ternary complex TCR-Vbeta/CollagenII(261-273/HLA-DR4 associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina De Rosa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is known that genetic predisposition to rheumatoid arthritis (RA is associated with the MHC class II allele HLA-DR4 and that residues 261-273 of type II collagen (huCollp261 represent an immunodominant T cell epitope restricted by the DR4 molecule. Despite recent advances in characterization of MHC and T cell receptor (TCR contacts to this epitope, the atomic details of TCR/huCollp261/HLA-DR4 ternary complex are not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we have used computational modeling to get insight into this interaction. A three-dimensional model of the TCR Vbeta domain from a DR4(+ patient affected by RA has been derived by homology modeling techniques. Subsequently, the structure of the TCR Vbeta domain in complex with huCollp261/HLA-DR4 was obtained from a docking approach in conjunction with a filtering procedure based on biochemical information. The best complex from the docking experiments was then refined by 20 ns of molecular dynamics simulation in explicit water. The predicted model is consistent with available experimental data. Our results indicate that residues 97-101 of CDR3beta are critical for recognition of huCollp261/HLA-DR4 by TCR. We also show that TCR contacts on p/MHC surface affect the conformation of the shared epitope expressed by DR alleles associated with RA susceptibility. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work presents a three-dimensional model for the ternary complex TCR-Vbeta/collagenII(261-273/HLA-DR4 associated with rheumatoid arthritis that can provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of self reactivity.

  20. Cartilage Turnover Reflected by Metabolic Processing of Type II Collagen: A Novel Marker of Anabolic Function in Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasja Stæhr Gudmann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to enable measurement of cartilage formation by a novel biomarker of type II collagen formation. The competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA Pro-C2 was developed and characterized for assessment of the beta splice variant of type II procollagen (PIIBNP. This is expected to originate primarily from remodeling of hyaline cartilage. A mouse monoclonal antibody (Mab was raised in mouse, targeting specifically PIIBNP (QDVRQPG and used in development of the assay. The specificity, sensitivity, 4-parameter fit and stability of the assay were tested. Levels of PIIBNP were quantified in human serum (0.6–2.2 nM, human amniotic fluid (163–188 nM and sera from different animal species, e.g., fetal bovine serum (851–901 nM with general good linearity (100% (SD 7.6 recovery and good intra- and inter-assay variation (CV% < 10. Dose (0.1 to 100 ng/mL and time (7, 14 and 21 days dependent release of PIIBNP were evaluated in the conditioned medium from bovine cartilage explants (BEX and human cartilage explants (HEX upon stimulation with insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1, transforming growth factor (TGF-β1 and fibroblastic growth factor-2 (FGF-2. TGF-β1 and IGF-1 in concentrations of 10–100 ng/mL significantly (p < 0.05 induced release of PIIBNP in BEX compared to conditions without treatment (WO. In HEX, IGF-1 100 ng/mL was able to induce a significant increase of PIIBNP after one week compared to WO. FGF-2 did not induce a PIIBNP release in our models. To our knowledge this is the first assay, which is able to specifically evaluate PIIBNP excretion. The Pro-C2 assay seems to provide a promising and novel marker of type II collagen formation.

  1. The Scavenging of Free Radical and Oxygen Species Activities and Hydration Capacity of Collagen Hydrolysates from Walleye Pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) Skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG Yongliang; LI Bafang; ZHAO Xue

    2009-01-01

    Fish skin collagen hydrolysates (FSCH) were prepared from walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) using a mixture of enzymes, namely trypsin and flavourzyme. The degree of hydrolysis of the skin collagen was 27.3%. FSCH was mainly composed of low-molecular-weight peptides and the relative proportion of <1000Da fraction was 70.6%. Free radical and oxygen species scavenging activities of FSCH were investigated in four model systems, including diphenylpicrylhy-drazyl radical (DPPH), superox-ide anion radical, hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide model, and compared with that of a native antioxidant, reduced glutathione (GSH). FSCH was also evaluated by water-absorbing and water-holding capacity. The results showed that FSCH was able to scav-enge free radical and oxygen species significantly and to enhance water-absorbing and water-holding capacity remarkably. Therefore, FSCH may have potential applications in the medicine and food industries.

  2. Inhibitory Effects of Soyeum Pharmacopuncture (SPP on Rheumatoid Arthritis in Collagen II-induced Arthritis (CIA Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwa-Seung Yoo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The aim is to examine the effect of Soyeum Pharmacopuncture (SPP on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA in DBA/1OlaHsd mice. Methods : To determine the effect of SPP on chronic IFNlammatory joint disease, we induced CIA in DBA/1OlaHsd mice by immunization with bovine type II collagen. Animals were treated with intraperitoneal injection doses of 2 mg/kg of SPP, beginning 3 days before the expected onset of disease symptoms. Inhibitory Effects of SPP were observed by serum levels of TNF-, and IFN-,,, or cell proliferation in the spleen cell culture and histological examination of knee joint. Results : In the CIA Mice, serum levels of TNF-, and IFN-,, production in the spleen cell culture were reduced. At the histopathological examination of knee joint, chondropathy of cartilage in the synovial joint in the SP group was repaired while compared with control group. Conclusion : These results suggest that the SPP may be effective for the prevention and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis disease.

  3. Some thermodynamical aspects of protein hydration water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallamace, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.mallamace@unime.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Corsaro, Carmelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Mallamace, Domenico [Dipartimento SASTAS, Università di Messina, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Sebastiano [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Cirino [CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Stanley, H. Eugene [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Chen, Sow-Hsin [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    We study by means of nuclear magnetic resonance the self-diffusion of protein hydration water at different hydration levels across a large temperature range that includes the deeply supercooled regime. Starting with a single hydration shell (h = 0.3), we consider different hydrations up to h = 0.65. Our experimental evidence indicates that two phenomena play a significant role in the dynamics of protein hydration water: (i) the measured fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover temperature is unaffected by the hydration level and (ii) the first hydration shell remains liquid at all hydrations, even at the lowest temperature.

  4. Phenotypic expressions of a Gly154Arg mutation in type II collagen in two unrelated patients with spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaitila, I.; Marttinen, E. [Helsinki Univ. Hospital (Finland); Koerkkoe, J.; Ala-Kokko, L. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-05-03

    Type II collagenopathies consist of chondrodysplasia ranging from lethal to mild in severity. A large number of mutations has been found in the COL2A1 gene. Glycine substitutions have been the most common types of mutation. Genotype-phenotype correlations in type II collagenopathies have not been established, partly because of insufficient clinical and radiographic description of the patients. We found a glycine-to-arginine substitution at position 154 in type II collagen in two unrelated isolated propositi with spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia and provide a comparative clinical and radiographic analysis from birth to young adulthood for this condition. The clinical phenotype was disproportionate short stature with varus/valgus deformities of the lower limbs requiring corrective osteotomies, and lumbar lordosis. The skeletal radiographs showed an evolution from short tubular bones, delayed epiphyseal development, and mild vertebral involvement to severe metaphyseal dysplasia with dappling irregularities, and hip {open_quotes}dysplasia.{close_quotes} The metaphyseal abnormalities disappeared by adulthood. 27 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Safety and immunogenicity of a novel therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding chicken type II collagen for rheumatoid arthritis in normal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Long; Xiao, Zhao; Song, Yun; Zhijian, Zhang; Jing, Jin; Kun, Yu; Yuna, Hao; Dongfa, Dai; Lili, Ding; Liuxin, Tan; Fei, Liang; Nan, Liu; Fang, Yuan; Yuying, Sun; Yongzhi, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Current clinically available treatments for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) fail to cure the disease or unsatisfactorily halt disease progression. To overcome these limitations, the development of therapeutic DNA vaccines and boosters may offer new promising strategies. Because type II collagen (CII) as a critical autoantigen in RA and native chicken type II collagen (nCCII) has been used to effectively treat RA, we previously developed a novel therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding CCII (pcDNA-CCOL2A1) with efficacy comparable to that of the current "gold standard", methotrexate(MTX). Here, we systemically evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine in normal Wistar rats. Group 1 received only a single intramuscular injection into the hind leg with pcDNA-CCOL2A1 at the maximum dosage of 3 mg/kg on day 0; Group 2 was injected with normal saline (NS) as a negative control. All rats were monitored daily for any systemic adverse events, reactions at the injection site, and changes in body weights. Plasma and tissues from all experimental rats were collected on day 14 for routine examinations of hematology and biochemistry parameters, anti-CII IgG antibody reactivity, and histopathology. Our results indicated clearly that at the maximum dosage of 3 mg/kg, the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine was safe and well-tolerated. No abnormal clinical signs or deaths occurred in the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 group compared with the NS group. Furthermore, no major alterations were observed in hematology, biochemistry, and histopathology, even at the maximum dose. In particularly, no anti-CII IgG antibodies were detected in vaccinated normal rats at 14 d after vaccination; this was relevant because we previously demonstrated that the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine, when administered at the therapeutic dosage of 300 μg/kg alone, did not induce anti-CII IgG antibody production and significantly reduced levels of anti-CII IgG antibodies in the plasma of rats with established collagen-induced arthritis

  6. Crystal structure of aquatris(isonicotinamide-κNbis(thiocyanato-κNcobalt(II 2.5-hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan Neumann

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, [Co(NCS2(C6H6N2O3(H2O]·2.5H2O, comprises one CoII cation, three isonicotinamide ligands, two thiocyanate anions, one aqua ligand and two water solvent molecules in general positions, as well as one water solvent molecule that is located on a twofold rotation axis. The CoII cations are octahedrally coordinated by two terminally N-bonded thiocyanate anions, one water molecule and three isonicotinamide ligands, each coordinating via the pyridine N atom. The discrete complexes are linked by intermolecular O—H...O, N—H...O and N—H...S hydrogen bonding into a three-dimensional network that contains cavities in which the solvent water molecules are located. The latter are linked by further O—H...O hydrogen bonds to the network. There are additional short contacts present in the crystal, indicative of weak C—H...S, C—H...O and C—H...N interactions.

  7. Tris(ethylenediaminenickel(II 1H-pyrazole-3,5-dicarboxylate 1.67-hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güneş Demirtaş

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, [Ni(C2H8N23](C5H2N2O4·1.67H2O, consists of three [Ni(en3]2+ dications (en is ethylenediamine, three [(pzdc3]2− dianions (pzdc is pyrazole-3,5-dicarboxylate and five water molecules. In each complex dication, the NiII atom is coordinated by six N atoms from three en ligands forming a distorted octahedral coordination geometry. In the crystal, the ions and water molecules are linked into a three-dimensional framework by a large number of N—H...O and O—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  8. Mapping of Potent and Specific Binding Motifs, GLOGEN and GVOGEA, for Integrin α1β1 Using Collagen Toolkits II and III*

    OpenAIRE

    Hamaia, Samir W.; Pugh, Nicholas; Raynal, Nicolas; Némoz, Benjamin; Stone, Rachael; Gullberg, Donald; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    Integrins are well characterized cell surface receptors for extracellular matrix proteins. Mapping integrin-binding sites within the fibrillar collagens identified GFOGER as a high affinity site recognized by α2β1, but with lower affinity for α1β1. Here, to identify specific ligands for α1β1, we examined binding of the recombinant human α1 I domain, the rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12), and the rat glioma Rugli cell line to our collagen Toolkit II and III peptides using solid-phase and r...

  9. A Comparative Study Between the Early Stages Hydration of a High Strength and Sulphate Resistant Portland Cement and the Type II F Portland Cement Through Non Conventional Differential Thermal Analysis and Thermogravimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Neves Junior,Alex; Viana,Marcelo Mendes; Dweck,Jo; Toledo Filho,Romildo Dias

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a study, which compares the early stages of hydration of a High Initial Strength and Sulphate Resistant Portland Cement (HIS SR PC) with those of Type II F Portland Cement (PC II), by Non-Conventional Differential Thermal Analysis (NCDTA) within the first 24 hours of hydration. Water/cement (w/c) ratios equal to 0.5, 0.6 and 0.66 were used to prepare the pastes. The hydration of these two types of cement was monitored on real time by NCDTA curves, through the thermal effect...

  10. Articular cartilage repair with recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold in a preliminary porcine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhonen, Virpi; Salonius, Eve; Haaparanta, Anne-Marie; Järvinen, Elina; Paatela, Teemu; Meller, Anna; Hannula, Markus; Björkman, Mimmi; Pyhältö, Tuomo; Ellä, Ville; Vasara, Anna; Töyräs, Juha; Kellomäki, Minna; Kiviranta, Ilkka

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a novel recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold (rhCo-PLA) in the repair of full-thickness cartilage lesions with autologous chondrocyte implantation technique (ACI). The forming repair tissue was compared to spontaneous healing (spontaneous) and repair with a commercial porcine type I/III collagen membrane (pCo). Domestic pigs (4-month-old, n = 20) were randomized into three study groups and a circular full-thickness chondral lesion with a diameter of 8 mm was created in the right medial femoral condyle. After 3 weeks, the chondral lesions were repaired with either rhCo-PLA or pCo together with autologous chondrocytes, or the lesion was only debrided and left untreated for spontaneous repair. The repair tissue was evaluated 4 months after the second operation. Hyaline cartilage formed most frequently in the rhCo-PLA treatment group. Biomechanically, there was a trend that both treatment groups resulted in better repair tissue than spontaneous healing. Adverse subchondral bone reactions developed less frequently in the spontaneous group (40%) and the rhCo-PLA treated group (50%) than in the pCo control group (100%). However, no statistically significant differences were found between the groups. The novel rhCo-PLA biomaterial showed promising results in this proof-of-concept study, but further studies will be needed in order to determine its effectiveness in articular cartilage repair. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:745-753, 2016. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Collagen and component polypeptides: Low frequency and amide vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine-Vive, F.; Merzel, F.; Johnson, M. R.; Kearley, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    Collagen is a fibrous protein, which exists widely in the human body. The biomechanical properties of collagen depend on its triple helix structure and the corresponding low frequency vibrations. We use first-principles, density functional theory methods and analytical force fields to investigate the molecular vibrations of a model collagen compound, the results being validated by comparison with published, inelastic neutron scattering data. The results from these atomistic simulations are used at higher frequency to study the Amide I and V vibrations and therefore the vibrational signature of secondary and tertiary structure formation. In addition to collagen, its component homopolymers, poly-glycine and poly-proline are also studied. The Amide V vibration of glycine is strongly modified in going from the single helix of poly-glycine II to the triple helix of collagen. The collagen models are hydrated and this work allows us to discuss the relative merits of density functional theory and force field methods when tackling complex, partially crystalline systems.

  12. Efficacy of MTA and CEM Cement with Collagen Membranes for Treatment of Class II Furcation Defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Ollah Ghanbari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the efficacy of MTA and CEM cement in Class II furcation defects in human mandibular molars.Forty furcation defects were treated in 16 patients with chronic periodontitis. The clinical parameters of probing depth (PD, vertical and horizontal clinical attachment levels (VCAL and HCAL, open vertical and horizontal furcation depths (OVFD and OHFD, and gingival margin level (GML were measured at baseline and at 3- and 6-month (re-entry surgery postoperatively. Data were analyzed at a significance level of P<0.05.Use of MTA and CEM caused significant decreases in PD, VCAL, HCAL, OVFD and OHFD at re-entry, with no statistically significant differences between the two treatment options in soft and hard tissue parameters.Both treatment modalities caused significant gains in attachment levels and bone fills, proving efficacy for treatment of Class II furcation involvements.

  13. Specific recognition of the collagen triple helix by chaperone HSP47. II. The HSP47-binding structural motif in collagens and related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Takaki; Nishikawa, Yoshimi; Asada, Shinichi; Yamazaki, Chisato M; Takahara, Yoshifumi; Homma, Daisuke L; Otaka, Akira; Ohtani, Katsuki; Wakamiya, Nobutaka; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Kouki

    2006-04-21

    The endoplasmic reticulum-resident chaperone heat-shock protein 47 (HSP47) plays an essential role in procollagen biosynthesis. The function of HSP47 relies on its specific interaction with correctly folded triple-helical regions comprised of Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats, and Arg residues at Yaa positions have been shown to be important for this interaction. The amino acid at the Yaa position (Yaa(-3)) in the N-terminal-adjoining triplet containing the critical Arg (defined as Arg(0)) was also suggested to be directly recognized by HSP47 (Koide, T., Asada, S., Takahara, Y., Nishikawa, Y., Nagata, K., and Kitagawa, K. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 3432-3438). Based on this finding, we examined the relationship between the structure of Yaa(-3) and HSP47 binding using synthetic collagenous peptides. The results obtained indicated that the structure of Yaa(-3) determined the binding affinity for HSP47. Maximal binding was observed when Yaa(-3) was Thr. Moreover, the required relative spatial arrangement of these key residues in the triple helix was analyzed by taking advantage of heterotrimeric collagen-model peptides, each of which contains one Thr(-3) and one Arg(0). The results revealed that HSP47 recognizes the Yaa(-3) and Arg(0) residues only when they are on the same peptide strand. Taken together, the data obtained led us to define the HSP47-binding structural epitope in the collagen triple helix and also define the HSP47-binding motif in the primary structure. A motif search against human protein database predicted candidate clients for this molecular chaperone. The search result indicated that not all collagen family proteins require the chaperoning by HSP47.

  14. Oral Administration of Shark Type II Collagen Suppresses Complete Freund’s Adjuvant-Induced Rheumatoid Arthritis in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lijuan; Bao, Bin; Wang, Nanping; Xie, Jing; Wu, Wenhui

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Shark type II collagen (SCII) is extracted as a glycoprotein from the cartilage of blue shark (Prionace glauca). We aim to confirm the effects of oral tolerance of SCII on inflammatory and immune responses to the ankle joint of rheumatoid-arthritis rats induced by Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA). Materials and Methods: The onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was observed 14 ± x days after injection of CFA. Rats in the control group were treated with acetic acid by oral administration (0.05 mmol kg−1d−1, days 14–28), while rats in experimental groups were treated by oral administration with SCII (1 or 3 mg kg−1d−1, days 14–28), Tripterygium wilfordii polyglycosidium (TWP) (10 mg kg−1d−1, days 14–28), and bovine type II collagen from US (US-CII) (1 mg kg−1d−1, days 14–28), respectively. The severity of arthritis was evaluated by the articular swelling. The immunological indexes observed included delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction, the level of interleukins 10 (IL-10) in rat blood serum and morphological characterization. Mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) was performed to investigate the relationship between T cell apoptosis and specific immune tolerance induced by SCII. Results: Treatment with SCII for 2 weeks significantly attenuated the acute inflammation. The rats orally administrated with SCII at the level of 3 mg kg−1d−1 (SCII 3) and US-CII had decreased DTH reaction compared with rats in control group. Rats treated with SCII 3 had the highest level of IL-10 with 102 pg/mL. SCII with concentration of 10 μg/L could help to significantly enhance level of Fas/Apo-1 in T cell in vitro. The result of histological staining indicated that the recovery of the articular membranes of ankle joint in SCII 3 group was greatly enhanced. Conclusions: Our results suggest that appropriate dose of SCII can not only ameliorate symptoms but also modify the disease process of Complete-Freunds-Adjuvant-induced arthritis. Oral

  15. Oral Administration of Shark Type II Collagen Suppresses Complete Freund's Adjuvant-Induced Rheumatoid Arthritis in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lijuan; Bao, Bin; Wang, Nanping; Xie, Jing; Wu, Wenhui

    2012-03-28

    Shark type II collagen (SCII) is extracted as a glycoprotein from the cartilage of blue shark (Prionace glauca). We aim to confirm the effects of oral tolerance of SCII on inflammatory and immune responses to the ankle joint of rheumatoid-arthritis rats induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA). The onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was observed 14 ± x days after injection of CFA. Rats in the control group were treated with acetic acid by oral administration (0.05 mmol kg-1d-1, days 14-28), while rats in experimental groups were treated by oral administration with SCII (1 or 3 mg kg-1d-1, days 14-28), Tripterygium wilfordii polyglycosidium (TWP) (10 mg kg-1d-1, days 14-28), and bovine type II collagen from US (US-CII) (1 mg kg-1d-1, days 14-28), respectively. The severity of arthritis was evaluated by the articular swelling. The immunological indexes observed included delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction, the level of interleukins 10 (IL-10) in rat blood serum and morphological characterization. Mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) was performed to investigate the relationship between T cell apoptosis and specific immune tolerance induced by SCII. Treatment with SCII for 2 weeks significantly attenuated the acute inflammation. The rats orally administrated with SCII at the level of 3 mg kg-1d-1 (SCII 3) and US-CII had decreased DTH reaction compared with rats in control group. Rats treated with SCII 3 had the highest level of IL-10 with 102 pg/mL. SCII with concentration of 10 μg/L could help to significantly enhance level of Fas/Apo-1 in T cell in vitro. The result of histological staining indicated that the recovery of the articular membranes of ankle joint in SCII 3 group was greatly enhanced. Our results suggest that appropriate dose of SCII can not only ameliorate symptoms but also modify the disease process of Complete-Freunds-Adjuvant-induced arthritis. Oral administration of SCII might be a potential candidate as a novel drug for further

  16. Oral Administration of Shark Type II Collagen Suppresses Complete Freund’s Adjuvant-Induced Rheumatoid Arthritis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhui Wu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Shark type II collagen (SCII is extracted as a glycoprotein from the cartilage of blue shark (Prionace glauca. We aim to confirm the effects of oral tolerance of SCII on inflammatory and immune responses to the ankle joint of rheumatoid-arthritis rats induced by Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA. Materials and Methods: The onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA was observed 14 ± x days after injection of CFA. Rats in the control group were treated with acetic acid by oral administration (0.05 mmol kg−1d−1, days 14–28, while rats in experimental groups were treated by oral administration with SCII (1 or 3 mg kg−1d−1, days 14–28, Tripterygium wilfordii polyglycosidium (TWP (10 mg kg−1d−1, days 14–28, and bovine type II collagen from US (US-CII (1 mg kg−1d−1, days 14–28, respectively. The severity of arthritis was evaluated by the articular swelling. The immunological indexes observed included delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH reaction, the level of interleukins 10 (IL-10 in rat blood serum and morphological characterization. Mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC was performed to investigate the relationship between T cell apoptosis and specific immune tolerance induced by SCII. Results: Treatment with SCII for 2 weeks significantly attenuated the acute inflammation. The rats orally administrated with SCII at the level of 3 mg kg−1d−1 (SCII 3 and US-CII had decreased DTH reaction compared with rats in control group. Rats treated with SCII 3 had the highest level of IL-10 with 102 pg/mL. SCII with concentration of 10 μg/L could help to significantly enhance level of Fas/Apo-1 in T cell in vitro. The result of histological staining indicated that the recovery of the articular membranes of ankle joint in SCII 3 group was greatly enhanced. Conclusions: Our results suggest that appropriate dose of SCII can not only ameliorate symptoms but also modify the disease process of Complete-Freunds-Adjuvant-induced arthritis. Oral

  17. Elastic energy storage in human articular cartilage: estimation of the elastic modulus for type II collagen and changes associated with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Frederick H; Bradica, Gino; Tria, Alfred

    2002-03-01

    The viscoelastic mechanical properties of normal and osteoarthritic articular were analyzed based on data reported by Kempson [in: Adult Articular Cartilage (1973)] and Silver et al. (Connect. Tissue Res., 2001b). Results of the analysis of tensile elastic stress-strain curves suggest that the elastic modulus of cartilage from the superficial zone is approximately 7.0 GPa parallel and 2.21 GPa perpendicular to the cleavage line pattern. Collagen fibril lengths in the superficial zone were found to be approximately 1265 microm parallel and 668 microm perpendicular to the cleavage line direction. The values for the elastic modulus and fibril lengths decreased with increased extent of osteoarthritis. The elastic modulus of type II collagen parallel to the cleavage line pattern in the superficial zone approaches that of type I collagen in tendon, suggesting that elastic energy storage occurs in the superficial zone due to the tensile pre-tension that exists in this region. Decreases in the elastic modulus associated with osteoarthritis reflect decreased ability of cartilage to store elastic energy, which leads to cartilage fibrillation and fissure formation. We hypothesize that under normal physiological conditions, collagen fibrils in cartilage function to store elastic energy associated with weight bearing and locomotion. Enzymatic cleavage of cartilage proteoglycans and collagen observed in osteoarthritis may lead to fibrillation and fissure formation as a result of impaired energy storage capability of cartilage.

  18. Type II collagen peptide is able to accelerate embryonic chondrocyte differentiation: an association with articular cartilage matrix resorption in osteoarthrosis

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    Elena Vasil'evna Chetina

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion. The effect of CP on gene expression and collagen decomposition activity depends on the morphotype of embryonic chondrocytes. Lack of effect of CP on collagen decomposition activity in both the embryonic hypertrophic chondrocytes and the cartilage explants from OA patients supports the hypothesis that the hypertrophic morphotype is a dominant morphotype of articular chondrocytes in OA. Moreover, collagen decomposition products can be involved in the resorption of matrix in OA and in the maintenance of chronic nature of the pathology.

  19. Treatment of progressive keratoconus by riboflavin-UVA-induced cross-linking of corneal collagen: ultrastructural analysis by Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph II in vivo confocal microscopy in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotta, Cosimo; Balestrazzi, Angelo; Traversi, Claudio; Baiocchi, Stefano; Caporossi, Tomaso; Tommasi, Cristina; Caporossi, Aldo

    2007-05-01

    To assess ultrastructural stromal modifications after riboflavin-UVA-induced cross-linking of corneal collagen in patients with progressive keratoconus. This was a second-phase prospective nonrandomized open study in 10 patients with progressive keratoconus treated by riboflavin-UVA-induced cross-linking of corneal collagen and assessed by means of Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph II Rostock Corneal Module (HRT II-RCM) in vivo confocal microscopy. The eye in the worst clinical condition was treated for each patient. Treatment under topical anesthesia included corneal deepithelization (9-mm diameter) and instillation of 0.1% riboflavin phosphate-20% dextran T 500 solution at 5 minutes before UVA irradiation and every 5 minutes for a total of 30 minutes. UVA irradiation was 7 mm in diameter. Patients were assessed by HRT II-RCM confocal microscopy in vivo at 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. Rarefaction of keratocytes in the anterior and intermediate stroma, associated with stromal edema, was observed immediately after treatment. The observation at 3 months after the operation detected keratocyte repopulation in the central treated area, whereas the edema had disappeared. Cell density increased progressively over the postoperative period. At approximately 6 months, keratocyte repopulation was complete, accompanied by increased density of stromal fibers. No endothelial damage was observed at any time. Reduction in anterior and intermediate stromal keratocytes followed by gradual repopulation has been confirmed directly in vivo in humans by HRT II-RCM confocal microscopy after riboflavin-UVA-induced corneal collagen cross-linking.

  20. Upregulation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Synthesis and Consequent Collagen II Expression in Leptin-stimulated Human Chondrocytes.

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    Shun-Fu Chang

    Full Text Available Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs play positive roles in cartilage development, but they can barely be detected in healthy articular cartilage. However, recent evidence has indicated that BMPs could be detected in osteoarthritic and damaged cartilage and their precise roles have not been well defined. Extremely high amounts of leptin have been reported in obese individuals, which can be associated with osteoarthritis (OA development. The aim of this study was to investigate whether BMPs could be induced in human primary chondrocytes during leptin-stimulated OA development and the underlying mechanism. We found that expression of BMP-2 mRNA, but not BMP-4, BMP-6, or BMP-7 mRNA, could be increased in human primary chondrocytes under leptin stimulation. Moreover, this BMP-2 induction was mediated through transcription factor-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT 3 activation via JAK2-ERK1/2-induced Ser727-phosphorylation. Of note, histone deacetylases (HDACs 3 and 4 were both involved in modulating leptin-induced BMP-2 mRNA expression through different pathways: HDAC3, but not HDAC4, associated with STAT3 to form a complex. Our results further demonstrated that the role of BMP-2 induction under leptin stimulation is to increase collagen II expression. The findings in this study provide new insights into the regulatory mechanism of BMP-2 induction in leptin-stimulated chondrocytes and suggest that BMP-2 may play a reparative role in regulating leptin-induced OA development.

  1. The Predicted Proteomic Network Associated with the Antiarthritic Action of Qingfu Guanjieshu in Collagen-II-Induced Arthritis in Rats

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    Ting Yu Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Qingfu Guanjieshu (QFGJS is an herbal preparation for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Previous studies revealed that QFGJS significantly inhibited experimental arthritis and acute inflammation, accompanied by reduction of proinflammatory cytokines and elevation of anti-inflammatory cytokines. This study aims to identify the targeted proteins and predict the proteomic network associated with the drug action of QFGJS by using 2D gel and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS techniques. Thirty female Wistar rats were evenly grouped as normal and vehicle- and QFGJS-treated CIA rats. The antiarthritic effect of QFGJS was examined with a 19-day treatment course, and the knee synovial tissues of animals from each group were obtained for 2D gel and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis. Results showed that QFGJS significantly ameliorated collagen II-induced arthritis when administrated at 2.8 g/kg body weight for 19 days. 2D gel image analysis revealed 89 differentially expressed proteins in the synovial tissues among the normal and vehicle- and QFGJS-treated CIA rats from over 1000 proteins of which 63 proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis, and 32 proteins were included for classification of functions using Gene Ontology (GO method. Finally, 14 proteins were analyzed using bioinformatics, and a predicted proteomic network related to the anti-arthritic effect of QFGJS was established, and Pgk1 plays a central role.

  2. Collagen-induced arthritis in Biozzi mice. Joint involvement is not correlated with collagen II IgG2a autoantibodies nor restricted to only H-2q and H-2r.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, J P; Couderc, J; Bouthillier, Y; Franc, B; Decreusefond, C; Mouton, D

    1989-09-01

    High (H) and low (L) immune responder "Biozzi" mice, obtained by four different selections, were investigated for their ability to develop collagen-induced arthritis. Both LI and LII lines--characterized by their low antibody responses to a wide variety of Ag--developed arthritis though they do not bear the susceptible H-2q and H-2r haplotypes. Out of the two lines (HI and HII) selected for their high antibody responses and bearing H-2q, only one (HI) developed arthritis. Both the lines with amplified high or low antibody responses (HG and LG), and the lines differing in the levels of cell-mediated immunity (Hpha and Lpha), failed to develop arthritis. Collagen II autoantibodies were found in all the lines: the responses being high (HI and HG), low (LI, LII and LG), or intermediate (HII, Hpha and Lpha). The level of IgG2a autoantibodies, presumed to be the most pathogenic, was low in two (HI and LII) of the three arthritic lines, and was high in the unaffected HG line. These results show that this arthritis is not solely restricted to H-2q and H-2r haplotypes, and argue against a correlation between collagen autoantibody levels and disease incidence.

  3. Communication: Librational dynamics in water, sI and sII clathrate hydrates, and ice Ih: Molecular-dynamics insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Christian J; English, Niall J

    2016-02-01

    Equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations have been performed for liquid water, and on metastable sI and sII polymorphs of empty hydrate lattices, in addition to ice Ih, in order to study the dynamical properties of librational motion (rotation oscillation) depicted by protons in water molecules. In particular, hydrate lattices were found to display prominent "bifurcated" features, or peaks, at circa 70 and 80-95 meV (or ∼560 and 640-760 cm(-1), respectively), also displayed by ice, in essentially quantitative agreement with experimental neutron-scattering data. However, observed differences in dispersion between these librational modes between these two structures (both hydrate polymorphs vis-à-vis ice), owing primarily to density effects, have been decomposed into contributions arising from angular-velocity dynamics about axes in the local molecular frame of water molecules, with in-plane "wagging" and "twisting" rationalising one mode at ∼70 meV, and out-of-plane motion for the higher-frequency band. This was confirmed explicitly by a type of de facto normal-mode analysis, in which only immediate layers of water molecules about the one under consideration were allowed to move. In contrast, liquid water displayed no marked preference for such local in- or out-of-plane modes characterising librational motion, owing to the marked absence of rigid, pentamers or hexamers therein.

  4. Communication: Librational dynamics in water, sI and sII clathrate hydrates, and ice Ih: Molecular-dynamics insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Christian J.; English, Niall J.

    2016-02-01

    Equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations have been performed for liquid water, and on metastable sI and sII polymorphs of empty hydrate lattices, in addition to ice Ih, in order to study the dynamical properties of librational motion (rotation oscillation) depicted by protons in water molecules. In particular, hydrate lattices were found to display prominent "bifurcated" features, or peaks, at circa 70 and 80-95 meV (or ˜560 and 640-760 cm-1, respectively), also displayed by ice, in essentially quantitative agreement with experimental neutron-scattering data. However, observed differences in dispersion between these librational modes between these two structures (both hydrate polymorphs vis-à-vis ice), owing primarily to density effects, have been decomposed into contributions arising from angular-velocity dynamics about axes in the local molecular frame of water molecules, with in-plane "wagging" and "twisting" rationalising one mode at ˜70 meV, and out-of-plane motion for the higher-frequency band. This was confirmed explicitly by a type of de facto normal-mode analysis, in which only immediate layers of water molecules about the one under consideration were allowed to move. In contrast, liquid water displayed no marked preference for such local in- or out-of-plane modes characterising librational motion, owing to the marked absence of rigid, pentamers or hexamers therein.

  5. Evaluation of Magnetic Nanoparticle-Labeled Chondrocytes Cultivated on a Type II Collagen-Chitosan/Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic) Acid Biphasic Scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Juin-Yih; Chen, Shi-Hui; Chen, Yu-Pin; Chen, Wei-Chuan

    2017-01-04

    Chondral or osteochondral defects are still controversial problems in orthopedics. Here, chondrocytes labeled with magnetic nanoparticles were cultivated on a biphasic, type II collagen-chitosan/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold in an attempt to develop cultures with trackable cells exhibiting growth, differentiation, and regeneration. Rabbit chondrocytes were labeled with magnetic nanoparticles and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron (TEM) microscopy, and gene and protein expression analyses. The experimental results showed that the magnetic nanoparticles did not affect the phenotype of chondrocytes after cell labeling, nor were protein and gene expression affected. The biphasic type II collagen-chitosan/poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid scaffold was characterized by SEM, and labeled chondrocytes showed a homogeneous distribution throughout the scaffold after cultivation onto the polymer. Cellular phenotype remained unaltered but with increased gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan, as indicated by cell staining, indicating chondrogenesis. Decreased SRY-related high mobility group-box gene (Sox-9) levels of cultured chondrocytes indicated that differentiation was associated with osteogenesis. These results are encouraging for the development of techniques for trackable cartilage regeneration and osteochondral defect repair which may be applied in vivo and, eventually, in clinical trials.

  6. Transepithelial corneal collagen crosslinking for keratoconus: qualitative investigation by in vivo HRT II confocal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporossi, Aldo; Mazzotta, Cosimo; Baiocchi, Stefano; Caporossi, Tomaso; Paradiso, Anna Lucia

    2012-01-01

    This was a qualitative investigation of corneal microstructural modifications in keratoconic patients undergoing experimental transepithelial crosslinking (TE CXL). Ten patients with keratoconus intolerant to gas-permeable rigid contact lenses were enrolled. Corneal thickness was in the range 350-390 µm at the thinnest point measured by Visante AC optical coherence tomography system (Zeiss, Jena, Germany). All patients underwent TE CXL with 0.1% riboflavin-15% dextran solution supplemented with TRIS plus sodium EDTA (Ricrolin TE, Sooft Italia) according to Siena protocol. In vivo Heidelberg retinal tomograph II laser scanning confocal analysis (Rostock Cornea Module, Heidelberg, Germany) was performed with the following follow-up: preoperative and postoperative assessments at 1, 3, and 6 months. The following morphologic parameters were evaluated: epithelium, subepithelial, and anterior stroma nerve plexi, keratocytes apoptosis, stromal changes, and the endothelium. After TE CXL, epithelial cells showed apoptosis, with mosaic alterations gradually disappearing. Keratocytes apoptosis was variable, superficial, and uneven, with a maximum depth of penetration at about 140 µm, measured from the surface of epithelium. Treatment respected subepithelial and stromal nerves that did not disappear. No variation in cell count or endothelial mosaic was observed. In vivo confocal analysis of corneal modifications induced by TE CXL showed a limited apoptotic affect of this treatment, about one-third of classic epi-off crosslinking procedure. The TE CXL respected sub-basal and anterior stroma nerve fibers, resulting safe for corneal endothelium. According to limited penetration, its mid- to long-term efficacy needs to be determined in different clinical settings related to patient age and keratoconus progression.

  7. Mapping of potent and specific binding motifs, GLOGEN and GVOGEA, for integrin α1β1 using collagen toolkits II and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaia, Samir W; Pugh, Nicholas; Raynal, Nicolas; Némoz, Benjamin; Stone, Rachael; Gullberg, Donald; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W

    2012-07-27

    Integrins are well characterized cell surface receptors for extracellular matrix proteins. Mapping integrin-binding sites within the fibrillar collagens identified GFOGER as a high affinity site recognized by α2β1, but with lower affinity for α1β1. Here, to identify specific ligands for α1β1, we examined binding of the recombinant human α1 I domain, the rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12), and the rat glioma Rugli cell line to our collagen Toolkit II and III peptides using solid-phase and real-time label-free adhesion assays. We observed Mg(2+)-dependent binding of the α1 I domain to the peptides in the following rank order: III-7 (GLOGEN), II-28 (GFOGER), II-7 and II-8 (GLOGER), II-18 (GAOGER), III-4 (GROGER). PC12 cells showed a similar profile. Using antibody blockade, we confirmed that binding of PC12 cells to peptide III-7 was mediated by integrin α1β1. We also identified a new α1β1-binding activity within peptide II-27. The sequence GVOGEA bound weakly to PC12 cells and strongly to activated Rugli cells or to an activated α1 I domain, but not to the α2 I domain or to C2C12 cells expressing α2β1 or α11β1. Thus, GVOGEA is specific for α1β1. Although recognized by both α2β1 and α11β1, GLOGEN is a better ligand for α1β1 compared with GFOGER. Finally, using biosensor assays, we show that although GLOGEN is able to compete for the α1 I domain from collagen IV (IC(50) ∼3 μm), GFOGER is much less potent (IC(50) ∼90 μm), as shown previously. These data confirm the selectivity of GFOGER for α2β1 and establish GLOGEN as a high affinity site for α1β1.

  8. Comparative immunolocalisation of perlecan with collagen II and aggrecan in human foetal, newborn and adult ovine joint tissues demonstrates perlecan as an early developmental chondrogenic marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan M; Shu, Cindy; Melrose, James

    2010-09-01

    We undertook a comparative immunolocalisation study on type II collagen, aggrecan and perlecan in a number of 12- to 14-week-old human foetal and postnatal (7-19 months) ovine joints including finger, toe, knee, elbow, hip and shoulder. This demonstrated that perlecan followed a virtually identical immunolocalisation pattern to that of type II collagen in the foetal tissues, but a slightly divergent localisation pattern in adult tissues. Aggrecan was also localised in the cartilaginous joint tissues, which were clearly delineated by toluidine blue staining and the type II collagen immunolocalisations. It was also present in the capsular joint tissues and in ligaments and tendons in the joint, which stained poorly or not at all with toluidine blue. In higher power microscopic views, antibodies to perlecan also stained small blood vessels in the synovial lining tissues of the joint capsule; however, this was not discernable in low power macroscopic views where the immunolocalisation of perlecan to pericellular regions of cells within the cartilaginous rudiments was a predominant feature. Perlecan was also evident in small blood vessels in stromal connective tissues associated with the cartilage rudiments and with occasional nerves in the vicinity of the joint tissues. Perlecan was expressed by rounded cells in the enthesis attachment points of tendons to bone and in rounded cells in the inner third of the meniscus, which stained prominently with type II collagen and aggrecan identifying the chondrogenic background of these cells and local compressive loads. Flattened cells within the tendon and in the surface laminas of articular cartilages and the meniscus did not express perlecan. Collected evidence presented herein, therefore, indicates that besides being a basement membrane component, perlecan is also a marker of chondrogenic cells in prenatal cartilages. In postnatal cartilages, perlecan displayed a pericellular localisation pattern rather than the territorial

  9. rFN/Cad-11-Modified Collagen Type II Biomimetic Interface Promotes the Adhesion and Chondrogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongfeng; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Zhengsheng; Kang, Fei; Yang, Bo; Kang, Xia; Wen, Can; Yan, Yanfei; Jiang, Bo; Fan, Yujiang

    2013-01-01

    Properties of the cell-material interface are determining factors in the successful function of cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Currently, cell adhesion is commonly promoted through the use of polypeptides; however, due to their lack of complementary or modulatory domains, polypeptides must be modified to improve their ability to promote adhesion. In this study, we utilized the principle of matrix-based biomimetic modification and a recombinant protein, which spans fragments 7–10 of fibronectin module III (heterophilic motif ) and extracellular domains 1–2 of cadherin-11 (rFN/Cad-11) (homophilic motif ), to modify the interface of collagen type II (Col II) sponges. We showed that the designed material was able to stimulate cell proliferation and promote better chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro than both the FN modified surfaces and the negative control. Further, the Col II/rFN/Cad-11-MSCs composite stimulated cartilage formation in vivo; the chondrogenic effect of Col II alone was much less significant. These results suggested that the rFN/Cad-11-modified collagen type II biomimetic interface has dual biological functions of promoting adhesion and stimulating chondrogenic differentiation. This substance, thus, may serve as an ideal scaffold material for cartilage tissue engineering, enhancing repair of injured cartilage in vivo. PMID:23919505

  10. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrutal Narendra Deshmukh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen.

  11. Ethyl pyruvate therapy attenuates experimental severe arthritis caused by type II collagen (CII) in the mouse (CIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paola, R; Mazzon, E; Galuppo, M; Esposito, E; Bramanti, P; Fink, M P; Cuzzocrea, S

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that ethyl pyruvate (EP), a simple aliphatic ester with anti-inflammatory effects, can reduce type II collagen-induced mouse arthritis (CIA). DBA/1J mice were used for the study, developing erosive hind paw arthritis when immunized with CII in an emulsion in complete Freund?s adjuvant (CFA). The incidence of CIA was 100 percent by day 28 in the CII-challenged mice, and the severity of CIA progressed over a 35-day period with radiographic evaluation revealing focal resorption of bone. The histopathology of CIA included erosion of the cartilage at the joint margins. EP-treatment (40 mg/kg/day i.p.) starting at the onset of arthritis (day 25) ameliorated the clinical signs at days 26-35 and improved histological status in the joint and paw. Immunohistochemical analysis for nitrotyrosine, poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) revealed a positive staining in inflamed joints from mice subjected to CIA, while no staining was observed for HO-1 and Nrf-2 in the same group. The degree of staining for nitrotyrosine, PAR, iNOS, was significantly reduced in CII-challenged mice treated with the EP. Immuno-positive-staining for HO-1 and Nrf-2 was observed instead, in joints obtained from the EP-treated group. Plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and the joint tissue levels of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α and MIP-2 were also significantly reduced by EP treatment. Thirty-five days after immunization, EP-treatment significantly increased plasma levels of IL-10. These data demonstrate that EP treatment exerts an anti-inflammatory effect during chronic inflammation and is able to ameliorate the tissue damage associated with CIA.

  12. A Novel Regulatory Mechanism of Type II Collagen Expression via a SOX9-dependent Enhancer in Intron 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Hideyo; Oh, Chun-do; Chen, Di; de Crombrugghe, Benoit; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2017-01-13

    Type II collagen α1 is specific for cartilaginous tissues, and mutations in its gene are associated with skeletal diseases. Its expression has been shown to be dependent on SOX9, a master transcription factor required for chondrogenesis that binds to an enhancer region in intron 1. However, ChIP sequencing revealed that SOX9 does not strongly bind to intron 1, but rather it binds to intron 6 and a site 30 kb upstream of the transcription start site. Here, we aimed to determine the role of the novel SOX9-binding site in intron 6. We prepared reporter constructs that contain a Col2a1 promoter, intron 1 with or without intron 6, and the luciferase gene. Although the reporter constructs were not activated by SOX9 alone, the construct that contained both introns 1 and 6 was activated 5-10-fold by the SOX9/SOX5 or the SOX9/SOX6 combination in transient-transfection assays in 293T cells. This enhancement was also observed in rat chondrosarcoma cells that stably expressed the construct. CRISPR/Cas9-induced deletion of intron 6 in RCS cells revealed that a 10-bp region of intron 6 is necessary both for Col2a1 expression and SOX9 binding. Furthermore, SOX9, but not SOX5, binds to this region as demonstrated in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, although both SOX9 and SOX5 bind to a larger 325-bp fragment of intron 6 containing this small sequence. These findings suggest a novel mechanism of action of SOX5/6; namely, the SOX9/5/6 combination enhances Col2a1 transcription through a novel enhancer in intron 6 together with the enhancer in intron 1. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Time course of antibodies against IgG and type II collagen in adjuvant arthritis. Role of mycobacteria administration in antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franch, A; Cassany, S; Castellote, C; Castell, M

    1994-02-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate, during the time course of adjuvant arthritis, the existence of antibodies directed to IgG (rheumatoid factor-like) and antibodies against type II collagen. In a second study, we also studied the relation between antibody production, arthritic process and mycobacteria administration. We have demonstrated the presence of antibodies to IgG and type II collagen by means of ELISA techniques. This reactivity appeared on day 7 post-induction, decreased later, and increased progressively from day 21 until last day studied (day 56 post-induction). We have also quantified antibodies against a soluble fraction of Mycobacterium butyricum, the inductor of the disease. Anti-mycobacteria antibodies appeared during the first seven days after induction, but from day 14, when systemic inflammation began, their levels suddenly increased. There is a positive correlation between anti-mycobacteria antibody levels and articular swelling. Anti-IgG and anti-collagen antibody production was not directly linked to arthritic process since these antibodies were synthesized when M. butyricum was administered intraperitoneally, which does not induce arthritis. Anti-mycobacteria antibody concentration was higher when arthritis induction by mycobacterial was successful than when it was unsuccessful.

  14. Characterization of type I, II, III, IV, and V collagens by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, Laura; Cohen, David; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    2000-04-01

    The relative proportions of genetically distinct collagen types in connective tissues vary with tissue type and change during disease progression, development, wound healing, aging. This study aims to 1) characterize the spectro- temporal fluorescence emission of fiber different types of collagen and 2) assess the ability of time-resolved laser- induced fluorescence spectroscopy to distinguish between collagen types. Fluorescence emission of commercially available purified samples was induced with nitrogen laser excitation pulses and detected with a MCP-PMT connected to a digital storage oscilloscope. The recorded time-resolved emission spectra displayed distinct fluorescence emission characteristics for each collagen type. The time domain information complemented the spectral domain intensity data for improved discrimination between different collagen types. Our results reveal that analysis of the fluorescence emission can be used to characterize different species of collagen. Also, the results suggest that time-resolved spectroscopy can be used for monitoring of connective tissue matrix composition changes due to various pathological and non-pathological conditions.

  15. Telmisartan inhibited angiotensin II-induced collagen metabolic imbalance without directly targeting TGF-β 1/Smad signaling pathway in cardiac fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Zhao, N A; Wang, J K; Zhu, S M; Zhu, H L; Liu, B; Cui, Q W; Guan, G C; Tian, G

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is an important pathological process of cardiac remodeling. A large number of studies have shown that telmisartan can attenuate cardiac fibrosis through acting on angiotensin II 1 receptor (AT1R), and TGF-β 1/Smad signaling molecule is an important pathway to achieve this effect. The aim of the study was to clarify whether, with excessive activation of RAAS system, telmisartan could also directly target TGF-β 1/Smad signaling pathway to have the function of anti-cardiac fibrosis. In this study, neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts were cultured and AngII or TGF-β 1 was administered for treatment or pre-incubation, and then telmisartan was used for 24 hours' incubation. Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests were performed to detect protein expressions. The results showed that telmisartan could inhibit collagen synthesis and collagen metabolic imbalance under the effect of Ang II, but telmisartan could not have such function in TGF-β 1-induced cardiac fibroblasts. It was further confirmed by western blot method that telmisartan could inhibit TGF-β 1/Smad signaling molecule expression under the effect of Ang II, but telmisartan had no effect on TGF-β 1-induced Smad signaling molecule expression. According to the present study telmisartan played a role of anticardiac fibrosis without directly targeting TGF-β 1/Smad signaling pathway molecule.

  16. 900-m high gas plumes rising from marine sediments containing structure II hydrates at Vestnesa Ridge, offshore W-Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew J.; Mienert, Jürgen; Bünz, Stefan; Greinert, Jens; Rasmussen, Tine L.

    2013-04-01

    We study an arctic sediment drift in ~1200 m water depth at Vestnesa Ridge, offshore western Svalbard. The ridge is spotted with pockmarks that range in size from a few meters to hundreds of meters in diameter and centimeters to tens of meters in height (e.g. Vogt et al., 1994). There is a strong negative-polarity seismic reflection below the ridge that is interpreted to record a negative impedance contrast marking the boundary between gas hydrate and water above and free gas and water below: it is the bottom-simulating reflector (BSR). Seismically transparent zones, interpreted as gas chimneys, extend from pockmarks at the seafloor to depths below the BSR (180-220 meters below the seafloor) (Bünz et al., 2012). Gas flares, gas hydrate, and methane-seep-specific biological communities (pogonphora and begiatoa bacterial mats) have been observed adjacent to pockmarks at the ridge (Bünz et al., 2012). We present new single-beam echosounding data that were acquired during 2010 and 2012 cruises on the R/V Helmer Hanssen at Vestnesa Ridge using a Simrad EK60 system that operates at frequencies of 18 and 38 kHz. During both cruises which lasted 3-5 days, we detected continuous bubble release from 4 separate pockmarks in 2010 and 6 separate pockmarks in 2012. There were no noticeable, short-term (hourly or daily) variations in the bubble release from the pockmarks, indicating that the venting from the pockmarks does not undergo rapid changes. Plumes from the pockmarks rise between 875 to 925m above the seafloor to a final water depth of 325 to 275m, respectively. This depth is in excellent agreement with the top of the hydrate stability zone (275 meters below sea level) for the gas composition of hydrate sampled at the ridge (96.31% C1; 3.36% C2; 0.21% C3; 0.11% IC4; 0.01% NC4). This suggests that hydrate skins are forming around the gas bubbles, inhibiting the dissolution of gas, and allowing the bubbles to rise to such great heights in the water column. Our results

  17. Mode-coupling study on the dynamics of hydrophobic hydration II: Aqueous solutions of benzene and rare gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, T; Matsuoka, T; Koda, S

    2006-02-14

    The dynamic properties of both the solute and solvent of the aqueous solution of benzene, xenon and neon are calculated by the mode-coupling theory for molecular liquids based on the interaction-site model. The B-coefficients of the reorientational relaxation and the translational diffusion of the solvent are evaluated from their dependence on the concentration of the solute, and the reorientational relaxation time of water within the hydration shell is estimated based on the two-state model. The reorientational relaxation times of water in the bulk and within the hydration shell, that of solute, and the translational diffusion coefficients of solute and solvent, are calculated at 0-30 degrees C. The temperature dependence of these dynamic properties is in qualitative agreement with that of NMR experiment reported by Nakahara et al. (M. Nakahara, C. Wakai, Y. Yoshimoto and N. Matubayasi, J. Phys. Chem., 1996, 100, 1345-1349, ref. 36), although the agreement of the absolute values is not so good. The B-coefficients of the reorientational relaxation times for benzene, xenon and neon solution are correlated with the hydration number and the partial molar volume of the solute. The proportionality with the latter is better than that with the former. These results support the mechanism that the retardation of the mobility of water is caused by the cavity formation of the solute, as previously suggested by us (T. Yamaguchi, T. Matsuoka and S. Koda, J. Chem. Phys., 2004, 120, 7590-7601, ref. 34), rather than the conventional one that the rigid hydration structure formed around the hydrophobic solute reduces the mobility of water.

  18. Collagenous gastroduodenitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rai, Mridula; Scholes, John V

    2011-10-01

    Collagenous gastroduodenitis is a rare histopathologic entity characterized by marked subepithelial collagen deposition with associated mucosal inflammatory infiltrate. Only 4 cases have been reported, of which 3 had associated collagenous colitis. Collagenous gastroduodenitis without colonic involvement is exceptionally rare with only 1 case reported so far in the literature. We present a case of a 68-year-old woman with dyspepsia and mild anemia, who was found to have nodular gastric and duodenal mucosa on endoscopic examination. Histopathology showed collagenous gastroduodenitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second (and first in English literature) reported case of isolated collagenous gastroduodenitis.

  19. Collagenous sprue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soendergaard, Christoffer; Riis, Lene Buhl; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2014-01-01

    Collagenous sprue is a rare clinicopathological condition of the small bowel. It is characterised by abnormal subepithelial collagen deposition and is typically associated with malabsorption, diarrhoea and weight loss. The clinical features of collagenous sprue often resemble those of coeliac dis...... disease and together with frequent histological findings like mucosal thinning and intraepithelial lymphocytosis the diagnosis may be hard to reach without awareness of this condition. While coeliac disease is treated using gluten restriction, collagenous sprue is, however, not improved...

  20. HyFlux - Part II: Subsurface sequestration of methane-derived carbon in gas-hydrate- bearing marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naehr, T. H.; Asper, V. L.; Garcia, O.; Kastner, M.; Leifer, I.; MacDonald, I. R.; Solomon, E. A.; Yvon-Lewis, S.; Zimmer, B.

    2008-12-01

    The recently funded DOE/NETL study "HyFlux: Remote sensing and sea-truth measurements of methane flux to the atmosphere" (see MacDonald et al.: HyFlux - Part I) will combine sea surface, water column and shallow subsurface observations to improve our estimates of methane flux from submarine seeps and associated gas hydrate deposits to the water column and atmosphere along the Gulf of Mexico continental margin and other selected areas world-wide. As methane-rich fluids rise towards the sediment-water interface, they will interact with sulfate-rich pore fluids derived from overlying bottom water, which results in the formation of an important biogeochemical redox boundary, the so-called sulfate-methane interface, or SMI. Both methane and sulfate are consumed within the SMI and dissolved inorganic carbon, mostly bicarbonate (HCO3-) and hydrogen sulfide are produced, stimulating authigenic carbonate precipitation at and immediately below the SMI. Accordingly, the formation of authigenic carbonates in methane- and gas-hydrate-rich sediments will sequester a portion of the methane-derived carbon. To date, however, little is known about the quantitative aspects of these reactions. Rates of DIC production are not well constrained, but recent biogeochemical models indicate that CaCO3 precipitation rates may be as high as 120 μmol cm-2a-1. Therefore, AOM-driven carbonate precipitation must be considered when assessing the impact of gas-hydrate-derived methane on the global carbon cycle. As part of HyFlux, we will conduct pore water analyses (DOC, DIC, CH4, δ13CDIC, δ13CDOC, δ13CCH4, δ18O, and δD isotope ratios) to evaluate the importance of authigenic carbonate precipitation as a sequestration mechanism for methane- derived carbon. In addition, sediment and seafloor carbonate samples will be analyzed for bulk sedimentary carbonate (δ13C and δ18O) and bulk sedimentary organic matter (δ13C and δ15N), as well as sulfur, bulk mineralogy, texture and morphological

  1. Conclusions of the II International and IV Spanish Hydration Congress. Toledo, Spain, 2nd-4th December, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranceta-Bartrina, Javier; Gil, Ángel; Marcos, Ascensión; Pérez-Rodrigo, Carmen; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio; Drewnowski, Adam; Palou, Andreu; Anadón, Arturo; Murray, Bob; Gómez-Candela, Carmen; Maffeis, Claudio; Ramón, Daniel; Benton, David; Corella, Dolores; Alonso-Aperte, Elena; Martínez de Victoria, Emilio; O'Neal, Eric; Pfeffer, Frania; Braun, Hans; Lukaski, Henry; Polanco, Isabel; Bernal, Jennifer; González-Alonso, José; Ordvás, José María; del Coso, Juan; Kenney, Larry; Sardinha, Luis B; Díaz-Rubio, Manuel; González-Gross, Marcela; Kapsokefalou, María; Sawka, Michael N; Millard-Stafford, Mindy; Palacios, Nieves; Watson, Phil; Riobó, Pilar; Urrialde, Rafael; Mora-Rodríguez, Ricardo; Maughan, Ronald J; Ortega, Rosa María; Gellert, Ryszard; Oliver, Samuel; Trangmar, Steven; Partearroyo, Teresa

    2016-07-13

    Water is the major component of our organism representing about 60% of total body weight in adults and has to be obtained through the consumption of different foods and beverages as part of our diet. Water is an essential nutrient performing important functions, including transport of other nutrients, elimination of waste products, temperature regulation, lubrication and structural support. In this context, hydration through water has an essential role in health and wellness, which has been highly acknowledged in recent years among the health community experts such as nutritionists, dietitians, general practitioners, pharmacists, educators, as well as by physical activity and sport sciences experts and the general population.

  2. Dysregulated miR-127-5p contributes to type II collagen degradation by targeting matrix metalloproteinase-13 in human intervertebral disc degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Wen-Bin; Wu, Xing-Huo; Zhang, Yu-Kun; Song, Yu; Tu, Ji; Kang, Liang; Zhao, Kang-Cheng; Li, Shuai; Wang, Kun; Liu, Wei; Shao, Zeng-Wu; Yang, Shu-Hua; Yang, Cao

    2017-08-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a chronic disease associated with the degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM). Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 is a major enzyme that mediates the degradation of ECM components. MMP-13 has been predicted to be a potential target of miR-127-5p. However, the exact function of miR-127-5p in IDD is still unclear. We designed this study to evaluate the correlation between miR-127-5p level and the degeneration of human intervertebral discs and explore the potential mechanisms. miR-127-5p levels and MMP-13 mRNA levels were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). To determine whether MMP-13 is a target of miR-127-5p, dual luciferase reporter assays were performed. miR-127-5p mimic and miR-127-5p inhibitor were used to overexpress or downregulate miR-127-5p expression in human NP cells, respectively. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to knock down MMP-13 expression in human NP cells. Type II collagen expression in human NP cells was detected by qPCR, western blotting, and immunofluorescence staining. We confirmed that miR-127-5p was significantly downregulated in nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue of degenerative discs and its expression was inversely correlated with MMP-13 mRNA levels. We reveal that MMP-13 may act as a target of miR-127-5p. Expression of miR-127-5p was inversely correlated with type II collagen expression in human NP cells. Moreover, suppression of MMP-13 expression by siRNA blocked downstream signaling and increased type II collagen expression. Dysregulated miR-127-5p contributed to the degradation of type II collagen by targeting MMP-13 in human IDD. Our findings highlight that miR-127-5p may serve as a new therapeutic target in IDD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  3. Encapsulation and sensitization of UV-vis and near infrared lanthanide hydrate emitters for dual- and bimodal-emissions in both air and aqueous media based on a porous heteroatom-rich Cd(II)-framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-An; Ren, Shu-Kui; Liu, Qi-Kui; Ma, Jian-Ping; Chen, Xueyuan; Zhu, Haomiao; Dong, Yu-Bin

    2012-09-17

    A porous heteroatom-rich Cd(II)-polymeric framework which is generated from an ethylene glycol ether-bridging dicarboxylate ligand L, 4,4'-bipy and Cd(II) ion is reported. It contains one-dimensional tubes (9-11 Å) which are able to trap cationic lanthanide hydrates such as Eu(H(2)O)(8)(3+), Tb(H(2)O)(8)(3+), and Nd(H(2)O)(8)(3+) under ambient conditions to generate Ln(H(2)O)(8)(3+)-loaded materials. In addition, the heteroatom-rich host material can effectively protect and sensitize the encapsulated Ln(3+) emitters in their hydrate form in both air and aqueous media. Furthermore, the dual- and bimodal-emissions are successfully realized by intercalation of the different Ln(3+)-hydrates based on a guest-driven approach.

  4. Effects of type II collagen epitope carbamylation and citrullination in human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR4(+) monozygotic twins discordant for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, M; Ceribelli, A; Cavaciocchi, F; Generali, E; Massarotti, M; Isailovic, N; Crotti, C; Scherer, H U; Montecucco, C; Selmi, C

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the native, citrullinated or carbamylated type II human collagen T cell- and B cell-epitopes on the adaptive immune response in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Peripheral blood T and B cells obtained from a human leucocyte D4-related (antigen DR4(-) HLA-DR4)(+) woman with early RA, her healthy monozygotic twin and an unrelated HLA-DR3(+) woman with early RA were analysed for activation (CD154/CD69), apoptosis (annexin/7-aminoactinomycin), cytokine production [interferon (IFN)γ/interleukin (IL)-17/IL-4/IL-10/IL-6] and functional phenotype (CD45Ra/CCR7) after stimulation with the collagen native T cell epitope (T261-273), the K264 carbamylated T cell epitope (carT261-273), the native B cell epitope (B359-369) or the R360 citrullinated B cell epitope (citB359-369), and the combinations of these. The T cell memory compartment was activated by T cell epitopes in both discordant DR4(+) twins, but not in the DR3(+) RA. The collagen-specific activation of CD4(+) T cells was induced with both the native and carbamylated T cell epitopes only in the RA twin. Both T cell epitopes also induced IL-17 production in the RA twin, but a greater IL-4 and IL-10 response in the healthy twin. The citrullinated B cell epitope, particularly when combined with the carbamylated T cell epitope, induced B cell activation and an increased IL-6/IL-10 ratio in the RA twin compared to a greater IL-10 production in the healthy twin. Our data suggest that circulating collagen-specific T and B cells are found in HLA-DR4(+) subjects, but only RA activated cells express co-stimulatory molecules and produce proinflammatory cytokines. Carbamylation and citrullination further modulate the activation and cytokine polarization of T and B cells.

  5. Divergent kinetic and thermodynamic hydration of a porous Cu(II) coordination polymer with exclusive CO₂ sorption selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Miao; Li, Cheng-Peng; Chen, Min; Ge, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Xi; Wang, Lei; Liu, Chun-Sen

    2014-08-06

    Selective adsorption and separation of CO2 are of great importance for different target applications. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) represent a promising class of porous materials for this purpose. Here we present a unique MOF material, [Cu(tba)2]n (tba = 4-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)benzoate), which shows high CO2 adsorption selectivity over CH4/H2/O2/Ar/N2 gases (with IAST selectivity of 41-68 at 273 K and 33-51 at 293 K). By using a critical point dryer, the CO2 molecules can be well sealed in the 1D channels of [Cu(tba)2]n to allow a single-crystal X-ray analysis, which reveals the presence of not only C(δ+)-H···O(δ-) bonds between the host framework and CO2 but also quadrupole-quadrupole (CO2(δ-)···(δ+)CO2) interactions between the CO2 molecules. Furthermore, [Cu(tba)2]n will suffer divergent kinetic and thermodynamic hydration processes to form its isostructural hydrate {[Cu(tba)2](H2O)}n and a mononuclear complex [Cu(tba)2(H2O)4] via single-crystal to single-crystal transformations.

  6. Effect of Age-Related Cartilage Turnover on Serum C-Telopeptide of Collagen Type II and Osteocalcin Levels in Growing Rabbits with and without Surgically Induced Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Cheng Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the effect of age-related cartilage turnover on the serum C-telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II and osteocalcin (OC levels in growing rabbits with and without surgically induced osteoarthritis. Twenty-four New Zealand male 3-month-old rabbits were randomized into three operated groups (n = 6 per group, with surgically induced osteroarthritis in the right knee; after blood sampling, the knees were harvested following euthanization at 2, 3, and 6 months after surgery and a control group (n = 6, blood samples were obtained monthly between 3 and 15 months. Histomorphologically, the medial femoral condyles, particularly the central parts, harbored the most severe osteoarthritic changes among the operated rabbits. The serum levels of CTX-II and OC decreased in the controls from 3 to 11 months and then remained stable. No significant differences in the serum CTX-II and OC levels between the osteoarthritic rabbits and controls were observed. The osteoarthritic-to-normal ratios (ONRs, the ratios of serum CTX-II or OC levels in osteoarthritic rabbits to those of the controls at same ages enabled an overall assessment of osteoarthritis and age-related cartilage turnover. Elevated CTX-II ONRs were observed in rabbits with mild to advanced osteoarthritis. However, the OC ONRs were unhelpful in assessing osteoarthritic growing rabbits.

  7. Anisotropic models to account for large borehole washouts to estimate gas hydrate saturations in the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II Alaminos 21 B well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.; Lewis, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    Through the use of 3-D seismic amplitude mapping, several gashydrate prospects were identified in the Alaminos Canyon (AC) area of the Gulf of Mexico. Two locations were drilled as part of the Gulf of MexicoGasHydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II (JIP Leg II) in May of 2009 and a comprehensive set of logging-while-drilling (LWD) logs were acquired at each well site. LWD logs indicated that resistivity in the range of ~2 ohm-m and P-wave velocity in the range of ~1.9 km/s were measured in the target sand interval between 515 and 645 feet below sea floor. These values were slightly elevated relative to those measured in the sediment above and below the target sand. However, the initial well log analysis was inconclusive regarding the presence of gashydrate in the logged sand interval, mainly because largewashouts caused by drilling in the target interval degraded confidence in the well log measurements. To assess gashydratesaturations in the sedimentary section drilled in the Alaminos Canyon 21B (AC21-B) well, a method of compensating for the effect of washouts on the resistivity and acoustic velocities was developed. The proposed method models the washed-out portion of the borehole as a vertical layer filled with sea water (drilling fluid) and the apparent anisotropic resistivity and velocities caused by a vertical layer are used to correct the measured log values. By incorporating the conventional marine seismic data into the well log analysis, the average gashydratesaturation in the target sand section in the AC21-Bwell can be constrained to the range of 8–28%, with 20% being our best estimate.

  8. Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2), an osteoarthritis-associated gene, enhances proliferation and type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyatake, Kazumasa [Department of Joint Surgery and Sports Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Tsuji, Kunikazu, E-mail: ktsuji.gcoe@tmd.ac.jp [International Research Center for Molecular Science in Tooth and Bone Diseases (Global Center of Excellence Program), Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Yamaga, Mika; Yamada, Jun; Matsukura, Yu; Abula, Kahaer [Department of Joint Surgery and Sports Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Sekiya, Ichiro [Section of Cartilage Regeneration, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Muneta, Takeshi [Department of Joint Surgery and Sports Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); International Research Center for Molecular Science in Tooth and Bone Diseases (Global Center of Excellence Program), Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes. ► To examine the molecular functions of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in chondrocytic ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 enhanced proliferation and colony formation in ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 increased type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells treated with chondrogenic medium. -- Abstract: Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2/CHI3L2) is a secreted 39 kDa protein produced by articular chondrocytes and synoviocytes. Recent studies showed that hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes suggesting the involvement of hYKL-39 in the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). However little is known regarding the molecular function of hYKL-39 in joint homeostasis. Sequence analyses indicated that hYKL-39 has significant identity with the human chitotorisidase family molecules, although it is considered that hYKL-39 has no enzymatic activity since it lacks putative chitinase catalytic motif. In this study, to examine the molecular function of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in ATDC5 cells. Here we report that hYKL-39 enhances colony forming activity, cell proliferation, and type II collagen expression in these cells. These data suggest that hYKL-39 is a novel growth and differentiation factor involved in cartilage homeostasis.

  9. Safety and Efficacy of NEXT-II®, a Novel Water-Soluble, Undenatured Type II Collagen inHealthy Human SubjectsSuffering from Occasional Knee Joint Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orie Yoshinari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral administration of a novel water-soluble undenatured type II collagen (NEXT-II® has been demonstrated to ameliorate the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA in animal models. In the present investigation, we conducted a pilot study to examine the efficacy and safety of NEXT-II® in borderline subjects defined as healthy and non-diseased state, but with potential risks in knee joint health. Method: We employed Western Ontario McMaster Index (WOMAC score and Visual Analog Scale (VAS scores to assess the extent of improvement in the knee joints in these volunteers following supplementation of 40 mg NEXT-II® (10 mg as undenatured type II collagen over a period of 12 weeks. Result: The results demonstrated that NEXT-II® treatment significantly reduced WOMAC and VAS scores compared to subjects at baseline. Specifically, in the evaluation using VAS, the borderline subjects at resting, walking, and going up and down the stairs revealed significant improvement when compared to the baseline. Conclusion: The results of the studies demonstrated that NEXT-II® might be an ingredient which is safe and effective in the application of dietary supplement in ameliorating joint pain and symptoms of the borderline subjects without any adverse events.

  10. Monte Carlo calculations of the free energy of binary sII hydrogen clathrate hydrates for identifying efficient promoter molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamas, Alexander A; Cuppen, Herma M; Koudriachova, Marina V; de Leeuw, Simon W

    2013-01-31

    The thermodynamics of binary sII hydrogen clathrates with secondary guest molecules is studied with Monte Carlo simulations. The small cages of the sII unit cell are occupied by one H(2) guest molecule. Different promoter molecules entrapped in the large cages are considered. Simulations are conducted at a pressure of 1000 atm in a temperature range of 233-293 K. To determine the stabilizing effect of different promoter molecules on the clathrate, the Gibbs free energy of fully and partially occupied sII hydrogen clathrates are calculated. Our aim is to predict what would be an efficient promoter molecule using properties such as size, dipole moment, and hydrogen bonding capability. The gas clathrate configurational and free energies are compared. The entropy makes a considerable contribution to the free energy and should be taken into account in determining stability conditions of binary sII hydrogen clathrates.

  11. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    and the role it plays in the global climate and the future of fuels. Russia, Japan, Nigeria, Peru, Chile, Pakistan, Indonesia, Korea, etc are various countries who are perusing the gas hydrates studies as a future resource for fuel. Indian Initiative..., 1993, Free gas at the base of the gas hydrate zone in the vicinity of the Chile Triple junction: Geology, v. 21, pp. 905-908. Borowski, W.S., C.K. Paull, and U. William, III, 1999, Global and local variations of interstitial sulfate gradients...

  12. Hydration of beryllium(II) in aqueous solutions of common inorganic salts. A combined vibrational spectroscopic and ab initio molecular orbital study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Wolfram W; Fischer, Dieter; Irmer, Gert; Pye, Cory C

    2009-09-01

    Raman spectra of aqueous beryllium perchlorate, chloride, nitrate, and sulfate solutions have been measured over a broad concentration (0.098-4.950 mol L(-1)) range. The Raman spectroscopic data suggest that the tetra-aqua beryllium(II) ion is thermodynamically stable in perchlorate, chloride, and nitrate solutions over the concentration range measured. No inner-sphere complexes in these solutions could be detected spectroscopically except in very concentrated beryllium nitrate solutions. Beryllium sulfate solutions however, show a different picture, namely the existence of a thermodynamically stable beryllium sulfato complex most likely monodentate even at very low concentrations. At very high beryllium sulfate concentrations, a small quantity of a bidentate sulfato complex was found. With a temperature increase, the sulfato complex formation increases and this demonstrates the entropically driven sulfato complex formation. Furthermore, with increased temperature the hydrolysis increases, measured by the formation of hydrogen sulfate. Ab initio geometry optimizations and frequency calculations are reported for beryllium-water clusters with only inner sphere waters, clusters with an inner sphere and an incomplete second hydration, and clusters with a higher number of waters in the second hydration sphere. The cluster, [Be(OH2)(12)(2+)] (Be[4 + 8]) with 4 water molecules in the first sphere and 8 water molecules in the second sphere gave sufficiently realistic frequencies for BeO4 skeleton in comparison to the experimental ones. However, the cluster, [Be(OH2)(18)(2+)] (Be[6 + 12]) with 6 water molecules in the inner sphere and 12 water molecules in the outer sphere on an energy minimum gave unrealistically low BeO4 frequencies. This fact demonstrates that a six-fold coordination of Be2+ can be ruled out.

  13. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the charge-separation energies of hydrated zinc(II): redefinition of the critical size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Theresa E; Armentrout, P B

    2009-12-10

    In the preceding article, the hydration energies of Zn(2+)(H(2)O)(n) complexes, where n = 6-10, were measured using threshold collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer (GIBMS) coupled with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The present investigation explores the charge-separation processes observed, Zn(2+)(H(2)O)(n) --> ZnOH(+)(H(2)O)(m) + H(+)(H(2)O)(n-m-1), and the competition between this process and the loss of water. Our results demonstrate that charge-separation processes occur at variable complex sizes of n = 6, 7, and 8, prompting a redefinition of the critical size for charge separation. Experimental kinetic energy-dependent cross sections are analyzed to yield 0 K threshold energies for the charge-separation products and the effects of competition with this channel on the energies for losing one and two water ligands after accounting for multiple collisions, kinetic shifts, and energy distributions. A complete reaction coordinate is calculated for the n = 7 complex dissociating into ZnOH(+)(H(2)O)(3) + H(+)(H(2)O)(3). Calculated rate-limiting transition states for n = 6-8 are also compared to experimental threshold measurements for the charge-separation processes.

  14. A clinical stydy on the effectiveness of slow - resorbing collagen membrane barrier therapy to guide regeneration in mandibular class II furcations in human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazli N

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The present clinical trial was designed to evaluate the regenerative potential of periodontal tissues in degree II"nfurcation defects at mandibular molars of human using a slow-resorbing collagen membrane and a surgical treatment"ntechnique based on the principles of guided tissue regeneration."nThe patient sampleinclude 8 subjects who had periodontal lessions in right and left mandibular molars regions, including moderate to advance periodonal destruction within the radicular area. Following a baseline examination including recording the clinical measurements (PD, Al, HC, F.G.M , the furcation- involved molars were randomly assigned in each patient to either a test or a control treatment procedure. Included the evevation of mucoperiosteal flaps, recording measurement from the cemento enamel junction (C.E.J directly coronal to the furcation area to the alveolar crest and to the base of the defect-Horizontal furcation measurements were also made using a William's probe, finally a collagen membrrane placed on the involved area to cover the entrance of the furcation and adjucent root surfaces as well as a portion of the alveolar bone apical to the crest. The flaps were repositioned and secured with interdental sutures. A procedure identical to the one used at the test teeth was Performed at the control teeth region with the exception of the placement of the collagen membrance. Following surgery all patients were placed on a plaque control regimen. All Patients received normal postsurgical care and at 6 month post-surgery were scheduled for re-entry surgery. Before re-entry surgery all clinical parameters recorded again. The re-entry mucoperiosteal flaps were designed to expose the furcation area for measurements, as describedabove. There was clinical improvement in all measurements made in both the test and control patients (especially in test group over the 6 month period. The horizontal and vertical furcation measurements did yield a

  15. Biosynthesis of collagen I, II, RUNX2 and lubricin at different time points of chondrogenic differentiation in a 3D in vitro model of human mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Mobasheri, Ali; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Graziano, Adriana Carol Eleonora; Lo Furno, Debora; Avola, Rosanna; Mangano, Sebastiano; Giuffrida, Rosario; Cardile, Venera

    2014-10-01

    The first aim of the study was to identify the most appropriate time for differentiation of adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to chondrocytes, through the self-assembly process. For this purpose, the expression of some chondrocyte markers, such as collagen type I, collagen type II, RUNX2 and lubricin was investigated at different times (7, 14, 21 and 28 days) of chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, by using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The second aim of the study was to demonstrate that the expression of lubricin, such as the expression of collagen type II, could be a possible biomarker for the detection of chondrocytes well-being and viability in the natural self-assembling constructs, called 'cell pellets'. Histology (hematoxylin and eosin) and histochemistry (alcian blue staining) methods were used to assess the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. The results showed that after 21 days the differentiated chondrocytes, when compared with MSCs cultured without chondrogenic medium (CD44, CD90 and CD105 positive; CD45, CD14 and CD34 negative), were able to produce significant quantities of collagen type I, collagen type II, and lubricin, suggesting hyaline cartilage formation. During the differentiation phase, the cells showed a reduced expression of RUNX2, a protein expressed by osteoblasts. Our studies demonstrated that 21 days is the optimum time for the implantation of chondrocytes differentiated from adipose tissue-derived MSCs. This information could be useful for the future development of cell-based repair therapies for degenerative diseases of articular cartilage.

  16. Aqua(2,2′-bipyridyl(pyrazine-2,6-dicarboxylatonickel(II 1.25-hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Fang Zhang

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, [Ni(C6H2N2O4(C10H8N2(H2O]·1.25H2O, contains two independent chemically identical NiII complex cations and two and a half solvent water molecules. The NiII ions are in slightly distorted coordination environments. In the crystal structure, intermolecular O—H...O and weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds link cations and water molecules into a three-dimensional network. One of the three uncoordinated water molecules is half-occupied.

  17. Differential effect of severe and moderate social stress on blood immune and endocrine measures and susceptibility to collagen type II arthritis in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanski, Volker; Hemschemeier, Susanne K; Schunke, Kerstin; Hahnel, Anja; Wolff, Christine; Straub, Rainer H

    2013-03-01

    The effects of social stress on several blood immune measures and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were investigated in Wistar rats using the resident-intruder confrontation paradigm to induce stress of different intensity. Male intruders were exposed for one week to a dominant opponent either repeatedly for 4h daily (moderate stress) or continuously (severe stress). Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of collagen type II (CII) into the tail skin at the end of day 3 of confrontation. Only severe stress was associated with decreased CD4 and CD8 T cells, and the increase in granulocyte numbers and body mass loss was more pronounced under these conditions. Only severe stress reduced the susceptibility to arthritis by about 50%. Severity scores did not differ in the first five days after disease onset between all groups. Subsequent experiments focused on severely stressed rats indicated that disease progressed until day 10 only in control animals, but not in severely stressed males. Stressor exposure resulted in increased blood monocyte numbers, but these males failed to accumulate macrophages into the skin at the site of CII injection. High numbers of attacks experienced by intruders correlated with delayed disease onset in severely stressed rats. We hypothesize that severe stress persisting after disease induction exhibits beneficial effects on the susceptibility of CIA and propose that the specific endocrine and immunological profile associated with severe stress is an important factor for disease outcome--a factor which probably explains many of the conflicting data of previous stress studies on CIA.

  18. Bioengineered collagens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramshaw, John AM; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24717980

  19. Urotensin II contributes to collagen synthesis and up-regulates Egr-1 expression in cultured pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells through the ERK1/2 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wei [Biomedical Engineering Institute, School of Control Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Cai, Zhifeng; Liu, Mengmeng [Department of Pediatrics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Zhao, Cuifen, E-mail: zhaocuifen@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Pediatrics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Li, Dong [Research Room of Hypothermia Medicine, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Lv, Chenguang; Wang, Yuping; Xu, Tengfei [Biomedical Engineering Institute, School of Control Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2015-11-27

    Aim: The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of urotensin II (UII) treatment on the proliferation and collagen synthesis of cultured rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) and to explore whether these effects are mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways and early growth response 1 (Egr-1). Methods: The proliferation of cultured PASMCs stimulated with different doses of UII was detected by BrdU incorporation. The mRNA expression levels of procollagen I (procol I), procollagen III (procol III), extracellular regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), stress-stimulated protein kinase (Sapk), p38 MAPK (p38), and Egr-1 mRNA in cultured PASMCs after treatment with UII, the UII-specific antagonist urantide, and the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the protein expression levels of procol I, procol III, phosphorylated (p)-ERK1/2, p-Sapk, p-p38, and Egr-1 were detected by Western blotting. Results: Treatment with UII increased the proliferation of cultured PASMCs in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05). However, treatment with urantide and PD98059 inhibited the promoting effect of UII on PASMC proliferation (P < 0.05). Real-time PCR analysis showed that UII up-regulated the expression of procol I, procol III, ERK1/2, Sapk, and Egr-1 mRNA (P < 0.05), but not p38 mRNA. However, the up-regulating effect of UII was inhibited by PD98059 and urantide. Western blotting analysis showed that UII increased the synthesis of collagen I, collagen III, p-ERK1/2, p-Sapk, and Egr-1, and these effects also were inhibited by PD98059 and urantide (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Egr-1 participates in the UII-mediated proliferation and collagen synthesis of cultured rat PASMCs via activation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

  20. Biology, chemistry and pathology of collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischmajer, R.; Olsen, B.R.; Kuhn, K.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of five parts and a section of poster papers. Some of the articles are: Structure of the Type II Collagen Gene; Structural and Functional Analysis of the Genes for ..cap alpha..2(1) and ..cap alpha..1(III) collagens; Structure and Expression of the Collagen Genes of C. Elegans; Molecular Basis of Clinical Heterogeneity in the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; and Normal and Mutant Human Collagen Genes.

  1. [Collagenous colitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, C G

    1991-05-01

    Collagenous colitis is now regarded by an overwhelming majority of authors as a clinicopathological entity and has been taken up as a such in many text-books and diagnostic atlases (Morson & Dawson, 1990, Fenoglio-Preiser et al., 1989, Whitehead 1985, Whitehead 1989). A good, detailed review of cases of collagenous colitis published up to 1988 was performed by Perri et al. Collagenous colitis was also presented to a wider medical public through a clinicopathological conference case at Massachusetts General Hospital (Case 29-1988). Finally it may be added that collagenous colitis has been included in the new fourth edition of Robbins Pathologic Basis of Disease (Cotran, Kumar, Robbins, 1989), where the possibility of an autoimmune disease is stressed.

  2. Aqua(4-hydroxypyridine-2,6-dicarboxylato(1,10-phenanothrolinecopper(II 4.5-hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Aghabozorg

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [Cu(C7H3NO5(C12H8N2(H2O]·4.5H2O or [Cu(hypydc(phen(H2O]·4.5H2O (phen is 1,10-phenanthroline and hypydcH2 is 4-hydroxypyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid, was obtained by the reaction of copper(II nitrate hexahydrate with the proton-transfer compound (phenH2(hypydc in aqueous solution. Both the cationic and the anionic fragments of the proton-transfer compound are involved in complexation. Each CuII atom has a distorted octahedral geometry. It is hexacoordinated by three O atoms and three N atoms, from one phen fragment (as bidentate ligand, one (hypydc2− unit (as tridentate ligand and a water molecule. In the crystal structure, O—H...O and C—H...O hydrogen bonds, and π–π stacking interactions [centroid-to-centroid distance 3.5642 (11 Å] between the phen ring systems, contribute to the formation of a three-dimensional supramolecular structure.

  3. [Malonato(2-)-κO,O']bis-(1,10-phenanthroline-κN,N')zinc(II) penta-hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-Min; Xie, Qing-Fan

    2010-12-11

    In the title complex, [Zn(C(3)H(2)O(4))(C(12)H(8)N(2))(2)]·5H(2)O, the Zn(II) cation displays a distorted octa-hedral geometry, being coordinated by four N atoms from two 1,10-phenanthroline ligands and two O atoms from different carboxyl-ate groups of the chelating malonate dianion. In the crystal, the complexes are linked into a three-dimensional supra-molecular network by both O-H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter-actions between water mol-ecules and the uncoordinated carboxyl-ate O atoms of neighboring mol-ecules, and aromatic π-π stacking inter-actions between neighboring phenanthroline rings with centroid-centroid distances of 3.4654 (17) and 3.697 (2) Å.

  4. Diaquabis(ethylenediamine-κ2N,N′copper(II bis(4-phenylbenzoate 2.66-hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Fernandes

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, [Cu(C2H8N22(H2O2](C13H9O22·2.66H2O, the CuII centre (located at an inversion centre is coordinated by two bidentate ethylenediamine (en ligands and two water O atoms in a typical Jahn–Teller distorted octahedral geometry. The amino groups and the water molecules are disordered over two distinct crystallographic positions with occupancies of 1/3 and 2/3. In the crystal, the cations and anions are disposed in alternating layers. One of the water molecules of crystallization is disordered and the other has a fractional occupation. In the 2/3 occupancy component, water molecules are organized into a chain composed of hexameric units interconnected by carboxylate bridges.

  5. Evaluation of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody therapy using murine type II collagen-induced arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shealy David

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interleukin-6 is a multifunctional cytokine that is critical for T/B-cell differentiation and maturation, immunoglobulin secretion, acute-phase protein production, and macrophage/monocyte functions. Extensive research into the biology of IL-6 has implicated IL-6 in the pathophysiology and pathogenesis of RA. An anti-murine IL-6 mAb that neutralizes mouse IL-6 activities was tested in animal model of collagen-induced arthritis. Prophylactic treatment with anti-IL-6 mAb significantly reduced the incidence and severity of arthritis compared to control mAb treated mice. The mitogenic response of B and T cells isolated from the lymph nodes of anti-IL-6 treated mice was significantly reduced compared to cells isolated from control mAb treated mice. The overall histopathology score for paws from the anti-IL-6 treated mice was significantly reduced when compared to paws from mice treated with control mAb, including both inflammatory (synovitis and pannus and erosive (erosions and architecture parameters. Reduced loss of cartilage matrix components was also observed in the anti-IL-6 treated mice. Collectively, these data suggest that IL-6 plays a major role in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis, and thus support the potential benefit of anti-IL-6 mAb treatment in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  6. Involvement of P2X7 receptor signaling on regulating the differentiation of Th17 cells and type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhi-Dan; Zhang, Ya-Yuan; Guo, Yi-Hong; Huang, Na; Ma, Hui-Hui; Huang, Hui; Yu, Hai-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17 producing T helper (Th17) cells are major effector cells in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) has emerged as a potential site in the regulation of inflammation in RA but little is known of its functional role on the differentiation of Th17 cells. This study investigates the in vitro and in vivo effects of P2X7R on Th17 cell differentiation during type II collagen (CII) induced experimental arthritis model. In CII-treated dendritic cells (DCs) and DC/CD4+ T coculture system, pretreatment with pharmacological antagonists of P2X7R (Suramin and A-438079) caused strong inhibition of production of Th17-promoting cytokines (IL-1β, TGF-β1, IL-23p19 and IL-6). Exposure to CII induced the elevation of mRNAs encoding retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α and γt, which were abolished by pretreatment with P2X7R antagonists. Furthermore, blocking P2X7R signaling abolished the CII-mediated increase in IL-17A. Blockade of P2X7R remarkably inhibited hind paw swelling and ameliorated pathological changes in ankle joint of the collagen-induced arthritis mice. Thus, we demonstrated a novel function for P2X7R signaling in regulating CII-induced differentiation of Th17 cells. P2X7R signaling facilitates the development of the sophisticated network of DC-derived cytokines that favors a Th17 phenotype. PMID:27775097

  7. Articular cartilage collagen: an irreplaceable framework?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D R Eyre

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Adult articular cartilage by dry weight is two-thirds collagen. The collagen has a unique molecular phenotype. The nascent type II collagen fibril is a heteropolymer, with collagen IX molecules covalently linked to the surface and collagen XI forming the filamentous template of the fibril as a whole. The functions of collagens IX and XI in the heteropolymer are far from clear but, evidently, they are critically important since mutations in COLIX and COLXI genes can result in chondrodysplasia syndromes. Here we review what is known of the collagen assembly and present new evidence that collagen type III becomes covalently added to the polymeric fabric of adult human articular cartilage, perhaps as part of a matrix repair or remodelling process.

  8. Collagen crosslinks in chondromalacia of the patella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väätäinen, U; Kiviranta, I; Jaroma, H; Arokosi, J; Tammi, M; Kovanen, V

    1998-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine collagen concentration and collagen crosslinks in cartilage samples from chondromalacia of the patella. To study the extracellular matrix alterations associated to chondromalacia, we determined the concentration of collagen (hydroxyproline) and its hydroxylysylpyridinoline and lysylpyridinoline crosslinks from chondromalacia foci of the patellae in 12 patients and 7 controls from apparently normal cadavers. The structure of the collagen network in 8 samples of grades II-IV chondromalacia was examined under polarized light microscopy. The full-thickness cartilage samples taken with a surgical knife from chondromalacia lesions did not show changes in collagen, hydroxylysylpyridinoline and lysylpyridinoline concentration as compared with the controls. Polarized light microscopy showed decreased birefringence in the superficial cartilage of chondromalacia lesions, indicating disorganization or disappearance of collagen fibers in this zone. It is concluded that the collagen network shows gradual disorganization with the severity of chondromalacia lesion of the patella without changes in the concentration or crosslinks of collagen.

  9. Potassium nickel(II gallium phosphate hydrate, K[NiGa2(PO43(H2O2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J. Hibble

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, potassium nickel(II digallium tris(phosphate dihydrate, K[NiGa2(PO43(H2O2], was synthesized hydrothermally. The structure is constructed from distorted trans-NiO4(H2O2 octahedra linked through vertices and edges to GaO5 trigonal bipyramids and PO4 tetrahedra, forming a three-dimensional framework of formula [NiGa2(PO43(H2O2]−. The K, Ni and one P atom lie on special positions (Wyckoff position 4e, site symmetry 2. There are two sets of channels within the framework, one running parallel to the [10overline{1}] direction and the other parallel to [001]. These intersect, forming a three-dimensional pore network in which the water molecules coordinated to the Ni atoms and the K+ ions required to charge balance the framework reside. The K+ ions lie in a highly distorted environment surrounded by ten O atoms, six of which are closer than 3.1Å. The coordinated water molecules are within hydrogen-bonding distance to O atoms of bridging Ga—O—P groups.

  10. Experimental Determination of Refractive Index of Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bylov, Martin; Rasmussen, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The refractive indexes of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate have been experimentally determined. The refractive indexes were determined in an indirect manner making use of the fact that two non-absorbing materials will have the same refractive index if they cannot be distinguished visually....... For methane hydrate (structure I) the refractive index was found to be 1.346 and for natural gas hydrate (structure II) it was found to be 1.350. The measurements further suggest that the gas hydrate growth rate increases if the water has formed hydrates before. The induction time, on the other hand, seems...

  11. Effect of Gu Tong Xian capsule on expression level of type I, II collagen and BMP-2 mRNA in rabbits with fracture during long-distance running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to analyze and investigate the effects of Gu Tong Xian Capsule on the expression level of type I, II collagen and BMP-2 mRNA in rabbits with fracture during long-distance running. 60 adult healthy rabbits were selected as research objects, and then randomly divided into three groups including model group, positive control group and treatment group, each containing 20 rabbits. The three groups were treated with saline gastric lavage, powder for fracture and trauma, and Gu Tong Xian capsule, respectively. The rabbits of the three groups were respectively sacrificed at 1st week, 2nd weeks and 4th week after operation for sample collection. After that, the expression levels of bone collagen type I, II and BMP-2 of three groups were measured and compared with each other. At all stages, the transcriptional level of type I collagen mRNA in the treatment group were significantly higher than that in the positive control group and model group (p < 0.05; Transcriptional level of type II collagen mRNA in the treatment group increased significantly in the first week, then gradually declined in the 2nd and 4th week, with significantly difference to the model group and the positive control group (p < 0.05. In addition, the transcriptional level of bone morphogenetic protein BMP-2 mRNA at fracture site of the treatment group was higher than that of model group and positive control group (p < 0.05. Gu Tong Xian Capsule can significantly promote fracture healing of experiment rabbits and reduce fracture healing time. Moreover, it can well regulate the expression levels of type I, II collagen and transcriptional level ofBMP-2 mRNA in experiment rabbits with fracture.

  12. Cartilage collagen type II seromarker patterns in axial spondyloarthritis and psoriatic arthritis: associations with disease activity, smoking and HLA-B27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Heidi Lausten; Gudmann, Natasja Staehr; Christensen, Anne Friesgaard; Ejstrup, Leif; Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Loft, Anne Gitte; Bay-Jensen, Anne C; Siebuhr, Anne Sofie; Junker, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the possible association between type II collagen turnover seromarkers and disease profile in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Outpatients with axial SpA (n = 110) or PsA (n = 101) underwent clinical examination including disease activity measures and HLA-B27 typing. The procollagen IIA N-terminal peptide (PIIANP) and a matrix metalloproteinase-generated type II collagen fragment (C2M) were quantified in serum by ELISA. C2M was higher in SpA than in controls, 0.41 versus 0.36 ng/ml (p = 0.004), while PIIANP did not differ between patients and healthy subjects, 2252 versus 2142 ng/ml (p = 0.13). However, DMARD-naïve SpA patients had higher PIIANP, 2461 ng/ml (p = 0.01) and C2M, 0.44 ng/ml (p = 0.0007) levels than controls, and PIIANP correlated with CRP (ρ = 0.34). C2M was lower in SpA smokers, 0.36 ng/ml versus non-smokers, 0.43 ng/ml (p = 0.02), while PIIANP was higher in HLA-B27 positive, 2312 ng/ml versus negative patients, 2021 ng/ml (p = 0.03). In PsA, PIIANP and C2M did not differ between patients and controls, but PIIANP was elevated in patients not receiving DMARDs, 2726 ng/ml. In PsA, PIIANP and C2M did not differ according to smoking and HLA-B27. Cartilage degradation assessed by C2M is increased in SpA irrespective of treatment but not in PsA. Cartilage synthesis reflected by PIIANP is increased in untreated SpA and PsA. PIIANP correlates with CRP in SpA while not in PsA. In DMARD-naïve SpA but not in PsA, HLA-B27 positivity and smoking are associated with a chondro-proliferative metabolic pattern.

  13. Towards a green hydrate inhibitor: imaging antifreeze proteins on clathrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimond Gordienko

    Full Text Available The formation of hydrate plugs in oil and gas pipelines is a serious industrial problem and recently there has been an increased interest in the use of alternative hydrate inhibitors as substitutes for thermodynamic inhibitors like methanol. We show here that antifreeze proteins (AFPs possess the ability to modify structure II (sII tetrahydrofuran (THF hydrate crystal morphologies by adhering to the hydrate surface and inhibiting growth in a similar fashion to the kinetic inhibitor poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP. The effects of AFPs on the formation and growth rate of high-pressure sII gas mix hydrate demonstrated that AFPs are superior hydrate inhibitors compared to PVP. These results indicate that AFPs may be suitable for the study of new inhibitor systems and represent an important step towards the development of biologically-based hydrate inhibitors.

  14. Temperature dependence of the hydrated electron's excited-state relaxation. II. Elucidating the relaxation mechanism through ultrafast transient absorption and stimulated emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Erik P.; Zho, Chen-Chen; Challa, Jagannadha R.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2017-08-01

    The structure of the hydrated electron, particularly whether it exists primarily within a cavity or encompasses interior water molecules, has been the subject of much recent debate. In Paper I [C.-C. Zho et al., J. Chem. Phys. 147, 074503 (2017)], we found that mixed quantum/classical simulations with cavity and non-cavity pseudopotentials gave different predictions for the temperature dependence of the rate of the photoexcited hydrated electron's relaxation back to the ground state. In this paper, we measure the ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy of the photoexcited hydrated electron as a function of temperature to confront the predictions of our simulations. The ultrafast spectroscopy clearly shows faster relaxation dynamics at higher temperatures. In particular, the transient absorption data show a clear excess bleach beyond that of the equilibrium hydrated electron's ground-state absorption that can only be explained by stimulated emission. This stimulated emission component, which is consistent with the experimentally known fluorescence spectrum of the hydrated electron, decreases in both amplitude and lifetime as the temperature is increased. We use a kinetic model to globally fit the temperature-dependent transient absorption data at multiple temperatures ranging from 0 to 45 °C. We find the room-temperature lifetime of the excited-state hydrated electron to be 137 ±40 fs, in close agreement with recent time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) experiments and in strong support of the "non-adiabatic" picture of the hydrated electron's excited-state relaxation. Moreover, we find that the excited-state lifetime is strongly temperature dependent, changing by slightly more than a factor of two over the 45 °C temperature range explored. This temperature dependence of the lifetime, along with a faster rate of ground-state cooling with increasing bulk temperature, should be directly observable by future TRPES experiments. Our data also suggest

  15. Collagenous gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaoyi; Koike, Tomoyuki; Chiba, Takashi; Kondo, Yutaka; Ara, Nobuyuki; Uno, Kaname; Asano, Naoki; Iijima, Katsunori; Imatani, Akira; Watanabe, Mika; Shirane, Akio; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-09-01

    In the present paper, we report a case of rare collagenous gastritis. The patient was a 25-year-old man who had experienced nausea, abdominal distention and epigastralgia since 2005. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) carried out at initial examination by the patient's local doctor revealed an extensively discolored depression from the upper gastric body to the lower gastric body, mainly including the greater curvature, accompanied by residual mucosa with multiple islands and nodularity with a cobblestone appearance. Initial biopsies sampled from the nodules and accompanying atrophic mucosa were diagnosed as chronic gastritis. In August, 2011, the patient was referred to Tohoku University Hospital for observation and treatment. EGD at our hospital showed the same findings as those by the patient's local doctor. Pathological findings included a membranous collagen band in the superficial layer area of the gastric mucosa, which led to a diagnosis of collagenous gastritis. Collagenous gastritis is an extremely rare disease, but it is important to recognize its characteristic endoscopic findings to make a diagnosis. © 2012 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2012 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  16. Matrine Exerts a Strong Anti-Arthritic Effect on Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats by Inhibiting Inflammatory Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Pu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To investigate anti-arthritic effects of matrine isolated from the roots of S. flavescens on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA in rats and to explore its related potential mechanisms, CIA rats were established and administered with matrine (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/days, for 30 days. Subsequently, blood was collected to determine serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-10, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and hind paws and knee joints were collected for histopathological examination. Furthermore, indices of the thymus and spleen were determined, and synovial tissues were collected to determine the protein expressions of p-IκB, IκB, Cox-2 and iNOS. Our results indicated that matrine significantly suppressed inflammatory reactions and synovial tissue destruction. Matrine inhibited paw swelling, arthritis indices and weight loss in CIA rats. Additionally, matrine decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Matrine also down-regulated expressions of p-IκB, Cox-2, and iNOS but up-regulated IκB in synovial tissues in CIA rats. The results suggested matrine possesses an anti-arthritic effect in CIA rats via inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins that promote the NF-κB pathway.

  17. Matrine Exerts a Strong Anti-Arthritic Effect on Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats by Inhibiting Inflammatory Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jiang; Fang, Fan-Fu; Li, Xiu-Qing; Shu, Zhi-Heng; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Han, Ting; Peng, Wei; Zheng, Cheng-Jian

    2016-08-26

    To investigate anti-arthritic effects of matrine isolated from the roots of S. flavescens on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and to explore its related potential mechanisms, CIA rats were established and administered with matrine (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/days, for 30 days). Subsequently, blood was collected to determine serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-10, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and hind paws and knee joints were collected for histopathological examination. Furthermore, indices of the thymus and spleen were determined, and synovial tissues were collected to determine the protein expressions of p-IκB, IκB, Cox-2 and iNOS. Our results indicated that matrine significantly suppressed inflammatory reactions and synovial tissue destruction. Matrine inhibited paw swelling, arthritis indices and weight loss in CIA rats. Additionally, matrine decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Matrine also down-regulated expressions of p-IκB, Cox-2, and iNOS but up-regulated IκB in synovial tissues in CIA rats. The results suggested matrine possesses an anti-arthritic effect in CIA rats via inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins that promote the NF-κB pathway.

  18. Poly(γ-glutamic acid) and poly(γ-glutamic acid)-based nanocomplexes enhance type II collagen production in intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Joana C; Pereira, Catarina Leite; Teixeira, Graciosa Q; Silva, Ricardo V; Caldeira, Joana; Grad, Sibylle; Gonçalves, Raquel M; Barbosa, Mário A

    2017-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration often leads to low back pain, which is one of the major causes of disability worldwide, affecting more than 80% of the population. Although available treatments for degenerated IVD decrease symptoms' progression, they fail to address the underlying causes and to restore native IVD properties. Poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) has recently been shown to support the production of chondrogenic matrix by mesenchymal stem/stromal cells. γ-PGA/chitosan (Ch) nanocomplexes (NCs) have been proposed for several biomedical applications, showing advantages compared with either polymer alone. Hence, this study explores the potential of γ-PGA and γ-PGA/Ch NCs for IVD regeneration. Nucleotomised bovine IVDs were cultured ex vivo upon injection of γ-PGA (pH 7.4) and γ-PGA/Ch NCs (pH 5.0 and pH 7.4). Tissue metabolic activity and nucleus pulposus DNA content were significantly reduced when NCs were injected in acidic-buffered solution (pH 5.0). However, at pH 7.4, both γ-PGA and NCs promoted sulphated glycosaminoglycan production and significant type II collagen synthesis, as determined at the protein level. This study is a first proof of concept that γ-PGA and γ-PGA/Ch NCs promote recovery of IVD native matrix, opening new perspectives on the development of alternative therapeutic approaches for IVD degeneration.

  19. Contraction-induced Mmp13 and-14 expression by goat articular chondrocytes in collagen type I but not type II gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, Agnes D.; Vonk, Lucienne A.; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz; Everts, Vincent; Bank, Ruud A.

    2012-01-01

    Collagen gels are promising scaffolds to prepare an implant for cartilage repair but several parameters, such as collagen concentration and composition as well as cell density, should be carefully considered, as they are reported to affect phenotypic aspects of chondrocytes. In this study we

  20. Contraction-induced Mmp13 and-14 expression by goat articular chondrocytes in collagen type I but not type II gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, Agnes D.; Vonk, Lucienne A.; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz; Everts, Vincent; Bank, Ruud A.

    2012-01-01

    Collagen gels are promising scaffolds to prepare an implant for cartilage repair but several parameters, such as collagen concentration and composition as well as cell density, should be carefully considered, as they are reported to affect phenotypic aspects of chondrocytes. In this study we investi

  1. Clathrate hydrates in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Keith C; Brewer, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    Scientific knowledge of natural clathrate hydrates has grown enormously over the past decade, with spectacular new findings of large exposures of complex hydrates on the sea floor, the development of new tools for examining the solid phase in situ, significant progress in modeling natural hydrate systems, and the discovery of exotic hydrates associated with sea floor venting of liquid CO2. Major unresolved questions remain about the role of hydrates in response to climate change today, and correlations between the hydrate reservoir of Earth and the stable isotopic evidence of massive hydrate dissociation in the geologic past. The examination of hydrates as a possible energy resource is proceeding apace for the subpermafrost accumulations in the Arctic, but serious questions remain about the viability of marine hydrates as an economic resource. New and energetic explorations by nations such as India and China are quickly uncovering large hydrate findings on their continental shelves.

  2. Anti-collagen antibodies in sera from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, H K; Ryvar, R; Skingle, J; Greenbury, C L

    1980-11-01

    Anti-cartilage antibodies, demonstrable by immunofluorescence, were found in 3.3% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. In most of these patients antibodies to type II collagen were detected. In specificity studies on these anti-collagen antibodies, they appeared to be type specific, showing no reaction with collagen types I and III. Denatured type II collagen reacted much less well than native type II, but isolated peptides from different regions of the collagen molecule were differentiated by individual sera. Removal of the glycoside side chains from native type II collagen had no effect on its antigenicity. The findings suggest that these patients produce highly specific antibodies which react with the triple helix of type II collagen.

  3. Magnetic Interactions in the Copper Complex (L-Aspartato)(1,10-phenanthroline)copper(II) Hydrate. An Exchange-Coupled Extended System with Two Dissimilar Copper Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondino, Carlos D.; Calvo, Rafael; Atria, Ana María; Spodine, Evgenia; Nascimento, Otaciro R.; Peña, Octavio

    1997-07-02

    We report EPR measurements in single-crystal samples at the microwave frequencies 9.8 and 34.3 GHz and magnetic susceptibility measurements in polycrystalline samples for the ternary complex of copper with aspartic acid and phenanthroline, (L-aspartato)(1,10-phenanthroline)copper(II) hydrate. The crystal lattice of this compound is composed of two dissimilar copper ions identified as Cu(A) and Cu(B), which are in two types of copper chains called A and B, respectively, running parallel to the b crystal axis. The copper ions in the A chains are connected by the aspartic acid molecule, and those in the B chains by a chemical path that involves a carboxylate bridge and a hydrogen bond. Both chains are held together by a complex network of hydrogen bonds and by hydrophobic interactions between aromatic amines. Magnetic susceptibility data indicate a Curie-Weiss behavior in the studied temperature range (2-300 K). The EPR spectra at 9.8 GHz display a single exchange collapsed resonance for any magnetic field orientation, in the so-called strong exchange regime. Those at 34.3 GHz are within the so-called weak exchange regime and display two resonances which belong to each type of copper ion chain. The decoupling of the spectra at 34.3 GHz using a theory based on Anderson's model for the case of two weakly exchange coupled spins S = (1)/(2) allows one to obtain the angular variation of the squares of the g-factor and the peak-to-peak line width of each resonance. This model also allows one to evaluate the exchange parameter |J(AB)/k| = 2.7(6) mK associated with the chemical path connecting dissimilar copper ions. The line width data obtained for each component of the spectra at 34.3 GHz are analyzed in terms of a model based on Kubo and Tomita's theory, to obtain the exchange parameters |J(A)/k| = 0.77(2) K and |J(B)/k| = 1.44(2) K associated with the chemical paths connecting the similar copper ions of types A and B, respectively.

  4. Gas hydrate of Lake Baikal: Discovery and varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlystov, Oleg; De Batist, Marc; Shoji, Hitoshi; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Nishio, Shinya; Naudts, Lieven; Poort, Jeffrey; Khabuev, Andrey; Belousov, Oleg; Manakov, Andrey; Kalmychkov, Gennаdy

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of recent gas-hydrate studies in Lake Baikal, the only fresh-water lake in the world containing gas hydrates in its sedimentary infill. We provide a historical overview of the different investigations and discoveries and highlight some recent breakthroughs in our understanding of the Baikal hydrate system. So far, 21 sites of gas hydrate occurrence have been discovered. Gas hydrates are of structures I and II, which are of thermogenic, microbial, and mixed origin. At the 15 sites, gas hydrates were found in mud volcanoes, and the rest six - near gas discharges. Additionally, depending on type of discharge and gas hydrate structure, they were visually different. Investigations using MIR submersibles allowed finding of gas hydrates at the bottom surface of Lake Baikal at the three sites.

  5. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of strontium(II) coordination. I. Static and thermal disorder in crystalline, hydrated, and precipitated solids and in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Day, P.A.; Newville, M.; Neuhoff, P.S.; Sahai, N.; Carroll, S.A.

    2000-02-15

    Detailed analyses of crystalline, hydrated, and precipitated strontium compounds and an aqueous strontium solution by synchrotron extended X-ray adsorption fine structure (EXAFS) were used to quantify local thermal and static disorder and the characterize strontium coordination in a variety of oxygen-ligated bonding environments. Comparison of strontium structural coordination determined in this and previous studies suggest that previous EXAFS determinations of hydrated strontium may have underestimated first-shell interatomic distances and coordination numbers because minor contributions to the EXAFS phase-shift and amplitude functions were not accounted for, either theoretically or empirically.

  6. Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory) and Mitosis and Replication Hydrate Theory (MRH-Theory): three-dimensional PC validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadyshevich, E. A.; Dzyabchenko, A. V.; Ostrovskii, V. E.

    2014-04-01

    Size compatibility of the CH4-hydrate structure II and multi-component DNA fragments is confirmed by three-dimensional simulation; it is validation of the Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory).

  7. Thermal helix-coil transition in UV irradiated collagen from rat tail tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sionkowska, A; Kamińska, A

    1999-05-01

    The thermal helix-coil transition in UV irradiated collagen solution, collagen film and pieces of rat tail tendon (RTT) were compared. Their thermal stability's were determined by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and by viscometric measurements. The denaturation temperatures of collagen solution, film and pieces of RTT were different. The helix-coil transition occur near 40 degrees C in collagen solution, near 112 degrees C in collagen film, and near 101 degrees C in pieces of RTT. After UV irradiation the thermal helix-coil transition of collagen samples were changed. These changes depend on the degree of hydratation.

  8. Desalination utilizing clathrate hydrates (LDRD final report).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Greathouse, Jeffery A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Majzoub, Eric H. (University of Missouri, Columbia, MO)

    2008-01-01

    Advances are reported in several aspects of clathrate hydrate desalination fundamentals necessary to develop an economical means to produce municipal quantities of potable water from seawater or brackish feedstock. These aspects include the following, (1) advances in defining the most promising systems design based on new types of hydrate guest molecules, (2) selection of optimal multi-phase reactors and separation arrangements, and, (3) applicability of an inert heat exchange fluid to moderate hydrate growth, control the morphology of the solid hydrate material formed, and facilitate separation of hydrate solids from concentrated brine. The rate of R141b hydrate formation was determined and found to depend only on the degree of supercooling. The rate of R141b hydrate formation in the presence of a heat exchange fluid depended on the degree of supercooling according to the same rate equation as pure R141b with secondary dependence on salinity. Experiments demonstrated that a perfluorocarbon heat exchange fluid assisted separation of R141b hydrates from brine. Preliminary experiments using the guest species, difluoromethane, showed that hydrate formation rates were substantial at temperatures up to at least 12 C and demonstrated partial separation of water from brine. We present a detailed molecular picture of the structure and dynamics of R141b guest molecules within water cages, obtained from ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and Raman spectroscopy. Density functional theory calculations were used to provide an energetic and molecular orbital description of R141b stability in both large and small cages in a structure II hydrate. Additionally, the hydrate of an isomer, 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, does not form at ambient conditions because of extensive overlap of electron density between guest and host. Classical molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory trials support the results for the isomer hydrate. Molecular dynamics simulations

  9. Effects of solar radiation on collagen-based biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Sionkowska

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of solar radiation on collagen and collagen/synthetic polymer blends in the form of thin films and solutions has been studied by UV-VIS and FTIR spectroscopies. Films and solutions of collagen blended with poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone (PVP were irradiated by solar light. It was found that UV-VIS spectra, which characterize collagen, collagen/PVA, and collagen/PVP blended films, were significantly altered by solar radiation. FTIR spectra of collagen, collagen/PVA, and collagen/PVP films showed that after solar irradiation, the positions of Amide A bands were shifted to lower wavenumbers. There was not any significant alteration in the position of Amide I and Amide II bands of collagen and its blends after solar radiation. The effect of solar UV radiation in comparison with artificial UV radiation has been discussed.

  10. Inhibitory effects of deer antler aqua-acupuncture, the pilose antler of Cervus Korean TEMMINCK var mantchuricus Swinhoe, on type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon-Kye; Kim, Kyung-Sook; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Gyu; Kim, Kap-Sung; Lee, Young-Choon; Chang, Young-Chae; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2003-07-01

    Water extract of deer antler aqua-acupunture (DAA) prepared from the growing antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe, was used to investigate the efficacy of a traditional immunosuppressive and immuno-activating Korean aqua-acupuncture, on the development of type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. The onset of arthritis was observed at the 24th day after the CII-immunization in rats, and the severity of CIA was gradually developed. As compared with rats treated with saline, DAA i.p. injected at doses of more than 50 microg/kg once a day for 14 days inhibited the ability of inguinal lymph node cells to produce T cell cytokines interleukin 2 and interferon-gamma when the cells were obtained from rats 24 days after immunization and cultured in vitro with CII. Treatment with DAA also inhibited the production of macrophage cytokines interleukin-1beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha in response to in vitro stimulation of lymph node and macrophage cells with CII. In addition, in order to evaluate the influence of DAA on the incidence and development of arthritis in rat CIA, rats were immunized twice at a 3-week interval with bovine CII, with DAA being given i.p. once a day for 14 days with four different regimens. A 14-day course of DAA treatment at a daily dose of 100 microg/kg, which began on the day of the first CII immunization, suppressed the development of arthritis, as well as antibody formation and delayed-type hypersensitivity to CII. Treatment with DAA, which started on the same day as the booster immunization, also resulted in inhibition of development of arthritis and of immune responses to CII. However, treatment with DAA, which was prophylactically started prior to a primary immunization, did not inhibit the development of arthritis and immune response to CII. Furthermore, DAA extract did not affect the established diseases.

  11. Crystal and Molecular Structure of a Collagen-Like Peptide at 1.9 overset{circ}{A} Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bella, Jordi; Eaton, Mark; Brodsky, Barbara; Berman, Helen M.

    1994-10-01

    The structure of a protein triple helix has been determined at 1.9 angstrom resolution by x-ray crystallographic studies of a collagen-like peptide containing a single substitution of the consensus sequence. This peptide adopts a triple-helical structure that confirms the basic features determined from fiber diffraction studies on collagen: supercoiling of polyproline II helices and interchain hydrogen bonding that follows the model II of Rich and Crick. In addition, the structure provides new information concerning the nature of this protein fold. Each triple helix is surrounded by a cylinder of hydration, with an extensive hydrogen bonding network between water molecules and peptide acceptor groups. Hydroxyproline residues have a critical role in this water network. The interaxial spacing of triple helices in the crystal is similar to that in collagen fibrils, and the water networks linking adjacent triple helices in the crystal structure are likely to be present in connective tissues. The breaking of the repeating (X-Y-Gly)_n pattern by a Gly-->Ala substitution results in a subtle alteration of the conformation, with a local untwisting of the triple helix. At the substitution site, direct interchain hydrogen bonds are replaced with interstitial water bridges between the peptide groups. Similar conformational changes may occur in Gly-->X mutated collagens responsible for the diseases osteogenesis imperfecta, chondrodysplasias, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome IV.

  12. Collagen metabolism of human osteoarthritic articular cartilage as modulated by bovine collagen hydrolysates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Schadow

    Full Text Available Destruction of articular cartilage is a characteristic feature of osteoarthritis (OA. Collagen hydrolysates are mixtures of collagen peptides and have gained huge public attention as nutriceuticals used for prophylaxis of OA. Here, we evaluated for the first time whether different bovine collagen hydrolysate preparations indeed modulate the metabolism of collagen and proteoglycans from human OA cartilage explants and determined the chemical composition of oligopeptides representing collagen fragments. Using biophysical techniques, like MALDI-TOF-MS, AFM, and NMR, the molecular weight distribution and aggregation behavior of collagen hydrolysates from bovine origin (CH-Alpha®, Peptan™ B 5000, Peptan™ B 2000 were determined. To investigate the metabolism of human femoral OA cartilage, explants were obtained during knee replacement surgery. Collagen synthesis of explants as modulated by 0-10 mg/ml collagen hydrolysates was determined using a novel dual radiolabeling procedure. Proteoglycans, NO, PGE(2, MMP-1, -3, -13, TIMP-1, collagen type II, and cell viability were determined in explant cultures. Groups of data were analyzed using ANOVA and the Friedman test (n = 5-12. The significance was set to p≤0.05. We found that collagen hydrolysates obtained from different sources varied with respect to the width of molecular weight distribution, average molecular weight, and aggregation behavior. None of the collagen hydrolysates tested stimulated the biosynthesis of collagen. Peptan™ B 5000 elevated NO and PGE(2 levels significantly but had no effect on collagen or proteoglycan loss. All collagen hydrolysates tested proved not to be cytotoxic. Together, our data demonstrate for the first time that various collagen hydrolysates differ with respect to their chemical composition of collagen fragments as well as by their pharmacological efficacy on human chondrocytes. Our study underscores the importance that each collagen hydrolysate

  13. Molecular structure of the collagen triple helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Barbara; Persikov, Anton V

    2005-01-01

    The molecular conformation of the collagen triple helix confers strict amino acid sequence constraints, requiring a (Gly-X-Y)(n) repeating pattern and a high content of imino acids. The increasing family of collagens and proteins with collagenous domains shows the collagen triple helix to be a basic motif adaptable to a range of proteins and functions. Its rodlike domain has the potential for various modes of self-association and the capacity to bind receptors, other proteins, GAGs, and nucleic acids. High-resolution crystal structures obtained for collagen model peptides confirm the supercoiled triple helix conformation, and provide new information on hydrogen bonding patterns, hydration, sidechain interactions, and ligand binding. For several peptides, the helix twist was found to be sequence dependent, and such variation in helix twist may serve as recognition features or to orient the triple helix for binding. Mutations in the collagen triple-helix domain lead to a variety of human disorders. The most common mutations are single-base substitutions that lead to the replacement of one Gly residue, breaking the Gly-X-Y repeating pattern. A single Gly substitution destabilizes the triple helix through a local disruption in hydrogen bonding and produces a discontinuity in the register of the helix. Molecular information about the collagen triple helix and the effect of mutations will lead to a better understanding of function and pathology.

  14. Influence of PCL on the material properties of collagen based biocomposites and in vitro evaluation of drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanungo, Ivy; Fathima, Nishter Nishad; Rao, Jonnalagadda Raghava, E-mail: clrichem@mailcity.com; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2013-12-01

    Formulation of biodegradable collagen–poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) based biomaterials for the sustained release of insulin is the main objective of the present work. PCL has been employed to modulate the physico-chemical behavior of collagen to control the drug release. Designed formulations were employed to statistically optimize insulin release parameter profile at different collagen to PCL molar ratios. Circular dichroism, thermoporometry, FTIR, impedance and scanning electron microscopy techniques have been employed to investigate the effect of PCL on hydration dynamics of the collagen molecule, which in turn changes the dissolution parameters of the drug from the systems. Drug entrapment efficiency has been found to be maximum for collagen to PCL molar ratio of 1:2 (> 90%). In vitro dissolution test reveals that 99% of the drug was released from composite at collagen to PCL molar ratio of 1:3 and 1:4 within 2 h, which indicates that hydrophobicity of the matrix results in weak interaction between lipophilic drug and carrier materials. The least burst release was observed for collagen to PCL molar ratio at 1:2 as synergistic interactions between collagen and PCL was maximum at that particular polymer–polymer ratios. The drug release data indicates super case-II transport of drug (n > 1.0). - Graphical abstract: Collagen–poly-ε-caprolactone based biomaterials for the sustained release of insulin were formulated. Circular dichroism, thermoporometry, FTIR, impedance and scanning electron microscopy techniques have been employed to elucidate the effect of PCL on the structure of the collagen and in vitro drug release. The drug release data fitted to the kinetic model indicates super case-II transport due to the combination of diffusion and polymer relaxation/dissolution (n > 1.0). - Highlights: • Poly-ε-caprolactone influences physico-chemical behavior of collagen. • Poly-ε-caprolactone influences in vitro drug release mechanism from biocomposites.

  15. Jellyfish collagen scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Birgit; Bernhardt, Anne; Lode, Anja; Heinemann, Sascha; Sewing, Judith; Klinger, Matthias; Notbohm, Holger; Gelinsky, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Porous scaffolds were engineered from refibrillized collagen of the jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum for potential application in cartilage regeneration. The influence of collagen concentration, salinity and temperature on fibril formation was evaluated by turbidity measurements and quantification of fibrillized collagen. The formation of collagen fibrils with a typical banding pattern was confirmed by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analysis. Porous scaffolds from jellyfish collagen, refibrillized under optimized conditions, were fabricated by freeze-drying and subsequent chemical cross-linking. Scaffolds possessed an open porosity of 98.2%. The samples were stable under cyclic compression and displayed an elastic behavior. Cytotoxicity tests with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) did not reveal any cytotoxic effects of the material. Chondrogenic markers SOX9, collagen II and aggrecan were upregulated in direct cultures of hMSCs upon chondrogenic stimulation. The formation of typical extracellular matrix components was further confirmed by quantification of sulfated glycosaminoglycans.

  16. Comparison of thermal properties of fish collagen and bovine collagen in the temperature range 298-670K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauza-Włodarczyk, Marlena; Kubisz, Leszek; Mielcarek, Sławomir; Włodarczyk, Dariusz

    2017-11-01

    The increased interest in fish collagen is a consequence of the risk of exposure to Creutzfeld-Jacob disease (CJD) and the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), whose occurrence is associated with prions carried by bovine collagen. Collagen is the main biopolymer in living organisms and the main component of the skin and bones. Until the discovery of the BSE, bovine collagen had been widely used. The BSE epidemic increased the interest in new sources of collagen such as fish skin collagen (FSC) and its properties. Although the thermal properties of collagen originating from mammals have been well described, less attention has been paid to the thermal properties of FSC. Denaturation temperature is a particularly important parameter, depending on the collagen origin and hydration level. In the reported experiment, the free water and bound water release processes along with thermal denaturation process were studied by means of the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Measurements were carried out using a DSC 7 instrument (Elmer-Perkin), in the temperature range 298-670K. The study material was FSC derived by acidic hydration method. The bovine Achilles tendon (BAT) collagen type I was used as the control material. The thermograms recorded revealed both, exothermic and endothermic peaks. For both materials, the peaks in the temperature range of 330-360K were assigned to the release of free water and bound water. The denaturation temperatures of FSC and BAT collagen were determined as 420K and 493K, respectively. Thermal decomposition process was observed at about 500K for FSC and at about 510K for BAT collagen. These results show that FSC is less resistant to high temperature than BAT collagen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of humoral and cellular immune responses to a DNA vaccine encoding chicken type II collagen for rheumatoid arthritis in normal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhao; Juan, Long; Song, Yun; Zhijian, Zhang; Jing, Jin; Kun, Yu; Yuna, Hao; Dongfa, Dai; Lili, Ding; Liuxin, Tan; Fei, Liang; Nan, Liu; Fang, Yuan; Yuying, Sun; Yongzhi, Xi

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in the development of effective therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is finding a method for the specific inhibition of the inflammatory disease processes without the induction of generalized immunosuppression. Of note, the development of therapeutic DNA vaccines and boosters that may restore immunological tolerance remains a high priority. pcDNA-CCOL2A1 is a therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding chicken type II collagen(CCII). This vaccine was developed by our laboratory and has been shown to exhibit efficacy comparable to that of the current "gold standard" treatment, methotrexate (MTX). Here, we used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with anti-CII IgG antibodies, quantified the expression levels of Th1, Th2, and Th3 cytokines, and performed flow cytometric analyses of different T-cell subsets, including Th1, Th2, Th17, Tc, Ts, Treg, and CD4(+)CD29(+)T cells to systemically evaluate humoral and cellular immune responses to pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine in normal rats. Similar to our observations at maximum dosage of 3 mg/kg, vaccination of normal rats with 300 μg/kg pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine did not induce the production of anti-CII IgG. Furthermore, no significant changes were observed in the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-5, IL-6, IL-12(IL-23p40), monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, regulated on activation in normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) or anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 in vaccinated normal rats relative to that in controls(P > 0.05). However, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β levels were significantly increased on days 10 and 14, while interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels were significantly decreased on days 28 and 35 after vaccination(P 0.05), with the exception of Treg cells, which were significantly

  18. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-14

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  19. Hydroxonium hydrate tris(2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazin-1-ium bis[bis(pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylatocuprate(II] pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid hexahydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Hooshmand

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of copper(II nitrate hexahydrate with pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (pydcH2 and 2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazine (melamine in aqueous solution in a 1:2:2 molar ratio gave the title compound, (H5O2(C3H7N63[Cu(C7H3NO42]2·C7H5NO4·6H2O. The hydroxonium hydrate (H5O2+, also known as the Zundel cation, resides on a twofold rotation axis. The O—H distance is 1.274 (14 Å, the O...O distance is 2.518 (5 Å, and the O—H—O angle is 162 (8°. One of the melamine H+ cations, the uncoordinated pydcH2, and two water molecules also reside on crystallographic twofold axes. The CuII atom has a tetragonally distorted octahedral coordination environment. The structure features extensive hydrogen bonding, with 21 distinct interactions. There is also a centrosymmetric C=O...π interaction with an O...centroid distance of 3.288 (3 Å. The structure is similar to a mixed-valence manganese(II/III structure but shows interesting differences in the metal-atom coordination. One of the water molecules is equally disordered with respect to a twofold axis.

  20. A novel functional role of collagen glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürgensen, Henrik J; Madsen, Daniel H; Ingvarsen, Signe

    2011-01-01

    , the function of which is poorly known. The endocytic collagen receptor urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP)/Endo180 plays an important role in matrix remodeling through its ability to internalize collagen for lysosomal degradation. uPARAP/Endo180 is a member of the mannose...... receptor protein family. These proteins all include a fibronectin type II domain and a series of C-type lectin-like domains, of which only a minor part possess carbohydrate recognition activity. At least two of the family members, uPARAP/Endo180 and the mannose receptor, interact with collagens....... By expressing truncated recombinant uPARAP/Endo180 proteins and analyzing their interaction with collagens with high and low levels of glycosylation we demonstrated that this lectin domain interacts directly with glycosylated collagens. This interaction is functionally important because it was found to modulate...

  1. Collagen mediates adhesion of Streptococcus mutans to human dentin.

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Some strains of Streptococcus mutans were found to recognize and bind collagen type I. Binding of 125I-labeled collagen type I was specific in that collagen types I and II, but not unrelated proteins, were able to inhibit binding of the labeled ligand to bacteria. Collagen binding to S. mutans was partially reversible and involved a limited number of bacterial binding sites per cell. S. mutans UA 140 cells bound collagen type I with high affinity (Kd = 8 x 10(-8) M). The number of binding sit...

  2. Airway Hydration and COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arunava; Boucher, R.C.; Tarran, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the prevalent causes of worldwide mortality and encompasses two major clinical phenotypes, i.e., chronic bronchitis (CB) and emphysema. The most common cause of COPD is chronic tobacco inhalation. Research focused on the chronic bronchitic phenotype of COPD has identified several pathological processes that drive disease initiation and progression. For example, the lung’s mucociliary clearance (MCC) system performs the critical task of clearing inhaled pathogens and toxic materials from the lung. MCC efficiency is dependent on: (i) the ability of apical plasma membrane ion channels such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) to maintain airway hydration; (ii) ciliary beating; and, (iii) appropriate rates of mucin secretion. Each of these components is impaired in CB and likely contributes to the mucus stasis/accumulation seen in CB patients. This review highlights the cellular components responsible for maintaining MCC and how this process is disrupted following tobacco exposure and with CB. We shall also discuss existing therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic bronchitis and how components of the MCC can be used as biomarkers for the evaluation of tobacco or tobacco-like-product exposure. PMID:26068443

  3. Hydration Assessment of Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS · Although there is no scientific consensus for 1 ) howbest to assess the hydration status of athletes, 2)what criteria to use as acceptable outcome measurements, or 3) the best time to apply practical assessment methods, there are methods that can be used toprovide athletes with useful feedback about their hydration status

  4. Impact of Lewis base on chemical reactivity and separation efficiency for hydrated fourth-row transition metal (II) complexes: an ONIOM DFT/MM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dingsheng; Ma, Ming

    2014-04-24

    In this paper, two-layer ONIOM combinations of high-level quantum mechanics (QM) and inexpensive molecular mechanics (MM) are successfully used to investigate the structural characters of metal (M, all the transition metals in the fourth period)-H2O-Lewis base (A(-)) complexes. Global and local descriptors of chemical reactivity and selectivity from conceptual density functional theory are employed to show the properties of the active complexes of M(H2O)2A2 and to study the effect of the Lewis base for the separation of transition metal ions. It is shown that chemical potential, hardness, electrophilicity, as well as the dual and multiphilic descriptors are adequate for characterizing the global and local reactivity trends of the M(H2O)2A2 complex. It is found that the reactivity is well localized at the metallic center in M(H2O)2A2 and the dual descriptor (ΔfM(r)) can also be used to characterize the directional attack of the electrophile and nucleophile except for the selectivity of the reaction. On the basis of the values of ωM and Δsk, and the sign of ΔfM(r), the selectivity of the nucleophilic reagent (R(-)) for M(II) in M(H2O)2A2 (from high to low) follows this order: Cu(II) > Ni(II) > Co(II) > Fe(II) ≫ Mn(II) > Zn(II) > Cr(II). The Lewis base (A(-)) improves chemical reactivity and selectivity because of changing the reaction path and forming an intermediate, which possesses the higher antibonding character and the larger HOMO/LUMO gap. NBO or AIMALL analysis and Frontier orbital theory results presented here provided more theoretical support for the above reactivity and selectivity studies.

  5. Biomedical applications of collagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramshaw, John A M

    2016-05-01

    Collagen-based biomedical materials have developed into important, clinically effective materials used in a range of devices that have gained wide acceptance. These devices come with collagen in various formats, including those based on stabilized natural tissues, those that are based on extracted and purified collagens, and designed composite, biosynthetic materials. Further knowledge on the structure and function of collagens has led to on-going developments and improvements. Among these developments has been the production of recombinant collagen materials that are well defined and are disease free. Most recently, a group of bacterial, non-animal collagens has emerged that may provide an excellent, novel source of collagen for use in biomaterials and other applications. These newer collagens are discussed in detail. They can be modified to direct their function, and they can be fabricated into various formats, including films and sponges, while solutions can also be adapted for use in surface coating technologies.

  6. Collagen vascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on this ... previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many specific ...

  7. LMPROVED PROCESS FOR DEGREASING AND DECALCIFICATION OF COLLAGEN TYPE II FROM SHEEP CARTILAGE%羊软骨Ⅱ型胶原蛋白提取中脱钙、脱脂工艺的改进

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莎丽娜; 李振飞; 韩天翔

    2012-01-01

    The sheep cartilages were collected as raw materials, Optimization of degreasation and decalcification process during ex- tracting collagen from sheep cartilages were investigated. Improved process of degreasing and decalcification were confinued . The opti- mum parameters of degreasing were : temperature 25~C , degreasing time 48h, chloroform : methanol : water = 1 : 2:0.8. When ratio of Solvent to Solid was 1 : 10 ,the ratio of degreasing was 55.88%. The optimum decalcifying agent was 0.5mol/L EDTA and the ratio of decalcification was 29.16 %. The extracted collagen with improved process was same with the protein and Sigma C - II by SDS - PAGE. The absorption peak of C - II in UV was about 230 nm. The results showed that the collagen type II was mainly protein in sheep cartilage.%以羊软骨为试验材料,对前处理工艺-脱脂、脱钙工艺进行了改进。经过单因素实验筛选确定了较为理想的脱脂剂为氯仿:甲醇:水=1:2:0.8,脱脂条件是温度为25℃、时间为48h、固液比1:10时其脱脂率为最高,达55.88%;选择0.5mol/LEDTA为脱钙试剂时脱钙率最高,达29.16%;SDS—PAGE电泳结果表明:用前处理改进后提取的的胶原蛋白与sigma公司的Ⅱ型标准品相一致,证明羊软骨中存在的蛋白主要是Ⅱ型胶原蛋白。紫外光谱分析结果显示:所提胶原的最大吸收峰为230nm左右,与Ⅱ型标准品最大相一致。

  8. Synthesis of collagen by bovine chondrocytes cultured in alginate; posttranslational modifications and cell-matrix interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, B.; Verzijl, N.; Bank, R.A.; Von Der Mark, K.; TeKoppele, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The extracellular matrix synthesized by articular chondrocytes cultured in alginate beads was investigated. Collagen levels increased sigmoidally with time and remained constant after 2 weeks of culture. The presence of cartilage-specific type II collagen was confirmed immunohistochemically.

  9. IL-35 stimulation of CD39+ regulatory T cells confers protection against collagen II-induced arthritis via the production of IL-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetkova, Irina; Golden, Sarah; Holderness, Kathryn; Callis, Gayle; Pascual, David W

    2010-06-15

    IL-35 is produced by regulatory T cells, and this novel cytokine can downregulate Th17 cell development and inhibit autoimmune inflammation. In this work, an rIL-35, as a single-chain fusion between murine IL-12p35 and EBV-induced gene 3, was expressed in yeast. This rIL-35 inhibited OVA-specific cellular and Ab responses in OVA-challenged recipients of DO11.10 CD4+ T cells. Likewise, IL-35 inhibited clinical manifestation of collagen-induced arthritis or could cease further disease exacerbation upon initiation of IL-35 treatment. Exogenous IL-35 treatments suppressed Th1 and Th17 cells and promoted CD39 expression by CD4+ T cells. Sorted CD25-CD39+CD4+ T cells from IL-35-treated mice produced IL-10 and, upon adoptive transfer, were sufficiently potent to inhibit subsequent development of inflammation in mice with collagen-induced arthritis, whereas sorted CD25+CD39+CD4+ T cells showed reduced potency. IL-35 treatments of IL-10-/- mice failed to induce protective CD39+CD4+ T cells, demonstrating the effector role of IL-10 by IL-35 immunosuppression.

  10. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years.

  11. Effect of (3,5,6-trimethylpyrazin-2-yl)methyl 2-[4-(2-methylpropyl)phenyl]propanoate (ITE), a newly developed anti-inflammatory drug, on type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tao; Cao, Ying-Lin; Xu, Bei-Bei; Zhou, Xiao-Mian

    2004-06-01

    The effect of (3,5,6-trimethylpyrazin-2-yl)methyl 2-[4-(2-methylpropyl)phenyl]propanoate (ITE) on type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis in mice was studied. Mice were immunized twice with CII, ITE being given orally once a day for 40 d after the 1st immunization. Clinical assessment showed that ITE had no effect on the day of onset of arthritis but did lowered the incidence rate of arthritis and the arthritis score. And ITE had a marked suppressive effect on the mouse hind paw edema induced by CII. ITE suppressed the delayed-type mouse ear skin reaction to CII but had no effect on the level of serum anti-CII antibodies. These results suggest that ITE inhibits the development of CII-induced arthritis in mice by suppressing delayed-type hypersensitivity to CII.

  12. Role of collagen in terahertz absorption in skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Priyamvada; Culjat, Martin O.; Taylor, Zachary D.; Suen, Jonathan Y.; Burt, Benjamin O.; Lee, Hua; Brown, Elliott R.; Grundfest, Warren S.; Singh, Rahul S.

    2009-02-01

    Reflective terahertz (THz) imaging may potentially become a valuable tool in determining skin hydration due to its non-ionizing photon energy, high sensitivity to water concentration and ability to penetrate through clothing. The high absorption coefficient of water in the THz range is responsible for contrast between substances with lesser or higher degrees of water saturation. Water content, as well as collagen fiber arrangement, varies between different layers of skin. This study sought to determine whether the high THz absorption in water could be exploited to distinguish between these layers. Porcine skin specimens were sectioned into samples of increasing thickness, with the undersides corresponding to different layers in skin. The undersides of the samples were scanned using a THz imaging system operating at a center frequency of 0.5 THz with 0.125 THz of noise-equivalent bandwidth at a standoff of 4 cm and a spot size of 13 mm. Collagen solutions of varying hydrations were also prepared and raster scanned with the same system. The reflectivity of the deeper layers of skin was found to be higher than that of the upper layers, indicating that the deeper layers are more hydrated. The collagen solutions with higher hydration also had higher THz reflectivity. These results suggested that THz is able to distinguish between different layers of skin based on water content and the nature of its association with components in skin.

  13. cyclo-Tetra-μ-malato-κO,O',O'':O'''-tetra-kis[bis-(1H-benzimidazole-κN)cobalt(II)] eicosa-hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-Hua; Nie, Jing-Jing; Su, Jian-Rong; Xu, Duan-Jun

    2008-03-14

    The title compound, [Co(4)(C(4)H(4)O(5))(4)(C(7)H(6)N(2))(8)]·20H(2)O, consists of tetra-nuclear Co(II) complexes and disordered uncoordinated water mol-ecules. The tetra-meric complex mol-ecule has symmetry. While two benzimidazole mol-ecules and a tridentate malate dianion coordinate a Co(II) ion, the carboxylate O atom from an adjacent malate dianion bridges the Co(II) ions to complete a distorted octa-hedral coordination geometry. The tridentate malate dianion chelates the Co(II) ion, and the chelate six- and five-membered rings show half-chair and envelope configurations, respectively. A face-to-face separation of 3.494 (9) Å between parallel benzimidazole ligands indicates the existence of π-π stacking between adjacent complexes. The crystal structure also involves N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds.

  14. Endocytic collagen degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H.; Jürgensen, Henrik J.; Ingvarsen, Signe;

    2012-01-01

    it crucially important to understand both the collagen synthesis and turnover mechanisms in this condition. Here we show that the endocytic collagen receptor, uPARAP/Endo180, is a major determinant in governing the balance between collagen deposition and degradation. Cirrhotic human livers displayed a marked......Fibrosis of the liver and its end-stage, cirrhosis, represent major health problems worldwide. In these fibrotic conditions, activated fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells display a net deposition of collagen. This collagen deposition is a major factor leading to liver dysfunction, thus making...... up-regulation of uPARAP/Endo180 in activated fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells located close to the collagen deposits. In a hepatic stellate cell line, uPARAP/Endo180 was shown to be active in, and required for, the uptake and intracellular degradation of collagen. To evaluate the functional...

  15. Complications of collagenous colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Microscopic forms of colitis have been described, including collagenous colitis. This disorder generally has an apparently benign clinical course. However, a number of gastric and intestinal complications, possibly coincidental, may develop with collagenous colitis. Distinctive inflammatory disorders of the gastric mucosa have been described, including lymphocytic gastritis and collagenous gastritis. Celiac disease and collagenous sprue (or collagenous enteritis) may occur. Colonic ulceration has been associated with use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, while other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, may evolve from collagenous colitis. Submucosal "dissection", colonic fractures or mucosal tears and perforation from air insufflation during colonoscopy may occur and has been hypothesized to be due to compromise of the colonic wall from submucosal collagen deposition. Similar changes may result from increased intraluminal pressure during barium enema contrast studies. Finally, malignant disorders have also been reported, including carcinoma and lymphoproliferative disease.

  16. The characteristics of gas hydrates occurring in natural environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H.; Moudrakovski, I.; Udachin, K.; Enright, G.; Ratcliffe, C.; Ripmeester, J.

    2009-12-01

    In the past few years, extensive analyses have been carried out for characterizing the natural gas hydrate samples from Cascadia, offshore Vancouver Island; Mallik, Mackenzie Delta; Mount Elbert, Alaska North Slope; Nankai Trough, offshore Japan; Japan Sea and offshore India. With the results obtained, it is possible to give a general picture of the characteristics of gas hydrates occurring in natural environment. Gas hydrate can occur in sediments of various types, from sands to clay, although it is preferentially enriched in sediments of certain types, for example coarse sands and fine volcanic ash. Most of the gas hydrates in sediments are invisible, occurring in the pores of the sediments, while some hydrates are visible, appearing as massive, nodular, planar, vein-like forms and occurring around the seafloor, in the fractures related to fault systems, or any other large spaces available in sediments. Although methane is the main component of most of the natural gas hydrates, C2 to C7 hydrocarbons have been recognized in hydrates, sometimes even in significant amounts. Shallow marine gas hydrates have been found generally to contain minor amounts of hydrogen sulfide. Gas hydrate samples with complex gas compositions have been found to have heterogeneous distributions in composition, which might reflect changes in the composition of the available gas in the surrounding environment. Depending on the gas compositions, the structure type of a natural gas hydrate can be structure I, II or H. For structure I methane hydrate, the large cages are almost fully occupied by methane molecules, while the small cages are only partly occupied. Methane hydrates occurring in different environments have been identified with almost the same crystallographic parameters.

  17. 骨髓源性肥大细胞对软骨细胞表达Ⅱ型胶原及糖胺多糖的影响%Effects of bone marrow- derived mast cells on expressions of type II collagen and glycosaminoglycan in co-cultured chondrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧阳晴晴; 赵进军; 杨敏

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of the bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) on the expression of type II collagen and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) in chondrocytes co-cultured with BMMCs. Methods Primarily cultured mouse BMMCs at 4 weeks and the second passage of chondrocytes were plated in a Transwell co-cultured system at a ratio of 1∶10 in the presence or absence of sodium cromoglycate (DSCG) or compound 48/80 (C48/80). The chondrocytes were harvested and lysed for detecting type II collagen expression with ELISA and Western blotting and GAG expression using 1,9 dimethylmethylene blue (DBM). Results After a 24-hour culture, the chondrocytes co-cultured with BMMCs showed similar expression levels of type II collagen and GAG to the control group regardless of the presence of DSCG (P>0.05). Compared with chondrocytes cultured alone or with BMMCs, the co- cultured chondrocytes in the presence of C48/80 showed significantly lower expressions of type II collagen and GAG (P0.05),C48/80组Ⅱ型胶原与GAG含量相对于对照组和BMMCs组显著降低(P0.05)。结论C48/80激活的BMMCs可降低软骨细胞Ⅱ型胶原以及GAG表达。

  18. Bis[(1-ammonio-ethane-1,1-di-yl)diphospho-nato-κO,O']diaqua-nickel(II) nona-hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bon, Vladimir V; Dudko, Anatolij V; Kozachkova, Alexandra N; Pekhnyo, Vasily I; Tsaryk, Natalia V

    2010-04-30

    The title compound, [Ni(C(2)H(8)NO(6)P(2))(2)(H(2)O)(2)]·9H(2)O, exhibits a slightly distorted octa-hedral coordination environment around the Ni(II) atom. It contains two mol-ecules of 1-amino--ethyl-idenediphospho-nic acid in the zwitterionic form, coord-inated via O atoms from two phospho-nate groups and creating two six-membered chelate rings. Two water mol-ecules in cis positions complete the coordination environment of the Ni(II) atom. The title compound contains nine partly disordered solvent water mol-ecules, which create a three-dimensional network of strong O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds.

  19. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  20. Wet hydrate dissolution plant

    OpenAIRE

    Stanković Mirjana S.; Kovačević Branimir T.; Pezo Lato L.

    2003-01-01

    The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant with capacity of 50,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE), Italy, in 1997, for increasing detergent zeolite production from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate ...

  1. The minor collagens in articular cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yunyun

    2017-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a connective tissue consisting of a specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) that dominates the bulk of its wet and dry weight. Type II collagen and aggrecan are the main ECM proteins in cartilage. However, little attention has been paid to less abundant molecular components......, especially minor collagens, including type IV, VI, IX, X, XI, XII, XIII, and XIV, etc. Although accounting for only a small fraction of the mature matrix, these minor collagens not only play essential structural roles in the mechanical properties, organization, and shape of articular cartilage, but also...... fulfil specific biological functions. Genetic studies of these minor collagens have revealed that they are associated with multiple connective tissue diseases, especially degenerative joint disease. The progressive destruction of cartilage involves the degradation of matrix constituents including...

  2. Chondroitin Sulfate Perlecan Enhances Collagen Fibril Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, A. J.; Johnson, A. E.; Mörgelin, M.

    2006-01-01

    produced in the presence of perlecan. Interestingly, the enhancement of collagen fibril formation is independent on the core protein and is mimicked by chondroitin sulfate E but neither by chondroitin sulfate D nor dextran sulfate. Furthermore, perlecan chondroitin sulfate contains the 4,6-disulfated......Inactivation of the perlecan gene leads to perinatal lethal chondrodysplasia. The similarity to the phenotypes of the Col2A1 knock-out and the disproportionate micromelia mutation suggests perlecan involvement in cartilage collagen matrix assembly. We now present a mechanism for the defect...... in collagen type II fibril assembly by perlecan-null chondrocytes. Cartilage perlecan is a heparin sulfate or a mixed heparan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The latter form binds collagen and accelerates fibril formation in vitro, with more defined fibril morphology and increased fibril diameters...

  3. Cell-collagen interactions: the use of peptide Toolkits to investigate collagen-receptor interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farndale, Richard W; Lisman, Ton; Bihan, Dominique; Hamaia, Samir; Smerling, Christiane S; Pugh, Nicholas; Konitsiotis, Antonios; Leitinger, Birgit; de Groot, Philip G; Jarvis, Gavin E; Raynal, Nicolas

    2008-04-01

    Fibrillar collagens provide the most fundamental platform in the vertebrate organism for the attachment of cells and matrix molecules. We have identified specific sites in collagens to which cells can attach, either directly or through protein intermediaries. Using Toolkits of triple-helical peptides, each peptide comprising 27 residues of collagen primary sequence and overlapping with its neighbours by nine amino acids, we have mapped the binding of receptors and other proteins on to collagens II or III. Integrin alpha2beta1 binds to several GXX'GER motifs within the collagens, the affinities of which differ sufficiently to control cell adhesion and migration independently of the cellular regulation of the integrin. The platelet receptor, Gp (glycoprotein) VI binds well to GPO (where O is hydroxyproline)-containing model peptides, but to very few Toolkit peptides, suggesting that sequence in addition to GPO triplets is important in defining GpVI binding. The Toolkits have been applied to the plasma protein vWF (von Willebrand factor), which binds to only a single sequence, identified by truncation and amino acid substitution within Toolkit peptides, as GXRGQOGVMGFO in collagens II and III. Intriguingly, the receptor tyrosine kinase, DDR2 (discoidin domain receptor 2) recognizes three sites in collagen II, including its vWF-binding site, although the amino acids that support the interaction differ slightly within this motif. Furthermore, the secreted protein BM-40 (basement membrane protein 40) also binds well to this same region. Thus the availability of extracellular collagen-binding proteins may be important in regulating and facilitating direct collagen-receptor interaction.

  4. Modeling DNA hydration: comparison of calculated and experimental hydration properties of nuclic acid bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltev, V I; Malenkov, G G; Gonzalez, E J; Teplukhin, A V; Rein, R; Shibata, M; Miller, J H

    1996-02-01

    Hydration properties of individual nucleic acid bases were calculated and compared with the available experimental data. Three sets of classical potential functions (PF) used in simulations of nucleic acid hydration were juxtaposed: (i) the PF developed by Poltev and Malenkov (PM), (ii) the PF of Weiner and Kollman (WK), which together with Jorgensen's TIP3P water model are widely used in the AMBER program, and (iii) OPLS (optimized potentials for liquid simulations) developed by Jorgensen (J). The global minima of interaction energy of single water molecules with all the natural nucleic acid bases correspond to the formation of two water-base hydrogen bonds (water bridging of two hydrophilic atoms of the base). The energy values of these minima calculated via PM potentials are in somewhat better conformity with mass-spectrometric data than the values calculated via WK PF. OPLS gave much weaker water-base interactions for all compounds considered, thus these PF were not used in further computations. Monte Carlo simulations of the hydration of 9-methyladenine, 1-methyluracil and 1-methylthymine were performed in systems with 400 water molecules and periodic boundary conditions. Results of simulations with PM potentials give better agreement with experimental data on hydration energies than WK PF. Computations with PM PF of the hydration energy of keto and enol tautomers of 9-methylguanine can account for the shift in the tautomeric equilibrium of guanine in aqueous media to a dominance of the keto form in spite of nearly equal intrinsic stability of keto and enol tautomers. The results of guanine hydration computations are discussed in relation to mechanisms of base mispairing errors in nucleic acid biosynthesis. The data presented in this paper along with previous results on simulation of hydration shell structures in DNA duplex grooves provide ample evidence for the advantages of PM PF in studies of nucleic-acid hydration.

  5. Pseudomembranous collagenous colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shan; Reyes, Victoria; Bronner, Mary P

    2003-10-01

    The classic clinical and histologic features of collagenous colitis are well characterized; however, the acute or neutrophilic inflammatory changes that may accompany this entity are less well established. In this report of 10 patients, we describe the first series of pseudomembranous collagenous colitis. Because superimposed Clostridium difficile infection was only demonstrated in one patient and no other causes of pseudomembranous colitis were evident in the remaining nine patients, we conclude that pseudomembranes are part of the spectrum of collagenous colitis itself. This case series illustrates the importance of searching for collagenous colitis in the evaluation of pseudomembranous colitis. At the same time, superimposed infectious or ischemic etiologies need to be excluded clinically in any patient with superimposed pseudomembranes. The existence of pseudomembranes in collagenous colitis also lends support to the hypothesis that toxin- and/or ischemia-mediated injury may be involved in the pathogenesis of collagenous colitis.

  6. Implications for collagen I chain registry from the structure of the collagen von Willebrand factor A3 domain complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brondijk, T.H.C.; Bihan, D.; Farndale, R.W.; Huizinga, E.G.

    2012-01-01

    Fibrillar collagens, the most abundant proteins in the vertebrate body, are involved in a plethora of biological interactions. Plasma protein von Willebrand factor (VWF) mediates adhesion of blood platelets to fibrillar collagen types I, II, and III, which is essential for normal haemostasis. High a

  7. [Malonato(2−)-κ2 O,O′]bis­(1,10-phenanthroline-κ2 N,N′)zinc(II) penta­hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-Min; Xie, Qing-Fan

    2011-01-01

    In the title complex, [Zn(C3H2O4)(C12H8N2)2]·5H2O, the ZnII cation displays a distorted octa­hedral geometry, being coordinated by four N atoms from two 1,10-phenanthroline ligands and two O atoms from different carboxyl­ate groups of the chelating malonate dianion. In the crystal, the complexes are linked into a three-dimensional supra­molecular network by both O—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter­actions between water mol­ecules and the uncoordinated carboxyl­ate O atoms of neighboring mol­ecules, and aromatic π–π stacking inter­actions between neighboring phenanthroline rings with centroid–centroid distances of 3.4654 (17) and 3.697 (2) Å. PMID:21522585

  8. Diaquabis(5-carboxy-2-propyl-1H-imidazole-4-carboxylato-κ2N3,O4cobalt(II 3.5-hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Bo An

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, [Co(C8H9N2O42(H2O2]·3.5H2O, the CoII cation is six-coordinated by two H2pimda− ligands (H3pimda is 2-propyl-1H-imidazole-4,5-carboxylic acid and two water molecules in a distorted octahedral environment. The crystal structures features a three-dimensional network stabilized by extensive O—H...O and N—H...O hydrogen bonds. The propyl groups of the ligands are disordered over two sets of sites with refined occupancies of 0.673 (8:0.327 (8 and 0.621 (17:0.379 (17. One of the water molecules is located on a site with half-occupancy.

  9. Tris(ethyl­enediamine)­nickel(II) 1H-pyrazole-3,5-dicarboxyl­ate 1.67-hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtaş, Güneş; Dege, Necmi; Yeşilel, Okan Zafer; Erer, Hakan; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2010-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, [Ni(C2H8N2)3](C5H2N2O4)·1.67H2O, consists of three [Ni(en)3]2+ dications (en is ethyl­enediamine), three [(pzdc)3]2− dianions (pzdc is pyrazole-3,5-dicarboxyl­ate) and five water mol­ecules. In each complex dication, the NiII atom is coordinated by six N atoms from three en ligands forming a distorted octa­hedral coordination geometry. In the crystal, the ions and water mol­ecules are linked into a three-dimensional framework by a large number of N—H⋯O and O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. PMID:21588159

  10. (Propane-1,3-diammonium bis(4-hydroxypyridine-2,6-dicarboxylato-κ3O2,N,O6zinc(II 3.5-hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ghadermazi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, (C3H12N2[Zn(C7H3NO52]·3.5H2O, contains two formula units. The compound consists of an anionic complex, a doubly protonated propane-1,3-diamine as a counter-ion and 3.5 uncoordinated water molecules. The coordination polyhedron around the ZnII atom is distorted octahedral, defined by four O atoms and two N atoms from two Hchel (H3chel = 4-hydroxypyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid ligands. In the crystal structure, O—H...O, N—H...O and C—H...O hydrogen bonds along with π–π stacking interactions [centroid–centroid distance = 3.473 (2 Å] are observed to reinforce the crystal cohesion.

  11. Mechanical response of collagen molecule under hydrostatic compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, Karanvir, E-mail: karans@iitrpr.ac.in; Kumar, Navin

    2015-04-01

    Proteins like collagen are the basic building blocks of various body tissues (soft and hard). Collagen molecules find their presence in the skeletal system of the body where they bear mechanical loads from different directions, either individually or along with hydroxy-apatite crystals. Therefore, it is very important to understand the mechanical behavior of the collagen molecule which is subjected to multi-axial state of loading. The estimation of strains of collagen molecule along different directions resulting from the changes in hydrostatic pressure magnitude, can provide us new insights into its mechanical behavior. In the present work, full atomistic simulations have been used to study global (volumetric) as well as local (along different directions) mechanical properties of the hydrated collagen molecule which is subjected to different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. To estimate the local mechanical properties, the strains of collagen molecule along its longitudinal and transverse directions have been acquired at different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. In spite of non-homogeneous distribution of atoms within the collagen molecule, the calculated values of local mechanical properties have been found to carry the same order of magnitude along the longitudinal and transverse directions. It has been demonstrated that the values of global mechanical properties like compressibility, bulk modulus, etc. as well as local mechanical properties like linear compressibility, linear elastic modulus, etc. are functions of magnitudes of applied hydrostatic pressures. The mechanical characteristics of collagen molecule based on the atomistic model have also been compared with that of the continuum model in the present work. The comparison showed up orthotropic material behavior for the collagen molecule. The information on collagen molecule provided in the present study can be very helpful in designing the future bio-materials.

  12. Thermal denaturation of UV-irradiated wet rat tail tendon collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sionkowska, Alina

    2005-04-01

    The thermal helix-coil transition of UV irradiated collagen in rat tail tendon has been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. During UVB irradiation the tendons were immersed in water to keep the collagen fibers in a fully hydrated condition at all times. UV irradiation induced changes in collagen which caused both stabilization and destabilization of the triple helix in fibers. The helix-coil transition for non-irradiated collagen occurred near 64 degrees C, for irradiated 1 and 3 h at 66 and 67 degrees C, respectively. After irradiating for longer times (20-66 h) the helix-coil transition peak occurred at much lower temperatures. The peak was very broad and suggested that collagen was reduced by UV to different polypeptides of different molecular weight and different lower thermal stabilities. It was caused by the disruption of a network of hydrogen-bonded water molecules surrounding the collagen macromolecule.

  13. Investigating the Metastability of Clathrate Hydrates for Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Carolyn Ann [Colorado School of Mines

    2014-11-18

    Important breakthrough discoveries have been achieved from the DOE award on the key processes controlling the synthesis and structure-property relations of clathrate hydrates, which are critical to the development of clathrate hydrates as energy storage materials. Key achievements include: (i) the discovery of key clathrate hydrate building blocks (stable and metastable) leading to clathrate hydrate nucleation and growth; (ii) development of a rapid clathrate hydrate synthesis route via a seeding mechanism; (iii) synthesis-structure relations of H2 + CH4/CO2 binary hydrates to control thermodynamic requirements for energy storage and sequestration applications; (iv) discovery of a new metastable phase present during clathrate hydrate structural transitions. The success of our research to-date is demonstrated by the significant papers we have published in high impact journals, including Science, Angewandte Chemie, J. Am. Chem. Soc. Intellectual Merits of Project Accomplishments: The intellectual merits of the project accomplishments are significant and transformative, in which the fundamental coupled computational and experimental program has provided new and critical understanding on the key processes controlling the nucleation, growth, and thermodynamics of clathrate hydrates containing hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide, and other guest molecules for energy storage. Key examples of the intellectual merits of the accomplishments include: the first discovery of the nucleation pathways and dominant stable and metastable structures leading to clathrate hydrate formation; the discovery and experimental confirmation of new metastable clathrate hydrate structures; the development of new synthesis methods for controlling clathrate hydrate formation and enclathration of molecular hydrogen. Broader Impacts of Project Accomplishments: The molecular investigations performed in this project on the synthesis (nucleation & growth)-structure-stability relations of clathrate

  14. {6,6′-Dimethoxy-2,2′-[2,2-dimethylpropane-1,3-diylbis(nitrilomethylidyne]diphenolato}nickel(II 1.78-hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoong-Kun Fun

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, [Ni(C21H24N2O4]·1.78H2O, the NiII ion has a slightly distorted planar geometry, coordinated by the two N and two O atoms of the tetradentate Schiff base ligand, with a mean deviation of 0.272 Å from the NiN2O2 plane. The N and O donor atoms are mutually cis. The dihedral angle between two benzene rings of the ligand is 38.86 (8°. There are also three solvent water molecules, two of which lie across different crystallographic twofold rotation axes; one of these is partially occupied with a refined occupancy factor of 0.570 (7. The water molecules are linked together as tetramers in R22(8 ring motifs, which also connect two neighbouring molecules of the complex through a network of O—H...O hydrogen bonds. The crystal structure is further stabilized by intermolecular C—H...O and C—H...π interactions, which link neighbouring molecules into extended chains along the b axis. Other interesting features of the crystal structure are the short intermolecular C...C [3.204 (3–3.365 (3 Å] and the C...O [3.199 (2–3.205 (2 Å] contacts which are shorter than the sum of the van der Waals radii of these atoms.

  15. (3-Acetyl-4-methyl-1H-pyrazol-1-ide-5-carboxylatobis(1,10-phenanthrolinenickel(II 3.5-hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Malinkin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [Ni(C7H6N2O3(C12H8N22]·3.5H2O, crystallizes as a neutral mononuclear complex with 3.5 solvent water molecules. One of the water molecules lies on an inversion centre, so that its H atoms are disordered over two sites. The coordination environment of NiII has a slightly distorted octahedral geometry, which is formed by one O and five N atoms belonging to the N,O-chelating pyrazol-1-ide-5-carboxylate and two N,N′-chelating phenanthroline molecules. In the crystal, O—H...O, N—H...O and O—H...N hydrogen bonds involving the solvent water molecules and pyrazole-5-carboxylate ligands form layers parallel to the ab plane. These layers are linked further via weak π–π interactions between two adjacent phenanthroline molecules, with centroid-to-centroid distances in the range 3.886 (2–4.018 (1 Å, together with C—H...π contacts, forming a three-dimensional network.

  16. Stimuli responsive deswelling of radiation synthesized collagen hydrogel in simulated physiological environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangmei; Xu, Ling; Wei, Shicheng; Zhai, Maolin; Li, Jiuqiang

    2013-08-01

    Collagen hydrogels were prepared via radiation crosslinking. The simulated physiological environmental effects related to their biomedical applications on the volume phase transition of collagen hydrogel were studied, that is stimuli response to ions, temperature, and pH. The deswelling behavior of collagen hydrogel depends on the salt concentration, temperature, pH, and the hydrogel preparation procedure. Meanwhile, hydrogel structure related to the volume phase transition was investigated by FTIR, fluorescence spectrum, and HR-MAS NMR. Deswelling in salt solution caused little change on collagen conformation, and a denser network led to more significant tyrosine-derived fluorescence quenching. Hydrogen bonding between hydrated water and collagen polypeptide chain was dissociated and the activity of hydrophobic side chain increased, inducing a higher extent of contraction with the increasing of salt concentration. Moreover, salt solution treatments weakened the electrostatic interactions, side chains interactions, and hydrogen bonding of collagen hydrogel, which reduced the thermal stability of collagen hydrogel. Comparing with cell-free collagen hydrogel contraction, fibroblasts did not aggravate contraction of collagen hydrogel significantly. This study elucidated the deswelling mechanism of radiation crosslinked collagen hydrogel in simulated physiological environment and provides strategies for controlling the stimuli response of collagen hydrogel in biomedical application.

  17. Shrinking mechanism of a porous collagen matrix immersed in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Yang; Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen; Huang, Lynn L H

    2014-12-01

    The porous structure of collagen-based matrices enables the infiltration of cells both in in vitro and clinical applications. Reconstituted porous collagen matrices often collapse when they are in contact with aqueous solutions; however, the mechanism for the collapse of the pores is not understood. We, therefore, investigated the interactions between the collagen matrix and different solutions, and discuss the mechanisms for the change in microstructure of the matrix on immersing it in solution. When a dried collagen matrix was immersed in aqueous solutions, the matrix shrunk and pores close to the surface closed. The shrinkage ratio and thickness of the compact microstructure close to the superficial area decreased with increasing ethanol content in the solution. The original porous structure of the collagen matrix was preserved when the matrix was immersed in absolute ethanol. The shrinkage of a porous collagen matrix in contact with aqueous solutions was attributed to the liquid/gas interfacial tension. The average pore diameter of the matrix also significantly affected the shrinkage of the matrix. The shrinkage of the matrix, explained using the Young-Laplace equation, was found to result from the pressure drop, and especially in the pores located superficially, leading to the collapse of the matrix microstructure. The integrity of the porous microstructure allows better penetration of cells in medical applications. The numbers of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts penetrated through the hydrated Col/PBS porous collagen matrices pre-immersed in absolute ethanol with subsequent water and DMEM culture medium replacements were significantly higher than those through matrices hydrated directly in DMEM.

  18. Structural stability of methane hydrate at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, J.; Chen, X.; Chou, I.-Ming; Yang, W.; Hu, Jiawen; Hemley, R.J.; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2011-01-01

    The structural stability of methane hydrate under pressure at room temperature was examined by both in-situ single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction techniques on samples with structure types I, II, and H in diamond-anvil cells. The diffraction data for types II (sII) and H (sH) were refined to the known structures with space groups Fd3m and P63/mmc, respectively. Upon compression, sI methane hydrate transforms to the sII phase at 120 MPa, and then to the sH phase at 600 MPa. The sII methane hydrate was found to coexist locally with sI phase up to 500 MPa and with sH phase up to 600 MPa. The pure sH structure was found to be stable between 600 and 900 MPa. Methane hydrate decomposes at pressures above 3 GPa to form methane with the orientationally disordered Fm3m structure and ice VII (Pn3m). The results highlight the role of guest (CH4)-host (H2O) interactions in the stabilization of the hydrate structures under pressure. ?? 2011, China University of Geosciences (Beijing) and Peking University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Formation of porous gas hydrates

    CERN Document Server

    Salamatin, Andrey N

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates grown at gas-ice interfaces are examined by electron microscopy and found to have a submicron porous texture. Permeability of the intervening hydrate layers provides the connection between the two counterparts (gas and water molecules) of the clathration reaction and makes further hydrate formation possible. The study is focused on phenomenological description of principal stages and rate-limiting processes that control the kinetics of the porous gas hydrate crystal growth from ice powders. Although the detailed physical mechanisms involved in the porous hydrate formation still are not fully understood, the initial stage of hydrate film spreading over the ice surface should be distinguished from the subsequent stage which is presumably limited by the clathration reaction at the ice-hydrate interface and develops after the ice grain coating is finished. The model reveals a time dependence of the reaction degree essentially different from that when the rate-limiting step of the hydrate formation at...

  20. Zaocys type II collagen regulates mesenteric lymph node Treg/Th17 cell balance in mice with collagen-induced arthritis%乌梢蛇Ⅱ型胶原蛋白调控胶原诱导性关节炎小鼠肠系膜淋巴结Treg/Th17平衡

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王浩; 冯知涛; 朱俊卿; 李娟

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨乌梢蛇Ⅱ型胶原蛋白(Zaocys typeⅡcollagen, ZCⅡ)对胶原诱导性关节炎(Collagen-induced arthritis, CIA)小鼠肠系膜淋巴结淋巴细胞(mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes, MLNLs)Treg/Th17细胞及其细胞因子的影响。方法鸡Ⅱ型胶原蛋白小鼠尾根部皮下注射,诱导CIA模型;胃蛋白酶消化法提取ZCⅡ,口服高、中、低剂量ZCⅡ干预。视觉评分法评价关节肿胀,HE染色评价膝关节组织病理学;分离小鼠MLNLs,流式细胞术(FCM)检测Treg和Th17细胞的比率;酶联免疫吸附测定(ELISA)法检测MLNLs培养上清中TGF-β和IL-17的活性。结果与正常组比较,CIA小鼠关节炎及组织病理学评分升高(P<0.05),MLNLs中Treg和Th17的比率及其分泌TGF-β和IL-17水平上升(P<0.05)。与CIA模型组比较,不同剂量ZCⅡ干预组关节炎及组织病理学评分降低(P<0.05),MLNLs中Treg细胞的比率上升,Th17细胞的比率下降(P<0.05),MLNLs分泌TGF-β水平上升,分泌IL-17水平下降(P<0.05)。结论口服ZCⅡ能够改善CIA小鼠关节炎及组织病理学评分;ZCⅡ可能通过调节MLNLs中Treg/Th17比率及其细胞因子的水平,重新诱导CIA小鼠的免疫平衡,缓解关节炎症。%Objective To investigate the effect of oral administration of Zaocys type II collagen (ZCII) on the percentages of Treg/Th17 cells in mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes (MLNLs) in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods CIA was induced in male C57BL/6 mice by immunization with chicken type II collagen. Three weeks later, ZCII, purified by pepsin digestion, was orally administered in the mice for 7 consecutive days (daily dose of 10, 20, or 40 μg/kg). The severity of arthritis in each limb was evaluated using a macroscopic scoring system, and histopathological changes of the joint were observed microscopically with HE staining. The percentages of Treg and Th17 cells in MLNLs was

  1. [Hydration in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maristany, Cleofé Pérez-Portabella; Segurola Gurruchaga, Hegoi

    2011-01-01

    Water is an essential foundation for life, having both a regulatory and structural function. The former results from active and passive participation in all metabolic reactions, and its role in conserving and maintaining body temperature. Structurally speaking it is the major contributer to tissue mass, accounting for 60% of the basis of blood plasma, intracellular and intersticial fluid. Water is also part of the primary structures of life such as genetic material or proteins. Therefore, it is necessary that the nurse makes an early assessment of patients water needs to detect if there are signs of electrolyte imbalance. Dehydration can be a very serious problem, especially in children and the elderly. Dehydrations treatment with oral rehydration solution decreases the risk of developing hydration disorders, but even so, it is recommended to follow preventive measures to reduce the incidence and severity of dehydration. The key to having a proper hydration is prevention. Artificial nutrition encompasses the need for precise calculation of water needs in enteral nutrition as parenteral, so the nurse should be part of this process and use the tools for calculating the patient's requirements. All this helps to ensure an optimal nutritional status in patients at risk. Ethical dilemmas are becoming increasingly common in clinical practice. On the subject of artificial nutrition and hydration, there isn't yet any unanimous agreement regarding hydration as a basic care. It is necessary to take decisions in consensus with the health team, always thinking of the best interests of the patient.

  2. The collagen triple-helix structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, B; Ramshaw, J A

    1997-03-01

    Recent advances, principally through the study of peptide models, have led to an enhanced understanding of the structure and function of the collagen triple helix. In particular, the first crystal structure has clearly shown the highly ordered hydration network critical for stabilizing both the molecular conformation and the interactions between triple helices. The sequence dependent nature of the conformational features is also under active investigation by NMR and other techniques. The triple-helix motif has now been identified in proteins other than collagens, and it has been established as being important in many specific biological interactions as well as being a structural element. The nature of recognition and the degree of specificity for interactions involving triple helices may differ from globular proteins. Triple-helix binding domains consist of linear sequences along the helix, making them amenable to characterization by simple model peptides. The application of structural techniques to such model peptides can serve to clarify the interactions involved in triple-helix recognition and binding and can help explain the varying impact of different structural alterations found in mutant collagens in diseased states.

  3. Second Harmonic Light Scattering from Macromolecules: Collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Shmuel

    In this work we present the theory and practice of optical second harmonic generation (SHG) as applied to rat-tail tendon collagen. Our work is the first quantitative application of SHG to biological systems. The angular dependence of SHG is found to display a sharp, intense, forward peak superimposed on a broad background. The sharp peak is shown to imply long-range polar order, while the broad background corresponds to that predicted for the random "up"/"down" array of collagen fibrils seen with the electron microscope. The dependence of fibril diameter distribution on age and state of hydration is measured. Our experiments also reveal information concerning the structure of the fibrils and their arrangement in the tendon. The degree of polar order, the coherence length of tendon for harmonic generation and the absolute magnitude of the nonlinear susceptibility of the collagen fibril are also determined. The biological significance of these findings and the many advantages of SHG for the structural study of biological macromolecules and tissues are discussed.

  4. Clinical evaluation of porous hydroxyapatite bone graft (Periobone G with and without collagen membrane (Periocol in the treatment of bilateral grade II furcation defects in mandibular first permanent molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sruthy Prathap

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Furcation invasions represent one of the most demanding therapeutic challenges in periodontics. This investigation assessed and compared the clinical efficacy of hydroxyapatite bone graft material when used alone and with collagen membrane in the treatment of grade II furcation defects. Materials and Methods: Ten patients with comparable bilateral furcation defects in relation to mandibular first molars were selected and treated in a split-mouth design. After the hygiene phase of therapy was completed, the groups were selected randomly either for treatment with hydroxyapatite bone graft (Periobone G alone or with a combination of bone graft and guided tissue regeneration (GTR membrane (Periocol. Clinical parameters like plaque index, gingival index, vertical probing depth, horizontal probing depth, clinical attachment level, position of marginal gingiva, and the amount of bone fill were used at baseline and at 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Results: At 6 months, both surgical procedures resulted in statistically significant reduction in vertical and horizontal probing depths and gain in the clinical attachment level. Conclusion: The use of combination technique yielded superior results compared to sites treated with bone graft alone. However, the difference was not statistically significant.

  5. Aggregation of capped hexaglycine strands into hydrogen-bonding motifs representative of pleated and rippled β-sheets, collagen, and polyglycine I and II crystal structures. A density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumley, Joshua A; Tsai, Midas I-Hsien; Dannenberg, J J

    2011-02-17

    We compare the energies and enthalpies of inter-action of three- and seven-stranded capped polyglycine aggregates in both the pleated and rippled antiparallel and parallel β-sheet structures as well as the collagenic (three-strand) or polyglycine II-like (seven-strand) forms using density functional theory at the B3LYP/D95(d,p) level. We present the overall interaction energies as broken down into pure H-bonding between the strands at the geometries they assume in the aggregates and the distortion energies required to achieve those geometries starting from the fully relaxed single strands. While the antiparallel sheets represent the most stable structures for both the three- and seven-strand structures, the pure H-bonding interactions are the smallest for these structures. The overall interaction energies are dominated by the energy required to distort the relaxed polyglycine strands rather than the H-bonding energies. The antiparallel β-sheet constrained to C(s) symmetry has a lower enthalpy, but higher energy, of interaction than the fully optimized structure.

  6. Construction of collagen II/hyaluronate/chondroitin-6-sulfate tri-copolymer scaffold for nucleus pulposus tissue engineering and preliminary analysis of its physico-chemical properties and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang-Qing; Huang, Bo; Luo, Gang; Zhang, Chuan-Zhi; Zhuang, Ying; Zhou, Yue

    2010-02-01

    To construct a novel scaffold for nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue engineering, The porous type II collagen (CII)/hyaluronate (HyA)-chondroitin-6-sulfate (6-CS) scaffold was prepared using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) cross-linking system. The physico-chemical properties and biocompatibility of CII/HyA-CS scaffolds were evaluated. The results suggested CII/HyA-CS scaffolds have a highly porous structure (porosity: 94.8 +/- 1.5%), high water-binding capacity (79.2 +/- 2.8%) and significantly improved mechanical stability by EDC/NHS crosslinking (denaturation temperature: 74.6 +/- 1.8 and 58.1 +/- 2.6 degrees C, respectively, for the crosslinked scaffolds and the non-crosslinked; collagenase degradation rate: 39.5 +/- 3.4 and 63.5 +/- 2.0%, respectively, for the crosslinked scaffolds and the non-crosslinked). The CII/HyA-CS scaffolds also showed satisfactory cytocompatibility and histocompatibility as well as low immunogenicity. These results indicate CII/HyA-CS scaffolds may be an alternative material for NP tissue engineering due to the similarity of its composition and physico-chemical properties to those of the extracellular matrices (ECM) of native NP.

  7. Proximal collagenous gastroenteritides:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Riis, Lene Buhl; Danese, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    a systematic review of collagenous gastritis, collagenous sprue, and a combination thereof. METHOD: The search yielded 117 studies which were suitable for inclusion in the systematic review. Excluding repeated cases, 89 case reports and 28 case series were reported, whereas no prospective studies...... of these disorders is presented. The prognosis of both collagenous gastritis and sprue seems not to be as dismal as considered previously. Data point to involvement of immune or autoimmune mechanisms potentially driven by luminal antigens initiating the fibroinflammatory condition. CONCLUSIONS: To reach...

  8. Anticytokine treatment of established type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice : a comparative study using anti-TNFalpha, anti-IL-1alpha/beta and IL-1Ra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, L.A.B.; Helsen, M.M.A.; Loo, F.A.J. van de; Berg, W.B. van den

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), and IL-1 beta in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), immediately after onset and during the phase of established arthritis. METHODS: Male DBA/1 mice with collagen-induced arthritis were treated

  9. The discoidin domain receptor DDR2 is a receptor for type X collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitinger, Birgit; Kwan, Alvin P L

    2006-08-01

    During endochondral ossification, collagen X is deposited in the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate. Our previous results have shown that collagen X is capable of interacting directly with chondrocytes, primarily via integrin alpha2beta1. In this study, we determined whether collagen X could also interact with the non-integrin collagen receptors, discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), DDR1 or DDR2. The widely expressed DDRs are receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by a number of different collagen types. Collagen X was found to be a much better ligand for DDR2 than for DDR1. Collagen X bound to the DDR2 extracellular domain with high affinity and stimulated DDR2 autophosphorylation, the first step in transmembrane signalling. Expression of DDR2 in the epiphyseal plate was confirmed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The spatial expression of DDR2 in the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate is consistent with a physiological interaction of DDR2 with collagen X. Surprisingly, the discoidin domain of DDR2, which fully contains the binding sites for the fibrillar collagens I and II, was not sufficient for collagen X binding. The nature of the DDR2 binding site(s) within collagen X was further analysed. In addition to a collagenous domain, collagen X contains a C-terminal NC1 domain. DDR2 was found to recognise the triple-helical region of collagen X as well as the NC1 domain. Binding to the collagenous region was dependent on the triple-helical conformation. DDR2 autophosphorylation was induced by the collagen X triple-helical region but not the NC1 domain, indicating that the triple-helical region of collagen X contains a specific DDR2 binding site that is capable of receptor activation. Our study is the first to describe a non-fibrillar collagen ligand for DDR2 and will form the basis for further studies into the biological function of collagen X during endochondral ossification.

  10. Interaction Study of Guest with Host in Clathrate Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Wang; Shunle Dong

    2007-01-01

    Lattice dynamical simulations of noble gas hydrate structures I and II have been performed. Potential energies were investigated to study the influence of guest species on the stability of the hydrate structure. Results show that when the diameter of inclusion molecules is between 3 A and 4.2 A, such as Ar and Kr, the critical role of the 512 cage in the stabilization of hydrates becomes effective. For Xe hydrates SI and SII, with the help of lattice dynamical calculations, the modes attributions are identified directly. We proposed the resonant effect of the fingerprint frequency at about 7 meV and 10 meV which arise from the coupling of Xe molecules in the 512 cage with the host lattice.

  11. Collagenous gastritis: Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenya Kamimura; Masaaki Kobayashi; Yuichi Sato; Yutaka Aoyagi; Shuji Terai

    2015-01-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease characterizedby the subepithelial deposition of collagen bandsthicker than 10 μm and the infiltration of inflammatorymononuclear cells in the lamina propria. Collagenouscolitis and collagenous sprue have similar histologicalcharacteristics to collagenous gastritis and are thoughtto be part of the same disease entity. However, whilecollagenous colitis has become more common inthe field of gastroenterology, presenting with clinicalsymptoms of chronic diarrhea in older patients,collagenous gastritis is rare. Since the disease was firstreported in 1989, only 60 cases have been documentedin the English literature. No safe and effective treatmentshave been identified from randomized, controlled trials.Therefore, better understanding of the disease and thereporting of more cases will help to establish diagnosticcriteria and to develop therapeutic strategies. Therefore,here we review the clinical characteristics, endoscopicand histological findings, treatment, and clinical outcomesfrom case reports and case series published to date,and provide a summary of the latest information on thedisease. This information will contribute to improvedknowledge of collagenous gastritis so physicians canrecognize and correctly diagnose the disease, and willhelp to develop a standard therapeutic strategy forfuture clinical trials.

  12. Structural properties of pepsin-solubilized collagen acylated by lauroyl chloride along with succinic anhydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Conghu [The Key Laboratory of Leather Chemistry and Engineering of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); College of Life Sciences, Anqing Normal University, Anqing 246011 (China); Tian, Zhenhua; Liu, Wentao [The Key Laboratory of Leather Chemistry and Engineering of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Li, Guoying, E-mail: liguoyings@163.com [The Key Laboratory of Leather Chemistry and Engineering of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2015-10-01

    The structural properties of pepsin-solubilized calf skin collagen acylated by lauroyl chloride along with succinic anhydride were investigated in this paper. Compared with native collagen, acylated collagen retained the unique triple helix conformation, as determined by amino acid analysis, circular dichroism and X-ray diffraction. Meanwhile, the thermostability of acylated collagen using thermogravimetric measurements was enhanced as the residual weight increased by 5%. With the temperature increased from 25 to 115 °C, the secondary structure of native and acylated collagens using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements was destroyed since the intensity of the major amide bands decreased and the positions of the major amide bands shifted to lower wavenumber, respectively. Meanwhile, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy revealed that the most sensitive bands for acylated and native collagens were amide I and II bands, respectively. Additionally, the corresponding order of the groups between native and acylated collagens was different and the correlation degree for acylated collagen was weaker than that of native collagen, suggesting that temperature played a small influence on the conformation of acylated collagen, which might be concluded that the hydrophobic interaction improved the thermostability of collagen. - Highlights: • Acylated collagen retained the unique triple helix conformation. • Acylated collagen had stronger thermostability than native collagen. • Amide I was the most sensitive band to the temperature for acylated collagen. • Amide II was the most sensitive band to the temperature for native collagen. • Auto-peak at 1680 cm{sup −1} for acylated collagen disappeared at higher temperature.

  13. Mechanical properties of collagen fibrils

    OpenAIRE

    Wenger, M. P. E.; Bozec, L.; Horton, M. A.; Mesquida, P

    2007-01-01

    The formation of collagen fibers from staggered subfibrils still lacks a universally accepted model. Determining the mechanical properties of single collagen fibrils ( diameter 50 - 200 nm) provides new insights into collagen structure. In this work, the reduced modulus of collagen was measured by nanoindentation using atomic force microscopy. For individual type 1 collagen fibrils from rat tail, the modulus was found to be in the range from 5 GPa to 11.5 GPa ( in air and at room temperature)...

  14. Kinetic analysis of mineral formation during in vitro modeling of matrix vesicle mineralization: effect of annexin A5, phosphatidylserine, and type II collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genge, Brian R; Wu, Licia N Y; Wuthier, Roy E

    2007-08-15

    Matrix vesicles (MVs) are involved in de novo mineral formation by nearly all vertebrate tissues. The driving force for MV mineralization is a nucleational core composed of three principal constituents: (i) amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), complexed in part with phosphatidylserine (PS) to form (ii) calcium-phosphate-lipid complexes (CPLX), and (iii) annexin A5 (AnxA5), the principal lipid-dependent Ca(2+)-binding protein in MVs. We describe methods for reconstituting the nucleational core using a biomimetic approach and for analyzing the kinetics of its induction of mineral formation. The method is based on light scattering by the nascent crystallites at 340 nm and monitors mineral formation at regular intervals without disturbing the system using an automated plate reader. It yields precise replicate values that typically agree within less than 5%. As with MVs, mineral formation by the synthetic complex follows a sigmoidal pattern; following a quiescent induction period, rapid formation ensues for a limited time, followed by a distinct decline in rate that continues to slow, ultimately reaching a maximal asymptotic value. Key to quantization of mineral formation is the use of first-derivative analysis, which defines the induction time, the rate and the amount of initial mineral formation. Furthermore, using a five-parameter logistic curve-fitting algorithm, the maximal amount of mineral formation can be predicted accurately. Using these methods, we document the dramatic finding that AnxA5 synergistically activates PS-CPLX, transforming it from a very weak nucleator of mineral formation to a potent one. The methods presented should enable systematic study of the effects of numerous other factors thought to contribute to mineral formation.

  15. Modeling Hydrates and the Gas Hydrate Markup Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Wang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates, as an important potential fuels, flow assurance hazards, and possible factors initiating the submarine geo-hazard and global climate change, have attracted the interest of scientists all over the world. After two centuries of hydrate research, a great amount of scientific data on gas hydrates has been accumulated. Therefore the means to manage, share, and exchange these data have become an urgent task. At present, metadata (Markup Language is recognized as one of the most efficient ways to facilitate data management, storage, integration, exchange, discovery and retrieval. Therefore the CODATA Gas Hydrate Data Task Group proposed and specified Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML as an extensible conceptual metadata model to characterize the features of data on gas hydrate. This article introduces the details of modeling portion of GHML.

  16. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  17. A study on gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byoung Jae; Jung, Tae Jin; Sunwoo, Don [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Sufficient documents were reviewed to understand solid components of water and gaseous hydrocarbon known as gas hydrates, which represent an important potential energy resource of the future. The review provides us with valuable information on crystal structures, kinetics, origin and distribution of gas hydrates. In addition, the review increased our knowledge of exploration and development methods of gas hydrates. Large amounts of methane, the principal component of natural gas, in the form of solid gas hydrate are found mainly offshore in outer continental margin sediment and, to a lesser extent, in polar regions commonly associated with permafrost. Natural gas hydrates are stable in some environments where the hydrostatic pressure exerted by overlying water column is sufficient for hydrate formation and stability. The required high pressures generally restrict gas hydrate to sediments beneath water of approximately 400 m. Higher sediment temperatures at greater subbottom depths destabilize gas hydrates. Based on the pressure- temperature condition, the outer continental margin of East Sea where water depth is deep enough to form gas hydrate is considered to have high potential of gas hydrate accumulations. (author). 56 refs., tabs., figs.

  18. 高强度周期性静水压对人软骨细胞超微结构及II 型胶原分泌的影响%Effects of high-intensity cyclical hydrostatic pressures on the ultrastructure and type II collagen expression of chondrocytes of knee joint in human

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鑫; 白倩; 徐奎; 裘秀春; 范清宇; 马保安

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of high-intensity cyclic hydrostatic pressures on the ultrastructure and type II collagen contents of chondrocytes of the knee joint cultured in vitro in human. Methods The normal chondrocytes of human knee joint were isolated and cultured in vitro. The 3rd generation of chondrocytes were treated with high-intensity cyclical hydrostatic pressures ( 10.0 mPa ) by the multifunctional thermostatic high-insensitive hydrostatic pressure loading device for 2 h per day lasting for 5 days. Toluidine blue staining and immunohistochemical staining of type II collagen were employed to identify the chondrocytes. Cell morphology was observed by light microscopy. The ultrastructure of chondrocytes were observed by transmission electron microscopy ( TEM ). Type II collagen immunohistochemical staining and semi-quantitative analysis were performed to measure contents and expression of type II collagen of chondrocytes in 2 groups. Results Compared with the control group, cell morphology changed from irregular polygon into long spindle, membrane and cytoplasm retracted, the number of cells was reduced significantly and grew sparsely in the 10.0 mPa group. TEM showed that various apoptosis indications such as uneven distribution and margination of chromosomes in the 10.0 mPa group. Collagen type II immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative analysis showed that the percent of stained area of control group and 10.0 mPa group was ( 61.64 ± 6.19 ) % and ( 43.76 ± 5.61 ) %, compared with the control group, the stained area and extent of chondrocytes were significantly decreased in the 10.0 mPa group ( P < 0.05 ). Conclusions The high-intensity pressure over human physiological range can be regarded as a mechanical injury to result in cell apoptosis, morphology and intracellular ultrastructural changes of human chondrocytes, and also decrease protein expression of human chondrocytes. These data provide the experimental basis for studying the

  19. Scanning electron microscopy investigations of laboratory-grown gas clathrate hydrates formed from melting ice, and comparison to natural hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Circone, S.; Durham, W.B.

    2004-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate grain texture and pore structure development within various compositions of pure sI and sII gas hydrates synthesized in the laboratory, as well as in natural samples retrieved from marine (Gulf of Mexico) and permafrost (NW Canada) settings. Several samples of methane hydrate were also quenched after various extents of partial reaction for assessment of mid-synthesis textural progression. All laboratory-synthesized hydrates were grown under relatively high-temperature and high-pressure conditions from rounded ice grains with geometrically simple pore shapes, yet all resulting samples displayed extensive recrystallization with complex pore geometry. Growth fronts of mesoporous methane hydrate advancing into dense ice reactant were prevalent in those samples quenched after limited reaction below and at the ice point. As temperatures transgress the ice point, grain surfaces continue to develop a discrete "rind" of hydrate, typically 5 to 30 ??m thick. The cores then commonly melt, with rind microfracturing allowing migration of the melt to adjacent grain boundaries where it also forms hydrate. As the reaction continues under progressively warmer conditions, the hydrate product anneals to form dense and relatively pore-free regions of hydrate grains, in which grain size is typically several tens of micrometers. The prevalence of hollow, spheroidal shells of hydrate, coupled with extensive redistribution of reactant and product phases throughout reaction, implies that a diffusion-controlled shrinking-core model is an inappropriate description of sustained hydrate growth from melting ice. Completion of reaction at peak synthesis conditions then produces exceptional faceting and euhedral crystal growth along exposed pore walls. Further recrystallization or regrowth can then accompany even short-term exposure of synthetic hydrates to natural ocean-floor conditions, such that the final textures may closely mimic

  20. Drilling Gas Hydrates on hydrate Ridge, Oregon continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehu, A. M.; Bohrmann, G.; Leg 204 Science Party

    2002-12-01

    During Leg 204, we cored and logged 9 sites on the Oregon continental margin to determine the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates in an accretionary ridge and adjacent slope basin, investigate the mechanisms that transport methane and other gases into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and obtain constraints on physical properties of hydrates in situ. A 3D seismic survey conducted in 2000 provided images of potential subsurface fluid conduits and indicated the position of the GHSZ throughout the survey region. After coring the first site, we acquired Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) data at all but one site to provide an overview of downhole physical properties. The LWD data confirmed the general position of key seismic stratigraphic horizons and yielded an initial estimate of hydrate concentration through the proxy of in situ electrical resistivity. These records proved to be of great value in planning subsequent coring. The second new hydrate proxy to be tested was infrared thermal imaging of cores on the catwalk as rapidly as possible after retrieval. The thermal images were used to identify hydrate samples and to estimate the distribution and texture of hydrate within the cores. Geochemical analyses of interstitial waters and of headspace and void gases provide additional information on the distribution and concentration of hydrate within the stability zone, the origin and pathway of fluids into and through the GHSZ, and the rates at which gas hydrate is forming. Bio- and lithostratigraphic description of cores, measurement of physical properties, and in situ pressure core sampling and thermal measurements complement the data set, providing ground-truth tests of inferred physical and sedimentological properties. Among the most interesting preliminary results are: 1) that gas hydrates are distributed through a broad depth range within the GHSZ and that different physical and chemical proxies for hydrate distribution and concentration give generally

  1. Production of collagen micro- and nanofibers for potential drug-carrier systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Onur; Kazanci, Murat

    2015-12-01

    Two different nano- and micro-collagen fiber production methods are introduced and discussed. First one is the electrospinning method, that is very common technique to produce nanofibers from different polymeric solutions and recently collagen solutions are employed to produce nanofibers for different biomedical applications. This technique is extremely versatile method to produce nanofibers in a relatively short time, easy to control the fiber diameter and orientation with small pore sizes and a high surface area. The second method is self-assembly of collagen micro-fibers by co-extrusion method. The collagen fibers are obtained without any cross-linker, by using mainly ionic interactions. We demonstrated that self-assembled collagen fibers have well preserved their native structure (0.90 PP-II fraction), when compared with electrospun collagen fibers (0.38 PP-II fraction). However, it was only possible to produce collagen fibers with nanodimensions by using electrospinning method.

  2. Basin-Wide Temperature Constraints On Gas Hydrate Stability In The Gulf Of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Reagan, M. T.; Guinasso, N. L.; Garcia-Pineda, O. G.

    2012-12-01

    Gas hydrate deposits commonly occur at the seafloor-water interface on marine margins. They are especially prevalent in the Gulf of Mexico where they are associated with natural oil seeps. The stability of these deposits is potentially challenged by fluctuations in bottom water temperature, on an annual time-scale, and under the long-term influence of climate change. We mapped the locations of natural oil seeps where shallow gas hydrate deposits are known to occur across the entire Gulf of Mexico basin based on a comprehensive review of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data (~200 images). We prepared a bottom water temperature map based on the archive of CTD casts from the Gulf (~6000 records). Comparing the distribution of gas hydrate deposits with predicted bottom water temperature, we find that a broad area of the upper slope lies above the theoretical stability horizon for structure 1 gas hydrate, while all sites where gas hydrate deposits occur are within the stability horizon for structure 2 gas hydrate. This is consistent with analytical results that structure 2 gas hydrates predominate on the upper slope (Klapp et al., 2010), where bottom water temperatures fluctuate over a 7 to 10 C range (approx. 600 m depth), while pure structure 1 hydrates are found at greater depths (approx. 3000 m). Where higher hydrocarbon gases are available, formation of structure 2 gas hydrate should significantly increase the resistance of shallow gas hydrate deposits to destabilizing effects variable or increasing bottom water temperature. Klapp, S.A., Bohrmann, G., Kuhs, W.F., Murshed, M.M., Pape, T., Klein, H., Techmer, K.S., Heeschen, K.U., and Abegg, F., 2010, Microstructures of structure I and II gas hydrates from the Gulf of Mexico: Marine and Petroleum Geology, v. 27, p. 116-125.Bottom temperature and pressure for Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate outcrops and stability horizons for sI and sII hydrate.

  3. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  4. Anti-type II collagen antibodies, anti-CCP, IgA RF and IgM RF are associated with joint damage, assessed eight years after onset of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntson, Lillemor; Nordal, Ellen; Fasth, Anders; Aalto, Kristiina; Herlin, Troels; Nielsen, Susan; Rygg, Marite; Zak, Marek; Rönnelid, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Early appearance of antibodies specific for native human type II collagen (anti-CII) characterizes an early inflammatory and destructive phenotype in adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of anti-CII, IgM RF, IgA RF and anti-CCP in serum samples obtained early after diagnosis, and to relate the occurrence of autoantibodies to outcome after eight years of disease in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The Nordic JIA database prospectively included JIA patients followed for eight years with data on remission and joint damage. From this database, serum samples collected from 192 patients, at a median of four months after disease onset, were analysed for IgG anti-CII, IgM RF, IgA RF and IgG anti-CCP. Joint damage was assessed based on Juvenile Arthritis Damage Index for Articular damage (JADI-A), a validated clinical instrument for joint damage. Elevated serum levels of anti-CII occurred in 3.1%, IgM RF in 3.6%, IgA RF in 3.1% and anti-CCP in 2.6% of the patients. Occurrence of RF and anti-CCP did to some extent overlap, but rarely with anti-CII. The polyarticular and oligoarticular extended categories were overrepresented in patients with two or more autoantibodies. Anti-CII occurred in younger children, usually without overlap with the other autoantibodies and was associated with high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) early in the disease course. All four autoantibodies were significantly associated with joint damage, but not with active disease at the eight-year follow up. Anti-CII, anti-CCP, IgA RF and IgM RF detected early in the disease course predicted joint damage when assessed after eight years of disease. The role of anti-CII in JIA should be further studied.

  5. Thermodynamic promotion of carbon dioxide-clathrate hydrate formation by tetrahydrofuran, cyclopentane and their mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Peter Jørgensen; Thomsen, Kaj; Abildskov, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Gas clathrate hydrate dissociation pressures are reported for mixtures of carbon dioxide, water and thermodynamic promoters forming structure II hydrates.Hydrate (H)-aqueous liquid (Lw)-vapour (V) equilibrium pressures for the ternary system composed of water, tetrahydrofuran (THF), and carbon....... It is shown that upon adding THF to the pure aqueous phase to form a 4mass percent solution, the equilibrium pressure of the formed hydrates may be lowered compared to the ternary system of water, cyclopentane and carbon dioxide. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd....

  6. Effect of papain-based gel on type I collagen--spectroscopy applied for microstructural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Júnior, Zenildo Santos; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Ana, Patricia Aparecida; França, Cristiane Miranda; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Deana, Alessandro; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil

    2015-06-23

    Considering the improvement of biomaterials that facilitate atraumatic restorative techniques in dentistry, a papain-based gel can be used in the chemomechanical removal of decayed dental tissue. However, there is no information regarding the influence of this gel on the structure of sound collagen. The aim of the present study was to investigate the adsorption of a papain-based gel (Papacarie(TM)) to collagen and determine collagen integrity after treatment. A pilot study was first performed with 10 samples of type I collagen membrane obtained from bovine Achilles deep tendon to compare the influence of hydration (Milli-Q water) on infrared bands of collagen. In a further experiment, 10 samples of type I collagen membrane were used to evaluate the effects of Papacarie(TM) on the collagen microstructure. All analyses were performed using the attenuated total reflectance technique of Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR). The results demonstrated that the application of Papacarie(TM) does not lead to the degradation of collagen and this product can be safely used in minimally invasive dentistry. As the integrity of sound collagen is preserved after the application of the papain-based gel, this product is indicated for the selective removal of infected dentin, leaving the affected dentin intact and capable of re-mineralization.

  7. Poly[[tri-μ-aqua-do-deca-aqua-tris-(μ3-1-hy-droxy-ethyl-idene-1,1-di-phospho-nato)tricalcium(II)tripalladium(II)] penta-hydrate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsenko, Irina P; Kozachkova, Alexandra N; Tsaryk, Natalia V; Pekhnyo, Vasily I; Rusanova, Julia A

    2014-08-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, {[CaPd{CH3OHC(PO3)2}(H2O)5]·5/3H2O} n , consists of one half of the complex [Pd{CH3OHC(PO3)2}](2-) anion (point group symmetry m..), one Ca(2+) cation [site symmetry (.2.)] that is surrounded by three water mol-ecules (one of which is on the same rotation axis) and by three disordered lattice water mol-ecules. The anions form a trinuclear metallocycle around a crystallographic threefold rotation axis. The cations are related by a twofold rotation axis to form a [Ca2(H2O)10](2+) dimer. The slightly distorted square-planar coordination environment of the Pd(II) atoms in the complex anions is formed by O atoms of the bidentate chelating phospho-nate groups of the 1-hy-droxy-ethyl-idene-1,1-di-phospho-nate ligands. In the crystal, cations are bound to anions through -Ca-O-P-O- bonds, as well as through O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, resulting in a three-dimensional polymer. The structure is completed by five disordered solvent mol-ecules localized in cavities within the framework.

  8. Dynamic viscoelastic properties of collagen gels in the presence and absence of collagen fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Hideki; Shimizu, Kousuke; Hara, Masayuki, E-mail: hara@b.s.osakafu-u.ac.jp

    2012-10-01

    We measured the dynamic viscoelasticities of collagen gels prepared and modified by four different methods: i) collagen gels cross-linked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) after their preparation, ii) collagen gels cross-linked simultaneously with their preparation, iii) collagen gels irradiated with gamma rays after their preparation, and iv) collagen gels directly formed from an acidic collagen solution by gamma-cross-linking. Dynamic viscoelasticities of all samples were measured using a rheometer before and after heating for 30 min at 80 Degree-Sign C. The collagen gels sequentially cross-linked by 125 mM EDC after preparation and then heated exhibited mechanically strong properties (storage modulus G Prime , 7010 Pa; loss modulus G Double-Prime , 288 Pa; Young's modulus E, 0.012 in the rapidly-increasing phase and 0.095 in the moderately-increasing phase; tensile strain, 5.29; tensile stress {sigma}, 0.053). We generally conclude that the G Prime value decreases when gels without fibrils are heated. On the other hand, well cross-linked collagen gels with thick fibrils, such as gels sequentially cross-linked with 125 mM EDC after preparation or gamma-cross-linked conventional gels irradiated at 40 kGy, exhibit a distinct increase in G Prime value after heating. Those gels also have thick, twisted, or fused fibrils of collagen. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic viscoelasticities of collagen gels prepared and modified by various methods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical cross-linking with EDC and gamma-cross-linking were used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic viscoelasticities of those samples were measured before and after the heating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The gels sequentially cross-linked with 125 mM EDC exhibit a distinct increase in G' value after heating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Those gels also have thick, twisted, or fused fibrils of collagen.

  9. A urokinase receptor-associated protein with specific collagen binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Engelholm, L H

    2000-01-01

    membrane-bound lectin with hitherto unknown function. The human cDNA was cloned and sequenced. The protein, designated uPARAP, is a member of the macrophage mannose receptor protein family and contains a putative collagen-binding (fibronectin type II) domain in addition to 8 C-type carbohydrate recognition...... domains. It proved capable of binding strongly to a single type of collagen, collagen V. This collagen binding reaction at the exact site of plasminogen activation on the cell may lead to adhesive functions as well as a contribution to cellular degradation of collagen matrices....

  10. Oxygen Toxicity and Lung Collagenous Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-28

    the a and s chains. A large portion of the applied material did not enter the gel until reduced, a behavior typical of this type of sample [20]. The...Collagen. In Crystal RG (ed) The Biochemical Basis of Pulmonary Function, Dekker, New York, pp. 215-271. 11. Hoyer JR, Spiro RG (1978) Studies on the...mono-dispersed lung cell preparations without using time consuming differential gradient centrifugation. Past methods of isolating alveolar type II cells

  11. How stable is a collagen triple helix? An ab initio study on various collagen and beta-sheet forming sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pálfi, Villo K; Perczel, András

    2008-07-15

    Collagen forms the well characterized triple helical secondary structure, stabilized by interchain H-bonds. Here we have investigated the stability of fully optimized collagen triple helices and beta-pleated sheets by using first principles (ab initio and DFT) calculations so as to determine the secondary structure preference depending on the amino acid composition. Models composed of a total of 18 amino acid residues were studied at six different amino acid compositions: (i) L-alanine only, (ii) glycine only, (iii) L-alanines and glycine, (iv) L-alanines and D-alanine, (v) L-prolines with glycine, (vi) L-proline, L-hydroxyproline, and glycine. The last two, v and vi, were designed to mimic the core part of collagen. Furthermore, ii, iii, and iv model the binding and/or recognition sites of collagen. Finally, i models the G-->A replacement, rare in collagen. All calculated structures show great resemblance to those determined by X-ray crystallography. Calculated triple helix formation affinities correlate well with experimentally determined stabilities derived from melting point (T(m)) data of different collagen models. The stabilization energy of a collagen triple helical structure over that of a beta-pleated sheet is 2.1 kcal mol(-1) per triplet for the [(-Pro-Hyp-Gly-)(2)](3) collagen peptide. This changes to 4.8 kcal mol(-1) per triplet of destabilization energy for the [(-Ala-Ala-Gly-)(2)](3) sequence, known to be disfavored in collagen. The present study proves that by using first principles methods for calculating stabilities of supramolecular complexes, such as collagen and beta-pleated sheets, one can obtain stability data in full agreement with experimental observations, which envisage the applicability of QM in molecular design.

  12. Collagen metabolism in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M H; Jensen, L T; Andersen, T

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of obesity, fat distribution and weight loss on collagen turnover using serum concentrations of the carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (S-PICP) and the aminoterminal propeptide of type III pro-collagen (S-PIIINP) as markers for collagen turnover...... (r = 0.37; P = 0.004), height (r = 0.27; P = 0.04), waist circumference (r = 0.35; P = 0.007), as well as with WHR (r = 0.33; P = 0.01) and was inversely correlated to age (r = -0.40; P = 0.002). Compared with randomly selected controls from a large pool of healthy volunteers, the obese patients had...... restriction (P obesity and associated with body fat distribution, suggesting...

  13. 环戊烷水合物平衡数据%EQUILIBRIUM DATA OF CYCLOPENTANE HYDRATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁德青; 郭开华; 樊栓狮; 王如竹

    2001-01-01

    @@ In the oil and gas industry, it is important to determine hydrate phase boundary for avoiding hydrate formation. In general n-butane is regarded as the heaviest hydrocarbon hydrate. But for oil and gas condensate systems, it has been found that some hydrocarbons heavier than n-butane could enter the large cavity of structure-II hydrate due to their effective van der Waal's diameter. The hydrate formation characteristics of benzene[1], cyclohexane[2], and cyclopentane and neopentane in their binaries/tern-aries with methane or/and nitrogen have been reported[3]. Ripmeester et al[4] pointed out that cyclopentane could form gas hydrates without a help gas. However there are no further experimental data to support it.

  14. The role of water in gas hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    When raised to temperatures above the ice melting point, gas hydrates release their gas in well-defined, reproducible events that occur within self-maintained temperature ranges slightly below the ice point. This behavior is observed for structure I (carbon dioxide, methane) and structure II gas hydrates (methane-ethane, and propane), including those formed with either H2O- or D2O-host frameworks, and dissociated at either ambient or elevated pressure conditions. We hypothesize that at temperatures above the H2O (or D2O) melting point: (1) hydrate dissociation produces water + gas instead of ice + gas, (2) the endothermic dissociation reaction lowers the temperature of the sample, causing the water product to freeze, (3) this phase transition buffers the sample temperatures within a narrow temperature range just below the ice point until dissociation goes to completion, and (4) the temperature depression below the pure ice melting point correlates with the average rate of dissociation and arises from solution of the hydrate-forming gas, released by dissociation, in the water phase at elevated concentrations. In addition, for hydrate that is partially dissociated to ice + gas at lower temperatures and then heated to temperatures above the ice point, all remaining hydrate dissociates to gas + liquid water as existing barriers to dissociation disappear. The enhanced dissociation rates at warmer temperatures are probably associated with faster gas transport pathways arising from the formation of water product.

  15. Gas hydrates: entrance to a methane age or climate threat?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krey, Volker; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Grubler, Arnulf; O' Neill, Brian; Riahi, Keywan [International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Schlossplatz 1, 2361 Laxenburg (Austria); Canadell, Josep G [Global Carbon Project, CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, GPO Box 3023, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Abe, Yuichi [Social Science Consulting Unit, Japan Nus Co. Ltd, Loop-X Building 7F, 9-15 Kaigan 3-Chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0022 (Japan); Andruleit, Harald [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Stilleweg 2, 30655 Hannover (Germany); Archer, David [Department of the Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Hamilton, Neil T M [WWF International Arctic Programme, Kristian Augusts gate 7a, 0130 Oslo (Norway); Johnson, Arthur [Hydrate Energy International, 612 Petit Berdot Drive, Kenner, LA 70065 (United States); Kostov, Veselin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lamarque, Jean-Francois [Atmospheric Chemistry Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), PO Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Langhorne, Nicholas [US Office of Naval Research Global, Edison House, 223 Old Marylebone Road, London (United Kingdom); Nisbet, Euan G [Department of Geology, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Riedel, Michael [Earth and Planetary Sciences, McGill University, 3450 University Street, Montreal, QC, H3A 2A7 (Canada); Wang Weihua [Computer Network Information Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 4, 4th South Street, ZhongGuanCun, PO Box 349, Haidian District, Beijing 100080 (China); Yakushev, Vladimir, E-mail: krey@iiasa.ac.a [Gazprom VNIIGAZ LLC, Razvilka, Leninsky District, Moscow Region, 142717 (Russian Federation)

    2009-09-15

    Methane hydrates, ice-like compounds in which methane is held in crystalline cages formed by water molecules, are widespread in areas of permafrost such as the Arctic and in sediments on the continental margins. They are a potentially vast fossil fuel energy source but, at the same time, could be destabilized by changing pressure-temperature conditions due to climate change, potentially leading to strong positive carbon-climate feedbacks. To enhance our understanding of both the vulnerability of and the opportunity provided by methane hydrates, it is necessary (i) to conduct basic research that improves the highly uncertain estimates of hydrate occurrences and their response to changing environmental conditions, and (ii) to integrate the agendas of energy security and climate change which can provide an opportunity for methane hydrates-in particular if combined with carbon capture and storage-to be used as a 'bridge fuel' between carbon-intensive fossil energies and zero-emission energies. Taken one step further, exploitation of dissociating methane hydrates could even mitigate against escape of methane to the atmosphere. Despite these opportunities, so far, methane hydrates have been largely absent from energy and climate discussions, including global hydrocarbon assessments and the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

  16. 外源性转化生长因子-β1作用下胎儿软骨终板细胞II型胶原与蛋白多糖的相关性%The correlation between collagen II and proteoglycan of the fetal endplate cartilage cells cultured by the transforming growth factor-β1 in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李全修; 蔡月艳; 刘欣; 樊培新; 刘勇

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the correlation and the change of collagen II and proteoglycan of the fetal endplate cartilage cells cultured by the transforming growth factor-p, ( TGF-β1 ) in vitro. Methods The second generation fetal endplate cartilage cells for 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6 days with TGF-β11( 10μg/L ) in vitro. The proteoglycan, collagen II gene and protein expression were detected by Western blot or RT-PCR. Results There was not significant difference of the expression of collagen Hand proteoglycan mRNA before 1d and after 4d( P >0. 05 ), however, the expression of collagen II and proteoglycan mRNA increased gradually with a significant difference from 1d to 4d( P<0.05), and collagen II change with proteoglycan mRNA and expression of protein were positively correlated ( R = 0. 9991, R = 0. 9931 respectively ). Conclusion The production of collagen II and proteoglycan of the cultured fetal endplate cartilage cells were promoted by TGF-β1 in vitro, and there were significant correlation between collagen II and proteoglycan.%目的 观察外源性转化生长因子-β1(TGF-β1)作用下胎儿软骨终板细胞II型胶原和蛋白多糖的变化及相关性.方法 用含10 μg/L外源性TGF-β1培养基培养第2代胎儿软骨终板细胞,分别培养0d、1d、2d、3d、4d、5d、6d.Western blot和RT-PCR检测培养细胞II型胶原和蛋白多糖及其mRNA的表达.结果 0天与第1天之间相比较,第4天、第5天与第6天之间相互比较,II型胶原和蛋白多糖及其基因表达的差异皆无统计学意义(P>0.05);第1天、第2天、第3天和第4天之间相互比较,II型胶原和蛋白多糖及其基因表达的差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).II型胶原和蛋白多糖的mRNA表达及蛋白表达均呈正相关(分别为R=0.9991和R=0.9931).结论 TGF-β1能促进体外培养的胎儿软骨终板细胞合成II型胶原和蛋白多糖,且二者在变化过程中具有显著的相关性.

  17. Collagen Homeostasis and Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, S Peter; Heinemeier, Katja M; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system and its collagen rich tissue is important for ensuring architecture of skeletal muscle, energy storage in tendon and ligaments, joint surface protection, and for ensuring the transfer of muscular forces into resulting limb movement. Structure of tendon is stable...... inactivity or immobilization of the human body will conversely result in a dramatic loss in tendon stiffness and collagen synthesis. This illustrates the importance of regular mechanical load in order to preserve the stabilizing role of the connective tissue for the overall function of the musculoskeletal...

  18. Hydration and physical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Bob

    2007-10-01

    There is a rich scientific literature regarding hydration status and physical function that began in the late 1800s, although the relationship was likely apparent centuries before that. A decrease in body water from normal levels (often referred to as dehydration or hypohydration) provokes changes in cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, metabolic, and central nervous function that become increasingly greater as dehydration worsens. Similarly, performance impairment often reported with modest dehydration (e.g., -2% body mass) is also exacerbated by greater fluid loss. Dehydration during physical activity in the heat provokes greater performance decrements than similar activity in cooler conditions, a difference thought to be due, at least in part, to greater cardiovascular and thermoregulatory strain associated with heat exposure. There is little doubt that performance during prolonged, continuous exercise in the heat is impaired by levels of dehydration >or= -2% body mass, and there is some evidence that lower levels of dehydration can also impair performance even during relatively short-duration, intermittent exercise. Although additional research is needed to more fully understand low-level dehydration's effects on physical performance, one can generalize that when performance is at stake, it is better to be well-hydrated than dehydrated. This generalization holds true in the occupational, military, and sports settings.

  19. [The genetics of collagen diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, J; Maroteaux, P; Frezal, J

    1986-01-01

    Heritable disorders of collagen include Ehler-Danlos syndromes (11 types are actually known), Larsen syndrome and osteogenesis imperfecta. Their clinical, genetic and biochemical features are reviewed. Marfan syndrome is closely related to heritable disorders of collagen.

  20. Collagen turnover after tibial fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joerring, S; Krogsgaard, M; Wilbek, H

    1994-01-01

    Collagen turnover after tibial fractures was examined in 16 patients with fracture of the tibial diaphysis and in 8 patients with fracture in the tibial condyle area by measuring sequential changes in serological markers of turnover of types I and III collagen for up to 26 weeks after fracture...... collagen. A group comparison showed characteristic sequential changes in the turnover of types I and III collagen in fractures of the tibial diaphysis and tibial condyles. The turnover of type III collagen reached a maximum after 2 weeks in both groups. The synthesis of type I collagen reached a maximum...... after 2 weeks in the diaphyseal fractures and after 6 weeks in the condylar fractures. The degradation of type I collagen increased after 4 days and reached a maximum at 2 weeks in both groups. The interindividual variation was wide. On a group basis, the turnover of types I and III collagen had...

  1. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  2. Design and synthesis of collagen mimetic peptide derivatives for studying triple helix assembly and collagen mimetic peptide-collagen binding interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xiao

    2008-10-01

    Collagen is the principal tensile clement of the extra-cellular matrix in mammals and is the basic scaffold for cells and tissues. Collagen molecules are comprised of homo-trimeric helices (e.g. collagen type II and type III), ABB type hetero-trimeric helices (e.g. collagen type I, type IV, and type V), or ABC type hetero-trimeric helices (e.g. type V). Mimicry of collagen structures can help elucidate collagen triple helical conformation and provide insights into making novel collagen-like biomaterials. Our group previously reported a new physical collagen modification method, which was based on non-covalent interaction between collagen mimetic peptide (CMP: -(Pro-Hyp-Gly) x-) and natural collagen. We hypothesized that CMP binds to collagen through a process involving both strand invasion and triple helix assembly. The aim of this dissertation is to study structural formation and stability of collagen triple helix, and to investigate CMP-collagen binding interactions using two types of CMP derivatives: covalently templated CMP trimer and CMP-nanoparticle conjugates. We demonstrated that covalently templated ABB type CMP hetero-trimers could be prepared by a versatile synthetic strategy involving both solid phase and solution peptide coupling. Our thermal melting studies showed that the templated CMP hetero-trimers formed collagen-like triple helices and their folding kinetics correlated with the amino acid compositions of the individual CMP strands. We also studied the thermal melting behavior and folding kinetics of a templated hetero-trimer complex comprised of CMP and a peptide derived from collagen. This synthetic strategy can be readily extended to synthesize other ABB type hetero-trimers to investigate their local melting behavior and biological activity. We also prepared colloidally stable CMP functionalized gold nanoparticles (Au-CMPs) as a TEM marker for investigating the CMP-collagen interaction. Au-CMP showed preferential binding to collagen fiber's gap

  3. Flow assurance intervention, hydrates remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Christopher S. [Oceaneering International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the issues of removing hydrates in sub sea flow lines and associated equipment with an Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) of opportunity and a multi-service-vessel (MSV). The paper is split into three topics: the equipment used with the ROV, assessing the interface points and handling fluids produced from drawing down the pressure. Each section is explained thoroughly and backed up with real world experience. The equipment section details information from actual jobs performed and why the particular components were utilized. The system is generally contained in an ROV mounted skid. Pumps are utilized to draw down the pressure inside the hydrated section of equipment, removing one of the three necessary components for hydrates formation. Once the section is pumped down, several options exist for handling the fluids pumped out of the system: pumping to surface, re-injection into the well, or injection into an operating flow line. This method of hydrates remediation is both economical and timely. Hydrate blockages form in low temperatures and high pressures. Reducing the pressure or increasing the temperature so the conditions lie to the right of the hydrate dissociation curve will slowly decompose the blockage. Depressurization and the use of MEG or methanol will give favorable conditions to remove the hydrate plug. Oceaneering has the capabilities to remove hydrates using the FRS in conjunction with an installation vessel to dispose of the gas and fluid removed from the flow line. Hydrate remediation techniques should be implemented into the initial design to reduce costs later. The cost of stopped production combined with the day rate for equipment needed for hydrate removal outweighs the costs if no technique is utilized. (author)

  4. Control of dense collagen gel scaffolds for tissue engineering through measurement and modelling of hydraulic permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpooshan, Vahid

    Among various natural biopolymers, type I collagen gels have demonstrated the highest potential as biomimetic scaffolds for tissue engineering (TE). However, the successful application of collagen gels requires a greater understanding of the relationship between their microstructure and physical-mechanical properties. Therefore, a precise method to modulate collagen gel microstructure in order to attain optimal scaffold properties for diverse biomedical applications is necessary. This dissertation describes a new approach to produce collagen gels with defined microstructures, quantified by hydraulic permeability ( k), in order to optimize scaffold properties for TE applications. It was hypothesized that the measurement of k can be used to study the role of microstructure in collagen gel properties, as well as cell function and cell-scaffold interactions. Applying increasing levels of plastic compression (PC) to the highly hydrated collagen gels resulted in an increase in collagen fibrillar density, reduced Happel model derived k values, increased gel stiffness, promoted MSC metabolic activity, osteogenic differentiation, and mineral deposition, while cell-induced gel contraction diminished. Thus, collagen gels with lower k and higher stiffness values exhibited greater potential for bone tissue engineering. Correlating between collagen gel microstructure, k, and fibroblast function within collagen gels indicated that increasing the level of PC yielded a reduction in pore size and an increase in fibril bundle diameter. Decrease in k values resulted in a decrease in gel contraction and an increase in cell metabolic activity. An increase in cell density accelerated contraction. Therefore, fibroblast function within collagen gels can be optimised by a balance between the microstructure, k, and cell seeding density. Developing a micromechanical model to measure experimental k of collagen gels during confined compression revealed the formation of a dense collagen lamella

  5. Collagen hydrolysate based collagen/hydroxyapatite composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficai, Anton; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Birsan, Mihaela; Sonmez, Maria; Ficai, Denisa; Trandafir, Viorica; Andronescu, Ecaterina

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to study the influence of collagen hydrolysate (HAS) on the formation of ternary collagen-hydrolysate/hydroxyapatite composite materials (COLL-HAS/HA). During the precipitation process of HA, a large amount of brushite is resulted at pH = 7 but, practically pure HA is obtained at pH ⩾ 8. The FTIR data reveal the duplication of the most important collagen absorption bands due to the presence of the collagen hydrolysate. The presence of collagen hydrolysate is beneficial for the management of bone and joint disorders such as osteoarthritis and osteoporosis.

  6. Gas Hydrate Research Site Selection and Operational Research Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, T. S.; Boswell, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    In recent years it has become generally accepted that gas hydrates represent a potential important future energy resource, a significant drilling and production hazard, a potential contributor to global climate change, and a controlling factor in seafloor stability and landslides. Research drilling and coring programs carried out by the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), government agencies, and several consortia have contributed greatly to our understanding of the geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrates in marine and permafrost environments. For the most part, each of these field projects were built on the lessons learned from the projects that have gone before them. One of the most important factors contributing to the success of some of the more notable gas hydrate field projects has been the close alignment of project goals with the processes used to select the drill sites and to develop the project’s operational research plans. For example, IODP Expedition 311 used a transect approach to successfully constrain the overall occurrence of gas hydrate within the range of geologic environments within a marine accretionary complex. Earlier gas hydrate research drilling, including IODP Leg 164, were designed primarily to assess the occurrence and nature of marine gas hydrate systems, and relied largely on the presence of anomalous seismic features, including bottom-simulating reflectors and “blanking zones”. While these projects were extremely successful, expeditions today are being increasingly mounted with the primary goal of prospecting for potential gas hydrate production targets, and site selection processes designed to specifically seek out anomalously high-concentrations of gas hydrate are needed. This approach was best demonstrated in a recently completed energy resource focused project, the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II (GOM JIP Leg II), which featured the collection of a

  7. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in fibrosis : Collagen type I expression is highly upregulated after EMT, but does not contribute to collagen deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosper, Nynke A.; van den Berg, Paul P.; de Rond, Saskia; Popa, Eliane R.; Wilmer, Martijn J.; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Bank, Ruud A.

    2013-01-01

    The hallmark of fibrosis is an accumulation of fibrillar collagens, especially of collagen type I. There is considerable debate whether in vivo type II epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is involved in organ fibrosis. Lineage tracing experiments by various groups show opposing data

  8. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in fibrosis: collagen type I expression is highly upregulated after EMT, but does not contribute to collagen deposition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosper, N.A.; Berg, P.P. van den; Rond, S. de; Popa, E.R.; Wilmer, M.J.G.; Masereeuw, R.; Bank, R.A.

    2013-01-01

    The hallmark of fibrosis is an accumulation of fibrillar collagens, especially of collagen type I. There is considerable debate whether in vivo type II epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is involved in organ fibrosis. Lineage tracing experiments by various groups show opposing data concernin

  9. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in fibrosis : Collagen type I expression is highly upregulated after EMT, but does not contribute to collagen deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosper, Nynke A.; van den Berg, Paul P.; de Rond, Saskia; Popa, Eliane R.; Wilmer, Martijn J.; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Bank, Ruud A.

    2013-01-01

    The hallmark of fibrosis is an accumulation of fibrillar collagens, especially of collagen type I. There is considerable debate whether in vivo type II epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is involved in organ fibrosis. Lineage tracing experiments by various groups show opposing data concernin

  10. Adhesive properties of Clostridium perfringens to extracellular matrix proteins collagens and fibronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitsumoto, Yasuo; Morita, Naomi; Yamazoe, Ryosuke; Tagomori, Mika; Yamasaki, Tsutomu; Katayama, Seiichi

    2014-02-01

    The adhesive properties of Clostridium perfringens to collagens, gelatin, fibronectin (Fn), Fn-prebound collagens, and Fn-prebound gelatin were investigated. C. perfringens could bind to Fn-prebound collagen type II, type III, and gelatin, but not to gelatin or collagens except for collagen type I directly. Recombinant Fn-binding proteins of C. perfringens, rFbpA and rFbpB, were used to examine Fn-mediated bacterial adherence to collagen type I. In the presence of rFbps, C. perfringens adherence to Fn-prebound collagen type I was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Fn was not released from the coated collagen type I by the presence of rFbps, and rFbps did not bind to collagen type I. Thus, the inhibition of C. perfringens binding to Fn-prebound collagen type I by rFbps could not be explained by the removal of Fn from collagen or by the competitive binding of rFbps to collagen. Instead, both rFbps were found to bind to C. perfringens. These results suggest the possibility that rFbps may bind to the putative Fn receptor expressed on C. perfringens and competitively inhibit Fn binding to C. perfringens.

  11. Investigation on Gas Storage in Methane Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigao Sun; Rongsheng Ma; Shuanshi Fan; Kaihua Guo; Ruzhu Wang

    2004-01-01

    The effect of additives (anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), nonionic surfactant alkyl polysaccharide glycoside (APG), and liquid hydrocarbon cyclopentane (CP)) on hydrate induction time and formation rate, and storage capacity was studied in this work. Micelle surfactant solutions were found to reduce hydrate induction time, increase methane hydrate formation rate and improve methane storage capacity in hydrates. In the presence of surfactant, hydrate could form quickly in a quiescent system and the energy costs of hydrate formation were reduced. The critical micelle concentrations of SDS and APG water solutions were found to be 300× 10-6 and 500× 10-6 for methane hydrate formation system respectively. The effect of anionic surfactant (SDS) on methane storage in hydrates is more pronounced compared to a nonionic surfactant (APG). CP also reduced hydrate induction time and improved hydrate formation rate, but could not improve methane storage in hydrates.

  12. Norwegian Research Strategies on gas Hydrates and Natural Seeps in the Nordic Seas Region (GANS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelstuen, B. O.; Sejrup, H. P.; Andreassen, K.; Boe, R.; Eldholm, O.; Hovland, M.; Knies, J.; Kvalstad, T.; Kvamme, B.; Mienert, J.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2004-12-01

    Continuous leakage of methane to the oceans from hydrate reservoirs that partially are exposed towards the seafloor is an increasing international concern, as the greenhouse gas methane is significantly more (c. 20 times) aggressive than CO2. In Norway we have research groups with interest and experience on natural seeps and gas hydrates. These features, and processes related to them, are challenging research targets which demands inputs from different fields if important research breakthroughs shall be made. In February 2004 deep sea researchers from the University of Tromso, Geological Survey of Norway, Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Statoil and University of Bergen met to obtain an overview of the research effort in the fields of natural seeps and gas hydrates in Norway and to discuss national coordination, research strategies, research infrastructure and international co-operation. The following research strategies were agreed upon: i) Strengthen multidisciplinary research on deep sea systems, ii) develop a strategy for research on natural seeps and gas hydrates, iii) contribute in national coordination of research on natural seeps and gas hydrates, iv) Coordinate the use and development of research infrastructures important for research on natural seeps and gas hydrates, and v) contribute in the international evaluations of strategies for hydrate reservoir exploitation. Proposed research tasks for GANS include: i) Gas and gas hydrate formation processes and conditions for transport, accumulation, preservation and dissociation in sediments, ii) Effect of gas hydrate on physical properties of sediment, iii) Detection and quantification of in situ gas hydrate content and distribution pattern, iv) Effect of dissociation on soil properties, v) Gas hydrates as an energy resource, vi) Rapid methane release and climate change, and vii) Geohazard and environmental impact.

  13. New silica clathrate minerals that are isostructural with natural gas hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momma, Koichi; Ikeda, Takuji; Nishikubo, Katsumi; Takahashi, Naoki; Honma, Chibune; Takada, Masayuki; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Nagase, Toshiro; Kudoh, Yasuhiro

    2011-02-15

    Silica clathrate compounds (clathrasils) and clathrate hydrates are structurally analogous because both materials have framework structures with cage-like voids occupied by guest species. The following three structural types of clathrate hydrates are recognized in nature: cubic structure I (sI); cubic structure II (sII); and hexagonal structure H (sH). In contrast, only one naturally occurring silica clathrate mineral, melanophlogite (sI-type framework), has been found to date. Here, we report the discovery of two new silica clathrate minerals that are isostructural with sII and sH hydrates and contain hydrocarbon gases. Geological and mineralogical observations show that these silica clathrate minerals are traces of low-temperature hydrothermal systems at convergent plate margins, which are the sources of thermogenic natural gas hydrates. Given the widespread occurrence of submarine hydrocarbon seeps, silica clathrate minerals are likely to be found in a wide range of marine sediments.

  14. Direct visualization of protease action on collagen triple helical structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Rosenblum

    Full Text Available Enzymatic processing of extracellular matrix (ECM macromolecules by matrix metalloproteases (MMPs is crucial in mediating physiological and pathological cell processes. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to effective physiological enzyme-ECM interactions remain elusive. Only scant information is available on the mode by which matrix proteases degrade ECM substrates. An example is the enzymatic degradation of triple helical collagen II fragments, generated by the collagenase MMP-8 cleavage, during the course of acute inflammatory conditions by gelatinase B/MMP-9. As is the case for many other matrix proteases, it is not clear how MMP-9 recognizes, binds and digests collagen in this important physiological process. We used single molecule imaging to directly visualize this protease during its interaction with collagen fragments. We show that the initial binding is mediated by the diffusion of the protease along the ordered helix on the collagen (3/4 fragment, with preferential binding of the collagen tail. As the reaction progressed and prior to collagen degradation, gelatin-like morphologies resulting from the denaturation of the triple helical collagen were observed. Remarkably, this activity was independent of enzyme proteolysis and was accompanied by significant conformational changes of the working protease. Here we provide the first direct visualization of highly complex mechanisms of macromolecular interactions governing the enzymatic processing of ECM substrates by physiological protease.

  15. Hydrates fighting tools; Des outils de lutte contre les hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2003-04-01

    Shell Exploration and Production company (SEPCo) is the operator of the 'Popeye' deep offshore field in the Gulf of Mexico. Thanks to the introduction of a low dosing hydrates inhibitor (LDHI) elaborated by Shell Global Solutions, the company has added a 7.5 Gpc extra volume of gas to its recoverable reserves. This new technology avoids the plugging of pipes by hydrates formation. (J.S.)

  16. Synthesis of type III collagen by fibroblasts from the embryonic chick cornea

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Synthesis of collagen types I, II, III, and IV in cells from the embryonic chick cornea was studied using specific antibodies and immunofluorescence. Synthesis of radioactively labeled collagen types I and III was followed by fluorographic detection of cyanogen bromide peptides on polyacrylamide slab gels and by carboxymethylcellulose chromatography followed by disc gel electrophoresis. Type III collagen had been detected previously by indirect immunofluorescence in the corneal epithelial cel...

  17. Matricryptins derived from collagens and proteoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Ballut, Lionel

    2011-01-01

    Controlled proteolysis of extracellular matrix components releases bioactive fragments or unmasks cryptic sites that play key roles in controlling various physio-pathological processes including angiogenesis, tissue remodeling, wound healing, inflammation, tumor growth, and metastasis. We review here the structure and mechanisms of release of i) the proteolytic fragments (matricryptins) cleaved from collagens, proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans, and ii) the matricryptic sites existing in these molecules. The cell surface receptors and the signaling pathways they trigger to exert their biological activities is discussed with the major physio-pathological processes they control. Their involvement in autoimmune and inherited diseases is reported. Most matricryptins issued from collagens, proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans exhibit anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor properties and their use as potential drugs and as potential disease markers is discussed. Perspectives for identifying the common structural features, if any, of the matricryptins and their use in combination with chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer are presented.

  18. Structural changes in cartilage and collagen studied by high temperature Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Mark; Spencer, Nicholas; Dudhia, Jayesh; McMillan, Paul F

    2017-02-22

    Understanding the high temperature behavior of collagen and collagenous tissue is important for surgical procedures and biomaterials processing for the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. One primary event for proteins is thermal denaturation that involves unfolding the polypeptide chains while maintaining the primary structure intact. Collagen in the extracellular matrix of cartilage and other connective tissue is a hierarchical material containing bundles of triple-helical fibers associated with water and proteoglycan components. Thermal analysis of dehydrated collagen indicates irreversible denaturation at high temperature between 135-200°C, with another reversible event at ∼60-80°C for hydrated samples. We report high temperature Raman spectra for freeze-dried cartilage samples that show an increase in laser-excited fluorescence interpreted as conformational changes associated with denaturation above 140°C. Spectra for separated collagen and proteoglycan fractions extracted from cartilage indicate the changes are associated with collagen. The Raman data also show appearance of new features indicating peptide bond hydrolysis at high temperature implying that molecular H2 O is retained within the freeze-dried tissue. This is confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis that show 5-7 wt% H2 O remaining within freeze-dried cartilage that is released progressively upon heating up to 200°C. Spectra obtained after exposure to high temperature and re-hydration following recovery indicate that the capacity of the denatured collagen to re-absorb water is reduced. Our results are important for revealing the presence of bound H2 O within the collagen component of connective tissue even after freeze-drying and its role in denaturation that is accompanied by or perhaps preceded by breakdown of the primary polypeptide structure. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Obsidian Hydration: A New Paleothermometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Riciputi, Lee R [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Fayek, Mostafa [ORNL; Elam, J. Michael [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2006-01-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  20. Obsidian hydration: A new paleothermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Riciputi, Lee R.; Cole, David R.; Fayek, Mostafa; Elam, J. Michael

    2006-07-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  1. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  2. Characterization of high affinity binding motifs for the discoidin domain receptor DDR2 in collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konitsiotis, Antonios D; Raynal, Nicolas; Bihan, Dominique; Hohenester, Erhard; Farndale, Richard W; Leitinger, Birgit

    2008-03-14

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, are receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by native triple-helical collagen. Here we have located three specific DDR2 binding sites by screening the entire triple-helical domain of collagen II, using the Collagen II Toolkit, a set of overlapping triple-helical peptides. The peptide sequence that bound DDR2 with highest affinity interestingly contained the sequence for the high affinity binding site for von Willebrand factor in collagen III. Focusing on this sequence, we used a set of truncated and alanine-substituted peptides to characterize the sequence GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) as the minimal collagen sequence required for DDR2 binding. Based on a recent NMR analysis of the DDR2 collagen binding domain, we generated a model of the DDR2-collagen interaction that explains why a triple-helical conformation is required for binding. Triple-helical peptides comprising the DDR2 binding motif not only inhibited DDR2 binding to collagen II but also activated DDR2 transmembrane signaling. Thus, DDR2 activation may be effected by single triple-helices rather than fibrillar collagen.

  3. Primary hepatocyte culture in collagen gel mixture and collagen sandwich

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Jie Wang; Hong-Ling Liu; Hai-Tao Guo; Hong-Wei Wen; Jun Liu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the methods of hepatocytes culture in a collagen gel mixture or between double layers of collagen sandwich configuration and to examine the functional and cytomorphological characteristics of cultured hepatocytes.METHODS: A two-step collagenase perfusion technique was used to isolate the hepatocytes from Wistar rats or newborn Chinese experimental piglets. The isolated hepatocytes were cultured in a collagen gel mixture or between double layers of collagen sandwich configuration respectively. The former was that rat hepatocytes were mixed with type I rat tail collagen solution till gelled, and the medium was added onto the gel. The latter was that swine hepatocytes were seeded on a plate precoated with collagen gel for 24 h, then another layer of collagen gel was overlaid, resulting in a sandwich configuration. The cytomorphological characteristics, albumin secretion, and LDH-release of the hepatocytes cultured in these two models were examined.RESULTS: Freshly isolated rat hepatocytes were successfully mixed and fixed in collagen gel, and cultured in the gel condition. During the culture period, the urea synthesized and secreted by rat hepatocytes was detected throughout the period. Likewise, newborn experimental piglet hepatocytes were successfully fixed between the double layers of collagen gel, forming a sandwich configuration.Within a week of culture, the albumin secreted by swine hepatocytes was detected by SDS/PAGE analysis. The typical cytomorphological characteristics of the hepatocytes cultured by the above two culture models were found under a phasecontrast microscope. There was little LDH-release during the culture period.CONCLUSION: Both collagen gel mixture and double layers of collagen sandwich configuration can provide cultural conditions much closer to in vivoenvironment, and are helpful for maintaining specific hepatic fiJnctions and cytomorphological characteristics. A collagen gel mixture culture may be more eligible for the

  4. Structural properties of pepsin-solubilized collagen acylated by lauroyl chloride along with succinic anhydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Conghu; Tian, Zhenhua; Liu, Wentao; Li, Guoying

    2015-10-01

    The structural properties of pepsin-solubilized calf skin collagen acylated by lauroyl chloride along with succinic anhydride were investigated in this paper. Compared with native collagen, acylated collagen retained the unique triple helix conformation, as determined by amino acid analysis, circular dichroism and X-ray diffraction. Meanwhile, the thermostability of acylated collagen using thermogravimetric measurements was enhanced as the residual weight increased by 5%. With the temperature increased from 25 to 115 °C, the secondary structure of native and acylated collagens using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements was destroyed since the intensity of the major amide bands decreased and the positions of the major amide bands shifted to lower wavenumber, respectively. Meanwhile, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy revealed that the most sensitive bands for acylated and native collagens were amide I and II bands, respectively. Additionally, the corresponding order of the groups between native and acylated collagens was different and the correlation degree for acylated collagen was weaker than that of native collagen, suggesting that temperature played a small influence on the conformation of acylated collagen, which might be concluded that the hydrophobic interaction improved the thermostability of collagen.

  5. Storing natural gas as frozen hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudmundsson, J.S.; Khokhar, A.A. (Univ. of Trondheim (Norway)); Parlaktuna, M. (Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey))

    1994-02-01

    The formation of natural gas hydrates is a well-known problem in the petroleum and natural gas industries. Hydrates are solid materials that form when liquid water and natural gas are brought in contact under pressure. Hydrate formation need not be a problem. On the contrary, it can be an advantage. The volume of hydrates is much less than that of natural gas. At standard conditions, hydrates occupy 150 to 170 times less volume than the corresponding gas. Typically, natural gas hydrates contain 15% gas and 85% water by mass. It follows that hydrates can be used for large-scale storage of natural gas. Benesh proposed using hydrates to improve the load factor of natural gas supply systems. The author suggested that hydrates could be produced by bringing liquid water into contact with natural gas at the appropriate temperature and high pressure. The hydrate then would be stored at a temperature and pressure where it was stable. When gas was needed for the supply system, the hydrate would be melted at low pressure. The stability of a natural gas hydrate during storage at atmospheric pressure and below-freezing temperatures was studied in the laboratory. The gas hydrate was produced in a stirred vessel at 2- to 6-MPa pressure and temperatures from 0 to 20 C. The hydrate was refrigerated and stored in deep freezers at [minus]5, [minus]10, and [minus]18 C for up to 10 days. The natural gas hydrate remained stable when kept frozen at atmospheric pressure.

  6. UV damage of collagen: insights from model collagen peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jariashvili, Ketevan; Madhan, Balaraman; Brodsky, Barbara; Kuchava, Ana; Namicheishvili, Louisa; Metreveli, Nunu

    2012-03-01

    Fibrils of Type I collagen in the skin are exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light and there have been claims that collagen photo-degradation leads to wrinkles and may contribute to skin cancers. To understand the effects of UV radiation on collagen, Type I collagen solutions were exposed to the UV-C wavelength of 254 nm for defined lengths of time at 4°C. Circular dichroism (CD) experiments show that irradiation of collagen leads to high loss of triple helical content with a new lower thermal stability peak and SDS-gel electrophoresis indicates breakdown of collagen chains. To better define the effects of UV radiation on the collagen triple-helix, the studies were extended to peptides which model the collagen sequence and conformation. CD studies showed irradiation for days led to lower magnitudes of the triple-helix maximum at 225 nm and lower thermal stabilities for two peptides containing multiple Gly-Pro-Hyp triplets. In contrast, the highest radiation exposure led to little change in the T(m) values of (Gly-Pro-Pro)(10) and (Ala-Hyp-Gly)(10) , although (Gly-Pro-Pro)(10) did show a significant decrease in triple helix intensity. Mass spectroscopy indicated preferential cleavage sites within the peptides, and identification of some of the most susceptible sites of cleavage. The effect of radiation on these well defined peptides gives insight into the sequence and conformational specificity of photo-degradation of collagen.

  7. Shining light on collagen: expressing collagen in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Barbara; Kaplan, David L

    2013-07-01

    Collagens are a remarkable group of proteins that are critical from a physiological perspective due to their diverse and versatile functions in vivo. However, collagens are challenging to generate ex vivo for biomaterials or regenerative medicine due to their complex processing and assembly into functional materials. Therefore, collagen availability remains a major unmet need for biomaterials, as relatively limited supplies of the protein in pure form are available mainly through harvesting bovine tissues. This animal source, subsequent to purification, remains associated with significant safety concerns due to the potential carryover of animal-derived diseases. Other more limited sources of animal collagens are also commercially available, as well as collagens generated in heterologous hosts; however, the challenge to these sources remains both economic and structural. The need for new safe sources of collagens remains high, with a significant potential impact in areas of medicine when considering the opportunity to mimic native collagen features. The articles in this issue of the journal focus on plant-derived collagens to address some of these needs. Progress toward plant production of collagens, the ability to self-assemble these recombinant proteins into higher-order structures, and the utility of these materials in various medical applications suggest an important path forward for the field.

  8. Mechanism of gypsum hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco, G.

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an hypothesis that the mechanism o f gypsum hydration and dehydration is performed through two simultaneous phenomena. In this study we try to clear up this phenomenon using chlorides as accelerators or a mixture of ethanol-methanol as retarders to carry out the gypsum setting. Natural Mexican gypsum samples and a hemihydrate prepared in the laboratory are used. The following analytical techniques are used: MO, DRX, DTA, TG and DTG. In agreement with the obtained results, it can be concluded: that colloid formation depends on the action of accelerators or retarders and the crystals are a consequence of the quantity of hemihydrate formed.

    En el mecanismo de hidratación y deshidratación del yeso existe la hipótesis de que éste se efectúa por dos fenómenos simultáneos. Este estudio intenta esclarecer estos fenómenos, empleando: cloruros como aceleradores o mezcla etanol-metanol como retardadores para efectuar el fraguado del yeso. Se emplean muestras de yeso de origen natural mexicano y hemihydrate preparado en laboratorio; se utilizan técnicas analíticas: MO, DRX, DTA, TG y DTG. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos se puede deducir: que la formación del coloide depende de la acción de los agentes aceleradores o retardadores y que los cristales son consecuencia de la cantidad de hemihidrato formado.

  9. Interleukin 17 induces cartilage collagen breakdown: novel synergistic effects in combination with proinflammatory cytokines

    OpenAIRE

    Koshy, P.; Henderson, N; Logan, C.; Life, P; Cawston, T; Rowan, A

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether interleukin 17 (IL17), derived specifically from T cells, can promote type II collagen release from cartilage. The ability of IL17 to synergise with other proinflammatory mediators to induce collagen release from cartilage, and what effect anti-inflammatory agents had on this process, was also assessed.

  10. Oxidative damage to collagen and related substrates by metal ion/hydrogen peroxide systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawkins, C L; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1997-01-01

    . In this study electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with spin trapping has been used to identify radicals formed on collagen and related materials by metal ion-H2O2 mixtures. Attack of the hydroxyl radical, from a Fe(II)-H2O2 redox couple, on collagen peptides gave signals from both side chain (.CHR...

  11. Hydration and radiation effects on the residual stress state of cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Patrick K M; Mudie, Stephen; Daniels, John E

    2013-12-01

    The change in the biaxial residual stress state of hydroxyapatite crystals and collagen fibrillar structure in sections of bovine cortical bone has been investigated as a function of dehydration and radiation dose using combined small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering. It is shown that dehydration of the bone has a pronounced effect on the residual stress state of the crystalline phase, while the impact of radiation damage alone is less dramatic. In the initial hydrated state, a biaxial compressive stress of approximately -150 MPa along the bone axis exists in the hydroxyapatite crystals. As water evaporates from the bone material, the stress state moves to a tensile state of approximately 100 MPa. The collagen fibrillar structure is initially in a tensile residual stress state when the bone is hydrated and the state increases in magnitude slightly with dehydration. Radiation dose in continually hydrated samples also reduces the initial biaxial compressive stress magnitude in the hydroxyapatite phase; however, the stress remains compressive. Radiation exposure alone does not appear to affect the stress state of the collagen fibrillar structure.

  12. Arterial calcification: Conscripted by collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jordan D.

    2016-03-01

    In atherosclerotic plaques, patterns of calcification -- which have profound implications for plaque stability and vulnerability to rupture -- are determined by the collagen's content and patterning throughout the plaque.

  13. Mechanism of stabilization of a bacterial collagen triple helix in the absence of hydroxyproline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohs, Angela; Silva, Teresita; Yoshida, Takeshi; Amin, Ravish; Lukomski, Slawomir; Inouye, Masayori; Brodsky, Barbara

    2007-10-12

    The Streptococcus pyogenes cell-surface protein Scl2 contains a globular N-terminal domain and a collagen-like domain, (Gly-Xaa-X'aa)(79), which forms a triple helix with a thermal stability close to that seen for mammalian collagens. Hyp is a major contributor to triple-helix stability in animal collagens, but is not present in bacteria, which lack prolyl hydroxylase. To explore the basis of bacterial collagen triple-helix stability in the absence of Hyp, biophysical studies were carried out on recombinant Scl2 protein, the isolated collagen-like domain from Scl2, and a set of peptides modeling the Scl2 highly charged repetitive (Gly-Xaa-X'aa)(n) sequences. At pH 7, CD spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and differential scanning calorimetry of the Scl2 protein all showed a very sharp thermal transition near 36 degrees C, indicating a highly cooperative unfolding of both the globular and triple-helix domains. The collagen-like domain isolated by trypsin digestion showed a sharp transition at the same temperature, with an enthalpy of 12.5 kJ/mol of tripeptide. At low pH, Scl2 and its isolated collagen-like domain showed substantial destabilization from the neutral pH value, with two thermal transitions at 24 and 27 degrees C. A similar destabilization at low pH was seen for Scl2 charged model peptides, and the degree of destabilization was consistent with the strong pH dependence arising from the GKD tripeptide unit. The Scl2 protein contained twice as much charge as human fibril-forming collagens, and the degree of electrostatic stabilization observed for Scl2 was similar to the contribution Hyp makes to the stability of mammalian collagens. The high enthalpic contribution to the stability of the Scl2 collagenous domain supports the presence of a hydration network in the absence of Hyp.

  14. Tetrahydrofuran hydrate decomposition characteristics in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongchen; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Shenglong; Zhao, Jiafei; Yang, Mingjun

    2016-12-01

    Many tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate properties are similar to those of gas hydrates. In the present work THF hydrate dissociation in four types of porous media is studied. THF solution was cooled to 275.15 K with formation of the hydrate under ambient pressure, and then it dissociated under ambient conditions. THF hydrate dissociation experiments in each porous medium were conducted three times. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to obtain images. Decomposition time, THF hydrate saturation and MRI mean intensity (MI) were measured and analyzed. The experimental results showed that the hydrate decomposition time in BZ-4 and BZ-3 was similar and longer than that in BZ-02. In each dissociation process, the hydrate decomposition time of the second and third cycles was shorter than that of the first cycle in BZ-4, BZ-3, and BZ-02. The relationship between THF hydrate saturation and time is almost linear.

  15. Fourier transform infrared imaging and infrared fiber optic probe spectroscopy identify collagen type in connective tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Hanifi

    Full Text Available Hyaline cartilage and mechanically inferior fibrocartilage consisting of mixed collagen types are frequently found together in repairing articular cartilage. The present study seeks to develop methodology to identify collagen type and other tissue components using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectral evaluation of matrix composition in combination with multivariate analyses. FTIR spectra of the primary molecular components of repair cartilage, types I and II collagen, and aggrecan, were used to develop multivariate spectral models for discrimination of the matrix components of the tissues of interest. Infrared imaging data were collected from bovine bone, tendon, normal cartilage, meniscus and human repair cartilage tissues, and composition predicted using partial least squares analyses. Histology and immunohistochemistry results were used as standards for validation. Infrared fiber optic probe spectral data were also obtained from meniscus (a tissue with mixed collagen types to evaluate the potential of this method for identification of collagen type in a minimally-invasive clinical application. Concentration profiles of the tissue components obtained from multivariate analysis were in excellent agreement with histology and immunohistochemistry results. Bone and tendon showed a uniform distribution of predominantly type I collagen through the tissue. Normal cartilage showed a distribution of type II collagen and proteoglycan similar to the known composition, while in repair cartilage, the spectral distribution of both types I and II collagen were similar to that observed via immunohistochemistry. Using the probe, the outer and inner regions of the meniscus were shown to be primarily composed of type I and II collagen, respectively, in accordance with immunohistochemistry data. In summary, multivariate analysis of infrared spectra can indeed be used to differentiate collagen type I and type II, even in the presence of proteoglycan, in

  16. A Novel Approach to Stimulate Cartilage Repair: Targeting Collagen Turnover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.M. Bastiaansen-Jenniskens (Yvonne)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOA is a complex disease of which the ethiopathology is not completely known and therapies to repair cartilage are still under investigation. The increase of collagen type II expression in osteoarthritic cartilage suggests an activated repair mechanism that is however ineffective in

  17. A Novel Approach to Stimulate Cartilage Repair: Targeting Collagen Turnover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.M. Bastiaansen-Jenniskens (Yvonne)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOA is a complex disease of which the ethiopathology is not completely known and therapies to repair cartilage are still under investigation. The increase of collagen type II expression in osteoarthritic cartilage suggests an activated repair mechanism that is however ineffective in repai

  18. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.;

    1999-01-01

    Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations...... and experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6...

  19. Progress of Gas Hydrate Studies in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊栓狮; 汪集旸

    2006-01-01

    A brief overview is given on the gas hydrate-related research activities carried out by Chinese researchers in the past 15 years. The content involves: (1) Historical review. Introducing the gas hydrate research history in China; (2) Gas hydrate research groups in China. There are nearly 20 groups engaged in gas hydrate research now; (3) Present studies.Including fundamental studies, status of the exploration of natural gas hydrate resources in the South China Sea region, and development of hydrate-based new techniques; (4) Future development.

  20. Hydration of fly ash cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etsuo Sakai; Shigeyoshi Miyahara; Shigenari Ohsawa; Seung-Heun Lee; Masaki Daimon [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Graduate School of Science and Engineering

    2005-06-01

    It is necessary to establish the material design system for the utilization of large amounts of fly ash as blended cement instead of disposing of it as a waste. Cement blended with fly ash is also required as a countermeasure to reduce the amount of CO{sub 2} generation. In this study, the influences of the glass content and the basicity of glass phase on the hydration of fly ash cement were clarified and hydration over a long curing time was characterized. Two kinds of fly ash with different glass content, one with 38.2% and another with 76.6%, were used. The hydration ratio of fly ash was increased by increasing the glass content in fly ash in the specimens cured for 270 days. When the glass content of fly ash is low, the basicity of glass phase tends to decrease. Reactivity of fly ash is controlled by the basicity of the glass phase in fly ash during a period from 28 to 270 days. However, at an age of 360 days, the reaction ratios of fly ash show almost identical values with different glass contents. Fly ash also affected the hydration of cement clinker minerals in fly ash cement. While the hydration of alite was accelerated, that of belite was retarded at a late stage.

  1. Separation of SF6 from gas mixtures using gas hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Inuk; Lee, Seungmin; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Gang-woo; Seo, Yongwon

    2010-08-15

    This study aims to examine the thermodynamic feasibility of separating sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)), which is widely used in various industrial fields and is one of the most potent greenhouse gases, from gas mixtures using gas hydrate formation. The key process variables of hydrate phase equilibria, pressure-composition diagram, formation kinetics, and structure identification of the mixed gas hydrates, were closely investigated to verify the overall concept of this hydrate-based SF(6) separation process. The three-phase equilibria of hydrate (H), liquid water (L(W)), and vapor (V) for the binary SF(6) + water mixture and for the ternary N(2) + SF(6) + water mixtures with various SF(6) vapor compositions (10, 30, 50, and 70%) were experimentally measured to determine the stability regions and formation conditions of pure and mixed hydrates. The pressure-composition diagram at two different temperatures of 276.15 and 281.15 K was obtained to investigate the actual SF(6) separation efficiency. The vapor phase composition change was monitored during gas hydrate formation to confirm the formation pattern and time needed to reach a state of equilibrium. Furthermore, the structure of the mixed N(2) + SF(6) hydrate was confirmed to be structure II via Raman spectroscopy. Through close examination of the overall experimental results, it was clearly verified that highly concentrated SF(6) can be separated from gas mixtures at mild temperatures and low pressure conditions.

  2. Quantification of collagen distributions in rat hyaline and fibro cartilages based on second harmonic generation imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoqin; Liao, Chenxi; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Liu, Wenge; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    Hyaline cartilage is a semitransparent tissue composed of proteoglycan and thicker type II collagen fibers, while fibro cartilage large bundles of type I collagen besides other territorial matrix and chondrocytes. It is reported that the meniscus (fibro cartilage) has a greater capacity to regenerate and close a wound compared to articular cartilage (hyaline cartilage). And fibro cartilage often replaces the type II collagen-rich hyaline following trauma, leading to scar tissue that is composed of rigid type I collagen. The visualization and quantification of the collagen fibrillar meshwork is important for understanding the role of fibril reorganization during the healing process and how different types of cartilage contribute to wound closure. In this study, second harmonic generation (SHG) microscope was applied to image the articular and meniscus cartilage, and textural analysis were developed to quantify the collagen distribution. High-resolution images were achieved based on the SHG signal from collagen within fresh specimens, and detailed observations of tissue morphology and microstructural distribution were obtained without shrinkage or distortion. Textural analysis of SHG images was performed to confirm that collagen in fibrocartilage showed significantly coarser compared to collagen in hyaline cartilage (p imaging degenerative tissues or assessing wound repair following cartilage injury.

  3. Comparison of stromal hydration techniques for clear corneal cataract incisions: conventional hydration versus anterior stromal pocket hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifflin, Mark D; Kinard, Krista; Neuffer, Marcus C

    2012-06-01

    Anterior stromal pocket hydration was compared with conventional hydration for preventing wound leak after 2.8 mm uniplanar clear corneal incisions (CCIs) in patients having routine cataract surgery. Conventional hydration involves hydration of the lateral walls of the main incision with visible whitening of the stroma. The anterior stromal pocket hydration technique involves creation of an additional supraincisional stromal pocket overlying the main incision, which is then hydrated instead of the main incision. Sixty-six eyes of 48 patients were included in the data analysis with 33 assigned to each study group. The anterior stromal pocket hydration technique was significantly better than conventional hydration in preventing wound leak due to direct pressure on the posterior lip of the incision. Copyright © 2012 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Temperature-dependent FTIR spectra of collagen and protective effect of partially hydrolysed fucoidan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielesz, Anna

    2014-01-01

    FTIR spectra of collagen (PC) and partially hydrolysed fucoidan (PHF) incorporated into collagen films were investigated at different temperatures between 20 °C and 100 °C. Changes within the bands of amide I, amide II and amide III may indicate stabilization of collagen by hydrogen bonds during its interaction with partially hydrolysed fucoidan. Spectroscopic studies revealed that partially hydrolysed fucoidan was bound to the collagen without affecting its triple helicity. Interactions of fucoidan with H2SO4 (mild acid hydrolysis), leading to changes of the sulphated band positions in the 800-590 cm-1 region of IR spectra were observed. The effect of partially hydrolysed fucoidan on glucose-mediated collagen glycation and cross-linking of proteins in vitro was evaluated. It was observed that partially hydrolysed fucoidan incorporated into collagen films can be used as therapeutically active biomaterials that speed up the process of wound healing and may increase the anticancer activity of fucoidan.

  5. Binding of Clostridium perfringens to collagen correlates with the ability to cause necrotic enteritis in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, B; Keyburn, A L; Seemann, T; Rood, J I; Moore, R J

    2015-11-18

    This study investigated the ability of Clostridium perfringens isolates derived from chickens to bind to collagen types I-V and gelatin. In total 21 strains from three distinct backgrounds were studied: (i) virulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis, (ii) avirulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis and (iii) strains isolated from healthy birds. All strains isolated from diseased birds had been assessed for virulence in a disease induction model. The virulent isolates all displayed collagen binding ability. However, most strains in the other two classes showed negligible binding to collagen. The prevalence of a previously described C. perfringens putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene was investigated by PCR screening. It was found that five of the strains carried the putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene and that all of these strains were virulent isolates. Based on these studies it is postulated that collagen adhesion may play a role in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis.

  6. Temperature-dependent FTIR spectra of collagen and protective effect of partially hydrolysed fucoidan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielesz, Anna

    2014-01-24

    FTIR spectra of collagen (PC) and partially hydrolysed fucoidan (PHF) incorporated into collagen films were investigated at different temperatures between 20°C and 100°C. Changes within the bands of amide I, amide II and amide III may indicate stabilization of collagen by hydrogen bonds during its interaction with partially hydrolysed fucoidan. Spectroscopic studies revealed that partially hydrolysed fucoidan was bound to the collagen without affecting its triple helicity. Interactions of fucoidan with H2SO4 (mild acid hydrolysis), leading to changes of the sulphated band positions in the 800-590 cm(-1) region of IR spectra were observed. The effect of partially hydrolysed fucoidan on glucose-mediated collagen glycation and cross-linking of proteins in vitro was evaluated. It was observed that partially hydrolysed fucoidan incorporated into collagen films can be used as therapeutically active biomaterials that speed up the process of wound healing and may increase the anticancer activity of fucoidan.

  7. Temperature dependence of polyhedral cage volumes in clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakoumakos, B.C.; Rawn, C.J.; Rondinone, A.J.; Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Ishii, Y.; Jones, C.Y.; Toby, B.H.

    2003-01-01

    The polyhedral cage volumes of structure I (sI) (carbon dioxide, methane, trimethylene oxide) and structure II (sII) (methane-ethane, propane, tetrahydrofuran, trimethylene oxide) hydrates are computed from atomic positions determined from neutron powder-diffraction data. The ideal structural formulas for sI and sII are, respectively, S2L6 ?? 46H2O and S16L???8 ?? 136H2O, where S denotes a polyhedral cage with 20 vertices, L a 24-cage, and L??? a 28-cage. The space-filling polyhedral cages are defined by the oxygen atoms of the hydrogen-bonded network of water molecules. Collectively, the mean cage volume ratio is 1.91 : 1.43 : 1 for the 28-cage : 24-cage : 20-cage, which correspond to equivalent sphere radii of 4.18, 3.79, and 3.37 A??, respectively. At 100 K, mean polyhedral volumes are 303.8, 227.8, and 158.8 A??3 for the 28-cage, 24-cage, and 20-cage, respectively. In general, the 20-cage volume for a sII is larger than that of a sI, although trimethylene oxide is an exception. The temperature dependence of the cage volumes reveals differences between apparently similar cages with similar occupants. In the case of trimethylene oxide hydrate, which forms both sI and sII, the 20-cages common to both structures contract quite differently. From 220 K, the sII 20-cage exhibits a smooth monotonic reduction in size, whereas the sI 20-cage initially expands upon cooling to 160 K, then contracts more rapidly to 10 K, and overall the sI 20-cage is larger than the sII 20-cage. The volumes of the large cages in both structures contract monotonically with decreasing temperature. These differences reflect reoriented motion of the trimethyelene oxide molecule in the 24-cage of sI, consistent with previous spectroscopic and calorimetric studies. For the 20-cages in methane hydrate (sI) and a mixed methane-ethane hydrate (sII), both containing methane as the guest molecule, the temperature dependence of the 20-cage volume in sII is much less than that in sI, but sII is overall

  8. Collagen Conduit Versus Microsurgical Neurorrhaphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel; Sørensen, Allan Ibsen; Viñeta, Joaquin Fores

    2013-01-01

    To compare repair of acute lacerations of mixed sensory-motor nerves in humans using a collagen tube versus conventional repair.......To compare repair of acute lacerations of mixed sensory-motor nerves in humans using a collagen tube versus conventional repair....

  9. Collagen for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ana Marina; Gentile, Piergiorgio; Chiono, Valeria; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2012-09-01

    In the last decades, increased knowledge about the organization, structure and properties of collagen (particularly concerning interactions between cells and collagen-based materials) has inspired scientists and engineers to design innovative collagen-based biomaterials and to develop novel tissue-engineering products. The design of resorbable collagen-based medical implants requires understanding the tissue/organ anatomy and biological function as well as the role of collagen's physicochemical properties and structure in tissue/organ regeneration. Bone is a complex tissue that plays a critical role in diverse metabolic processes mediated by calcium delivery as well as in hematopoiesis whilst maintaining skeleton strength. A wide variety of collagen-based scaffolds have been proposed for different tissue engineering applications. These scaffolds are designed to promote a biological response, such as cell interaction, and to work as artificial biomimetic extracellular matrices that guide tissue regeneration. This paper critically reviews the current understanding of the complex hierarchical structure and properties of native collagen molecules, and describes the scientific challenge of manufacturing collagen-based materials with suitable properties and shapes for specific biomedical applications, with special emphasis on bone tissue engineering. The analysis of the state of the art in the field reveals the presence of innovative techniques for scaffold and material manufacturing that are currently opening the way to the preparation of biomimetic substrates that modulate cell interaction for improved substitution, restoration, retention or enhancement of bone tissue function.

  10. Gas hydrates forming and decomposition conditions analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Павленко

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of gas hydrates has been defined; their brief description has been given; factors that affect the formation and decomposition of the hydrates have been reported; their distribution, structure and thermodynamic conditions determining the gas hydrates formation disposition in gas pipelines have been considered. Advantages and disadvantages of the known methods for removing gas hydrate plugs in the pipeline have been analyzed, the necessity of their further studies has been proved. In addition to the negative impact on the process of gas extraction, the hydrates properties make it possible to outline the following possible fields of their industrial use: obtaining ultrahigh pressures in confined spaces at the hydrate decomposition; separating hydrocarbon mixtures by successive transfer of individual components through the hydrate given the mode; obtaining cold due to heat absorption at the hydrate decomposition; elimination of the open gas fountain by means of hydrate plugs in the bore hole of the gushing gasser; seawater desalination, based on the hydrate ability to only bind water molecules into the solid state; wastewater purification; gas storage in the hydrate state; dispersion of high temperature fog and clouds by means of hydrates; water-hydrates emulsion injection into the productive strata to raise the oil recovery factor; obtaining cold in the gas processing to cool the gas, etc.

  11. Variation in the helical structure of native collagen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P R O Orgel

    Full Text Available The structure of collagen has been a matter of curiosity, investigation, and debate for the better part of a century. There has been a particularly productive period recently, during which much progress has been made in better describing all aspects of collagen structure. However, there remain some questions regarding its helical symmetry and its persistence within the triple-helix. Previous considerations of this symmetry have sometimes confused the picture by not fully recognizing that collagen structure is a highly complex and large hierarchical entity, and this affects and is effected by the super-coiled molecules that make it. Nevertheless, the symmetry question is not trite, but of some significance as it relates to extracellular matrix organization and cellular integration. The correlation between helical structure in the context of the molecular packing arrangement determines which parts of the amino acid sequence of the collagen fibril are buried or accessible to the extracellular matrix or the cell. In this study, we concentrate primarily on the triple-helical structure of fibrillar collagens I and II, the two most predominant types. By comparing X-ray diffraction data collected from type I and type II containing tissues, we point to evidence for a range of triple-helical symmetries being extant in the molecules native environment. The possible significance of helical instability, local helix dissociation and molecular packing of the triple-helices is discussed in the context of collagen's supramolecular organization, all of which must affect the symmetry of the collagen triple-helix.

  12. Influence of functionalized nanoparticles on conformational stability of type I collagen for possible biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandamchira, Aswathy; Selvam, Sangeetha; Marimuthu, Nidhin; Janardhanan, Sreeram Kalarical; Fathima, Nishter Nishad

    2013-12-01

    Collagen-nanoparticle interactions are vital for many biomedical applications including drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. Iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized using starch template according to our earlier reported procedures were functionalized by treating them with Gum Arabic (GA), a biocompatible polysaccharide, so as to enhance the interaction between nanoparticle surfaces and collagen. Viscosity, circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques have been used to study the collagen-nanoparticle interactions. The relative viscosity for collagen-nanoparticle conjugate was found to increase with increase in concentration of the nanoparticle within the concentration range investigated, which is due to the aggregation of protein onto the surface of nanoparticle. The CD spectra for the collagen-nanoparticle at different concentration ratios do not have much variation in the Rpn values (ratio of positive peak intensity over negative peak intensity) after functionalization with GA. The variation of molar ellipticity values for collagen-nanoparticle is due to the glycoprotein present in GA. The collagen triple helical structure is maintained after interaction with nanoparticles. The FTIR spectra of native collagen, Coll-Fs (nanoparticle without functionalization) and Coll-FsG (nanoparticle functionalized with GA) show clearly the amide I, II, III bands, with respect to collagen. The ability of polysaccharide stabilized/functionalized nanoparticles to maintain the collagen properties would help in its biomedical applications.

  13. Phase behavior and hydration of silk fibroin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Sungkyun; Strey, Helmut H; Gido, Samuel P

    2004-01-01

    The osmotic stress method was applied to study the thermodynamics of supramolecular self-assembly phenomena in crystallizable segments of Bombyx mori silkworm silk fibroin. By controlling compositions and phases of silk fibroin solution, the method provided a means for the direct investigation of microscopic and thermodynamic details of these intermolecular interactions in aqueous media. It is apparent that as osmotic pressure increases, silk fibroin molecules are crowded together to form silk I structure and then with further increase in osmotic pressure become an antiparallel beta-sheet structure, silk II. A partial ternary phase diagram of water-silk fibroin-LiBr was constructed based on the results. The results provide quantitative evidence that the silk I structure must contain water of hydration. The enhanced control over structure and phase behavior using osmotic stress, as embodied in the phase diagram, could potentially be utilized to design a new route for water-based wet spinning of regenerated silk fibroin.

  14. The effects of urea and n-propanol on collagen denaturation: using DSC, circular dicroism and viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usha, R.; Ramasami, T

    2004-01-30

    The effect of urea and n-propanol on circular dichroism (CD) and viscosity of purified type1 collagen solution at various temperatures and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) of rat-tail tendon (RTT) collagen fibre have been studied. CD reveals a spectrum with a positive peak at around 220 nm and a negative peak at 200 nm characteristics of collagen triple helix. The molar ellipticity decreases as the concentration of urea increases up to particular concentration (collagen solution treated with 265 {mu}M of urea) and after that it increases (collagen solution treated with 500 {mu}M of urea). There is a linear decrease in molar ellipticity as the concentration of n-propanol increases. Denaturation temperature of urea and n-propanol treated with purified collagen solution has been studied using viscosity method. Additives such as urea and n-propanol decrease the thermal stability of collagen triple helix in solution and in RTT collagen fibre. Thermal helix to coil transition of urea and n-propanol treated collagen depends on the degree of hydration and the concentration of these additives. Thermodynamic parameters such as the peak temperature, enthalpy of activation, and energy of activation for collagen-gelatin transition for native, urea and n-propanol treated RTT collagen fibre has been calculated using DSC. The change in the thermodynamic parameters has been observed for native, urea and n-propanol treated RTT collagen fibres. The experimental results show that the change in the water structure, dehydration and desolvation induced by different additives such as urea and n-propanol on RTT may vary with the type of denaturation.

  15. Hydration of highly charged ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Thomas S; Weiss, Alexander K H; Randolf, Bernhard R; Rode, Bernd M

    2011-08-01

    Based on a series of ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) simulations, the broad spectrum of structural and dynamical properties of hydrates of trivalent and tetravalent ions is presented, ranging from extreme inertness to immediate hydrolysis. Main group and transition metal ions representative for different parts of the periodic system are treated, as are 2 threefold negatively charged anions. The results show that simple predictions of the properties of the hydrates appear impossible and that an accurate quantum mechanical simulation in cooperation with sophisticated experimental investigations seems the only way to obtain conclusive results.

  16. Clathrate structure-type recognition: Application to hydrate nucleation and crystallisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauricella, Marco; Meloni, Simone; Liang, Shuai; English, Niall J; Kusalik, Peter G; Ciccotti, Giovanni

    2015-06-28

    For clathrate-hydrate polymorphic structure-type (sI versus sII), geometric recognition criteria have been developed and validated. These are applied to the study of the rich interplay and development of both sI and sII motifs in a variety of hydrate-nucleation events for methane and H2S hydrate studied by direct and enhanced-sampling molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In the case of nucleation of methane hydrate from enhanced-sampling simulation, we notice that already at the transition state, ∼80% of the enclathrated CH4 molecules are contained in a well-structured (sII) clathrate-like crystallite. For direct MD simulation of nucleation of H2S hydrate, some sI/sII polymorphic diversity was encountered, and it was found that a realistic dissipation of the nucleation energy (in view of non-equilibrium relaxation to either microcanonical (NVE) or isothermal-isobaric (NPT) distributions) is important to determine the relative propensity to form sI versus sII motifs.

  17. Great Market Potential of Hydrazine Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Yuying

    2007-01-01

    @@ Stable consumption growth worldwide Hydrazine hydrate is an organic chemical raw material with extensive applications. The world's capacity to produce hydrazine hydrate has reached more than 200 thousand t/atoday (based on 100% hydrazine content).

  18. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  19. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lina

    2017-05-13

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10 was conducted for tricalcium silicate (C3S) to interpret long-term hydration process and investigate the formation, structure and properties of C-S-H. Based on results from XRD, IR, SEM, NMR and so forth, loose and dense clusters of C-S-H with analogous C/S ratio were obtained along with the corresponding chemical formulae proposed as Ca5Si4O13∙6.2H2O. Crystalline structure inside C-S-H was observed by TEM, which was allocated at the foil-like proportion as well as the edge of wrinkles of the product. The long-term hydration process of C3S in dilute suspension could be sketchily described as migration of calcium hydroxide and in-situ growth of C-S-H with equilibrium silicon in aqueous solution relatively constant and calcium varied.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-30

    properties of key hydrated cement constituent calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) at the molecular, nanometer scale level. Due to complexity, still unknown...public release; distribution is unlimited. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate- Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure The views... Cement Molecular Structure Report Title Multi-scale modeling of complex material systems requires starting from fundamental building blocks to

  1. Different effects of 4-hydroxyproline and 4-fluoroproline on the stability of collagen triple helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Yoshinori; Uchiyama, Susumu; Doi, Masamitsu; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Nakazawa, Takashi; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2005-04-26

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses of a series of collagen model peptides suggest that 4-hydroxyproline (Hyp) and 4-fluoroproline (fPro) have different effects on the stability of the collagen triple helices according to the sequence of amino acids and stereochemistry at the 4 positions of these imino acids. The thermodynamic parameters indicate that the enhanced stabilities are classified into two different types: the enthalpy term is primarily responsible for the enhanced stability of the triple helix of (Pro-Hyp(R)-Gly)(10), whereas the entropy term dominates the enhanced stability of (Pro-fPro(R)-Gly)(10). The difference between the molecular volumes observed in solution and intrinsic molecular volumes calculated from the crystal structure indicates the different hydration states of these peptides. (Pro-Hyp(R)-Gly)(10) is highly hydrated compared to (Pro-Pro-Gly)(10), which contributes to the larger enthalpy. In contrast, the volume of (Pro-fPro(R)-Gly)(10) shows a smaller degree of hydration than that of (Pro-Pro-Gly)(10). The entropic cost of forming the triple helix of the fPro-containing peptides is compensated by a decrease in an ordered structure of water molecules surrounding the peptide molecule, although the contribution of enthalpy originating from the hydration is reduced. These arguments about the different contribution of entropic and enthalpic terms were successfully applied to interpret the stability of the triple helix of (fPro(S)-Pro-Gly)(10) as well.

  2. Hydration and Thermal Expansion in Anatase Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, He; Li, Qiang; Ren, Yang; Fan, Longlong; Chen, Jun; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2016-08-01

    A tunable thermal expansion is reported in nanosized anatase by taking advantage of surface hydration. The coefficient of thermal expansion of 4 nm TiO2 along a-axis is negative with a hydrated surface and is positive without a hydrated surface. High-energy synchrotron X-ray pair distribution function analysis combined with ab initio calculations on the specific hydrated surface are carried out to reveal the local structure distortion that is responsible for the unusual negative thermal expansion.

  3. Hydration and Thermal Expansion in Anatase Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, He [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Li, Qiang [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Ren, Yang [Argonne National Laboratory, X-Ray Science Division, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Fan, Longlong [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Chen, Jun [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Deng, Jinxia [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Xing, Xianran [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China

    2016-06-06

    A tunable thermal expansion is reported in nanosized anatase by taking advantage of surface hydration. The coefficient of thermal expansion of 4 nm TiO2 along a-axis is negative with a hydrated surface and is positive without a hydrated surface. High-energy synchrotron X-ray pair distribution function analysis combined with ab initio calculations on the specific hydrated surface are carried out to reveal the local structure distortion that is responsible for the unusual negative thermal expansion.

  4. Release of antibiotics from collagen dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, J; Antos-Bielska, M; Ołdak, E; Trafny, E A

    1997-01-01

    Our new collagen dressing has been developed recently. Three types (A, B, and C) of the dressing were prepared in this study. Each type contained bacitracin, neomycin or colistin. The antibiotic was input into: i. collagen sponge (CS)--type A, ii. layer of limited hydrophobicity (LLH)--type B, and iii. into both CS and LLH layers--type C. The final concentration of the antibiotic that resulted from the loading level was 2 mg/cm2 for the dressings of type A and B and 4 mg/cm2 for the dressing of type C. The antibiotics were then extracted from the pieces of dressings for two days through dialysis membrane. Susceptibility of 54 bacterial strains (S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter) isolated from burn wounds were tested to the three antibiotics used for preparation of the dressings. The results of the study evidenced that efficiency of released of antibiotics into the extracts depended on the kind of antibiotic and on the type of dressing. The concentration of the antibiotics proved to be much higher than MIC90 values of the bacterial isolates tested in respect to their susceptibility. The dressing containing mixture of the three antibiotics in two layers--CS and LLH is now considered as potentially effective for care of infected wounds. It may be useful for the treatment of infected wounds or for profilaxis of contaminated wounds, ensuring: i. sufficient antimicrobial activity in wound, and ii. optimal wound environment for the presence of collagenic biomaterial on the damaged tissue.

  5. Changes to collagen structure during leather processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizeland, Katie H; Edmonds, Richard L; Basil-Jones, Melissa M; Kirby, Nigel; Hawley, Adrian; Mudie, Stephen; Haverkamp, Richard G

    2015-03-11

    As hides and skins are processed to produce leather, chemical and physical changes take place that affect the strength and other physical properties of the material. The structural basis of these changes at the level of the collagen fibrils is not fully understood and forms the basis of this investigation. Synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is used to quantify fibril orientation and D-spacing through eight stages of processing from fresh green ovine skins to staked dry crust leather. Both the D-spacing and fibril orientation change with processing. The changes in thickness of the leather during processing affect the fibril orientation index (OI) and account for much of the OI differences between process stages. After thickness is accounted for, the main difference in OI is due to the hydration state of the material, with dry materials being less oriented than wet. Similarly significant differences in D-spacing are found at different process stages. These are due also to the moisture content, with dry samples having a smaller D-spacing. This understanding is useful for relating structural changes that occur during different stages of processing to the development of the final physical characteristics of leather.

  6. Molecular basis for optical clearing of collagenous tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshburg, Jason M.; Ravikumar, Krishnakumar M.; Hwang, Wonmuk; Yeh, Alvin T.

    2010-09-01

    Molecular interactions of optical clearing agents were investigated using a combination of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and optical spectroscopy. For a series of sugar alcohols with low to high optical clearing potential, Raman spectroscopy and integrating sphere measurements were used to quantitatively characterize tissue water loss and reduction in light scattering following agent exposures. The rate of tissue water loss was found to correlate with agent optical clearing potential, but equivalent tissue optical clearing was measured in native and fixed tissue in vitro, given long-enough exposure times to the polyol series. MD simulations showed that the rate of tissue optical clearing correlated with the preferential formation of hydrogen bond bridges between agent and collagen. Hydrogen bond bridge formation disrupts the collagen hydration layer and facilitates replacement by a chemical agent to homogenize tissue refractive index. However, the reduction in tissue light scattering did not correlate with the agent index of refraction. Our results suggest that a necessary property of optical clearing agents is hyperosmolarity to tissue, but that the most effective agents with the highest rates of optical clearing are a subset with the highest collagen solubilities.

  7. Collagenous Gastritis: A Rare Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faten Limaiem

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Collagenous gastritis is a rare entity of unknown etiology characterized histologically by the presence of a thick subepithelial collagen band associated with an inflammatory infiltrate of gastric mucosa. A 40-year-old male presented with a history of chronic intermittent abdominal pain for about 6 months. Physical examination was unremarkable, and biological tests were within normal range. The patient underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy which showed a nodular mucosa of the stomach. Biopsies of the duodenum and colon were unremarkable. However, biopsies of the gastric fundus revealed a mild chronic gastritis characterized by lymphocytic and plasma cell infiltration of deep mucosa, without lymphoid follicle formation or active inflammation. No microorganisms were identified on routine hematoxylin and eosin or Giemsa-stained sections. Subepithelial collagen in the gastric biopsies was thickened and showed entrapped capillaries. Subepithelial collagen was highlighted by Masson's trichrome staining and was negative for amyloid by Congo Red. In the areas containing thickened collagen, there were no intraepithelial lymphocytes. The final pathological diagnosis was collagenous gastritis. Collagenous gastritis is an extremely rare disease, but it is important to recognize its characteristic endoscopic and pathologic findings to make a correct diagnosis. Specific therapy for this rare entity has not yet been established. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2015; 3(2.000: 68-70

  8. Terahertz sensing of corneal hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul S; Tewari, Priyamvada; Bourges, Jean Louis; Hubschman, Jean Pierre; Bennett, David B; Taylor, Zachary D; Lee, H; Brown, Elliott R; Grundfest, Warren S; Culjat, Martin O

    2010-01-01

    An indicator of ocular health is the hydrodyanmics of the cornea. Many corneal disorders deteriorate sight as they upset the normal hydrodynamics of the cornea. The mechanisms include the loss of endothelial pump function of corneal dystophies, swelling and immune response of corneal graft rejection, and inflammation and edema, which accompany trauma, burn, and irritation events. Due to high sensitivity to changes of water content in materials, a reflective terahertz (300 GHz and 3 THz) imaging system could be an ideal tool to measure the hydration level of the cornea. This paper presents the application of THz technology to visualize the hydration content across ex vivo porcine corneas. The corneas, with a thickness variation from 470 - 940 µm, were successfully imaged using a reflective pulsed THz imaging system, with a maximum SNR of 50 dB. To our knowledge, no prior studies have reported on the use of THz in measuring hydration in corneal tissues or other ocular tissues. These preliminary findings indicate that THz can be used to accurately sense hydration levels in the cornea using a pulsed, reflective THz imaging system.

  9. Physical properties of gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliner, J.T.R.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Gas hydrates are naturally occurring, solid crystalline compounds (clathrates) that encapsulate gas molecules inside the lattices of hydrogen bonded water molecules within a specific temperature-pressure stability zone. Estimates of the total quantity of available methane gas in natural occurring hydrates are based on twice the energy content of known conventional fossil fuels reservoirs. Accurate and reliable in-situ quantification techniques are essential in determining the economic viability of this potential energy yield, which is dependent upon several factors such as sensitivity of the temperature-pressure stability zone, sediment type, porosity, permeability, concentration/abundance of free gas, spatial distribution in pore spaces, specific cage occupancy, and the influence of inhibitors. Various techniques like acoustic P and S waves, time domain reflectometry, and electrical resistance have been used to analyze the quantity and spatial distribution of the gas hydrate samples. These techniques were reviewed and the results obtained in the course of gas hydrate research were presented. 34 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Hydration kinetics of transgenic soybeans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Francielle Fracasso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic and experimental analyses of the hydration process of transgenic soybeans (BRS 225 RR are provided. The importance of the hydration process consists of the grain texture modifications which favor grinding and extraction of soybeans. The soaking isotherms were obtained for four different temperatures. Results showed that temperature affected transgenic soybeans´ hydration rate and time. Moisture content d.b. of the soybeans increased from 0.12 ± 0.01 kg kg-1 to 1.45 ± 0.19 kg kg-1 during 270 min. of process. Two models were used to fit the kinetic curves: an empirical model developed by Peleg (1988 and a phenomenological one, proposed by Omoto et al. (2009. The two models adequately represented the hydration kinetics. Peleg model was applied to the experimental data and the corresponding parameters were obtained and correlated to temperature. The model by Omoto et al. (2009 showed a better statistical fitting. Although Ks was affected by temperature (Ks = 0.38079 exp (-2289.3 T-1, the equilibrium concentration remained practically unchanged.

  11. Fascial hierarchies and the relevance of crossed-helical arrangements of collagen to changes in shape; part II: The proposed effect of blood pressure (Traube-Hering-Mayer) waves on the fascia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarr, Graham

    2016-07-01

    Periodic changes in arterial pressure and volume have long been related to respiratory and sympathetic nerve activity (Traube-Hering-Mayer waves) but their origins and nomenclature have caused considerable confusion since they were first discovered in the eighteenth century. However, although they remain poorly understood and the underlying details of their control are complicated, these waves do provide valuable clinical information on the state of blood pressure regulation in both normal and pathological conditions; and a correlation with oscillatory motions observed by certain practitioners suggests that they may also have some physiological value that relates to changes in the volume of fascial 'tubes'. Part I of this paper (Scarr, 2016) described a complex fascial network of collagen-reinforced tubular sheaths that are an integral part of muscle structure and function, and continuous with 'higher-level' fascial tubes surrounding groups of muscles, the limbs and entire body. The anisotropic arrangements of collagen fibres within the walls of these tubes reflect the most efficient distribution of mechanical stresses and have been considered to coordinate changes in shape, and a proposed link between cyclic variations in arterial pressure and volume, and the behaviour of these fascial compartments is now described.

  12. Electrostatic effects in collagen fibrillization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Svetlana; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2014-03-01

    Using light scattering and AFM techniques, we have measured the kinetics of fibrillization of collagen (pertinent to the vitreous of human eye) as a function of pH and ionic strength. At higher and lower pH, collagen triple-peptides remain stable in solution without fibrillization. At neutral pH, the fibrillization occurs and its growth kinetics is slowed upon either an increase in ionic strength or a decrease in temperature. We present a model, based on polymer crystallization theory, to describe the observed electrostatic nature of collagen assembly.

  13. Sterile Keratitis following Collagen Crosslinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Mohammad-Ali; Feizi, Sepehr

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report a keratoconic eye that developed severe sterile keratitis and corneal scar after collagen crosslinking necessitating corneal transplantation. Case Report: A 26-year-old man with progressive keratoconus underwent collagen crosslinking and presented with severe keratitis 72 hours after the procedure. The initial impression was infectious corneal ulcer and a fortified antibiotic regimen was administered. However, the clinical course and confocal microscopy results prompted a diagnosis of sterile keratitis. The eye developed severe corneal scars leading to reduced visual acuity and necessitating corneal transplantation. Conclusion: Sterile keratitis may develop after collagen crosslinking resulting in profound visual loss leading to corneal transplantation. PMID:25709779

  14. Stability of collagen during denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkova, R; Goshev, I; Gorinstein, S; Nedkov, P

    1999-05-01

    The stability of calf skin collagen (CSC) type I during thermal and chemical denaturation in the presence of glycerol was investigated. Thermal denaturation of type I collagen was performed in the presence of glycerol or in combination with urea and sodium chloride. The denaturation curves obtained in the presence of urea or sodium chloride retained their original shape without glycerol. These curves were shifted upward proportionally to the glycerol concentration in the reaction medium. This means that glycerol and the denaturants act independently. The explanation is based on the difference in the mechanism of their action on the collagen molecule.

  15. Physical activity, hydration and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascensión Marcos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of mankind, man has sought ways to promote and preserve health as well as to prevent disease. Hydration, physical activity and exercise are key factors for enhancing human health. However, either a little dose of them or an excess can be harmful for health maintenance at any age. Water is an essential nutrient for human body and a major key to survival has been to prevent dehydration. However, there is still a general controversy regarding the necessary amount to drink water or other beverages to properly get an adequate level of hydration. In addition, up to now the tools used to measure hydration are controversial. To this end, there are several important groups of variables to take into account such as water balance, hydration biomarkers and total body water. A combination of methods will be the most preferred tool to find out any risk or situation of dehydration at any age range. On the other hand, physical activity and exercise are being demonstrated to promote health, avoiding or reducing health problems, vascular and inflammatory diseases and helping weight management. Therefore, physical activity is also being used as a pill within a therapy to promote health and reduce risk diseases, but as in the case of drugs, dose, intensity, frequency, duration and precautions have to be evaluated and taken into account in order to get the maximum effectiveness and success of a treatment. On the other hand, sedentariness is the opposite concept to physical activity that has been recently recognized as an important factor of lifestyle involved in the obesogenic environment and consequently in the risk of the non-communicable diseases. In view of the literature consulted and taking into account the expertise of the authors, in this review a Decalogue of global recommendations is included to achieve an adequate hydration and physical activity status to avoid overweight/obesity consequences.

  16. Mechanical implications of the domain structure of fiber-forming collagens: comparison of the molecular and fibrillar flexibilities of the alpha1-chains found in types I-III collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Frederick H; Horvath, Istvan; Foran, David J

    2002-05-21

    Fibrillar collagens store, transmit and dissipate elastic energy during tensile deformation. Results of previous studies suggest that the collagen molecule is made up of alternating rigid and flexible domains, and extension of the flexible domains is associated with elastic energy storage. In this study, we model the flexibility of the alpha1-chains found in types I-III collagen molecules and microfibrils in order to understand the molecular basis of elastic energy storage in collagen fibers by analysing the areas under conformational plots for dipeptide sequences. Results of stereochemical modeling suggest that the collagen triple helix is made up of rigid and flexible domains that alternate with periods that are multiples of three amino acid residues. The relative flexibility of dipeptide sequences found in the flexible regions is about a factor of five higher than that found for the flexibility of the rigid regions, and the flexibility of types II and III collagen molecules appears to be higher than that found for the type I collagen molecule. The different collagen alpha1-chains were compared by correlating the flexibilities. The results suggest that the flexibilities of the alpha1-chains of types I and III collagen are more closely related than the flexibilities of the alpha1-chains in types I and II and II and III collagen. The flexible domains found in the alpha1-chains of types I-III collagen were found to be conserved in the microfibril and had periods of about 15 amino acid residues and multiples thereof. The flexibility profiles of types I and II collagen microfibrils were found to be more highly correlated than those for types I and III and II and III. These results suggest that the domain structure of the alpha1-chains found in types I-III collagen is an efficient means for storage of elastic energy during stretching while preserving the triple helical structure of the overall molecule. It is proposed that all collagens that form fibers are designed to

  17. A novel cryptic binding motif, LRSKSRSFQVSDEQY, in the C-terminal fragment of MMP-3/7-cleaved osteopontin as a novel ligand for α9β1 integrin is involved in the anti-type II collagen antibody-induced arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeyuki Kon

    Full Text Available Osteopontin (OPN is a multifunctional protein that has been linked to various intractable inflammatory diseases. One way by which OPN induces inflammation is the production of various functional fragments by enzyme cleavage. It has been well appreciated that OPN is cleaved by thrombin, and/or matrix metalloproteinase-3 and -7 (MMP-3/7. Although the function of thrombin-cleaved OPN is well characterized, little is known about the function of MMP-3/7-cleaved OPN. In this study, we found a novel motif, LRSKSRSFQVSDEQY, in the C-terminal fragment of MMP-3/7-cleaved mouse OPN binds to α9β1 integrin. Importantly, this novel motif is involved in the development of anti-type II collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA. This study provides the first in vitro and in vivo evidence that OPN cleavage by MMP-3/7 is an important regulatory mechanism for CAIA.

  18. Seismic reflections associated with submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassen, K.

    1995-12-31

    Gas hydrates are often suggested as a future energy resource. This doctoral thesis improves the understanding of the concentration and distribution of natural submarine gas hydrates. The presence of these hydrates are commonly inferred from strong bottom simulating reflection (BSR). To investigate the nature of BSR, this work uses seismic studies of hydrate-related BSRs at two different locations, one where gas hydrates are accepted to exist and interpreted to be very extensive (in the Beaufort Sea), the other with good velocity data and downhole logs available (offshore Oregon). To ascertain the presence of free gas under the BSR, prestack offset data must supplement near-vertical incidence seismic data. A tentative model for physical properties of sediments partially saturated with gas hydrate and free gas is presented. This model, together with drilling information and seismic data containing the BSR beneath the Oregon margin and the Beaufort Sea, made it possible to better understand when to apply the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) method to constrain BSR gas hydrate and gas models. Distribution of natural gas hydrates offshore Norway and Svalbard is discussed and interpreted as reflections from the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, overlying sediments containing free gas. Gas hydrates inferred to exist at the Norwegian-Svalbard continental margin correlate well with Cenozoic depocenters, and the associated gas is assumed to be mainly biogenic. Parts of that margin have a high potential for natural gas hydrates of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. 235 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Handbook of gas hydrate properties and occurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuustraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.

    1983-12-01

    This handbook provides data on the resource potential of naturally occurring hydrates, the properties that are needed to evaluate their recovery, and their production potential. The first two chapters give data on the naturally occurring hydrate potential by reviewing published resource estimates and the known and inferred occurrences. The third and fourth chapters review the physical and thermodynamic properties of hydrates, respectively. The thermodynamic properties of hydrates that are discussed include dissociation energies and a simplified method to calculate them; phase diagrams for simple and multi-component gases; the thermal conductivity; and the kinetics of hydrate dissociation. The final chapter evaluates the net energy balance of recovering hydrates and shows that a substantial positive energy balance can theoretically be achieved. The Appendices of the Handbook summarize physical and thermodynamic properties of gases, liquids and solids that can be used in designing and evaluating recovery processes of hydrates. 158 references, 67 figures, 47 tables.

  20. Separation of water through gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boch Andersen, Torben; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goa...... volumes and the needs for high pressure. The process could be interesting for concentration of heat sensitive, high value products......Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goal...... of the project was to formulate an alternative separation concept, which can replace the traditional water evaporation process in the sugar production. Work with the separation concept showed that gas hydrates can be used for water separation. The process is not suitable for sugar production because of large...

  1. Mycobacterial laminin-binding histone-like protein mediates collagen-dependent cytoadherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Alves Dias

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available When grown in the presence of exogenous collagen I, Mycobacterium bovis BCG was shown to form clumps. Scanning electron microscopy examination of these clumps revealed the presence of collagen fibres cross-linking the bacilli. Since collagen is a major constituent of the eukaryotic extracellular matrices, we assayed BCG cytoadherence in the presence of exogenous collagen I. Collagen increased the interaction of the bacilli with A549 type II pneumocytes or U937 macrophages, suggesting that BCG is able to recruit collagen to facilitate its attachment to host cells. Using an affinity chromatography approach, we have isolated a BCG collagen-binding protein corresponding to the previously described mycobacterial laminin-binding histone-like protein (LBP/Hlp, a highly conserved protein associated with the mycobacterial cell wall. Moreover, Mycobacterium leprae LBP/Hlp, a well-characterized adhesin, was also able to bind collagen I. Finally, using recombinant fragments of M. leprae LBP/Hlp, we mapped the collagen-binding activity within the C-terminal domain of the adhesin. Since this protein was already shown to be involved in the recognition of laminin and heparan sulphate-containing proteoglycans, the present observations reinforce the adhesive activities of LBP/Hlp, which can be therefore considered as a multifaceted mycobacterial adhesin, playing an important role in both leprosy and tuberculosis pathogenesis.

  2. Riboflavin-induced photo-crosslinking of collagen hydrogel and its application in meniscus tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jiseung; Koh, Rachel H; Shim, Whuisu; Kim, Hwan D; Yim, Hyun-Gu; Hwang, Nathaniel S

    2016-04-01

    A meniscus tear is a common knee injury, but its regeneration remains a clinical challenge. Recently, collagen-based scaffolds have been applied in meniscus tissue engineering. Despite its prevalence, application of natural collagen scaffold in clinical setting is limited due to its extremely low stiffness and rapid degradation. The purpose of the present study was to increase the mechanical properties and delay degradation rate of a collagen-based scaffold by photo-crosslinking using riboflavin (RF) and UV exposure. RF is a biocompatible vitamin B2 that showed minimal cytotoxicity compared to conventionally utilized photo-initiator. Furthermore, collagen photo-crosslinking with RF improved mechanical properties and delayed enzyme-triggered degradation of collagen scaffolds. RF-induced photo-crosslinked collagen scaffolds encapsulated with fibrochondrocytes resulted in reduced scaffold contraction and enhanced gene expression levels for the collagen II and aggrecan. Additionally, hyaluronic acid (HA) incorporation into photo-crosslinked collagen scaffold showed an increase in its retention. Based on these results, we demonstrate that photo-crosslinked collagen-HA hydrogels can be potentially applied in the scaffold-based meniscus tissue engineering.

  3. Well log characterization of natural gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2011-01-01

    In the last 25 years we have seen significant advancements in the use of downhole well logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrate in nature: From an early start of using wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gas hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments to today where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. The most established and well known use of downhole log data in gas hydrate research is the use of electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data (both compressional- and shear-wave data) to make estimates of gas hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. New downhole logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation resistivity log measurements have provided the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly inter-bedded and fracture dominated gas hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing have also allowed for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids (i.e., free-water along with clay and capillary bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms controlling the formation and occurrence of gas hydrate in nature along with data on gas hydrate reservoir properties (i.e., permeabilities) needed to accurately predict gas production rates for various gas hydrate

  4. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn

    2009-11-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  5. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, D.D.; Martin, A.I.; Yun, T.S.; Francisca, F.M.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. cyclo-Tetra-μ-malato-κ16 O,O′,O′′:O′′′-tetra­kis[bis­(1H-benzimidazole-κN 3)cobalt(II)] eicosa­hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-Hua; Nie, Jing-Jing; Su, Jian-Rong; Xu, Duan-Jun

    2008-01-01

    The title compound, [Co4(C4H4O5)4(C7H6N2)8]·20H2O, consists of tetra­nuclear CoII complexes and disordered uncoordinated water mol­ecules. The tetra­meric complex mol­ecule has symmetry. While two benzimidazole mol­ecules and a tridentate malate dianion coordinate a CoII ion, the carboxylate O atom from an adjacent malate dianion bridges the CoII ions to complete a distorted octa­hedral coordination geometry. The tridentate malate dianion chelates the CoII ion, and the chelate six- and five-membered rings show half-chair and envelope configurations, respectively. A face-to-face separation of 3.494 (9) Å between parallel benzimidazole ligands indicates the existence of π–π stacking between adjacent complexes. The crystal structure also involves N—H⋯O and O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. PMID:21201998

  7. The effect of hydrate saturation on water retention curves in hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabadi, Nariman; Zheng, Xianglei; Jang, Jaewon

    2016-05-01

    The experimental measurement of water retention curve in hydrate-bearing sediments is critically important to understand the behavior of hydrate dissociation and gas production. In this study, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is selected as hydrate former. The pore habit of THF hydrates is investigated by visual observation in a transparent micromodel. It is confirmed that THF hydrates are not wetting phase on the quartz surface of the micromodel and occupy either an entire pore or part of pore space resulting in change in pore size distribution. And the measurement of water retention curves in THF hydrate-bearing sediments with hydrate saturation ranging from Sh = 0 to Sh = 0.7 is conducted for excess water condition. The experimental results show that the gas entry pressure and the capillary pressure increase with increasing hydrate saturation. Based on the experimental results, fitting parameters for van Genuchten equation are suggested for different hydrate saturation conditions.

  8. Human collagen produced in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoseyov, Oded; Posen, Yehudit; Grynspan, Frida

    2014-01-01

    Consequential to its essential role as a mechanical support and affinity regulator in extracellular matrices, collagen constitutes a highly sought after scaffolding material for regeneration and healing applications. However, substantiated concerns have been raised with regard to quality and safety of animal tissue-extracted collagen, particularly in relation to its immunogenicity, risk of disease transmission and overall quality and consistency. In parallel, contamination with undesirable cellular factors can significantly impair its bioactivity, vis-a-vis its impact on cell recruitment, proliferation and differentiation. High-scale production of recombinant human collagen Type I (rhCOL1) in the tobacco plant provides a source of an homogenic, heterotrimeric, thermally stable “virgin” collagen which self assembles to fine homogenous fibrils displaying intact binding sites and has been applied to form numerous functional scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In addition, rhCOL1 can form liquid crystal structures, yielding a well-organized and mechanically strong membrane, two properties indispensable to extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicry. Overall, the shortcomings of animal- and cadaver-derived collagens arising from their source diversity and recycled nature are fully overcome in the plant setting, constituting a collagen source ideal for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:23941988

  9. Purification, characterization and antioxidant properties of low molecular weight collagenous polypeptide (37 kDa) prepared from whale shark cartilage (Rhincodon typus)

    OpenAIRE

    Jeevithan, Elango; Bao, Bin; Zhang, Jingyi; Hong, Shaotong; Wu, Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    A low molecular weight type-II collagenous polypeptide (CIIp) from whale shark (WS) cartilage was prepared by thermolysin digestion; and examined for their physico-functional and antioxidant properties. The purified collagen was composed of an identical (α1)3 chains and was characterized as type-II. After hydrolysis with thermolysin, the α-chain of the WS collagen was degraded into smaller peptides with molecular weight ranging from 70 to 20KDa. CIIp was successfully separated from the hydrol...

  10. Polymerized-Type I Collagen Induces Upregulation of Foxp3-Expressing CD4 Regulatory T Cells and Downregulation of IL-17-Producing CD4+ T Cells (Th17 Cells in Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janette Furuzawa-Carballeda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies showed that polymerized-type I collagen (polymerized collagen exhibits potent immunoregulatory properties. This work evaluated the effect of intramuscular administration of polymerized collagen in early and established collagen-induced arthritis (CIA in mice and analyzed changes in Th subsets following therapy. Incidence of CIA was of 100% in mice challenged with type II collagen. Clinimorphometric analysis showed a downregulation of inflammation after administration of all treatments (P<0.05. Histological analysis showed that the CIA-mice group had extensive bone erosion, pannus and severe focal inflammatory infiltrates. In contrast, there was a remarkable reduction in the severity of arthritis in mice under polymerized collagen, methotrexate or methotrexate/polymerized collagen treatment. Polymerized Collagen but not methotrexate induced tissue joint regeneration. Polymerized Collagen and methotrexate/polymerized collagen but not methotrexate alone induces downregulation of CD4+/IL17A+ T cells and upregulation of Tregs and CD4+/IFN-γ+ T cells. Thus, Polymerized Collagen could be an effective therapeutic agent in early and established rheumatoid arthritis by exerting downregulation of autoimmune inflammation.

  11. Modern Collagen Wound Dressings: Function and Purpose

    OpenAIRE

    Fleck, Cynthia Ann; Simman, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Collagen, which is produced by fibroblasts, is the most abundant protein in the human body. A natural structural protein, collagen is involved in all 3 phases of the wound-healing cascade. It stimulates cellular migration and contributes to new tissue development. Because of their chemotactic properties on wound fibroblasts, collagen dressings encourage the deposition and organization of newly formed collagen, creating an environment that fosters healing. Collagen-based biomaterials stimulate...

  12. Modern Collagen Wound Dressings: Function and Purpose

    OpenAIRE

    Fleck, Cynthia Ann; Simman, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Collagen, which is produced by fibroblasts, is the most abundant protein in the human body. A natural structural protein, collagen is involved in all 3 phases of the wound-healing cascade. It stimulates cellular migration and contributes to new tissue development. Because of their chemotactic properties on wound fibroblasts, collagen dressings encourage the deposition and organization of newly formed collagen, creating an environment that fosters healing. Collagen-based biomaterials stimulate...

  13. Energies of peptide peptide and peptide water hydrogen bonds in collagen: Evidences from infrared spectroscopy, quartz piezogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boryskina, O. P.; Bolbukh, T. V.; Semenov, M. A.; Gasan, A. I.; Maleev, V. Ya.

    2007-02-01

    The aim of the present work is a quantitative estimation of energies of peptide-peptide N 1sbnd H 1⋯O 2dbnd C 2 and peptide-water hydrogen bonds in collagen type I and model collagen polypeptide poly(Gly-Pro-Pro). Being a challenging theoretical task this is also an issue that can clarify the physical basis of stability of collagen structures that play a very important structural role in connective tissue. The study was performed on the basis of a complex approach of a number of experimental techniques, namely infrared spectroscopy, quartz piezogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. Our results indicate that binding of 3-4 water molecules of the internal hydration shell to each -Gly-X-Y- unit of poly(Gly-Pro-Pro) and collagen leads to simultaneous conformational reorganization of the triple helix and strengthening of the peptide-peptide hydrogen bonds. Enthalpies of hydration of poly(Gly-Pro-Pro) and collagen constitute -10.9 and -12.2 kJ/mol, respectively. Enthalpies of peptide-peptide N 1sbnd H 1⋯O 2dbnd C 2 hydrogen bonds are -7.6 and -6.0 kJ/mol in poly(Gly-Pro-Pro) and collagen, correspondently. The results obtained can be used for evaluation of the impacts of energies of different types of interactions into the total energy of stabilization of native triple helical collagen and poly(Gly-Pro-Pro).

  14. Accurate measurement of phase equilibria and dissociation enthalpies of HFC-134a hydrates in the presence of NaCl for potential application in desalination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dongyoung; Lee, Yohan; Choi, Wonjung; Seo, Yongwon [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seungmin [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Phase equilibria, structure identification, and dissociation enthalpies of HFC-134a hydrates in the presence of NaCl are investigated for potential application in desalination. To verify the influence of NaCl on the thermodynamic hydrate stability of the HFC-134a hydrate, the three-phase (hydrate (H) - liquid water (L{sub W}) - vapor (V)) equilibria of the HFC-134a+NaCl (0, 3.5, and 8.0 wt%)+water systems are measured by both a conventional isochoric (pVT) method and a stepwise differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) method. Both pVT and DSC methods demonstrate reliable and consistent hydrate phase equilibrium points of the HFC-134a hydrates in the presence of NaCl. The HFC- 134a hydrate is identified as sII via powder X-ray diffraction. The dissociation enthalpies (ΔH{sub d}) of the HFC-134a hydrates in the presence of NaCl are also measured with a high pressure micro-differential scanning calorimeter. The salinity results in significant thermodynamic inhibition of the HFC-134a hydrates, whereas it has little effect on the dissociation enthalpy of the HFC-134a hydrates. The experimental results obtained in this study can be utilized as foundational data for the hydrate-based desalination process.

  15. First analysis of a bacterial collagen-binding protein with collagen Toolkits: promiscuous binding of YadA to collagens may explain how YadA interferes with host processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Jack C; Elovaara, Heli; Bihan, Dominique; Pugh, Nicholas; Kilpinen, Sami K; Raynal, Nicolas; Skurnik, Mikael; Farndale, Richard W; Goldman, Adrian

    2010-07-01

    The Yersinia adhesin YadA mediates the adhesion of the human enteropathogen Yersinia enterocolitica to collagens and other components of the extracellular matrix. Though YadA has been proposed to bind to a specific site in collagens, the exact binding determinants for YadA in native collagen have not previously been elucidated. We investigated the binding of YadA to collagen Toolkits, which are libraries of triple-helical peptides spanning the sequences of type II and III human collagens. YadA bound to many of them, in particular to peptides rich in hydroxyproline but with few charged residues. We were able to block the binding of YadA to collagen type IV with the triple-helical peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)(10), suggesting that the same site in YadA binds to triple-helical regions in network-forming collagens as well. We showed that a single Gly-Pro-Hyp triplet in a triple-helical peptide was sufficient to support YadA binding, but more than six triplets were required to form a tight YadA binding site. This is significantly longer than the case for eukaryotic collagen-binding proteins. YadA-expressing bacteria bound promiscuously to Toolkit peptides. Promiscuous binding could be advantageous for pathogenicity in Y. enterocolitica and, indeed, for other pathogenic bacteria. Many of the tightly binding peptides are also targets for eukaryotic collagen-binding proteins, and YadA was able to inhibit the interaction between selected Toolkit peptides and platelets. This leads to the intriguing possibility that YadA may interfere in vivo with host processes mediated by endogenous collagen-binding proteins.

  16. Cell cytoskeletal changes effected by static compressive stress lead to changes in the contractile properties of tissue regenerative collagen membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gellynck

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Static compressive stress can influence the matrix, which subsequently affects cell behaviour and the cell’s ability to further transform the matrix. This study aimed to assess response to static compressive stress at different stages of osteoblast differentiation and assess the cell cytoskeleton’s role as a conduit of matrix-derived stimuli. Mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs (D1 ORL UVA, osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1 and post-osteoblast/pre-osteocyte-like cells (MLO-A5 were seeded in hydrated and compressed collagen gels. Contraction was quantified macroscopically, and cell morphology, survival, differentiation and mineralisation assessed using confocal microscopy, alamarBlue® assay, real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR and histological stains, respectively. Confocal microscopy demonstrated cell shape changes and favourable microfilament organisation with static compressive stress of the collagen matrix; furthermore, cell survival was greater compared to the hydrated gels. The stage of osteoblast differentiation determined the degree of matrix contraction, with MSCs demonstrating the greatest amount. Introduction of microfilament disrupting inhibitors confirmed that pre-stress and tensegrity forces were under the influence of gel density, and there was increased survival and differentiation of the cells within the compressed collagen compared to the hydrated collagen. There was also relative stiffening and differentiation with time of the compressed cell-seeded collagen, allowing for greater manipulation. In conclusion, the combined collagen chemistry and increased density of the microenvironment can promote upregulation of osteogenic genes and mineralisation; MSCs can facilitate matrix contraction to form an engineered membrane with the potential to serve as a ‘pseudo-periosteum’ in the regeneration of bone defects.

  17. Engineering fibrin-based tissue constructs from myofibroblasts and application of constraints and strain to induce cell and collagen reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Nicky; Baaijens, Frank P T; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2013-10-28

    Collagen content and organization in developing collagenous tissues can be influenced by local tissue strains and tissue constraint. Tissue engineers aim to use these principles to create tissues with predefined collagen architectures. A full understanding of the exact underlying processes of collagen remodeling to control the final tissue architecture, however, is lacking. In particular, little is known about the (re)orientation of collagen fibers in response to changes in tissue mechanical loading conditions. We developed an in vitro model system, consisting of biaxially-constrained myofibroblast-seeded fibrin constructs, to further elucidate collagen (re)orientation in response to i) reverting biaxial to uniaxial static loading conditions and ii) cyclic uniaxial loading of the biaxially-constrained constructs before and after a change in loading direction, with use of the Flexcell FX4000T loading device. Time-lapse confocal imaging is used to visualize collagen (re)orientation in a nondestructive manner. Cell and collagen organization in the constructs can be visualized in real-time, and an internal reference system allows us to relocate cells and collagen structures for time-lapse analysis. Various aspects of the model system can be adjusted, like cell source or use of healthy and diseased cells. Additives can be used to further elucidate mechanisms underlying collagen remodeling, by for example adding MMPs or blocking integrins. Shape and size of the construct can be easily adapted to specific needs, resulting in a highly tunable model system to study cell and collagen (re)organization.

  18. Stable Occupancy of Hydrogen Molecules in H2 Clathrate Hydrates and H2 + THF Clathrate Hydrates Determined by Ab Initio Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Yedlapalli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Structure II clathrate hydrates of pure hydrogen and binary hydrates of THF+H2 are studied using ab initio calculations to determine the stable occupancies of small cavities. Ab initio calculations are carried out for a double cavity consisting of one dodecahedron (small cavity and one hexakaidecahedron (large cavity. These two cavities are attached to each other as in sII hydrates to form a double cavity. One or two H2 molecules are placed in the small cavity and one THF (or 4H2 molecules molecule is placed in the large cavity. We have determined the binding energies of the double cavities at the MP2 level using various basis sets (3-21G, 3-21G(2p, 3-21++G(2p, 6-31G, 6-31G(2p, and 6-31++G(2p. Different basis sets yield different stable occupancies of the small cavity. The results from the highest basis set (6-31++G(2p with zero point energy corrections indicate that the single occupancy is slightly more favorable than the double occupancy in both the cases of pure H2 hydrates and THF + H2 double hydrates.

  19. Furcation therapy with bioabsorbable collagen membrane: a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruthi, Vijay K; Gelskey, Shirley C; Mirbod, Sayed M

    2002-11-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of 2 barrier membranes, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) and collagen, in treating Class II furcation defects of mandibular molars in humans. Seventeen nonsmoking subjects with no history of systemic disease each presenting with Class II furcation defects in 2 mandibular molars were selected and underwent initial therapy. At the time of the surgery and at 8-month follow-up, soft-tissue measurements consisting of the gingival index, vertical and horizontal probing depth, recession and clinical attachment level were obtained at the midfurcation level. At the time of membrane placement and at 12-month re-entry, horizontal midfurcation probing depth and hard-tissue measurement of vertical fill (from the crown to the depth of the pocket) were also obtained. According to the surgical protocol, both membranes were completely covered with a coronally positioned flap, and in all cases healing was uneventful. Data were analyzed first by comparing baseline measurements (at surgery) with measurements at 8-month follow-up and 12-month re-entry for both e-PTFE and collagen membranes according to repeated-measures analysis of variance. The changes from surgery to follow-up and re-entry were then compared between the 2 treatment modalities with paired Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. No statistically significant differences were found between e-PTFE and collagen membranes with respect to gingival index, reduction in probing depth, gain in clinical attachment or filling of the horizontal defect. However, the improvement in vertical fill at 12-month re-entry was more substantial for the teeth treated with collagen membrane than those treated with e-PTFE (p collagen is a beneficial material for regenerative therapy of Class II furcation defects in humans, yielding results that are similar to or better than (vertical fill) those for e-PTFE membrane.

  20. Terahertz spectroscopy of dry, hydrated, and thermally denatured biological macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, Dawn; Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope; Thomas, Robert J.; Peralta, Xomalin; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2012-03-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is an effective technique to probe the intermolecular and collective vibrational modes of biological macromolecules at THz frequencies. To date, the vast majority of spectroscopic studies have been performed on dehydrated biomolecular samples. Given the fact that all biochemical processes occur in aqueous environments and water is required for proper protein folding and function, we hypothesize that valuable information can be gained from spectroscopic studies performed on hydrated biomolecules in their native conformation. In this study, we used a THz-TDS system that exploits photoconductive techniques for THz pulse generation and freespace electro-optical sampling approaches for detection. We used the THz spectrometer to measure the time-dependent electric field of THz waves upon interaction with water, phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and collagen gels. By comparing these waveforms with references, we simultaneously determined each sample's index of refraction (n) and absorption coefficients (μa) as a function of frequency. Our data show that the properties we measure for the water, PBS and collagen are comparable to those reported in the literature. In the future, we plan to examine the effect that both temperature and pH have on the optical properties of other biological macromolecules. Studies will also be performed to compare our results to those generated using molecular dynamics simulations.

  1. Synthesis of hydrated lutetium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Liu [South China Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Guangdong (China); Rong-jun Ma [Changsha Research Institute of Minig and Metallurgy, Hunan (China)

    1997-09-01

    Crystalline lutetium carbonate was synthesized for the corresponding chloride using ammonium bicarbonate as precipitant. The chemical analyses suggest that the synthesized lutetium carbonate is a hydrated basic carbonate or oxycarbonate. The X-ray powder diffraction data are presented. The IR data for the compound show the presence of two different carbonate groups. There is no stable intermediate carbonate in the process of thermal decomposition of the lutetium carbonate. (au) 15 refs.

  2. Metal Stabilization of Collagen and de Novo Designed Mimetic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Avanish S; Xu, Fei; Pike, Douglas H; Belure, Sandeep V; Hasan, Nida F; Drzewiecki, Kathryn E; Shreiber, David I; Nanda, Vikas

    2015-08-18

    We explore the design of metal binding sites to modulate triple-helix stability of collagen and collagen-mimetic peptides. Globular proteins commonly utilize metals to connect tertiary structural elements that are well separated in sequence, constraining structure and enhancing stability. It is more challenging to engineer structural metals into fibrous protein scaffolds, which lack the extensive tertiary contacts seen in globular proteins. In the collagen triple helix, the structural adjacency of the carboxy-termini of the three chains makes this region an attractive target for introducing metal binding sites. We engineered His3 sites based on structural modeling constraints into a series of designed homotrimeric and heterotrimeric peptides, assessing the capacity of metal binding to improve stability and in the case of heterotrimers, affect specificity of assembly. Notable enhancements in stability for both homo- and heteromeric systems were observed upon addition of zinc(II) and several other metal ions only when all three histidine ligands were present. Metal binding affinities were consistent with the expected Irving-Williams series for imidazole. Unlike other metals tested, copper(II) also bound to peptides lacking histidine ligands. Acetylation of the peptide N-termini prevented copper binding, indicating proline backbone amide metal-coordination at this site. Copper similarly stabilized animal extracted Type I collagen in a metal-specific fashion, highlighting the potential importance of metal homeostasis within the extracellular matrix.

  3. Riboflavin crosslinked high-density collagen gel for the repair of annular defects in intervertebral discs: An in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunert, Peter; Borde, Brandon H; Towne, Sara B; Moriguchi, Yu; Hudson, Katherine D; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Härtl, Roger

    2015-10-01

    Open annular defects compromise the ability of the annulus fibrosus to contain nuclear tissue in the disc space, and therefore lead to disc herniation with subsequent degenerative changes to the entire intervertebral disc. This study reports the use of riboflavin crosslinked high-density collagen gel for the repair of annular defects in a needle-punctured rat-tail model. High-density collagen has increased stiffness and greater hydraulic permeability than conventional low-density gels; riboflavin crosslinking further increases these properties. This study found that treating annular defects with crosslinked high-density collagen inhibited the progression of disc degeneration over 18 weeks compared to untreated control discs. Histological sections of FITC-labeled collagen gel revealed an early tight attachment to host annular tissue. The gel was subsequently infiltrated by host fibroblasts which remodeled it into a fibrous cap that bridged the outer disrupted annular fibers and partially repaired the defect. This repair tissue enhanced retention of nucleus pulposus tissue, maintained physiological disc hydration, and preserved hydraulic permeability, according to MRI, histological, and mechanical assessments. Degenerative changes were partially reversed in treated discs, as indicated by an increase in nucleus pulposus size and hydration between weeks 5 and 18. The collagen gel appeared to work as an instant sealant and by enhancing the intrinsic healing capabilities of the host tissue.

  4. Crystallite size distributions of marine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klapp, S.A.; Bohrmann, G.; Abegg, F. [Bremen Univ., Bremen (Germany). Research Center of Ocean Margins; Hemes, S.; Klein, H.; Kuhs, W.F. [Gottingen Univ., Gottingen (Germany). Dept. of Crystallography

    2008-07-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to determine the crystallite size distributions of natural gas hydrate samples retrieved from the Gulf of Mexico, the Black Sea, and a hydrate ridge located near offshore Oregon. Synchrotron radiation technology was used to provide the high photon fluxes and high penetration depths needed to accurately analyze the bulk sediment samples. A new beam collimation diffraction technique was used to measure gas hydrate crystallite sizes. The analyses showed that gas hydrate crystals were globular in shape. Mean crystallite sizes ranged from 200 to 400 {mu}m for hydrate samples taken from the sea floor. Larger grain sizes in the hydrate ridge samples suggested differences in hydrate formation ages or processes. A comparison with laboratory-produced methane hydrate samples showed half a lognormal curve with a mean value of 40{mu}m. Results of the study showed that a cautious approach must be adopted when transposing crystallite-size sensitive physical data from laboratory-made gas hydrates to natural settings. It was concluded that crystallite size information may also be used to resolve the formation ages of gas hydrates when formation processes and conditions are constrained. 48 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  5. IMPORTANCE OF HYDRATION IN SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Vasić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Importance of hydration is detrmined by importance of functions of water in the human organism: i.e. regulation of body temperature, transport, excretion of waste materials through urine, digestion of food which is facilititated by saliva and gastric juices, maintenance of flexibility of organs and tissues About 60 % body mass of an adult person (males: 61 %, females: 54 % is made up of water. Water content of a newly born baby reaches 77 %, and it is up to 50 % in adults. It is very important for sportsmen to provide adequate hydration during and after the time of bodily activities. A symptom of water shortage is thirst. However, thirst is a late response of an organism and it occurs when dehydration has already taken place. Minimum in take of fluids in humans should range between one-and-half to two liters. It has been known for a long time that there is no success in sport without proper hydration in a sportsman.

  6. Lattice constants and expansivities of gas hydrates from 10 K up to the stability limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, T. C. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, 38000 Grenoble (France); Falenty, A.; Kuhs, W. F. [GZG, Abt. Kristallographie, Universität Göttingen, Goldschmidtstrasse 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-02-07

    The lattice constants of hydrogenated and deuterated CH{sub 4}-, CO{sub 2}-, Xe- (clathrate structure type I) and N{sub 2}-hydrates (clathrate structure type II) from 10 K up to the stability limit were established in neutron- and synchrotron diffraction experiments and were used to derive the related thermal expansivities. The following results emerge from this analysis: (1) The differences of expansivities of structure type I and II hydrates are fairly small. (2) Despite the larger guest-size of CO{sub 2} as compared to methane, CO{sub 2}-hydrate has the smaller lattice constants at low temperatures, which is ascribed to the larger attractive guest-host interaction of the CO{sub 2}-water system. (3) The expansivity of CO{sub 2}-hydrate is larger than for CH{sub 4}-hydrate which leads to larger lattice constants for the former at temperatures above ∼150 K; this is likely due to the higher motional degrees of freedom of the CO{sub 2} guest molecules. (4) The cage occupancies of Xe- and CO{sub 2}-hydrates affect significantly the lattice constants. (5) Similar to ice Ih, the deuterated compounds have generally slightly larger lattice constants which can be ascribed to the somewhat weaker H-bonding. (6) Compared to ice Ih, the high temperature expansivities are about 50% larger; in contrast to ice Ih and the empty hydrate, there is no negative thermal expansion at low temperature. (7) A comparison of the experimental results with lattice dynamical work, with models based on an Einstein oscillator model, and results from inelastic neutron scattering suggest that the contribution of the guest atoms’ vibrational energy to thermal expansion is important, most prominently for CO{sub 2}- and Xe-hydrates.

  7. Crystal structure of tetra-kis-(μ3-2-{[1,1-bis-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)-2-oxidoeth-yl]imino-meth-yl}phenolato)tetra-copper(II) ethanol monosolvate 2.5-hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weilun; Ran, Jingwen

    2015-05-01

    The title compound, [Cu4(C11H13NO4)4]·CH3CH2OH·2.5H2O, is an electronically neutral tetra-nuclear copper(II) complex with a cubane-like Cu4O4 core. The complete molecule has point group symmetry 2. The phenol hy-droxy group and one of the three alcohol hy-droxy groups of each 2-{[tris-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)meth-yl]imino-meth-yl}phenol ligand are depro-ton-ated, while the secondary amine and the other two hy-droxy groups remain unchanged. The Cu(II) atoms in the Cu4O4 core are connected by four μ3-O atoms from the deprotonated alcohol hy-droxy groups. Each of the penta-coordinated Cu(II) ions has an NO4 distorted square-pyramidal environment through coordination to the tridentate Schiff base ligands. The Cu-N/O bond lengths span the range 1.902 (4)-1.955 (4) Å, similar to values reported for related structures. There are O-H⋯O hydrogen-bond inter-actions between the complex molecules and the ethanol and water solvent molecules, leading to the formation of a three-dimensional network. The ethanol solvent molecule is disordered about a twofold rotation axis. One of the two independent water molecules is also located on this twofold rotation axis and shows half-occupancy.

  8. Hypoxia-Induced Collagen Synthesis of Human Lung Fibroblasts by Activating the Angiotensin System

    OpenAIRE

    Shan-Shan Liu; Hao-Yan Wang; Jun-Ming Tang; Xiu-Mei Zhou

    2013-01-01

    The exact molecular mechanism that mediates hypoxia-induced pulmonary fibrosis needs to be further clarified. The aim of this study was to explore the effect and underlying mechanism of angiotensin II (Ang II) on collagen synthesis in hypoxic human lung fibroblast (HLF) cells. The HLF-1 cell line was used for in vitro studies. Angiotensinogen (AGT), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) expression levels in human ...

  9. Inhibition of Glycoprotein VI Clustering by Collagen as a Mechanism of Inhibiting Collagen-Induced Platelet Responses: The Example of Losartan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Jiang

    Full Text Available Exposure of platelets to collagen triggers the formation of a platelet clot. Pharmacological agents capable of inhibiting platelet activation by collagen are thus of potential therapeutic interest. Thrombus formation is initiated by the interaction of the GPIb-V-IX complex with collagen-bound vWF, while GPVI interaction with collagen triggers platelet activation that is reinforced by ADP and thromboxane A2. Losartan is an angiotensin II (Ang II type I receptor (AT1R antagonist proposed to have an antiplatelet activity via the inhibition of both the thromboxane A2 (TXA2 receptor (TP and the glycoprotein VI (GPVI. Here, we characterized in vitro the effects of losartan at different doses on platelet responses: losartan inhibited platelet aggregation and secretion induced by 1 μg . mL(-1 and 10 μg . mL(-1 of collagen with an IC50 of ~ 6 μM. Losartan inhibited platelet responses induced by the GPVI specific collagen related peptide but not by the α2β1 specific peptide. However, losartan did not inhibit the binding of recombinant GPVI to collagen, which is not in favor of a simple competition. Indeed, the clustering of GPVI observed in flow cytometry and using the Duolink methodology, was inhibited by losartan. The impact of a therapeutic dose of losartan (100 mg/day on platelet responses was analyzed ex vivo in a double blind study. No statistically significant differences were observed between losartan-treated (n=25 and non-treated (n=30 patients in terms of collagen and U46619-induced platelet activation. These data indicate that in treated patients, losartan does not achieve a measurable antiplatelet effect but provide the proof of concept that inhibiting collagen-induced GPVI clustering is of pharmacological interest to obtain an antithrombotic efficacy.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00763893.

  10. Biphasic function of focal adhesion kinase in endothelial tube formation induced by fibril-forming collagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Junko; Shigematsu, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Keishi; Takeda, Teiji; Yamazaki, Masanori; Kakizawa, Tomoko; Hashizume, Kiyoshi

    2008-10-03

    Migration and tube formation of endothelial cells are important in angiogenesis and require a coordinated response to the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) and growth factor. Since focal adhesion kinase (FAK) integrates signals from both ECM and growth factor, we investigated its role in angiogenesis. Type I and II collagens are fibril-forming collagens and stimulate human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to form tube structure. Although knockdown of FAK restrained cell motility and resulted in inhibition of tube formation, FAK degradation and tube formation occurred simultaneously after incubation with fibril-forming collagens. The compensation for the FAK degradation by a calpain inhibitor or transient over-expression of FAK resulted in disturbance of tube formation. These phenomena are specific to fibril-forming collagens and mediated via alpha2beta1 integrin. In conclusion, our data indicate that FAK is functioning in cell migration, but fibril-forming collagen-induced FAK degradation is necessary for endothelial tube formation.

  11. Study of Formation Mechanisms of Gas Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    Gas hydrates, which had been found in subsurface geological environments of deep-sea sediments and permafrost regions, are solid crystalline compounds of gas molecules and water. The estimated energy resources of hydrates are at least twice of that of the conventional fossil fuel in the world. Gas hydrates have a great opportunity to become a dominating future energy. In the past years, many laboratory experiments had been conducted to study chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of gas hydrates in order to investigate the formation and dissociation mechanisms of hydrates. However, it is difficult to observe the formation and dissociation of hydrates in a porous media from a physical experiment directly. The purpose of this study was to model the dynamic formation mechanisms of gas hydrate in porous media by reservoir simulation. Two models were designed for this study: 1) a closed-system static model with separated gas and water zones; this model was a hydrate equilibrium model to investigate the behavior of the formation of hydrates near the initial gas-water contact; and 2) an open-system dynamic model with a continuous bottom-up gas flow; this model simulated the behavior of gas migration and studied the formation of hydrates from flowed gas and static formation water in porous media. A phase behavior module was developed in this study for reservoir simulator to model the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) behavior of hydrates. The thermodynamic equilibriums and chemical reactions were coupled with the phase behavior module to have functions modelling the formation and dissociation of hydrates from/to water and gas. The simulation models used in this study were validated from the code-comparison project proposed by the NETL. According to the modelling results of the closed-system static model, we found that predominated location for the formation of hydrates was below the gas-water contact (or at the top of water zone). The maximum hydrate saturation

  12. SEISMIC STUDIES OF MARINE GAS HYDRATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Haibin

    2003-01-01

    We give a brief introduction of developments of seismic methods in the studies of marine gas hydrates. Then we give an example of seismic data processing for BSRs in western Nankai accretionary prism, a typical gas hydrate distribution region. Seismic data processing is proved to be important to obtain better images of BSRs distribution. Studies of velocity structure of hydrated sediments are useful for better understanding the distribution of gas hydrates. Using full waveform inversion, we successfully derived high-resolution velocity model of a double BSR in eastern Nankai Trough area. Recent survey and research show that gas hydrates occur in the marine sediments of the South China Sea and East China Sea.But we would like to say seismic researches on gas hydrate in China are very preliminary.

  13. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  14. Dichloridobis[3-methyl-4-phenyl-5-(2-pyridyl-4H-1,2,4-triazole-κ2N1,N5]copper(II 3.33-hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liaocheng Huang

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, [CuCl2(C14H12N42]·3.33H2O, the Cu(II atom is coordinated by two chelating 3-methyl-4-phenyl-5-(2-pyridyl-1,2,4-triazole ligands and two chloride anions in a distorted octahedral geometry with a CuN2N′2Cl2 chromophore. The Cu atom is located on an inversion center. Two uncoordinated water molecules lie on threefold rotation axes with disordered H atoms. Two hydrogen bonds are formed between the water molecules, and another between water and a chlorido ligand.

  15. Aqua(1H-benzimidazole-κN3(pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylato-κ3O2,N,O6copper(II 0.75-hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-Ying Dong

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The title complex, [Cu(C7H3NO4(C7H6N2(H2O]·0.75H2O, consists of discrete monomeric units. The CuII atom is coordinated by two carboxylate O atoms and the N atom from a dipicolinate unit and by an N atom from a benzimidazole ligand. The distorted square-pyramidal geometry is completed by a longer axial bond to the O atom of a water molecule. The molecular structure and packing are stabilized by classical O—H...O and N—H...O hydrogen bonds, also including a disordered crystal water molecule.

  16. Prostaglandin E2 role in inhibition of joint cartilage collagen destruction in patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E V Chetina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostaglandin E2 role in inhibition of articular cartilage collagen degradation in patients with osteoarthritis. Objective. To assess prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 role in inhibition of type II collagen digestion in explants of articular cartilage of pts with osteoarthritis (OA. Material and methods. Explants of articular cartilage of pts with OA were cultured with PGE2 1pg to 10 ng/ml. Type II collagen digestion was assessed with immuno-enzyme assay. Gene expression was evaluated with PCR in real time. Results. PGE2 10 pg/ml as well as transforming growth factor β2 (TGFβ2 suppressed type II collagen digestion in explants of articular cartilage of pts with OA. This concentration of PGE2 did not suppress proteoglycan (aggrecan degradation. Gene expression analysis in 5 OA pts showed that PGE2 10 pg/ml suppressed metallomonooxigenase (MMP-13, MMP-1 and marker of chondrocyte hypertrophy type X collagen (COL10A1 as well as proinflammatory cytokines interleukine (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNFα. Naproxen, nonselective cyclooxygenase(COX-2 and 1 inhibitor concentration from 5 to 30 mcg/ml blocked TGFβ2 induced collagen digestion inhibition proving that PGE2 mediate influence of this growth factor. Naproxen concentration 5 mcg/ml increased collagen degradation. Conclusion. The study showed that PGE2 is a chondroprotector because it is able to suppress selectively OA pts cartilage collagen degradation. Beside that cartilage chondrocyte hypertrophy in OA connected functionally with increased collagen digestion is also regulated by low concentrations of PGE2

  17. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...... prehydration may occur. In the report both theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during water vapour exposure is nucleation controlled....

  18. Self-association of collagen triple helic peptides into higher order structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Karunakar; Amin, Priyal; Bryan, Michael A; Persikov, Anton V; Mohs, Angela; Wang, Yuh-Hwa; Brodsky, Barbara

    2006-11-03

    Interest in self-association of peptides and proteins is motivated by an interest in the mechanism of physiologically higher order assembly of proteins such as collagen as well as the mechanism of pathological aggregation such as beta-amyloid formation. The triple helical form of (Pro-Hyp-Gly)(10), a peptide that has proved a useful model for molecular features of collagen, was found to self-associate, and its association properties are reported here. Turbidity experiments indicate that the triple helical peptide self-assembles at neutral pH via a nucleation-growth mechanism, with a critical concentration near 1 mM. The associated form is more stable than individual molecules by about 25 degrees C, and the association is reversible. The rate of self-association increases with temperature, supporting an entropically favored process. After self-association, (Pro-Hyp-Gly)(10) forms branched filamentous structures, in contrast with the highly ordered axially periodic structure of collagen fibrils. Yet a number of characteristics of triple helix assembly for the peptide resemble those of collagen fibril formation. These include promotion of fibril formation by neutral pH and increasing temperature; inhibition by sugars; and a requirement for hydroxyproline. It is suggested that these similar features for peptide and collagen self-association are based on common lateral underlying interactions between triple helical molecules mediated by hydrogen-bonded hydration networks involving hydroxyproline.

  19. Oriented Collagen Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohta Kodama

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Oriented collagen scaffolds were developed in the form of sheet, mesh and tube by arraying flow-oriented collagen string gels and dehydrating the arrayed gels. The developed collagen scaffolds can be any practical size with any direction of orientation for tissue engineering applications. The birefringence of the collagen scaffolds was quantitatively analyzed by parallel Nicols method. Since native collagen in the human body has orientations such as bone, cartilage, tendon and cornea, and the orientation has a special role for the function of human organs, the developed various types of three-dimensional oriented collagen scaffolds are expected to be useful biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicines.

  20. Prediction of Refrigerant Gas Hydrates Formation Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deqing Liang; Ruzhu Wang; Kaihua Guo; Shuanshi Fan

    2001-01-01

    A fugacity model was developed for prediction of mixed refrigerant gas hydrates formation conditions based on the molecule congregation and solution theories. In this model, g as hydrates were regarded as non-ideal solid solution composed of water groups and guest molecules, and the expressions of fugacity of guest molecules in hydrate phase was proposed accordingly. It has been shown that the developed model can indicate successfully the effect of guest-guest molecule interaction. The results showed that the model can describe better the characteristics of phase equilibrium of mixed refrigerant gas hydrates and predictions are in good agreement with experimental data.

  1. INVESTIGATION OF THE SORPTION OF IODINE ON A COLLAGEN CARRIER TO OBTAIN A FUNCTIONAL INGREDIENT FOR FOOD SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Antipova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Process of sorption of iodine on the collagenic carrier is studied. Duration of binding and optimum amount of iodide of potassium, sorption capacity of the preparation PROMIL C95 respect of Iis determined.

  2. Waters of Hydration of Cupric Hydrates: A Comparison between Heating and Absorbance Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2011-01-01

    The empirical formulas of four cupric hydrates are determined by measuring the absorbance in aqueous solution. The Beer-Lambert Law is verified by constructing a calibration curve of absorbance versus known Cu[superscript 2+](aq) concentration. A solution of the unknown hydrate is prepared by using 0.2-0.3 g of hydrate, and water is added such…

  3. Induction of tolerance with intranasal administration of human cartilage gp-39 in DBA/1 mice - Amelioration of clinical, histologic, and radiologic signs of type II collagen-induced arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, LAB; Coenen-de Roo, CJJ; Helsen, MMA; Lubberts, E; Boots, AMH; van den Berg, WB; Miltenburg, AMM

    2000-01-01

    Objective. Human cartilage glycoprotein 39 (HC gp-39) was recently identified as a candidate autoantigen in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, In the present studies, we investigated the capacity of HC gp-39 to interfere in clinical disease induced by an unrelated autoantigen, type II collage

  4. Hydration in soccer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. The rates that carbohydrate and water are absorbed by the organism are limited by the rates of gastric emptying and intestinal absorption. The composition of drinks offered to the players should be influenced by the relative importance of the need of supplying carbohydrates or water; it should be remembered that the depletion of carbohydrate can result in fatigue and decrease of performance, but it is not usually a life-threatening condition. The addition of carbohydrate in these drinks increases the concentrations of blood glucose, increases the use of external fuel through the increase of the glucose oxidation in the muscles and it spares muscle glycogen. So, the ingestion of carbohydrate before and during the exercise can delay the emergence of fatigue and increase the players' performance. Several tactics can be used to avoid dehydration, like hyperhydration before exercise and player's acclimatization. The ideal situation to restore the player's fluid losses is between the sessions of exercises. Since soccer is a sport with quite peculiar characteristics related to hydration, the players should be concerned and educated about the importance of fluid ingestion before, during and after the exercise.

  5. Hydration behaviour of polyhydroxylated fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Zavala, J G [Departamento de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnologicas, Centro Universitario de Los Lagos, Universidad de Guadalajara, Enrique Diaz de Leon S/N, 47460 Jalisco (Mexico); Barajas-Barraza, R E [Departamento de Matematicas y Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Occidente, Periferico Sur, Manuel Gomez MorIn No 8585, 45604 Jalisco (Mexico); Padilla-Osuna, I; Guirado-Lopez, R A, E-mail: jgrz@culagos.udg.mx, E-mail: ebarajas@iteso.mx, E-mail: ismael@ifisica.uaslp.mx, E-mail: guirado@ifisica.uaslp.mx [Instituto de Fisica ' Manuel Sandoval Vallarta' , Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, 78000 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2011-10-28

    We have performed semi-empirical as well as density functional theory calculations in order to analyse the hydration properties of both bare C{sub 60} and highly hydroxylated C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} fullerenes. In all of our calculations, a total of 42 and 98 water molecules are always surrounding our here-considered carbon nanostructures. We found different wetting properties as a function of the chemical composition and structure of the OH-molecular over-layer covering the fullerene surface. In the case of bare C{sub 60}, water adsorption reveals that the H{sub 2}O species are not uniformly arranged around the carbon network but rather forms water droplets of different sizes, clearly revealing the hydrophobic nature of the C{sub 60} structure. In contrast, in the polyhydroxylated C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} fullerenes, the degree of wetting is strongly influenced by the precise location of the hydroxyl groups. We found that different adsorbed configurations for the OH-molecular coating can lead to the formation of partially hydrated or completely covered C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} compounds, a result that could be used to synthesize fullerene materials with different degrees of wettability. By comparing the relative stability of our hydroxylated structures in both bare and hydrated conditions we obtain that the energy ordering of the C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} isomers can change in the presence of water. The radial distribution function of our hydrated fullerenes reveals that water near these kinds of surfaces is densely packed. In fact, by counting the number of H{sub 2}O molecules which are adsorbed, by means of hydrogen bonds, to the surface of our more stable C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} isomer, we found that it varies in the range of 5-10, in good agreement with experiments. Finally, by comparing the calculated optical absorption spectra of various C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} structures in the presence and absence of water molecules, we note that only slight variations in the position and

  6. Protein dynamics: hydration and cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Heremans

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-pressure behavior of proteins seems to be unique among the biological macromolecules. Thermodynamic as well as kinetic data show the typical elliptical stability diagram. This may be extended by assuming that the unfolded state gives rise to volume and enthalpy-driven liquid-liquid transitions. A molecular interpretation follows from the temperature and the pressure dependence of the hydration and cavities. We suggest that positron annihilation spectroscopy can provide additional quantitative evidence for the contributions of cavities to the dynamics of proteins. Only mature amyloid fibrils that form from unfolded proteins are very resistant to pressure treatment.

  7. Triple-helical peptides: an approach to collagen conformation, stability, and self-association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Barbara; Thiagarajan, Geetha; Madhan, Balaraman; Kar, Karunakar

    2008-05-01

    Peptides have been an integral part of the collagen triple-helix structure story, and have continued to serve as useful models for biophysical studies and for establishing biologically important sequence-structure-function relationships. High resolution structures of triple-helical peptides have confirmed the basic Ramachandran triple-helix model and provided new insights into the hydration, hydrogen bonding, and sequence dependent helical parameters in collagen. The dependence of collagen triple-helix stability on the residues in its (Gly-X-Y)(n) repeating sequence has been investigated by measuring melting temperatures of host-guest peptides and an on-line collagen stability calculator is now available. Although the presence of Gly as every third residue is essential for an undistorted structure, interruptions in the repeating (Gly-X-Y)(n) amino acid sequence pattern are found in the triple-helical domains of all nonfibrillar collagens, and are likely to play a role in collagen binding and degradation. Peptide models indicate that small interruptions can be incorporated into a rod-like triple-helix with a highly localized effect, which perturbs hydrogen bonds and places the standard triple-helices on both ends out of register. In contrast to natural interruptions, missense mutations which replace one Gly in a triple-helix domain by a larger residue have pathological consequences, and studies on peptides containing such Gly substitutions clarify their effect on conformation, stability, and folding. Recent studies suggest peptides may also be useful in defining the basic principles of collagen self-association to the supramolecular structures found in tissues.

  8. Corneal refractive index-hydration relationship by objective refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sudi; Alió, Jorge L

    2012-11-01

    To compare an objective (VCH-1) with a manual subjective Abbé refractometer (MSAR) and evaluate the refractive index (RI)-hydration (H) relationship for the corneal stroma. Epithelial and endothelial layers were removed from a fresh postmortem ovine corneal buttons. RI was measured at both surfaces using (i) MSAR then (ii) VCH-1. The sample was weighed, slowly dehydrated under controlled conditions (2 h), and RI measures were repeated. Sample was oven dried (90°C) for 3 d to obtain dry weight and hydration at each episode of RI measurement. Average difference between individual pairs of measurements obtained using the two refractometers (ΔRI) was 0.00071 (standard deviation ± 0.0029, 95% confidence interval ± 0.0058). Root mean square difference between measurements obtained by the refractometers was 0.0024. There was no relationship between ΔRI and the mean of each measurement pair (r = 0.201, n = 40, p = 0.214). Linear regression revealed a significant relationship between RI and reciprocal of H at both surfaces as follows: anterior (i) RI = 1.355 + 0.111/H (r = -0.852, n = 20, p = <0.001), (ii) RI = 1.357 + 0.105/H (r = -0.849, n = 20, p = <0.001) and posterior (i) RI = 1.353 + 0.085/H (r = -0.882, n = 20, p = <0.001), (ii) RI = 1.350 + 0.088/H (r = -0.813, n = 20, p = <0.001). VCH-1 measurements are in good agreement with MSAR. RI at the anterior stroma was consistently higher suggesting hydration is lower by 1.10 units (6%) compared with the posterior stroma. Dehydration increased RI at both surfaces by similar rates. Current hypothetical models are useful for predicting RI from H for the posterior, but not the anterior, stroma.

  9. Lymph node histopathological studies in a combined adjuvant–collagen induced arthritis model in albino rat Rattus rattus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed S. Ibraheem

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available There are at least 16 types of collagen. Antibodies, to collagens, in particular to types I and II have been reported in a number of autoimmune diseases. In this study, we used rat and bovine collagens to study the effects of anti-collagen antibodies on the lymphoid organs of rats Histological examination of the lymph node sections showed that immunization with different collagen types combined with the adjuvant used in this study induced arthritis and immune reaction in lymph nodes. The degrees of the disease symptoms and immune reaction depended on the foreignness of the stimulating collagen and on whether it was accompanied with adjuvant. Anti-collagen antibodies led to a decrease in the thickness of the lymph node cortex and atrophy, with medullary hyperplasia, small granulomas appeared in the section. Immunizing with either bovine collagen or BSA has shown a remarkable distortion in architecture appeared, follicular hyperplasia and reactive inflammatory hyperplasia of the LN. Passive transfer of rat anti-rat collagen antibodies either accompanied with Freund’s adjuvant or not with a lesser degree of severity, resulted in epithelioid cells forming granuloma surrounded by collar of lymphocytes, scattered apoptotic bodies, lymphatic sinus ectasia accompanied with lymphoid follicles atrophy. The results of our study present a reliable model for collagen induced arthritis which is suitable for the investigation of the mechanism of disease induction and treatment approaches.

  10. Formation rate of natural gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, Marit

    2002-07-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 deg C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted to hydrate. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by gas injection rate and pressure. The effect of stirring rate is less significant and subcooling has no observable effect on the formation rate. Hydrate crystal concentration and gas composition do not influence the hydrate formation rate. Observations of produced hydrate crystals indicate that the crystals are elongated, about 5 micron in diameter and 10 micron long. Analysis of the results shows that the rate of hydrate formation is dominated by gas-liquid mass transfer. A mass transfer model, the bubble-to-crystal model, was developed for the hydrate formation rate in a continuous stirred tank reactor, given in terms of concentration driving force and an overall mass transfer coefficient. The driving force is the difference between the gas concentration at the gas-liquid interface and at the hydrate crystal surface. These concentrations correspond to the solubility of gas in water at experimental temperature and pressure and the solubility of gas at hydrate equilibrium temperature and experimental pressure, respectively. The overall mass transfer coefficient is expressed in terms of superficial gas velocity and impeller power consumption, parameters commonly used in study of stirred tank reactors. Experiments and modeling show that the stirred tank reactor has a considerable potential for increased production capacity. However, at higher hydrate production rates the

  11. Computational phase diagrams of noble gas hydrates under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeratchanan, Pattanasak; Hermann, Andreas

    2015-10-21

    We present results from a first-principles study on the stability of noble gas-water compounds in the pressure range 0-100 kbar. Filled-ice structures based on the host water networks ice-Ih, ice-Ic, ice-II, and C0 interacting with guest species He, Ne, and Ar are investigated, using density functional theory (DFT) with four different exchange-correlation functionals that include dispersion effects to various degrees: the non-local density-based optPBE-van der Waals (vdW) and rPW86-vdW2 functionals, the semi-empirical D2 atom pair correction, and the semi-local PBE functional. In the He-water system, the sequence of stable phases closely matches that seen in the hydrogen hydrates, a guest species of comparable size. In the Ne-water system, we predict a novel hydrate structure based on the C0 water network to be stable or at least competitive at relatively low pressure. In the Ar-water system, as expected, no filled-ice phases are stable; however, a partially occupied Ar-C0 hydrate structure is metastable with respect to the constituents. The ability of the different DFT functionals to describe the weak host-guest interactions is analysed and compared to coupled cluster results on gas phase systems.

  12. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein deficiency promotes early onset and the chronic development of collagen-induced arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Hui; Carlsen, Stefan; Nandakumar, Kutty;

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a homopentameric protein in cartilage. The development of arthritis, like collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), involves cartilage as a target tissue. We have investigated the development of CIA in COMP-deficient mice. METHODS: COMP......-deficient mice in the 129/Sv background were backcrossed for 10 generations against B10.Q mice, which are susceptible to chronic CIA. COMP-deficient and wild-type mice were tested for onset, incidence, and severity of arthritis in both the collagen and collagen antibody-induced arthritis models. Serum anti......-collagen II and anti-COMP antibodies as well as serum COMP levels in arthritic and wild-type mice were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: COMP-deficient mice showed a significant early onset and increase in the severity of CIA in the chronic phase, whereas collagen II-antibody titers were...

  13. Enhanced stabilization of collagen by furfural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakra, Rachita; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Usha, Ramamoorthy; Mohan, Ranganathan; Sundaresan, Raja; Korrapati, Purna Sai

    2014-04-01

    Furfural (2-furancarboxaldehyde), a product derived from plant pentosans, has been investigated for its interaction with collagen. Introduction of furfural during fibril formation enhanced the thermal and mechanical stability of collagen. Collagen films treated with furfural exhibited higher denaturation temperature (Td) (pcollagen films did not have any cytotoxic effect. Rheological characterization showed an increase in shear stress and shear viscosity with increasing shear rate for treated collagen. Circular dichroism (CD) studies indicated that the furfural did not have any impact on triple helical structure of collagen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of furfural treated collagen exhibited small sized porous structure in comparison with untreated collagen. Thus this study provides an alternate ecologically safe crosslinking agent for improving the stability of collagen for biomedical and industrial applications.

  14. [Disc electrophoresis of collagen protein (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitmayr, P; Verzár, F

    1975-01-01

    The composition of proteins extracted from tendon collagen is investigated by disc electrophoresis. No qualitative differences can be demonstrated between young and old collagen. The action of formaldehyde and methionine on the tendons has no effect on the electrophoretic picture.

  15. Geomechanical Performance of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments in Offshore Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen A. Holditch

    2006-12-31

    The main objective of this study is to develop the necessary knowledge base and quantitative predictive capability for the description of geomechanical performance of hydrate bearing sediments (hereafter referred to as HBS) in oceanic environments. The focus is on the determination of the envelope of hydrate stability under conditions typical of those related to the construction and operation of offshore platforms. To achieve this objective, we have developed a robust numerical simulator of hydrate behavior in geologic media by coupling a reservoir model with a commercial geomechanical code. To be sure our geomechanical modeling is realistic, we are also investigating the geomechanical behavior of oceanic HBS using pore-scale models (conceptual and mathematical) of fluid flow, stress analysis, and damage propagation. In Phase II of the project, we will review all published core data and generate additional core data to verify the models. To generate data for our models, we are using data from the literature and we will be conducting laboratory studies in 2007 that generate data to (1) evaluate the conceptual pore-scale models, (2) calibrate the mathematical models, (3) determine dominant relations and critical parameters defining the geomechanical behavior of HBS, and (4) establish relationships between the geomechanical status of HBS and the corresponding geophysical signature. The milestones for Phase I of this project are given as follows: Literature survey on typical sediments containing gas hydrates in the ocean (TAMU); Recommendations on how to create typical sediments in the laboratory (TAMU); Demonstrate that typical sediments can be created in a repeatable manner in the laboratory and gas hydrates can be created in the pore space (TAMU); Develop a conceptual pore-scale model based on available data and reports (UCB); Test the developed pore-scale concepts on simple configurations and verify the results against known measurements and observations (UCB

  16. Tuning the composition of guest molecules in clathrate hydrates: NMR identification and its significance to gas storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yutaek; Lee, Jong-Won; Kumar, Rajnish; Moudrakovski, Igor L; Lee, Huen; Ripmeester, John A

    2009-08-03

    Gas hydrates represent an attractive way of storing large quantities of gas such as methane and carbon dioxide, although to date there has been little effort to optimize the storage capacity and to understand the trade-offs between storage conditions and storage capacity. In this work, we present estimates for gas storage based on the ideal structures, and show how these must be modified given the little data available on hydrate composition. We then examine the hypothesis based on solid-solution theory for clathrate hydrates as to how storage capacity may be improved for structure II hydrates, and test the hypothesis for a structure II hydrate of THF and methane, paying special attention to the synthetic approach used. Phase equilibrium data are used to map the region of stability of the double hydrate in P-T space as a function of the concentration of THF. In situ high-pressure NMR experiments were used to measure the kinetics of reaction between frozen THF solutions and methane gas, and (13)C MAS NMR experiments were used to measure the distribution of the guests over the cage sites. As known from previous work, at high concentrations of THF, methane only occupies the small cages in structure II hydrate, and in accordance with the hypothesis posed, we confirm that methane can be introduced into the large cage of structure II hydrate by lowering the concentration of THF to below 1.0 mol %. We note that in some preparations the cage occupancies appear to fluctuate with time and are not necessarily homogeneous over the sample. Although the tuning mechanism is generally valid, the composition and homogeneity of the product vary with the details of the synthetic procedure. The best results, those obtained from the gas-liquid reaction, are in good agreement with thermodynamic predictions; those obtained for the gas-solid reaction do not agree nearly as well.

  17. Bioinspired catalytic nitrile hydration by dithiolato, sulfinato/thiolato, and sulfenato/sulfinato ruthenium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Davinder; Masitas, César A; Nguyen, Tho N; Grapperhaus, Craig A

    2013-01-11

    A series of Ru(II) catalysts inspired by the metalloenzyme nitrile hydratase catalyze the hydration of benzonitrile with up to 242 turnovers under neutral conditions with very low catalysts loading. Catalysts with an oxidized sulfur environment are less susceptible to product inhibition increasing the catalytic efficiency at low nitrile : water ratios.

  18. Collagen Mimetic Peptides: Progress Towards Functional Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, S. Michael; Li, Yang; Kim, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, collagen mimetic peptides (CMPs) have been used for elucidating the structure of the collagen triple helix and the factors responsible for its stabilization. The wealth of fundamental knowledge on collagen structure and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions accumulated over the past decades has led to a recent burst of research exploring the potential of CMPs to recreate the higher order assembly and biological function of natural collagens for biomedical applications. A...

  19. Investigation of shallow gas hydrate occurrence and gas seep activity on the Sakhalin continental slope, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Young Keun; Baranov, Boris; Obzhirov, Anatoly; Salomatin, Alexander; Derkachev, Alexander; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Minami, Hrotsugu; Kuk Hong, Jong

    2016-04-01

    The Sakhalin continental slope has been a well-known gas hydrate area since the first finding of gas hydrate in 1980's. This area belongs to the southernmost glacial sea in the northern hemisphere where most of the area sea is covered by sea ice the winter season. Very high organic carbon content in the sediment, cold sea environment, and active tectonic regime in the Sakhalin slope provide a very favorable condition for occurring shallow gas hydrate accumulation and gas emission phenomena. Research expeditions under the framework of a Korean-Russian-Japanese long-term international collaboration projects (CHAOS, SSGH-I, SSGH-II projects) have been conducted to investigate gas hydrate occurrence and gas seepage activities on the Sakhalin continental slope, Russia from 2003 to 2015. During the expeditions, near-surface gas hydrate samples at more than 30 sites have been retrieved and hundreds of active gas seepage structures on the seafloor were newly registered by multidisciplinary surveys. The gas hydrates occurrence at the various water depths from about 300 m to 1000 m in the study area were accompanied by active gas seepage-related phenomena in the sub-bottom, on the seafloor, and in the water column: well-defined upward gas migration structures (gas chimney) imaged by high-resolution seismic, hydroacoustic anomalies of gas emissions (gas flares) detected by echosounders, seafloor high backscatter intensities (seepage structures) imaged by side-scan sonar and bathymetric structures (pockmarks and mounds) mapped by single/multi-beam surveys, and very shallow SMTZ (sulphate-methane transition zone) depths, strong microbial activities and high methane concentrations measured in sediment/seawater samples. The highlights of the expeditions are shallow gas hydrate occurrences around 300 m in the water depth which is nearly closed to the upper boundary of gas hydrate stability zone in the area and a 2,000 m-high gas flare emitted from the deep seafloor.

  20. Temperature, pressure, and compositional effects on anomalous or "self" preservation of gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2003-01-01

    We previously reported on a thermal regime where pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate is preserved metastably in bulk at up to 75 K above its nominal temperature stability limit of 193 K at 0.1 MPa, following rapid release of the sample pore pressure. Large fractions (>50 vol.%) of methane hydrate can be preserved for 2-3 weeks by this method, reflecting the greatly suppressed rates of dissociation that characterize this "anomalous preservation" regime. This behavior contrasts that exhibited by methane hydrate at both colder (193-240 K) and warmer (272-290 K) isothermal test conditions, where dissociation rates increase monotonically with increasing temperature. Here, we report on recent experiments that further investigate the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition on anomalous preservation behavior. All tests conducted on sI methane hydrate yielded self-consistent results that confirm the highly temperature-sensitive but reproducible nature of anomalous preservation behavior. Temperature-stepping experiments conducted between 250 and 268 K corroborate the relative rates measured previously in isothermal preservation tests, and elevated pore-pressure tests showed that, as expected, dissociation rates are further reduced with increasing pressure. Surprisingly, sII methane-ethane hydrate was found to exhibit no comparable preservation effect when rapidly depressurized at 268 K, even though it is thermodynamically stable at higher temperatures and lower pressures than sI methane hydrate. These results, coupled with SEM imaging of quenched sample material from a variety of dissociation tests, strongly support our earlier arguments that ice-"shielding" effects provided by partial dissociation along hydrate grain surfaces do not serve as the primary mechanism for anomalous preservation. The underlying physical-chemistry mechanism(s) of anomalous preservation remains elusive, but appears to be based more on textural or morphological changes within the hydrate

  1. Synthesis of reduced collagen crosslinks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwendijk, A.M.C.H. van den; Benningshof, J.C.J.; Wegmann, V.; Bank, R.A.; Koppele, J.M. te; Brussee, J.; Gen, A. van der

    1999-01-01

    A new synthetic route to reduced collagen crosslinks (LNL and HLNL) is described in this report. It enables an enantioselective synthesis of LNL. HLNL was obtained as a mixture of two diastereoisomers. This method also provides the possibility to introduce radio-labels during the synthesis.

  2. Fracture mechanics of collagen fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Rene B; Mulder, Hindrik; Kovanen, Vuokko

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are important load-bearing structures, which are frequently injured in both sports and work. Type I collagen fibrils are the primary components of tendons and carry most of the mechanical loads experienced by the tissue, however, knowledge of how load is transmitted between and within...

  3. Synthesis of reduced collagen crosslinks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwendijk, A.M.C.H. van den; Benningshof, J.C.J.; Wegmann, V.; Bank, R.A.; Koppele, J.M. te; Brussee, J.; Gen, A. van der

    1999-01-01

    A new synthetic route to reduced collagen crosslinks (LNL and HLNL) is described in this report. It enables an enantioselective synthesis of LNL. HLNL was obtained as a mixture of two diastereoisomers. This method also provides the possibility to introduce radio-labels during the synthesis.

  4. Pure SF6 and SF6-N2 mixture gas hydrates equilibrium and kinetic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Kyung; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Lee, Bo Ram; Lee, Yoon Seok; Kim, Soo Min; Park, Hye Ok; Kim, Young Seok; Park, Yeong-Do; Kim, Yang Do

    2009-10-15

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), whether pure or mixed with inexpensive inert gas, has been widely used in a variety of industrial processes, but it is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. For this reason, it is necessary to separate and/or collect it from waste gas streams. In this study, we investigated the pure SF6 and SF6-N2 mixture gas hydrates formation equilibrium aswell asthe gas separation efficiency in the hydrate process. The equilibrium pressure of SF6-N2 mixture gas was higher than that of pure SF6 gas. Phase equilibrium data of SF6-N2 mixture gas was similar to SF6 rather than N2. The kinetics of SF6-N2 mixture gas was controlled by the amount of SF6 at the initial gas composition as well as N2 gas incorporation into the S-cage of structure-II hydrate preformed by the SF6 gas. Raman analysis confirmed the N2 gas incorporation into the S-cage of structure-II hydrate. The compositions in the hydrate phase were found to be 71, 79, 80, and 81% of SF6 when the feed gas compositions were 40, 65, 70, and 73% of SF6, respectively. The present study provides basic information for the separation and purification of SF6 from mixed SF6 gas containing inert gases.

  5. A collagen defect in homocystinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, A H; Trelstad, R L

    1973-10-01

    The biochemical mechanism accounting for the connective tissue abnormalities in homocystinuria was explored by examining the effects of various amino acids known to accumulate in the plasma of patients with this disease on cross-link formation in collagen. Neutral salt solutions of purified, rat skin collagen, rich in cross-link precursor aldehydes, were polymerized to native type fibrils by incubating at 37 degrees C in the presence of homocysteine, homocystine, or methionine. After the polymerization was completed, each sample was examined for the formation of covalent intermolecular cross-links, assessed indirectly by solubility tests and directly by measuring the cross-link compounds after reduction with tritiated sodium borohydride and hydrolysis. Collagen solutions containing homocysteine (0.01 M-0.1 M) failed to form insoluble fibrils. Furthermore, much less of the reducible cross-links, Delta(6,7) dehydrohydroxylysinonorleucine, Delta(6,7) dehydrohydroxylysinohydroxynorleucine, and histidino-dehydrohydroxymerodesmosine were formed in the preparations containing homocysteine as compared with the control and the samples containing methionine or homocystine. The content of the precursor aldehydes, alpha-aminoadipic-delta-semialdehyde (allysine) and the aldol condensation product, was also markedly diminished in tropocollagen incubated with homocysteine. It is concluded that homocysteine interferes with the formation of intermolecular cross-links that help stabilize the collagen macromolecular network via its reversible binding to the aldehydic functional groups. Analysis of the collagen cross-links in skin biopsy samples obtained from three patients with documented homocystinuria showed that the cross-links were significantly decreased as compared with the age-matched controls, supporting the tentative conclusions reached from the in vitro model studies. In addition, the solubility of dermal collagen in non-denaturing solvents was significantly increased in

  6. Dynamics of a photoexcited hydrated electron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pshenichnikov, M.S.; Baltuška, A.; Wiersma, D.A.; Kärtner, F.X.

    2004-01-01

    Combining photon-echo and frequency-resolved pump-probe techniques with extremely short laser pulses that consist of only few optical cycles, we investigate the dynamics of the equilibrated hydrated electron. The pure dephasing time of the hydrated electron deduced from the photon-echo measurements

  7. Gas hydrate inhibition of drilling fluid additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaolan, L.; Baojiang, S.; Shaoran, R. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Dongying (China). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates that form during offshore well drilling can have adverse impacts on well operational safety. The hydrates typically form in the risers and the annulus between the casing and the drillstring, and can stop the circulation of drilling fluids. In this study, experiments were conducted to measure the effect of drilling fluid additives on hydrate inhibition. Polyalcohols, well-stability control agents, lubricating agents, and polymeric materials were investigated in a stirred tank reactor at temperatures ranging from -10 degree C to 60 degrees C. Pressure, temperature, and torque were used to detect onset points of hydrate formation and dissociation. The inhibitive effect of the additives on hydrate formation was quantified. Phase boundary shifts were measured in terms of temperature difference or sub-cooling gained when chemicals were added to pure water. Results showed that the multiple hydroxyl groups in polyalcohol chemicals significantly inhibited hydrate formation. Polymeric and polyacrylamide materials had only a small impact on hydrate formation, while sulfonated methyl tannins were found to increase hydrate formation. 6 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  8. Hydration shells exchange charge with their protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abitan, Haim; Lindgård, Per-Anker; Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert;

    2010-01-01

    Investigation of the interaction between a protein and its hydration shells is an experimental and theoretical challenge. Here, we used ultrasonic pressure waves in aqueous solutions of a protein to explore the conformational states of the protein and its interaction with its hydration shells. In...

  9. A new geotechnical gas hydrates research laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Gas hydrates encapsulate natural gas molecules in a very compact form, as ice-like compounds composed of water molecules. Permafrost environments and offshore areas contain vast quantities of gas hydrates within soil and rock. This paper describes the role played by gas hydrates in submarine slope instability, their potential as a sustainable energy source, and their effects on global climate change. A new state-of-the-art laboratory located at the University of Calgary, which was developed to study the geomechanical behaviour of gas hydrate-sediment mixtures, was also presented. A specialized high pressure low temperature triaxial apparatus capable of performing a suite of tests on gas hydrate-sediment mixtures is housed in this laboratory. Extensive renovations were required in order to enable the use of methane gas to simulate natural hydrate formation conditions. The laboratory is specifically designed to examine the properties and behaviour of reconstituted gas hydrate-sediment mixtures and natural gas hydrate core samples. 26 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Investigations into surfactant/gas hydrate relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Rudy; Zhang, Guochang; Dearman, Jennifer; Woods, Charles [Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Gas hydrates have unique physical properties portending useful industrial applications of gas storage, gas separation, or water desalination. When gas hydrates were found in the early 1990s to occur naturally and abundantly in seafloors, three other primary interests and concerns emerged: potential new energy source, climate threat from their greenhouse gases, and seafloor instabilities. This paper presents research showing how anionic synthetic surfactants helped develop an industrial gas hydrate storage process for natural gas and how naturally-occurring in-situ anionic biosurfactants influence the formation and placement of gas hydrates in ocean sediments. The catalytic effects, mechanisms, and surface specificities imparted by synthetic surfactants in the gas storage process and imparted by biosurfactants in porous media are discussed. The Bacillus subtilis bacterium that is indigenous to gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico was cultured in the laboratory. Its biosurfactant was separated and found to catalyze gas hydrates in porous media. The experiments indicate that seafloor-biosurfactants can be produced rapidly in-situ to achieve threshold concentrations whereby hydrates are promoted. The biosurfactants accumulate and promote hydrate formation on specific mineral surfaces such as sodium montmorillonite. (author)

  11. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  12. Differential effects of collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation on skeletal tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica P Homan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the genes encoding cartilage associated protein (CRTAP and prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1 encoded by LEPRE1 were the first identified causes of recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI. These proteins, together with cyclophilin B (encoded by PPIB, form a complex that 3-hydroxylates a single proline residue on the α1(I chain (Pro986 and has cis/trans isomerase (PPIase activity essential for proper collagen folding. Recent data suggest that prolyl 3-hydroxylation of Pro986 is not required for the structural stability of collagen; however, the absence of this post-translational modification may disrupt protein-protein interactions integral for proper collagen folding and lead to collagen over-modification. P3H1 and CRTAP stabilize each other and absence of one results in degradation of the other. Hence, hypomorphic or loss of function mutations of either gene cause loss of the whole complex and its associated functions. The relative contribution of losing this complex's 3-hydroxylation versus PPIase and collagen chaperone activities to the phenotype of recessive OI is unknown. To distinguish between these functions, we generated knock-in mice carrying a single amino acid substitution in the catalytic site of P3h1 (Lepre1(H662A . This substitution abolished P3h1 activity but retained ability to form a complex with Crtap and thus the collagen chaperone function. Knock-in mice showed absence of prolyl 3-hydroxylation at Pro986 of the α1(I and α1(II collagen chains but no significant over-modification at other collagen residues. They were normal in appearance, had no growth defects and normal cartilage growth plate histology but showed decreased trabecular bone mass. This new mouse model recapitulates elements of the bone phenotype of OI but not the cartilage and growth phenotypes caused by loss of the prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex. Our observations suggest differential tissue consequences due to selective inactivation of P3H1 hydroxylase

  13. Structural and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from alite hydration in the presence of sodium and potassium hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, Oscar, E-mail: oamendoz@unal.edu.co [Grupo del Cemento y Materiales de Construcción (CEMATCO). Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Facultad de Minas, Medellín (Colombia); Giraldo, Carolina [Cementos Argos S.A., Medellín (Colombia); Camargo, Sergio S. [Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro/COPPE, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tobón, Jorge I. [Grupo del Cemento y Materiales de Construcción (CEMATCO). Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Facultad de Minas, Medellín (Colombia)

    2015-08-15

    This research evaluates the effect of sodium and potassium hydroxide on the structure and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from the hydration of pure alite. Monoclinic (MIII) alite was synthesized and hydrated, using water-to-alite ratios of 0.5 and 0.6 and additions of 10% NaOH and KOH by weight of alite. Based on results of X-ray diffraction, isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nanoindentation, two different effects of the alkaline hydroxides on the hydration reaction of alite, both at early and later ages, can be identified: (i) a differentiated hydration process, attributed to an enhancement in calcium hydroxide (CH) precipitation and a stimulation of the C-S-H nuclei; and (ii) an increase in the elastic modulus of the C-S-H aggregations, attributed to an electrostatic attraction between positive charges from the alkaline cations and negative charges from the C-S-H structure.

  14. Physico-chemical characterization of collagen scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.H. León-Mancilla

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to research the physical and chemical properties of collagen scaffolds (CS obtained from bone matrix Nukbone® subject to a demineralization process using hydrochloric acid. The CS samples were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy, elemental chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, spectroscopy Infrared, thermal analysis, differential scanning calorimetry and nitrogen adsorption. The microanalysis were used to set the macro- and microstructures of CS. They showed that the CS retained the morphology of Nukbone® with interconnected pores and their size between 100 and 500 μm, and it is composed of 20% by weight of HA and the rest is collagen type I. By infrared spectroscopy the functional groups of collagen type I (amide A – 3285, B – 2917, I – 1633, II – 1553 and III – 1239 cm−1 were identified. By thermal analysis it was determined that the phenomenon of denaturation of the collagen type I began in the range of 75–85 °C and burned above 200 °C.

  15. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the

  16. Compound Natural Gas Hydrate: A Natural System for Separation of Hydrate-Forming Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, M. D.; Osegovic, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Natural processes that separate materials from a mixture may exert a major influence on the development of the atmospheres and surfaces of planets, moons, and other planetary bodies. Natural distillation and gravity separation, amongst others, are well known means of differentiating materials through liquid-gas partitioning. One of the least known attributes of clathrate (gas) hydrates is their potential effect on the evolution of planetary system oceans and atmospheres. Gas hydrates separate gases from mixtures of gases by concentrating preferred hydrate-forming materials (HFM) guests within the water-molecule cage structure of crystalline hydrate. Different HFMs have very different fields of stability. When multiple hydrate formers are present, a preference series based on their selective uptake exists. Compound hydrate, which is formed from two or more species of HFM, extract preferred HFM from a mixture in very different proportions to their relative percentages of the original mixture. These compound hydrates can have different formation and dissociation conditions depending on the evolution of the environment. That is, the phase boundary of the compound hydrate that is required for dissociation lies along a lower pressure - higher temperature course. Compound hydrates respond to variations in temperature, pressure, and HFM composition. On Earth, the primary naturally occurring hydrate of interest to global climate modeling is methane hydrate. Oceanic hydrate on Earth is the largest store of carbon in the biosphere that is immediately reactive to environmental change, and is capable of releasing large amounts of methane into the atmosphere over a short geological time span. Hydrate formation is essentially metastable and is very sensitive to environmental change and to gas flux. Where natural variations in temperature and pressure varies so that hydrate will form and dissociate in some cyclical manner, such as in oceans where sea level is capable of rising and

  17. Simteche Hydrate CO2 Capture Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nexant and Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2006-09-30

    As a result of an August 4, 2005 project review meeting held at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to assess the project's technical progress, Nexant/Simteche/LANL project team was asked to meet four targets related to the existing project efforts. The four targets were to be accomplished by the September 30, 2006. These four targets were: (1) The CO{sub 2} hydrate process needs to show, through engineering and sensitivity analysis, that it can achieve 90% CO{sub 2} capture from the treated syngas stream, operating at 1000 psia. The cost should indicate the potential of achieving the Sequestration Program's cost target of less than 10% increase in the cost of electricity (COE) of the non-CO{sub 2} removal IGCC plant or demonstrate a significant cost reduction from the Selexol process cost developed in the Phase II engineering analysis. (2) The ability to meet the 20% cost share requirement for research level efforts. (3) LANL identifies through equilibrium and bench scale testing a once-through 90% CO{sub 2} capture promoter that supports the potential to achieve the Sequestration Program's cost target. Nexant is to perform an engineering analysis case to verify any economic benefits, as needed; no ETM validation is required, however, for this promoter for FY06. (4) The CO{sub 2} hydrate once-through process is to be validated at 1000 psia with the ETM at a CO{sub 2} capture rate of 60% without H{sub 2}S. The performance of 68% rate of capture is based on a batch, equilibrium data with H{sub 2}S. Validation of the test results is required through multiple runs and engineering calculations. Operational issues will be solved that will specifically effect the validation of the technology. Nexant was given the primary responsibility for Target No.1, while Simteche was mainly responsible for Target No.2; with LANL having the responsibility of Targets No.3 and No.4.

  18. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  19. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated

  20. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-07-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  1. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-06-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  2. Molecular Packing in Network-Forming Collagens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Knupp

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Collagen is the most abundant protein among vertebrates and occurs in virtually all multicellular animals. Collagen molecules are classified into 21 different types and differ in their sequence, weight, structure, and function, but they can be broadly subdivided into families. Type IV, VI, VIII, X, and dogfish egg case collagens belong to the network-forming family. Here, we summarise what is known about the way these collagen molecules pack to form networks. In addition the main structural characteristics of the network-forming collagens are compared and discussed.

  3. Experimental Study of Natural Gas Storage in Hydrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙志高; 王如竹; 郭开华; 樊栓狮

    2004-01-01