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Sample records for hydrated collagen gels

  1. Morphology studies on gas hydrates interacting with silica gel

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    Beltran, J.; Servio, P. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Clathrate hydrates or gas hydrates are non-stoichiometric, crystalline compounds that form when small molecules come in contact with water at certain temperatures and pressures. Natural gas hydrates are found in the ocean bottom and in permafrost regions. It is thought that the amount of energy stored in natural hydrates is at least twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. In addition, trapping carbon dioxide as a hydrate in the bottom of the ocean has been suggested as an alternative means of reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. Naturally occurring clathrates are found in close interaction with fine grained particles of very small mean pore diameters. Even though an increasing amount of hydrate equilibrium data for small diameter porous media has become available, the morphological behavior of hydrates subject to such conditions is yet to be explored. This paper presented a study that visually examined hydrate formation and decomposition of gas hydrates while interacting with fine grains of silica gel. The study showed still frames from high-resolution video recordings for hydrate formation and decomposition. The paper discussed the experiment including the apparatus as well as the results of hydrate formation and hydrate dissociation. This study enabled for the first time to observe clathrate morphology while hydrates interacted closely with fine grain particles with small mean pore diameters. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Nanomechanical mapping of hydrated rat tail tendon collagen I fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Samuel J; Quigley, Andrew S; Clegg, Charlotte; Kreplak, Laurent

    2014-10-21

    Collagen fibrils play an important role in the human body, providing tensile strength to connective tissues. These fibrils are characterized by a banding pattern with a D-period of 67 nm. The proposed origin of the D-period is the internal staggering of tropocollagen molecules within the fibril, leading to gap and overlap regions and a corresponding periodic density fluctuation. Using an atomic force microscope high-resolution modulus maps of collagen fibril segments, up to 80 μm in length, were acquired at indentation speeds around 10(5) nm/s. The maps revealed a periodic modulation corresponding to the D-period as well as previously undocumented micrometer scale fluctuations. Further analysis revealed a 4/5, gap/overlap, ratio in the measured modulus providing further support for the quarter-staggered model of collagen fibril axial structure. The modulus values obtained at indentation speeds around 10(5) nm/s are significantly larger than those previously reported. Probing the effect of indentation speed over four decades reveals two distinct logarithmic regimes of the measured modulus and point to the existence of a characteristic molecular relaxation time around 0.1 ms. Furthermore, collagen fibrils exposed to temperatures between 50 and 62°C and cooled back to room temperature show a sharp decrease in modulus and a sharp increase in fibril diameter. This is also associated with a disappearance of the D-period and the appearance of twisted subfibrils with a pitch in the micrometer range. Based on all these data and a similar behavior observed for cross-linked polymer networks below the glass transition temperature, we propose that collagen I fibrils may be in a glassy state while hydrated.

  3. Development of an injectable chitosan/marine collagen composite gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Itoh, Soichiro; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Demura, Makoto; Okawa, Atsushi; Sakai, Katsuyoshi; Ohkuma, Tsuneo

    2010-01-01

    A chitosan/marine-originated collagen composite has been developed. This composite gel was characterized and its biocompatibility, as well as an inflammatory reaction, was observed. The chitosan gel including N-3-carboxypropanoil-6-O-(carboxymethyl) chitosan of 3 mol%, 6-O-(carboxymethyl) chitosan of 62 mol% and 6-O-(carboxymethyl) chitin of 35 mol% was prepared and compounded with the salmon atelocollagen (SA) gel at different mixture ratios. The composite gels were injected subcutaneously in to the back of rats. The specimens were harvested for a histological survey as well as a tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) assay by ELISA. The inflammatory cell infiltration and release of TNF-α were successively controlled low with the ratio of SA to chitosan at 10:90 or 20:80. The SA gel first, within 2 weeks, and then chitosan in the composite gel were slowly absorbed after implantation, followed by soft tissue formation. It is expected that this composite gel will be available as a carrier for tissue filler and drug delivery systems.

  4. Functional study on two artificial liver bioreactors with collagen gel

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    XU Bing

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo improve the hollow fiber bioreactor of artificial liver. MethodsRat hepatocytes mixed with collagen solution were injected into the external cavity of a hollow fiber reactor to construct a bioreactor of hepatocytes suspended in collagen gel (group Ⅰ. Other rat hepatocytes suspended in solution were injected into the external cavity of a hollow fiber reactor with a layer of collagen on the wall of the external cavity to construct a bioreactor of collagen layer and hepatocytes (group Ⅱ. For each group, the culture solution circulated through the internal cavity of the hollow fiber bioreactor; the bioreactor was put in a culture box for 9 d, and the culture solution in the internal cavity was exchanged for new one every 24 h; the concentrations of albumin (Alb, urea, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in the culture solution samples were measured to examine the hepatocyte function of the bioreactor. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 130. Continuous data were expressed as mean±SD, and comparison between groups was made by paired t test. ResultsFor groups Ⅰ and Ⅱ, Alb levels reached peak values on day 3 of culture (1.41±0.08 g/L and 0.65±0.05 g/L; from day 3 to 9, group I had a significantly higher Alb level than group Ⅱ (t>7.572, P<0.01. For groups Ⅰ and Ⅱ, urea levels reached peak values on days 3 and 5 of culture (1.73±0.14 mmol/L and 1.56±0.18 mmol/L; from days 5 to 9, group I had a significantly higher urea level than group Ⅱ (t>8.418, P<0.01. For groups Ⅰ and Ⅱ, LDH levels reached peak values on day 9 of culture (32.03±9.13 U/L and 70.17±25.28 U/L; from days 1 to 9, group I had a significantly lower LDH level than group Ⅱ(t>5.633, P<0.01. Therefore, the bioreactor of hepatocytes suspended in collagen gel (group Ⅰ showed a better hepatocyte function and less hepatic enzyme leakage compared with the bioreactor of collagen layer and hepatocytes (group Ⅱ. Conclusion

  5. Effects of a Pseudophysiological Environment on the Elastic and Viscoelastic Properties of Collagen Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghezi, Sébastien; Couet, Frédéric; Chevallier, Pascale; Mantovani, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Vascular tissue engineering focuses on the replacement of diseased small-diameter blood vessels with a diameter less than 6 mm for which adequate substitutes still do not exist. One approach to vascular tissue engineering is to culture vascular cells on a scaffold in a bioreactor. The bioreactor establishes pseudophysiological conditions for culture (medium culture, 37°C, mechanical stimulation). Collagen gels are widely used as scaffolds for tissue regeneration due to their biological properties; however, they exhibit low mechanical properties. Mechanical characterization of these scaffolds requires establishing the conditions of testing in regard to the conditions set in the bioreactor. The effects of different parameters used during mechanical testing on the collagen gels were evaluated in terms of mechanical and viscoelastic properties. Thus, a factorial experiment was adopted, and three relevant factors were considered: temperature (23°C or 37°C), hydration (aqueous saline solution or air), and mechanical preconditioning (with or without). Statistical analyses showed significant effects of these factors on the mechanical properties which were assessed by tensile tests as well as stress relaxation tests. The last tests provide a more consistent understanding of the gels' viscoelastic properties. Therefore, performing mechanical analyses on hydrogels requires setting an adequate environment in terms of temperature and aqueous saline solution as well as choosing the adequate test. PMID:22844285

  6. Growth of hydrated gel layers in nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T.M.; Machiels, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    The hydration kinetics of waste glasses in contact with an aqueous solution has been studied by using three different approaches. Emphasis has been placed on modeling processes in the transition zone defined as the region in which the nature of the glass changes from the original dry glass to an open hydrated structure. The first model relies on concentration-dependent diffusion coefficients to obtain a transition zone in which the ions mobility is extremely low compared to that in the gel layer. In the second model, the transition zone and hydrated layer are treated as distinct phases and it is assumed that ion exchange at their common boundary is the rate-controlling process. The third model treats the transition zone as a thin film of constant thickness and low diffusivity. In the absence of appreciable network dissolution, all three models indicate that growth of the gel layer becomes eventually proportional to the square root of time; however, as long as processes in the transition zone are rate controlling, growth is linearly proportional to time

  7. Platelets stimulate fibroblast-mediated contraction of collagen gels

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    Lundahl Joachim

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelets are thought to play a role in a variety of inflammatory conditions in the lung, some of which may lead to fibrosis. In the current study we tested the hypothesis that whole platelets and platelet lysate can mediate remodelling of extracellular matrix in vitro by affecting fibroblast-mediated contraction of a collagen gel. We also sought to determine to what extent platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β contribute to this effect. Methods Washed platelets, isolated from healthy blood donors, and platelet lysate (freezing and thawing, were cast together with human lung fibroblasts in three-dimensional collagen gels. The gels were then released and cultured for four days. PDGF and TGF-β1 concentrations were measured in culture supernatants by ELISA. Results Both platelets and platelet lysate augmented fibroblast-mediated gel contraction in a time and concentration dependent manner (19.9% ± 0.1 (mean ± SEM of initial area vs. 48.0% ± 0.4 at 48 hours; P 1 and PDGF-AA/AB were released in co-culture. PDGF-AA/AB had a maximum release at 24 hours whereas TGF-β1 release increased with longer culture periods. Neutralising antibodies to these mediators partially inhibited platelet-induced gel contraction. Conclusion We conclude that platelets may promote remodelling of extracellular matrix in vitro and that PDGF and TGF-β partially mediate this effect, also indicating a role for other mediators. The findings may be an important mechanism in regulating repair processes after injury.

  8. Evidencing of collagen polypeptide sequences responsible of hydration by means of 13 C NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trandafir, Viorica; Georgescu, Mariana; Albu, Bujor; Popescu, G.; Akutsu, Hiroshi; Nechifor, Gheorghe

    2000-01-01

    The aim of these studies is to prepare biomaterials of high biocompatibility to the human body, provided for a long lifetime. Among these important biomaterials also accounts the collagen, with a large application area in medicine, pharmaceutics, cosmetics, etc. Collagen biomaterials of various hydration levels (between 23 - 83%) were prepared by a particular technique, using a matrix of 23% initial humidity. In order to investigate the structural and conformational changes from the collagen macromolecules by denaturation - renaturation, hydration - dehydration, the high-resolution 13 C - NMR solid state and also pore size distribution analysis were carried out. The collagen biomaterials can be made in a large range of shapes and can have structures of mimesis, close to those of the live tissues, when hydrated. (authors)

  9. Type I collagen gel protects murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells from TNFα-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hong-Ju; He, Wen-Qi; Chen, Ling; Liu, Wei-Wei; Xu, Qian; Xia, Ming-Yu; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji; Tashiro, Shin-ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells have been used to test efficacy of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. In the present study, we reported on protective effect of type I collagen gel used as L929 cell culture. L929 cell grew and proliferated well on collagen gel. However, the L929 cells exhibited cobblestone-like morphology which was much different from the spread fusiform shape when cultured on conventional cell dishes as well as the cells tended to aggregate. On conventional cell culture dishes, the cells treated with TNFα became round in shape and eventually died in a necroptotic manner. The cells cultured on collagen gel, however, were completely unaffected. TNFα treatment was reported to induce autophagy in L929 cells on the plastic dish, and therefore we investigated the effect of collagen gel on induction of autophagy. The results indicated that autophagy induced by TNFα treatment was much reduced when the cells were cultured on collagen gel. In conclusion, type I collagen gel protected L929 cell from TNFα-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Collagen gel culture changed the morphology of L929 cells. • L929 cell cultured on collagen gel were resistant to TNFα-induced cell death. • Collagen gel culture inhibited TNFα-induced autophagy in L929 cells

  10. Type I collagen gel protects murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells from TNFα-induced cell death

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    Wang, Hong-Ju; He, Wen-Qi; Chen, Ling; Liu, Wei-Wei; Xu, Qian; Xia, Ming-Yu; Hayashi, Toshihiko [China-Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China); Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji [Nippi Research Institute of Biomatrix, Toride, Ibaraki 302-0017 (Japan); Tashiro, Shin-ichi [Institute for Clinical and Biomedical Sciences, Kyoto 603-8072 (Japan); Onodera, Satoshi [Department of Clinical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa Pharmaceutical University, Tokyo 194-8543 (Japan); Ikejima, Takashi, E-mail: ikejimat@vip.sina.com [China-Japan Research Institute of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells have been used to test efficacy of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. In the present study, we reported on protective effect of type I collagen gel used as L929 cell culture. L929 cell grew and proliferated well on collagen gel. However, the L929 cells exhibited cobblestone-like morphology which was much different from the spread fusiform shape when cultured on conventional cell dishes as well as the cells tended to aggregate. On conventional cell culture dishes, the cells treated with TNFα became round in shape and eventually died in a necroptotic manner. The cells cultured on collagen gel, however, were completely unaffected. TNFα treatment was reported to induce autophagy in L929 cells on the plastic dish, and therefore we investigated the effect of collagen gel on induction of autophagy. The results indicated that autophagy induced by TNFα treatment was much reduced when the cells were cultured on collagen gel. In conclusion, type I collagen gel protected L929 cell from TNFα-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Collagen gel culture changed the morphology of L929 cells. • L929 cell cultured on collagen gel were resistant to TNFα-induced cell death. • Collagen gel culture inhibited TNFα-induced autophagy in L929 cells.

  11. Fibrillar structure and elasticity of hydrating collagen: a quantitative multiscale approach.

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    Morin, Claire; Hellmich, Christian; Henits, Peter

    2013-01-21

    It is well known that hydration of collagenous tissues leads to their swelling, as well as to softening of their elastic behavior. However, it is much less clear which microstructural and micromechanical "rules" are involved in this process. Here, we develop a theoretical approach cast in analytical mathematical formulations, which is experimentally validated by a wealth of independent tests on collagenous tissues, such as X-ray diffraction, vacuum drying, mass measurements, and Brillouin light scattering. The overall emerging picture is the following: air-drying leaves water only in the gap zones between the triple-helical collagen molecules; upon re-hydration, the extrafibrillar space is established at volumes directly proportional to the hydration-induced swelling of the (micro) fibrils, until the maximum equatorial distance between the long collagen molecules is reached. Thereafter, the volume of the fibrils stays constant, and only the extrafibrillar volume continues to grow. At all these hydration stages, the elastic behavior is governed by the same, hydration-invariant mechanical interaction pattern of only two, interpenetrating mechanical phases: transversely isotropic molecular collagen and isotropic water (or empty pores in the vacuum-dried case). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Stabilization and anomalous hydration of collagen fibril under heating.

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    Sasun G Gevorkian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type I collagen is the most common protein among higher vertebrates. It forms the basis of fibrous connective tissues (tendon, chord, skin, bones and ensures mechanical stability and strength of these tissues. It is known, however, that separate triple-helical collagen macromolecules are unstable at physiological temperatures. We want to understand the mechanism of collagen stability at the intermolecular level. To this end, we study the collagen fibril, an intermediate level in the collagen hierarchy between triple-helical macromolecule and tendon. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: When heating a native fibril sample, its Young's modulus decreases in temperature range 20-58°C due to partial denaturation of triple-helices, but it is approximately constant at 58-75°C, because of stabilization by inter-molecular interactions. The stabilization temperature range 58-75°C has two further important features: here the fibril absorbs water under heating and the internal friction displays a peak. We relate these experimental findings to restructuring of collagen triple-helices in fibril. A theoretical description of the experimental results is provided via a generalization of the standard Zimm-Bragg model for the helix-coil transition. It takes into account intermolecular interactions of collagen triple-helices in fibril and describes water adsorption via the Langmuir mechanism. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We uncovered an inter-molecular mechanism that stabilizes the fibril made of unstable collagen macromolecules. This mechanism can be relevant for explaining stability of collagen.

  13. Effect of controlled release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 from collagen gel on neural stem cells.

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    Huang, Fei; Wu, Yunfeng; Wang, Hao; Chang, Jun; Ma, Guangwen; Yin, Zongsheng

    2016-01-20

    This study aimed to examine the effect of controlled release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) from collagen gel on rat neural stem cells (NSCs). With three groups of collagen gel, BDNF/collagen gel, and NT-3/collagen gel as controls, BDNF and NT-3 were tested in the BDNF-NT-3/collagen gel group at different time points. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results showed that BDNF and NT-3 were steadily released from collagen gels for 10 days. The cell viability test and the bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assay showed that BDNF-NT-3/collagen gel supported the survival and proliferation of NSCs. The results also showed that the length of processes was markedly longer and differentiation percentage from NSCs into neurons was much higher in the BDNF-NT-3/collagen gel group than those in the collagen gel, BDNF/collagen gel, and NT-3/collagen gel groups. These findings suggest that BDNF-NT-3/collagen gel could significantly improve the ability of NSCs proliferation and differentiation.

  14. Influence of Crosslink Density and Stiffness on Mechanical Properties of Type I Collagen Gel

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    Shengmao Lin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of type I collagen gel vary due to different polymerization parameters. In this work, the role of crosslinks in terms of density and stiffness on the macroscopic behavior of collagen gel were investigated through computational modeling. The collagen fiber network was developed in a representative volume element, which used the inter-fiber spacing to regulate the crosslink density. The obtained tensile behavior of collagen gel was validated against published experimental data. Results suggest that the cross-linked fiber alignment dominated the strain stiffening effect of the collagen gel. In addition, the gel stiffness was enhanced approximately 40 times as the crosslink density doubled. The non-affine deformation was reduced with the increased crosslink density. A positive bilinear correlation between the crosslink density and gel stiffness was obtained. On the other hand, the crosslink stiffness had much less impact on the gel stiffness. This work could enhance our understanding of collagen gel mechanics and shed lights on designing future clinical relevant biomaterials with better control of polymerization parameters.

  15. Modelling Elastic Scattering and Light Transport in 3D Collagen Gel Constructs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bixio, L

    2001-01-01

    A model of elastic scattering and light propagation is presented, which can be used to obtain the scattering coefficient, the index of refraction and the distribution of the collagen fibrils in a gel...

  16. Identification of the hydrate gel phases present in phosphate-modified calcium aluminate binders

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    Chavda, Mehul A.; Bernal, Susan A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Apperley, David C. [Solid-State NMR Group, Department of Chemistry, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Kinoshita, Hajime [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Provis, John L., E-mail: j.provis@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    The conversion of hexagonal calcium aluminate hydrates to cubic phases in hydrated calcium aluminate cements (CAC) can involve undesirable porosity changes and loss of strength. Modification of CAC by phosphate addition avoids conversion, by altering the nature of the reaction products, yielding a stable amorphous gel instead of the usual crystalline hydrate products. Here, details of the environments of aluminium and phosphorus in this gel were elucidated using solid-state NMR and complementary techniques. Aluminium is identified in both octahedral and tetrahedral coordination states, and phosphorus is present in hydrous environments with varying, but mostly low, degrees of crosslinking. A {sup 31}P/{sup 27}Al rotational echo adiabatic passage double resonance (REAPDOR) experiment showed the existence of aluminium–phosphorus interactions, confirming the formation of a hydrated calcium aluminophosphate gel as a key component of the binding phase. This resolves previous disagreements in the literature regarding the nature of the disordered products forming in this system.

  17. Phase equilibria and thermodynamic modeling of ethane and propane hydrates in porous silica gels.

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    Seo, Yongwon; Lee, Seungmin; Cha, Inuk; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Huen

    2009-04-23

    In the present study, we examined the active role of porous silica gels when used as natural gas storage and transportation media. We adopted the dispersed water in silica gel pores to substantially enhance active surface for contacting and encaging gas molecules. We measured the three-phase hydrate (H)-water-rich liquid (L(W))-vapor (V) equilibria of C(2)H(6) and C(3)H(8) hydrates in 6.0, 15.0, 30.0, and 100.0 nm silica gel pores to investigate the effect of geometrical constraints on gas hydrate phase equilibria. At specified temperatures, the hydrate stability region is shifted to a higher pressure region depending on pore size when compared with those of bulk hydrates. Through application of the Gibbs-Thomson relationship to the experimental data, we determined the values for the C(2)H(6) hydrate-water and C(3)H(8) hydrate-water interfacial tensions to be 39 +/- 2 and 45 +/- 1 mJ/m(2), respectively. By using these values, the calculation values were in good agreement with the experimental ones. The overall results given in this study could also be quite useful in various fields, such as exploitation of natural gas hydrate in marine sediments and sequestration of carbon dioxide into the deep ocean.

  18. Automatic and quantitative measurement of collagen gel contraction using model-guided segmentation

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    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Yang, Tai-Hua; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Zhao, Chunfeng; Amadio, Peter C.; Sun, Yung-Nien; Su, Fong-Chin; An, Kai-Nan

    2013-08-01

    Quantitative measurement of collagen gel contraction plays a critical role in the field of tissue engineering because it provides spatial-temporal assessment (e.g., changes of gel area and diameter during the contraction process) reflecting the cell behavior and tissue material properties. So far the assessment of collagen gels relies on manual segmentation, which is time-consuming and suffers from serious intra- and inter-observer variability. In this study, we propose an automatic method combining various image processing techniques to resolve these problems. The proposed method first detects the maximal feasible contraction range of circular references (e.g., culture dish) and avoids the interference of irrelevant objects in the given image. Then, a three-step color conversion strategy is applied to normalize and enhance the contrast between the gel and background. We subsequently introduce a deformable circular model which utilizes regional intensity contrast and circular shape constraint to locate the gel boundary. An adaptive weighting scheme was employed to coordinate the model behavior, so that the proposed system can overcome variations of gel boundary appearances at different contraction stages. Two measurements of collagen gels (i.e., area and diameter) can readily be obtained based on the segmentation results. Experimental results, including 120 gel images for accuracy validation, showed high agreement between the proposed method and manual segmentation with an average dice similarity coefficient larger than 0.95. The results also demonstrated obvious improvement in gel contours obtained by the proposed method over two popular, generic segmentation methods.

  19. The evaluation of collagen gel with various connection states by using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Hiroki; Mukai, Naoki; Gouping, Chen; Numanno, Tomokazu; Honma, Kazuhiro; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Miyanaga, Yutaka; Miyakawa, Syumpei

    2008-01-01

    To noninvasively evaluate the connection states of collagen fiber, a characterizing factor of the physical property, is considered to be helpful in the evaluation of cartilage functions. The purpose of this study was to examine how the connection states of collagen influence the MRI parameters by evaluating the collagen gel with various connection states using MRI. MRI was performed to six type I collagen gel samples with various connection status and a water sample. The evaluation parameters included T1 relaxation time, T2 relaxation time, and diffusion coefficient. With regard to gel samples with cross-links, the T2 relaxation time was shortened in proportion to the dose of glutaraldehyde. It is considered that as the glutaraldehyde concentration increases, the distance between protons in water molecules decreases; this is followed by a stronger bipole-bipole interaction, resulting in a shorter T2 relaxation time. The diffusion coefficient for gel samples with cross-links also decreased with increasing glutaraldehyde concentrations. However, gel samples without glutaraldehyde were almost the same as that of the water. This result suggested that the degree of entrapment of water inside the gel samples without cross-links, even when it converted into gel, was found to be nearly equal to that of the free water

  20. Investigation of the effect of hydration on dermal collagen in ex vivo human skin tissue using second harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samatham, Ravikant; Wang, Nicholas K.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2016-02-01

    Effect of hydration on the dermal collagen structure in human skin was investigated using second harmonic generation microscopy. Dog ears from the Mohs micrographic surgery department were procured for the study. Skin samples with subject aged between 58-90 years old were used in the study. Three dimensional Multiphoton (Two-photon and backward SHG) control data was acquired from the skin samples. After the control measurement, the skin tissue was either soaked in deionized water for 2 hours (Hydration) or kept at room temperature for 2 hours (Desiccation), and SHG data was acquired. The data was normalized for changes in laser power and detector gain. The collagen signal per unit volume from the dermis was calculated. The desiccated skin tissue gave higher backward SHG compared to respective control tissue, while hydration sample gave a lower backward SHG. The collagen signal decreased with increase in hydration of the dermal collagen. Hydration affected the packing of the collagen fibrils causing a change in the backward SHG signal. In this study, the use of multiphoton microscopy to study the effect of hydration on dermal structure was demonstrated in ex vivo tissue.

  1. Changes Of Hydration Level In Type I Collagen And Glycosaminoglycans Synthesized In The Rat’s Skin Under The Mechanical Stress

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    Alexandr M. Ponomarenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes of Hydratation Level Of Type I Collagen And Glycosaminoglycans That Are Synthesized In The Rat’s Skin Under The Mechanical Stress. The effect of the mechanical stress on the levels of hydratation of type I collagen and glycosaminoglycans that are synthesized in it, has been studied in vitro using the rats’ skin. The measured hydration of isotherms has shown that mechanical stress in the skin increases and decreases the amount of absorbed water in glycosaminoglycans and in collagen, respectively. Сalculated the average amounts of water molecules in collagen tripeptide and glycosaminoglycans disaccharide unit in the inside and outside layers of their hydrate shells

  2. Inactivation of microorganisms within collagen gel biomatrices using pulsed electric field treatment.

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    Griffiths, Sarah; Maclean, Michelle; Anderson, John G; MacGregor, Scott J; Grant, M Helen

    2012-02-01

    Pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment was examined as a potential decontamination method for tissue engineering biomatrices by determining the susceptibility of a range of microorganisms whilst within a collagen gel. High intensity pulsed electric fields were applied to collagen gel biomatrices containing either Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae or the spores of Aspergillus niger. The results established varying degrees of microbial PEF susceptibility. When high initial cell densities (10(6)-10(7) CFU ml(-1)) were PEF treated with 100 pulses at 45 kV cm(-1), the greatest log reduction was achieved with S. cerevisiae (~6.5 log(10) CFU ml(-1)) and the lowest reduction achieved with S. epidermidis (~0.5 log(10) CFU ml(-1)). The results demonstrate that inactivation is influenced by the intrinsic properties of the microorganism treated. Further investigations are required to optimise the microbial inactivation kinetics associated with PEF treatment of collagen gel biomatrices.

  3. Accelerated craniofacial bone regeneration through dense collagen gel scaffolds seeded with dental pulp stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamieh, Frédéric; Collignon, Anne-Margaux; Coyac, Benjamin R.; Lesieur, Julie; Ribes, Sandy; Sadoine, Jérémy; Llorens, Annie; Nicoletti, Antonino; Letourneur, Didier; Colombier, Marie-Laure; Nazhat, Showan N.; Bouchard, Philippe; Chaussain, Catherine; Rochefort, Gael Y.

    2016-12-01

    Therapies using mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) seeded scaffolds may be applicable to various fields of regenerative medicine, including craniomaxillofacial surgery. Plastic compression of collagen scaffolds seeded with MSC has been shown to enhance the osteogenic differentiation of MSC as it increases the collagen fibrillary density. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the osteogenic effects of dense collagen gel scaffolds seeded with mesenchymal dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) on bone regeneration in a rat critical-size calvarial defect model. Two symmetrical full-thickness defects were created (5 mm diameter) and filled with either a rat DPSC-containing dense collagen gel scaffold (n = 15), or an acellular scaffold (n = 15). Animals were imaged in vivo by microcomputer tomography (Micro-CT) once a week during 5 weeks, whereas some animals were sacrificed each week for histology and histomorphometry analysis. Bone mineral density and bone micro-architectural parameters were significantly increased when DPSC-seeded scaffolds were used. Histological and histomorphometrical data also revealed significant increases in fibrous connective and mineralized tissue volume when DPSC-seeded scaffolds were used, associated with expression of type I collagen, osteoblast-associated alkaline phosphatase and osteoclastic-related tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. Results demonstrate the potential of DPSC-loaded-dense collagen gel scaffolds to benefit of bone healing process.

  4. Structural determinants of hydration, mechanics and fluid flow in freeze-dried collagen scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offeddu, G S; Ashworth, J C; Cameron, R E; Oyen, M L

    2016-09-01

    Freeze-dried scaffolds provide regeneration templates for a wide range of tissues, due to their flexibility in physical and biological properties. Control of structure is crucial for tuning such properties, and therefore scaffold functionality. However, the common approach of modeling these scaffolds as open-cell foams does not fully account for their structural complexity. Here, the validity of the open-cell model is examined across a range of physical characteristics, rigorously linking morphology to hydration and mechanical properties. Collagen scaffolds with systematic changes in relative density were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Micro-Computed Tomography and spherical indentation analyzed in a time-dependent poroelastic framework. Morphologically, all scaffolds were mid-way between the open- and closed-cell models, approaching the closed-cell model as relative density increased. Although pore size remained constant, transport pathway diameter decreased. Larger collagen fractions also produced greater volume swelling on hydration, although the change in pore diameter was constant, and relatively small at ∼6%. Mechanically, the dry and hydrated scaffold moduli varied quadratically with relative density, as expected of open-cell materials. However, the increasing pore wall closure was found to determine the time-dependent nature of the hydrated scaffold response, with a decrease in permeability producing increasingly elastic rather than viscoelastic behavior. These results demonstrate that characterizing the deviation from the open-cell model is vital to gain a full understanding of scaffold biophysical properties, and provide a template for structural studies of other freeze-dried biomaterials. Freeze-dried collagen sponges are three-dimensional microporous scaffolds that have been used for a number of exploratory tissue engineering applications. The characterization of the structure-properties relationships of these scaffolds is

  5. Sol-gel-state of hydrated zirconium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakchiev, L.G.; Lyakhov, N.Z.

    1995-01-01

    The change in viscosity and density of a system in the course of sol-gel-xerogel has been traced. The size and molecular mass of particles in sol have been determined. Initial sol is practically a monodisperse system. Gel is a spatial net of similar particles. Reversible character of sol-gel transition with a change in water content in the system suggests instability of the bond between the particles in the structure of the solid state body formed. 11 refs.; 4 figs

  6. Characterization of Fibrin and Collagen Gels for Engineering Wound Healing Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oihana Moreno-Arotzena

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogels are used for 3D in vitro assays and tissue engineering and regeneration purposes. For a thorough interpretation of this technology, an integral biomechanical characterization of the materials is required. In this work, we characterize the mechanical and functional behavior of two specific hydrogels that play critical roles in wound healing, collagen and fibrin. A coherent and complementary characterization was performed using a generalized and standard composition of each hydrogel and a combination of techniques. Microstructural analysis was performed by scanning electron microscopy and confocal reflection imaging. Permeability was measured using a microfluidic-based experimental set-up, and mechanical responses were analyzed by rheology. We measured a pore size of 2.84 and 1.69 μm for collagen and fibrin, respectively. Correspondingly, the permeability of the gels was 1.00·10−12 and 5.73·10−13 m2. The shear modulus in the linear viscoelastic regime was 15 Pa for collagen and 300 Pa for fibrin. The gels exhibited strain-hardening behavior at ca. 10% and 50% strain for fibrin and collagen, respectively. This consistent biomechanical characterization provides a detailed and robust starting point for different 3D in vitro bioapplications, such as collagen and/or fibrin gels. These features may have major implications for 3D cellular behavior by inducing divergent microenvironmental cues.

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Uniaxial Mechanical Properties of Collagen Gel Scaffolds for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro M. Irastorza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small diameter tissue-engineered arteries improve their mechanical and functional properties when they are mechanically stimulated. Applying a suitable stress and/or strain with or without a cycle to the scaffolds and cells during the culturing process resides in our ability to generate a suitable mechanical model. Collagen gel is one of the most used scaffolds in vascular tissue engineering, mainly because it is the principal constituent of the extracellular matrix for vascular cells in human. The mechanical modeling of such a material is not a trivial task, mainly for its viscoelastic nature. Computational and experimental methods for developing a suitable model for collagen gels are of primary importance for the field. In this research, we focused on mechanical properties of collagen gels under unconfined compression. First, mechanical viscoelastic models are discussed and framed in the control system theory. Second, models are fitted using system identification. Several models are evaluated and two nonlinear models are proposed: Mooney-Rivlin inspired and Hammerstein models. The results suggest that Mooney-Rivlin and Hammerstein models succeed in describing the mechanical behavior of collagen gels for cyclic tests on scaffolds (with best fitting parameters 58.3% and 75.8%, resp.. When Akaike criterion is used, the best is the Mooney-Rivlin inspired model.

  8. Mathematical modeling of uniaxial mechanical properties of collagen gel scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irastorza, Ramiro M; Drouin, Bernard; Blangino, Eugenia; Mantovani, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Small diameter tissue-engineered arteries improve their mechanical and functional properties when they are mechanically stimulated. Applying a suitable stress and/or strain with or without a cycle to the scaffolds and cells during the culturing process resides in our ability to generate a suitable mechanical model. Collagen gel is one of the most used scaffolds in vascular tissue engineering, mainly because it is the principal constituent of the extracellular matrix for vascular cells in human. The mechanical modeling of such a material is not a trivial task, mainly for its viscoelastic nature. Computational and experimental methods for developing a suitable model for collagen gels are of primary importance for the field. In this research, we focused on mechanical properties of collagen gels under unconfined compression. First, mechanical viscoelastic models are discussed and framed in the control system theory. Second, models are fitted using system identification. Several models are evaluated and two nonlinear models are proposed: Mooney-Rivlin inspired and Hammerstein models. The results suggest that Mooney-Rivlin and Hammerstein models succeed in describing the mechanical behavior of collagen gels for cyclic tests on scaffolds (with best fitting parameters 58.3% and 75.8%, resp.). When Akaike criterion is used, the best is the Mooney-Rivlin inspired model.

  9. Skin hydration and cooling effect produced by the Voltaren® vehicle gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, Agnes M; Schmidts, Thomas; Kuhlmann, Jens; Segger, Dörte; Fotopoulos, Grigorios; Heinzerling, Johanna

    2012-05-01

    Voltaren vehicle gel is the carrier substance of the topical Voltaren products. This vehicle gel is especially formulated to be easily applied on the skin, while providing some sensory benefits. The present study aims to substantiate the widely perceived hydrating and cooling effect of Voltaren vehicle gel. Volar forearm skin hydration and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were measured and user satisfaction was evaluated by questionnaires, after application in 31 healthy, female volunteers. The cooling effect was investigated for 40 min with thermal imaging on 12 forearm sites of six healthy subjects. Voltaren vehicle gel application increased skin hydration by 13.1% (P = 0.0002) when compared with the untreated site, 8 h after the final treatment after 2 weeks. TEWL decreased on both treated (0.37 g/m(2) /h) and untreated (0.74 g/m(2) /h) forearm sites after 2 weeks (8 h after last treatment), demonstrating a relative increase of 6.5% in water loss. Voltaren vehicle gel application resulted in a rapid reduction of skin surface temperature by 5.1°C after only 3 min with an average maximum reduction of 5.8°C after 10 min. The cooling effect was experienced by 94% subjects, while 74% felt that their skin became softer. No adverse events, including skin irritation, were reported during the study and by the 37 participants. This study showed a statistically significant increase in skin hydration as well as a rapid cooling effect lasting approximately 30 min, after application of Voltaren vehicle gel. The small relative increase in water loss may be attributed to an additional skin surface water loss secondary to the increased water content brought into the skin by the Voltaren vehicle gel. The use did not induce any skin irritation and was found acceptable to use by the majority of participants. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Thermal denaturation of type I collagen vitrified gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Zhiyong; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Trexler, Morgana; Elisseeff, Jennifer; Guo, Qiongyu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We analyzed the denaturation of vitrigels synthesized under different conditions. ► Overall denaturation kinetics consisted of both reversible and irreversible steps. ► More stable vitrigels were formed under high level of vitrification. - Abstract: The denaturation kinetics of type I collagen vitrigels synthesized under different vitrification time and temperature were analyzed by the classical Kissinger approach and the advanced model free kinetics (AMFK) using the Vyazovkin algorithm. The AMFK successfully elucidated the overall denaturation into reversible and irreversible processes. Depending on vitrification conditions, the activation energy for the irreversible process ranged from 100 to 200 kJ/mol, and the reversible enthalpy ranged from 250 to 300 kJ/mol. All of these values increased with the vitrification time and temperature, indicating that a more stable and complex structure formed with increased vitrification. The classical Kissinger method predicted the presence of a critical temperate of approximately 60 °C for the transition between reversible and irreversible processes. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of fibril structures in vitrigels both before and after full denaturation; however the fibrils had became thicker and rougher after denaturation.

  11. Collagen gel protects L929 cells from TNFα-induced death by activating NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Ju; Li, Meng-Qi; Liu, Wei-Wei; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji; Tashiro, Shin-Ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    Type I collagen is one of the most abundant components of extracellular matrix. We previously illustrated that murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells grew well on type I collagen gel and escaped from TNFα-induced cell death. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying the protective effect of collagen gel. We used western blot, confocal microscopy, MTT assay and flow cytometry by introducing fluorescence staining to determine the expression levels of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitory ratio and autophagy. L929 cells on collagen gel showed higher expression of NF-κB in the nucleus. Inhibition of NF-κB with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate hydrochloride (PDTC) or knockdown by NF-κB-siRNA canceled the protective effect of collagen gel on L929 cells from TNFα-induced death, suggesting for the role of NF-κB in the protection from cell death. We found a new aspect of the effect of PDTC on L929 cells cultured on collagen gel. PDTC alone without TNFα induced apoptosis in the L929 cells cultured on collagen gel but not the cells on plastic dish. The apoptosis induction of the L929 cells cultured on collagen gel with PDTC was repressed by inhibiting autophagy with chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, suggesting that autophagy contributes to the death induced by the treatment with PDTC. Possible underlying mechanism of this finding is discussed. NF-κB played an important role in protecting the L929 cells cultured on collagen gel from TNFα-induced death.

  12. Influence of a multiple emulsion, liposomes and a microemulsion gel on sebum, skin hydration and TEWL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrhauser, D; Nagelreiter, C; Baierl, A; Skipiol, J; Valenta, C

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the influence of three cosmetically relevant, priorly characterized vehicles on skin hydration, sebum content and transepidermal water loss was investigated. The chosen vehicles included a liposomal pre-formulation, a multiple W/O/W emulsion and a microemulsion gel. The in vivo effects of these vehicles were demonstrated and compared among them. The stability of the prepared vehicles was determined visually, microscopically, rheologically by pH measurements and particle size. Interactions with skin were assessed by non-invasive biophysical techniques using the Corneometer(®), Aqua Flux(®) and Sebumeter, measuring skin hydration, TEWL and skin sebum content, respectively. All vehicles remained stable over an observation period of 6 weeks. The multiple emulsion increased sebum content and skin hydration. In case of the liposomes, each monitored parameter remained almost constant. In contrast, the microemulsion gel lowered skin hydration and increased TEWL values, but even 1 week after termination of the treatment TEWL decreased almost close to control levels. All produced vehicles were proven to remain physically stable over the duration of this study. The used multiple emulsion showed very skin-friendly properties by increasing sebum and skin hydration. Likewise, the liposomal pre-formulation exhibited no negative effects. On the contrary, the investigated microemulsion gel seemed to have skin dehydrating and TEWL increasing features. However, the multiple emulsion as well as liposomes was identified to be well-tolerated vehicles for skin which might qualify them for the use in cosmetic formulations. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  13. X-ray spectra and theoretical elastic properties of crystalline calcium silicate hydrates: comparison with cement hydrated gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayuela, A.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available For 22 crystalline Calcium Silicates Hydrates, we have calculated their structure and their elastic properties by atomistic force field methods as well as simulate their Xray diffraction patterns. From the computed Young moduli, it can be suggested that the key parameters to determine the elastic properties of crystalline Calcium Silicate Hydrates are densities and water content. We have compared these trends with those of cementitious C-S-H gel and synthetic C-S-H type I as a function of their C/S ratios and nominal water content. Our comparison show that the experimentally suggested values of density and Young moduli for C-S-H gel lie in the range of the calculated CSH crystals. However, we conclude that a detailed correspondence might require investigating structurally within CSH gels the role of water and especially of Ca and Si sites through their C/S ratio.

    En este trabajo se han calculado para 22 Silicatos Cálcicos Hidratados cristalinos, su estructura y sus propiedades elásticas mediante métodos atomísticos “force field”, así como simulado sus espectros de difracción de rayos X. De los módulos de Young calculados se puede deducir, que los parámetros clave que determinan las propiedades elásticas de los Silicatos Cálcicos Hidratados cristalinos son la densidad y el contenido en agua. Nuestros resultados muestran que los valores experimentales de la densidad y de los módulos de Young para el gel C-S-H están dentro del rango de los cristales de CSH calculados. Sin embargo, podemos concluir que para establecer una correlación más directa sería necesario investigar el papel que juegan el agua y sobre todo el Ca y Si, mediante la relación C/S, en la estructura del gel CSH.

  14. Dynamic impact indentation of hydrated biological tissues and tissue surrogate gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilke Kalcioglu, Z.; Qu, Meng; Strawhecker, Kenneth E.; Shazly, Tarek; Edelman, Elazer; VanLandingham, Mark R.; Smith, James F.; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.

    2011-03-01

    For both materials engineering research and applied biomedicine, a growing need exists to quantify mechanical behaviour of tissues under defined hydration and loading conditions. In particular, characterisation under dynamic contact-loading conditions can enable quantitative predictions of deformation due to high rate 'impact' events typical of industrial accidents and ballistic insults. The impact indentation responses were examined of both hydrated tissues and candidate tissue surrogate materials. The goals of this work were to determine the mechanical response of fully hydrated soft tissues under defined dynamic loading conditions, and to identify design principles by which synthetic, air-stable polymers could mimic those responses. Soft tissues from two organs (liver and heart), a commercially available tissue surrogate gel (Perma-Gel™) and three styrenic block copolymer gels were investigated. Impact indentation enabled quantification of resistance to penetration and energy dissipative constants under the rates and energy densities of interest for tissue surrogate applications. These analyses indicated that the energy dissipation capacity under dynamic impact increased with increasing diblock concentration in the styrenic gels. Under the impact rates employed (2 mm/s to 20 mm/s, corresponding to approximate strain energy densities from 0.4 kJ/m3 to 20 kJ/m3), the energy dissipation capacities of fully hydrated soft tissues were ultimately well matched by a 50/50 triblock/diblock composition that is stable in ambient environments. More generally, the methodologies detailed here facilitate further optimisation of impact energy dissipation capacity of polymer-based tissue surrogate materials, either in air or in fluids.

  15. The endogenous fluorescence of fibroblast in collagen gels as indicator of stiffness of the extracellular matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Martinez, J. P.; Ortega-Martinez, A.; Franco, W.

    2016-03-01

    The stiffness or rigidity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cell response. Established mechanical tests to measure stiffness, such as indentation and tensile tests, are invasive and destructive to the sample. Endogenous or native molecules to cells and ECM components, like tryptophan and cross-links of collagen, display fluorescence upon irradiation with ultraviolet light. Most likely, the concentration of these endogenous fluorophores changes as the stiffness of the ECM changes. In this work we investigate the endogenous fluorescence of collagen gels containing fibroblasts as a non-invasive non-destructive method to measure stiffness of the ECM. Human fibroblast cells were cultured in three-dimensional gels of type I collagen (50,000 cells/ml). This construct is a simple model of tissue contraction. During contraction, changes in the excitation-emission matrix (a fluorescence map in the 240-520/290-530 nm range) of constructs were measured with a spectrofluoremeter, and changes in stiffness were measured with a standard indentation test over 16 days. Results show that a progressive increase in fluorescence of the 290/340 nm excitation-emission pair correlates with a progressive increase in stiffness (r=0.9, α=0.5). The fluorescence of this excitation-emission pair is ascribed to tryptophan and variations in the fluorescence of this pair correlate with cellular proliferation. In this tissue model, the endogenous functional fluorescence of proliferating fibroblast cells is a biomechanical marker of stiffness of the ECM.

  16. Confocal Raman microscopy supported by optical clearing treatment of the skin—influence on collagen hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sdobnov, Anton Yu; Tuchin, Valery V; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2017-01-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) is employed to study the skin physiology, drug permeation and skin disease monitoring. In order to increase the depth of investigations, the effect of optical clearing was observed on porcine ear skin ex vivo . The optical clearing agents (OCAs) glycerol and iohexol (Omnipaque ™ ) were applied to the porcine ear skin and investigated by CRM after 30 and 60 min of treatment. The extent of optical clearing by utilizing concentrations of 70% glycerol and 100% Omnipaque ™ was evaluated. The intensity of the skin-related Raman peaks significantly increased starting from the depth 160 µ m for Omnipaque ™ and 40 µ m for glycerol ( p   ⩽  0.05) after 60 min of treatment. The OCAs’ influence on the collagen hydration in the deep-located dermis was investigated. Both OCAs induce skin dehydration, but the effect of glycerol treatment (30 min and 60 min) is stronger. The obtained results demonstrate that with increasing the treatment time, both glycerol and Omnipaque ™ solutions improve the optical clearing of porcine skin making the deep-located dermal regions able for investigations. At the used concentrations and time intervals, glycerol is more effective than Omnipaque ™ . However, Omnipaque ™ is more promising than glycerol for future in vivo applications as it is an already approved pharmaceutic substance without any known impact on the skin structure. (paper)

  17. Confocal Raman microscopy supported by optical clearing treatment of the skin—influence on collagen hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sdobnov, Anton Yu; Tuchin, Valery V.; Lademann, Juergen; E Darvin, Maxim

    2017-07-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) is employed to study the skin physiology, drug permeation and skin disease monitoring. In order to increase the depth of investigations, the effect of optical clearing was observed on porcine ear skin ex vivo. The optical clearing agents (OCAs) glycerol and iohexol (Omnipaque™) were applied to the porcine ear skin and investigated by CRM after 30 and 60 min of treatment. The extent of optical clearing by utilizing concentrations of 70% glycerol and 100% Omnipaque™ was evaluated. The intensity of the skin-related Raman peaks significantly increased starting from the depth 160 µm for Omnipaque™ and 40 µm for glycerol (p  ⩽  0.05) after 60 min of treatment. The OCAs’ influence on the collagen hydration in the deep-located dermis was investigated. Both OCAs induce skin dehydration, but the effect of glycerol treatment (30 min and 60 min) is stronger. The obtained results demonstrate that with increasing the treatment time, both glycerol and Omnipaque™ solutions improve the optical clearing of porcine skin making the deep-located dermal regions able for investigations. At the used concentrations and time intervals, glycerol is more effective than Omnipaque™. However, Omnipaque™ is more promising than glycerol for future in vivo applications as it is an already approved pharmaceutic substance without any known impact on the skin structure.

  18. Long-term Culture of Human iPS Cell-derived Telencephalic Neuron Aggregates on Collagen Gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Koji; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Takemoto, Hiroshi; Haga, Hisashi

    2018-01-01

    It takes several months to form the 3-dimensional morphology of the human embryonic brain. Therefore, establishing a long-term culture method for neuronal tissues derived from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is very important for studying human brain development. However, it is difficult to keep primary neurons alive for more than 3 weeks in culture. Moreover, long-term adherent culture to maintain the morphology of telencephalic neuron aggregates induced from human iPS cells is also difficult. Although collagen gel has been widely used to support long-term culture of cells, it is not clear whether human iPS cell-derived neuron aggregates can be cultured for long periods on this substrate. In the present study, we differentiated human iPS cells to telencephalic neuron aggregates and examined long-term culture of these aggregates on collagen gel. The results indicated that these aggregates could be cultured for over 3 months by adhering tightly onto collagen gel. Furthermore, telencephalic neuronal precursors within these aggregates matured over time and formed layered structures. Thus, long-term culture of telencephalic neuron aggregates derived from human iPS cells on collagen gel would be useful for studying human cerebral cortex development.Key words: Induced pluripotent stem cell, forebrain neuron, collagen gel, long-term culture.

  19. Collagen gel contraction serves to rapidly distinguish epithelial- and mesenchymal-derived cells irrespective of alpha-smooth muscle actin expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helga Lind; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Villadsen, René

    2004-01-01

    Mesenchymal-like cells in the stroma of breast cancer may arise as a consequence of plasticity within the epithelial compartment, also referred to as epithelial-mesenchymal transition, or by recruitment of genuine mesenchymal cells from the peritumoral stroma. Cells of both the epithelial...... compartment and the stromal compartment express alpha smooth muscle actin (alpha-sm actin) as part of a myoepithelial or a myofibroblastic differentiation program, respectively. Moreover, because both epithelial- and mesenchymal-derived cells are nontumorigenic, other means of discrimination are warranted....... Here, we describe the contraction of hydrated collagen gels as a rapid functional assay for the distinction between epithelial- and mesenchymal-derived stromal-like cells irrespective of the status of alpha-sm actin expression. Three epithelial-derived cell lines and three genuine mesenchymal...

  20. Characterization of elasticity and hydration of composite hydrogel based on collagen-iota carrageenan as a corneal tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinawati, M.; Triastuti, J.; Pursetyo, K. T.

    2018-04-01

    The cornea is a refractive element of the eye that serves to continue the stimulation of light into the eye it has a clear, transparent, elastic and relatively thick tissue. Factors caused corneal blindness, are dystrophy, keratoconus, corneal scaring. Hydrogels can be made from polysaccharide derivatives that have gelation properties such as iota carrageenan. Therefore, it is a need to develop composite hydrogel based collagen-iota carragenan as an engineeried corneal tissue with high elasticity and hydration properties. Collagen hydrogel has a maximum water content an has equlibrium up to 40 %, less than the human cornea, 81 % and under normal hydration conditions, the human cornea can transmit 87 % of visible light. In addition, the refractive index on the surface of the cornea with air is 1.375-1.380. Based on this study, it is necessary to conduct research on the development and composition of hydrogel composite collagen-iota carrageen hydrogen based on. The best result was K5 (5:5) treatment, which has the equilibrium water content of 87.07 % and viscosity of 10.7346 Pa.s.

  1. Metabolic regulation of collagen gel contraction by porcine aortic valvular interstitial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Peter I.; Qu, Xin; Geiszler, Andrew M.; Nagrath, Deepak; Harmancey, Romain; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Grande-Allen, K. Jane

    2014-01-01

    Despite a high incidence of calcific aortic valve disease in metabolic syndrome, there is little information about the fundamental metabolism of heart valves. Cell metabolism is a first responder to chemical and mechanical stimuli, but it is unknown how such signals employed in valve tissue engineering impact valvular interstitial cell (VIC) biology and valvular disease pathogenesis. In this study porcine aortic VICs were seeded into three-dimensional collagen gels and analysed for gel contraction, lactate production and glucose consumption in response to manipulation of metabolic substrates, including glucose, galactose, pyruvate and glutamine. Cell viability was also assessed in two-dimensional culture. We found that gel contraction was sensitive to metabolic manipulation, particularly in nutrient-depleted medium. Contraction was optimal at an intermediate glucose concentration (2 g l−1) with less contraction with excess (4.5 g l−1) or reduced glucose (1 g l−1). Substitution with galactose delayed contraction and decreased lactate production. In low sugar concentrations, pyruvate depletion reduced contraction. Glutamine depletion reduced cell metabolism and viability. Our results suggest that nutrient depletion and manipulation of metabolic substrates impacts the viability, metabolism and contractile behaviour of VICs. Particularly, hyperglycaemic conditions can reduce VIC interaction with and remodelling of the extracellular matrix. These results begin to link VIC metabolism and macroscopic behaviour such as cell–matrix interaction. PMID:25320066

  2. Magnetically levitated mesenchymal stem cell spheroids cultured with a collagen gel maintain phenotype and quiescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha S Lewis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Multicellular spheroids are an established system for three-dimensional cell culture. Spheroids are typically generated using hanging drop or non-adherent culture; however, an emerging technique is to use magnetic levitation. Herein, mesenchymal stem cell spheroids were generated using magnetic nanoparticles and subsequently cultured within a type I collagen gel, with a view towards developing a bone marrow niche environment. Cells were loaded with magnetic nanoparticles, and suspended beneath an external magnet, inducing self-assembly of multicellular spheroids. Cells in spheroids were viable and compared to corresponding monolayer controls, maintained stem cell phenotype and were quiescent. Interestingly, core spheroid necrosis was not observed, even with increasing spheroid size, in contrast to other commonly used spheroid systems. This mesenchymal stem cell spheroid culture presents a potential platform for modelling in vitro bone marrow stem cell niches, elucidating interactions between cells, as well as a useful model for drug delivery studies.

  3. The USANS technique for the investigation of structure from hydrated gels to porous rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crompton, Kylie; Forsythe, John; Bertram, Willem; Knott, R.B.; Barker, John

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The Ultra Small Angle Neutron Scattering (USANS) technique extends the range of the Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) technique into the tens of micron size range. This is extremely useful for many systems particularly those where sample preparation for optical or electron microscopy can cause major changes to the microstructure under investigation. Two examples will be presented to highlight different aspects of the technique. Firstly, the structure was investigated of a full hydrated polymer scaffold for stem cells constructed from chitosan. Stem cells interact with the scaffold on the micron scale however information on the nanoscale (i e individual chitosan polymer chains) is also required in order the tailor the scaffold structure. The soft, hydrated gel is unsuitable for optical or electron microscopy. Secondly, the structure was investigated of natural oil-bearing and synthetic rock. The scattering data from different thickness of rock was analysed using a Fourier Transform method to remove multiple scattering effects and to simulate scattering from a thin rock. In this case bulk properties such as porosity are of interest. (authors)

  4. Strong Static Magnetic Fields Increase the Gel Signal in Partially Hydrated DPPC/DMPC Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jennifer; Alsop, Richard J; Schmalzl, Karin; Epand, Richard M; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2015-09-29

    NIt was recently reported that static magnetic fields increase lipid order in the hydrophobic membrane core of dehydrated native plant plasma membranes [Poinapen, Soft Matter 9:6804-6813, 2013]. As plasma membranes are multicomponent, highly complex structures, in order to elucidate the origin of this effect, we prepared model membranes consisting of a lipid species with low and high melting temperature. By controlling the temperature, bilayers coexisting of small gel and fluid domains were prepared as a basic model for the plasma membrane core. We studied molecular order in mixed lipid membranes made of dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) using neutron diffraction in the presence of strong static magnetic fields up to 3.5 T. The contribution of the hydrophobic membrane core was highlighted through deuterium labeling the lipid acyl chains. There was no observable effect on lipid organization in fluid or gel domains at high hydration of the membranes. However, lipid order was found to be enhanced at a reduced relative humidity of 43%: a magnetic field of 3.5 T led to an increase of the gel signal in the diffraction patterns of 5%. While all biological materials have weak diamagnetic properties, the corresponding energy is too small to compete against thermal disorder or viscous effects in the case of lipid molecules. We tentatively propose that the interaction between the fatty acid chains' electric moment and the external magnetic field is driving the lipid tails in the hydrophobic membrane core into a better ordered state.

  5. Strong Static Magnetic Fields Increase the Gel Signal in Partially Hydrated DPPC/DMPC Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Tang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available NIt was recently reported that static magnetic fields increase lipid order in the hydrophobic membrane core of dehydrated native plant plasma membranes [Poinapen, Soft Matter 9:6804-6813, 2013]. As plasma membranes are multicomponent, highly complex structures, in order to elucidate the origin of this effect, we prepared model membranes consisting of a lipid species with low and high melting temperature. By controlling the temperature, bilayers coexisting of small gel and fluid domains were prepared as a basic model for the plasma membrane core. We studied molecular order in mixed lipid membranes made of dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC and dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC using neutron diffraction in the presence of strong static magnetic fields up to 3.5 T. The contribution of the hydrophobic membrane core was highlighted through deuterium labeling the lipid acyl chains. There was no observable effect on lipid organization in fluid or gel domains at high hydration of the membranes. However, lipid order was found to be enhanced at a reduced relative humidity of 43%: a magnetic field of 3.5 T led to an increase of the gel signal in the diffraction patterns of 5%. While all biological materials have weak diamagnetic properties, the corresponding energy is too small to compete against thermal disorder or viscous effects in the case of lipid molecules. We tentatively propose that the interaction between the fatty acid chains’ electric moment and the external magnetic field is driving the lipid tails in the hydrophobic membrane core into a better ordered state.

  6. Thermodynamic description of the solubility of C-S-H gels in hydrated Portland cement. Literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soler, J.M.

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this study is to compile the available information published in the scientific literature regarding the solubility of C-S-H (calcium silica hydrate) gels, which are the main components of hydrated Portland cement. Modeling the thermodynamic properties of C-S-H, including its incongruent dissolution behavior, is an important requirement to understand the evolution and degradation of hydrated cement and concrete. The thermodynamic modeling of C-S-H started with the use of empirical or semi-empirical models and evolved to the application of solid solution models. Most of the experimental work has been performed at or near 25 deg C and the models are in principle applicable to temperatures near 25 deg C. One of the models provides an explicit dependence on temperature. (orig.)

  7. Fabrication of Collagen Gel Hollow Fibers by Covalent Cross-Linking for Construction of Bioengineering Renal Tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chong; Zhang, Guoliang; Wang, Qichen; Meng, Qin

    2015-09-09

    Collagen, the most used natural biomacromolecule, has been extensively utilized to make scaffolds for cell cultures in tissue engineering, but has never been fabricated into the configuration of a hollow fiber (HF) for cell culture due to its poor mechanical properties. In this study, renal tubular cell-laden collagen hollow fiber (Col HF) was fabricated by dissolving sacrificial Ca-alginate cores from collagen shells strengthened by carbodiimide cross-linking. The inner/outer diameters of the Col HF were precisely controlled by the flow rates of core alginate/shell collagen solution in the microfluidic device. As found, the renal tubular cells self-assembled into renal tubules with diameters of 50-200 μm post to the culture in Col HF for 10 days. According to the 3D reconstructed confocal images or HE staining, the renal cells appeared as a tight tubular monolayer on the Col HF inner surface, sustaining more 3D cell morphology than the cell layer on the 2D flat collagen gel surface. Moreover, compared with the cultures in either a Transwell or polymer HF membrane, the renal tubules in Col HF exhibited at least 1-fold higher activity on brush border enzymes of alkaline phosphatase and γ-glutamyltransferase, consistent with their gene expressions. The enhancement occurred similarly on multidrug resistance protein 2 and glucose uptake. Such bioengineered renal tubules in Col HF will present great potential as alternatives to synthetic HF in both clinical use and pharmaceutical investigation.

  8. Fabrication and evaluation of biomimetic scaffolds by using collagen-alginate fibrillar gels for potential tissue engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sang Lin; Luo Dongmei; Xu Songmei; Wang Xiaoliang; Li Xudong

    2011-01-01

    Pore architecture and its stable functionality under cell culturing of three dimensional (3D) scaffolds are of great importance for tissue engineering purposes. In this study, alginate was incorporated with collagen to fabricate collagen-alginate composite scaffolds with different collagen/alginate ratios by lyophilizing the respective composite gels formed via collagen fibrillogenesis in vitro and then chemically crosslinking. The effects of alginate amount and crosslinking treatment on pore architecture, swelling behavior, enzymatic degradation and tensile property of composite scaffolds were systematically investigated. The relevant results indicated that the present strategy was simple but efficient to fabricate highly interconnected strong biomimetic 3D scaffolds with nanofibrous surface. NIH3T3 cells were used as a model cell to evaluate the cytocompatibility, attachment to the nanofibrous surface and porous architectural stability in terms of cell proliferation and infiltration within the crosslinked scaffolds. Compared with the mechanically weakest crosslinked collagen sponges, the cell-cultured composite scaffolds presented a good porous architecture, thus permitting cell proliferation on the top surface as well as infiltration into the inner part of 3D composite scaffolds. These composite scaffolds with pore size ranging from 150 to 300 μm, over 90% porosity, tuned biodegradability and water-uptake capability are promising for tissue engineering applications.

  9. Alteration of cellular behavior and response to PI3K pathway inhibition by culture in 3D collagen gels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Fallica

    Full Text Available Most investigations into cancer cell drug response are performed with cells cultured on flat (2D tissue culture plastic. Emerging research has shown that the presence of a three-dimensional (3D extracellular matrix (ECM is critical for normal cell behavior including migration, adhesion, signaling, proliferation and apoptosis. In this study we investigate differences between cancer cell signaling in 2D culture and a 3D ECM, employing real-time, live cell tracking to directly observe U2OS human osteosarcoma and MCF7 human breast cancer cells embedded in type 1 collagen gels. The activation of the important PI3K signaling pathway under these different growth conditions is studied, and the response to inhibition of both PI3K and mTOR with PI103 investigated. Cells grown in 3D gels show reduced proliferation and migration as well as reduced PI3K pathway activation when compared to cells grown in 2D. Our results quantitatively demonstrate that a collagen ECM can protect U2OS cells from PI103. Overall, our data suggests that 3D gels may provide a better medium for investigation of anti-cancer drugs than 2D monolayers, therefore allowing better understanding of cellular response and behavior in native like environments.

  10. In Vivo skin hydration and anti-erythema effects of Aloe vera, Aloe ferox and Aloe marlothii gel materials after single and multiple applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Lizelle T; du Plessis, Jeanetta; Gerber, Minja; van Zyl, Sterna; Boneschans, Banie; Hamman, Josias H

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the skin hydrating and anti-erythema activity of gel materials from Aloe marlothii A. Berger and A. ferox Mill. in comparison to that of Aloe barbadensis Miller (Aloe vera) in healthy human volunteers. Aqueous solutions of the polisaccharidic fractions of the selected aloe leaf gel materials were applied to the volar forearm skin of female subjects. The hydration effect of the aloe gel materials were measured with a Corneometer(®) CM 825, Visioscan(®) VC 98 and Cutometer(®) dual MPA 580 after single and multiple applications. The Mexameter(®) MX 18 was used to determine the anti-erythema effects of the aloe material solutions on irritated skin areas. The A. vera and A. marlothii gel materials hydrated the skin after a single application, whereas the A. ferox gel material showed dehydration effects compared to the placebo. After multiple applications all the aloe materials exhibited dehydration effects on the skin. Mexameter(®) readings showed that A. vera and A. ferox have anti-erythema activity similar to that of the positive control group (i.e. hydrocortisone gel) after 6 days of treatment. The polysaccharide component of the gel materials from selected aloe species has a dehydrating effect on the skin after multiple applications. Both A. vera and A. ferox gel materials showed potential to reduce erythema on the skin similar to that of hydrocortisone gel.

  11. In Vivo skin hydration and anti-erythema effects of Aloe vera, Aloe ferox and Aloe marlothii gel materials after single and multiple applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Lizelle T.; du Plessis, Jeanetta; Gerber, Minja; van Zyl, Sterna; Boneschans, Banie; Hamman, Josias H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the skin hydrating and anti-erythema activity of gel materials from Aloe marlothii A. Berger and A. ferox Mill. in comparison to that of Aloe barbadensis Miller (Aloe vera) in healthy human volunteers. Materials and Methods: Aqueous solutions of the polisaccharidic fractions of the selected aloe leaf gel materials were applied to the volar forearm skin of female subjects. The hydration effect of the aloe gel materials were measured with a Corneometer® CM 825, Visioscan® VC 98 and Cutometer® dual MPA 580 after single and multiple applications. The Mexameter® MX 18 was used to determine the anti-erythema effects of the aloe material solutions on irritated skin areas. Results: The A. vera and A. marlothii gel materials hydrated the skin after a single application, whereas the A. ferox gel material showed dehydration effects compared to the placebo. After multiple applications all the aloe materials exhibited dehydration effects on the skin. Mexameter® readings showed that A. vera and A. ferox have anti-erythema activity similar to that of the positive control group (i.e. hydrocortisone gel) after 6 days of treatment. Conclusion: The polysaccharide component of the gel materials from selected aloe species has a dehydrating effect on the skin after multiple applications. Both A. vera and A. ferox gel materials showed potential to reduce erythema on the skin similar to that of hydrocortisone gel. PMID:24991119

  12. Collagen tissue treated with chitosan solution in H2O/CO2 mixtures: Influence of clathrates hydrates on the structure and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaschin, Ivan S; Bakuleva, Natalia P; Grigoriev, Timofei E; Krasheninnikov, Sergey V; Nikitin, Lev N

    2017-03-01

    A mixture of water/carbon dioxide is a "green" perspective solvent from the viewpoint of biomedical applications. Clathrate hydrates are formed this solvent under certain conditions and a very interesting question is the impact of clathrates hydrates on the structure and properties of bovine pericardium, which is used in biomedicine, in particular as a main part of biological heart valve prostheses. The aim of the present work is to investigate the influence of clathrates on the structure and mechanical properties of the collagen tissue treated with chitosan in H 2 O/CO 2 mixtures under pressure 3.0-3.5MPa and temperatures 2-4°C. It was first found that the clathrate hydrates in this media due to the strong fluctuations "bomb" collagen tissue of bovine pericardium, which is manifested in the appearance of numerous small gaps (pores) with mean size of 225±25nm and large pores with size of 1-3μ on the surface and within collagen matrices. High porosity leads to averaging characteristics of the organization structure in tissues with different orientation of the collagen fibers. As a result, the mechanical properties of the collagen tissue with a different orientation of the collagen fibrils become similar, which is quite different from their original properties. The structural changes caused by the influence of the environment clathrate hydrates led to a significant decrease of the tensile strength (30-47% in total, p<0.05) and initial elastic moduli (74-83%, p<0.05). However, the final elastic moduli and the maximum tensile virtually unchanged compared to the control. Nevertheless, it was found that the direct deposition of chitosan from the H 2 O/CO 2 mixtures with clathrate improve the mechanical-strength properties of the porous matrices. We believe that these improved mechanical properties are achieved due to particularly deep and uniform impregnation of the collagen matrix with chitosan from its pressurized solutions in H 2 O/CO 2 mixtures. Copyright © 2016

  13. Type XII and XIV collagens mediate interactions between banded collagen fibers in vitro and may modulate extracellular matrix deformability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, T; McDonough, A M; Bruns, R R; Burgeson, R E

    1994-11-11

    Type XII and XIV collagens are very large molecules containing three extended globular domains derived from the amino terminus of each alpha chain and an interrupted triple helix. Both collagens are genetically and immunologically unique and have distinct distributions in many tissues. These collagens localize near the surface of banded collagen fibrils. The function of the molecules is unknown. We have prepared a mixture of native type XII and XIV collagens that is free of contaminating proteins by electrophoretic criteria. In addition, we have purified the collagenase-resistant globular domains of type XII or XIV collagens (XII-NC-3 or XIV-NC-3). In this study, we have investigated the effect of intact type XII and XIV and XII-NC-3 or XIV-NC-3 on the interactions between fibroblasts and type I collagen fibrils. We find that both type XII and XIV collagens promote collagen gel contraction mediated by fibroblasts, even in the absence of serum. The activity is present in the NC-3 domains. The effect is dose-dependent and is inhibited by denaturation. The effect of type XII NC-3 is inhibited by the addition of anti-XII antiserum. To elucidate the mechanism underlying this phenomenon, we examined the effect of XII-NC-3 or XIV-NC-3 on deformability of collagen gels by centrifugal force. XII-NC-3 or XIV-NC-3 markedly promotes gel compression after centrifugation. The effect is also inhibited by denaturation, and the activity of type XII-NC3 is inhibited by the addition of anti-XII antiserum. The results indicate that the effect of XII-NC-3 or XIV-NC-3 on collagen gel contraction by fibroblasts is not due to activation of cellular events but rather results from the increase in mobility of hydrated collagen fibrils within the gel. These studies suggest that collagen types XII and XIV may modulate the biomechanical properties of tissues.

  14. Structure changes in the sol-gel systems of hydrated oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponov, Y.A.; Karakchiev, L.G.; Lyakhov, N.Z.; Tolochko, B.P.; Ito, K.; Amemiya, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Sols of hydrated aluminium oxide, hydrated zirconium oxide and their mixtures were investigated during the xerogel-amorphous-product-crystalline-product transition by SAXS using synchrotron radiation. In the different temperature regions certain changes in structure and morphology were observed. Some correlation between the characteristics of the initial sols and their mixtures (the size and shape of the pores) was observed. In the temperature region 298-1173 K the characteristics of the mixed sol are defined by the characteristics of the initial sols

  15. Comprehensive analysis of collagen metabolism in vitro using [4(3H)]/[14C]proline dual-labeling and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.F.; Harley, V.; Chan, D.; Cole, W.G.

    1988-01-01

    A method to simultaneously quantify the production, secretion, and prolyl hydroxylation of individual types of collagen in cell culture samples has been developed. Collagens were biosynthetically labeled with a mixture of [ 14 C]proline and [4- 3 H]proline. The labeled collagens were isolated and their component alpha-chains were resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Migration of the collagen alpha-chains was determined by fluorography, and radioactivity in excised bands was quantified by scintillation counting. [ 14 C]Proline labeling of collagen chains was used to determine the production and secretion of the different types of collagen. The ratios of the component alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) chains of type I collagen were also determined in this way. Prolyl hydroxylation of collagen alpha-chains was readily determined by measurement of their 3 H: 14 C ratios. Following 4-hydroxylation, 3 H was lost from the [4-3H]proline with alteration of this ratio. This dual-labeling method is suitable for the comprehensive analysis of collagen metabolism in multiple samples

  16. Textural and mechanical characterization of C-S-H gels from hydration of synthetic T1-C3S, β-C2S and their blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goni, S.; Guerrero, A.; Puertas, F.; Hernandez, M. S.; Palacios, M.; Dolado, J. S.; Zhu, W.; Howind, T.

    2011-01-01

    The textural and mechanical characterization of C-S-H gels formed from the hydration of pure T1-C 3 S, β-C 2 S and their blends are studied by Nitrogen sorption and nano indentation experiments. The surface area and nano porosity of C-S-H gels formed from the hydration of β-C 2 S and the 30-70 (T1-C 3 S and β-C 2 S mixture) are higher than those from hydration of T1-C 3 S, and 70-30, with the difference decreasing with hydration age. Such changes are well supported by findings of nano indentation study, which shows the greater relative volume of C-S-H phases with lower densities in the β-C 2 S and the 30-70 pastes. With the increase in hydration age, the relative volume of C-S-H phases with higher densities increased at the expenses of those with lower density. Important quantitative correlations were found among these textural characteristics and the mean chain length, determined from 2 9Si magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR, of the C-S-H gels. (Author) 36 refs.

  17. Effects of Aloe Sterol Supplementation on Skin Elasticity, Hydration, and Collagen Score: A 12-Week Double-Blind, Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Miyuki; Yamamoto, Yuki; Misawa, Eriko; Nabeshima, Kazumi; Saito, Marie; Yamauchi, Koji; Abe, Fumiaki; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study confirmed that Aloe sterol stimulates collagen and hyaluronic acid production in human dermal fibroblasts. This study aims to investigate whether Aloe sterol intake affects skin conditions. We performed a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the effects of oral Aloe sterol supplementation on skin elasticity, hydration, and the collagen score in 64 healthy women (age range 30-59 years; average 44.3 years) who were randomly assigned to receive either a placebo or an Aloe sterol-supplemented yogurt. Skin parameters were measured and ultrasound analysis of the forearm was performed. ANCOVA revealed statistical differences in skin moisture, transepidermal water loss, skin elasticity, and collagen score between the Aloe sterol and placebo groups. The gross elasticity (R2), net elasticity (R5), and biological elasticity (R7) scores of the Aloe sterol group significantly increased with time. In addition, skin fatigue area F3, which is known to decrease with age and fatigue, also increased with Aloe sterol intake. Ultrasound echogenicity revealed that the collagen content in the dermis increased with Aloe sterol intake. The results suggest that continued Aloe sterol ingestion contributes to maintaining healthy skin. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Raman spectral markers of collagen denaturation and hydration in human cortical bone tissue are affected by radiation sterilization and high cycle fatigue damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Christopher D; Unal, Mustafa; Akkus, Ozan; Rimnac, Clare M

    2017-11-01

    Thermal denaturation and monotonic mechanical damage alter the organic and water-related compartments of cortical bone. These changes can be detected using Raman spectroscopy. However, less is known regarding Raman sensitivity to detect the effects of cyclic fatigue damage and allograft sterilization doses of gamma radiation. To determine if Raman spectroscopic biomarkers of collagen denaturation and hydration are sensitive to the effects of (a) high cycle fatigue damage and (b) 25kGy irradiation. Unirradiated and gamma-radiation sterilized human cortical bone specimens previously tested in vitro under high-cycle (> 100,000 cycles) fatigue conditions at 15MPa, 25MPa, 35MPa, 45MPa, and 55MPa cyclic stress levels were studied. Cortical bone Raman spectral profiles from wavenumber ranges of 800-1750cm -1 and 2700-3800cm -1 were obtained and compared from: a) non-fatigue vs fatigue fracture sites and b) radiated vs. unirradiated states. Raman biomarker ratios 1670/1640 and 3220/2949, which reflect collagen denaturation and organic matrix (mainly collagen)-bound water, respectively, were assessed. One- and two-way ANOVA analyses were utilized to identify differences between groups along with interaction effects between cyclic fatigue and radiation-induced damage. Cyclic fatigue damage resulted in increases in collagen denaturation (1670/1640: 1.517 ± 0.043 vs 1.579 ± 0.021, p Raman spectroscopy can detect the effects of cyclic fatigue damage and 25kGy irradiation via increases in organic matrix (mainly collagen)-bound water. A Raman measure of collagen denaturation was sensitive to cyclic fatigue damage but not 25kGy irradiation. Collagen denaturation was correlated with organic matrix-bound water, suggesting that denaturation of collagen to gelatinous form may expose more binding sites to water by unwinding the triple alpha chains. This research may eventually be useful to help identify allograft quality and more appropriately match donors to recipients. Copyright

  19. The effect of sodium chloride on the dissolution of calcium silicate hydrate gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.; Harris, A.W.; Manning, M.; Chambers, A.; Swanton, S.W.

    2006-01-01

    The use of cement based materials will be widespread in the long-term management of radioactive materials in the United Kingdom. One of the applications could be the Nirex reference vault backfill (NRVB) as an engineered barrier within a deep geological repository. NRVB confers alkaline conditions, which would provide a robust chemical barrier through the control of the solubility of some key radionuclides, enhanced sorption and minimised corrosion of steel containers. An understanding of the dissolution of C-S-H gels in cement under the appropriate conditions (e.g., saline groundwaters) is necessary to demonstrate the expected evolution of the chemistry over time and to provide sufficient cement to buffer the porewater conditions for the required time. A programme of experimental work has been undertaken to investigate C-S-H gel dissolution behaviour in sodium chloride solutions and the effect of calcium/silicon ratio (C/S), temperature and cation type on this behaviour. Reductions in calcium concentration and pH values were observed with samples equilibrated at 45 deg. C compared to those prepared at 25 deg. C. The effect of salt cation type on salt-concentration dependence of the dissolution of C-S-H gels was investigated by the addition of lithium or potassium chloride in place of sodium chloride for gels with a C/S of 1.0 and 1.8. With a C/S of 1.0, similar increases in dissolved calcium concentration with increasing ionic strength were recorded for the different salts. However, at a C/S of 1.8, anomalously high calcium concentrations were observed in the presence of lithium

  20. FGF-2 potently induces both proliferation and DSP expression in collagen type I gel cultures of adult incisor immature pulp cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Kazuhisa; Itoh, Makoto; Tomita, Yusuke; Tomooka, Yasuhiro; Tsuji, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the effects of both cytokines and extracellular matrices on the proliferation and differentiation of immature adult rat incisor dental pulp cells. These immature cells, which have a high-proliferative potency in vitro and do not express mRNAs for dentin non-collagenous proteins such as dentin sialoprotein (DSP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and osteocalcin, exist in the root regions of adult rat incisors. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) stimulated the proliferation of these immature cells and the subsequent production of mineralized calcium was induced by β-glycerophosphate treatment. Additionally, FGF-2 dramatically induced the expression of DSP and BSP mRNAs, but only in collagen type I gel cultures, whereas neither plate-coated collagen type I nor fibronectin, laminin or collagen type IV cultures could produce this effect and generate sufficient physiological levels of these transcripts. Although bone morphogenetic protein-4 could not induce the proliferation of immature dental pulp cells nor upregulate DSP mRNA expression, it had a synergistic effect upon DSP transcript levels in conjunction with FGF-2. These results suggest that both the presence of FGF-2 and the three-dimensional formation of immature dental pulp cells in collagen type I gel cultures are essential for both DSP expression and odontoblast differentiation. These observations provide valuable information concerning the study of the commitment and differentiation of odontoblast lineages, and also provide a basis for the rational design of cytokine and extracellular matrix based compounds for regenerative therapies in new dental treatments

  1. Agent-based modeling traction force mediated compaction of cell-populated collagen gels using physically realistic fibril mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, James W; Gooch, Keith J

    2014-02-01

    Agent-based modeling was used to model collagen fibrils, composed of a string of nodes serially connected by links that act as Hookean springs. Bending mechanics are implemented as torsional springs that act upon each set of three serially connected nodes as a linear function of angular deflection about the central node. These fibrils were evaluated under conditions that simulated axial extension, simple three-point bending and an end-loaded cantilever. The deformation of fibrils under axial loading varied <0.001% from the analytical solution for linearly elastic fibrils. For fibrils between 100 μm and 200 μm in length experiencing small deflections, differences between simulated deflections and their analytical solutions were <1% for fibrils experiencing three-point bending and <7% for fibrils experiencing cantilever bending. When these new rules for fibril mechanics were introduced into a model that allowed for cross-linking of fibrils to form a network and the application of cell traction force, the fibrous network underwent macroscopic compaction and aligned between cells. Further, fibril density increased between cells to a greater extent than that observed macroscopically and appeared similar to matrical tracks that have been observed experimentally in cell-populated collagen gels. This behavior is consistent with observations in previous versions of the model that did not allow for the physically realistic simulation of fibril mechanics. The significance of the torsional spring constant value was then explored to determine its impact on remodeling of the simulated fibrous network. Although a stronger torsional spring constant reduced the degree of quantitative remodeling that occurred, the inclusion of torsional springs in the model was not necessary for the model to reproduce key qualitative aspects of remodeling, indicating that the presence of Hookean springs is essential for this behavior. These results suggest that traction force mediated matrix

  2. Use of collagen gel as an alternative extracellular matrix for the in vitro and in vivo growth of murine small intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabaji, Ziyad; Sears, Connie M; Brinkley, Garrett J; Lei, Nan Ye; Joshi, Vaidehi S; Wang, Jiafang; Lewis, Michael; Stelzner, Matthias; Martín, Martín G; Dunn, James C Y

    2013-12-01

    Methods for the in vitro culture of primary small intestinal epithelium have improved greatly in recent years. A critical barrier for the translation of this methodology to the patient's bedside is the ability to grow intestinal stem cells using a well-defined extracellular matrix. Current methods rely on the use of Matrigel(™), a proprietary basement membrane-enriched extracellular matrix gel produced in mice that is not approved for clinical use. We demonstrate for the first time the capacity to support the long-term in vitro growth of murine intestinal epithelium in monoculture, using type I collagen. We further demonstrate successful in vivo engraftment of enteroids co-cultured with intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts in collagen gel. Small intestinal crypts were isolated from 6 to 10 week old transgenic enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP+) mice and suspended within either Matrigel or collagen gel; cultures were supported using previously reported media and growth factors. After 1 week, cultures were either lysed for DNA or RNA extraction or were implanted subcutaneously in syngeneic host mice. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to determine expansion of the transgenic eGFP-DNA and to determine the mRNA gene expression profile. Immunohistochemistry was performed on in vitro cultures and recovered in vivo explants. Small intestinal crypts reliably expanded to form enteroids in either Matrigel or collagen in both mono- and co-cultures as confirmed by microscopy and eGFP-DNA qPCR quantification. Collagen-based cultures yielded a distinct morphology with smooth enteroids and epithelial monolayer growth at the gel surface; both enteroid and monolayer cells demonstrated reactivity to Cdx2, E-cadherin, CD10, Periodic Acid-Schiff, and lysozyme. Collagen-based enteroids were successfully subcultured in vitro, whereas pure monolayer epithelial sheets did not survive passaging. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction

  3. Pycnogenol® effects on skin elasticity and hydration coincide with increased gene expressions of collagen type I and hyaluronic acid synthase in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, A; Grether-Beck, S; Jaenicke, T; Weber, M; Burki, C; Formann, P; Brenden, H; Schönlau, F; Krutmann, J

    2012-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing interest in the use of nutritional supplements to benefit human skin. Molecular evidence substantiating such effects, however, is scarce. In the present study we investigated whether nutritional supplementation of women with the standardized pine bark extract Pycnogenol® will improve their cosmetic appearance and relate these effects to expression of corresponding molecular markers of their skin. For this purpose 20 healthy postmenopausal women were supplemented with Pycnogenol for 12 weeks. Before, during and after supplementation, their skin condition was assessed (i) by employing non-invasive, biophysical methods including corneometry, cutometry, visioscan and ultrasound analyses and (ii) by taking biopsies and subsequent PCR for gene expression analyses related to extracellular matrix homeostasis. Pycnogenol supplementation was well tolerated in all volunteers. Pycnogenol significantly improved hydration and elasticity of skin. These effects were most pronounced in women presenting with dry skin conditions prior to the start of supplementation. The skin-physiological improvement was accompanied by a significant increase in the mRNA expression of hyaluronic acid synthase-1 (HAS-1), an enzyme critically involved in the synthesis of hyaluronic acid, and a noticeable increase in gene expression involved in collagen de novo synthesis. This study provides skin-physiological and for the first time molecular evidence that Pycnogenol supplementation benefits human skin by increasing skin hydration and skin elasticity. These effects are most likely due to an increased synthesis of extracellular matrix molecules such as hyaluronic acid and possibly collagen. Pycnogenol supplementation may thus be useful to counteract the clinical signs of skin aging. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Preparation and characterization of hydrated salts/silica composite as shape-stabilized phase change material via sol–gel process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yuping; Wang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A mixture of hydrated salts were adopted as phase change materials. • Phase segregation of the hydrated salts was inhibited. • Subcooling was slightly mitigated. • Thermal cycling performance was greatly improved after PVP coating. - Abstract: A novel shape-stabilized phase change material composite was prepared by impregnating the mixture of hydrated salts (Na 2 SO 4 ·10H 2 O–Na 2 HPO 4 ·12H 2 O) into porous silica matrix obtained by sol–gel process and further coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) to improve the thermal cycling performance. The chemical compatibility, morphology and phase change properties were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), hot-stage polarizing optical microscope (HS-POM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Confined in the silica matrix, phase segregation of the hydrated salts was inhibited and subcooling was slightly mitigated. No leakage was observed during the solid–liquid phase transition even when the mass ratio of hydrated salts to silica was as high as 70:30. Results showed that the melting enthalpy of the composite can reach 106.2 kJ/kg with the melting temperature at 30.13 °C and there was no significant enthalpy loss after 30 thermal cycles

  5. Standardization of the CFU-GM assay: Advantages of plating a fixed number of CD34+ cells in collagen gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobo, Irène; Pineau, Danielle; Robillard, Nelly; Geneviève, Frank; Piard, Nicole; Zandecki, Marc; Hermouet, Sylvie

    2003-10-01

    We investigated whether plating a stable amount of CD34(+) cells improves the CFU-GM assay. Data of CFU-GM assays performed with leukaphereses products in two transplant centers using a commercial collagen-based medium and unified CFU-GM scoring criteria were pooled and analyzed according to the numbers of CD34(+) cells plated. A first series of 113 CFU-GM assays was performed with a fixed number of mononuclear cells (i.e., a variable number of CD34(+) cells). In these cultures the CFU-GM/CD34 ratio varied according to the number of CD34(+) cells plated: median CFUGM/CD34 ratios were 1/6.2 to 1/6.6 for grafts containing or =2% CD34(+) cells. The median CFU-GM/CD34 ratio also varied depending on pathology: 1/9.3 for multiple myeloma (MM), 1/6.8 for Hodgkin's disease (HD), 1/6.5 for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and 1/4.5 for solid tumors (ST). A second series of 95 CFU-GM assays was performed with a fixed number of CD34(+) cells (220/ml). The range of median CFU-GM/CD34 ratios was narrowed to 1/7.0 to 1/5.2, and coefficients of variation for CFU-GM counts decreased by half to 38.1% (NHL), 36.1% (MM), 49.9% (HD), and 22.4% (ST). In addition, CFU-GM scoring was facilitated as the percentages of cultures with >50 CFU/GM/ml decreased from 6.7% to 43.8% when a variable number of CD34(+) cells was plated, to 4.5% to 16.7% when 220 CD34(+) cells/ml were plated. Hence, plating a fixed number of CD34(+) cells in collagen gels improves the CFU-GM assay by eliminating cell number-related variability and reducing pathology-related variability in colony growth.

  6. Textural and mechanical characterization of C-S-H gels from hydration of synthetic T1-C3S, β-C2S and their blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolado, J. S.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The textural and mechanical characterization of C-S-H gels formed from the hydration of pure T1-C3S, β-C2S and their blends are studied by Nitrogen sorption and nanoindentation experiments. The surface area and nanoporosity of C-S-H gels formed from the hydration of β-C2S and the 30-70 (T1-C3S and β-C2S mixture are higher than those from hydration of T1-C3S, and 70-30, with the difference decreasing with hydration age. Such changes are well supported by findings of nanoindentation study, which shows the greater relative volume of C-S-H phases with lower densities in the β-C2S and the 30-70 pastes. With the increase in hydration age, the relative volume of C-S-H phases with higher densities increased at the expenses of those with lower density. Important quantitative correlations were found among these textural characteristics and the mean chain length, determined from 29Si magic-angle-spinning (MAS NMR, of the C-S-H gels.La caracterización textural y mecánica de geles C-S-H formados a partir de la hidratación de muestras puras de T1-C3S, ß-C2S y sus mezclas ha sido estudiada por medio de adsorción de nitrógeno y nanoindentación. El área superficial y la nano-porosidad de los geles formados durante la hidratación del ß-C2S y la mezcla 30-70 (T1-C3S- ß-C2S son mayores que los correspondientes a los geles del T1-C3S, y la mezcla 70-30; esta diferencia disminuye con el tiempo de hidratación. Estos cambios coinciden con los resultados de nanoindentación que indican un aumento de volumen relativo de las fases C-S-H con una densidad menor en el caso del ß-C2S y la mezcla 30-70. Al aumentar el tiempo de hidratación, el volumen relativo de fases C-S-H de mayor densidad aumenta a expensas de aquellas de menor densidad. Importantes correlaciones cuantitativas se establecen entre las características texturales y la longitud de cadena media del gel C-S-H, determinada mediante RMN-MAS de 29Si.

  7. Experimental study and thermodynamic modelling of methane clathrate hydrate dissociation conditions in silica gel porous media in the presence of methanol aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi, Hamed; Javanmardi, Jafar; Zarifi, Mojdeh; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Mohammadi, Amir H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Phase equilibria of hydrates of methane in confined silica gel pores are reported. ► Dissociation data in the presences of methanol aqueous solution are also measured. ► A thermodynamic model is developed for prediction of the obtained data. ► Acceptable agreement is found between the obtained data and the predicted results. - Abstract: In this work, the phase equilibria of clathrate hydrates of methane in the presence of pure water and 0.035 mass fraction of methanol aqueous solution in confined silica gel pores with (10 and 15) nm mean diameters are measured and reported. A thermodynamic model is also developed for prediction of the obtained experimental hydrate dissociation data. The Valderrama–Patel–Teja (VPT-EoS) equation of state (EoS) accompanied with the non-density dependent (NDD) mixing rules coupled with a previously developed activity model are applied to evaluate the fugacity of the species present and the activity coefficient of water in methanol aqueous solution. Acceptable agreement between the reported data and the predicted results using the proposed model and an existing method reported in the literature demonstrates the reliability of the presented model.

  8. Pichia pastoris as a cell factory for the secreted production of tunable collagen-inspired gel-forming proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, da C.I.F.

    2013-01-01

    It is the ability to establish triple helices and assemble into supramolecular structures, which makes collagen and its denature counterpart, gelatine, interesting for the food and biomedical industry. Collagen and gelatine array of applications is quite extensive, ranging from gelling agents in

  9. Effects of inorganic acids and divalent hydrated metal cations (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+)) on γ-AlOOH sol-gel process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Xia, Yuguo; Zhang, Li; Chen, Dairong; Jiao, Xiuling

    2015-11-07

    In-depth understanding of the sol-gel process plays an essential role in guiding the preparation of new materials. Herein, the effects of different inorganic acids (HCl, HNO3 and H2SO4) and divalent hydrated metal cations (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+)) on γ-AlOOH sol-gel process were studied based on experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In these experiments, the sol originating from the γ-AlOOH suspension was formed only with the addition of HCl and HNO3, but not with H2SO4. Furthermore, the DFT calculations showed that the strong adsorption of HSO4(-) on the surface of the γ-AlOOH particles, and the hydrogen in HSO4(-) pointing towards the solvent lead to an unstable configuration of electric double layer (EDL). In the experiment, the gelation time sequence of γ-AlOOH sol obtained by adding metal ions changed when the ionic strength was equal to or greater than 0.198 mol kg(-1). The DFT calculations demonstrated that the adsorption energy of hydrated metal ions on the γ-AlOOH surface can actually make a difference in the sol-gel process.

  10. Fibrin Gels Exhibit Improved Biological, Structural, and Mechanical Properties Compared with Collagen Gels in Cell-Based Tendon Tissue-Engineered Constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyment, Nathaniel A.; Lu, Yinhui; Rao, Marepalli; Shearn, Jason T.; Rowe, David W.; Kadler, Karl E.; Butler, David L.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of tendon and ligament injuries and inadequacies of current treatments is driving the need for alternative strategies such as tissue engineering. Fibrin and collagen biopolymers have been popular materials for creating tissue-engineered constructs (TECs), as they exhibit advantages of biocompatibility and flexibility in construct design. Unfortunately, a few studies have directly compared these materials for tendon and ligament applications. Therefore, this study aims at determining how collagen versus fibrin hydrogels affect the biological, structural, and mechanical properties of TECs during formation in vitro. Our findings show that tendon and ligament progenitor cells seeded in fibrin constructs exhibit improved tenogenic gene expression patterns compared with their collagen-based counterparts for approximately 14 days in culture. Fibrin-based constructs also exhibit improved cell-derived collagen alignment, increased linear modulus (2.2-fold greater) compared with collagen-based constructs. Cyclic tensile loading, which promotes the maturation of tendon constructs in a previous work, exhibits a material-dependent effect in this study. Fibrin constructs show trending reductions in mechanical, biological, and structural properties, whereas collagen constructs only show improved tenogenic expression in the presence of mechanical stimulation. These findings highlight that components of the mechanical stimulus (e.g., strain amplitude or time of initiation) need to be tailored to the material and cell type. Given the improvements in tenogenic expression, extracellular matrix organization, and material properties during static culture, in vitro findings presented here suggest that fibrin-based constructs may be a more suitable alternative to collagen-based constructs for tissue-engineered tendon/ligament repair. PMID:25266738

  11. Effects of transforming growth factor-beta1 on cell motility, collagen gel contraction, myofibroblastic differentiation, and extracellular matrix expression of human adipose-derived stem cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakudo, Natsuko; Kushida, Satoshi; Suzuki, Kenji; Ogura, Tsunetaka; Notodihardjo, Priscilla Valentin; Hara, Tomoya; Kusumoto, Kenji

    2012-12-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are adult pluripotent stem cells, and their usefulness in plastic surgery has garnered attention in recent years. Although, there have been expectations that ASCs might function in wound repair and regeneration, no studies to date have examined the role of ASCs in the mechanism that promotes wound-healing. Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) is a strong candidate cytokine for the triggering of mesenchymal stem cell migration, construction of extracellular matrices, and differentiation of ASCs into myofibroblasts. Cell proliferation, motility, and differentiation, as well as extracellular matrix production, play an important role in wound-healing. We have evaluated the capacity of ASCs to proliferate and their potential to differentiate into phenotypic myofibroblasts, as well as their cell motility and collagen gel contraction ability, when cultured with TGF-β1. Cell motility was analyzed using a wound-healing assay. ASCs that differentiated into myofibroblasts expressed the gene for alpha-smooth muscle actin, and its protein expression was detected immunohistochemically. The extracellular matrix expression in ASCs was evaluated using real-time RT-PCR. Based on the results, we conclude that human ASCs have the potential for cell motility, extracellular matrix gene expression, gel contraction, and differentiation into myofibroblasts and, therefore, may play an important role in the wound-healing process.

  12. Collagen gel droplet-embedded culture drug sensitivity test for adjuvant chemotherapy after complete resection of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Masayoshi; Maeda, Hajime; Takeuchi, Yukiyasu; Fukuhara, Kenjiro; Shintani, Yasushi; Funakoshi, Yasunobu; Funaki, Soichiro; Nojiri, Takashi; Kusu, Takashi; Kusumoto, Hidenori; Kimura, Toru; Okumura, Meinoshin

    2018-04-01

    We conducted a prospective clinical study to individualize adjuvant chemotherapy after complete resection of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), based on the drug sensitivity test. Patients with resectable c-stage IB-IIIA NSCLC were registered between 2005 and 2010. We performed the collagen gel droplet-embedded culture drug sensitivity test (CD-DST) on a fresh surgical specimen to assess in vitro chemosensitivity and evaluated the prognostic outcome after adjuvant chemotherapy with carboplatin/paclitaxel based on the CD-DST. Among 92 registered patients, 87 were eligible for inclusion in the analysis. The success rate of CD-DST was 86% and chemosensitivity to carboplatin and/or paclitaxel was evident in 57 (76%) of the 75 patients. Adjuvant chemotherapy was completed in 22 (73%) of 30 patients. The 5-year overall survival rates were 71, 73, and 75% for all, CD-DST success, and chemosensitive patients, respectively. The 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates of the chemosensitive patients who completed adjuvant chemotherapy using carboplatin/paclitaxel were 68 and 82%, respectively. The 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates of the patients with stage II-IIIA chemosensitive NSCLC were 58 and 75%, respectively. Comparative analyses of the chemosensitive and non-chemosensitive/CD-DST failure groups showed no significant survival difference. CD-DST can be used to evaluate chemosensitivity after lung cancer surgery; however, its clinical efficacy for assessing individualized treatment remains uncertain.

  13. Cell cytoskeletal changes effected by static compressive stress lead to changes in the contractile properties of tissue regenerative collagen membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gellynck

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Static compressive stress can influence the matrix, which subsequently affects cell behaviour and the cell’s ability to further transform the matrix. This study aimed to assess response to static compressive stress at different stages of osteoblast differentiation and assess the cell cytoskeleton’s role as a conduit of matrix-derived stimuli. Mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs (D1 ORL UVA, osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1 and post-osteoblast/pre-osteocyte-like cells (MLO-A5 were seeded in hydrated and compressed collagen gels. Contraction was quantified macroscopically, and cell morphology, survival, differentiation and mineralisation assessed using confocal microscopy, alamarBlue® assay, real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR and histological stains, respectively. Confocal microscopy demonstrated cell shape changes and favourable microfilament organisation with static compressive stress of the collagen matrix; furthermore, cell survival was greater compared to the hydrated gels. The stage of osteoblast differentiation determined the degree of matrix contraction, with MSCs demonstrating the greatest amount. Introduction of microfilament disrupting inhibitors confirmed that pre-stress and tensegrity forces were under the influence of gel density, and there was increased survival and differentiation of the cells within the compressed collagen compared to the hydrated collagen. There was also relative stiffening and differentiation with time of the compressed cell-seeded collagen, allowing for greater manipulation. In conclusion, the combined collagen chemistry and increased density of the microenvironment can promote upregulation of osteogenic genes and mineralisation; MSCs can facilitate matrix contraction to form an engineered membrane with the potential to serve as a ‘pseudo-periosteum’ in the regeneration of bone defects.

  14. The scavenging of free radical and oxygen species activities and hydration capacity of collagen hydrolysates from walleye pollock ( Theragra chalcogramma) skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yongliang; Li, Bafang; Zhao, Xue

    2009-06-01

    Fish skin collagen hydrolysates (FSCH) were prepared from walleye pollock ( Theragra chalcogramma) using a mixture of enzymes, namely trypsin and flavourzyme. The degree of hydrolysis of the skin collagen was 27.3%. FSCH was mainly composed of low-molecular-weight peptides and the relative proportion of <1000Da fraction was 70.6%. Free radical and oxygen species scavenging activities of FSCH were investigated in four model systems, including diphenylpicrylhy-drazyl radical (DPPH), superoxide anion radical, hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide model, and compared with that of a native antioxidant, reduced glutathione (GSH). FSCH was also evaluated by water-absorbing and water-holding capacity. The results showed that FSCH was able to scavenge free radical and oxygen species significantly and to enhance water-absorbing and water-holding capacity remarkably. Therefore, FSCH may have potential applications in the medicine and food industries.

  15. A novel chemotherapeutic sensitivity-testing system based on collagen gel droplet embedded 3D-culture methods for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jun; Hong, Zhixian; Feng, Fan; Chai, Yantao; Zhang, Yunkai; Jiang, Qiyu; Hu, Yan; Wu, Shunquan; Wu, Yingsong; Gao, Xunian; Chen, Qiong; Wan, Yong; Bi, Jingfeng; Zhang, Zheng

    2017-11-08

    Patients suffering from advanced stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) often exhibit a poor prognosis or dismal clinical outcomes due to ineffective chemotherapy or a multi-drug resistance (MDR) process. Thus, it is urgent to develop a new chemotherapeutic sensitivity testing system for HCC treatment. The presence study investigated the potential application of a novel chemotherapeutic sensitivity-testing system based on a collagen gel droplet embedded 3D-culture system (CD-DST). Primary cells were separating from surgical resection specimens and then tested by CD-DST. To identify whether HCC cell lines or cells separating from clinical specimens contain MDR features, the cells were treated with an IC 50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration) or IC max (maximal inhibitory concentration) concentration of antitumor agents, e.g., 5-furuolouracil (5-FU), paclitaxel (PAC), cisplatin (CDDP), epirubicin (EPI), or oxaliplatin (L-OHP), and the inhibitory rates (IRs) were calculated. HepG2 cells were sensitive to 5-FU, PAC, CDDP, EPI, or L-OHP; the IC 50 value is 0.83 ± 0.45 μg/ml, 0.03 ± 0.02 μg/ml, 1.15 ± 0.75 μg/ml, 0.09 ± 0.03 μg/ml, or 1.76 ± 0.44 μg/ml, respectively. Only eight (8/26), nine (9/26), or five (5/26) patients were sensitive to the IC max concentration of CDDP, EPI, or L-OHP; whereas only three (3/26), four (4/26), or two (2/26) patients were sensitive to the IC 50 concentration of CDDP, EPI, or L-OHP. No patients were sensitive to 5-FU or PAC. The in vitro drug sensitivity exanimation revealed the MDR features of HCC and examined the sensitivity of HCC cells from clinical specimens to anti-tumor agents. CD-DST may be a useful method to predict the potential clinical benefits of anticancer agents for HCC patients.

  16. Estrogen response of MCF-7 cells grown on diverse substrates and in suspension culture: promotion of morphological heterogeneity, modulation of progestin receptor induction; cell-substrate interactions on collagen gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourreau-Schneider, N; Berthois, Y; Mittre, H; Charpin, C; Jacquemier, J; Martin, P M

    1984-12-01

    In this study we observed the incidence of hormone sensitivity in the response of MCF-7 cells to estrogen stimulation when the cells were cultured in different contact environments (hydrophilic plastic, bovine corneal extracellular matrix, type I collagen and in suspension culture). The major purpose was to describe the influence of cell to cell and cell to substrate contacts on the morphological response to estrogen treatment. However, other parameters including growth and induction of progestin receptor were also explored, keeping in mind that the MCF-7 cell line, although representative of normal mammary epithelium in that it contains a similar hormone receptivity, was selected in vitro from a metastatic population in a pleural effusion. Although substrate conditions did not modify growth enhancement by estrogens, progestin receptor levels were significantly higher in three-dimensional spheroid cultures in which cell to cell contacts were optimal due to elimination of basal contact. A careful morphological survey of large surfaces lead to an objective opinion of the overall effect of the hormone treatment on the non-cloned cell line in which a marked heterogeneity in the response of individual cells was observed. In terms of morphofunctional differentiation, the edification of acini with dense microvillus coating was best in suspension culture. When sections were made perpendicular to the plane of cultures on collagen gel rafts two other phenomena were noted: decrease in intercellular junctions, resulting in reduced cell to cell cohesion, and accumulation biodegradation products in the collagen lattice. This suggested a hormone-mediated interaction between the metastatic cells and the fibrillar substrate, collagen I, one of the major constituents of tissue stroma. This estrogen response might be related to the metastatic phenotype and must be distinct from their hormone sensitivity in terms of growth and differentiation since hormone receptivity is generally

  17. Snail1 induced in breast cancer cells in 3D collagen I gel environment suppresses cortactin and impairs effective invadopodia formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi-Sook; Kim, Sudong; Kim, Baek Gil; Won, Cheolhee; Nam, Seo Hee; Kang, Suki; Kim, Hye-Jin; Kang, Minkyung; Ryu, Jihye; Song, Haeng Eun; Lee, Doohyung; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Jeon, Noo Li; Kim, Tai Young; Cho, Nam Hoon; Lee, Jung Weon

    2014-09-01

    Although an in vitro 3D environment cannot completely mimic the in vivo tumor site, embedding tumor cells in a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) allows for the study of cancer cell behaviors and the screening of anti-metastatic reagents with a more in vivo-like context. Here we explored the behaviors of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells embedded in 3D collagen I. Diverse tumor environmental conditions (including cell density, extracellular acidity, or hypoxia as mimics for a continuous tumor growth) reduced JNKs, enhanced TGFβ1/Smad signaling activity, induced Snail1, and reduced cortactin expression. The reduced JNKs activity blocked efficient formation of invadopodia labeled with actin, cortactin, or MT1-MMP. JNKs inactivation activated Smad2 and Smad4, which were required for Snail1 expression. Snail1 then repressed cortactin expression, causing reduced invadopodia formation and prominent localization of MT1-MMP at perinuclear regions. MDA-MB-231 cells thus exhibited less efficient collagen I degradation and invasion in 3D collagen I upon JNKs inhibition. These observations support a signaling network among JNKs, Smads, Snail1, and cortactin to regulate the invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells embedded in 3D collagen I, which may be targeted during screening of anti-invasion reagents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Textural and mechanical characterization of C-S-H gels from hydration of synthetic T1-C{sub 3}S, {beta}-C{sub 2}S and their blends; Caracterizacion textural y mecanica de geles C-S-H formados en la hidratacion de muestras sinteticas T1-C{sub 3}S, {beta}-C{sub 2}S y sus mezclas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goni, S.; Guerrero, A.; Puertas, F.; Hernandez, M. S.; Palacios, M.; Dolado, J. S.; Zhu, W.; Howind, T.

    2011-07-01

    The textural and mechanical characterization of C-S-H gels formed from the hydration of pure T1-C{sub 3}S, {beta}-C{sub 2}S and their blends are studied by Nitrogen sorption and nano indentation experiments. The surface area and nano porosity of C-S-H gels formed from the hydration of {beta}-C{sub 2}S and the 30-70 (T1-C{sub 3}S and {beta}-C{sub 2}S mixture) are higher than those from hydration of T1-C{sub 3}S, and 70-30, with the difference decreasing with hydration age. Such changes are well supported by findings of nano indentation study, which shows the greater relative volume of C-S-H phases with lower densities in the {beta}-C{sub 2}S and the 30-70 pastes. With the increase in hydration age, the relative volume of C-S-H phases with higher densities increased at the expenses of those with lower density. Important quantitative correlations were found among these textural characteristics and the mean chain length, determined from {sup 2}9Si magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR, of the C-S-H gels. (Author) 36 refs.

  19. A tissue adaptation model based on strain-dependent collagen degradation and contact-guided cell traction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, T A M; Wilson, W; Foolen, J; Cilingir, A C; Ito, K; van Donkelaar, C C

    2015-03-18

    Soft biological tissues adapt their collagen network to the mechanical environment. Collagen remodeling and cell traction are both involved in this process. The present study presents a collagen adaptation model which includes strain-dependent collagen degradation and contact-guided cell traction. Cell traction is determined by the prevailing collagen structure and is assumed to strive for tensional homeostasis. In addition, collagen is assumed to mechanically fail if it is over-strained. Care is taken to use principally measurable and physiologically meaningful relationships. This model is implemented in a fibril-reinforced biphasic finite element model for soft hydrated tissues. The versatility and limitations of the model are demonstrated by corroborating the predicted transient and equilibrium collagen adaptation under distinct mechanical constraints against experimental observations from the literature. These experiments include overloading of pericardium explants until failure, static uniaxial and biaxial loading of cell-seeded gels in vitro and shortening of periosteum explants. In addition, remodeling under hypothetical conditions is explored to demonstrate how collagen might adapt to small differences in constraints. Typical aspects of all essentially different experimental conditions are captured quantitatively or qualitatively. Differences between predictions and experiments as well as new insights that emerge from the present simulations are discussed. This model is anticipated to evolve into a mechanistic description of collagen adaptation, which may assist in developing load-regimes for functional tissue engineered constructs, or may be employed to improve our understanding of the mechanisms behind physiological and pathological collagen remodeling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Preparation of collagen-coated gels that maximize in vitro myogenesis of stem cells by matching the lateral elasticity of in vivo muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Tathagata; Rehfeldt, Florian; Sweeney, H Lee; Discher, Dennis E

    2010-01-01

    The physical nature of a cell's microenvironment--including the elasticity of the surrounding tissue--appears to exert a significant influence on cell morphology, cytoskeleton, and gene expression. We have previously shown that committed muscle cells will develop sarcomeric striations of skeletal muscle myosin II only when the cells are grown on a compliant gel that closely matches the passive compliance of skeletal muscle. We have more recently shown with the same types of elastic gels that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) maximally express myogenic genes, even in the absence of tailored soluble factors. Here, we provide detailed methods not only for how we make and nanomechanically characterize hydrogels of muscle-like elasticity, but also how we culture MSCs and characterize their myogenic induction by whole human genome transcript analysis.

  1. Collagenous sprue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soendergaard, Christoffer; Riis, Lene Buhl; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2014-01-01

    Collagenous sprue is a rare clinicopathological condition of the small bowel. It is characterised by abnormal subepithelial collagen deposition and is typically associated with malabsorption, diarrhoea and weight loss. The clinical features of collagenous sprue often resemble those of coeliac...... disease and together with frequent histological findings like mucosal thinning and intraepithelial lymphocytosis the diagnosis may be hard to reach without awareness of this condition. While coeliac disease is treated using gluten restriction, collagenous sprue is, however, not improved...... by this intervention. In cases of diet-refractory 'coeliac disease' it is therefore essential to consider collagenous sprue to initiate treatment at an early stage to prevent the fibrotic progression. Here, we report a case of a 78-year-old man with collagenous sprue and present the clinical and histological...

  2. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    , not all of them are white like snow. Some hydrates from the deep Gulf of Mexico are richly colored in shades of yellow, orange, or even red. The ice-like masses are beautiful, and contrast with the dull gray of deep sea muds. Hydrates from the Blake... volcanoes and associated gas hydrates: Marine Geology, v. 167, p. 29-42. Milkov, A.V. and R. Sassen, 2001a, Estimate of gas hydrate resource, northwestern Gulf of Mexico continental slope: Marine Geology, v. 179, pp. 71-83. Milkov, A.V., Sassen, R...

  3. Preparation and structure characterization of soluble bone collagen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, G-25 gel chromatography, X-diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to analyze soluble collagen peptides chelating calcium. Collagen peptide hydrolysis can be divided into four components using G-25 gel chromatography.

  4. [Collagen nephritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, N R; Bulos, M J; Monserrat, A J

    1997-01-01

    Fibrillar collagen in the glomeruli is considered specific of the nail-patella syndrome. A new nephropathy with diffuse intraglomerular deposition of type III collagen without nail and skeletal abnormalities has been described. We report the case of a 26-year-old woman who presented persistent proteinuria, hematuria, deafness without nail and skeletal abnormalities. The renal biopsy showed focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis by light microscopy. The electron microscopy revealed the presence of massive fibrillar collagen within the mesangial matriz and the basement membrane. This is the first patient reported in our country. We emphasize the usefulness of electron microscopy in the study of glomerular diseases.

  5. Collagen Fibrils: Nature's Highly Tunable Nonlinear Springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriotis, Orestis G; Desissaire, Sylvia; Thurner, Philipp J

    2018-03-21

    Tissue hydration is well known to influence tissue mechanics and can be tuned via osmotic pressure. Collagen fibrils are nature's nanoscale building blocks to achieve biomechanical function in a broad range of biological tissues and across many species. Intrafibrillar covalent cross-links have long been thought to play a pivotal role in collagen fibril elasticity, but predominantly at large, far from physiological, strains. Performing nanotensile experiments of collagen fibrils at varying hydration levels by adjusting osmotic pressure in situ during atomic force microscopy experiments, we show the power the intrafibrillar noncovalent interactions have for defining collagen fibril tensile elasticity at low fibril strains. Nanomechanical tensile tests reveal that osmotic pressure increases collagen fibril stiffness up to 24-fold in transverse (nanoindentation) and up to 6-fold in the longitudinal direction (tension), compared to physiological saline in a reversible fashion. We attribute the stiffening to the density and strength of weak intermolecular forces tuned by hydration and hence collagen packing density. This reversible mechanism may be employed by cells to alter their mechanical microenvironment in a reversible manner. The mechanism could also be translated to tissue engineering approaches for customizing scaffold mechanics in spatially resolved fashion, and it may help explain local mechanical changes during development of diseases and inflammation.

  6. Chloral Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if you are allergic to chloral hydrate, aspirin, tartrazine (a yellow dye in some processed foods and ... in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature, away from excess ...

  7. Biomimetic soluble collagen purified from bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ana Marina; Gentile, Piergiorgio; Sartori, Susanna; Pagliano, Cristina; Cabrele, Chiara; Chiono, Valeria; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2012-11-01

    Type I collagen has been extensively exploited as a biomaterial for biomedical applications and drug delivery; however, small molecular alterations occurring during the isolation procedure and its interaction with residual bone extracellular matrix molecules or proteins might affect the overall material biocompatibility and performance. The aim of the current work is to study the potential alterations in collagen properties and organization associated with the absence of proteoglycans, which mimic pathological conditions associated with age-related diseases. A new approach for evaluating the effect of proteoglycans on the properties of isolated type I collagen from the bone matrix is described. Additional treatment with guanidine hydrochloride was introduced to remove residual proteoglycans from the collagen matrix. The properties of the isolated collagen with/without guanidine hydrochloride treatment were investigated and compared with a commercial rabbit collagen as control. We demonstrate that the absence of proteoglycans in the isolated type I collagen affects its thermal properties, the extraction into its native structure, and its ability to hydrate and self-assemble into fibers. The fine control and tuning of all these features, linked to the absence of non-collagenous proteins as proteoglycans, offer the possibility of designing new strategies and biomaterials with advanced biomimetic properties aimed at regenerating bone tissue in the case of fragility and/or defects. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Hyaluronan in aged collagen matrix increases prostate epithelial cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodarasamy, Mamatha; Vernon, Robert B.; Chan, Christina K.; Plymate, Stephen R.; Wight, Thomas N.

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the prostate, which is comprised primarily of collagen, becomes increasingly disorganized with age, a property that may influence the development of hyperplasia and cancer. Collageous ECM extracted from the tails of aged mice exhibits many characteristics of collagen in aged tissues, including the prostate. When polymerized into a 3-dimensional (3D) gel, these collagen extracts can serve as models for the study of specific cell-ECM interactions. In the present study, we examined the behaviors of human prostatic epithelial cell lines representing normal prostate epithelial cells (PEC), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH-1), and adenocarcinoma (LNCaP) cultured in contact with 3D gels made from collagen extracts of young and aged mice. We found that proliferation of PEC, BPH-1, and LNCaP cells were all increased by culture on aged collagen gels relative to young collagen gels. In examining age-associated differences in the composition of the collagen extracts, we found that aged and young collagen had a similar amount of several collagen-associated ECM components, but aged collagen had a much greater content of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA) than young collagen. The addition of HA (of similar size and concentration to that found in aged collagen extracts) to cells placed in young collagen elicited significantly increased proliferation in BPH-1 cells, but not in PEC or LNCaP cells, relative to controls not exposed to HA. Of note, histochemical analyses of human prostatic tissues showed significantly higher expression of HA in BPH and prostate cancer stroma relative to stroma of normal prostate. Collectively, these results suggest that changes in ECM involving increased levels of HA contribute to the growth of prostatic epithelium with aging. PMID:25124870

  9. Anatase nanoparticles from hydrated titania gels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pulišová, Petra; Boháček, Jaroslav; Šubrt, Jan; Szatmáry, Lórant; Bezdička, Petr; Murafa, Nataliya

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 161, č. 1 (2011), s. 84-90 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0577 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : anatase particles Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.407, year: 2011

  10. Characteristics of Methane Hydrate Formation in Artificial and Natural Media

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Zhang; Qingbai Wu; Yuzhong Yang

    2013-01-01

    The formation of methane hydrate in two significantly different media was investigated, using silica gel as an artificial medium and loess as a natural medium. The methane hydrate formation was observed through the depletion of water in the matrix, measured via the matrix potential and the relationship between the matrix potential and the water content was determined using established equations. The velocity of methane hydrate nucleation slowed over the course of the reaction, as it relied on...

  11. Thermal helix-coil transition in UV irradiated collagen from rat tail tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sionkowska, A; Kamińska, A

    1999-05-01

    The thermal helix-coil transition in UV irradiated collagen solution, collagen film and pieces of rat tail tendon (RTT) were compared. Their thermal stability's were determined by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and by viscometric measurements. The denaturation temperatures of collagen solution, film and pieces of RTT were different. The helix-coil transition occur near 40 degrees C in collagen solution, near 112 degrees C in collagen film, and near 101 degrees C in pieces of RTT. After UV irradiation the thermal helix-coil transition of collagen samples were changed. These changes depend on the degree of hydratation.

  12. [Skin hydration and hydrating products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplan, H; Nocera, T

    2018-05-01

    One of the skin's principal functions is to protect the body against its environment by maintaining an effective epidermal barrier, not only against external factors, but also to prevent water loss from the body. Indeed, water homeostasis is vital for the normal physiological functioning of skin. Hydration levels affect not only visible microscopic parameters such as the suppleness and softness of skin, but also molecular parameters, enzyme activities and cellular signalling within the epidermis. The body is continually losing some of its water, but this phenomenon is limited and the optimal hydration gradient in skin is ensured via a set of sophisticated regulatory processes that rely on the functional and dynamic properties of the uppermost level of the skin consisting of the stratum corneum. The present article brings together data recently acquired in the fields of skin hydration and the characterisation of dehydrated or dry skin, whether through study of the regulatory processes involved or as a result of changes in the techniques used for in situ measurement, and thus in optimisation of management. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Hydration Properties of Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag (GGBS Under Different Hydration Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua LIU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The hydration properties of various cementitious materials containing Ground Granulated Blast-furnace Slag (GGBS, two alkali-activated slag cements (AAS-1 and AAS-2 in which sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide act as alkaline activators respectively, supersulfated cement (SSC and slag Portland cement(PSC, are compared with ordinary Portland cement (OPC to investigate the effect of activating environment on the hydration properties in this study by determining the compressive strength of the pastes, the hydration heat of binders within 96 hours, and the hydration products at age of 28 days. The results show that C-S-H gels are the main hydrated products for all cementitious systems containing GGBS. Ca(OH2 is the hydration products of OPC and PSC paste. However, ettringite and gypsum crystals instead of Ca(OH2 are detected in SSC paste. Additionally, tobermorite, a crystalline C-S-H, and calcite are hydrated products in AAS-1. Tobermorite, cowlesite and calcite are hydrated products of AAS-2 as well. Based on strength results, AAS-1 paste exhibits the highest compressive strength followed by POC, PSC, SSC in order at all testing ages and AAS-2 give the lowest compressive strength except for the early age at 3 days, which is higher than SSC but still lower than PSC. From hydration heat analysis, alkalinity in the reaction solution is a vital factor influencing the initial hydration rate and the initial hydration rate from higher to lower is AAS-2, AAS-1, OPC, PSC and SSC. Although AAS possesses a faster reaction rate in the initial hours, cumulative hydration heat of AAS is comparably lower than that of OPC, but higher than those of PSC and SSC in turn, which indicates that the hydration heat of clinkers is much higher than that of slag.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.14934

  14. Characterization of internal structure of hydrated agar and gelatin matrices by cryo-SEM

    KAUST Repository

    Rahbani, Janane; Behzad, Ali Reza; Khashab, Niveen M.; Al-Ghoul, Mazen

    2012-01-01

    There has been a considerable interest in recent years in developing polymer gel matrices for many important applications such as 2DE for quantization and separation of a variety of proteins and drug delivery system to control the release of active agents. However, a well-defined knowledge of the ultrastructures of the gels has been elusive. In this study, we report the characterization of two different polymers used in 2DE: Gelatin, a naturally occurring polymer derived from collagen (protein) and agar, a polymer of polysaccharide (sugar) origin. Low-temperature SEM is used to examine the internal structure of these gels in their frozen natural hydrated states. Results of this study show that both polymers have an array of hollow cells that resembles honeycomb structures. While agar pores are almost circular, the corresponding Gaussian curve is very broad exhibiting a range of radii from nearly 370 to 700 nm. Gelatin pores are smaller and more homogeneous reflecting a narrower distribution from nearly 320 to 650 nm. Overall, these ultrastructural findings could be used to correlate with functions of the polymers. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Characterization of internal structure of hydrated agar and gelatin matrices by cryo-SEM

    KAUST Repository

    Rahbani, Janane

    2012-12-26

    There has been a considerable interest in recent years in developing polymer gel matrices for many important applications such as 2DE for quantization and separation of a variety of proteins and drug delivery system to control the release of active agents. However, a well-defined knowledge of the ultrastructures of the gels has been elusive. In this study, we report the characterization of two different polymers used in 2DE: Gelatin, a naturally occurring polymer derived from collagen (protein) and agar, a polymer of polysaccharide (sugar) origin. Low-temperature SEM is used to examine the internal structure of these gels in their frozen natural hydrated states. Results of this study show that both polymers have an array of hollow cells that resembles honeycomb structures. While agar pores are almost circular, the corresponding Gaussian curve is very broad exhibiting a range of radii from nearly 370 to 700 nm. Gelatin pores are smaller and more homogeneous reflecting a narrower distribution from nearly 320 to 650 nm. Overall, these ultrastructural findings could be used to correlate with functions of the polymers. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Characterization of internal structure of hydrated agar and gelatin matrices by cryo-SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbani, Janane; Behzad, Ali R; Khashab, Niveen M; Al-Ghoul, Mazen

    2013-02-01

    There has been a considerable interest in recent years in developing polymer gel matrices for many important applications such as 2DE for quantization and separation of a variety of proteins and drug delivery system to control the release of active agents. However, a well-defined knowledge of the ultrastructures of the gels has been elusive. In this study, we report the characterization of two different polymers used in 2DE: Gelatin, a naturally occurring polymer derived from collagen (protein) and agar, a polymer of polysaccharide (sugar) origin. Low-temperature SEM is used to examine the internal structure of these gels in their frozen natural hydrated states. Results of this study show that both polymers have an array of hollow cells that resembles honeycomb structures. While agar pores are almost circular, the corresponding Gaussian curve is very broad exhibiting a range of radii from nearly 370 to 700 nm. Gelatin pores are smaller and more homogeneous reflecting a narrower distribution from nearly 320 to 650 nm. Overall, these ultrastructural findings could be used to correlate with functions of the polymers. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Comparison of thermal properties of fish collagen and bovine collagen in the temperature range 298-670K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauza-Włodarczyk, Marlena; Kubisz, Leszek; Mielcarek, Sławomir; Włodarczyk, Dariusz

    2017-11-01

    The increased interest in fish collagen is a consequence of the risk of exposure to Creutzfeld-Jacob disease (CJD) and the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), whose occurrence is associated with prions carried by bovine collagen. Collagen is the main biopolymer in living organisms and the main component of the skin and bones. Until the discovery of the BSE, bovine collagen had been widely used. The BSE epidemic increased the interest in new sources of collagen such as fish skin collagen (FSC) and its properties. Although the thermal properties of collagen originating from mammals have been well described, less attention has been paid to the thermal properties of FSC. Denaturation temperature is a particularly important parameter, depending on the collagen origin and hydration level. In the reported experiment, the free water and bound water release processes along with thermal denaturation process were studied by means of the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Measurements were carried out using a DSC 7 instrument (Elmer-Perkin), in the temperature range 298-670K. The study material was FSC derived by acidic hydration method. The bovine Achilles tendon (BAT) collagen type I was used as the control material. The thermograms recorded revealed both, exothermic and endothermic peaks. For both materials, the peaks in the temperature range of 330-360K were assigned to the release of free water and bound water. The denaturation temperatures of FSC and BAT collagen were determined as 420K and 493K, respectively. Thermal decomposition process was observed at about 500K for FSC and at about 510K for BAT collagen. These results show that FSC is less resistant to high temperature than BAT collagen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of water on piezoelectricity in bone and collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, T G; Zimmerman, R L

    1975-01-01

    Interferometric measurements of bovine bone and tendon show that the values of the piezoelectric strain constant d14 decrease with hydration from the dry values of 0.2 X 10(-14) and 2.0 X 10(-14) m/V, respectively. The decrease of piezoelectricity in tendon is exponential with a characteristic hydration of 7% by weight from which an upper limit of the average molecular weight of the responsible electric dipole moments is deduced. The piezoelectricity in bone decreases relatively slowly with hydration indicating that the electric dipoles in bone collagen are subject to a different cancelling mechanism. PMID:1148359

  19. Mechanical properties of the collagen network in human articular cartilage as measured by osmotic stress technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basser, P.J.; Schneiderman, R.; Bank, R.A.; Wachtel, E.; Maroudas, A.

    1998-01-01

    We have used an isotropic osmotic stress technique to assess the swelling pressures of human articular cartilage over a wide range of hydrations in order to determine from these measurements, for the first time, the tensile stress in the collagen network, P(c), as a function of hydration. Osmotic

  20. A 48 kDa collagen-binding phosphoprotein isolated from bovine aortic endothelial cells interacts with the collagenous domain, but not the globular domain, of collagen type IV.

    OpenAIRE

    Yannariello-Brown, J; Madri, J A

    1990-01-01

    We have identified collagen-binding proteins in detergent extracts of metabolically labelled bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) by collagen type IV-Sepharose affinity chromatography. The major collagen type IV-binding protein identified by SDS/PAGE had a molecular mass of 48 kDa, which we term the 'collagen-binding 48 kDa protein' (CB48). The pI of CB48 was 8.0-8.3 in a two-dimensional gel system, running non-equilibrium pH gel electrophoresis in the first dimension and SDS/PAGE in the se...

  1. Cosmetic Potential of Marine Fish Skin Collagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L. Alves

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Many cosmetic formulations have collagen as a major component because of its significant benefits as a natural humectant and moisturizer. This industry is constantly looking for innovative, sustainable, and truly efficacious products, so marine collagen based formulations are arising as promising alternatives. A solid description and characterization of this protein is fundamental to guarantee the highest quality of each batch. In the present study, we present an extensive characterization of marine-derived collagen extracted from salmon and codfish skins, targeting its inclusion as component in cosmetic formulations. Chemical and physical characterizations were performed using several techniques such as sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE, Fourier Transformation Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy rheology, circular dichroism, X-ray diffraction, humidity uptake, and a biological assessment of the extracts regarding their irritant potential. The results showed an isolation of type I collagen with high purity but with some structural and chemical differences between sources. Collagen demonstrated a good capacity to retain water, thus being suitable for dermal applications as a moisturizer. A topical exposure of collagen in a human reconstructed dermis, as well as the analysis of molecular markers for irritation and inflammation, exhibited no irritant potential. Thus, the isolation of collagen from fish skins for inclusion in dermocosmetic applications may constitute a sustainable and low-cost platform for the biotechnological valorization of fish by-products.

  2. Sorption of sodium hydroxide by type I collagen and bovine corneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whikehart, D R; Edwards, W C; Pfister, R R

    1991-01-01

    There are no quantitative studies on the uptake of alkali into corneal tissues. To study this phenomenon, both type I collagen and bovine corneas were incubated in sodium hydroxide (NaOH) under varying conditions for periods up to 27.5 h. The sorption (absorption or adsorption) of the alkali to protein and tissue was measured as the quantity of NaOH no longer available for titration to neutrality with hydrochloric acid. Sorption was found to be dependent on the concentration of NaOH (0.01-1 N) but independent of the incubation temperature (4-35 degrees C). In whole cornea, sorption of 1 N NaOH began immediately and increased with time up to 6 h. After 6 h, sorption decreased, together with the observed degradation and solubilization of the tissue. Stripping of the corneal endothelium alone or of the endothelium and epithelium increased sorption in a similar manner when compared to whole corneas for periods up to 4 h. These observations are compatible with ionic and nonionic bonding of hydroxide ions to collagen (including that of the cornea) and the subsequent release of hydroxide ions during hydrolysis of the protein itself. Indirect evidence also suggests the inclusion of quantities of unbound hydroxide ions in hydrated gels of glycosaminoglycans. It is proposed that in a chemical burn of the cornea, alkali is both stored in the tissue (by sorption) and reacted with it (by hydrolysis), without any net consumption of alkali taking place.

  3. Hydration mechanism and leaching behavior of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Na; Li, Hongxu [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Rare and Precious Metals Green Recycling and Extraction, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Xiaoming, E-mail: liuxm@ustb.edu.cn [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Rare and Precious Metals Green Recycling and Extraction, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Nanocrystalline regions in size of ∼5 nm were found in the amorphous C-A-S-H gel. • A hydration model was proposed to clarify the hydration mechanism. • The developed cementitious materials are environmentally acceptable. - Abstract: A deep investigation on the hydration mechanism of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials was conducted from viewpoints of hydration products and hydration heat analysis. As a main hydration product, the microstructure of C-A-S-H gel was observed using high resolution transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the C-A-S-H gel is composed of amorphous regions and nanocrystalline regions. Most of regions in the C-A-S-H gel are amorphous with continuous distribution, and the nanocrystalline regions on scale of ∼5 nm are dispersed irregularly within the amorphous regions. The hydration heat of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials is much lower than that of the ordinary Portland cement. A hydration model was proposed for this kind of cementitious materials, and the hydration process mainly consists of four stages which are dissolution of materials, formation of C-A-S-H gels and ettringite, cementation of hydration products, and polycondensation of C-A-S-H gels. There are no strict boundaries among these four basic stages, and they proceed crossing each other. Moreover, the leaching toxicity tests were also performed to prove that the developed red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials are environmentally acceptable.

  4. Hydration mechanism and leaching behavior of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Na; Li, Hongxu; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanocrystalline regions in size of ∼5 nm were found in the amorphous C-A-S-H gel. • A hydration model was proposed to clarify the hydration mechanism. • The developed cementitious materials are environmentally acceptable. - Abstract: A deep investigation on the hydration mechanism of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials was conducted from viewpoints of hydration products and hydration heat analysis. As a main hydration product, the microstructure of C-A-S-H gel was observed using high resolution transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the C-A-S-H gel is composed of amorphous regions and nanocrystalline regions. Most of regions in the C-A-S-H gel are amorphous with continuous distribution, and the nanocrystalline regions on scale of ∼5 nm are dispersed irregularly within the amorphous regions. The hydration heat of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials is much lower than that of the ordinary Portland cement. A hydration model was proposed for this kind of cementitious materials, and the hydration process mainly consists of four stages which are dissolution of materials, formation of C-A-S-H gels and ettringite, cementation of hydration products, and polycondensation of C-A-S-H gels. There are no strict boundaries among these four basic stages, and they proceed crossing each other. Moreover, the leaching toxicity tests were also performed to prove that the developed red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials are environmentally acceptable.

  5. Structure–mechanics relationships of collagen fibrils in the osteogenesis imperfecta mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriotis, O. G.; Chang, S. W.; Vanleene, M.; Howarth, P. H.; Davies, D. E.; Shefelbine, S. J.; Buehler, M. J.; Thurner, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    The collagen molecule, which is the building block of collagen fibrils, is a triple helix of two α1(I) chains and one α2(I) chain. However, in the severe mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta (OIM), deletion of the COL1A2 gene results in the substitution of the α2(I) chain by one α1(I) chain. As this substitution severely impairs the structure and mechanics of collagen-rich tissues at the tissue and organ level, the main aim of this study was to investigate how the structure and mechanics are altered in OIM collagen fibrils. Comparing results from atomic force microscopy imaging and cantilever-based nanoindentation on collagen fibrils from OIM and wild-type (WT) animals, we found a 33% lower indentation modulus in OIM when air-dried (bound water present) and an almost fivefold higher indentation modulus in OIM collagen fibrils when fully hydrated (bound and unbound water present) in phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBS) compared with WT collagen fibrils. These mechanical changes were accompanied by an impaired swelling upon hydration within PBS. Our experimental and atomistic simulation results show how the structure and mechanics are altered at the individual collagen fibril level as a result of collagen gene mutation in OIM. We envisage that the combination of experimental and modelling approaches could allow mechanical phenotyping at the collagen fibril level of virtually any alteration of collagen structure or chemistry. PMID:26468064

  6. Inelastic behaviour of collagen networks in cell–matrix interactions and mechanosensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Hamid; Arora, Pamma D.; Simmons, Craig A.; Janmey, Paul A.; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of extracellular matrix proteins strongly influence cell-induced tension in the matrix, which in turn influences cell function. Despite progress on the impact of elastic behaviour of matrix proteins on cell–matrix interactions, little is known about the influence of inelastic behaviour, especially at the large and slow deformations that characterize cell-induced matrix remodelling. We found that collagen matrices exhibit deformation rate-dependent behaviour, which leads to a transition from pronounced elastic behaviour at fast deformations to substantially inelastic behaviour at slow deformations (1 μm min−1, similar to cell-mediated deformation). With slow deformations, the inelastic behaviour of floating gels was sensitive to collagen concentration, whereas attached gels exhibited similar inelastic behaviour independent of collagen concentration. The presence of an underlying rigid support had a similar effect on cell–matrix interactions: cell-induced deformation and remodelling were similar on 1 or 3 mg ml−1 attached collagen gels while deformations were two- to fourfold smaller in floating gels of high compared with low collagen concentration. In cross-linked collagen matrices, which did not exhibit inelastic behaviour, cells did not respond to the presence of the underlying rigid foundation. These data indicate that at the slow rates of collagen compaction generated by fibroblasts, the inelastic responses of collagen gels, which are influenced by collagen concentration and the presence of an underlying rigid foundation, are important determinants of cell–matrix interactions and mechanosensation. PMID:25392399

  7. Artificial Hydration and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ... Your Health Resources Healthcare Management Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Share Print Patients who ...

  8. Proximal collagenous gastroenteritides:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Riis, Lene Buhl; Danese, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    AIM: While collagenous colitis represents the most common form of the collagenous gastroenteritides, the collagenous entities affecting the proximal part of the gastrointestinal tract are much less recognized and possibly overlooked. The aim was to summarize the latest information through a syste...

  9. Effectiveness of xenogenous-based bovine-derived platelet gel embedded within a three-dimensional collagen implant on the healing and regeneration of the Achilles tendon defect in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid

    2014-08-01

    Tissue engineering is an option in reconstructing large tendon defects and managing their healing and regeneration. We designed and produced a novel xenogeneic-based bovine platelet, embedded it within a tissue-engineered collagen implant (CI) and applied it in an experimentally induced large tendon defect model in rabbits to test whether bovine platelets could stimulate tendon healing and regeneration in vivo. One hundred twenty rabbits were randomly divided into two experimental and pilot groups. In all the animals, the left Achilles tendon was surgically excised and the tendon edges were aligned by Kessler suture. Each group was then divided into three groups of control (no implant), treated with CI and treated with collagen-platelet implant. The pilot groups were euthanized at 10, 15, 30 and 40 days post-injury (DPI), and their gross and histologic characteristics were evaluated to study host-graft interaction mechanism. To study the tendon healing and its outcome, the experimental animals were tested during the experiment using hematologic, ultrasonographic and various methods of clinical examinations and then euthanized at 60 DPI and their tendons were evaluated by gross pathologic, histopathologic, scanning electron microscopic, biophysical and biochemical methods. Bovine platelets embedded within a CI increased inflammation at short term while it increased the rate of implant absorption and matrix replacement compared with the controls and CI alone. Treatment also significantly increased diameter, density, amount, alignment and differentiation of the collagen fibrils and fibers and approximated the water uptake and delivery behavior of the healing tendons to normal contralaterals (p tendons and reduced peritendinous adhesion, muscle fibrosis and atrophy, and therefore, it improved the clinical scores and physical activity related to the injured limb when compared with the controls (p Achilles tendon in rabbit. This strategy may be a valuable option in the

  10. The initiation of embryonic-like collagen fibrillogenesis by adult human tendon fibroblasts when cultured under tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayer, Monika L; Yeung, Chin-Yan C; Kadler, Karl E

    2010-01-01

    to initiate collagen fibrillogenesis when cultured in fixed-length fibrin gels. Fibroblasts were dissected from semitendinosus and gracilis tendons from healthy humans and cultured in 3D linear fibrin gels. The fibroblasts synthesized an extracellular matrix of parallel collagen fibrils that were aligned...

  11. Noninvasive Quantitative Imaging of Collagen Microstructure in Three-Dimensional Hydrogels Using High-Frequency Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Karla P; Helguera, María; Hocking, Denise C; Dalecki, Diane

    2015-07-01

    Collagen I is widely used as a natural component of biomaterials for both tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. The physical and biological properties of fibrillar collagens are strongly tied to variations in collagen fiber microstructure. The goal of this study was to develop the use of high-frequency quantitative ultrasound to assess collagen microstructure within three-dimensional (3D) hydrogels noninvasively and nondestructively. The integrated backscatter coefficient (IBC) was employed as a quantitative ultrasound parameter to detect, image, and quantify spatial variations in collagen fiber density and diameter. Collagen fiber microstructure was varied by fabricating hydrogels with different collagen concentrations or polymerization temperatures. IBC values were computed from measurements of the backscattered radio-frequency ultrasound signals collected using a single-element transducer (38-MHz center frequency, 13-47 MHz bandwidth). The IBC increased linearly with increasing collagen concentration and decreasing polymerization temperature. Parametric 3D images of the IBC were generated to visualize and quantify regional variations in collagen microstructure throughout the volume of hydrogels fabricated in standard tissue culture plates. IBC parametric images of corresponding cell-embedded collagen gels showed cell accumulation within regions having elevated collagen IBC values. The capability of this ultrasound technique to noninvasively detect and quantify spatial differences in collagen microstructure offers a valuable tool to monitor the structural properties of collagen scaffolds during fabrication, to detect functional differences in collagen microstructure, and to guide fundamental research on the interactions of cells and collagen matrices.

  12. Calcium and magnesium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lothenbach, B.; L'Hopital, E.; Nied, D.; Achiedo, G.; Dauzeres, A.

    2015-01-01

    Deep geological disposals are planed to discard long-lived intermediate-level and high-level radioactive wastes. Clay-based geological barriers are expected to limit the ingress of groundwater and to reduce the mobility of radioelements. In the interaction zone between the cement and the clay based material alteration can occur. Magnesium silicate hydrates (M-S-H) have been observed due to the reaction of magnesium sulfate containing groundwater with cements or in the interaction zone between low-pH type cement and clays. M-S-H samples synthesized in the laboratory showed that M-S-H has a variable composition within 0.7 ≤ Mg/Si ≤ 1.5. TEM/EDS analyses show an homogeneous gel with no defined structure. IR and 29 Si NMR data reveal a higher polymerization degree of the silica network in M-S-H compared to calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H). The presence of mainly Q 3 silicate tetrahedrons in M-S-H indicates a sheet like or a triple-chain silica structure while C-S-H is characterised by single chain-structure. The clear difference in the silica structure and the larger ionic radius of Ca 2+ (1.1 Angstrom) compared to Mg 2+ (0.8 Angstrom) make the formation of an extended solid solution between M-S-H and C-S-H gel improbable. In fact, the analyses of synthetic samples containing both magnesium and calcium in various ratios indicate the formation of separate M-S-H and C-S-H gels with no or very little uptake of magnesium in CS-H or calcium in M-S-H

  13. ISOCT study of collagen crosslinking of collagen in cancer models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Graham; Young, Scott T.; Yi, Ji; Shea, Lonnie D.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-03-01

    The role of extracellular matrix modification and signaling in cancer progression is an increasingly recognized avenue for the progression of the disease. Previous study of field effect carcinogenesis with Inverse Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography (ISOCT) has revealed pronounced changes in the nanoscale-sensitive mass fractal dimension D measured from field effect tissue when compared to healthy tissue. However, the origin of this difference in tissue ultrastructure in field effect carcinogenesis has remained poorly understood. Here, we present findings supporting the idea that enzymatic crosslinking of the extracellular matrix is an effect that presents at the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. We use a model of collagen gel with crosslinking induced by lysyl oxidase (LOXL4) to recapitulate the difference in D previously reported from healthy and cancerous tissue biopsies. Furthermore, STORM imaging of this collagen gel model verifies the morphologic effects of enzymatic crosslinking at length scales as small as 40 nm, close to the previously reported lower length scale sensitivity threshold of 35 nm for ISOCT. Analysis of the autocorrelation function from STORM images of collagen gels and subsequent fitting to the Whittle-Matérn correlation function shows a similar effect of LOXL4 on D from collagen measured with ISOCT and STORM. We extend this to mass spectrometric study of tissue to directly measure concentrations of collagen crosslink residues. The validation of ISOCT as a viable tool for non-invasive rapid quantification of collagen ultrastructure lends it to study other physiological phenomena involving ECM restructuring such as atherosclerotic plaque screening or cervical ripening during pregnancy.

  14. Collagen metabolism and basement membrane formation in cultures of mouse mammary epithelial cells: Induction of assembly on fibrillar type I collagen substrata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, G.; van der Schueren, B.; van den Berghe, H.; Nusgens, B.; Van Cauwenberge, D.; Lapiere, C.

    1987-01-01

    Collagen metabolism was compared in cultures of mouse mammary epithelial cells maintained on plastic or fibrillar type I collagen gel substrata. The accumulation of dialysable and non-dialysable [ 3 H]hydroxyproline and the identification of the collagens produced suggest no difference between substrata in the allover rates of collagen synthesis and degradation. The proportion of the [ 3 H]collagen which accumulates in the monolayers of cultures on collagen, however, markedly exceeds that of cultures on plastic. Cultures on collagen deposit a sheet-like layer of extracellular matrix materials on the surface of the collagen fibers. Transformed cells on collagen produce and accumulate more [ 3 H]collage, yet are less effective in basement membrane formation than normal cells, indicting that the accumulation of collagen alone and the effect of interstitial collagen thereupon do not suffice. Thus, exogenous fibrillar collagen appears to enhance, but is not sufficient for proper assembly of collagenous basement membrane components near the basal epithelial cell surface

  15. Characteristics of Methane Hydrate Formation in Artificial and Natural Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingbai Wu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The formation of methane hydrate in two significantly different media was investigated, using silica gel as an artificial medium and loess as a natural medium. The methane hydrate formation was observed through the depletion of water in the matrix, measured via the matrix potential and the relationship between the matrix potential and the water content was determined using established equations. The velocity of methane hydrate nucleation slowed over the course of the reaction, as it relied on water transfer to the hydrate surfaces with lower Gibbs free energy after nucleation. Significant differences in the reactions in the two types of media arose from differences in the water retention capacity and lithology of media due to the internal surface area and pore size distributions. Compared with methane hydrate formation in silica gel, the reaction in loess was much slower and formed far less methane hydrate. The results of this study will advance the understanding of how the properties of the environment affect the formation of gas hydrates in nature.

  16. Collagen matrix as a tool in studying fibroblastic cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanta, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is a fibrillar protein, a member of a large family of collagen proteins. It is present in most body tissues, usually in combination with other collagens and other components of extracellular matrix. Its synthesis is increased in various pathological situations, in healing wounds, in fibrotic tissues and in many tumors. After extraction from collagen-rich tissues it is widely used in studies of cell behavior, especially those of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Cells cultured in a classical way, on planar plastic dishes, lack the third dimension that is characteristic of body tissues. Collagen I forms gel at neutral pH and may become a basis of a 3D matrix that better mimics conditions in tissue than plastic dishes.

  17. Endocytic collagen degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H.; Jürgensen, Henrik J.; Ingvarsen, Signe Ziir

    2012-01-01

    it crucially important to understand both the collagen synthesis and turnover mechanisms in this condition. Here we show that the endocytic collagen receptor, uPARAP/Endo180, is a major determinant in governing the balance between collagen deposition and degradation. Cirrhotic human livers displayed a marked...... up-regulation of uPARAP/Endo180 in activated fibroblasts and hepatic stellate cells located close to the collagen deposits. In a hepatic stellate cell line, uPARAP/Endo180 was shown to be active in, and required for, the uptake and intracellular degradation of collagen. To evaluate the functional...... groups of mice clearly revealed a fibrosis protective role of uPARAP/Endo180. This effect appeared to directly reflect the activity of the collagen receptor, since no compensatory events were noted when comparing the mRNA expression profiles of the two groups of mice in an array system focused on matrix-degrading...

  18. Gas hydrate in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2018-01-17

    Gas hydrate is a naturally occurring, ice-like substance that forms when water and gas combine under high pressure and at moderate temperatures. Methane is the most common gas present in gas hydrate, although other gases may also be included in hydrate structures, particularly in areas close to conventional oil and gas reservoirs. Gas hydrate is widespread in ocean-bottom sediments at water depths greater than 300–500 meters (m; 984–1,640 feet [ft]) and is also present in areas with permanently frozen ground (permafrost). Several countries are evaluating gas hydrate as a possible energy resource in deepwater or permafrost settings. Gas hydrate is also under investigation to determine how environmental change may affect these deposits.

  19. NMR mechanisms in gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, L J

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance was critical to the development of gel dosimetry, as it established the potential for three dimensional dosimetry with chemical dosimeter systems through magnetic resonance imaging [1]. In the last two decades MRI has served as the gold standard for imaging, while NMR relaxometry has played an important role in the development and understanding of the behaviour of new gel dosimetry systems. Therefore, an appreciation of the relaxation mechanisms determining the NMR behaviour of irradiated gel dosimeters is important for a full comprehension of a considerable component of the literature on gel dosimetry. A number of excellent papers have presented this important theory, this brief review will highlight some of the salient points made previously [1-5]. The spin relaxation of gel dosimeters (which determines the dose dependence in most conventional MR imaging) is determined principally by the protons on water molecules in the system. These water protons exist in different environments, or groups (see Figure 1): on bulk water, on water hydrating the chemical species that are being modified under irradiation, and on water hydrating the gel matrix used to spatially stabilize the dosimeter (e.g., gelatin, agarose, etc). The spin relaxation depends on the inherent relaxation rate of each spin group, that is, on the relaxation rate which would be observed for the specific group if it were isolated. Also, the different water environments are not isolated from each other, and the observed relaxation rate also depends on the rate of exchange of magnetization between the groups, and on the fraction of protons in each group. In fact, the water exchanges quickly between the environments, so that relaxation is in what is usually termed the fast exchange regime. In the limit of fast exchange, the relaxation of the water protons is well characterized by a single exponential and hence by a single apparent relaxation rate. In irradiated gel dosimeters this

  20. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  1. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  2. Mechanical response of collagen molecule under hydrostatic compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, Karanvir; Kumar, Navin

    2015-01-01

    Proteins like collagen are the basic building blocks of various body tissues (soft and hard). Collagen molecules find their presence in the skeletal system of the body where they bear mechanical loads from different directions, either individually or along with hydroxy-apatite crystals. Therefore, it is very important to understand the mechanical behavior of the collagen molecule which is subjected to multi-axial state of loading. The estimation of strains of collagen molecule along different directions resulting from the changes in hydrostatic pressure magnitude, can provide us new insights into its mechanical behavior. In the present work, full atomistic simulations have been used to study global (volumetric) as well as local (along different directions) mechanical properties of the hydrated collagen molecule which is subjected to different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. To estimate the local mechanical properties, the strains of collagen molecule along its longitudinal and transverse directions have been acquired at different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. In spite of non-homogeneous distribution of atoms within the collagen molecule, the calculated values of local mechanical properties have been found to carry the same order of magnitude along the longitudinal and transverse directions. It has been demonstrated that the values of global mechanical properties like compressibility, bulk modulus, etc. as well as local mechanical properties like linear compressibility, linear elastic modulus, etc. are functions of magnitudes of applied hydrostatic pressures. The mechanical characteristics of collagen molecule based on the atomistic model have also been compared with that of the continuum model in the present work. The comparison showed up orthotropic material behavior for the collagen molecule. The information on collagen molecule provided in the present study can be very helpful in designing the future bio-materials.

  3. Mechanical response of collagen molecule under hydrostatic compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Karanvir; Kumar, Navin

    2015-04-01

    Proteins like collagen are the basic building blocks of various body tissues (soft and hard). Collagen molecules find their presence in the skeletal system of the body where they bear mechanical loads from different directions, either individually or along with hydroxy-apatite crystals. Therefore, it is very important to understand the mechanical behavior of the collagen molecule which is subjected to multi-axial state of loading. The estimation of strains of collagen molecule along different directions resulting from the changes in hydrostatic pressure magnitude, can provide us new insights into its mechanical behavior. In the present work, full atomistic simulations have been used to study global (volumetric) as well as local (along different directions) mechanical properties of the hydrated collagen molecule which is subjected to different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. To estimate the local mechanical properties, the strains of collagen molecule along its longitudinal and transverse directions have been acquired at different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. In spite of non-homogeneous distribution of atoms within the collagen molecule, the calculated values of local mechanical properties have been found to carry the same order of magnitude along the longitudinal and transverse directions. It has been demonstrated that the values of global mechanical properties like compressibility, bulk modulus, etc. as well as local mechanical properties like linear compressibility, linear elastic modulus, etc. are functions of magnitudes of applied hydrostatic pressures. The mechanical characteristics of collagen molecule based on the atomistic model have also been compared with that of the continuum model in the present work. The comparison showed up orthotropic material behavior for the collagen molecule. The information on collagen molecule provided in the present study can be very helpful in designing the future bio-materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  4. Mechanical response of collagen molecule under hydrostatic compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, Karanvir, E-mail: karans@iitrpr.ac.in; Kumar, Navin

    2015-04-01

    Proteins like collagen are the basic building blocks of various body tissues (soft and hard). Collagen molecules find their presence in the skeletal system of the body where they bear mechanical loads from different directions, either individually or along with hydroxy-apatite crystals. Therefore, it is very important to understand the mechanical behavior of the collagen molecule which is subjected to multi-axial state of loading. The estimation of strains of collagen molecule along different directions resulting from the changes in hydrostatic pressure magnitude, can provide us new insights into its mechanical behavior. In the present work, full atomistic simulations have been used to study global (volumetric) as well as local (along different directions) mechanical properties of the hydrated collagen molecule which is subjected to different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. To estimate the local mechanical properties, the strains of collagen molecule along its longitudinal and transverse directions have been acquired at different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. In spite of non-homogeneous distribution of atoms within the collagen molecule, the calculated values of local mechanical properties have been found to carry the same order of magnitude along the longitudinal and transverse directions. It has been demonstrated that the values of global mechanical properties like compressibility, bulk modulus, etc. as well as local mechanical properties like linear compressibility, linear elastic modulus, etc. are functions of magnitudes of applied hydrostatic pressures. The mechanical characteristics of collagen molecule based on the atomistic model have also been compared with that of the continuum model in the present work. The comparison showed up orthotropic material behavior for the collagen molecule. The information on collagen molecule provided in the present study can be very helpful in designing the future bio-materials.

  5. Electrophoretic mobility patterns of collagen following laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Lawrence S.; Moazami, Nader; Pocsidio, Joanne O.; Oz, Mehmet C.; LoGerfo, Paul; Treat, Michael R.

    1991-06-01

    Clinical application of laser vascular anastomosis in inhibited by a lack of understanding of its mechanism. Whether tissue fusion results from covalent or non-covalent bonding of collagen and other structural proteins is unknown. We compared electrophoretic mobility of collagen in laser treated and untreated specimens of rat tail tendon (>90% type I collagen) and rabbit aorta. Welding was performed, using tissue shrinkage as the clinical endpoint, using the 808 nm diode laser (power density 14 watts/cm2) and topical indocyanine green dye (max absorption 805 nm). Collagen was extracted with 8 M urea (denaturing), 0.5 M acetic acid (non-denaturing) and acetic acid/pepsin (cleaves non- helical protein). Mobility patterns on gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) after urea or acetic acid extraction were identical in the lasered and control tendon and vessel (confirmed by optical densitometry), revealing no evidence of formation of novel covalent bonds. Alpha and beta band intensity was diminished in pepsin incubated lasered specimens compared with controls (optical density ratio 0.00 +/- 9 tendon, 0.65 +/- 0.12 aorta), indicating the presence of denatured collagen. With the laser parameters used, collagen is denatured without formation of covalent bonds, suggesting that non-covalent interaction between denatured collagen molecules may be responsible for the weld. Based on this mechanism, welding parameters can be chosen which produce collagen denaturation without cell death.

  6. Chemical alteration of cement hydrates by dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Daisuke; Fujita, Tomonari; Nakanishi, Kiyoshi

    2000-01-01

    Cementitious material is a potential waste packaging and backfilling material for the radioactive waste disposal, and is expected to provide both physical and chemical containment. In particular, the sorption of radionuclides onto cementitious material and the ability to provide a high pH condition are very important parameters when considering the release of radionuclides from radioactive wastes. For the long term, in the geological disposal environment, cement hydrates will be altered by, for example, dissolution, chemical reaction with ions in the groundwater, and hydrothermal reaction. Once the composition or crystallinity of the constituent minerals of a cement hydrate is changed by these processes, the pH of the repository buffered by cementitious material and its sorption ability might be affected. However, the mechanism of cement alteration is not yet fully understood. In this study, leaching experiments of some candidate cements for radioactive waste disposal were carried out. Hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Blast Furnace Slag blended cement (OPC/BFS) and Highly containing Flyash and Silicafume Cement (HFSC) samples were contacted with distilled water at liquid:solid ratios of 10:1, 100:1 and 1000:1 at room temperature for 200 days. In the case of OPC, Ca(OH) 2 dissolved at high liquid:solid ratios. The specific surface area of all cement samples increased by leaching process. This might be caused by further hydration and change of composition of constituent minerals. A model is presented which predicts the leaching of cement hydrates and the mineral composition in the hydrated cement solid phase, including the incongruent dissolution of CSH gel phases and congruent dissolution of Ca(OH) 2 , Ettringite and Hydrotalcite. Experimental results of dissolution of Ca-O-H and Ca-Si-O-H phases were well predicted by this model. (author)

  7. Collagen-derived markers of bone metabolism in osteogenesis imperfecta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, A M; Hansen, M; Kollerup, Gina Birgitte

    1998-01-01

    )] were measured in 78 osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) patients to investigate bone metabolism in vivo and relate marker concentrations to phenotype and in vitro collagen I defects, as shown by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). PICP and PINP were generally low...

  8. Type I collagen from bullfrog ( Rana catesbeiana ) fallopian tube ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rana catesbeiana) with a yield of 16.4%, on a dry weight basis. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacylamide-gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that the PSC contained two alpha components (α1 and α2) and was classified as type I collagen ...

  9. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years.

  10. Reflective terahertz (THz) imaging: system calibration using hydration phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Neha; Garritano, James; Lee, Yoon Kyung; Tewari, Priyamvada; Sung, Shijun; Maccabi, Ashkan; Nowroozi, Bryan; Babakhanian, Meghedi; Sanghvi, Sajan; Singh, Rahul; Grundfest, Warren; Taylor, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) hydration sensing continues to gain traction in the medical imaging community due to its unparalleled sensitivity to tissue water content. Rapid and accurate detection of fluid shifts following induction of thermal skin burns as well as remote corneal hydration sensing have been previously demonstrated in vivo using reflective, pulsed THz imaging. The hydration contrast sensing capabilities of this technology were recently confirmed in a parallel 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging study, in which burn areas are associated with increases in local mobile water content. Successful clinical translation of THz sensing, however, still requires quantitative assessments of system performance measurements, specifically hydration concentration sensitivity, with tissue substitutes. This research aims to calibrate the sensitivity of a novel, reflective THz system to tissue water content through the use of hydration phantoms for quantitative comparisons of THz hydration imagery.Gelatin phantoms were identified as an appropriate tissue-mimicking model for reflective THz applications, and gel composition, comprising mixtures of water and protein, was varied between 83% to 95% hydration, a physiologically relevant range. A comparison of four series of gelatin phantom studies demonstrated a positive linear relationship between THz reflectivity and water concentration, with statistically significant hydration sensitivities (p hydration). The THz-phantom interaction is simulated with a three-layer model using the Transfer Matrix Method with agreement in hydration trends. Having demonstrated the ability to accurately and noninvasively measure water content in tissue equivalent targets with high sensitivity, reflective THz imaging is explored as a potential tool for early detection and intervention of corneal pathologies.

  11. A 48 kDa collagen-binding phosphoprotein isolated from bovine aortic endothelial cells interacts with the collagenous domain, but not the globular domain, of collagen type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yannariello-Brown, J; Madri, J A

    1990-01-15

    We have identified collagen-binding proteins in detergent extracts of metabolically labelled bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) by collagen type IV-Sepharose affinity chromatography. The major collagen type IV-binding protein identified by SDS/PAGE had a molecular mass of 48 kDa, which we term the 'collagen-binding 48 kDa protein' (CB48). The pI of CB48 was 8.0-8.3 in a two-dimensional gel system, running non-equilibrium pH gel electrophoresis in the first dimension and SDS/PAGE in the second dimension. Under these conditions CB48 separated into two major (a and b) and one minor isoform (c); a was the most basic of the three isoforms. Two-dimensional chymotryptic peptide maps derived from each individual isoform were virtually identical. The charge differences between the isoforms were due in part to differential H3(32)PO4 incorporation by the protein. CB48 bound to intact collagen type IV and the collagenous region of collagen type IV, but not to the globular NC1 domain. Cell-surface labelling and indirect immunofluorescence experiments localized the bulk of CB48 intracellularly in the endoplasmic reticulum Golgi region, with a minor population of molecules on the cell surface. A specific rabbit polyclonal anti-CB48 serum did not inhibit the attachment or spreading of BAEC to collagen type IV in an 'in vitro' adhesion assay, suggesting that the cell-surface population of CB48 is not involved in BAEC adhesion. We conclude that CB48 is a collagen-binding phosphoprotein that interacts with the collagenous domain of collagen type IV and may be involved in intracellular transport of collagen molecules.

  12. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  13. The structural response of the cornea to changes in stromal hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Sally; White, Tomas; Boote, Craig; Kamma-Lorger, Christina S; Bell, James; Sorenson, Thomas; Terrill, Nick; Shebanova, Olga; Meek, Keith M

    2017-06-01

    The primary aim of this study was to quantify the relationship between corneal structure and hydration in humans and pigs. X-ray scattering data were collected from human and porcine corneas equilibrated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to varying levels of hydration, to obtain measurements of collagen fibril diameter, interfibrillar spacing (IFS) and intermolecular spacing. Both species showed a strong positive linear correlation between hydration and IFS 2 and a nonlinear, bi-phasic relationship between hydration and fibril diameter, whereby fibril diameter increased up to approximately physiological hydration, H = 3.0, with little change thereafter. Above H = 3.0, porcine corneas exhibited a larger fibril diameter than human corneas ( p < 0.001). Intermolecular spacing also varied with hydration in a bi-phasic manner but reached a maximum value at a lower hydration ( H = 1.5) than fibril diameter. Human corneas displayed a higher intermolecular spacing than porcine corneas at all hydrations ( p < 0.0001). Human and porcine corneas required a similar PEG concentration to reach physiological hydration, suggesting that the total fixed charge that gives rise to the swelling pressure is the same. The difference in their structural responses to hydration can be explained by variations in molecular cross-linking and intra/interfibrillar water partitioning. © 2017 The Authors.

  14. Biosynthesis of collagen by fibroblasts kept in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado-Santelli, G.M.

    1978-01-01

    The sinthesis of collagen is studied in fibroblasts of different origins with the purpose of obtaining an appropriate system for the study of its biosynthesis and processing. The percentage of collagen synthesis vary according to the fibroblast origin. Experiences are performed with fibroblasts kept in culture from: chicken - and guinea pig embryos, carragheenin - induced granulomas in adult guinea pig and from human skin. The collagen pattern synthesized after acetic acid - or saline extractions in the presence of inhibitors is also determined. This pattern is then assayed by poliacrilamide - 5% - SDS gel electrophoresis accompanied by fluorography. The importance of the cell culture system in the elucidation of collagen biosynthesis is pointed out. (M.A.) [pt

  15. Collagen Quantification in Tissue Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coentro, João Quintas; Capella-Monsonís, Héctor; Graceffa, Valeria; Wu, Zhuning; Mullen, Anne Maria; Raghunath, Michael; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I

    2017-01-01

    Collagen is the major extracellular protein in mammals. Accurate quantification of collagen is essential in the biomaterials (e.g., reproducible collagen scaffold fabrication), drug discovery (e.g., assessment of collagen in pathophysiologies, such as fibrosis), and tissue engineering (e.g., quantification of cell-synthesized collagen) fields. Although measuring hydroxyproline content is the most widely used method to quantify collagen in biological specimens, the process is very laborious. To this end, the Sircol™ Collagen Assay is widely used due to its inherent simplicity and convenience. However, this method leads to overestimation of collagen content due to the interaction of Sirius red with basic amino acids of non-collagenous proteins. Herein, we describe the addition of an ultrafiltration purification step in the process to accurately determine collagen content in tissues.

  16. Newly identified interfibrillar collagen crosslinking suppresses cell proliferation and remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelli, Benedetto; Le Nihouannen, Damien; Hacking, S Adam; Tran, Simon; Li, Jingjing; Murshed, Monzur; Doillon, Charles J; Ghezzi, Chiara E; Zhang, Yu Ling; Nazhat, Showan N; Barralet, Jake E

    2015-06-01

    Copper is becoming recognised as a key cation in a variety of biological processes. Copper chelation has been studied as a potential anti-angiogenic strategy for arresting tumour growth. Conversely the delivery of copper ions and complexes in vivo can elicit a pro-angiogenic effect. Previously we unexpectedly found that copper-stimulated intraperitoneal angiogenesis was accompanied by collagen deposition. Here, in hard tissue, not only was healing accelerated by copper, but again enhanced deposition of collagen was detected at 2 weeks. Experiments with reconstituted collagen showed that addition of copper ions post-fibrillogenesis rendered plastically-compressed gels resistant to collagenases, enhanced their mechanical properties and increased the denaturation temperature of the protein. Unexpectedly, this apparently interfibrillar crosslinking was not affected by addition of glucose or ascorbic acid, which are required for crosslinking by advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Fibroblasts cultured on copper-crosslinked gels did not proliferate, whereas those cultured with an equivalent quantity of copper on either tissue culture plastic or collagen showed no effect compared with controls. Although non-proliferative, fibroblasts grown on copper-cross-linked collagen could migrate, remained metabolically active for at least 14 days and displayed a 6-fold increase in Mmps 1 and 3 mRNA expression compared with copper-free controls. The ability of copper ions to crosslink collagen fibrils during densification and independently of AGEs or Fenton type reactions is previously unreported. The effect on MMP susceptibility of collagen and the dramatic change in cell behaviour on this crosslinked ECM may contribute to shedding some light on unexplained phenomena as the apparent benefit of copper complexation in fibrotic disorders or the enhanced collagen deposition in response to localised copper delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ion exchange centres of sorption of alkaline and alkaline-earth cations on hydrated titanium and tin dioxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisova, T.A.; Perekhozheva, T.N.; Sharigin, L.M.; Pletnev, R.N.

    1986-01-01

    The nature of exchange centres of one- and two-charged cations on hydrated titanium and tin dioxides by means of paramagnetic resonance method is studied. The sorption of cations of Na + , Cs + , Ca 2+ was carried out at 25 and 90 deg C at ph=5.0-10.4 on samples of hydrated titanium dioxide and hydrated tin dioxide, obtained by sol gel method and calcined at 150 deg C and 300 deg C accordingly.

  18. Dense tissue-like collagen matrices formed in cell-free conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosser, Gervaise; Anglo, Anny; Helary, Christophe; Bouligand, Yves; Giraud-Guille, Marie-Madeleine

    2006-01-01

    A new protocol was developed to produce dense organized collagen matrices hierarchically ordered on a large scale. It consists of a two stage process: (1) the organization of a collagen solution and (2) the stabilization of the organizations by a sol-gel transition that leads to the formation of collagen fibrils. This new protocol relies on the continuous injection of an acid-soluble collagen solution into glass microchambers. It leads to extended concentration gradients of collagen, ranging from 5 to 1000 mg/ml. The self-organization of collagen solutions into a wide array of spatial organizations was investigated. The final matrices obtained by this procedure varied in concentration, structure and density. Changes in the liquid state of the samples were followed by polarized light microscopy, and the final stabilized gel states obtained after fibrillogenesis were analyzed by both light and electron microscopy. Typical organizations extended homogeneously by up to three centimetres in one direction and several hundreds of micrometers in other directions. Fibrillogenesis of collagen solutions of high and low concentrations led to fibrils spatially arranged as has been described in bone and derm, respectively. Moreover, a relationship was revealed between the collagen concentration and the aggregation of and rotational angles between lateral fibrils. These results constitute a strong base from which to further develop highly enriched collagen matrices that could lead to substitutes that mimic connective tissues. The matrices thus obtained may also be good candidates for the study of the three-dimensional migration of cells.

  19. The anabolic effects of insulin on type II collagen synthesis of Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bembenek, M.E.; Liberti, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    The anabolic effects of insulin on collagen production of freshly isolated Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocytes were investigated. The specific radioactivity of newly synthesized collagen was not increased by insulin, indicating that the hormone has no effect on the specific radioactivity of the aminoacyl tRNA pool. Results of further studies obtained from collagen degradation experiments demonstrated that insulin did not alter the rate of [3H]collagen degradation. Together, these results clearly indicate that insulin stimulates collagen biosynthesis. Polyacrylamide gel analysis of the newly synthesized collagen of both control and insulin-stimulated cells revealed a large-molecular-weight component which migrated with authentic alpha 1(II) collagen and was collagenase-sensitive. Additional studies showed that, although insulin increased the processing and secretion of collagen, the hormone did not cause a shift in the distribution of the extracellular and intracellular collagen pools. Finally, results of studies conducted with the transcriptional inhibitor, actinomycin D, indicated that the anabolic effects of insulin on collagen and non-collagen proteins were mediated at a post-transcriptional site

  20. Increasing extracellular matrix collagen level and MMP activity induces cyst development in polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Li, Chenghai; Liu, Zijuan; Dai, Zonghan; Tao, Yunxia

    2012-09-11

    Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) kidneys exhibit increased extracellular matrix (ECM) collagen expression and metalloproteinases (MMPs) activity. We investigated the role of these increases on cystic disease progression in PKD kidneys. We examined the role of type I collagen (collagen I) and membrane bound type 1 MMP (MT1-MMP) on cyst development using both in vitro 3 dimensional (3D) collagen gel culture and in vivo PCK rat model of PKD. We found that collagen concentration is critical in controlling the morphogenesis of MDCK cells cultured in 3D gels. MDCK cells did not form 3D structures at collagen I concentrations lower than 1 mg/ml but began forming tubules when the concentration reaches 1 mg/ml. Significantly, these cells began to form cyst when collagen I concentration reached to 1.2 mg/ml, and the ratios of cyst to tubule structures increased as the collagen I concentration increased. These cells exclusively formed cyst structures at a collagen I concentration of 1.8 mg/ml or higher. Overexpression of MT1-MMP in MDCK cells significantly induced cyst growth in 3D collagen gel culture. Conversely, inhibition of MMPs activity with doxycycline, a FDA approved pan-MMPs inhibitor, dramatically slowed cyst growth. More importantly, the treatment of PCK rats with doxycycline significantly decreased renal tubule cell proliferation and markedly inhibited the cystic disease progression. Our data suggest that increased collagen expression and MMP activity in PKD kidneys may induce cyst formation and expansion. Our findings also suggest that MMPs may serve as a therapeutic target for the treatment of human PKD.

  1. Increasing extracellular matrix collagen level and MMP activity induces cyst development in polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Bin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD kidneys exhibit increased extracellular matrix (ECM collagen expression and metalloproteinases (MMPs activity. We investigated the role of these increases on cystic disease progression in PKD kidneys. Methods We examined the role of type I collagen (collagen I and membrane bound type 1 MMP (MT1-MMP on cyst development using both in vitro 3 dimensional (3D collagen gel culture and in vivo PCK rat model of PKD. Results We found that collagen concentration is critical in controlling the morphogenesis of MDCK cells cultured in 3D gels. MDCK cells did not form 3D structures at collagen I concentrations lower than 1 mg/ml but began forming tubules when the concentration reaches 1 mg/ml. Significantly, these cells began to form cyst when collagen I concentration reached to 1.2 mg/ml, and the ratios of cyst to tubule structures increased as the collagen I concentration increased. These cells exclusively formed cyst structures at a collagen I concentration of 1.8 mg/ml or higher. Overexpression of MT1-MMP in MDCK cells significantly induced cyst growth in 3D collagen gel culture. Conversely, inhibition of MMPs activity with doxycycline, a FDA approved pan-MMPs inhibitor, dramatically slowed cyst growth. More importantly, the treatment of PCK rats with doxycycline significantly decreased renal tubule cell proliferation and markedly inhibited the cystic disease progression. Conclusions Our data suggest that increased collagen expression and MMP activity in PKD kidneys may induce cyst formation and expansion. Our findings also suggest that MMPs may serve as a therapeutic target for the treatment of human PKD.

  2. Toward single cell traction microscopy within 3D collagen matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Matthew S.; Long, Rong; Feng, Xinzeng; Huang, YuLing; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Wu, Mingming

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three-dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell–ECM and cell–cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cell migration within collagen gels. - Highlights: • Review of the current state of the art in 3D cell traction force microscopy. • Bulk and micro-characterization of remodelable fibrous collagen gels. • Strategies for performing 3D cell traction microscopy within collagen gels

  3. Toward single cell traction microscopy within 3D collagen matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Matthew S. [Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Long, Rong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2G8 (Canada); Feng, Xinzeng [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Huang, YuLing [Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hui, Chung-Yuen [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Wu, Mingming, E-mail: mw272@cornell.edu [Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Mechanical interaction between the cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cellular behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and migration. Cells require the three-dimensional (3D) architectural support of the ECM to perform physiologically realistic functions. However, current understanding of cell–ECM and cell–cell mechanical interactions is largely derived from 2D cell traction force microscopy, in which cells are cultured on a flat substrate. 3D cell traction microscopy is emerging for mapping traction fields of single animal cells embedded in either synthetic or natively derived fibrous gels. We discuss here the development of 3D cell traction microscopy, its current limitations, and perspectives on the future of this technology. Emphasis is placed on strategies for applying 3D cell traction microscopy to individual tumor cell migration within collagen gels. - Highlights: • Review of the current state of the art in 3D cell traction force microscopy. • Bulk and micro-characterization of remodelable fibrous collagen gels. • Strategies for performing 3D cell traction microscopy within collagen gels.

  4. Collagen metabolism in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M H; Jensen, L T; Andersen, T

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of obesity, fat distribution and weight loss on collagen turnover using serum concentrations of the carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (S-PICP) and the aminoterminal propeptide of type III pro-collagen (S-PIIINP) as markers for collagen turnover...... (r = 0.37; P = 0.004), height (r = 0.27; P = 0.04), waist circumference (r = 0.35; P = 0.007), as well as with WHR (r = 0.33; P = 0.01) and was inversely correlated to age (r = -0.40; P = 0.002). Compared with randomly selected controls from a large pool of healthy volunteers, the obese patients had...... restriction (P obesity and associated with body fat distribution, suggesting...

  5. Collagen-derived markers of bone metabolism in osteogenesis imperfecta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, A M; Hansen, M; Kollerup, Gina Birgitte

    1998-01-01

    )] were measured in 78 osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) patients to investigate bone metabolism in vivo and relate marker concentrations to phenotype and in vitro collagen I defects, as shown by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). PICP and PINP were generally low....... The in vivo findings correlated with in vitro results of collagen I SDS-PAGE. Bone turnover is reduced in OI children and mildly affected OI adults, whereas bone resorption is elevated in severely affected adults. These findings may prove helpful for diagnosis and decision-making regarding therapy in OI....

  6. Collagen Homeostasis and Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, S Peter; Heinemeier, Katja M; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system and its collagen rich tissue is important for ensuring architecture of skeletal muscle, energy storage in tendon and ligaments, joint surface protection, and for ensuring the transfer of muscular forces into resulting limb movement. Structure of tendon is stable...... inactivity or immobilization of the human body will conversely result in a dramatic loss in tendon stiffness and collagen synthesis. This illustrates the importance of regular mechanical load in order to preserve the stabilizing role of the connective tissue for the overall function of the musculoskeletal...

  7. Microstructure of hydrated cement pastes as determined by SANS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabine, T.; Bertram, W.; Aldridge, L.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Technologists have known how to make concrete for over 2000 years but despite painstaking research no one has been able to show how and why concrete sets. Part of the problem is that the calcium silicate hydrate (the gel produced by hydrating cement) is amorphous and cannot be characterised by x-ray crystallographic techniques. Small angle neutron scattering on instrument V12a at BENSC was used to characterise the hydration reactions and show the growth of the calcium silicate hydrates during initial hydration and the substantial differences in the rate of growth and structure as different additives are used. SANS spectra were measured as a function of the hydration from three different types of cement paste: 1) Ordinary Portland Cement made with a water to cement ratio of about 0.4; 2) A blend of Ordinary Portland Cement(25%) and Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (75%) with a water to cement ration of about 0.4; 3) A dense paste made from silica fume(24%), Ordinary Portland Cement (76%) at a water to powder ratio of 0.18. The differences in the spectra are interpreted in terms of differences between the microstructure of the pastes

  8. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate

  9. Pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide in a fixed bed reactor using the clathrate hydrate process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, Ponnivalavan; Kumar, Rajnish; Linga, Praveen

    2013-01-01

    Hydrate based gas separation (HBGS) process with silica sand and silica gel as contact medium was employed to capture CO 2 from fuel gas mixture. Gas uptake measurement at three different pressures (7.5, 8.5 and 9.0 MPa) and 274.15 K were conducted for hydrate formation kinetics and overall conversion of water to hydrate, rate of hydrate formation were determined. Water conversion of up to 36% was achieved with silica sand bed compared to 13% conversion in the silica gel bed. Effect of driving force on the rate of hydrate formation and gas consumption was significant in silica sand bed whereas it was found to be insignificant in silica gel bed. Hydrate dissociation experiments by thermal stimulation (at constant pressure) alone and a combination of depressurization and thermal stimulation were carried out for complete recovery of the hydrated gas. A driving force of 23 K was found to be sufficient to recover all the hydrated gas within 1 h. This study indicates that silica sand can be an effective porous media for separation of CO 2 from fuel gas when compared to silica gel. - Highlights: ► The clathrate process for pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide in a novel fixed bed reactor is presented. ► Performance of two contact media (silica gel and silica sand) was investigated. ► Water to hydrate conversion was higher in a silica sand column. ► A pressure reduction and thermal stimulation approach is presented for a complete recovery of the hydrated gas

  10. Scaffold architecture and fibrin gels promote meniscal cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawelec, K. M., E-mail: pawelec.km@gmail.com, E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk; Best, S. M.; Cameron, R. E. [Cambridge Centre for Medical Materials, Materials Science and Metallurgy Department, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Wardale, R. J., E-mail: pawelec.km@gmail.com, E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk [Division of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 2QQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    Stability of the knee relies on the meniscus, a complex connective tissue with poor healing ability. Current meniscal tissue engineering is inadequate, as the signals for increasing meniscal cell proliferation have not been established. In this study, collagen scaffold structure, isotropic or aligned, and fibrin gel addition were tested. Metabolic activity was promoted by fibrin addition. Cellular proliferation, however, was significantly increased by both aligned architectures and fibrin addition. None of the constructs impaired collagen type I production or triggered adverse inflammatory responses. It was demonstrated that both fibrin gel addition and optimized scaffold architecture effectively promote meniscal cell proliferation.

  11. Collagen I self-assembly: revealing the developing structures that generate turbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jieling; Kaufman, Laura J

    2014-04-15

    Type I collagen gels are routinely used in biophysical studies and bioengineering applications. The structural and mechanical properties of these fibrillar matrices depend on the conditions under which collagen fibrillogenesis proceeds, and developing a fuller understanding of this process will enhance control over gel properties. Turbidity measurements have long been the method of choice for monitoring developing gels, whereas imaging methods are regularly used to visualize fully developed gels. In this study, turbidity and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) were simultaneously employed to track collagen fibrillogenesis and reconcile the information reported by the two techniques, with confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) used to supplement information about early events in fibrillogenesis. Time-lapse images of 0.5 mg/ml, 1.0 mg/ml, and 2.0 mg/ml acid-solubilized collagen I gels forming at 27°C, 32°C, and 37°C were collected. It was found that in situ turbidity measured in a scanning transmittance configuration was interchangeable with traditional turbidity measurements using a spectrophotometer. CRM and CFM were employed to reveal the structures responsible for the turbidity that develops during collagen self-assembly. Information from CRM and transmittance images was collapsed into straightforward single variables; total intensity in CRM images tracked turbidity development closely for all collagen gels investigated, and the two techniques were similarly sensitive to fibril number and dimension. Complementary CRM, CFM, and in situ turbidity measurements revealed that fibril and network formation occurred before substantial turbidity was present, and the majority of increasing turbidity during collagen self-assembly was due to increasing fibril thickness. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [The genetics of collagen diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, J; Maroteaux, P; Frezal, J

    1986-01-01

    Heritable disorders of collagen include Ehler-Danlos syndromes (11 types are actually known), Larsen syndrome and osteogenesis imperfecta. Their clinical, genetic and biochemical features are reviewed. Marfan syndrome is closely related to heritable disorders of collagen.

  13. A three-dimensional computational model of collagen network mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoungkoo Lee

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix (ECM strongly influences cellular behaviors, including cell proliferation, adhesion, and particularly migration. In cancer, the rigidity of the stromal collagen environment is thought to control tumor aggressiveness, and collagen alignment has been linked to tumor cell invasion. While the mechanical properties of collagen at both the single fiber scale and the bulk gel scale are quite well studied, how the fiber network responds to local stress or deformation, both structurally and mechanically, is poorly understood. This intermediate scale knowledge is important to understanding cell-ECM interactions and is the focus of this study. We have developed a three-dimensional elastic collagen fiber network model (bead-and-spring model and studied fiber network behaviors for various biophysical conditions: collagen density, crosslinker strength, crosslinker density, and fiber orientation (random vs. prealigned. We found the best-fit crosslinker parameter values using shear simulation tests in a small strain region. Using this calibrated collagen model, we simulated both shear and tensile tests in a large linear strain region for different network geometry conditions. The results suggest that network geometry is a key determinant of the mechanical properties of the fiber network. We further demonstrated how the fiber network structure and mechanics evolves with a local formation, mimicking the effect of pulling by a pseudopod during cell migration. Our computational fiber network model is a step toward a full biomechanical model of cellular behaviors in various ECM conditions.

  14. Rheology of Heterotypic Collagen Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piechocka, I.K.; van Oosten, A.S.G.; Breuls, R.G.M.; Koenderink, G.H.

    2011-01-01

    Collagen fibrils are the main structural element of connective tissues. In many tissues, these fibrils contain two fibrillar collagens (types I and V) in a ratio that changes during tissue development, regeneration, and various diseases. Here we investigate the influence of collagen composition on

  15. Collagen turnover after tibial fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joerring, S; Krogsgaard, M; Wilbek, H

    1994-01-01

    Collagen turnover after tibial fractures was examined in 16 patients with fracture of the tibial diaphysis and in 8 patients with fracture in the tibial condyle area by measuring sequential changes in serological markers of turnover of types I and III collagen for up to 26 weeks after fracture....... The markers were the carboxy-terminal extension peptide of type I procollagen (PICP), the amino-terminal extension peptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP), and the pyridinoline cross-linked carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP). The latter is a new serum marker of degradation of type I...... collagen. A group comparison showed characteristic sequential changes in the turnover of types I and III collagen in fractures of the tibial diaphysis and tibial condyles. The turnover of type III collagen reached a maximum after 2 weeks in both groups. The synthesis of type I collagen reached a maximum...

  16. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

    2011-04-01

    Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas

  17. Assembly of Collagen Matrices as a Phase Transition Revealed by Structural and Rheologic Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Forgacs, Gabor; Newman, Stuart A.; Hinner, Bernhard; Maier, Christian W.; Sackmann, Erich

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the structural and viscoelastic properties of assembling networks of the extracellular matrix protein type-I collagen by means of phase contrast microscopy and rotating disk rheometry. The initial stage of the assembly is a nucleation process of collagen monomers associating to randomly distributed branched clusters with extensions of several microns. Eventually a sol-gel transition takes place, which is due to the interconnection of these clusters. We analyzed this transition...

  18. Observation of microstructure of hydrated Ca3SiO5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Kazuhiro; Sato, Takashi; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Oishi, Koji; Kimura, Katsuhiko; Iwase, Kenji; Sugiyama, Masaaki; Itoh, Keiji; Shikanai, Fumihito; Wuernisha, Tuerxun; Yonemura, Masao; Sulistyanintyas, Dyah; Tsukushi, Itaru; Takata, Shinich; Otomo, Toshiya; Kamiyma, Takashi; Kawai, Masayoshi

    2006-01-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments were carried out to evaluate the hydration rate of tricalcium silicate (Ca 3 SiO 5 ). Furthermore, in the early hydration period, a variation in surface roughness of Ca 3 SiO 5 was observed in nano-scale by the small-angle neutron scattering. From these results, it was found that the hydration rate of Ca 3 SiO 5 is suppressed when the surface of Ca 3 SiO 5 becomes rough through the creation of hydration products C-S-H gel and Ca(OH) 2 , and this roughness is associated with changes in the Ca 3 SiO 5 hydration rate

  19. Historical methane hydrate project review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Frye, Matt; Goldberg, Dave; Husebo, Jarle; Koh, Carolyn; Malone, Mitch; Shipp, Craig; Torres, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In 1995, U.S. Geological Survey made the first systematic assessment of the volume of natural gas stored in the hydrate accumulations of the United States. That study, along with numerous other studies, has shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world greatly exceeds the volume of known conventional gas resources. However, gas hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of gas hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various gas hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural gas hydrates, and (5) analyzing the effects of methane hydrate on drilling safety.Methane hydrates are naturally occurring crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid water-­‐lattice holds gas molecules in a cage-­‐like structure. The gas and water becomes a solid under specific temperature and pressure conditions within the Earth, called the hydrate stability zone. Other factors that control the presence of methane hydrate in nature include the source of the gas included within the hydrates, the physical and chemical controls on the migration of gas with a sedimentary basin containing methane hydrates, the availability of the water also included in the hydrate structure, and the presence of a suitable host sediment or “reservoir”. The geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrates have become collectively known as the “methane hydrate petroleum system”, which has become the focus of numerous hydrate research programs.Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated

  20. The spatial-temporal characteristics of type I collagen-based extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher Allen Rucksack; Liang, Long; Lin, Daniel; Jiao, Yang; Sun, Bo

    2014-11-28

    Type I collagen abounds in mammalian extracellular matrix (ECM) and is crucial to many biophysical processes. While previous studies have mostly focused on bulk averaged properties, here we provide a comprehensive and quantitative spatial-temporal characterization of the microstructure of type I collagen-based ECM as the gelation temperature varies. The structural characteristics including the density and nematic correlation functions are obtained by analyzing confocal images of collagen gels prepared at a wide range of gelation temperatures (from 16 °C to 36 °C). As temperature increases, the gel microstructure varies from a "bundled" network with strong orientational correlation between the fibers to an isotropic homogeneous network with no significant orientational correlation, as manifested by the decaying of length scales in the correlation functions. We develop a kinetic Monte-Carlo collagen growth model to better understand how ECM microstructure depends on various environmental or kinetic factors. We show that the nucleation rate, growth rate, and an effective hydrodynamic alignment of collagen fibers fully determines the spatiotemporal fluctuations of the density and orientational order of collagen gel microstructure. Also the temperature dependence of the growth rate and nucleation rate follow the prediction of classical nucleation theory.

  1. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C Mark; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-12-07

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  2. Formation of submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soloviev, V.; Ginsburg, G.D. (Reserch Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources of the Ocean ' ' VNII Okeangeologia' ' , St. Petersburg (Russian Federation))

    1994-03-01

    Submarine gas hydrates have been discoverd in the course of deep-sea drilling (DSDP and ODP) and bottom sampling in many offshore regions. This paper reports on expeditions carried out in the Black, Caspian and Okhotsk Seas. Gas hydrate accumulations were discovered and investigated in all these areas. The data and an analysis of the results of the deep-sea drilling programme suggest that the infiltration of gas-bearing fluids is a necessary condition for gas hydrate accumulation. This is confirmed by geological observations at three scale levels. Firstly, hydrates in cores are usually associated with comparatively coarse-grained, permeable sediments as well as voids and fractures. Secondly, hydrate accumulations are controlled by permeable geological structures, i.e. faults, diapirs, mud volcanos as well as layered sequences. Thirdly, in the worldwide scale, hydrate accumulations are characteristic of continental slopes and rises and intra-continental seas where submarine seepages also are widespread. Both biogenic and catagenic gas may occur, and the gas sources may be located at various distances from the accumulation. Gas hydrates presumably originate from water-dissolved gas. The possibility of a transition from dissolved gas into hydrate is confirmed by experimental data. Shallow gas hydrate accumulations associated with gas-bearing fluid plumes are the most convenient features for the study of submarine hydrate formation in general. These accumulations are known from the Black, Caspian and Okhotsk Seas, the Gulf of Mexico and off northern California. (au) (24 refs.)

  3. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  4. Evaluation of a collagen-chitosan hydrogel for potential use as a pro-angiogenic site for islet transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne E McBane

    Full Text Available Islet transplantation to treat type 1 diabetes (T1D has shown varied long-term success, due in part to insufficient blood supply to maintain the islets. In the current study, collagen and collagen:chitosan (10:1 hydrogels, +/- circulating angiogenic cells (CACs, were compared for their ability to produce a pro-angiogenic environment in a streptozotocin-induced mouse model of T1D. Initial characterization showed that collagen-chitosan gels were mechanically stronger than the collagen gels (0.7 kPa vs. 0.4 kPa elastic modulus, respectively, had more cross-links (9.2 vs. 7.4/µm(2, and were degraded more slowly by collagenase. After gelation with CACs, live/dead staining showed greater CAC viability in the collagen-chitosan gels after 18 h compared to collagen (79% vs. 69%. In vivo, collagen-chitosan gels, subcutaneously implanted for up to 6 weeks in a T1D mouse, showed increased levels of pro-angiogenic cytokines over time. By 6 weeks, anti-islet cytokine levels were decreased in all matrix formulations ± CACs. The 6-week implants demonstrated increased expression of VCAM-1 in collagen-chitosan implants. Despite this, infiltrating vWF(+ and CXCR4(+ angiogenic cell numbers were not different between the implant types, which may be due to a delayed and reduced cytokine response in a T1D versus non-diabetic setting. The mechanical, degradation and cytokine data all suggest that the collagen-chitosan gel may be a suitable candidate for use as a pro-angiogenic ectopic islet transplant site.

  5. Dehydration behaviour of hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dette, S.S.; Stelzer, T.; Jones, M.J.; Ulrich, J. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Zentrum fuer Ingenieurwissenschaften, Verfahrenstechnik/TVT, 06099 Halle (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Immersing a crystalline solvate in a suitable anti-solvent can induce phase transformation to solvent-free solid phase. In certain cases the solvent-mediated phase transition results in the generation of hollow, tubular structures. Both the tube dimensions of sodium-2-keto-L-gulonate anhydrate (skga) and the dehydration kinetics of sodium-2-keto-L-gulonate monohydrate (skgm) can be modified by the antisolvent employed. An explanation for the variable dehydration behaviour of skgm in the antisolvents is presented here. Furthermore, other crystalline hydrates were dehydrated in dry methanol. Providing an operational window can be found, any hydrate material could possibly find use in the production of tubes (micro- or nanotubes for different applications). The experimental conditions selected (dry methanol as antisolvent, dehydration temperature at 25 C) for the dehydration did not lead to the anhydrate tube growth for all hydrates investigated. Based upon the results presented here a first hypothesis is presented to explain this effect. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Effects of plant sterols derived from Aloe vera gel on human dermal fibroblasts in vitro and on skin condition in Japanese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka M

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Miyuki Tanaka,1 Eriko Misawa,1 Koji Yamauchi,1 Fumiaki Abe,1 Chiaki Ishizaki2 1Functional Food Research Department, Food Science and Technology Institute, Morinaga Milk Industry Co, Ltd, Zama, Kanagawa, 2Ebisu Skin Research Center, Inforward, Inc., Tokyo, Japan Background: Aloe is known for its topical use for treating wounds and burns. Many previous studies reported the healing effects of Aloe vera. However, there are few clinical studies on the effect of orally administered A. vera gel on the skin. Aloe sterols are a type of plant sterols that have the capability to regulate the metabolism of glucose and lipids. In a recent study, we confirmed that ingested Aloe sterols reached the peripheral tissues through the bloodstream. However, their influence on dermal fibroblasts has not been investigated. Methods: First, we investigated the capability of Aloe sterols (cycloartenol and lophenol to stimulate human dermal fibroblasts in vitro. Then, we investigated the effect of intake of Aloe vera gel powder (AVGP containing 40 µg Aloe sterols on the skin conditions in Japanese women with dry skin in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Results: After cocultivation with Aloe sterols, the production of collagen and hyaluronic acid increased by approximately two-fold and 1.5-fold, and gene expression levels of these enzymes responsible for their synthesis were also observed in human dermal fibroblasts. An increase in arm skin hydration was observed at 8 weeks in the AVGP group, whereas a slight decrease in arm skin hydration was noted in the placebo group. However, there was no statistical difference between AVGP and placebo groups in skin moisture. In subgroup analysis, the change in the mean wrinkle depth was significantly lower in the AVGP group than in the control group. In addition, percent body fat after 8 weeks was significantly lower in the AVGP group. No AVGP intake-dependent harmful phenomenon was observed during the intake

  7. Riboflavin/UVA Collagen Cross-Linking-Induced Changes in Normal and Keratoconus Corneal Stroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Sally; Boote, Craig; Kamma-Lorger, Christina S.; Rajan, Madhavan S.; Harris, Jonathan; Dooley, Erin; Hawksworth, Nicholas; Hiller, Jennifer; Terill, Nick J.; Hafezi, Farhad; Brahma, Arun K.; Quantock, Andrew J.; Meek, Keith M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of Ultraviolet-A collagen cross-linking with hypo-osmolar and iso-osmolar riboflavin solutions on stromal collagen ultrastructure in normal and keratoconus ex vivo human corneas. Methods Using small-angle X-ray scattering, measurements of collagen D-periodicity, fibril diameter and interfibrillar spacing were made at 1 mm intervals across six normal post-mortem corneas (two above physiological hydration (swollen) and four below (unswollen)) and two post-transplant keratoconus corneal buttons (one swollen; one unswollen), before and after hypo-osmolar cross-linking. The same parameters were measured in three other unswollen normal corneas before and after iso-osmolar cross-linking and in three pairs of swollen normal corneas, in which only the left was cross-linked (with iso-osmolar riboflavin). Results Hypo-osmolar cross-linking resulted in an increase in corneal hydration in all corneas. In the keratoconus corneas and unswollen normal corneas, this was accompanied by an increase in collagen interfibrillar spacing (priboflavin solutions are more likely a consequence of treatment-induced changes in tissue hydration rather than cross-linking. PMID:21850225

  8. A comparative study of the properties and self-aggregation behavior of collagens from the scales and skin of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaowen; Ma, Donghui; Wang, Yihao; Qin, Wen

    2018-01-01

    Collagens were extracted from the scales and skin of Ctenopharyngodon idella (C. idella) as raw materials using an acid-enzyme hybrid method. The structural properties of the extracted collagens were compared using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and differential scanning calorimetry. Additionally, the in vitro self-aggregation behaviors of the two types of collagens (fish skin- and scale-derived collagens) were compared using turbidimetric assays, aggregation assays, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that both types of extracted collagen were typical type I collagen with two α chains and intact triple-helical structures. The denaturation temperatures of the collagens from fish scales and skin were 34.99°C and 39.75°C, respectively. Both types of collagens were capable of self-aggregation in neutral salt solution at 30°C, with aggregation degrees of 28% and 27.33% for the scale and skin collagens, respectively. SEM analysis revealed that both types of collagens could self-aggregate into interwoven fibers, and the fish scale-derived collagen had a more pronounced reticular fiber structure with a striped periodic D-band pattern of collagen fibrils, whereas the collagen fibers from the self-aggregation of fish skin-derived collagen had a certain degree of disruption without any D-band pattern. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Collagen macromolecular drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine collagen for use as a macromolecular drug delivery system by determining the mechanism of release through a matrix. Collagen membranes varying in porosity, crosslinking density, structure and crosslinker were fabricated. Collagen characterized by infrared spectroscopy and solution viscosity was determined to be pure and native. The collagen membranes were determined to possess native vs. non-native quaternary structure and porous vs. dense aggregate membranes by electron microscopy. Collagen monolithic devices containing a model macromolecule (inulin) were fabricated. In vitro release rates were found to be linear with respect to t 1/2 and were affected by crosslinking density, crosslinker and structure. The biodegradation of the collagen matrix was also examined. In vivo biocompatibility, degradation and 14 C-inulin release rates were evaluated subcutaneously in rats

  10. Collagens - structure, function and biosynthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Gelse, K; Poschl, E; Aigner, T

    2003-01-01

    The extracellular matrix represents a complex alloy of variable members of diverse protein families defining structural integrity and various physiological functions. The most abundant family is the collagens with more than 20 different collagen types identified so far. Collagens are centrally involved in the formation of fibrillar and microfibrillar networks of the extracellular matrix, basement membranes as well as other structures of the extracellular matrix. This review focuses on the dis...

  11. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  12. THERMODYNAMIC MODEL OF GAS HYDRATES

    OpenAIRE

    Недоступ, В. И.; Недоступ, О. В.

    2015-01-01

    The interest to gas hydrates grows last years. Therefore working out of reliable settlement-theoretical methods of definition of their properties is necessary. The thermodynamic model of gas hydrates in which the central place occupies a behaviour of guest molecule in cell is described. The equations of interaction of molecule hydrate formative gas with cell are received, and also an enthalpy and energy of output of molecule from a cell are determined. The equation for calculation of thermody...

  13. A Simple and Efficient Method to Improve Mechanical Properties of Collagen Scaffolds by UV Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Khayyatan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Collagen is the major protein component of cartilage, bone, skin and connective tissue and constitutes the major part of the extracellular matrix. Collagen type I has complex structural hierarchy, which consists of treepolypeptide α-chains wound together in a rod-like helical structure. Collagen is an important biomaterial, finding many applications in the field of tissue engineering. It has been processed into various shapes, such as, gel, film, sponge and fiber. It is commonly used as the scaffolding material for tissue engineering due to its many superior properties including low antigenicity and high growth promotion. Unfortunately, poor mechanical properties and rapid degradation rates of collagen scaffolds can cause instability and difficulty in handling. By crosslinking, the structural stability of the collagen and its rate of resorption can be adapted with respect to its demanding requirements. The strength, resorption rate, and biocompatibility of collagenous biomaterials are profoundly influenced by the method and extent of crosslinking. In thisstudy, the effect of UV irradiation on collagen scaffolds has been carried out.Collagen scaffolds were fabricated using freeze drying method with freezing temperature of -80oC, then exposed to UV irradiation. Mean pore size of the scaffolds was obtained as 98.52±14.51 μm using scanning electron microscopy. Collagen scaffolds exposed to UV Irradiation (254 nm for 15 min showed the highest tensile strain (17.37±0.98 %, modulus (1.67±0.15 MPa and maximum load (24.47±2.38 cN values. As partial loss of the native collagen structure may influence attachment, migration, and proliferation of cells on collagen scaffolds, we detected no intact α-chains after SDS-Page chromatography. We demonstrate that UV irradiation is a rapid and easily controlled means of increasing the mechanical strength of collagen scaffolds without any molecular fracture.

  14. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lina; Yamauchi, Kazuo; Li, Zongjin; Zhang, Xixiang; Ma, Hongyan; Ge, Shenguang

    2017-01-01

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Collagen and Antioxidant Collagen Peptides from Scales of Croceine Croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Acid soluble collagen (ASC from scales of croceine croaker (ASC-C was successfully isolated with the yield of 0.37% ± 0.08% (dry weight basis, and characterized as type I collagen on the basis of amino acid analysis and electrophoretic pattern. The antioxidant hydrolysate of ASC-C (ACH was prepared through a two-stage in vitro digestion (4-h trypsin followed by 4-h pepsin, and three antioxidant peptides (ACH-P1, ACH-P2, and ACH-P3 were further isolated from ACH using ultrafiltration, gel chromatography, and RP-HPLC, and their amino acid sequences were identified as GFRGTIGLVG (ACH-P1, GPAGPAG (ACH-P2, and GFPSG (ACH-P3. ACH-P1, ACH-P2, and ACH-P3 showed good scavenging activities on hydroxyl radical (IC50 0.293, 0.240, and 0.107 mg/mL, respectively, DPPH radical (IC50 1.271, 0.675, and 0.283 mg/mL, respectively, superoxide radical (IC50 0.463, 0.099, and 0.151 mg/mL, respectively, and ABTS radical (IC50 0.421, 0.309, and 0.210 mg/mL, respectively. ACH-P3 was also effectively against lipid peroxidation in the model system. The antioxidant activities of three collagen peptides were due to the presence of hydrophobic amino acid residues within the peptide sequences. The collagen peptides might be used as antioxidant for the therapy of diseases associated with oxidative stress, or reducing oxidative changes during storage.

  16. In situ monitoring of the hydration process of K-PS geopolymer cement with ESEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Wei; Zhang Yunsheng; Lin Wei; Liu Zhiyong

    2004-01-01

    Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) was used to in situ quantitatively study the hydration process of K-PS geopolymer cement under an 80% RH environment. An energy dispersion X-ray analysis (EDXA) was also employed to distinguish the chemical composition of hydration product. The ESEM micrographs showed that metakaolin particles pack loosely at 10 min after mixing, resulting in the existence of many large voids. As hydration proceeds, a lot of gels were seen and gradually precipitated on the surfaces of these particles. At later stage, these particles were wrapped by thick gel layers and their interspaces were almost completely filled. The corresponding EDXA results illustrated that the molar ratios of K/Al increase while Si/Al decrease with the development of hydration. As a result, the molar ratios of K/Al and Si/Al of hydration products at an age of 4 h amounted to 0.99 and 1.49, respectively, which were close to the theoretical values (K/Al=1.0, Si/Al=1.0 for K-PS geopolymer cement paste). In addition, well-developed crystals could not been found at any ages; instead, spongelike amorphous gels were always been observed

  17. Hydrate-CASM for modeling Methane Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Fuente Ruiz, M.; Vaunat, J.; Marin Moreno, H.

    2017-12-01

    A clear understanding of the geomechanical behavior of methane hydrate-bearing sediments (MHBS) is crucial to assess the stability of the seafloor and submarine infrastructures to human and natural loading changes. Here we present the Hydrate-CASM, a new elastoplastic constitutive model to predict the geomechanical behavior of MHBS. Our model employs the critical state model CASM (Clay and Sand Model) because of its flexibility in describing the shape of the yield surface and its proven ability to predict the mechanical behavior of sands, the most commercially viable hydrate reservoirs. The model considers MHBS as a deformable elastoplastic continuum, and hydrate-related changes in the stress-strain behavior are predicted by a densification mechanism. The densification attributes the mechanical contribution of hydrate to; a reduction of the available void ratio; a decrease of the swelling line slope; and an increase of the volumetric yield stress. It is described by experimentally derived physical parameters except from the swelling slope coefficient that requires empirical calibration. The Hydrate-CASM is validated against published triaxial laboratory tests performed at different confinement stresses, hydrate saturations, and hydrate morphologies. During the validation, we focused on capturing the mechanical behavior of the host sediment and consider perturbations of the sediment's mechanical properties that could result from the sample preparation. Our model successfully captures the experimentally observed influence of hydrate saturation in the magnitude and trend of the stiffness, shear strength, and dilatancy of MHBS. Hence, we propose that hydrate-related densification changes might be a major factor controlling the geomechanical response of MHBS.

  18. Collagen Conduit Versus Microsurgical Neurorrhaphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel; Sørensen, Allan Ibsen; Viñeta, Joaquin Fores

    2013-01-01

    To compare repair of acute lacerations of mixed sensory-motor nerves in humans using a collagen tube versus conventional repair.......To compare repair of acute lacerations of mixed sensory-motor nerves in humans using a collagen tube versus conventional repair....

  19. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  20. Viscoplastic fracture transition of a biopolymer gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieberg, Bradley R; Garatsa, Ray-Shimry; Jones, Ronald L; Bachert, John O; Crawshaw, Benjamin; Liu, X Michael; Chan, Edwin P

    2018-06-13

    Physical gels are swollen polymer networks consisting of transient crosslink junctions associated with hydrogen or ionic bonds. Unlike covalently crosslinked gels, these physical crosslinks are reversible thus enabling these materials to display highly tunable and dynamic mechanical properties. In this work, we study the polymer composition effects on the fracture behavior of a gelatin gel, which is a thermoreversible biopolymer gel consisting of denatured collagen chains bridging physical network junctions formed from triple helices. Below the critical volume fraction for chain entanglement, which we confirm via neutron scattering measurements, we find that the fracture behavior is consistent with a viscoplastic type process characterized by hydrodynamic friction of individual polymer chains through the polymer mesh to show that the enhancement in fracture scales inversely with the squared of the mesh size of the gelatin gel network. Above this critical volume fraction, the fracture process can be described by the Lake-Thomas theory that considers fracture as a chain scission process due to chain entanglements.

  1. Antioxidant activities and skin hydration effects of rice bran bioactive compounds entrapped in niosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manosroi, Aranya; Chutoprapat, Romchat; Sato, Yuji; Miyamoto, Kukizo; Hsueh, Kesyin; Abe, Masahiko; Manosroi, Worapaka; Manosroi, Jiradej

    2011-03-01

    Bioactive compounds [ferulic acid (F), gamma-oryzanol (O) and phytic acid (P)] in rice bran have been widely used as antioxidants in skin care products. However, one of the major problems of antioxidants is the deterioration of their activities during long exposure to air and light. Niosomes have been used to entrap many degradable active agents not only for stability improvement, but also for increasing skin hydration. The objective of this study was to determine antioxidant activities [by in vitro ORAC (oxygen radical absorbance capacity) and ex vivo lipid peroxidation inhibition assay] and in vivo human skin hydration effects of gel and cream containing the rice bran extracts entrapped in niosomes. Gel and cream containing the rice bran extracts entrapped in niosomes showed higher antioxidant activity (ORAC value) at 20-28 micromol of Trolox equivalents (TE) per gram of the sample than the placebo gel and cream which gave 16-18 micromolTE/g. Human sebum treated with these formulations showed more lipid peroxidation inhibition activity than with no treatment of about 1.5 times. The three different independent techniques including corneometer, vapometer and confocal Raman microspectroscopy (CRM) indicated the same trend in human skin hydration enhancement of the gel or cream formulations containing the rice bran extracts entrapped in niosomes of about 20, 3 and 30%, respectively. This study has demonstrated the antioxidant activities and skin hydration enhancement of the rice bran bioactive compounds when entrapped in niosomes and incorporated in cream formulations.

  2. Embroidered polymer-collagen hybrid scaffold variants for ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, M; Drechsel, N; Meyer, M; Meier, C; Hinüber, C; Breier, A; Hahner, J; Heinrich, G; Rentsch, C; Garbe, L-A; Ertel, W; Schulze-Tanzil, G; Lohan, A

    2014-10-01

    Embroidery techniques and patterns used for scaffold production allow the adaption of biomechanical scaffold properties. The integration of collagen into embroidered polylactide-co-caprolactone [P(LA-CL)] and polydioxanone (PDS) scaffolds could stimulate neo-tissue formation by anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) cells. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test embroidered P(LA-CL) and PDS scaffolds as hybrid scaffolds in combination with collagen hydrogel, sponge or foam for ligament tissue engineering. ACL cells were cultured on embroidered P(LA-CL) and PDS scaffolds without or with collagen supplementation. Cell adherence, vitality, morphology and ECM synthesis were analyzed. Irrespective of thread size, ACL cells seeded on P(LA-CL) scaffolds without collagen adhered and spread over the threads, whereas the cells formed clusters on PDS and larger areas remained cell-free. Using the collagen hydrogel, the scaffold colonization was limited by the gel instability. The collagen sponge layers integrated into the scaffolds were hardly penetrated by the cells. Collagen foams increased scaffold colonization in P(LA-CL) but did not facilitate direct cell-thread contacts in the PDS scaffolds. The results suggest embroidered P(LA-CL) scaffolds as a more promising basis for tissue engineering an ACL substitute than PDS due to superior cell attachment. Supplementation with a collagen foam presents a promising functionalization strategy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural aspects of fish skin collagen which forms ordered arrays via liquid crystalline states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud-Guille, M M; Besseau, L; Chopin, C; Durand, P; Herbage, D

    2000-05-01

    The ability of acid-soluble type I collagen extracts from Soleidae flat fish to form ordered arrays in condensed phases has been compared with data for calf skin collagen. Liquid crystalline assemblies in vitro are optimized by preliminary treatment of the molecular population with ultrasounds. This treatment requires the stability of the fish collagen triple helicity to be controlled by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry and the effect of sonication to be evaluated by viscosity measurements and gel electrophoresis. The collagen solution in concentrations of at least 40 mg ml(-1) showed in polarized light microscopy birefringent patterns typical of precholesteric phases indicating long-range order within the fluid collagen phase. Ultrastructural data, obtained after stabilization of the liquid crystalline collagen into a gelated matrix, showed that neutralized acid-soluble fish collagen forms cross-striated fibrils, typical of type I collagen, following sine wave-like undulations in precholesteric domains. These ordered geometries, approximating in vivo situations, give interesting mechanical properties to the material.

  4. Engineering a collagen matrix that replicates the biological properties of native extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kwangwoo; Sakai, Yuuki; Funamoto, Seiichi; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Kishida, Akio

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to replicate the function of native tissues that can be used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The key to such replication is the preparation of an artificial collagen matrix that possesses a structure resembling that of the extracellular matrix. We, therefore, prepared a collagen matrix by fibrillogenesis in a NaCl/Na(2)HPO(4) aqueous solution using a dialysis cassette and investigated its biological behavior in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro cell adhesion and proliferation did not show any significant differences. The degradation rate in the living body could be controlled according to the preparation condition, where the collagen matrix with high water content (F-collagen matrix, >98%) showed fast degradation and collagen matrix with lower water content (T-collagen matrix, >80%) showed no degradation for 8 weeks. The degradation did not affect the inflammatory response at all and relatively faster wound healing response was observed. Comparing this result with that of collagen gel and decellularized cornea, it can be concluded that the structural factor is very important and no cell abnormal behavior would be observed for quaternary structured collagen matrix.

  5. Flow assurance intervention, hydrates remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Christopher S. [Oceaneering International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the issues of removing hydrates in sub sea flow lines and associated equipment with an Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) of opportunity and a multi-service-vessel (MSV). The paper is split into three topics: the equipment used with the ROV, assessing the interface points and handling fluids produced from drawing down the pressure. Each section is explained thoroughly and backed up with real world experience. The equipment section details information from actual jobs performed and why the particular components were utilized. The system is generally contained in an ROV mounted skid. Pumps are utilized to draw down the pressure inside the hydrated section of equipment, removing one of the three necessary components for hydrates formation. Once the section is pumped down, several options exist for handling the fluids pumped out of the system: pumping to surface, re-injection into the well, or injection into an operating flow line. This method of hydrates remediation is both economical and timely. Hydrate blockages form in low temperatures and high pressures. Reducing the pressure or increasing the temperature so the conditions lie to the right of the hydrate dissociation curve will slowly decompose the blockage. Depressurization and the use of MEG or methanol will give favorable conditions to remove the hydrate plug. Oceaneering has the capabilities to remove hydrates using the FRS in conjunction with an installation vessel to dispose of the gas and fluid removed from the flow line. Hydrate remediation techniques should be implemented into the initial design to reduce costs later. The cost of stopped production combined with the day rate for equipment needed for hydrate removal outweighs the costs if no technique is utilized. (author)

  6. Genetics and biochemistry of collagen binding-triggered glandular differentiation in a human colon carcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pignatelli, M.; Bodmer, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have examined the interaction between collagen binding and epithelial differentiation by using a human colon carcinoma cell line (SW1222) that can differentiate structurally when grown in a three-dimensional collagen gel to form glandular structures. As much as 66% inhibition of glandular differentiation can be achieved by addition to the culture of a synthetic peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr (RGDT) sequence, which is a cell recognition site found in collagen. Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr also inhibited the cell attachment to collagen-coated plates. Chromosome 15 was found in all human-mouse hybrid clones that could differentiate in the collagen gel and bind collagen. Both binding to collagen and glandular differentiation of the hybrid cells were also inhibited by Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr as for the parent cell line SW1222. The ability of SW1222 cells to express the differentiated phenotype appears, therefore, to be determined by an Arg-Gly-Asp-directed collagen receptor on the cell surface that is controlled by a gene on chromosome 15

  7. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  8. Chemical functionalization and stabilization of type I collagen with organic tanning agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Deselnicu, Viorica; Ioannidis, Ioannis; Deselnicu, Dana; Chelaru, Ciprian

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the interactions between selected organic tanning agents and type I fibrillar collagen as a model fibrillar substrate to enable the fast direct evaluation and validation of interpretations of tanning activity. Type I fibrillar collagen (1%) as gel was used as substrate of tanning and tannic acid, resorcinol- and melamine-formaldehyde and their combination at three concentrations as crosslinking agents (tannins). To evaluate the stability of collagen during tanning, the crosslinked gels at 2.8, 4.5 and 9.0 pHs were freeze-dried as discs which were characterized by FTIR, shrinkage temperature, enzymatic degradation and optical microscopy, and the results were validated by statistical analyses. The best stability was given by combinations between resorcinol- and melamine-formaldehyde at isoelectric pH

  9. Chemical functionalization and stabilization of type I collagen with organic tanning agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Deselnicu, Viorica; Ioannidis, Ioannis; Deselnicu, Dana; Chelaru, Ciprian [Leather and Footwear Research Institute, Bucharest (Romania)

    2015-02-15

    We investigated the interactions between selected organic tanning agents and type I fibrillar collagen as a model fibrillar substrate to enable the fast direct evaluation and validation of interpretations of tanning activity. Type I fibrillar collagen (1%) as gel was used as substrate of tanning and tannic acid, resorcinol- and melamine-formaldehyde and their combination at three concentrations as crosslinking agents (tannins). To evaluate the stability of collagen during tanning, the crosslinked gels at 2.8, 4.5 and 9.0 pHs were freeze-dried as discs which were characterized by FTIR, shrinkage temperature, enzymatic degradation and optical microscopy, and the results were validated by statistical analyses. The best stability was given by combinations between resorcinol- and melamine-formaldehyde at isoelectric pH.

  10. Shifting Focus: From Hydration for Performance to Hydration for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Erica T

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, literature on hydration biomarkers has evolved considerably - from (de)hydration assessment towards a more global definition of biomarkers of hydration in daily life. This shift in thinking about hydration markers was largely driven by investigating the differences that existed between otherwise healthy individuals whose habitual, ad-libitum drinking habits differ, and by identifying physiological changes in low-volume drinkers who subsequently increase their water intake. Aside from obvious differences in urinary volume and concentration, a growing body of evidence is emerging that links differences in fluid intake with small, but biologically significant, differences in vasopressin (copeptin), glomerular filtration rate, and markers of metabolic dysfunction or disease. Taken together, these pieces of the puzzle begin to form a picture of how much water intake should be considered adequate for health, and represent a shifting focus from hydration for performance, toward hydration for health outcomes. This narrative review outlines the key areas of research in which the global hydration process - including water intake, urinary hydration markers, and vasopressin - has been associated with health outcomes, focusing on kidney and metabolic endpoints. It will also provide a commentary on how various hydration biomarkers may be used in hydration for health assessment. Finally, if adequate water intake can play a role in maintaining health, how might we tell if we are drinking enough? Urine output is easily measured, and can take into account differences in daily physical activity, climate, dietary solute load, and other factors that influence daily water needs. Today, targets have been proposed for urine osmolality, specific gravity, and color that may be used by researchers, clinicians, and individuals as simple indicators of optimal hydration. However, there remain a large number of incomplete or unanswered research questions regarding the

  11. The effects of urea and n-propanol on collagen denaturation: using DSC, circular dicroism and viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usha, R.; Ramasami, T.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of urea and n-propanol on circular dichroism (CD) and viscosity of purified type1 collagen solution at various temperatures and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) of rat-tail tendon (RTT) collagen fibre have been studied. CD reveals a spectrum with a positive peak at around 220 nm and a negative peak at 200 nm characteristics of collagen triple helix. The molar ellipticity decreases as the concentration of urea increases up to particular concentration (collagen solution treated with 265 μM of urea) and after that it increases (collagen solution treated with 500 μM of urea). There is a linear decrease in molar ellipticity as the concentration of n-propanol increases. Denaturation temperature of urea and n-propanol treated with purified collagen solution has been studied using viscosity method. Additives such as urea and n-propanol decrease the thermal stability of collagen triple helix in solution and in RTT collagen fibre. Thermal helix to coil transition of urea and n-propanol treated collagen depends on the degree of hydration and the concentration of these additives. Thermodynamic parameters such as the peak temperature, enthalpy of activation, and energy of activation for collagen-gelatin transition for native, urea and n-propanol treated RTT collagen fibre has been calculated using DSC. The change in the thermodynamic parameters has been observed for native, urea and n-propanol treated RTT collagen fibres. The experimental results show that the change in the water structure, dehydration and desolvation induced by different additives such as urea and n-propanol on RTT may vary with the type of denaturation

  12. The temperature hydration kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Oroian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the hydration kinetics of lentil seeds (Lens culinaris in water at different temperatures (25, 32.5, 40, 55, 70 and 80 °C for assessing the adequacy of models for describing the absorption phenomena during soaking. The diffusion coefficient values were calculated using Fick’s model for spherical and hemispherical geometries and the values were in the range of 10−6 m2/s. The experimental data were fitted to Peleg, Sigmoidal, Weibull and Exponential models. The models adequacy was determined using regression coefficients (R2, root mean square error (RMSE and reduced chi-square (χ2. The Peleg model is the suitable one for predicting the experimental data. Temperature had a positive and significant effect on the water absorption capacities and absorption was an endothermic process.

  13. A collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment targeting tumors with a collagen-rich extracellular matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Liang; Xiaoran Li; Bin Wang; Bing Chen; Yannan Zhao; Jie Sun; Yan Zhuang; Jiajia Shi; He Shen; Zhijun Zhang; Jianwu Dai

    2016-01-01

    Many tumors over-express collagen, which constitutes the physical scaffold of tumor microenvironment. Collagen has been considered to be a target for cancer therapy. The collagen-binding domain (CBD) is a short peptide, which could bind to collagen and achieve the sustained release of CBD-fused proteins in collagen scaffold. Here, a collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment was designed and expressed for targeting the collagen-rich extracellular matrix in tumors. The antibody fragment (Fab) of ...

  14. Alcohol cosurfactants in hydrate antiagglomeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, J Dalton; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2008-08-28

    Because of availability, as well as economical and environmental considerations, natural gas is projected to be the premium fuel of the 21st century. Natural gas production involves risk of the shut down of onshore and offshore operations because of blockage from hydrates formed from coproduced water and hydrate-forming species in natural gas. Industry practice has been usage of thermodynamic inhibitors such as alcohols often in significant amounts, which have undesirable environmental and safety impacts. Thermodynamic inhibitors affect bulk-phase properties and inhibit hydrate formation. An alternative is changing surface properties through usage of polymers and surfactants, effective at 0.5 to 3 weight % of coproduced water. One group of low dosage hydrate inhibitors (LDHI) are kinetic inhibitors, which affect nucleation rate and growth. A second group of LDHI are antiagglomerants, which prevent agglomeration of small hydrate crystallites. Despite great potential, work on hydrate antiagglomeration is very limited. This work centers on the effect of small amounts of alcohol cosurfactant in mixtures of two vastly different antiagglomerants. We use a model oil, water, and tetrahydrofuran as a hydrate-forming species. Results show that alcohol cosurfactants may help with antiagglomeration when traditional antiagglomerants alone are ineffective. Specifically, as low as 0.5 wt. % methanol cosurfactant used in this study is shown to be effective in antiagglomeration. Without the cosurfactant there will be agglomeration independent of the AA concentration. To our knowledge, this is the first report of alcohol cosurfactants in hydrate antiagglomerants. It is also shown that a rhamnolipid biosurfactant is effective down to only 0.5 wt. % in such mixtures, yet a quaternary ammonium chloride salt, i. e., quat, results in hydrate slurries down to 0.01 wt. %. However, biochemical surfactants are less toxic and biodegradable, and thus their use may prove beneficial even if at

  15. Removing water from gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, E.S.; Winter, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Water is removed from a gel material by contacting the gel material with an organic liquid and contacting the organic liquid with a gas such that water is taken up by the gas. The invention, in one embodiment, may be used to dry gel materials whilst maintaining an open porous network therein. In one example, the invention is applied to gel precipitated spheres containing uranium and plutonium. (author)

  16. Polymer gels and networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Osada, Yoshihito; Khokhlov, A. R

    2002-01-01

    ... or magnetic field, etc.). It was realized that not only can polymer gels absorb and hold a considerable volume of liquids, but they can also be forced to expel the absorbed liquid in a controlled manner. Of particular interest are hydrogels, i.e., polymer gels, which swell extensively in water. The most common hydrogels are polyelectrolyte gels: ...

  17. In vitro deposition of hydroxyapatite on cortical bone collagen stimulated by deformation-induced piezoelectricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noris-Suárez, Karem; Lira-Olivares, Joaquin; Ferreira, Ana Marina; Feijoo, José Luis; Suárez, Nery; Hernández, Maria C; Barrios, Esteban

    2007-03-01

    In the present work, we have studied the effect of the piezoelectricity of elastically deformed cortical bone collagen on surface using a biomimetic approach. The mineralization process induced as a consequence of the piezoelectricity effect was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). SEM micrographs showed that mineralization occurred predominantly over the compressed side of bone collagen, due to the effect of piezoelectricity, when the sample was immersed in the simulated body fluid (SBF) in a cell-free system. The TSDC method was used to examine the complex collagen dielectric response. The dielectric spectra of deformed and undeformed collagen samples with different hydration levels were compared and correlated with the mineralization process followed by SEM. The dielectric measurements showed that the mineralization induced significant changes in the dielectric spectra of the deformed sample. DSC and TSDC results demonstrated a reduction of the collagen glass transition as the mineralization process advanced. The combined use of SEM, TSDC, and DSC showed that, even without osteoblasts present, the piezoelectric dipoles produced by deformed collagen can produce the precipitation of hydroxyapatite by electrochemical means, without a catalytic converter as occurs in classical biomimetic deposition.

  18. Applications of gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S

    2004-01-01

    Gel dosimetry has been examined as a clinical dosimeter since the 1950s. During the last two decades, however, a rapid increase in the number of investigators has been seen, and the body of knowledge regarding gel dosimetry has expanded considerably. Gel dosimetry is still considered a research project, and the introduction of this tool into clinical use is proceeding slowly. This paper will review the characteristics of gel dosimetry that make it desirable for clinical use, the postulated and demonstrated applications of gel dosimetry, and some complications, set-backs, and failures that have contributed to the slow introduction into routine clinical use

  19. Resveratrol-Loaded Lipid Nanocarriers: Correlation between In Vitro Occlusion Factor and In Vivo Skin Hydrating Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Montenegro

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Lipid nanocarriers show occlusive properties that may be related to their ability to improve skin hydration. The aim of this work was to evaluate the relationship between in vitro occlusion factor and in vivo skin hydration for three types of lipid nanocarriers: nanoemulsions (NEs, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs. These lipid nanocarriers were loaded with trans-resveratrol (RSV and incorporated in gel vehicles. In vitro occlusion factor was in the order SLNs > NLCs > NEs. Gels containing unloaded or RSV loaded lipid nanocarriers were applied on the back of a hand of 12 healthy volunteers twice a day for one week, recording skin hydration changes using the instrument Soft Plus. An increase of skin hydration was observed for all lipid nanocarriers (SLNs > NLCs > NEs. RSV loading into these nanocarriers did not affect in vitro and in vivo lipid nanocarriers effects. A linear relationship (r2 = 0.969 was observed between occlusion factor and in vivo increase of skin hydration. Therefore, the results of this study showed the feasibility of using the occlusion factor to predict in vivo skin hydration resulting from topical application of different lipid nanocarriers loading an active ingredient with no inherent hydrating activity.

  20. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  1. Hydration water and microstructure in calcium silicate and aluminate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fratini, Emiliano; Ridi, Francesca; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Baglioni, Piero

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the state of the hydration water and the microstructure development in a cement paste is likely to be the key for the improvement of its ultimate strength and durability. In order to distinguish and characterize the reacted and unreacted water, the single-particle dynamics of water molecules in hydrated calcium silicates (C 3 S, C 2 S) and aluminates (C 3 A, C 4 AF) were studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering, QENS. The time evolution of the immobile fraction represents the hydration kinetics and the mobile fraction follows a non-Debye relaxation. Less sophisticated, but more accessible and cheaper techniques, like differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, and near-infrared spectroscopy, NIR, were validated through QENS results and they allow one to easily and quantitatively follow the cement hydration kinetics and can be widely applied on a laboratory scale to understand the effect of additives (i.e., superplasticizers, cellulosic derivatives, etc) on the thermodynamics of the hydration process. DSC provides information on the free water index and on the activation energy involved in the hydration process while the NIR band at 7000 cm -1 monitors, at a molecular level, the increase of the surface-interacting water. We report as an example the effect of two classes of additives widely used in the cement industry: superplasticizers, SPs, and cellulose derivatives. SPs interact at the solid surface, leading to a consistent increment of the activation energy for the processes of nucleation and growth of the hydrated phases. In contrast, the cellulosic additives do not affect the nucleation and growth activation energy, but cause a significant increment in the water availability: in other words the hydration process is more efficient without any modification of the solid/liquid interaction, as also evidenced by the 1 H-NMR. Additional information is obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultra small angle neutron scattering (USANS) and wide

  2. PHAGOCYTOSIS AND REMODELING OF COLLAGEN MATRICES

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham, Leah C.; Dice, J Fred.; Lee, Kyongbum; Kaplan, David L.

    2007-01-01

    The biodegradation of collagen and the deposition of new collagen-based extracellular matrices are of central importance in tissue remodeling and function. Similarly, for collagen-based biomaterials used in tissue engineering, the degradation of collagen scaffolds with accompanying cellular infiltration and generation of new extracellular matrix is critical for integration of in vitro grown tissues in vivo. In earlier studies we observed significant impact of collagen structure on primary lun...

  3. Transport Phenomena in Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Tokita

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Gel becomes an important class of soft materials since it can be seen in a wide variety of the chemical and the biological systems. The unique properties of gel arise from the structure, namely, the three-dimensional polymer network that is swollen by a huge amount of solvent. Despite the small volume fraction of the polymer network, which is usually only a few percent or less, gel shows the typical properties that belong to solids such as the elasticity. Gel is, therefore, regarded as a dilute solid because its elasticity is much smaller than that of typical solids. Because of the diluted structure, small molecules can pass along the open space of the polymer network. In addition to the viscous resistance of gel fluid, however, the substance experiences resistance due to the polymer network of gel during the transport process. It is, therefore, of importance to study the diffusion of the small molecules in gel as well as the flow of gel fluid itself through the polymer network of gel. It may be natural to assume that the effects of the resistance due to the polymer network of gel depends strongly on the network structure. Therefore, detailed study on the transport processes in and through gel may open a new insight into the relationship between the structure and the transport properties of gel. The two typical transport processes in and through gel, that is, the diffusion of small molecules due to the thermal fluctuations and the flow of gel fluid that is caused by the mechanical pressure gradient will be reviewed.

  4. Hydration dependent dynamics in RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Greg L.; Bardaro, Michael F.; Echodu, Dorothy C.; Drobny, Gary P.; Varani, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    The essential role played by local and collective motions in RNA function has led to a growing interest in the characterization of RNA dynamics. Recent investigations have revealed that even relatively simple RNAs experience complex motions over multiple time scales covering the entire ms-ps motional range. In this work, we use deuterium solid-state NMR to systematically investigate motions in HIV-1 TAR RNA as a function of hydration. We probe dynamics at three uridine residues in different structural environments ranging from helical to completely unrestrained. We observe distinct and substantial changes in 2 H solid-state relaxation times and lineshapes at each site as hydration levels increase. By comparing solid-state and solution state 13 C relaxation measurements, we establish that ns-μs motions that may be indicative of collective dynamics suddenly arise in the RNA as hydration reaches a critical point coincident with the onset of bulk hydration. Beyond that point, we observe smaller changes in relaxation rates and lineshapes in these highly hydrated solid samples, compared to the dramatic activation of motion occurring at moderate hydration

  5. Higher iron bioavailability of a human-like collagen iron complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenhui; Yang, Fan; Fan, Daidi; Wang, Ya; Yu, Yuanyuan

    2017-07-01

    Iron deficiency remains a public health problem around the world due to low iron intake and/or bioavailability. FeSO 4 , ferrous succinate, and ferrous glycinate chelate are rich in iron but have poor bioavailability. To solve the problem of iron deficiency, following previous research studies, a thiolated human-like collagen-ironcomplex supplement with a high iron content was prepared in an anaerobic workstation. In addition, cell viability tests were evaluated after conducting an MTT assay, and a quantitative analysis of the thiolated human-like collagen-iron digesta samples was performed using the SDS-PAGE method coupled with gel filtration chromatography. The iron bioavailability was assessed using Caco-2 cell monolayers and iron-deficiency anemia mice models. The results showed that (1) one mole of thiolated human-like collagen-iron possessed approximately 35.34 moles of iron; (2) thiolated human-like collagen-iron did not exhibit cytotoxity and (3) thiolated human-like collagen- iron digesta samples had higher bioavailability than other iron supplements, including FeSO 4 , ferrous succinate, ferrous glycine chelate and thiolated human-like collagen-Fe iron. Finally, the iron bioavailability was significantly enhanced by vitamin C. These results indicated that thiolated human-like collagen-iron is a promising iron supplement for use in the future.

  6. Biomimetic Proteoglycan Interactions with Type I Collagen Investigated via 2D and 3D TEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorehead, Carli

    Collagen is one of the leading components in extracellular matrix (ECM), providing durability, structural integrity, and functionality for many tissues. Regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis and degradation is important in the treatment of a number of diseases from orthopedic injuries to genetic deficiencies. Recently, novel, biocompatible, semi-synthetic biomimetic proteoglycans (BPGs) were developed, which consist of an enzymatically resistant synthetic polymer core and natural chondroitin sulfate bristles. It was demonstrated that BPGs affect type I collagen fibrillogenesis in vitro, as reflected by their impact delaying the kinetic formation of gels similar to native PGs. This indicates that the morphology of collagen scaffolds as well as endogenous ECM could also be modulated by these proteoglycan mimics. However, the imaging modality used previously, reflectance confocal microscopy, did not yield the resolution necessary to spatially localize BPGs within the collagen network or investigate the effect of BPGs on the quality of collagen fibrils produced in an in vitro fibrillogenesis model which is important for understanding the method of interaction. Consequently, a histological technique, electron tomography, was adapted and utilized to 3D image the nano-scale structures within this simplified tissue model. BPGs were found to aid in lateral growth and enhance fibril banding periodicity resulting in structures more closely resembling those in tissue, in addition to attaching to the collagen surface despite the lack of a protein core.

  7. Mechanism of gypsum hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco, G.

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an hypothesis that the mechanism o f gypsum hydration and dehydration is performed through two simultaneous phenomena. In this study we try to clear up this phenomenon using chlorides as accelerators or a mixture of ethanol-methanol as retarders to carry out the gypsum setting. Natural Mexican gypsum samples and a hemihydrate prepared in the laboratory are used. The following analytical techniques are used: MO, DRX, DTA, TG and DTG. In agreement with the obtained results, it can be concluded: that colloid formation depends on the action of accelerators or retarders and the crystals are a consequence of the quantity of hemihydrate formed.

    En el mecanismo de hidratación y deshidratación del yeso existe la hipótesis de que éste se efectúa por dos fenómenos simultáneos. Este estudio intenta esclarecer estos fenómenos, empleando: cloruros como aceleradores o mezcla etanol-metanol como retardadores para efectuar el fraguado del yeso. Se emplean muestras de yeso de origen natural mexicano y hemihydrate preparado en laboratorio; se utilizan técnicas analíticas: MO, DRX, DTA, TG y DTG. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos se puede deducir: que la formación del coloide depende de la acción de los agentes aceleradores o retardadores y que los cristales son consecuencia de la cantidad de hemihidrato formado.

  8. Agar/collagen membrane as skin dressing for wounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao Lei; Yang Wei; Mao Xuan; Mou Shansong; Tang Shunqing [Biomedical Engineering Institute, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China)], E-mail: tshunqt@jnu.edu.cn, E-mail: tmuss@jnu.edu.cn

    2008-12-15

    Agar, a highly hydrophilic polymer, has a special gel property and favorable biocompatibility, but moderate intension strength in an aqueous condition and a low degradation rate. In order to tailor both properties of mechanical intension and degradation, type I collagen was composited with agar in a certain ratio by drying at 50 {sup 0}C or by a freeze-dry process. Glutaraldehyde was chosen as a crosslinking agent, and the most favorable condition for crosslinking was that the weight ratio of agar to glutaraldehyde was 66.7 and the pH value about 5. Dynamic mechanical analysis results showed that the single agar membrane had a modulus value between 640 MPa and 1064 MPa, but it was between 340 MPa and 819 MPa after being composited with type I collagen. It was discovered under an optical microscope that the pores were interconnected in the composite scaffolds instead of the honeycomb-like pores in a single type I collagen scaffold or the laminated gaps in a single agar scaffold. The results of an acute toxicity test disclosed that the composites were not toxic to mice although the composites were crosslinked with a certain concentration of glutaraldehyde. The results of gross examinations showed that when the composite membranes or scaffolds were applied to a repair rabbit skin lesion, the composites had a good repair effect without infection, liquid exudation or visible scar in the lesion covered with them. But in the control group, the autologous skin showed necrosis and there were a lot of scar tissues in the lesion site. H and E staining results showed that the repair tissue was similar to the normal one and very few scaffolds or membranes were left without degradation after 2 or 3 weeks. In conclusion, it is proved that type I collagen increases the toughness of the agar membrane, and the agar/type I collagen composites are promising biomaterials as wound dressings for healing burns or ulcers.

  9. Agar/collagen membrane as skin dressing for wounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Lei; Yang Wei; Mao Xuan; Mou Shansong; Tang Shunqing

    2008-01-01

    Agar, a highly hydrophilic polymer, has a special gel property and favorable biocompatibility, but moderate intension strength in an aqueous condition and a low degradation rate. In order to tailor both properties of mechanical intension and degradation, type I collagen was composited with agar in a certain ratio by drying at 50 0 C or by a freeze-dry process. Glutaraldehyde was chosen as a crosslinking agent, and the most favorable condition for crosslinking was that the weight ratio of agar to glutaraldehyde was 66.7 and the pH value about 5. Dynamic mechanical analysis results showed that the single agar membrane had a modulus value between 640 MPa and 1064 MPa, but it was between 340 MPa and 819 MPa after being composited with type I collagen. It was discovered under an optical microscope that the pores were interconnected in the composite scaffolds instead of the honeycomb-like pores in a single type I collagen scaffold or the laminated gaps in a single agar scaffold. The results of an acute toxicity test disclosed that the composites were not toxic to mice although the composites were crosslinked with a certain concentration of glutaraldehyde. The results of gross examinations showed that when the composite membranes or scaffolds were applied to a repair rabbit skin lesion, the composites had a good repair effect without infection, liquid exudation or visible scar in the lesion covered with them. But in the control group, the autologous skin showed necrosis and there were a lot of scar tissues in the lesion site. H and E staining results showed that the repair tissue was similar to the normal one and very few scaffolds or membranes were left without degradation after 2 or 3 weeks. In conclusion, it is proved that type I collagen increases the toughness of the agar membrane, and the agar/type I collagen composites are promising biomaterials as wound dressings for healing burns or ulcers.

  10. Sol-Gel Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Multicomponent homogeneous, ultrapure noncrystalline gels/gel derived glasses are promising batch materials for the containerless glass melting experiments in microgravity. Hence, ultrapure, homogeneous gel precursors could be used to: (1) investigate the effect of the container induced nucleation on the glass forming ability of marginally glass forming compositions; and (2) investigate the influence of gravity on the phase separation and coarsening behavior of gel derived glasses in the liquid-liquid immiscibility zone of the nonsilicate systems having a high density phase. The structure and crystallization behavior of gels in the SiO2-GeO2 as a function of gel chemistry and thermal treatment were investigated. As are the chemical principles involved in the distribution of a second network former in silica gel matrix being investigated. The procedures for synthesizing noncrystalline gels/gel-monoliths in the SiO2-GeO2, GeO2-PbO systems were developed. Preliminary investigations on the levitation and thermal treatment of germania silicate gel-monoliths in the Pressure Facility Acoustic Levitator were done.

  11. Decorin-transforming growth factor- interaction regulates matrix organization and mechanical characteristics of three-dimensional collagen matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdous, Zannatul; Wei, Victoria Mariko; Iozzo, Renato; Höök, Magnus; Grande-Allen, Kathryn Jane

    2007-12-07

    The small leucine-rich proteoglycan decorin has been demonstrated to be a key regulator of collagen fibrillogenesis; decorin deficiencies lead to irregularly shaped collagen fibrils and weakened material behavior in postnatal murine connective tissues. In an in vitro investigation of the contributions of decorin to tissue organization and material behavior, model tissues were engineered by seeding embryonic fibroblasts, harvested from 12.5-13.5 days gestational aged decorin null (Dcn(-/-)) or wild-type mice, within type I collagen gels. The resulting three-dimensional collagen matrices were cultured for 4 weeks under static tension. The collagen matrices seeded with Dcn(-/-) cells exhibited greater contraction, cell density, ultimate tensile strength, and elastic modulus than those seeded with wild-type cells. Ultrastructurally, the matrices seeded with Dcn(-/-) cells contained a greater density of collagen. The decorin-null tissues contained more biglycan than control tissues, suggesting that this related proteoglycan compensated for the absence of decorin. The effect of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), which is normally sequestered by decorin, was also investigated in this study. The addition of TGF-beta1 to the matrices seeded with wild-type cells improved their contraction and mechanical strength, whereas blocking TGF-beta1 in the Dcn(-/-) cell-seeded matrices significantly reduced the collagen gel contraction. These results indicate that the inhibitory interaction between decorin and TGF-beta1 significantly influenced the matrix organization and material behavior of these in vitro model tissues.

  12. Reconsideration on Hydration of Sodium Ion: From Micro-Hydration to Bulk Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongquan, Zhou; Chunhui, Fang; Yan, Fang; Fayan, Zhu; Haiwen, Ge; Hongyan, Liu

    2017-12-01

    Micro hydration structures of the sodium ion, [Na(H2O) n ]+, n = 1-12, were probed by density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level in both gaseous and aqueous phase. The predicted equilibrium sodium-oxygen distance of 0.240 nm at the present level of theory. The four-, five- and six-coordinated cluster can transform from each other at the ambient condition. The analysis of the successive water binding energy and natural charge population (NBO) on Na+ clearly shows that the influence of Na+ on the surrounding water molecules goes beyond the first hydration shell with the hydration number of 6. The Car-Parrinello molecular dynamic simulation shows that only the first hydration sphere can be found, and the hydration number of Na+ is 5.2 and the hydration distance ( r Na-O) is 0.235 nm. All our simulations mentioned in the present paper show an excellent agreement with the diffraction result from X-ray scattering study.

  13. A high yield process for hydrate formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giavarini, C.; Maccioni, F. [Univ. of Roma La Sapienza, Roma (Italy). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Due to the large quantities of natural gas stored in deep ocean hydrates, hydrate reservoirs are a substantial energy resource. Hydrates concentrate methane by as much as a factor of 164. As such, several natural gas transportation and storage systems using gas hydrates have been studied, and many of them are nearing practical use. In these systems, the hydrate is produced as a slurry by a spray process at approximately 7 megapascal (MPa), and then shaped into pellets. The use of a spray process, instead of a conventional stirred vessel is necessary in order to reach high hydrate concentrations in the hydrate-ice system. This paper presented a new procedure to produce a bulk of concentrated methane hydrate in a static traditional reactor at moderate pressure, controlling pressure and temperature in the interval between ice melting and the hydrate equilibrium curve. This paper discussed the experimental procedure which included formation of methane hydrate at approximately 5 MPa and 2 degrees Celsius in a reaction calorimeter at a volume of two liters. Results were also discussed. It was concluded that the procedure seemed suitable for the development of a gas hydrate storage and transport technology. It was found that the spray procedure took more time, but could be sped up and made continuous by using two vessels, one for hydrate formation and the other for hydrate concentration. The advantage was the production of a concentrated hydrate, using a simpler equipment and working at lower pressures respect to the spray process. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Enhanced stabilization of collagen by furfural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakra, Rachita; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Usha, Ramamoorthy; Mohan, Ranganathan; Sundaresan, Raja; Korrapati, Purna Sai

    2014-04-01

    Furfural (2-furancarboxaldehyde), a product derived from plant pentosans, has been investigated for its interaction with collagen. Introduction of furfural during fibril formation enhanced the thermal and mechanical stability of collagen. Collagen films treated with furfural exhibited higher denaturation temperature (Td) (pFurfural and furfural treated collagen films did not have any cytotoxic effect. Rheological characterization showed an increase in shear stress and shear viscosity with increasing shear rate for treated collagen. Circular dichroism (CD) studies indicated that the furfural did not have any impact on triple helical structure of collagen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of furfural treated collagen exhibited small sized porous structure in comparison with untreated collagen. Thus this study provides an alternate ecologically safe crosslinking agent for improving the stability of collagen for biomedical and industrial applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Etodolac Containing Topical Niosomal Gel: Formulation Development and Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyati Shilakari Asthana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the delivery potential of Etodolac (ETD containing topical niosomal gel. Niosomal formulations were prepared by thin film hydration method at various ratios of cholesterol and Span 60 and were evaluated with respect to particle size, shape, entrapment efficiency, and in vitro characteristics. Dicetyl phosphate (DCP was also added in the niosomal formulation. Mean particle size of niosomal formulation was found to be in the range of 2 μm to 4 μm. Niosomal formulation N2 (1 : 1 ratio of cholesterol and surfactant displayed good entrapment efficiency (96.72%. TEM analyses showed that niosomal formulation was spherical in shape. Niosomal formulation (N2 displayed high percentage of drug release after 24 h (94.91 at (1 : 1 ratio of cholesterol : surfactant. Further selected niosomal formulation was used to formulate topical gel and was characterized with respect to its various parameters such as pH, viscosity, spreadability, ex vivo study, and in vivo potential permeation. Ex vivo study showed that niosomal gel possessed better skin permeation study than the plain topical gel. Further in vivo study revealed good inhibition of inflammation in case of topical niosomal gel than plain gel and niosomal formulation. The present study suggested that topical niosomal gel formulations provide sustained and prolonged delivery of drug.

  16. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.

    1999-01-01

    and experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6......Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations...

  17. Storage capacity of hydrogen in gas hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, Takaaki; Ogata, Kyohei; Hashimoto, Shunsuke; Sugahara, Takeshi; Sato, Hiroshi; Ohgaki, Kazunari

    2010-01-01

    The storage capacity of H 2 in the THF, THT, and furan hydrates was studied by p-V-T measurements. We confirmed that the storage and release processes of H 2 in all hydrates could be performed reversibly by pressure swing without destroying of hydrate cages. H 2 absorption in both THT and furan hydrates is much faster than THF hydrate in spite of same unit-cell structure. On the other hand, the storage amounts of H 2 are coincident in the all additive hydrates and would reach at about 1.0 mass% asymptotically.

  18. GelTouch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miruchna, Viktor; Walter, Robert; Lindlbauer, David

    2015-01-01

    We present GelTouch, a gel-based layer that can selectively transition between soft and stiff to provide tactile multi-touch feedback. It is flexible, transparent when not activated, and contains no mechanical, electromagnetic, or hydraulic components, resulting in a compact form factor (a 2mm thin...... touchscreen layer for our prototype). The activated areas can be morphed freely and continuously, without being limited to fixed, predefined shapes. GelTouch consists of a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) gel layer which alters its viscoelasticity when activated by applying heat (>32 C). We present three different...

  19. Thorium inorganic gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genet, M.; Brandel, V.

    1988-01-01

    The optimum pH and concentration values of thorium salts and oxoacids or oxoacid salts which lead to transparent and stable inorganic gels have been determined. The isotherm drying process of the gel at 50 0 C leads successively to a partly dehydrated gel, then, to the formation of an unusual liquid phase and, finally to a dry amorphous solid phase which is still transparent. This kind of transparent inorganic gels and amorphous phase can be used as matrices for spectroscopic studies [fr

  20. PPAR-δ Agonist With Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induces Type II Collagen-Producing Chondrocytes in Human Arthritic Synovial Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Bruce E; Park, Joshua J; Makani, Vishruti; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2017-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterized by degeneration of articular cartilage within synovial joints. An estimated 27 million Americans suffer from OA, and the population is expected to reach 67 million in the United States by 2030. Thus, it is urgent to find an effective treatment for OA. Traditional OA treatments have no disease-modifying effect, while regenerative OA therapies such as autologous chondrocyte implantation show some promise. Nonetheless, current regenerative therapies do not overcome synovial inflammation that suppresses the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to chondrocytes and the expression of type II collagen, the major constituent of functional cartilage. We discovered a synergistic combination that overcame synovial inflammation to form type II collagen-producing chondrocytes. The combination consists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) δ agonist, human bone marrow (hBM)-derived MSCs, and hyaluronic acid (HA) gel. Interestingly, those individual components showed their own strong enhancing effects on chondrogenesis. GW0742, a PPAR-δ agonist, greatly enhanced MSC chondrogenesis and the expression of type II collagen and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) in hBM-MSC-derived chondrocytes. GW0742 also increased the expression of transforming growth factor β that enhances chondrogenesis and suppresses cartilage fibrillation, ossification, and inflammation. HA gel also increased MSC chondrogenesis and GAG production. However, neither GW0742 nor HA gel could enhance the formation of type II collagen-producing chondrocytes from hBM-MSCs within human OA synovial fluid. Our data demonstrated that the combination of hBM-MSCs, PPAR-δ agonist, and HA gel significantly enhanced the formation of type II collagen-producing chondrocytes within OA synovial fluid from 3 different donors. In other words, the novel combination of PPAR-δ agonist, hBM-MSCs, and HA gel can overcome synovial inflammation to form

  1. Fracture mechanics of collagen fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Rene B; Mulder, Hindrik; Kovanen, Vuokko

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are important load-bearing structures, which are frequently injured in both sports and work. Type I collagen fibrils are the primary components of tendons and carry most of the mechanical loads experienced by the tissue, however, knowledge of how load is transmitted between and within...... fibrils is limited. The presence of covalent enzymatic cross-links between collagen molecules is an important factor that has been shown to influence mechanical behavior of the tendons. To improve our understanding of how molecular bonds translate into tendon mechanics, we used an atomic force microscopy...... technique to measure the mechanical behavior of individual collagen fibrils loaded to failure. Fibrils from human patellar tendons, rat-tail tendons (RTTs), NaBH₄ reduced RTTs, and tail tendons of Zucker diabetic fat rats were tested. We found a characteristic three-phase stress-strain behavior in the human...

  2. Thermal and infrared-diode laser effects on indocyanine-green-treated corneal collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timberlake, George T.; Patmore, Ann; Shallal, Assaad; McHugh, Dominic; Marshall, John

    1993-07-01

    It has been suggested that laser welds of collagenous tissues form by interdigitation and chemical bonding of thermally 'unraveled' collagen fibrils. We investigated this proposal by attempting to weld highly collagenous, avascular corneal tissue with an infrared (IR) diode laser as follows. First, the temperature at which corneal collagen shrinks and collagen fibrils 'split' into subfibrillary components was determined. Second, since use of a near-IR laser wavelength necessitated addition of an absorbing dye (indocyanine green (ICG) to the cornea, we measured absorption spectra of ICG-treated tissue to ensure that peak ICG absorbance did not change markedly when ICG was present in the cornea. Third, using gel electrophoresis of thermally altered corneal collagen, we searched for covalently crosslinked compounds predicted by the proposed welding mechanism. Finally, we attempted to weld partial thickness corneal incisions infused with ICG. Principal experimental findings were as follows: (1) Human corneal (type I) collagen splits into subfibrillary components at approximately 63 degree(s)C, the same temperature that produces collagen shrinkage. (2) Peak ICG absorption does not change significantly in corneal stroma or with laser heating. (3) No evidence was found for the formation of novel compounds or the loss of proteins as a result of tissue heating. All tissue treated with ICG, however, exhibited a novel 244 kD protein band indicating chemical activity between collagen and corneal stromal components. (4) Laser welding corneal incisions was unsuccessful possibly due to shrinkage of the sides of the incision, lack of incision compression during heating, or a less than optimal combination of ICG concentration and radiant exposure. In summary, these experiments demonstrate the biochemical and morphological complexity of ICG-enhanced IR laser-tissue welding and the need for further investigation of laser welding mechanisms.

  3. Effects of carbohydrate-hydration strategies on glucose metabolism, sprint performance and hydration during a soccer match simulation in recreational players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, Michael; Penas-Ruiz, Carlos; Terry, Chris; Russell, Mark

    2014-03-01

    This study compared the effects of three carbohydrate-hydration strategies on blood glucose concentration, exercise performance and hydration status throughout simulated soccer match-play. A randomized, double-blind and cross-over study design was employed. After familiarization, 14 recreational soccer players completed the soccer match simulation on three separate occasions. Participants consumed equal volumes of 9.6% carbohydrate-caffeine-electrolyte (∼ 6 mg/kg BW caffeine) solution with carbohydrate-electrolyte gels (H-CHO), 5.6% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution with electrolyte gels (CHO) or electrolyte solution and electrolyte gels (PL). Blood samples were taken at rest, immediately before exercise and every 15 min during exercise (first half: 15, 30, 45 min; second half: 60, 75, 90 min). Supplementation influenced blood glucose concentration (time × treatment interaction: pcarbohydrate availability with caffeine resulted in improved sprint performance and elevated blood glucose concentrations throughout the first half and at 90 min of exercise; however, this supplementation strategy negatively influenced hydration status when compared with 5.6% carbohydrate-electrolyte and electrolyte solutions. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Gas hydrates forming and decomposition conditions analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Павленко

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of gas hydrates has been defined; their brief description has been given; factors that affect the formation and decomposition of the hydrates have been reported; their distribution, structure and thermodynamic conditions determining the gas hydrates formation disposition in gas pipelines have been considered. Advantages and disadvantages of the known methods for removing gas hydrate plugs in the pipeline have been analyzed, the necessity of their further studies has been proved. In addition to the negative impact on the process of gas extraction, the hydrates properties make it possible to outline the following possible fields of their industrial use: obtaining ultrahigh pressures in confined spaces at the hydrate decomposition; separating hydrocarbon mixtures by successive transfer of individual components through the hydrate given the mode; obtaining cold due to heat absorption at the hydrate decomposition; elimination of the open gas fountain by means of hydrate plugs in the bore hole of the gushing gasser; seawater desalination, based on the hydrate ability to only bind water molecules into the solid state; wastewater purification; gas storage in the hydrate state; dispersion of high temperature fog and clouds by means of hydrates; water-hydrates emulsion injection into the productive strata to raise the oil recovery factor; obtaining cold in the gas processing to cool the gas, etc.

  5. Electron migration in hydrated biopolymers following pulsed irradiation at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lith, D. van.

    1987-01-01

    Charge migration in biopolymer-water mixtures and the effect of water concentration on the charge migration is investigated by measuring the electrical conductivity and the light emission with the pulse radiolysis technique. A preliminary account of the microwave conductivity observed in hydrated DNA and collagen at low temperature after pulsed irradiation is given. The results show that when hydrated DNA or collagen are irradiated at low temperatures, conductivity transients with microsecond lifetime are observed. It is tentatively concluded that these transients are due to the highly mobile dry electron. The effect of water concentration on mobility, lifetime and migration distance of the electron is discussed. The effect of additives to the hydrated systems on the behaviour of the electron is described. It is shown that the observed effects of the additives confirm the earlier conclusions that the dry electron is the species responsible for the radiation induced conductivity. The water concentration in the DNA- and collagen-systems could be varied only between zero and approximately fifty percent, due to inhomogeneities which occur at higher water concentrations. Experiments on gelatin, a biopolymer which forms homogeneous samples with levels of hydration varying from almost zero to 100% water (ice) are described. Both the radiation induced and the dark microwave conductivity have been studied as a function of water content. Preliminary results of a study of the light emission from pulse irradiated DNA-water mixtures are reported in an attempt to establish a relation between the observed electron migration and the formation of excited states via charge neutralization. (Auth.)

  6. Cyanocobalamin Nasal Gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to supply extra vitamin B12 to people who need unusually large amounts of this vitamin because they are pregnant or have certain diseases. ... Cyanocobalamin nasal gel will supply you with enough vitamin B12 only as ... it regularly. You may need to use cyanocobalamin nasal gel every week for ...

  7. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  8. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na 2 SO 4 –H 2 O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions

  9. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lina

    2017-05-13

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10 was conducted for tricalcium silicate (C3S) to interpret long-term hydration process and investigate the formation, structure and properties of C-S-H. Based on results from XRD, IR, SEM, NMR and so forth, loose and dense clusters of C-S-H with analogous C/S ratio were obtained along with the corresponding chemical formulae proposed as Ca5Si4O13∙6.2H2O. Crystalline structure inside C-S-H was observed by TEM, which was allocated at the foil-like proportion as well as the edge of wrinkles of the product. The long-term hydration process of C3S in dilute suspension could be sketchily described as migration of calcium hydroxide and in-situ growth of C-S-H with equilibrium silicon in aqueous solution relatively constant and calcium varied.

  10. Collagen crosslinks in chondromalacia of the patella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väätäinen, U; Kiviranta, I; Jaroma, H; Arokosi, J; Tammi, M; Kovanen, V

    1998-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine collagen concentration and collagen crosslinks in cartilage samples from chondromalacia of the patella. To study the extracellular matrix alterations associated to chondromalacia, we determined the concentration of collagen (hydroxyproline) and its hydroxylysylpyridinoline and lysylpyridinoline crosslinks from chondromalacia foci of the patellae in 12 patients and 7 controls from apparently normal cadavers. The structure of the collagen network in 8 samples of grades II-IV chondromalacia was examined under polarized light microscopy. The full-thickness cartilage samples taken with a surgical knife from chondromalacia lesions did not show changes in collagen, hydroxylysylpyridinoline and lysylpyridinoline concentration as compared with the controls. Polarized light microscopy showed decreased birefringence in the superficial cartilage of chondromalacia lesions, indicating disorganization or disappearance of collagen fibers in this zone. It is concluded that the collagen network shows gradual disorganization with the severity of chondromalacia lesion of the patella without changes in the concentration or crosslinks of collagen.

  11. Impacts of Hydrate Distribution on the Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Properties of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Seol, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In general, hydrate makes the sediments hydraulically less conductive, thermally more conductive, and mechanically stronger; yet the dependency of these physical properties on hydrate saturation varies with hydrate distribution and morphology. Hydrate distribution in sediments may cause the bulk physical properties of their host sediments varying several orders of magnitude even with the same amount of hydrate. In natural sediments, hydrate morphology is inherently governed by the burial depth and the grain size of the host sediments. Compare with patchy hydrate, uniformly distributed hydrate is more destructive to fluid flow, yet leads to higher gas and water permeability during hydrate dissociation due to the easiness of forming percolation paths. Water and hydrate have similar thermal conductivity values; the bulk thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments depends critically on gas-phase saturation. 60% of gas saturation may result in evident thermal conductivity drop and hinder further gas production. Sediments with patchy hydrate yield lower stiffness than that with cementing hydrate but higher stiffness than that with pore filling and loading bearing hydrate. Besides hydrate distribution, the stress state and loading history also play an important role in the mechanical behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments.

  12. Sealing wells with gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, E C

    1967-10-01

    A new system is being used in Mexico to temporarily plug producing wells. The temporary seal is a gel with a catalyst. The use of this temporary plug allows gas-lift wells to be taken off production in order to carry out emergency repairs. The gel solidifies by the action of the catalyst to a high temperature (70 - 150/sup 0/C). By locating the bottom of the tubing at the top of the production interval, the gel material will go into the permeable formation, and immediately set. When the gel has solidified, it seals off the horizon that must not be stimulated, and leaves the others exposed to the acid action. When the treatment is finished, the gel, by action of the catalyst, is liquefied and removed from the formation, being produced with the oil.

  13. Hydration properties and phosphorous speciation in native, gelatinized and enzymatically modified potato starch analyzed by solid-state MAS NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Flemming H.; Kasprzak, Miroslaw Marek; Lærke, Helle Nygaard

    2013-01-01

    Hydration of granular, gelatinized and molecularly modified states of potato starch in terms of molecular mobility were analyzed by 13C and 31P solid-state MAS NMR. Gelatinization (GEL) tremendously reduced the immobile fraction compared to native (NA) starch granules. This effect was enhanced...... by enzyme-assisted catalytic branching with branching enzyme (BE) or combined BE and β-amylase (BB) catalyzed exo-hydrolysis. Carbons of the glycosidic α-1,6 linkages required high hydration rates before adopting uniform chemical shifts indicating solid-state disorder and poor water accessibility...... regions was only observed in NA starch. Moreover phosphorous was observed in a minor pH-insensitive form and as major phosphate in hydrated GEL and BE starches....

  14. SANS contrast in iota-carrageenan gels and solutions in D2O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mischenko, N.; Denef, B.; Mortensen, K.

    1997-01-01

    SANS of Na+-iota-carrageenan in D2O/saline solutions was measured as a function of concentration, temperature and type of counterions (K+ or Na+). High and low scattering-contrasted gels and solutions were detected. High contrast is caused by aggregation of low-hydrated chains at high concentration...

  15. Rosemary Essential Oil-Loaded Lipid Nanoparticles: In Vivo Topical Activity from Gel Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Montenegro

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Although rosemary essential oil (EO shows many biological activities, its topical benefits have not been clearly demonstrated. In this work, we assessed the effects on skin hydration and elasticity of rosemary EO after topical application via gel vehicles in human volunteers. To improve its topical efficacy, rosemary EO was loaded into lipid nanoparticles (NLCs consisting of cetyl palmitate as a solid lipid, and non-ionic surfactants. Such NLCs were prepared using different ratios of EO/solid lipid and those containing EO 3% w/w and cetyl pamitate 7% w/w were selected for in vivo studies, showing the best technological properties (small particle size, low polydispersity index and good stability. Gels containing free EO or EO-loaded NLCs were applied on the hand skin surface of ten healthy volunteers twice a day for one week. Skin hydration and elasticity changes were recorded using the instrument Soft Plus. Gels containing EO-loaded NLCs showed a significant increase in skin hydration in comparison with gels containing free EO. Skin elasticity increased, as well, although to a lesser extent. The results of this study point out the usefulness of rosemary EO-loaded NLCs for the treatment of cutaneous alterations involving loss of skin hydration and elasticity.

  16. An improved collagen zymography approach for evaluating the collagenases MMP-1, MMP-8, and MMP-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inanc, Seniz; Keles, Didem; Oktay, Gulgun

    2017-10-01

    Collagen zymography is an SDS-PAGE-based method for detecting both the proenzyme and active forms of collagenases. Although collagen zymography is used for assessment of the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-1 and MMP-13, it can be difficult to detect these collagenases due to technical issues. Moreover, it remains unclear whether the collagenase activity of MMP-8 can be detected by this method. Here, we present an improved collagen zymography method that allows quantification of the activities of MMP-1, MMP-8, and MMP-13. Activities of recombinant collagenases could be detected in collagen zymogram gels copolymerized with 0.3 mg/mL type I collagen extracted from rat tail tendon. This improved method is sensitive enough to detect the activity of as little as 1 ng of collagenase. We generated standard curves for the three collagenases to quantify the collagenolytic activity levels of unknown samples. To validate our improved method, we investigated MMP-1 activity levels in human thyroid cancer (8505C) and normal thyroid (Nthy-ori-3-1) cell lines, finding that the proenzyme and active MMP-1 levels were greater in 8505C cells than in Nthy-ori-3-1 cells. Taken together, our data show that collagen zymography can be used in both molecular and clinical investigations to evaluate collagenase activities in various pathological conditions.

  17. Correlating rheological properties and printability of collagen bioinks: the effects of riboflavin photocrosslinking and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantides, Nicole; Wang, Louis; Pruiksma, Tylar; Siemiatkoski, Joseph; Dugopolski, Caroline; Shortkroff, Sonya; Kennedy, Stephen; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2017-07-05

    Collagen has shown promise as a bioink for extrusion-based bioprinting, but further development of new collagen bioink formulations is necessary to improve their printability. Screening these formulations by measuring print accuracy is a costly and time consuming process. We hypothesized that rheological properties of the bioink before, during, and/or after gelation can be used to predict printability. In this study, we investigated the effects of riboflavin photocrosslinking and pH on type I collagen bioink rheology before, during, and after gelation and directly correlated these findings to the printability of each bioink formulation. From the riboflavin crosslinking study, results showed that riboflavin crosslinking increased the storage moduli of collagen bioinks, but the degree of improvement was less pronounced at higher collagen concentrations. Dots printed with collagen bioinks with riboflavin crosslinking exhibited smaller dot footprint areas than those printed with collagen bioinks without riboflavin crosslinking. From the pH study, results showed that gelation kinetics and final gel moduli were highly pH dependent and both exhibited maxima around pH 8. The shape fidelity of printed lines was highest at pH 8-9.5. The effect of riboflavin crosslinking and pH on cell viability was assessed using bovine chondrocytes. Cell viability in collagen gels was found to decrease after blue light activated riboflavin crosslinking but was not affected by pH. Correlations between rheological parameters and printability showed that the modulus associated with the bioink immediately after extrusion and before deposition was the best predictor of bioink printability. These findings will allow for the more rapid screening of collagen bioink formulations.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging and X-ray microtomography studies of a gel-forming tablet formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laity, P R; Mantle, M D; Gladden, L F; Cameron, R E

    2010-01-01

    The capabilities of two methods for investigating tablet swelling are investigated, based on a study of a model gel-forming system. Results from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were compared with results from a novel application of X-ray microtomography (XmicroT) to track the movements of embedded glass microsphere tracers as the model tablets swelled. MRI provided information concerning the movement of hydration fronts into the tablets and the composition of the swollen gel layer, which formed at the tablet surface and progressively thickened with time. Conversely, XmicroT revealed significant axial expansion within the tablet core, at short times and ahead of the hydration fronts, where there was insufficient water to be observed by MRI (estimated to be around 15% by weight for the system used here). Thus, MRI and XmicroT may be regarded as complementary methods for studying the hydration and swelling behaviour of tablets. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Building blocks of Collagen based biomaterial devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Building blocks of Collagen based biomaterial devices. Collagen as a protein. Collagen in tissues and organs. Stabilizing and cross linking agents. Immunogenicity. Hosts (drugs). Controlled release mechanisms of hosts. Biodegradability, workability into devices ...

  20. Contribution of collagen fibers to the compressive stiffness of cartilaginous tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römgens, Anne M; van Donkelaar, Corrinus C; Ito, Keita

    2013-11-01

    Cartilaginous tissues such as the intervertebral disk are predominantly loaded under compression. Yet, they contain abundant collagen fibers, which are generally assumed to contribute to tensile loading only. Fiber tension is thought to originate from swelling of the proteoglycan-rich nucleus. However, in aged or degenerate disk, proteoglycans are depleted, whereas collagen content changes little. The question then rises to which extend the collagen may contribute to the compressive stiffness of the tissue. We hypothesized that this contribution is significant at high strain magnitudes and that the effect depends on fiber orientation. In addition, we aimed to determine the compression of the matrix. Bovine inner and outer annulus fibrosus specimens were subjected to incremental confined compression tests up to 60 % strain in radial and circumferential direction. The compressive aggregate modulus was determined per 10 % strain increment. The biochemical composition of the compressed specimens and uncompressed adjacent tissue was determined to compute solid matrix compression. The stiffness of all specimens increased nonlinearly with strain. The collagen-rich outer annulus was significantly stiffer than the inner annulus above 20 % compressive strain. Orientation influenced the modulus in the collagen-rich outer annulus. Finally, it was shown that the solid matrix was significantly compressed above 30 % strain. Therefore, we concluded that collagen fibers significantly contribute to the compressive stiffness of the intervertebral disk at high strains. This is valuable for understanding the compressive behavior of collagen-reinforced tissues in general, and may be particularly relevant for aging or degenerate disks, which become more fibrous and less hydrated.

  1. [Identification of Zaocys type II collagen and its effect on arthritis in mice with collagen-induced arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Feng, Zhi-tao; Zhu, Jun-qing; Wu, Xiang-hui; Li, Juan

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the homology of Zaocys type 1I collagen ( ZC II ) with the C II collagen from other species, and to investigate the effect of ZC II on arthritis in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). ZC II was purified with restriction pepsin digestion. Then SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis and UV spectrophotometry were used to identify the protein,the homology of the ZC II peptide was analyzed with Mass Spectrometry. The model of CIA mice were induced by subcutaneous injection of Chicken C II into male C57BL/6 mice from the base of the tails. After immunization,ZC II [H,M,L:40,20 and 10 μg/(kgd) ]was administered orally to mice from day 21 to 28 accordingly. The severity of the arthritis in each limb was evaluated using a macroscopic scoring system, and his- topathological change of joint was observed by light microscope with HE staining. The molecular weight of ZC II protein deter- mined by SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis was between 110 kD and 140 kD, and UV absorption peak appeared at around 230 nm in wave- length. The peptide mass fingerprinting(PMF) of the purified protein by Mass Spectrometry analysis showed that it had at least 4 peptides matched with other species,and the protein score was greater than 95%. Compared with normal group,the CIA model group had significantly higher scores for arthritis and histopathological changes (P II peptide-treated mice with CIA were significantly lower than the mice from CIA model group(P II has high homology with the C II from other species. Oral administration of ZC II can suppress arthritis in mice with CIA and ameliorate the histopathological changes of the joint.

  2. Is Br2 hydration hydrophobic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Torres, A; Gamboa-Suárez, A; Bernal-Uruchurtu, M I

    2017-02-28

    The spectroscopic properties of bromine in aqueous systems suggest it can behave as either hydrophilic or hydrophobic solute. In small water clusters, the halogen bond and the hydrogen-halogen interaction are responsible for its specific way of binding. In water hydrates, it is efficiently hosted by two different cages forming the crystal structure and it has been frequently assumed that there is little or no interaction between the guest and the host. Bromine in liquid solution poses a challenging question due to its non-negligible solubility and the large blue shift measured in its absorption spectra. Using a refined semi-empirical force field, PM3-PIF, we performed a Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics study of bromine in liquid water. Here we present a detailed study in which we retrieved the most representative hydration structures in terms of the most frequent positions around bromine and the most common water orientations. Albeit being an approximate description of the total hydration phenomenon, it captures the contribution of the leading molecular interactions in form of the recurrent structures. Our findings confirm that the spectroscopic signature is mainly caused by the closest neighbors. The dynamics of the whole first hydration shell strongly suggests that the external molecules in that structure effectively isolate the bulk from the presence of bromine. The solvation structure fluctuates from a hydrophilic to a hydrophobic-like environment along the studied trajectory.

  3. Hydration modeling of calcium sulphates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korte, A.C.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Al-Mattarneh, Hashem; Mustapha, Kamal N.; Nuruddin, Muhd Fadhil

    2008-01-01

    The CEMHYD3D model has been extended at the University of Twente in the last ten years [1,2]. At present the cement hydration model is extended for the use of gypsum. Although gypsum was present in the model already, the model was not suitable for high contents of gypsum and did not include the

  4. On the origin of the hydration interaction of LIPID bilayers from molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essmann, U.; Perera, L.; Berkowitz, M.L.

    1996-01-01

    To understand the nature of the hydration forces acting between biomembranes we performed computer simulations on DLPE/water and DPPC/water systems in liquid crystalline and gel phases. The simulations show that the influence of the membrane surface on water properties is detectable only over a short range and that the membrane surfaces are rough on the molecular scale. We find that the hydration force is due to (a) the removal of only one or two layers of solvating water from the membrane surface and (b) steric interactions. The detailed structure of the solvating water is responsible for the difference in the hydration force acting between DLPE membranes compared to DPPC membranes

  5. The crucial effect of early-stage gelation on the mechanical properties of cement hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Kanduč, Matej; Li, Lunna; Frenkel, Daan; Dobnikar, Jure; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-07-01

    Gelation and densification of calcium-silicate-hydrate take place during cement hydration. Both processes are crucial for the development of cement strength, and for the long-term evolution of concrete structures. However, the physicochemical environment evolves during cement formation, making it difficult to disentangle what factors are crucial for the mechanical properties. Here we use Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics simulations to study a coarse-grained model of cement formation, and investigate the equilibrium and arrested states. We can correlate the various structures with the time evolution of the interactions between the nano-hydrates during the preparation of cement. The novel emerging picture is that the changes of the physicochemical environment, which dictate the evolution of the effective interactions, specifically favour the early gel formation and its continuous densification. Our observations help us understand how cement attains its unique strength and may help in the rational design of the properties of cement and related materials.

  6. A Double-Blind, Randomised Study Comparing the Skin Hydration and Acceptability of Two Emollient Products in Atopic Eczema Patients with Dry Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djokic-Gallagher, Jasmina; Rosher, Phil; Oliveira, Gabriela; Walker, Jennine

    2017-09-01

    Healthcare professionals tend to recommend emollients based primarily on patient/consumer preference and cost, with cheaper options assumed to be therapeutically equivalent. The aim of this study was therefore to compare the effects on skin hydration of two emollients prescribed in the UK, Doublebase Dayleve™ gel (DELP) and a cheaper alternative, Zerobase Emollient™ cream (ZBC). This was a single-centre, randomised, double-blind, concurrent bi-lateral (within-patient) comparison in 18 females with atopic eczema and dry skin on their lower legs. DELP gel and ZBC cream were each applied to one lower leg twice daily for 4 days and on the morning only on day 5. The efficacy of both products was assessed by hydration measurements using a Corneometer CM825 probe (Courage-Khazaka Electronic). The measurements were made three times daily on days 1 to 5. The primary efficacy variable was the area under the curve (AUC) of the change from baseline corneometer readings over the 5 days. Skin hydration using DELP gel was significantly higher than using ZBC cream (p skin hydration observed for DELP gel was substantial and long lasting. In contrast, for ZBC cream, there was no significant improvement of the cumulative skin hydration as measured by the AUC (p = 0.22). DELP gel achieved substantial, long-lasting and cumulative skin hydration, whilst ZBC cream achieved no measurable improvement in skin hydration compared to before treatment. Healthcare professionals should be aware that different emollients can perform differently. Dermal Laboratories Ltd. EudraCT number:2014-001026-16.

  7. Hydration of Magnesium Carbonate in a Thermal Energy Storage Process and Its Heating Application Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rickard Erlund

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available First ideas of applications design using magnesium (hydro carbonates mixed with silica gel for day/night and seasonal thermal energy storage are presented. The application implies using solar (or another heat source for heating up the thermal energy storage (dehydration unit during daytime or summertime, of which energy can be discharged (hydration during night-time or winter. The applications can be used in small houses or bigger buildings. Experimental data are presented, determining and analysing kinetics and operating temperatures for the applications. In this paper the focus is on the hydration part of the process, which is the more challenging part, considering conversion and kinetics. Various operating temperatures for both the reactor and the water (storage tank are tested and the favourable temperatures are presented and discussed. Applications both using ground heat for water vapour generation and using water vapour from indoor air are presented. The thermal energy storage system with mixed nesquehonite (NQ and silica gel (SG can use both low (25–50% and high (75% relative humidity (RH air for hydration. The hydration at 40% RH gives a thermal storage capacity of 0.32 MJ/kg while 75% RH gives a capacity of 0.68 MJ/kg.

  8. Observed gas hydrate morphologies in marine sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Roberts, J.; Druce, M. [Geotek Ltd., Daventry, Northamptonshire (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    The morphology of gas hydrate in marine sediments determines the basic physical properties of the sediment-hydrate matrix and provides information regarding the formation of gas hydrate deposits, and the nature of the disruption that will occur on dissociation. Small-scale morphology is useful in estimating the concentrations of gas hydrate from geophysical data. It is also important for predicting their response to climate change or commercial production. Many remote techniques for gas hydrate detection and quantification depend on hydrate morphology. In this study, morphology of gas hydrate was examined in HYACINTH pressure cores from recent seagoing expeditions. Visual and infrared observations from non-pressurized cores were also used. The expeditions and pressure core analysis were described in detail. This paper described the difference between two types of gas hydrate morphologies, notably pore-filling and grain-displacing. Last, the paper addressed the impact of hydrate morphology. It was concluded that a detailed morphology of gas hydrate is an essential component for a full understanding of the past, present, and future of any gas hydrate environment. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Seismic reflections associated with submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassen, K

    1996-12-31

    Gas hydrates are often suggested as a future energy resource. This doctoral thesis improves the understanding of the concentration and distribution of natural submarine gas hydrates. The presence of these hydrates are commonly inferred from strong bottom simulating reflection (BSR). To investigate the nature of BSR, this work uses seismic studies of hydrate-related BSRs at two different locations, one where gas hydrates are accepted to exist and interpreted to be very extensive (in the Beaufort Sea), the other with good velocity data and downhole logs available (offshore Oregon). To ascertain the presence of free gas under the BSR, prestack offset data must supplement near-vertical incidence seismic data. A tentative model for physical properties of sediments partially saturated with gas hydrate and free gas is presented. This model, together with drilling information and seismic data containing the BSR beneath the Oregon margin and the Beaufort Sea, made it possible to better understand when to apply the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) method to constrain BSR gas hydrate and gas models. Distribution of natural gas hydrates offshore Norway and Svalbard is discussed and interpreted as reflections from the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, overlying sediments containing free gas. Gas hydrates inferred to exist at the Norwegian-Svalbard continental margin correlate well with Cenozoic depocenters, and the associated gas is assumed to be mainly biogenic. Parts of that margin have a high potential for natural gas hydrates of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. 235 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Seismic reflections associated with submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassen, K.

    1995-12-31

    Gas hydrates are often suggested as a future energy resource. This doctoral thesis improves the understanding of the concentration and distribution of natural submarine gas hydrates. The presence of these hydrates are commonly inferred from strong bottom simulating reflection (BSR). To investigate the nature of BSR, this work uses seismic studies of hydrate-related BSRs at two different locations, one where gas hydrates are accepted to exist and interpreted to be very extensive (in the Beaufort Sea), the other with good velocity data and downhole logs available (offshore Oregon). To ascertain the presence of free gas under the BSR, prestack offset data must supplement near-vertical incidence seismic data. A tentative model for physical properties of sediments partially saturated with gas hydrate and free gas is presented. This model, together with drilling information and seismic data containing the BSR beneath the Oregon margin and the Beaufort Sea, made it possible to better understand when to apply the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) method to constrain BSR gas hydrate and gas models. Distribution of natural gas hydrates offshore Norway and Svalbard is discussed and interpreted as reflections from the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, overlying sediments containing free gas. Gas hydrates inferred to exist at the Norwegian-Svalbard continental margin correlate well with Cenozoic depocenters, and the associated gas is assumed to be mainly biogenic. Parts of that margin have a high potential for natural gas hydrates of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. 235 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Influence of fluorosurfactants on hydrate formation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C.U.; Jeong, K.E.; Chae, H.J.; Jeong, S.Y. [Korea Reasearch Inst. of Chemical Technology, Alternative Chemicals/Fuel Research Center, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates, or clathrates, are ice-like solids that forms when natural gas is in contact with liquid water or ice under high pressure and low temperature. There is significant interest in studying the storage and transportation of gas in the form of hydrates. However, a critical problem impacting the industrial application of gas hydrates for storage and transportation of natural gas is the slow formation rate of natural gas hydrate. Researchers have previously reported on the promotion effect of some additives on gas hydrate formation and hydrate gas content. Fluorosurfactants are significantly superior to nonfluorinated surfactants in wetting action, as well as stability in harsh environments, both thermal and chemical. This paper discussed an experimental investigation into the effects of fluorosurfactants with different ionic types on the formation of methane hydrate. The surfactants used were FSN-100 of DuPont Zonyl as non-ionic surfactant and FC-143 of DuPont as anionic surfactant. The paper discussed the experimental apparatus for methane hydrate formation. It also discussed hydrate formation kinetics and the series of hydrate formation experiments that were conducted in the presence of fluorosurfactants. Last, the paper explored the results of the study. It was concluded that anionic fluorosurfactant of FC-143 had a better promoting effect on methane hydrate formation compared with nonionic surfactant of FSN-100. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  12. Multilayered dense collagen-silk fibroin hybrid: a platform for mesenchymal stem cell differentiation towards chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzi, Chiara E; Marelli, Benedetto; Donelli, Ilaria; Alessandrino, Antonio; Freddi, Giuliano; Nazhat, Showan N

    2017-07-01

    Type I collagen is a major structural and functional protein in connective tissues. However, collagen gels exhibit unstable geometrical properties, arising from extensive cell-mediated contraction. In an effort to stabilize collagen-based hydrogels, plastic compression was used to hybridize dense collagen (DC) with electrospun silk fibroin (SF) mats, generating multilayered DC-SF-DC constructs. Seeded mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-mediated DC-SF-DC contraction, as well as growth and differentiation under chondrogenic and osteogenic supplements, were compared to those seeded in DC and on SF alone. The incorporation of SF within DC prevented extensive cell-mediated collagen gel contraction. The effect of the multilayered hybrid on MSC remodelling capacity was also evident at the transcription level, where the expression of matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitor (MMP1, MMP2, MMP3, MMP13 and Timp1) by MSCs within DC-SF-DC were comparable to those on SF and significantly downregulated in comparison to DC, except for Timp1. Chondrogenic supplements stimulated extracellular matrix production within the construct, stabilizing its multilayered structure and promoting MSC chondrogenic differentiation, as indicated by the upregulation of the genes Col2a1 and Agg and the production of collagen type II. In osteogenic medium there was an upregulation in ALP and OP along with the presence of an apatitic phase, indicating MSC osteoblastic differentiation and matrix mineralization. In sum, these results have implications on the modulation of three-dimensional collagen-based gel structural stability and on the stimulation and maintenance of the MSC committed phenotype inherent to the in vitro formation of chondral tissue and bone, as well as on potential multilayered complex tissues. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Collagens--structure, function, and biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelse, K; Pöschl, E; Aigner, T

    2003-11-28

    The extracellular matrix represents a complex alloy of variable members of diverse protein families defining structural integrity and various physiological functions. The most abundant family is the collagens with more than 20 different collagen types identified so far. Collagens are centrally involved in the formation of fibrillar and microfibrillar networks of the extracellular matrix, basement membranes as well as other structures of the extracellular matrix. This review focuses on the distribution and function of various collagen types in different tissues. It introduces their basic structural subunits and points out major steps in the biosynthesis and supramolecular processing of fibrillar collagens as prototypical members of this protein family. A final outlook indicates the importance of different collagen types not only for the understanding of collagen-related diseases, but also as a basis for the therapeutical use of members of this protein family discussed in other chapters of this issue.

  14. Formation of magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) cement pastes using sodium hexametaphosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tingting [Faculty of Infrastructure Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Department of Materials, Centre for Advanced Structural Ceramics, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Vandeperre, Luc J. [Department of Materials, Centre for Advanced Structural Ceramics, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cheeseman, Christopher R., E-mail: c.cheeseman@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) gel is formed by the reaction of brucite with amorphous silica during sulphate attack in concrete and M-S-H is therefore regarded as having limited cementing properties. The aim of this work was to form M-S-H pastes, characterise the hydration reactions and assess the resulting properties. It is shown that M-S-H pastes can be prepared by reacting magnesium oxide (MgO) and silica fume (SF) at low water to solid ratio using sodium hexametaphosphate (NaHMP) as a dispersant. Characterisation of the hydration reactions by x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis shows that brucite and M-S-H gel are formed and that for samples containing 60 wt.% SF and 40 wt.% MgO all of the brucites react with SF to form M-S-H gel. These M-S-H cement pastes were found to have compressive strengths in excess of 70 MPa.

  15. Collagen cross linking: Current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas K Rao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus is a common ectatic disorder occurring in more than 1 in 1,000 individuals. The condition typically starts in adolescence and early adulthood. It is a disease with an uncertain cause and its progression is unpredictable, but in extreme cases, vision deteriorates and can require corneal transplant surgery. Corneal collagen cross-linking (CCL with riboflavin (C3R is a recent treatment option that can enhance the rigidity of the cornea and prevent disease progression. Since its inception, the procedure has evolved with newer instrumentation, surgical techniques, and is also now performed for expanded indications other than keratoconus. With increasing experience, newer guidelines regarding optimization of patient selection, the spectrum of complications and their management, and combination procedures are being described. This article in conjunction with the others in this issue, will try and explore the uses of collagen cross-linking (CXL in its current form.

  16. Polymer gel dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldock, C [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney (Australia); De Deene, Y [Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Doran, S [CRUK Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research Group, Institute of Cancer Research, Surrey (United Kingdom); Ibbott, G [Radiation Physics, UT M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Jirasek, A [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada); Lepage, M [Centre d' imagerie moleculaire de Sherbrooke, Departement de medecine nucleaire et de radiobiologie, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC (Canada); McAuley, K B [Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON (Canada); Oldham, M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Schreiner, L J [Cancer Centre of South Eastern Ontario, Kingston, ON (Canada)], E-mail: c.baldock@physics.usyd.edu.au, E-mail: yves.dedeene@ugent.be

    2010-03-07

    Polymer gel dosimeters are fabricated from radiation sensitive chemicals which, upon irradiation, polymerize as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. These gel dosimeters, with the capacity to uniquely record the radiation dose distribution in three-dimensions (3D), have specific advantages when compared to one-dimensional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, and two-dimensional dosimeters, such as film. These advantages are particularly significant in dosimetry situations where steep dose gradients exist such as in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery. Polymer gel dosimeters also have specific advantages for brachytherapy dosimetry. Potential dosimetry applications include those for low-energy x-rays, high-linear energy transfer (LET) and proton therapy, radionuclide and boron capture neutron therapy dosimetries. These 3D dosimeters are radiologically soft-tissue equivalent with properties that may be modified depending on the application. The 3D radiation dose distribution in polymer gel dosimeters may be imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical-computerized tomography (optical-CT), x-ray CT or ultrasound. The fundamental science underpinning polymer gel dosimetry is reviewed along with the various evaluation techniques. Clinical dosimetry applications of polymer gel dosimetry are also presented. (topical review)

  17. Magnetic resonance microscopy for assessment of morphological changes in hydrating hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose matrix tablets in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulinowski, Piotr; Młynarczyk, Anna; Dorożyński, Przemysław; Jasiński, Krzysztof; Gruwel, Marco L H; Tomanek, Bogusław; Węglarz, Władysław P

    2012-12-01

    To resolve contradictions found in morphology of hydrating hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC) matrix as studied using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques. Until now, two approaches were used in the literature: either two or three regions that differ in physicochemical properties were identified. Multiparametric, spatially and temporally resolved T(2) MR relaxometry in situ was applied to study the hydration progress in HPMC matrix tablets using a 11.7 T MRI system. Two spin-echo based pulse sequences-one of them designed to specifically study short T(2) signals-were used. Two components in the T(2) decay envelope were estimated and spatial distributions of their parameters, i.e. amplitudes and T(2) values, were obtained. Based on the data, five different regions and their temporal evolution were identified: dry glassy, hydrated solid like, two interface layers and gel layer. The regions were found to be separated by four evolving fronts identified as penetration, full hydration, total gelification and apparent erosion. The MRI results showed morphological details of the hydrating HPMC matrices matching compound theoretical models. The proposed method will allow for adequate evaluation of controlled release polymeric matrix systems loaded with drug substances of different solubility.

  18. Fire extinction utilizing carbon dioxide hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatakeyama, T.; Aida, E.; Yokomori, T.; Ohmura, R.; Ueda, T. [Keio Univ., Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Clathrate hydrates formed with nonflammable gases may be suitable for use as fire extinguishing agents because dissociation of the hydrates results in the temperature decrease in the combustion field and the nonflammable gases released from the dissociated hydrates prevent the supply of the oxygen to the combustion field. This paper discussed experiments in which ordinary ice and dry ice were used to evaluate the performance of CO{sub 2} hydrate as a fire extinguishing agent. The paper described the apparatus and procedure for the preparation of CO{sub 2} hydrate crystals. A schematic of the reactor to form CO{sub 2} hydrate and a photograph of CO{sub 2} hydrate crystal formed in the study were also presented. Other illustrations, photographs, and tables that were presented included a schematic diagram of the experimental apparatus used for the flame extinction experiments; a photograph of CO{sub 2} hydrate powder; sequential video graphs of the flame extinction by the supply of CO{sub 2} hydrate crystals to the methanol pool flame and the relevant illustration; and heat of CO{sub 2} hydrate dissociation, water vaporization and sublimation of dry ice. It was concluded that the critical mass of the CO{sub 2} hydrate required to extinguish a flame was much less than that of ordinary ice, indicating the superiority of CO{sub 2} hydrate to the ice. In addition, the experiments also revealed that the size of the CO{sub 2} hydrate particles had a significant effect on the performance of flame extinction. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  19. CH4 recovery and CO2 sequestration using flue gas in natural gas hydrates as revealed by a micro-differential scanning calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yohan; Kim, Yunju; Lee, Jaehyoung; Lee, Huen; Seo, Yongwon

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The extent of the replacement was improved due to the enclathration of N 2 in small cages. • The dissociation enthalpies of the replaced gas hydrates were measured. • There was no noticeable heat flow change during the CH 4 –flue gas replacement. • The replacement could occur without significant destruction of gas hydrates. - Abstract: The CH 4 –flue gas replacement in naturally occurring gas hydrates has attracted significant attention due to its potential as a method of exploitation of clean energy and sequestration of CO 2 . In the replacement process, the thermodynamic and structural properties of the mixed gas hydrates are critical factors to predict the heat flow in the hydrate-bearing sediments and the heat required for hydrate dissociation, and to evaluate the CO 2 storage capacity of hydrate reservoirs. In this study, the 13 C NMR and gas composition analyses confirmed that the preferential enclathration of N 2 molecules in small 5 12 cages of structure I hydrates improved the extent of the CH 4 recovery. A high pressure micro-differential scanning calorimeter (HP μ-DSC) provided reliable hydrate stability conditions and heat of dissociation values in the porous silica gels after the replacement, which confirmed that CH 4 in the hydrates was successfully replaced with flue gas. A heat flow change associated with the dissociation and formation of hydrates was not noticeable during the CH 4 –flue gas replacement. Therefore, this study reveals that CH 4 –flue gas swapping occurs without structural transitions and significant hydrate dissociations

  20. Magnetic resonance microscopy for assessment of morphological changes in hydrating hydroxypropylmethylcellulose matrix tablets in situ-is it possible to detect phenomena related to drug dissolution within the hydrated matrices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulinowski, Piotr; Młynarczyk, Anna; Jasiński, Krzysztof; Talik, Przemysław; Gruwel, Marco L H; Tomanek, Bogusław; Węglarz, Władysław P; Dorożyński, Przemysław

    2014-09-01

    So far, the hydrated part of the HPMC matrix has commonly been denoted as a "gel" or "pseudogel" layer. No MRI-based results have been published regarding observation of internal phenomena related to drug dissolution inside swelling polymeric matrices during hydration. The purpose of the study was to detect such phenomena. Multiparametric, spatially and temporally resolved T2 MR relaxometry, in situ, was applied to study formation of the hydration progress in HPMC matrix tablets loaded with L-dopa and ketoprofen using a 11.7 T MRI system. Two spin-echo based pulse sequences were used, one of them specifically designed to study short T2 signals. Two components in the T2 decay envelope were estimated and spatial distributions of their parameters, i.e. amplitudes and T2 values, were obtained. Based on the data, different region formation patterns (i.e. multilayer structure) were registered depending on drug presence and solubility. Inside the matrix with incorporated sparingly soluble drug a specific layer formation due to drug dissolution was detected, whereas a matrix with very slightly soluble drug does not form distinct external "gel-like" layer. We have introduced a new paradigm in the characterization of hydrating matrices using (1)H MRI methods. It reflects molecular mobility and concentration of water inside the hydrated matrix. For the first time, drug dissolution related phenomena, i.e. particular front and region formation, were observed by MRI methods.

  1. Design of Autonomous Gel Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Hashimoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce autonomous gel actuators driven by chemical energy. The polymer gels prepared here have cyclic chemical reaction networks. With a cyclic reaction, the polymer gels generate periodical motion. The periodic motion of the gel is produced by the chemical energy of the oscillatory Belouzov-Zhabotinsky (BZ reaction. We have succeeded in making synthetic polymer gel move autonomously like a living organism. This experimental fact represents the great possibility of the chemical robot.

  2. Review of Fricke gel dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, L J

    2004-01-01

    The innovation of adding a gel matrix to the traditional Fricke dosimeter to stabilize geometric information established the field of gel dosimetry for radiation therapy. A discussion of Fricke gels provides an overview of the issues that determine the dose response of all gel dosimeters in general. In this paper we review some of the features of Fricke systems to illustrate these issues and, in addition, to motivate renewed clinical interest in Fricke gels

  3. Host Tissue Interaction, Fate, and Risks of Degradable and Nondegradable Gel Fillers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lise

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND A constantly increasing number of gel fillers for aesthetic and reconstructive purposes have been introduced during the last 20 years. Most of the new ones are modified versions of the original collagen and hyaluronic acid gels. They have been reconstructed, often by adding cross......-bindings to the polymer in order to obtain a more dense molecular structure, which will prolong degradation and filling effect of the gel. Other gel fillers contain particles of organic (poly-lactic acid) or inorganic (calcium hydroxylapatite) material, which have been used in human tissue for other purposes (degradable...... are based on experimental and clinical observations coupled with a search of the literature. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION Complications following homogenous hydrogels are caused by infection with bacteria, which have been inserted into the gel during injection. If not treated with relevant antibiotics (but...

  4. Collagen fibrillogenesis: fibronectin, integrins, and minor collagens as organizers and nucleators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadler, Karl E; Hill, Adele; Canty-Laird, Elizabeth G

    2008-10-01

    Collagens are triple helical proteins that occur in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and at the cell-ECM interface. There are more than 30 collagens and collagen-related proteins but the most abundant are collagens I and II that exist as D-periodic (where D = 67 nm) fibrils. The fibrils are of broad biomedical importance and have central roles in embryogenesis, arthritis, tissue repair, fibrosis, tumor invasion, and cardiovascular disease. Collagens I and II spontaneously form fibrils in vitro, which shows that collagen fibrillogenesis is a selfassembly process. However, the situation in vivo is not that simple; collagen I-containing fibrils do not form in the absence of fibronectin, fibronectin-binding and collagen-binding integrins, and collagen V. Likewise, the thin collagen II-containing fibrils in cartilage do not form in the absence of collagen XI. Thus, in vivo, cellular mechanisms are in place to control what is otherwise a protein self-assembly process. This review puts forward a working hypothesis for how fibronectin and integrins (the organizers) determine the site of fibril assembly, and collagens V and XI (the nucleators) initiate collagen fibrillogenesis.

  5. 3D MR gel dosimetry with lung equivalent gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, J.; Solleder, M.; Schiessl, I.; Bogner, L.; Herbst, M.

    1998-01-01

    The MR gel dosimetry is used to verify complex 3D treatment plans. Till now this method served only for dose evaluation in homogeneous phantoms. On the way to build a heterogeneous anthropomorphic gel phantom, a lung equivalent gel with the density 0.4 g/cm 3 was developed. First experiments show a 1.55 times higher dose reponse in the low density gel (LD gel). The comparison of a dose distribution in a gel/LD gel/gel slab phantom with Monte Carlo calculations shows good agreement within 5%. More over the accuray of the measuring device magnetic resonance imager was studied in respect to the now exclusive digital image processing with the software MRD (MR dosimetry). Because of the dimensions of the Fricke gel phantom an artefact correction, based on the data from the unirradiated phantom proved to be essential. (orig.) [de

  6. Glyoxal Crosslinking of Cell-Seeded Chitosan/Collagen Hydrogels for Bone Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Limin; Stegemann, Jan P.

    2011-01-01

    Chitosan and collagen are natural biomaterials that have been used extensively in tissue engineering, both separately and as composite materials. Most methods to fabricate chitosan/collagen composites use freeze drying and chemical crosslinking to create stable porous scaffolds, which subsequently can be seeded with cells. In this study, we directly embedded human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSC) in chitosan/collagen materials by initiating gelation using β-glycerophosphate at physiological temperature and pH. We further examined the use of glyoxal, a dialdehyde with relatively low toxicity, to crosslink these materials and characterized the resulting changes in matrix and cell properties. The cytocompatibility of glyoxal and the crosslinked gels were investigated in terms of hBMSC metabolic activity, viability, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation. These studies revealed that glyoxal was cytocompatible at concentrations below about 1 mM for periods of exposure up to 15 h, though the degree of cell spreading and proliferation were dependent on matrix composition. Glyoxal-crosslinked matrices were stiffer and compacted less than uncrosslinked controls. It was further demonstrated that hBMSC can attach and proliferate in 3D matrices composed of 50/50 chitosan/collagen, and that these materials supported osteogenic differentiation in response to stimulation. Such glyoxal-crosslinked chitosan/collagen composite materials may find utility as cell delivery vehicles for enhancing the repair of bone defects. PMID:21345389

  7. Structure of mineral gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda Salvado, I.M.; Margaca, F.M.A.; Teixeira, J.

    1999-01-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) measurements have been performed to investigate the nanoscale structure of materials of the systems xTiO 2 -(1-x)SiO 2 and xZrO 2 -(1-x)SiO 2 with x ≤ 10 mol % at different processing stages. The materials were prepared by sol-gel using the alkoxides method, in strong acidic conditions. Samples were studied as xerogels heat-treated at 120 and 850 deg. C and as wet gels at gel point and after aging. All samples showed identical microstructure at gel point, extended linear chains ∼10 nm long. The aged gel has a mass fractal structure with fractal dimension of 1.7 - 1.9. The 120 deg. C heat-treated xerogels show homogeneous oxide regions with mass fractal structure. For the 850 deg. C heat-treated xerogel the oxide regions average size has reduced and it has densified as compared to 120 deg. C heat-treated sample. (author)

  8. Micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoming [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy, School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Na [Green Construction Materials and Circulation Economy Center, Architectural Design and Research Institute of Tsinghua University Co., Ltd., Beijing 100084 (China); Yao, Yuan, E-mail: yuanyaocas@163.com [School of Engineering and Computer Science, University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA 95211 (United States); Sun, Henghu; Feng, Huan [School of Engineering and Computer Science, University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA 95211 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Al{sup IV} and Al{sup VI} both exist in the hydration products. • Increase of Ca/Si ratio promotes the conversion from [AlO{sub 4}] to [AlO{sub 6}]. • Polymerization degree of [SiO{sub 4}] in the hydration products declines. -- Abstract: In this research, the micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials has been investigated through SEM-EDS, {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR techniques, in which the used red mud was derived from the bauxite calcination method. The results show that the red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials mainly form fibrous C-A-S-H gel, needle-shaped/rod-like AFt in the early hydration period. With increasing of the hydration period, densification of the pastes were promoted resulting in the development of strength. EDS analysis shows that with the Ca/Si of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials increases, the average Ca/Si and Ca/(Si + Al) atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel increases, while the average Al/Si atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel decreases. MAS NMR analysis reveals that Al in the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials exists in the forms of Al{sup IV} and Al{sup VI}, but mainly in the form of Al{sup VI}. Increasing the Ca/Si ratio of raw material promotes the conversion of [AlO{sub 4}] to [AlO{sub 6}] and inhibits the combination between [AlO{sub 4}] and [SiO{sub 4}] to form C-A-S-H gel. Meanwhile, the polymerization degree of [SiO{sub 4}] in the hydration products declines.

  9. Micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Na; Yao, Yuan; Sun, Henghu; Feng, Huan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Al IV and Al VI both exist in the hydration products. • Increase of Ca/Si ratio promotes the conversion from [AlO 4 ] to [AlO 6 ]. • Polymerization degree of [SiO 4 ] in the hydration products declines. -- Abstract: In this research, the micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials has been investigated through SEM-EDS, 27 Al MAS NMR and 29 Si MAS NMR techniques, in which the used red mud was derived from the bauxite calcination method. The results show that the red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials mainly form fibrous C-A-S-H gel, needle-shaped/rod-like AFt in the early hydration period. With increasing of the hydration period, densification of the pastes were promoted resulting in the development of strength. EDS analysis shows that with the Ca/Si of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials increases, the average Ca/Si and Ca/(Si + Al) atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel increases, while the average Al/Si atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel decreases. MAS NMR analysis reveals that Al in the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials exists in the forms of Al IV and Al VI , but mainly in the form of Al VI . Increasing the Ca/Si ratio of raw material promotes the conversion of [AlO 4 ] to [AlO 6 ] and inhibits the combination between [AlO 4 ] and [SiO 4 ] to form C-A-S-H gel. Meanwhile, the polymerization degree of [SiO 4 ] in the hydration products declines

  10. Complete Histological Resolution of Collagenous Sprue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old woman developed a watery diarrhea syndrome with collagenous colitis. Later, weight loss and hypoalbuminemia were documented. This prompted small bowel biopsies that showed pathological changes of collagenous sprue. An apparent treatment response to a gluten-free diet and prednisone resulted in reduced diarrhea, weight gain and normalization of serum albumin. Later repeated biopsies from multiple small and large bowel sites over a period of over three years, however, showed reversion to normal small intestinal mucosa but persistent collagenous colitis. These results indicate that collagenous inflammatory disease may be a far more extensive process in the gastrointestinal tract than is currently appreciated. Moreover, collagenous colitis may be a clinical signal that occult small intestinal disease is present. Finally, collagenous sprue may, in some instances, be a completely reversible small intestinal disorder.

  11. A novel functional role of collagen glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürgensen, Henrik J; Madsen, Daniel H; Ingvarsen, Signe

    2011-01-01

    Collagens make up the most abundant component of interstitial extracellular matrices and basement membranes. Collagen remodeling is a crucial process in many normal physiological events and in several pathological conditions. Some collagen subtypes contain specific carbohydrate side chains......, the function of which is poorly known. The endocytic collagen receptor urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP)/Endo180 plays an important role in matrix remodeling through its ability to internalize collagen for lysosomal degradation. uPARAP/Endo180 is a member of the mannose...... receptor protein family. These proteins all include a fibronectin type II domain and a series of C-type lectin-like domains, of which only a minor part possess carbohydrate recognition activity. At least two of the family members, uPARAP/Endo180 and the mannose receptor, interact with collagens...

  12. Effect of radiation on rat skin collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogami, Akira

    1980-01-01

    I. Albino male rats were exposed for 16 weeks to ultraviolet light (UVL) which has principle emission at 305 nm. There were no significant changes between control and UVL-exposed skins in the total hydroxyproline content. However, a little increase of citrate-soluble collagen, a little decrease of insoluble collagen and a decrease of aldehyde content in soluble collagen were observed with UVL exposure. Total acid glycosaminoglycan in skin increased 30% or more from control. These results show that the effect of UVL on rat skin in vivo was merely inflammation phenomenon and that the 'aging' process of skin was not caused in our experimental conditions. II. The effects of radiation on the solubility of rat skin collagen were examined under various conditions. 1) When intact rats were exposed to a single dose of radiation from 43 kVp X-ray source, the solubility in skin collagen did not change at 4,000 R dosage, while in irradiation of 40,000 R a decreased solubility in collagen was observed. When rats were given 400 R a week for 12 weeks, there was no changes in the solubility of collagen during experimental period. 2) In vitro exposure to skins, an irradiation of 40,000 R from 43 kVp X-ray source caused a decrease in the solubility of collagen. While an irradiation of 40,000 R of dosage from 200 kVp X-ray source resulted in the increase in soluble collagen and the decrease in insoluble collagen. 3) When intact rats were given a single dose of 40,000 R from 60 Co- gamma -ray, insoluble collagen decreased in both young and adult rats. Similar changes in collagen solubility were observed in vitro gamma -irradiation. (author)

  13. Alginate-Collagen Fibril Composite Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Baniasadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on the synthesis and the mechanical characterization of an alginate-collagen fibril composite hydrogel. Native type I collagen fibrils were used to synthesize the fibrous composite hydrogel. We characterized the mechanical properties of the fabricated fibrous hydrogel using tensile testing; rheometry and atomic force microscope (AFM-based nanoindentation experiments. The results show that addition of type I collagen fibrils improves the rheological and indentation properties of the hydrogel.

  14. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...... prehydration may occur. In the report both theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during water vapour exposure is nucleation controlled....

  15. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate–saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate–bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  16. Gel electrolytes and electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Sven; Bunte, Christine; Mikhaylik, Yuriy V.; Viner, Veronika G.

    2017-09-05

    Gel electrolytes, especially gel electrolytes for electrochemical cells, are generally described. In some embodiments, the gel electrolyte layers comprise components a) to c). Component a) may be at least one layer of at least one polymer comprising polymerized units of: a1) at least one monomer containing an ethylenically unsaturated unit and an amido group and a2) at least one crosslinker. Component b) may be at least one conducting salt and component c) may be at least one solvent. Electrodes may comprise the components a), d) and e), wherein component a) may be at least one layer of at least one polymer as described herein. Component d) may be at least one electroactive layer and component e) may be at least one ceramic layer. Furthermore, electrochemical cells comprising component a) which may be at least one layer of at least one polymer as described herein, are also provided.

  17. Routes towards Novel Collagen-Like Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian V. Golser

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Collagen plays a major role in providing mechanical support within the extracellular matrix and thus has long been used for various biomedical purposes. Exemplary, it is able to replace damaged tissues without causing adverse reactions in the receiving patient. Today’s collagen grafts mostly are made of decellularized and otherwise processed animal tissue and therefore carry the risk of unwanted side effects and limited mechanical strength, which makes them unsuitable for some applications e.g., within tissue engineering. In order to improve collagen-based biomaterials, recent advances have been made to process soluble collagen through nature-inspired silk-like spinning processes and to overcome the difficulties in providing adequate amounts of source material by manufacturing collagen-like proteins through biotechnological methods and peptide synthesis. Since these methods also open up possibilities to incorporate additional functional domains into the collagen, we discuss one of the best-performing collagen-like type of proteins, which already have additional functional domains in the natural blueprint, the marine mussel byssus collagens, providing inspiration for novel biomaterials based on collagen-silk hybrid proteins.

  18. Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabitto, Jorge [Prairie View A& M University; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Methane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 1016?m3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detected by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed.

  19. Accelerated hydration of high silica cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Colin; Yui, Mikazu

    2012-01-01

    Current Japanese designs for high level radioactive waste (HLW) repositories anticipate the use of both bentonite (buffer and backfill material) and cement based materials. Using hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) as a grouting material is undesirable because the associated high pH buffer will have an undisputed detrimental effect on the performance of the bentonite buffer and backfill and of the host rock by changing its porosity. Instead, hydrated low pH cement (LopHC) grouting materials are being developed to provide a pH inferior or equal to 11 to reduce these detrimental effects. LopHC grouting materials use mixtures of superfine OPC (SOPC) clinker and silica fume (SF), and are referred as high silica cements (HSC). The focus of the present study was to identify the development of the unhydrated and hydrated mineral assemblage and the solution chemistry during the hydration of HSC. Since hydration experiments of cementitious materials are notably slow, a ball mill was used to accelerate hydration. This was done for two reasons. Firstly, to develop a method to rapidly hydrate cement based materials without the need for higher temperatures (which can alter the mineral assemblage), and secondly, to ensure that the end point of hydration was reached in a reasonable time frame and so to realize the final mineralogy and solution chemistry of hydrated HSC

  20. Microstructure of natural hydrate host sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.; Kerkar, P.B.; Mahajan, D.; Lindquist, W.B.; Feng, H.

    2007-01-01

    There is worldwide interest in the study of natural gas hydrate because of its potential impact on world energy resources, control on seafloor stability, significance as a drilling hazard and probable impact on climate as a reservoir of a major greenhouse gas. Gas hydrates can (a) be free floating in the sediment matrix (b) contact, but do not cement, existing sediment grains, or (c) actually cement and stiffen the bulk sediment. Seismic surveys, often used to prospect for hydrates over a large area, can provide knowledge of the location of large hydrate concentrations because the hydrates within the sediment pores modify seismic properties. The ability to image a sample at the grain scale and to determine the porosity, permeability and seismic profile is of great interest since these parameters can help in determining the location of hydrates with certainty. We report here on an investigation of the structure of methane hydrate sediments at the grain-size scale using the synchrotron radiation-based computed microtomography (CMT) technique. Work has started on the measurements of the changes occurring as tetrahydrofuran hydrate, a surrogate for methane hydrate, is formed in the sediment

  1. Electroblotting from Polyacrylamide Gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Aaron; Ursitti, Jeanine A; Mozdzanowski, Jacek; Speicher, David W

    2015-11-02

    Transferring proteins from polyacrylamide gels onto retentive membranes is now primarily used for immunoblotting. A second application that was quite common up to about a decade ago was electroblotting of proteins for N-terminal and internal sequencing using Edman chemistry. This unit contains procedures for electroblotting proteins from polyacrylamide gels onto a variety of membranes, including polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) and nitrocellulose. In addition to the commonly used tank or wet transfer system, protocols are provided for electroblotting using semidry and dry systems. This unit also describes procedures for eluting proteins from membranes using detergents or acidic extraction with organic solvents for specialized applications. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Application of empirical hydration distribution functions around polar atoms for assessing hydration structures of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Daisuke; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Empirical distribution functions of water molecules in protein hydration are made. ► The functions measure how hydrogen-bond geometry in hydration deviate from ideal. ► The functions assess experimentally identified hydration structures of protein. - Abstract: To quantitatively characterize hydrogen-bond geometry in local hydration structures of proteins, we constructed a set of empirical hydration distribution functions (EHDFs) around polar protein atoms in the main and side chains of 11 types of hydrophilic amino acids (D. Matsuoka, M. Nakasako, Journal of Physical Chemistry B 113 (2009) 11274). The functions are the ensemble average of possible hydration patterns around the polar atoms, and describe the anisotropic deviations from ideal hydrogen bond geometry. In addition, we defined probability distribution function of hydration water molecules (PDFH) over the hydrophilic surface of a protein as the sum of EHDFs of solvent accessible polar protein atoms. The functions envelop most of hydration sites identified in crystal structures of proteins (D. Matsuoka, M. Nakasako, Journal of Physical Chemistry B 114 (2010) 4652). Here we propose the application of EHDFs and PDFHs for assessing crystallographically identified hydration structures of proteins. First, hydration water molecules are classified with respect to the geometry in hydrogen bonds in referring EHDFs. Difference Fourier electron density map weighted by PDFH of protein is proposed to identify easily density peaks as candidates of hydration water molecules. A computer program implementing those ideas was developed and used for assessing hydration structures of proteins

  3. Waters of Hydration of Cupric Hydrates: A Comparison between Heating and Absorbance Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2011-01-01

    The empirical formulas of four cupric hydrates are determined by measuring the absorbance in aqueous solution. The Beer-Lambert Law is verified by constructing a calibration curve of absorbance versus known Cu[superscript 2+](aq) concentration. A solution of the unknown hydrate is prepared by using 0.2-0.3 g of hydrate, and water is added such…

  4. High resolution imaging of collagen organisation and synthesis using a versatile collagen specific probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerboom, R.A.; Krahn - Nash, K.; Megens, R.T.A.; Zandvoort, van M.; Merkx, M.; Bouten, C.V.C.

    2007-01-01

    Collagen is the protein primarily responsible for the load-bearing properties of tissues and collagen architecture is one of the main determinants of the mechanical properties of tissues. Visualisation of changes in collagen three-dimensional structure is essential in order to improve our

  5. Hydration in soccer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. The rates that carbohydrate and water are absorbed by the organism are limited by the rates of gastric emptying and intestinal absorption. The composition of drinks offered to the players should be influenced by the relative importance of the need of supplying carbohydrates or water; it should be remembered that the depletion of carbohydrate can result in fatigue and decrease of performance, but it is not usually a life-threatening condition. The addition of carbohydrate in these drinks increases the concentrations of blood glucose, increases the use of external fuel through the increase of the glucose oxidation in the muscles and it spares muscle glycogen. So, the ingestion of carbohydrate before and during the exercise can delay the emergence of fatigue and increase the players' performance. Several tactics can be used to avoid dehydration, like hyperhydration before exercise and player's acclimatization. The ideal situation to restore the player's fluid losses is between the sessions of exercises. Since soccer is a sport with quite peculiar characteristics related to hydration, the players should be concerned and educated about the importance of fluid ingestion before, during and after the exercise.

  6. Selective laser sintered poly-ε-caprolactone scaffold hybridized with collagen hydrogel for cartilage tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Chen, Jyh-Ping; Shyu, Victor Bong-Hang; Lee, Ming-Yih

    2014-01-01

    Selective laser sintering (SLS), an additive manufacturing (AM) technology, can be used to produce tissue engineering scaffolds with pre-designed macro and micro features based on computer-aided design models. An in-house SLS machine was built and 3D poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds were manufactured using a layer-by-layer design of scaffold struts with varying orientations (0°/45°/0°/45°, 0°/90°/0°/90°, 0°/45°/90°/135°), producing scaffolds with pores of different shapes and distribution. To better enhance the scaffold properties, chondrocytes were seeded in collagen gel and loaded in scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering. Gel uptake and dynamic mechanical analysis demonstrated the better suitability of the 0°/90°/0°/90° scaffolds for reconstructive cartilage tissue engineering purposes. Chondrocytes were then seeded onto the 0°/90°/0°/90° scaffolds in collagen I hydrogel (PCL/COL1) and compared to medium-suspended cells in terms of their cartilage-like tissue engineering parameters. PCL/COL1 allowed better cell proliferation when compared to PCL or two-dimensional tissue culture polystyrene. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy observations demonstrated a similar trend for extracellular matrix production and cell survival. Glycosaminoglycan and collagen II quantification also demonstrated the superior matrix secretion properties of PCL/COL1 hybrid scaffolds. Collagen-gel-suspended chondrocytes loaded in SLS-manufactured PCL scaffolds may provide a means of producing tissue-engineered cartilage with customized shapes and designs via AM technology. (paper)

  7. Laser welding and collagen crosslinks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, K.M.; Last, J.A. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Medicine; Small, W. IV; Maitland, D.J.; Heredia, N.J.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-02-20

    Strength and stability of laser-welded tissue may be influenced, in part, by effects of laser exposure on collagen crosslinking. We therefore studied effects of diode laser exposure (805 nm, 1-8 watts, 30 seconds) + indocyanine green dye (ICG) on calf tail tendon collagen crosslinks. Effect of ICG dye alone on crosslink content prior to laser exposure was investigated; unexpectedly, we found that ICG-treated tissue had significantly increased DHLNL and OHP, but not HLNL. Laser exposure after ICG application reduced elevated DHLNL and OHP crosslink content down to their native levels. The monohydroxylated crosslink HLNL was inversely correlated with laser output (p<0.01 by linear regression analysis). DHLNL content was highly correlated with content of its maturational product, OHP, suggesting that precursor-product relations are maintained. We conclude that: (1)ICG alone induces DHLNL and OHP crosslink formation; (2)subsequent laser exposure reduces the ICG-induced crosslinks down to native levels; (3)excessive diode laser exposure destroys normally occurring HLNL crosslinks.

  8. Gas Hydrates | Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preliminary Report - Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrates, Volume 204 Initial Report Mallik 2002 GSC Bulletin 585 : Scientific results from the Mallik 2002 gas hydrate production well program Offshore gas hydrate sample

  9. Synergistic intrafibrillar/extrafibrillar mineralization of collagen scaffolds based on a biomimetic strategy to promote the regeneration of bone defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yao Wang,1 Ngo Van Manh,1,2 Haorong Wang,1 Xue Zhong,1 Xu Zhang,1 Changyi Li1 1School of Dentistry, Hospital of Stomatology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China; 2Thaibinh University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Thaibinh, Vietnam Abstract: The mineralization of collagen scaffolds can improve their mechanical properties and biocompatibility, thereby providing an appropriate microenvironment for bone regeneration. The primary purpose of the present study is to fabricate a synergistically intra- and extrafibrillar mineralized collagen scaffold, which has many advantages in terms of biocompatibility, biomechanical properties, and further osteogenic potential. In this study, mineralized collagen scaffolds were fabricated using a traditional mineralization method (ie, immersed in simulated body fluid as a control group and using a biomimetic method based on the polymer-induced liquid precursor process as an experimental group. In the polymer-induced liquid precursor process, a negatively charged polymer, carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC, was used to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP to form nanocomplexes of CMC/ACP. Collagen scaffolds mineralized based on the polymer-induced liquid precursor process were in gel form such that nanocomplexes of CMC/ACP can easily be drawn into the interstices of the collagen fibrils. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the porous micromorphology and synergistic mineralization pattern of the collagen scaffolds. Compared with simulated body fluid, nanocomplexes of CMC/ACP significantly increased the modulus of the collagen scaffolds. The results of in vitro experiments showed that the cell count and differentiated degrees in the experimental group were higher than those in the control group. Histological staining and micro-computed tomography showed that the amount of new bone regenerated in the experimental group was larger than that in the

  10. Modern collagen wound dressings: function and purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Cynthia Ann; Simman, Richard

    2010-09-01

    Collagen, which is produced by fibroblasts, is the most abundant protein in the human body. A natural structural protein, collagen is involved in all 3 phases of the wound-healing cascade. It stimulates cellular migration and contributes to new tissue development. Because of their chemotactic properties on wound fibroblasts, collagen dressings encourage the deposition and organization of newly formed collagen, creating an environment that fosters healing. Collagen-based biomaterials stimulate and recruit specific cells, such as macrophages and fibroblasts, along the healing cascade to enhance and influence wound healing. These biomaterials can provide moisture or absorption, depending on the delivery system. Collagen dressings are easy to apply and remove and are conformable. Collagen dressings are usually formulated with bovine, avian, or porcine collagen. Oxidized regenerated cellulose, a plant-based material, has been combined with collagen to produce a dressing capable of binding to and protecting growth factors by binding and inactivating matrix metalloproteinases in the wound environment. The increased understanding of the biochemical processes involved in chronic wound healing allows the design of wound care products aimed at correcting imbalances in the wound microenvironment. Traditional advanced wound care products tend to address the wound's macroenvironment, including moist wound environment control, fluid management, and controlled transpiration of wound fluids. The newer class of biomaterials and wound-healing agents, such as collagen and growth factors, targets specific defects in the chronic wound environment. In vitro laboratory data point to the possibility that these agents benefit the wound healing process at a biochemical level. Considerable evidence has indicated that collagen-based dressings may be capable of stimulating healing by manipulating wound biochemistry.

  11. Simulation and Characterization of Methane Hydrate Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, S.; Gupta, I.

    2017-12-01

    The ever rising global energy demand dictates human endeavor to explore and exploit new and innovative energy sources. As conventional oil and gas reserves deplete, we are constantly looking for newer sources for sustainable energy. Gas hydrates have long been discussed as the next big energy resource to the earth. Its global occurrence and vast quantity of natural gas stored is one of the main reasons for such interest in its study and exploration. Gas hydrates are solid crystalline substances with trapped molecules of gas inside cage-like crystals of water molecules. Gases such as methane, ethane, propane and carbon dioxide can form hydrates but in natural state, methane hydrates are the most common. Subsurface geological conditions with high pressure and low temperature favor the formation and stability of gas hydrates. While the occurrence and potential of gas hydrates as energy source has long been studied, there are still gaps in knowledge, especially in the quantitative research of gas hydrate formation and reservoir characterization. This study is focused on exploring and understanding the geological setting in which gas hydrates are formed and the subsequent changes in rock characteristics as they are deposited. It involves the numerical simulation of methane gas flow through fault to form hydrates. The models are representative of the subsurface geologic setting of Gulf of Mexico with a fault through layers of shale and sandstone. Hydrate formation simulated is of thermogenic origin. The simulations are conducted using TOUGH+HYDRATE, a numerical code developed at the Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory for modeling multiphase flow through porous medium. Simulation results predict that as the gas hydrates form in the pores of the model, the porosity, permeability and other rock properties are altered. Preliminary simulation results have shown that hydrates begin to form in the fault zone and gradually in the sandstone layers. The increase in hydrate

  12. Formation rate of natural gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, Marit

    2002-07-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 deg C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted to hydrate. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by gas injection rate and pressure. The effect of stirring rate is less significant and subcooling has no observable effect on the formation rate. Hydrate crystal concentration and gas composition do not influence the hydrate formation rate. Observations of produced hydrate crystals indicate that the crystals are elongated, about 5 micron in diameter and 10 micron long. Analysis of the results shows that the rate of hydrate formation is dominated by gas-liquid mass transfer. A mass transfer model, the bubble-to-crystal model, was developed for the hydrate formation rate in a continuous stirred tank reactor, given in terms of concentration driving force and an overall mass transfer coefficient. The driving force is the difference between the gas concentration at the gas-liquid interface and at the hydrate crystal surface. These concentrations correspond to the solubility of gas in water at experimental temperature and pressure and the solubility of gas at hydrate equilibrium temperature and experimental pressure, respectively. The overall mass transfer coefficient is expressed in terms of superficial gas velocity and impeller power consumption, parameters commonly used in study of stirred tank reactors. Experiments and modeling show that the stirred tank reactor has a considerable potential for increased production capacity. However, at higher hydrate production rates the

  13. Engineering stable topography in dense bio-mimetic 3D collagen scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Alekseeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Topographic features are well known to influence cell behaviour and can provide a powerful tool for engineering complex, functional tissues. This study aimed to investigate the mechanisms of formation of a stable micro-topography on plastic compressed (PC collagen gels. The uni-directional fluid flow that accompanies PC of collagen gels creates a fluid leaving surface (FLS and a non-fluid leaving surface (non-FLS. Here we tested the hypothesis that the resulting anisotropy in collagen density and stiffness between FLS and non-FLS would influence the fidelity and stability of micro-grooves patterned on these surfaces. A pattern template of parallel-aligned glass fibres was introduced to the FLS or non-FLS either at the start of the compression or halfway through, when a dense FLS had already formed. Results showed that both early and late patterning of the FLS generated grooves that had depth (25 ±7 µm and 19 ±8 µm, respectively and width (55 ±11 µm and 50 ±12 µm, respectively which matched the glass fibre diameter (50 µm. In contrast, early and late patterning of the non-FLS gave much wider (151 ±50 µm and 89 ±14 µm, respectively and shallower (10 ±2.7 µm and 13 ±3.5 µm, respectively grooves than expected. The depth to width ratio of the grooves generated on the FLS remained unaltered under static culture conditions over 2 weeks, indicating that grooves were stable under long term active cell-mediated matrix remodelling. These results indicate that the FLS, characterised by a higher matrix collagen density and stiffness than the non-FLS, provides the most favourable mechanical surface for precise engineering of a stable micro-topography in 3D collagen hydrogel scaffolds.

  14. gel template method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TiO2 nanotubes have been synthesized by sol–gel template method using alumina membrane. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, UV absorption spectrum and X-ray diffraction techniques have been used to investigate the structure, morphology and optical ...

  15. Numerical modelling of glass dissolution: gel layer morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devreux, F. E-mail: fd@pmc.polytechnique.fr; Barboux, P

    2001-09-01

    Numerical simulations of glass dissolution are presented. The glass is modelized as a random binary mixture composed of two species representing silica and soluble oxides, such as boron and alkali oxides. The soluble species are dissolved immediately when they are in contact with the solution. For the species which represents silica, one introduces dissolution and condensation probabilities. It is shown that the morphology and the thickness of the surface hydration layer (the gel) are highly dependent on the dissolution model, especially on the parameter which controls the surface tension. Simulations with different glass surface area to solution volume ratio (S/V) show that this experimental parameter has important effects on both the shrinkage and the gel layer thickness.

  16. Transdermal delivery of paeonol using cubic gel and microemulsion gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Maofu; Shen, Qi; Chen, Jinjin

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to develop new systems for transdermal delivery of paeonol, in particular microemulsion gel and cubic gel formulations. Methods Various microemulsion vehicles were prepared using isopropyl myristate as an oil phase, polyoxyethylated castor oil (Cremophor® EL) as a surfactant, and polyethylene glycol 400 as a cosurfactant. In the optimum microemulsion gel formulation, carbomer 940 was selected as the gel matrix, and consisted of 1% paeonol, 4% isopropyl myristate, 28% Cremophor EL/polyethylene glycol 400 (1:1), and 67% water. The cubic gel was prepared containing 3% paeonol, 30% water, and 67% glyceryl monooleate. Results A skin permeability test using excised rat skins indicated that both the cubic gel and microemulsion gel formulations had higher permeability than did the paeonol solution. An in vivo pharmacokinetic study done in rats showed that the relative bioavailability of the cubic gel and microemulsion gel was enhanced by about 1.51-fold and 1.28-fold, respectively, compared with orally administered paeonol suspension. Conclusion Both the cubic gel and microemulsion gel formulations are promising delivery systems to enhance the skin permeability of paeonol, in particular the cubic gel. PMID:21904450

  17. Modified sol-gel coatings for biotechnological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beganskiene, A [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Vilnius University, Vilnius LT-03225 (Lithuania); Raudonis, R [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Vilnius University, Vilnius LT-03225 (Lithuania); Jokhadar, S Zemljic [Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Biophysics, Lipiceva 2, Ljubljana SI-1000 (Slovenia); Batista, U [Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Biophysics, Lipiceva 2, Ljubljana SI-1000 (Slovenia); Kareiva, A [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Vilnius University, Vilnius LT-03225 (Lithuania)

    2007-12-15

    The modified sol-gel derived silica coatings were prepared and characterized. The amino and methyl groups were introduced onto the colloidal silica. The silica coatings with different wettability properties: coloidal silica (water contact angle 17 deg.), polysiloxane (61 deg.), methyl-modified (158 deg. and 46 deg.) coatings samples were tested for CaCo-2 cells proliferation. Methyl-modified coating (46 deg.) proved to be the best substrate for cell proliferation. CaCo-2 cell proliferation two days post seeding was significantly faster on almost laminine, fibronectin and collagen-1 coated samples compared to corresponding controls.

  18. Effects of Minoxidil Gel on Burn Wound Healing in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Khazaeli, Payam; Karamouzian, Mohammad; Rohani, Shohreh; Sadeghirad, Behnam; Ghalekhani, Nima

    2014-01-01

    Minoxidil has been reported to inhibit in-vitro fibroblast proliferation and lysyl hydroxylase activity, a key enzyme in collagen biosynthesis. These in-vitro effects proposed minoxidil to be a potential antifibrotic agent. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of minoxidil gel on wound healing procedure in a second-degree burn model in rats. Wistar rats were anesthetized and a second-degree burn was induced on the back of Wistar rats using a heated 2 cm diameter metal plate. Exp...

  19. Neurotrophins differentially stimulate the growth of cochlear neurites on collagen surfaces and in gels☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Joanna; Pak, Kwang; Evans, Amaretta; Kamgar-Parsi, Andy; Fausti, Stephen; Mullen, Lina; Ryan, Allen Frederic

    2013-01-01

    The electrodes of a cochlear implant are located far from the surviving neurons of the spiral ganglion, which results in decreased precision of neural activation compared to the normal ear. If the neurons could be induced to extend neurites toward the implant, it might be possible to stimulate more discrete subpopulations of neurons, and to increase the resolution of the device. However, a major barrier to neurite growth toward a cochlear implant is the fluid filling the scala tympani, which separates the neurons from the electrodes. The goal of this study was to evaluate the growth of cochlear neurites in three-dimensional extracellular matrix molecule gels, and to increase biocompatibility by using fibroblasts stably transfected to produce neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Spiral ganglion explants from neonatal rats were evaluated in cultures. They were exposed to soluble neurotrophins, cells transfected to secrete neurotrophins, and/or collagen gels. We found that cochlear neurites grew readily on collagen surfaces and in three-dimensional collagen gels. Co-culture with cells producing neurotrophin-3 resulted in increased numbers of neurites, and neurites that were longer than when explants were cultured with control fibroblasts stably transfected with green fluorescent protein. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor-producing cells resulted in a more dramatic increase in the number of neurites, but there was no significant effect on neurite length. It is suggested that extracellular matrix molecule gels and cells transfected to produce neurotrophins offer an opportunity to attract spiral ganglion neurites toward a cochlear implant. PMID:24459465

  20. Recombinant gelatin and collagen from methylotrophic yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, de E.C.

    2002-01-01

    Based on its structural role and compatibility within the human body, collagen is a commonly used biomaterial in medical applications, such as cosmetic surgery, wound treatment and tissue engineering. Gelatin is in essence denatured and partly degraded collagen and is,

  1. Free energy of hydration of niobium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Some of the glasses being formulated by SRTC researchers contain niobium oxide. In this report, the free energy of hydration of the oxide is calculated from the free energies of formation of the oxide, the hydroxide, and water. This value can be used in calculations of the free energy of hydration of glasses containing niobium

  2. Investigations into surfactant/gas hydrate relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Rudy; Zhang, Guochang; Dearman, Jennifer; Woods, Charles [Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Gas hydrates have unique physical properties portending useful industrial applications of gas storage, gas separation, or water desalination. When gas hydrates were found in the early 1990s to occur naturally and abundantly in seafloors, three other primary interests and concerns emerged: potential new energy source, climate threat from their greenhouse gases, and seafloor instabilities. This paper presents research showing how anionic synthetic surfactants helped develop an industrial gas hydrate storage process for natural gas and how naturally-occurring in-situ anionic biosurfactants influence the formation and placement of gas hydrates in ocean sediments. The catalytic effects, mechanisms, and surface specificities imparted by synthetic surfactants in the gas storage process and imparted by biosurfactants in porous media are discussed. The Bacillus subtilis bacterium that is indigenous to gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico was cultured in the laboratory. Its biosurfactant was separated and found to catalyze gas hydrates in porous media. The experiments indicate that seafloor-biosurfactants can be produced rapidly in-situ to achieve threshold concentrations whereby hydrates are promoted. The biosurfactants accumulate and promote hydrate formation on specific mineral surfaces such as sodium montmorillonite. (author)

  3. 75 FR 9886 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane... the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential...

  4. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  5. Multicomponent modelling of Portland cement hydration reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ukrainczyk, N.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    The prospect of cement and concrete technologies depends on more in depth understanding of cement hydration reactions. Hydration reaction models simulate the development of the microstructures that can finally be used to estimate the cement based material properties that influence performance and

  6. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the

  7. Chondroitin Sulfate Perlecan Enhances Collagen Fibril Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, A. J.; Johnson, A. E.; Mörgelin, M.

    2006-01-01

    in collagen type II fibril assembly by perlecan-null chondrocytes. Cartilage perlecan is a heparin sulfate or a mixed heparan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The latter form binds collagen and accelerates fibril formation in vitro, with more defined fibril morphology and increased fibril diameters...... produced in the presence of perlecan. Interestingly, the enhancement of collagen fibril formation is independent on the core protein and is mimicked by chondroitin sulfate E but neither by chondroitin sulfate D nor dextran sulfate. Furthermore, perlecan chondroitin sulfate contains the 4,6-disulfated...... disaccharides typical for chondroitin sulfate E. Indeed, purified glycosaminoglycans from perlecan-enriched fractions of cartilage extracts contain elevated levels of 4,6-disulfated chondroitin sulfate disaccharides and enhance collagen fibril formation. The effect on collagen assembly is proportional...

  8. Experimental Setup to Characterize Bentonite Hydration Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bru, A.; Casero, D.; Pastor, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    We present an experimental setup to follow-up the hydration process of a bentonite. Clay samples, of 2 cm x 12 cm x 12 cm, were made and introduced in a Hele-Shaw cell with two PMM windows and two steel frames. In hydration experiments, a fluid enters by an orifice in the frame, located both at the top and the bottom of the cell, to perform hydration in both senses. To get a uniform hydration we place a diffuser near the orifice. Volume influxes in hydration cells are registered in time. The evolution of the developed interface was recorded on a videotape. The video cameras was fixed to a holder so that the vertical direction in the monitor was the same as the direction of the larger extension of the cell. (Author) 6 refs

  9. Volume of hydration in terminal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruera, E; Belzile, M; Watanabe, S; Fainsinger, R L

    1996-03-01

    In this retrospective study we reviewed the volume and modality of hydration of consecutive series of terminal cancer patients in two different settings. In a palliative care unit 203/290 admitted patients received subcutaneous hydration for 12 +/- 8 days at a daily volume of 1015 +/- 135 ml/day. At the cancer center, 30 consecutive similar patients received intravenous hydration for 11.5 +/- 5 days (P > 0.2) but at a daily volume of 2080 +/- 720 ml/day (P palliative care unit patients required discontinuation of hydration because of complications. Hypodermoclysis was administered mainly as a continuous infusion, an overnight infusion, or in one to three 1-h boluses in 62 (31%), 98 (48%) and 43 (21%) patients, respectively. Our findings suggest that, in some settings, patients may be receiving excessive volumes of hydration by less comfortable routes such as the intravenous route. Increased education and research in this area are badly needed.

  10. Hydration shells exchange charge with their protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abitan, Haim; Lindgård, Per-Anker; Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2010-01-01

    . In our experiments, the amplitude of an ultrasonic pressure wave is gradually increased (0–20 atm) while we simultaneously measure the Raman spectra from the hydrated protein (β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme). We detected two types of spectral changes: first, up to 70% increase in the intensity......Investigation of the interaction between a protein and its hydration shells is an experimental and theoretical challenge. Here, we used ultrasonic pressure waves in aqueous solutions of a protein to explore the conformational states of the protein and its interaction with its hydration shells...... the presence of an ultrasonic pressure, a protein and its hydration shells are in thermodynamic and charge equilibrium, i.e. a protein and its hydration shells exchange charges. The ultrasonic wave disrupts these equilibria which are regained within 30–45 min after the ultrasonic pressure is shut off....

  11. The impact of zirconium oxide radiopacifier on the early hydration behaviour of white Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, Nichola J.; Li, Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium oxide has been identified as a candidate radiopacifying agent for use in Portland cement-based biomaterials. During this study, the impact of 20 wt.% zirconium oxide on the hydration and setting reactions of white Portland cement (WPC) was monitored by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), 29 Si and 27 Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Vicat apparatus. The presence of 20 wt.% zirconium oxide particles in the size-range of 0.2 to 5 μm was found to reduce the initial and final setting times of WPC from 172 to 147 min and 213 to 191 min, respectively. Zirconium oxide did not formally participate in the chemical reactions of the hydrating cement; however, the surface of the zirconium oxide particles presented heterogeneous nucleation sites for the precipitation and growth of the early C-S-H gel products which accelerated the initial setting reactions. The presence of zirconium oxide was found to have little impact on the development of the calcium (sulpho)aluminate hydrate phases. - Highlights: ► This is the first study of Portland cement-based biomaterials by 27 Al and 29 Si NMR. ► 20 wt.% ZrO 2 radiopacifier accelerates the early cement hydration reactions. ► Extent of hydration after 6 h is increased from 5.7% to 15% in the presence of ZrO 2 . ► Initial and final setting times are reduced by 25 and 22 min, respectively. ► ZrO 2 provides nucleation sites for the precipitation of early hydration products.

  12. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated

  13. A review of minodronic acid hydrate for the treatment of osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanishima S

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Shinji Tanishima, Yasuo MorioDepartment of Orthopedic Surgery, Misasa Onsen Hospital, Misasa, Tottori, JapanAbstract: Minodronic acid hydrate was the first bisphosphonate developed and approved for osteoporosis treatment in Japan. With regard to inhibition of bone resorption, minodronic acid hydrate is 1000 times more effective than etidronic acid and 10–100 times more effective than alendronic acid. Clinical trials conducted to date have focused on postmenopausal female patients suffering from primary osteoporosis. In these trials, 1 mg of oral minodronic acid hydrate was administrated once daily, and a significant increase was observed in lumbar-spine and hip-joint bone density 1–2 years after administration. All markers of bone metabolism urinary collagen type 1 cross-linked N-telopeptide, urinary free deoxypyridinoline, serum bone alkaline phosphatase, and serum osteocalcin were decreased. The incidence rate of new vertebral and nonvertebral fractures was also decreased. Therefore, effectiveness in fracture prevention was confirmed. A form of minodronic acid (50 mg requiring once-monthly administration has been developed and is currently being used clinically. A comparative study between this new formulation and once-daily minodronic acid (1 mg showed no significant differences between the two formulations in terms of improvement rates in lumbar-spine and hip-joint bone density, changes in bone metabolism markers, or incidence of side effects. This indicates the noninferiority of the monthly formulation. Side effects such as osteonecrosis of the jaw or atypical femoral fractures were not reported with other bisphosphonates, although it is believed that these side effects may emerge as future studies continue to be conducted. On the basis of studies conducted to date, minodronic acid hydrate is considered effective for improving bone density and preventing fractures. We anticipate further investigations in the future

  14. Microfibrous {beta}-TCP/collagen scaffolds mimic woven bone in structure and composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Shen; Zhang Xin; Cai Qing; Yang Xiaoping [Key Laboratory of Beijing City on Preparation and Processing of Novel Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang Bo; Deng Xuliang, E-mail: yangxp@mail.buct.edu.c [Department of VIP Dental Service, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Woven bone, as the initial form of bone tissue, is always found in developing and repairing bone. It is thought of as a temporary scaffold for the deposition of osteogenic cells and the laying down of lamellar bone. Thus, we hypothesize that a matrix which resembles the architecture and components of woven bone can provide an osteoblastic microenvironment for bone cell growth and new bone formation. In this study, woven-bone-like beta-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP)/collagen scaffolds were fabricated by sol-gel electrospinning and impregnating methods. Optimization studies on sol-gel synthesis and electrospinning process were conducted respectively to prepare pure {beta}-TCP fibers with dimensions close to mineralized collagen fibrils in woven bone. The collagen-coating layer prepared by impregnation had an adhesive role that held the {beta}-TCP fibers together, and resulted in rapid degradation and matrix mineralization in in vitro tests. MG63 osteoblast-like cells seeded on the resultant scaffolds showed three-dimensional (3D) morphologies, and merged into multicellular layers after 7 days culture. Cytotoxicity test further revealed that extracts from the resultant scaffolds could promote the proliferation of MG63 cells. Therefore, the woven-bone-like matrix that we constructed favored the attachment and proliferation of MG63 cells in three dimensions. It has great potential ability to shorten the time of formation of new bone.

  15. Microfibrous β-TCP/collagen scaffolds mimic woven bone in structure and composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shen; Zhang Xin; Cai Qing; Yang Xiaoping; Wang Bo; Deng Xuliang

    2010-01-01

    Woven bone, as the initial form of bone tissue, is always found in developing and repairing bone. It is thought of as a temporary scaffold for the deposition of osteogenic cells and the laying down of lamellar bone. Thus, we hypothesize that a matrix which resembles the architecture and components of woven bone can provide an osteoblastic microenvironment for bone cell growth and new bone formation. In this study, woven-bone-like beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP)/collagen scaffolds were fabricated by sol-gel electrospinning and impregnating methods. Optimization studies on sol-gel synthesis and electrospinning process were conducted respectively to prepare pure β-TCP fibers with dimensions close to mineralized collagen fibrils in woven bone. The collagen-coating layer prepared by impregnation had an adhesive role that held the β-TCP fibers together, and resulted in rapid degradation and matrix mineralization in in vitro tests. MG63 osteoblast-like cells seeded on the resultant scaffolds showed three-dimensional (3D) morphologies, and merged into multicellular layers after 7 days culture. Cytotoxicity test further revealed that extracts from the resultant scaffolds could promote the proliferation of MG63 cells. Therefore, the woven-bone-like matrix that we constructed favored the attachment and proliferation of MG63 cells in three dimensions. It has great potential ability to shorten the time of formation of new bone.

  16. Assembly of collagen matrices as a phase transition revealed by structural and rheologic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgacs, Gabor; Newman, Stuart A; Hinner, Bernhard; Maier, Christian W; Sackmann, Erich

    2003-02-01

    We have studied the structural and viscoelastic properties of assembling networks of the extracellular matrix protein type-I collagen by means of phase contrast microscopy and rotating disk rheometry. The initial stage of the assembly is a nucleation process of collagen monomers associating to randomly distributed branched clusters with extensions of several microns. Eventually a sol-gel transition takes place, which is due to the interconnection of these clusters. We analyzed this transition in terms of percolation theory. The viscoelastic parameters (storage modulus G' and loss modulus G") were measured as a function of time for five different frequencies ranging from omega = 0.2 rad/s to 6.9 rad/s. We found that at the gel point both G' and G" obey a scaling law, with the critical exponent Delta = 0.7 and a critical loss angle being independent of frequency as predicted by percolation theory. Gelation of collagen thus represents a second order phase transition.

  17. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a

  18. The Gel Generator option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a national policy for guaranteeing an ample supply of 99m Tc to nuclear medicine, involves issues which go beyond the means by which radioactivation is achieved. Indeed, in such an exercise the pragmatic dictates of business and the sensitivities of politics must also be taken into account. Furthermore where a preference towards the nuclear reactor or the potential of cyclotrons is being questioned, the debate is incomplete if the only options that are considered are the fission-based 99 Mo generator versus the direct cyclotron production of 99m Tc. There is a third option (also neutron γ-based), an alternative to the fission 99 Mo generator, which ought not be overlooked. The application of low specific activity (n,γ) 99 Mo to a new type of generator, the Gel Generator, has been the focus of much research, particularly in Australia and more recently in China. After the initial concept had been established in the laboratory, the Australian researchers then undertook a comprehensive program of tests on the Gel Generator to assess its potential, either in the clinical laboratory or the centralised radiopharmacy, for supplying 99m Tc suitable for nuclear medicine. The outcome of this program was a clear indication that the Gel Generator innovation had the capability to provide both technical and economic advantages to the nuclear medicine industry. These advantages are described. Since that time the Gel Generator has been selected for routine use in China where it now satisfies more than 30% of the 99m Tc demand. (author)

  19. Development of Magnesium Silicate Hydrate cement system for nuclear waste encapsulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, T.; Vandeperre, L.J.; Cheeseman, C.R.

    2012-01-01

    A novel low pH cement system for encapsulating nuclear industry wastes containing aluminium has been developed using blends of MgO and silica fume (SF). Identification of the hydrated phases in MgO/silica fume samples showed that brucite formed in early stages of hydration and then reacted with the silica fume to produce a magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) gel phase. When all brucite reacts with silica fume a cement system with an equilibrium pH just below 10 was achieved. Selected mixes have been characterized for hydration reactions, setting time and strength development. Mortar samples with w/s ratios of 0.5 and 50% by weight of sand added achieved compressive strengths in excess of 95 MPa after 28 days. The addition of MgCO 3 buffered the early pH and the addition of fine sand particles eliminated shrinkage cracking. The interaction of the optimised mortar with Al metal has been investigated. Al metal strips were firmly bound into the MgO:SF:sand samples and no H 2 gas detected, and this indicates that the novel systems developed in this work have potential for encapsulating certain types of problematic legacy wastes from the nuclear industry. (authors)

  20. Effect of addition of Sikament-R superplasticizer on the hydration characteristics of portland cement pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaa.M. El Gamal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of addition of Sikament-R superplasticizer (modified lignosulphonate base on the hydration characteristics of hardened Portland cement pastes were studied at different curing conditions. Four mixtures were prepared using 0, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 wt% addition of Sikament-R superplasticizer (SR of cement. These pastes were hydrated under two different conditions; (i normal curing at room temperature; 25 °C up to 90 days periods and (ii hydrothermal curing at a pressure of 8 atm. of saturated steam up to 24 h. The compressive strength, combined water content, free lime content, gel/space ratio and microstructure of hardened cement pastes were studied. The results revealed that addition of SR superplasticizer promote the dispersion of cement particles and interacts with Ca(OH2. The addition of SR superplasticizer exhibits Portland cement better workability during the preparation of pastes. In addition, amore compact structure were obtained leading to higher values of compressive strength for all the hardened hydrated pastes under both normal and hydrothermal curing. The results indicated that the addition of SR superplasticizer to Portland cement does not alter the types of hydration products formed during normal or hydrothermal conditions; only it caused a decrease in the degree of the porosity of the formed pastes.

  1. Changes in protein structure and dynamics as a function of hydration from 1H second moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diakova, Galina; Goddard, Yanina A.; Korb, Jean-Pierre; Bryant, Robert G.

    2007-12-01

    We report the proton second moment obtained directly from the Free Induction Decay (FID) of the NMR signal of variously hydrated bovine serum albumin (BSA) and hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and from the width of the NMR Z-spectrum of the cross-linked protein gels of different concentrations. The second moment of the proteins decreases in a continuous stepwise way as a function of increasing water content, which suggests that the structural and dynamical changes occur in small incremental steps. Although the second moment is dominated by the short range distances of nearest neighbors, the changes in the second moment show that the protein structure becomes more open with increasing hydration level. A difference between the apparent liquid content of the sample as found from decomposition of the FID and the analytically determined water content demonstrates that water absorbed in the early stages of hydration is motionally immobilized and magnetically indistinguishable from rigid protein protons while at high hydration levels some protein side-chain protons move rapidly contributing to liquid-like component of the NMR signal.

  2. Can hydrate dissolution experiments predict the fate of a natural hydrate system?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hester, K.C.; Peltzer, E.T.; Dunk, R.M.; Walz, P.M.; Brewer, P.G. [Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Inst., Moss Landing, CA (United States); Dendy Sloan, E. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Hydrate Research

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates are naturally occurring compounds found in permafrost regions and in oceans. In the natural environment, sufficient temperature and pressure conditions for hydrate formation exist over a significant portion of the ocean. However, in addition to pressure and temperature, the chemical potential of the gas in the hydrate must be equal to the surrounding waters. If the concentration of the gas in surrounding water is under-saturated with respect to the gas in the hydrate, the hydrate will dissolve to drive the system towards chemical equilibrium. This paper presented a dissolution study of exposed hydrate from outcrops at Barkley Canyon, located off Vancouver Island, British Columbia. A previous field experiment on synthetic methane hydrate samples had demonstrated that mass transfer controlled dissolution in under-saturated seawater. However, seafloor hydrate outcrops have been shown to have significant longevity compared to expected dissolution rates based upon convective boundary layer diffusion calculations. An in-situ dissolution experiment was performed on two distinct natural hydrate fabrics in order to help resolve this apparent disconnect between the dissolution rates of synthetic and natural hydrate. The paper presented a map of Barkley Canyon and discussed the field measurements and methods for the study. Exposed outcrops of gas hydrates were cored using a specially constructed stainless steel coring device and a hydraulic ram was located inside the corer. Hydrate samples were cored directly using the a manipulator arm and then injected into a sampling cell. The hydrate was then added to an open mesh exposure container, which allowed for exposure to ambient benthic currents with minimal disturbance. As well, in order to observe the slow dissolution of the hydrate in seawater at Barkley Canyon, time-lapse photography was employed. Last, the paper presented the results of the hydrate fabric porosities and hydrate dissolution rates. It was

  3. The application of DTA and TG methods to investigate the non-crystalline hydration products of CaAl2O4 and Ca7ZrAl6O18 compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczerba, Jacek; Madej, Dominika; Śnieżek, Edyta; Prorok, Ryszard

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hydrates, i.e. CAH 10 , C 2 AH 8 , C 3 AH 6 and C 4 AH 19 are formed during hydration of CaAl 2 O 4 and Ca 7 ZrAl 6 O 18 . ► Hydrated CaAl 2 O 4 and Ca 7 ZrAl 6 O 18 compounds were investigated by X-ray diffraction, SEM/EDS and thermal analysis. ► The hydration reaction proceeds as consumes the unreacted core of the CaAl 2 O 4 and Ca 7 ZrAl 6 O 18 grain. - Abstract: The hydration products and thermal decomposition mechanism of hydrated CaAl 2 O 4 and Ca 7 ZrAl 6 O 18 compounds were investigated by X-ray diffraction, SEM/EDS and thermal analysis. The processes of crystal hydrate nucleation and precipitation were preceded by the evolution of the X-ray amorphous phase during the first 24 h of hydration. DTA–TGA–EGA techniques allowed the study of the detailed decomposition and identification of intermediate and stable to be performed. The differential thermal analysis (DTA) curves of hydrated CaAl 2 O 4 and Ca 7 ZrAl 6 O 18 compounds show five similar endothermic peaks due to crystal water desorption. According to the quantitative TGA–EGA analyses performed on hydrated CaAl 2 O 4 and Ca 7 ZrAl 6 O 18 compounds, it was found that C 2 AH 8 , C 3 AH 6 and Al(OH) 3 phases are the main hydration products of CaAl 2 O 4 . Under the same laboratory conditions, the hydration of Ca 7 ZrAl 6 O 18 proceeds with the formation of mainly CAH 10 and AH 3 -gel phases. We provide the original illustrations of the hydrate crystals formation via amorphous phases

  4. Caffeine-catalyzed gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCiccio, Angela M; Lee, Young-Ah Lucy; Glettig, Dean L; Walton, Elizabeth S E; de la Serna, Eva L; Montgomery, Veronica A; Grant, Tyler M; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni

    2018-07-01

    Covalently cross-linked gels are utilized in a broad range of biomedical applications though their synthesis often compromises easy implementation. Cross-linking reactions commonly utilize catalysts or conditions that can damage biologics and sensitive compounds, producing materials that require extensive post processing to achieve acceptable biocompatibility. As an alternative, we report a batch synthesis platform to produce covalently cross-linked materials appropriate for direct biomedical application enabled by green chemistry and commonly available food grade ingredients. Using caffeine, a mild base, to catalyze anhydrous carboxylate ring-opening of diglycidyl-ether functionalized monomers with citric acid as a tri-functional crosslinking agent we introduce a novel poly(ester-ether) gel synthesis platform. We demonstrate that biocompatible Caffeine Catalyzed Gels (CCGs) exhibit dynamic physical, chemical, and mechanical properties, which can be tailored in shape, surface texture, solvent response, cargo release, shear and tensile strength, among other potential attributes. The demonstrated versatility, low cost and facile synthesis of these CCGs renders them appropriate for a broad range of customized engineering applications including drug delivery constructs, tissue engineering scaffolds, and medical devices. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Chiromagnetic nanoparticles and gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Jihyeon; Santos, Uallisson S.; Chekini, Mahshid; Cha, Minjeong; de Moura, André F.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2018-01-01

    Chiral inorganic nanostructures have high circular dichroism, but real-time control of their optical activity has so far been achieved only by irreversible chemical changes. Field modulation is a far more desirable path to chiroptical devices. We hypothesized that magnetic field modulation can be attained for chiral nanostructures with large contributions of the magnetic transition dipole moments to polarization rotation. We found that dispersions and gels of paramagnetic Co3O4 nanoparticles with chiral distortions of the crystal lattices exhibited chiroptical activity in the visible range that was 10 times as strong as that of nonparamagnetic nanoparticles of comparable size. Transparency of the nanoparticle gels to circularly polarized light beams in the ultraviolet range was reversibly modulated by magnetic fields. These phenomena were also observed for other nanoscale metal oxides with lattice distortions from imprinted amino acids and other chiral ligands. The large family of chiral ceramic nanostructures and gels can be pivotal for new technologies and knowledge at the nexus of chirality and magnetism.

  6. Nonlinear optical response of the collagen triple helix and second harmonic microscopy of collagen liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniset-Besseau, A.; De Sa Peixoto, P.; Duboisset, J.; Loison, C.; Hache, F.; Benichou, E.; Brevet, P.-F.; Mosser, G.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2010-02-01

    Collagen is characterized by triple helical domains and plays a central role in the formation of fibrillar and microfibrillar networks, basement membranes, as well as other structures of the connective tissue. Remarkably, fibrillar collagen exhibits efficient Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and SHG microscopy proved to be a sensitive tool to score fibrotic pathologies. However, the nonlinear optical response of fibrillar collagen is not fully characterized yet and quantitative data are required to further process SHG images. We therefore performed Hyper-Rayleigh Scattering (HRS) experiments and measured a second order hyperpolarisability of 1.25 10-27 esu for rat-tail type I collagen. This value is surprisingly large considering that collagen presents no strong harmonophore in its amino-acid sequence. In order to get insight into the physical origin of this nonlinear process, we performed HRS measurements after denaturation of the collagen triple helix and for a collagen-like short model peptide [(Pro-Pro-Gly)10]3. It showed that the collagen large nonlinear response originates in the tight alignment of a large number of weakly efficient harmonophores, presumably the peptide bonds, resulting in a coherent amplification of the nonlinear signal along the triple helix. To illustrate this mechanism, we successfully recorded SHG images in collagen liquid solutions by achieving liquid crystalline ordering of the collagen triple helices.

  7. The Mineral–Collagen Interface in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The interface between collagen and the mineral reinforcement phase, carbonated hydroxyapatite (cAp), is essential for bone’s remarkable functionality as a biological composite material. The very small dimensions of the cAp phase and the disparate natures of the reinforcement and matrix are essential to the material’s performance but also complicate study of this interface. This article summarizes what is known about the cAp-collagen interface in bone and begins with descriptions of the matrix and reinforcement roles in composites, of the phases bounding the interface, of growth of cAp growing within the collagen matrix, and of the effect of intra- and extrafibrilar mineral on determinations of interfacial properties. Different observed interfacial interactions with cAp (collagen, water, non-collagenous proteins) are reviewed; experimental results on interface interactions during loading are reported as are their influence on macroscopic mechanical properties; conclusions of numerical modeling of interfacial interactions are also presented. The data suggest interfacial interlocking (bending of collagen molecules around cAp nanoplatelets) and water-mediated bonding between collagen and cAp are essential to load transfer. The review concludes with descriptions of areas where new research is needed to improve understanding of how the interface functions. PMID:25824581

  8. Age Increases Monocyte Adhesion on Collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaji, Samira; Zondler, Lisa; Kleinjan, Fenneke; Nolte, Ulla; Mulaw, Medhanie A.; Danzer, Karin M.; Weishaupt, Jochen H.; Gottschalk, Kay-E.

    2017-05-01

    Adhesion of monocytes to micro-injuries on arterial walls is an important early step in the occurrence and development of degenerative atherosclerotic lesions. At these injuries, collagen is exposed to the blood stream. We are interested whether age influences monocyte adhesion to collagen under flow, and hence influences the susceptibility to arteriosclerotic lesions. Therefore, we studied adhesion and rolling of human peripheral blood monocytes from old and young individuals on collagen type I coated surface under shear flow. We find that firm adhesion of monocytes to collagen type I is elevated in old individuals. Pre-stimulation by lipopolysaccharide increases the firm adhesion of monocytes homogeneously in older individuals, but heterogeneously in young individuals. Blocking integrin αx showed that adhesion of monocytes to collagen type I is specific to the main collagen binding integrin αxβ2. Surprisingly, we find no significant age-dependent difference in gene expression of integrin αx or integrin β2. However, if all integrins are activated from the outside, no differences exist between the age groups. Altered integrin activation therefore causes the increased adhesion. Our results show that the basal increase in integrin activation in monocytes from old individuals increases monocyte adhesion to collagen and therefore the risk for arteriosclerotic plaques.

  9. Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

    2011-12-31

    This project seeks to understand regional differences in gas hydrate systems from the perspective of as an energy resource, geohazard, and long-term climate influence. Specifically, the effort will: (1) collect data and conceptual models that targets causes of gas hydrate variance, (2) construct numerical models that explain and predict regional-scale gas hydrate differences in 2-dimensions with minimal 'free parameters', (3) simulate hydrocarbon production from various gas hydrate systems to establish promising resource characteristics, (4) perturb different gas hydrate systems to assess potential impacts of hot fluids on seafloor stability and well stability, and (5) develop geophysical approaches that enable remote quantification of gas hydrate heterogeneities so that they can be characterized with minimal costly drilling. Our integrated program takes advantage of the fact that we have a close working team comprised of experts in distinct disciplines. The expected outcomes of this project are improved exploration and production technology for production of natural gas from methane hydrates and improved safety through understanding of seafloor and well bore stability in the presence of hydrates. The scope of this project was to more fully characterize, understand, and appreciate fundamental differences in the amount and distribution of gas hydrate and how this would affect the production potential of a hydrate accumulation in the marine environment. The effort combines existing information from locations in the ocean that are dominated by low permeability sediments with small amounts of high permeability sediments, one permafrost location where extensive hydrates exist in reservoir quality rocks and other locations deemed by mutual agreement of DOE and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations were Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location was Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the project was to understand

  10. Basics of development of gas hydrate deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makogon, Yuri F.; Holditch, Stephen A.; Makogon, Taras Y.

    2005-07-01

    Natural gas hydrate deposits could possibly be an important energy resource during this century. However, many problems associated with producing these deposits must first be solved. The industry must develop new technologies to produce the gas, to forecast possible tectonic cataclysms in regions of gas hydrate accumulations, and to prevent damage to the environment. These global issues must be addressed by every company or country who wants to produce gas hydrate deposits. Cooperative research between industry and universities can lead to technology breakthroughs in coming years. This paper reviews the Messoyakha field and the Blake Ridge and Nankai areas to explain a methodology for estimating how much gas might be producible from gas hydrate deposits (GHDs) under various conditions. The Messoyakha field is located on land, while the Blake Ridge and Nankai areas are offshore. Messoyakha is the first and the only GHD where gas production from hydrates has reached commercial flow rates. The Blake Ridge GHD has been studied for 20 years and 11 wells have been drilled to collect gas-hydrate samples. The potential resources of gas (gas in place) from Blake Ridge is estimated at 37.7Oe10{sup 12} m{sup 3} (1.330 Tcf) in hydrate form and 19.3Oe10{sup 12}m{sup 3} (681 Bcf) [5] in free gas. To estimate how much of the potential resource can be produced we need a thorough understanding of both the geologic and the thermodynamic characteristics of the formations. (Author)

  11. Gas hydrate exploration activities in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keun-Pil Park, K.P. [Korea Inst. of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Gas Hydrate R and D Organization, Ministry of Knowledge Economy, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Korea's first gas hydrate research project was launched in 1996 to study the gas hydrate potential in the Ulleung Basin of the East Sea. It involved a series of laboratory experiments followed by a preliminary offshore seismic survey and regional reconnaissance geophysical and marine geological surveys. The bottom simulating reflector (BSR) was interpreted to show wide area distribution in the southern part of the Ulleung Basin, and its average burial depth was 187 m below the sea floor in the East Sea. A three-phase 10-year National Gas Hydrate Development Program was launched in 2004 to estimate the potential reserves in the East Sea. It will involve drilling to identify natural gas hydrates and to determine the most optimized production methods. Drilling sites were proposed based on five indicators that imply gas hydrate occurrence, notably BSR, gas vent, enhanced seismic reflection, acoustic blanking and gas seeping structure. The UBGH-X-01 gas hydrate expedition in the East Sea Ulleung Basin involved 5 logging while drilling (LWD) surveys at three high priority sites. One wire line logging was implemented at the site of the UBGH09. A total 334 m of non-pressurized conventional cores and 16 pressure cores were obtained in late 2007. The UBGH-X-01 was successfully completed, recovering many natural samples of gas hydrate from 3 coring sites in the East Sea. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  12. Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2009-12-09

    Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

  13. Association of collagen architecture with glioblastoma patient survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pointer, Kelli B; Clark, Paul A; Schroeder, Alexandra B; Salamat, M Shahriar; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Kuo, John S

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most malignant primary brain tumor. Collagen is present in low amounts in normal brain, but in GBMs, collagen gene expression is reportedly upregulated. However, to the authors' knowledge, direct visualization of collagen architecture has not been reported. The authors sought to perform the first direct visualization of GBM collagen architecture, identify clinically relevant collagen signatures, and link them to differential patient survival. METHODS Second-harmonic generation microscopy was used to detect collagen in a GBM patient tissue microarray. Focal and invasive GBM mouse xenografts were stained with Picrosirius red. Quantitation of collagen fibers was performed using custom software. Multivariate survival analysis was done to determine if collagen is a survival marker for patients. RESULTS In focal xenografts, collagen was observed at tumor brain boundaries. For invasive xenografts, collagen was intercalated with tumor cells. Quantitative analysis showed significant differences in collagen fibers for focal and invasive xenografts. The authors also found that GBM patients with more organized collagen had a longer median survival than those with less organized collagen. CONCLUSIONS Collagen architecture can be directly visualized and is different in focal versus invasive GBMs. The authors also demonstrate that collagen signature is associated with patient survival. These findings suggest that there are collagen differences in focal versus invasive GBMs and that collagen is a survival marker for GBM.

  14. Characterization of Genipin-Modified Dentin Collagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Nagaoka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of biomodification techniques to dentin can improve its biochemical and biomechanical properties. Several collagen cross-linking agents have been reported to strengthen the mechanical properties of dentin. However, the characteristics of collagen that has undergone agent-induced biomodification are not well understood. The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of a natural cross-linking agent, genipin (GE, on dentin discoloration, collagen stability, and changes in amino acid composition and lysyl oxidase mediated natural collagen cross-links. Dentin collagen obtained from extracted bovine teeth was treated with three different concentrations of GE (0.01%, 0.1%, and 0.5% for several treatment times (0–24 h. Changes in biochemical properties of NaB3H4-reduced collagen were characterized by amino acid and cross-link analyses. The treatment of dentin collagen with GE resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent pigmentation and stability against bacterial collagenase. The lysyl oxidase-mediated trivalent mature cross-link, pyridinoline, showed no difference among all groups while the major divalent immature cross-link, dehydro-dihydroxylysinonorleucine/its ketoamine in collagen treated with 0.5% GE for 24 h, significantly decreased compared to control (P< 0.05. The newly formed GE-induced cross-links most likely involve lysine and hydroxylysine residues of collagen in a concentration-dependent manner. Some of these cross-links appear to be reducible and stabilized with NaB3H4.

  15. Supramolecular Organization of Nonstoichiometric Drug Hydrates: Dapsone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Doris E.; Griesser, Ulrich J.

    2018-01-01

    The observed moisture- and temperature dependent transformations of the dapsone (4,4′-diaminodiphenyl sulfone, DDS) 0. 33-hydrate were correlated to its structure and the number and strength of the water-DDS intermolecular interactions. A combination of characterization techniques was used, including thermal analysis (hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis), gravimetric moisture sorption/desorption studies and variable humidity powder X-ray diffraction, along with computational modeling (crystal structure prediction and pair-wise intermolecular energy calculations). Depending on the relative humidity the hydrate contains between 0 and 0.33 molecules of water per molecule DDS. The crystal structure is retained upon dehydration indicating that DDS hydrate shows a non-stoichiometric (de)hydration behavior. Unexpectedly, the water molecules are not located in structural channels but at isolated-sites of the host framework, which is counterintuitively for a hydrate with non-stoichiometric behavior. The water-DDS interactions were estimated to be weaker than water-host interactions that are commonly observed in stoichiometric hydrates and the lattice energies of the isomorphic dehydration product (hydrate structure without water molecules) and (form III) differ only by ~1 kJ mol−1. The computational generation of hypothetical monohydrates confirms that the hydrate with the unusual DDS:water ratio of 3:1 is more stable than a feasible monohydrate structure. Overall, this study highlights that a deeper understanding of the formation of hydrates with non-stoichiometric behavior requires a multidisciplinary approach including suitable experimental and computational methods providing a firm basis for the development and manufacturing of high quality drug products. PMID:29520359

  16. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release as much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  17. Engineering specific chemical modification sites into a collagen-like protein from Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoichevska, Violet; Peng, Yong Y; Vashi, Aditya V; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J; Ramshaw, John A M

    2017-03-01

    Recombinant bacterial collagens provide a new opportunity for safe biomedical materials. They are readily expressed in Escherichia coli in good yield and can be readily purified by simple approaches. However, recombinant proteins are limited in that direct secondary modification during expression is generally not easily achieved. Thus, inclusion of unusual amino acids, cyclic peptides, sugars, lipids, and other complex functions generally needs to be achieved chemically after synthesis and extraction. In the present study, we have illustrated that bacterial collagens that have had their sequences modified to include cysteine residue(s), which are not normally present in bacterial collagen-like sequences, enable a range of specific chemical modification reactions to be produced. Various model reactions were shown to be effective for modifying the collagens. The ability to include alkyne (or azide) functions allows the extensive range of substitutions that are available via "click" chemistry to be accessed. When bifunctional reagents were used, some crosslinking occurred to give higher molecular weight polymeric proteins, but gels were not formed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 806-813, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Identification of a polymorphic collagen-like protein in the crustacean bacteria Pasteuria ramosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouton, Laurence; Traunecker, Emmanuel; McElroy, Kerensa; Du Pasquier, Louis; Ebert, Dieter

    2009-12-01

    Pasteuria ramosa is a spore-forming bacterium that infects Daphnia species. Previous results demonstrated a high specificity of host clone/parasite genotype interactions. Surface proteins of bacteria often play an important role in attachment to host cells prior to infection. We analyzed surface proteins of P. ramosa spores by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. For the first time, we prove that two isolates selected for their differences in infectivity reveal few but clear-cut differences in protein patterns. Using internal sequencing and LC/MS/MS, we identified a collagen-like protein named Pcl1a (Pasteuria collagen-like protein 1a). This protein, reconstructed with the help of Pasteuria genome sequences, contains three domains: a 75-amino-acid amino-terminal domain with a potential transmembrane helix domain, a central collagen-like region (CLR) containing Gly-Xaa-Yaa (GXY) repeats, and a 7-amino-acid carboxy-terminal domain. The CLR region is polymorphic among the two isolates with amino-acid substitutions and a variable number of GXY triplets. Collagen-like proteins are rare in prokaryotes, although they have been described in several pathogenic bacteria, including Bacillus cereus, Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis, closely related to Pasteuria species, in which they could be involved in the adherence of bacteria to host cells.

  19. Vinculin is required for cell polarization, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling in 3D collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thievessen, Ingo; Fakhri, Nikta; Steinwachs, Julian; Kraus, Viola; McIsaac, R Scott; Gao, Liang; Chen, Bi-Chang; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Betzig, Eric; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Waterman, Clare M; Fabry, Ben

    2015-11-01

    Vinculin is filamentous (F)-actin-binding protein enriched in integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Whereas studies in 2-dimensional (2D) tissue culture models have suggested that vinculin negatively regulates cell migration by promoting cytoskeleton-ECM coupling to strengthen and stabilize adhesions, its role in regulating cell migration in more physiologic, 3-dimensional (3D) environments is unclear. To address the role of vinculin in 3D cell migration, we analyzed the morphodynamics, migration, and ECM remodeling of primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with cre/loxP-mediated vinculin gene disruption in 3D collagen I cultures. We found that vinculin promoted 3D cell migration by increasing directional persistence. Vinculin was necessary for persistent cell protrusion, cell elongation, and stable cell orientation in 3D collagen, but was dispensable for lamellipodia formation, suggesting that vinculin-mediated cell adhesion to the ECM is needed to convert actin-based cell protrusion into persistent cell shape change and migration. Consistent with this finding, vinculin was necessary for efficient traction force generation in 3D collagen without affecting myosin II activity and promoted 3D collagen fiber alignment and macroscopical gel contraction. Our results suggest that vinculin promotes directionally persistent cell migration and tension-dependent ECM remodeling in complex 3D environments by increasing cell-ECM adhesion and traction force generation. © FASEB.

  20. Entrapment of cultured pancreas islets in three-dimensional collagen matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, S H; Peshwa, M V; Sutherland, D E; Hu, W S

    1992-01-01

    In vitro culture of islets of Langerhans decreases their immunogenicity, presumably by eliminating passenger leukocytes and other Ia+ presenting cells within the islets. Islets cultivated in petri dishes either at 37 degrees C or at 25 degrees C gradually disintegrate during culture in a time-dependent manner which is related to the free-floating condition of the islets. Also, a fraction of the islets disperse as single cells and beta-cell aggregates or adhere to the bottom of the culture dishes. Thus, the retrieval rate of transplantable islets is dampened due to their disintegration and spontaneous dispersion in conventional petri dish cultures. Entrapment of freshly harvested islets of Langerhans in a three-dimensional collagen matrix was studied as an alternative method for islet cultivation. The contraction of collagen fibrils during in vitro culture counteracts the dispersion of islets and helps in maintaining their integrity while in culture. It was observed that the entrapped islets maintain satisfactory morphology, viability, and capability of glucose-dependent insulin secretion for over 2 wk. The oxygen consumption rate and glucose metabolism of these islets was not deranged when entrapped in collagen. Also, the retrieval of islets is easier and more efficient than that observed in conventional culture systems. Our results indicate that culture of islets in three-dimensional collagen gels can potentially develop into an ideal system applicable to clinical transplantation of cultured islets or beta-cell aggregates.

  1. Further studies on hydration of alkynes by the PtCl4-CO catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Israelsohn, Osnat; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.; Blum, Jochanan

    2002-01-18

    Under CO atmosphere, between 80 and 120 C, a glyme solution of PtCl{sub 4} forms a carbonyl compound that promotes hydration of internal as well as terminal alkynes to give aldehyde-free ketones. The catalytic process depends strongly on the electronic and steric nature of the substrates. Part of the carbonyl functions of the catalyst can be replaced by phosphine ligands. Chiral DIOP reacts with the PtCl{sub 4}-CO compound to give a catalyst that promotes partial kinetic resolution of a racemic alkyne. Replacement of part of the CO by polystyrene-bound diphenylphosphine enables to attach the catalyst to the polymeric support. Upon entrapment of the platinum compound in a silica sol-gel matrix, it reacts as a partially recyclable catalyst. A reformulated mechanism for the PdCl{sub 4}-CO catalyzed hydration is suggested on the basis of the present study.

  2. Fibrous mini-collagens in hydra nematocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, T W; Benoit, M; Herder, G V; David, C N; Wanner, G; Gaub, H E

    1994-07-15

    Nematocysts (cnidocysts) are exocytotic organelles found in all cnidarians. Here, atomic force microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy reveal the structure of the nematocyst capsule wall. The outer wall consists of globular proteins of unknown function. The inner wall consists of bundles of collagen-like fibrils having a spacing of 50 to 100 nanometers and cross-striations at intervals of 32 nanometers. The fibrils consist of polymers of "mini-collagens," which are abundant in the nematocysts of Hydra. The distinct pattern of mini-collagen fibers in the inner wall can provide the tensile strength necessary to withstand the high osmotic pressure (15 megapascals) in the capsules.

  3. Tapping methane hydrates for unconventional natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    Methane hydrate is an icelike form of concentrated methane and water found in the sediments of permafrost regions and marine continental margins at depths far shallower than conventional oil and gas. Despite their relative accessibility and widespread occurrence, methane hydrates have never been tapped to meet increasing global energy demands. With rising natural gas prices, production from these unconventional gas deposits is becoming economically viable, particularly in permafrost areas already being exploited for conventional oil and gas. This article provides an overview of gas hydrate occurrence, resource assessment, exploration, production technologies, renewability, and future challenges.

  4. On the electrolytic generation of hydrated electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh Mazumdar, A.S.; Guha, S.N.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations on the electrolytic generation of hydrated electron in oxygenated as well as oxygen-free solutions at different pH were undertaken. Since sup(-e)aq is known to react rapidly with O 2 yielding the transient O 2 - ion, the latter was looked for through its interaction with phosphite ions resulting in their oxidation near the cathode. It appears from the results that in electrolytic processes, the primary electron (esup(-)sub(cathode)) probably reacts directly with reactive solutes like oxygen, bypassing the hydration step. Data obtained in oxygen-free solutions, however, support the possible formation of hydrated electron at least in alkaline solutions. (author)

  5. Hydroxyproline Ring Pucker Causes Frustration of Helix Parameters in the Collagen Triple Helix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying Chow, W.; Bihan, Dominique; Forman, Chris J.; Slatter, David A.; Reid, David G.; Wales, David J.; Farndale, Richard W.; Duer, Melinda J.

    2015-07-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in mammals, are defined by their triple-helical structures and distinctive Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeating sequence, where Xaa is often proline and Yaa, hydroxyproline (Hyp/O). It is known that hydroxyproline in the Yaa position stabilises the triple helix, and that lack of proline hydroxylation in vivo leads to dysfunctional collagen extracellular matrix assembly, due to a range of factors such as a change in hydration properties. In addition, we note that in model peptides, when Yaa is unmodified proline, the Xaa proline has a strong propensity to adopt an endo ring conformation, whilst when Yaa is hydroxyproline, the Xaa proline adopts a range of endo and exo conformations. Here we use a combination of solid-state NMR spectroscopy and potential energy landscape modelling of synthetic triple-helical collagen peptides to understand this effect. We show that hydroxylation of the Yaa proline causes the Xaa proline ring conformation to become metastable, which in turn confers flexibility on the triple helix.

  6. Radiotherapy gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldock, C.

    2002-01-01

    shapes and sizes while sparing normal tissue. The situation is further complicated if the normal tissues are critical organs or are particularly sensitive to radiation. Radiotherapy techniques employed to obtain a closer conformation of the dose distribution to the tumour volume are referred to as conformal radiotherapy techniques. The clinical implementation of conformal therapy has been delayed by limitations in the verification of conformal dose distributions calculated by treatment planning systems prior to the irradiation of the patient and the verification of complex treatments during its delivery to the patient. There are several aspects of conformal therapy that complicate dose verification. To achieve the dose distributions conforming to complex 3D volumes, high dose gradients arise in the treatment volume. Further, overdose or underdose regions can exist when separate radiation fields are used to deliver additional radiation. These aspects require that practical dose measurement (dosimetry) techniques be able to integrate dose over time and easily measure dose distributions in 3D with high spatial resolution. Traditional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, thermoluminescent dosimeters and radiographic film do not fulfil these requirements. Novel gel dosimetry techniques are being developed in which dose distributions can potentially be determined in vitro in 3D using anthropomorphic phantoms to simulate a clinically irradiated situation. As long ago as the 1950's, radiation-induced colour change in dyes was used to investigate radiation doses in gels. It was subsequently shown that radiation induced changes in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation properties of gels infused with conventional Fricke dosimetry solutions could be measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In Fricke gels, Fe 2+ ions in ferrous sulphate solutions are usually dispersed throughout a gelatin, agarose or PVA matrix. Radiation-induced changes in the dosimeters are considered to

  7. Preparation and efficacy assessment of malva nut polysaccharide for skin hydrating products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanlayavattanakul, M; Fungpaisalpong, K; Pumcharoen, M; Lourith, N

    2017-11-01

    Scaphium scaphigerum or malva nut has long been served in Chinese medicine. However, the use of this herb in modern health care applications has, to date, been rarely reported. Maceration of the herb in water afforded malva nut polysaccharide which was standardized. Safety and skin hydrating efficacy of the polysaccharide and products were evaluated in human volunteers. Malva nut polysaccharide (41.71±0.64%) having 36.58±0.51% total sugar content was isolated, with further analysis quantifying ash, carbohydrate, reducing sugar and moisture contents to be 6.05±0.00, 40.06±1.00, 12.20±0.05 and 12.64±0.31%, respectively. The polysaccharide exhibited swelling and hydrating capacities of 0.46±0.01% and 54.46±0.02g/g, with L*, a* and b* of 52.56±0.04, 9.02±0.06 and 18.42±0.03, respectively, and a viscosity of 1263.00±2.00 cps. Accelerated testing indicated the biopolysaccharide to be stable, resulting in no skin irritation in 15 human volunteers. The skin hydrating efficacy as assessed via a randomized single-blind, placebo-controlled study in 24 volunteers highlighted the superior performance of malva nut over the vehicle (moisture retainment for 70min as examined by Corneometer ® CM 825). A stable skin moisturizing gel containing malva nut was developed and was shown to exhibit improved performance over benchmark tamarind and algae polysaccharide gels (after 180min observation). Malva nut polysaccharide has potential as a key ingredient in skin hydrating products, which should encourage its further development. Copyright © 2017 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. A novel fibrin gel derived from hyaluronic acid-grafted fibrinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chiung L; Chen, Hui W; Wang, Tzu C; Wang, Yng J

    2011-01-01

    Fibrinogen is a major plasma protein that forms a three-dimensional fibrin gel upon being activated by thrombin. In this study, we report the synthesis and potential applications of hybrid molecules composed of fibrinogen coupled to the reducing ends of short-chain hyaluronic acids (sHAs) by reductive amination. The grafting of sHAs to fibrinogen was verified by analyzing particle size, zeta potential and gel-electrophoretic mobility of the hybrid molecules. The sHA-fibrinogen hybrid molecules with graft ratios (sHA/fibrinogen) of up to 6.5 retained the ability to form gels in response to thrombin activation. The sHA-fibrin gels were transparent in appearance and exhibited high water content, which were characteristics distinct from those of gels formed by mixtures of sHAs and fibrinogen. The potential applications of the sHA-fibrin gels were evaluated. The sHA-fibrinogen gel with a graft ratio of 3.6 (S3.6F) was examined for its ability to encapsulate and support the differentiation of ATDC5 chondrocyte-like cells. Compared with the fibrinogen-formed gel, cells cultured in the S3.6F gel exhibited increased lacunae formation; moreover, the abundance of cartilaginous extracellular matrix molecules and the expression of chondrocyte marker genes, such as aggrecan, collagen II and Sox9, were also significantly increased. Our data suggest that the three-dimensional gel formed by the sHA-fibrinogen hybrid is a better support than the fibrin gel for chondrogenesis induction.

  9. A novel fibrin gel derived from hyaluronic acid-grafted fibrinogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chiung L; Chen, Hui W; Wang, Tzu C; Wang, Yng J, E-mail: wang@ym.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang Ming University, No. 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nung St., Shih-Pai, Taipei, Taiwan 112 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Fibrinogen is a major plasma protein that forms a three-dimensional fibrin gel upon being activated by thrombin. In this study, we report the synthesis and potential applications of hybrid molecules composed of fibrinogen coupled to the reducing ends of short-chain hyaluronic acids (sHAs) by reductive amination. The grafting of sHAs to fibrinogen was verified by analyzing particle size, zeta potential and gel-electrophoretic mobility of the hybrid molecules. The sHA-fibrinogen hybrid molecules with graft ratios (sHA/fibrinogen) of up to 6.5 retained the ability to form gels in response to thrombin activation. The sHA-fibrin gels were transparent in appearance and exhibited high water content, which were characteristics distinct from those of gels formed by mixtures of sHAs and fibrinogen. The potential applications of the sHA-fibrin gels were evaluated. The sHA-fibrinogen gel with a graft ratio of 3.6 (S3.6F) was examined for its ability to encapsulate and support the differentiation of ATDC5 chondrocyte-like cells. Compared with the fibrinogen-formed gel, cells cultured in the S3.6F gel exhibited increased lacunae formation; moreover, the abundance of cartilaginous extracellular matrix molecules and the expression of chondrocyte marker genes, such as aggrecan, collagen II and Sox9, were also significantly increased. Our data suggest that the three-dimensional gel formed by the sHA-fibrinogen hybrid is a better support than the fibrin gel for chondrogenesis induction.

  10. Biomimetic properties of an injectable chitosan/nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Zhi [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Feng Qingling, E-mail: biomater@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu Bo; Li Songjian [Department of Orthopedics, Zhujiang Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282 (China)

    2011-04-08

    To meet the challenges of designing an injectable scaffold and regenerating bone with complex three-dimensional (3D) structures, a biomimetic and injectable hydrogel scaffold based on nano-hydroxyapatite (HA), collagen (Col) and chitosan (Chi) is synthesized. The chitosan/nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen (Chi/HA/Col) solution rapidly forms a stable gel at body temperature. It shows some features of natural bone both in main composition and microstructure. The Chi/HA/Col system can be expected as a candidate for workable systemic minimally invasive scaffolds with surface properties similar to physiological bone based on scanning electron microscopic (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) results.

  11. Biomimetic properties of an injectable chitosan/nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhi; Feng Qingling; Yu Bo; Li Songjian

    2011-01-01

    To meet the challenges of designing an injectable scaffold and regenerating bone with complex three-dimensional (3D) structures, a biomimetic and injectable hydrogel scaffold based on nano-hydroxyapatite (HA), collagen (Col) and chitosan (Chi) is synthesized. The chitosan/nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen (Chi/HA/Col) solution rapidly forms a stable gel at body temperature. It shows some features of natural bone both in main composition and microstructure. The Chi/HA/Col system can be expected as a candidate for workable systemic minimally invasive scaffolds with surface properties similar to physiological bone based on scanning electron microscopic (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) results.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Effect on Hydrate Formation in Spray Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of reaction condition on hydrate formation were conducted in spray reactor. The temperature, pressure, and gas volume of reaction on hydrate formation were measured in pure water and SDS solutions at different temperature and pressure with a high-pressure experimental rig for hydrate formation. The experimental data and result reveal that additives could improve the hydrate formation rate and gas storage capacity. Temperature and pressure can restrict the hydrate formation. Lower temperature and higher pressure can promote hydrate formation, but they can increase production cost. So these factors should be considered synthetically. The investigation will promote the advance of gas storage technology in hydrates.

  13. Gas hydrate concentration and characteristics within Hydrate Ridge inferred from multicomponent seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhananjay; Sen, Mrinal K.; Bangs, Nathan L.

    2007-12-01

    A seismic experiment composed of streamer and ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) surveys was conducted in the summer of 2002 at southern Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon, to map the gas hydrate distribution within the hydrate stability zone. Gas hydrate concentrations within the reservoir can be estimated with P wave velocity (Vp); however, we can further constrain gas hydrate concentrations using S wave velocity (Vs), and use Vs through its relationship to Vp (Vp/Vs) to reveal additional details such as gas hydrate form within the matrix (i.e., hydrate cements the grains, becomes part of the matrix frame or floats in pore space). Both Vp and Vs can be derived simultaneously by inverting multicomponent seismic data. In this study, we use OBS data to estimate seismic velocities where both gas hydrate and free gas are present in the shallow sediments. Once Vp and Vs are estimated, they are simultaneously matched with modeled velocities to estimate the gas hydrate concentration. We model Vp using an equation based on a modification of Wood's equation that incorporates an appropriate rock physics model and Vs using an empirical relation. The gas hydrate concentration is estimated to be up to 7% of the rock volume, or 12% of the pore space. However, Vp and Vs do not always fit the model simultaneously. Vp can vary substantially more than Vs. Thus we conclude that a model, in which higher concentrations of hydrate do not affect shear stiffness, is more appropriate. Results suggest gas hydrates form within the pore space of the sediments and become part of the rock framework in our survey area.

  14. A Hydrate Database: Vital to the Technical Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Sloan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates may contain more energy than all the combined other fossil fuels, causing hydrates to be a potentially vital aspect of both energy and climate change. This article is an overview of the motivation, history, and future of hydrate data management using a CODATA vehicle to connect international hydrate databases. The basis is an introduction to the Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML to connect various hydrate databases. The accompanying four articles on laboratory hydrate data by Smith et al., on field hydrate data by L?wner et al., on hydrate modeling by Wang et al., and on construction of a Chinese gas hydrate system by Xiao et al. provide details of GHML in their respective areas.

  15. Joint immobilization inhibits spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration induced by a novel double-network gel implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakaki, Kazunobu; Kitamura, Nobuto; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Onodera, Shin; Kanaya, Fuminori; Gong, Jian-Ping; Yasuda, Kazunori

    2011-02-01

    We have recently discovered that spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration can be induced in an osteochondral defect in the rabbit, when we implant a novel double-network (DN) gel plug at the bottom of the defect. To clarify whether joint immobilization inhibits the spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration, we conducted this study with 20 rabbits. At 4 or 12 weeks after surgery, the defect in the mobile knees was filled with a sufficient volume of the hyaline cartilage tissue rich in proteoglycan and type-2 collagen, while no cartilage tissues were observed in the defect in the immobilized knees. Type-2 collagen, Aggrecan, and SOX9 mRNAs were expressed only in the mobile knees at each period. This study demonstrated that joint immobilization significantly inhibits the spontaneous hyaline cartilage regeneration induced by the DN gel implantation. This fact suggested that the mechanical environment is one of the significant factors to induce this phenomenon.

  16. A New Kind of Biomaterials-Bullfrog Skin Collagen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He LI; Bai Ling LIU; Hua Lin CHEN; Li Zhen GAO

    2003-01-01

    Pepsin-soluble collagen was prepared from bullfrog skin and partially characterized. This study revealed interesting differences, such as molecular weight, amino acid composition, denaturation temperature (Td), in the frog skin collagen when compared to the known vertebrate collagens. This study gives hints that bullfrog skin can be a potential, safe alternative source of collagen from cattle for use in various fields.

  17. Protease-activatable collagen targeting based on protein cyclization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breurken, M.; Lempens, E.H.M.; Merkx, M.

    2010-01-01

    Threading collagen through a protein needle: The collagen-binding protein CNA35 operates by wrapping itself around the collagen triple helix. By connecting the N and C termini through an MMP recognition sequence, a dual-specific MMP-sensitive collagen-targeting ligand is obtained that can be used

  18. Collagen based Biomaterials from CLRI: An Inspiration from the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Collagen-based Smart Biomaterials · Smart materials: As smart people see them · Some Biomaterials based on Collagen in Human Health care · Questions of Value to this presentation ... Collagen based biomaterials · COLLAGEN IN VISION CARE · Slide 57 · Bandage lens: A smart device · Work at CLRI: In summary.

  19. Chitosan: collagen sponges. In vitro mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Virginia da C.A.; Silva, Gustavo M.; Plepis, Ana Maria G.

    2011-01-01

    The regeneration of bone tissue is a problem that affects many people and scaffolds for bone tissue growth has been widely studied. The aim of this study was the in vitro mineralization of chitosan, chitosan:native collagen and chitosan:anionic collagen sponges. The sponges were obtained by lyophilization and mineralization was made by soaking the sponges in alternating solutions containing Ca 2+ and PO 4 3- . The mineralization was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction observing the formation of phosphate salts, possibly a carbonated hydroxyapatite since Ca/P=1.80. The degree of mineralization was obtained by thermogravimetry calculating the amount of residue at 750 deg C. The chitosan:anionic collagen sponge showed the highest degree of mineralization probably due to the fact that anionic collagen provides additional sites for interaction with the inorganic phase. (author)

  20. The minor collagens in articular cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yunyun; Sinkeviciute, Dovile; He, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a connective tissue consisting of a specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) that dominates the bulk of its wet and dry weight. Type II collagen and aggrecan are the main ECM proteins in cartilage. However, little attention has been paid to less abundant molecular components......, especially minor collagens, including type IV, VI, IX, X, XI, XII, XIII, and XIV, etc. Although accounting for only a small fraction of the mature matrix, these minor collagens not only play essential structural roles in the mechanical properties, organization, and shape of articular cartilage, but also...... fulfil specific biological functions. Genetic studies of these minor collagens have revealed that they are associated with multiple connective tissue diseases, especially degenerative joint disease. The progressive destruction of cartilage involves the degradation of matrix constituents including...

  1. Glycine functionalized alumina nanoparticles stabilize collagen in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Al2O3 nanoparticles thereby suggesting ... 1. Introduction. Collagen is a naturally occurring skin protein in animal tis- ... easily adsorb on the surface of the nanoparticles and amino .... [19,23], agglomeration is prevented by the electrostatic.

  2. Exogenous origin of hydration on asteroid (16) Psyche: the role of hydrated asteroid families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdellidou, C.; Delbo', M.; Fienga, A.

    2018-04-01

    Asteroid (16) Psyche, which for a long time was the largest M-type with no detection of hydration features in its spectrum, was recently discovered to have a weak 3-μm band and thus it was eventually added to the group of hydrated asteroids. Its relatively high density, in combination with the high radar albedo, led researchers to classify the asteroid as a metallic object. It is believed that it is possibly a core of a differentiated body, a remnant of `hit-and-run' collisions. The detection of hydration is, in principle, inconsistent with a pure metallic origin for this body. Here, we consider the scenario in which the hydration on its surface is exogenous and was delivered by hydrated impactors. We show that impacting asteroids that belong to families whose members have the 3-μm band can deliver hydrated material to Psyche. We developed a collisional model with which we test all dark carbonaceous asteroid families, which contain hydrated members. We find that the major source of hydrated impactors is the family of Themis, with a total implanted mass on Psyche of the order of ˜1014 kg. However, the hydrated fraction could be only a few per cent of the implanted mass, as the water content in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, the best analogue for the Themis asteroid family, is typically a few per cent of their mass.

  3. Properties of Chitosan-Laminated Collagen Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lazić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to determine physical, mechanical and barrier properties of chitosan-laminated collagen film. Commercial collagen film, which is used for making collagen casings for dry fermented sausage production, was laminated with chitosan film layer in order to improve the collagen film barrier properties. Different volumes of oregano essential oil per 100 mL of filmogenic solution were added to chitosan film layer: 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 mL to optimize water vapour barrier properties. Chitosan layer with 0.6 or 0.8 % of oregano essential oil lowered the water vapour transmission rate to (1.85±0.10·10–6 and (1.78±0.03·10–6 g/(m2·s·Pa respectively, compared to collagen film ((2.51±0.05·10–6 g/(m2·s·Pa. However, chitosan-laminated collagen film did not show improved mechanical properties compared to the collagen one. Tensile strength decreased from (54.0±3.8 MPa of the uncoated collagen film to (36.3±4.0 MPa when the film was laminated with 0.8 % oregano essential oil chitosan layer. Elongation at break values of laminated films did not differ from those of collagen film ((18.4±2.7 %. Oxygen barrier properties were considerably improved by lamination. Oxygen permeability of collagen film was (1806.8±628.0·10–14 cm3/(m·s·Pa and values of laminated films were below 35·10–14 cm3/(m·s·Pa. Regarding film appearance and colour, lamination with chitosan reduced lightness (L and yellowness (+b of collagen film, while film redness (+a increased. These changes were not visible to the naked eye.

  4. Collagen Accumulation in Osteosarcoma Cells lacking GLT25D1 Collagen Galactosyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Stephan; Hennet, Thierry

    2016-08-26

    Collagen is post-translationally modified by prolyl and lysyl hydroxylation and subsequently by glycosylation of hydroxylysine. Despite the widespread occurrence of the glycan structure Glc(α1-2)Gal linked to hydroxylysine in animals, the functional significance of collagen glycosylation remains elusive. To address the role of glycosylation in collagen expression, folding, and secretion, we used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to inactivate the collagen galactosyltransferase GLT25D1 and GLT25D2 genes in osteosarcoma cells. Loss of GLT25D1 led to increased expression and intracellular accumulation of collagen type I, whereas loss of GLT25D2 had no effect on collagen secretion. Inactivation of the GLT25D1 gene resulted in a compensatory induction of GLT25D2 expression. Loss of GLT25D1 decreased collagen glycosylation by up to 60% but did not alter collagen folding and thermal stability. Whereas cells harboring individually inactivated GLT25D1 and GLT25D2 genes could be recovered and maintained in culture, cell clones with simultaneously inactive GLT25D1 and GLT25D2 genes could be not grown and studied, suggesting that a complete loss of collagen glycosylation impairs osteosarcoma cell proliferation and viability. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Collagen XII myopathy with rectus femoris atrophy and collagen XII retention in fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Krag, Thomas; Werlauff, Ulla

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mutation in the collagen XII gene (COL12A1) was recently reported to induce Bethlem myopathy. We describe a family affected by collagen XII-related myopathy in 3 generations. METHODS: Systematic interview, clinical examination, skin biopsies, and MRI of muscle were used. RESULTS...... affection and abnormal collagen XII retention in fibroblasts. MRI disclosed a selective wasting of the rectus femoris muscle. DISCUSSION: COL12A1 mutations should be considered in patients with a mild Bethlem phenotype who present with selective wasting of the rectus femoris, absence of the outside......-in phenomenon on MRI, and abnormal collagen XII retention in fibroblasts. Muscle Nerve, 2018....

  6. Oceanic hydrates: more questions than answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laherrere, Jean

    2000-01-01

    Methane hydrates create problems by blocking pipelines and casing; they are also accused of contributing to environmental problems (e.g. global warming). Methane hydrates are also found in permafrost areas and in oceanic sediments where the necessary temperature and pressure for stability occur. Claims for the widespread occurrence in thick oceanic deposits are unfounded: apparently indirect evidence from seismic reflectors, seismic hydrocarbon indicators, logs and free samples is unreliable. At one time, hydrate was seen as a static, biogenic, continuous, huge resource but that view is changing to one of a dynamic, overpressurised, discontinuous and unreliable resource. Only Japan and India are currently showing any serious interest in hydrates. Academic research has raised more questions than answers. It is suggested that more hard exploratory evidence rather than theoretical study is required

  7. Vibrational dynamics of hydration water in amylose

    CERN Document Server

    Cavatorta, F; Albanese, G; Angelini, N

    2002-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamical properties of hydration water associated with amylose helices, based on low-temperature vibrational spectra collected using the TOSCA inelastic spectrometer at ISIS. The structural constraints of the polysaccharidic chains favour the formation of a high-density structure for water, which has been suggested by Imberty and Perez on the basis of conformational analysis. According to this model, hydration water can only enter the pores formed by six adjacent helices and completely fills the pores at a hydration level of about 0.27-g water/g dry amylose. Our measurements show that the dynamical behaviour of hydration water is similar to that observed in high-density amorphous ice. (orig.)

  8. Separation of water through gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boch Andersen, Torben; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goal...... of the project was to formulate an alternative separation concept, which can replace the traditional water evaporation process in the sugar production. Work with the separation concept showed that gas hydrates can be used for water separation. The process is not suitable for sugar production because of large...... volumes and the needs for high pressure. The process could be interesting for concentration of heat sensitive, high value products...

  9. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  10. ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrate Production Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoderbek, David [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Farrell, Helen [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Howard, James [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Raterman, Kevin [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Silpngarmlert, Suntichai [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Martin, Kenneth [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Smith, Bruce [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States); Klein, Perry [ConocoPhillips Co., Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-06-30

    Work began on the ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrates Production Test (DOE award number DE-NT0006553) on October 1, 2008. This final report summarizes the entire project from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013.

  11. Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Savidge

    2008-10-31

    The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

  12. Imaging Prostate Cancer Microenvironment by Collagen Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    diagnosis, staging, and treatment of numerous connective tissue disorders and diseases. Standard antibody staining methods that rely on epitopes of a...CMP can be used to detect mechanical damage to collagen in tendon which could be used for diagnostic and therapeutics of musculoskeletal injury which...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The major goal of the proposed work is to develop new PCa imaging methods based on the collagen mimetic peptide

  13. Oriented collagen fibers direct tumor cell intravasation

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Weijing

    2016-09-24

    In this work, we constructed a Collagen I-Matrigel composite extracellular matrix (ECM). The composite ECM was used to determine the influence of the local collagen fiber orientation on the collective intravasation ability of tumor cells. We found that the local fiber alignment enhanced cell-ECM interactions. Specifically, metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells followed the local fiber alignment direction during the intravasation into rigid Matrigel (∼10 mg/mL protein concentration).

  14. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  15. Diacerein niosomal gel for topical delivery: development, in vitro and in vivo assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Say, Khalid M; Abd-Allah, Fathy I; Lila, Ahmed E; Hassan, Abd El-Saboor A; Kassem, Alaa Eldin A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to load diacerein (DCR) in niosomes by applying response surface methodology and incorporate these niosomes in gel base for topical delivery. Box-Behnken design was used to investigate the effect of charge-inducing agent (X1), surfactant HLB (X2) and sonication time (X3) on the vesicle size (Y1), entrapment efficiency (Y2) and cumulative drug released (Y3). DCR niosomal formulations were prepared by thin film hydration method. The optimized formula was incorporated in different gel bases. DCR niosomal gels were evaluated for homogeneity, rheological behavior; in vitro release and pharmacodynamic activity by carrageenan-induced hind paw edema method in the rat compared with DCR commercial gel. The results revealed that the mean vesicle sizes of the prepared niosomes ranged from 7.33 to 23.72 µm and the entrapment efficiency ranged from 9.52% to 58.43% with controlled release pattern over 8 h. DCR niosomal gels exhibited pseudoplastic flow with thixotropic behavior. The pharmacodynamic activity of DCR niosomal gel in 3% HPMC showed significant, 37.66%, maximum inhibition of edema size in comparison with 20.83% for the commercial gel (p < 0.05). These results recommended the incorporation of DCR niosomes in 3% HPMC for topical application as a potent anti-inflammatory drug for the treatment of osteoarthritis.

  16. Full-Length Fibronectin Drives Fibroblast Accumulation at the Surface of Collagen Microtissues during Cell-Induced Tissue Morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper Foolen

    Full Text Available Generating and maintaining gradients of cell density and extracellular matrix (ECM components is a prerequisite for the development of functionality of healthy tissue. Therefore, gaining insights into the drivers of spatial organization of cells and the role of ECM during tissue morphogenesis is vital. In a 3D model system of tissue morphogenesis, a fibronectin-FRET sensor recently revealed the existence of two separate fibronectin populations with different conformations in microtissues, i.e. 'compact and adsorbed to collagen' versus 'extended and fibrillar' fibronectin that does not colocalize with the collagen scaffold. Here we asked how the presence of fibronectin might drive this cell-induced tissue morphogenesis, more specifically the formation of gradients in cell density and ECM composition. Microtissues were engineered in a high-throughput model system containing rectangular microarrays of 12 posts, which constrained fibroblast-populated collagen gels, remodeled by the contractile cells into trampoline-shaped microtissues. Fibronectin's contribution during the tissue maturation process was assessed using fibronectin-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (Fn-/- MEFs and floxed equivalents (Fnf/f MEFs, in fibronectin-depleted growth medium with and without exogenously added plasma fibronectin (full-length, or various fragments. In the absence of full-length fibronectin, Fn-/- MEFs remained homogenously distributed throughout the cell-contracted collagen gels. In contrast, in the presence of full-length fibronectin, both cell types produced shell-like tissues with a predominantly cell-free compacted collagen core and a peripheral surface layer rich in cells. Single cell assays then revealed that Fn-/- MEFs applied lower total strain energy on nanopillar arrays coated with either fibronectin or vitronectin when compared to Fnf/f MEFs, but that the presence of exogenously added plasma fibronectin rescued their contractility. While collagen

  17. Supramolecular Organization of Nonstoichiometric Drug Hydrates: Dapsone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris E. Braun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The observed moisture- and temperature dependent transformations of the dapsone (4,4′-diaminodiphenyl sulfone, DDS 0. 33-hydrate were correlated to its structure and the number and strength of the water-DDS intermolecular interactions. A combination of characterization techniques was used, including thermal analysis (hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis, gravimetric moisture sorption/desorption studies and variable humidity powder X-ray diffraction, along with computational modeling (crystal structure prediction and pair-wise intermolecular energy calculations. Depending on the relative humidity the hydrate contains between 0 and 0.33 molecules of water per molecule DDS. The crystal structure is retained upon dehydration indicating that DDS hydrate shows a non-stoichiometric (dehydration behavior. Unexpectedly, the water molecules are not located in structural channels but at isolated-sites of the host framework, which is counterintuitively for a hydrate with non-stoichiometric behavior. The water-DDS interactions were estimated to be weaker than water-host interactions that are commonly observed in stoichiometric hydrates and the lattice energies of the isomorphic dehydration product (hydrate structure without water molecules and (form III differ only by ~1 kJ mol−1. The computational generation of hypothetical monohydrates confirms that the hydrate with the unusual DDS:water ratio of 3:1 is more stable than a feasible monohydrate structure. Overall, this study highlights that a deeper understanding of the formation of hydrates with non-stoichiometric behavior requires a multidisciplinary approach including suitable experimental and computational methods providing a firm basis for the development and manufacturing of high quality drug products.

  18. Preservation of methane hydrate at 1 atm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    A "pressure-release" method that enables reproducible bulk preservation of pure, porous, methane hydrate at conditions 50 to 75 K above its equilibrium T (193 K) at 1 atm is refined. The amount of hydrate preserved by this method appears to be greatly in excess of that reported in the previous citations, and is likely the result of a mechanism different from ice shielding.

  19. High transparent shape memory gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jin; Arai, Masanori; Kabir, M. H.; Makino, Masato; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2014-03-01

    Gels are a new material having three-dimensional network structures of macromolecules. They possess excellent properties as swellability, high permeability and biocompatibility, and have been applied in various fields of daily life, food, medicine, architecture, and chemistry. In this study, we tried to prepare new multi-functional and high-strength gels by using Meso-Decoration (Meso-Deco), one new method of structure design at intermediate mesoscale. High-performance rigid-rod aromatic polymorphic crystals, and the functional groups of thermoreversible Diels-Alder reaction were introduced into soft gels as crosslinkable pendent chains. The functionalization and strengthening of gels can be realized by meso-decorating the gels' structure using high-performance polymorphic crystals and thermoreversible pendent chains. New gels with good mechanical properties, novel optical properties and thermal properties are expected to be developed.

  20. Relationship between diffusivity of water molecules inside hydrating tablets and their drug release behavior elucidated by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Shingo; Onuki, Yoshinori; Kuribayashi, Hideto; Takayama, Kozo

    2012-01-01

    We reported previously that sustained release matrix tablets showed zero-order drug release without being affected by pH change. To understand drug release mechanisms more fully, we monitored the swelling and erosion of hydrating tablets using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three different types of tablets comprised of polyion complex-forming materials and a hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) were used. Proton density- and diffusion-weighted images of the hydrating tablets were acquired at intervals. Furthermore, apparent self-diffusion coefficient maps were generated from diffusion-weighted imaging to evaluate the state of hydrating tablets. Our findings indicated that water penetration into polyion complex tablets was faster than that into HPMC matrix tablets. In polyion complex tablets, water molecules were dispersed homogeneously and their diffusivity was relatively high, whereas in HPMC matrix tablets, water molecule movement was tightly restricted within the gel. An optimal tablet formulation determined in a previous study had water molecule penetration and diffusivity properties that appeared intermediate to those of polyion complex and HPMC matrix tablets; water molecules were capable of penetrating throughout the tablets and relatively high diffusivity was similar to that in the polyion complex tablet, whereas like the HPMC matrix tablet, it was well swollen. This study succeeded in characterizing the tablet hydration process. MRI provides profound insight into the state of water molecules in hydrating tablets; thus, it is a useful tool for understanding drug release mechanisms at a molecular level.

  1. Three-dimensional collagen I promotes gemcitabine resistance in vitro in pancreatic cancer cells through HMGA2-dependent histone acetyltransferase expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surabhi Dangi-Garimella

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is associated with a pronounced collagen-rich stromal reaction that has been shown to contribute to chemo-resistance. We have previously shown that PDAC cells are resistant to gemcitabine chemotherapy in the collagen microenvironment because of increased expression of the chromatin remodeling protein high mobility group A2 (HMGA2. We have now found that human PDAC tumors display higher levels of histone H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation in fibrotic regions. We show that relative to cells grown on tissue culture plastic, PDAC cells grown in three-dimensional collagen gels demonstrate increased histone H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation, along with increased expression of p300, PCAF and GCN5 histone acetyltransferases (HATs. Knocking down HMGA2 attenuates the effect of collagen on histone H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation and on collagen-induced p300, PCAF and GCN5 expression. We also show that human PDAC tumors with HMGA2 demonstrate increased histone H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation. Additionally, we show that cells in three-dimensional collagen gels demonstrate increased protection against gemcitabine. Significantly, down-regulation of HMGA2 or p300, PCAF and GCN5 HATs sensitizes the cells to gemcitabine in three-dimensional collagen. Overall, our results increase our understanding of how the collagen microenvironment contributes to chemo-resistance in vitro and identify HATs as potential therapeutic targets against this deadly cancer.

  2. Collagen as potential cell scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annuar, N; Spier, R E

    2004-05-01

    Selections of collagen available commercially were tested for their biocompatibility as scaffold to promote cell growth in vitro via simple collagen fast test and cultivation of mammalian cells on the selected type of collagen. It was found that collagen type C9791 promotes the highest degree of aggregation as well as cells growth. This preliminary study also indicated potential use of collagen as scaffold in engineered tissue.

  3. Thoria sol-gel processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, R.B.

    1978-10-01

    Alternate fuel fabrication techniques are being developed at WNRE as part of the thorium fuel cycle program. The sol-gel techniques are attractive and this report assembles and summarizes information relating to thoria sol-gel fuels. Some background information on the behaviour and advantages of sol-gel fuel forms is presented, followed by a review of relevant colloid chemistry and an explanation of the fundamental steps of sol-gel processes. Finally, several variants to the basic process are reviewed and evaluated. (author)

  4. Silver nitrate based gel dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titus, D; Samuel, E J J; Srinivasan, K; Roopan, S M; Madhu, C S

    2017-01-01

    A new radiochromic gel dosimeter based on silver nitrate and a normoxic gel dosimeter was investigated using UV-Visible spectrophotometry in the clinical dose range. Gamma radiation induced the synthesis of silver nanoparticles in the gel and is confirmed from the UV-Visible spectrum which shows an absorbance peak at around 450 nm. The dose response function of the dosimeter is found to be linear upto12Gy. In addition, the gel samples were found to be stable which were kept under refrigeration. (paper)

  5. Gel polymer electrolytes for batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gur, Ilan; Singh, Mohit; Hudson, William

    2014-11-18

    Nanostructured gel polymer electrolytes that have both high ionic conductivity and high mechanical strength are disclosed. The electrolytes have at least two domains--one domain contains an ionically-conductive gel polymer and the other domain contains a rigid polymer that provides structure for the electrolyte. The domains are formed by block copolymers. The first block provides a polymer matrix that may or may not be conductive on by itself, but that can soak up a liquid electrolyte, thereby making a gel. An exemplary nanostructured gel polymer electrolyte has an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-4 S cm.sup.-1 at 25.degree. C.

  6. In Situ Raman Analyses of Natural Gas and Gas Hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, E. T.; White, S. N.; Dunk, R. M.; Brewer, P. G.; Sherman, A. D.; Schmidt, K.; Hester, K. C.; Sloan, E. D.

    2004-12-01

    During a July 2004 cruise to Hydrate Ridge, Oregon, MBARI's sea-going laser Raman spectrometer was used to obtain in situ Raman spectra of natural gas hydrates and natural gas venting from the seafloor. This was the first in situ analysis of gas hydrates on the seafloor. The hydrate spectra were compared to laboratory analyses performed at the Center for Hydrate Research, Colorado School of Mines. The natural gas spectra were compared to MBARI gas chromatography (GC) analyses of gas samples collected at the same site. DORISS (Deep Ocean Raman In Situ Spectrometer) is a laboratory model laser Raman spectrometer from Kaiser Optical Systems, Inc modified at MBARI for deployment in the deep ocean. It has been successfully deployed to depths as great as 3600 m. Different sampling optics provide flexibility in adapting the instrument to a particular target of interest. An immersion optic was used to analyze natural gas venting from the seafloor at South Hydrate Ridge ( ˜780 m depth). An open-bottomed cube was placed over the vent to collect the gas. The immersion optic penetrated the side of the cube as did a small heater used to dissociate any hydrate formed during sample collection. To analyze solid hydrates at both South and North Hydrate Ridge ( ˜590 m depth), chunks of hydrate were excavated from the seafloor and collected in a glass cylinder with a mesh top. A stand-off optic was used to analyze the hydrate inside the cylinder. Due to the partial opacity of the hydrate and the small focal volume of the sampling optic, a precision underwater positioner (PUP) was used to focus the laser spot onto the hydrate. PUP is a stand-alone system with three degrees-of-freedom, capable of moving the DORISS probe head with a precision of 0.1 mm. In situ Raman analyses of the gas indicate that it is primarily methane. This is verified by GC analyses of samples collected from the same site. Other minor constituents (such as CO2 and higher hydrocarbons) are present but may be in

  7. The Secret Life of Collagen: Temporal Changes in Nanoscale Fibrillar Pre-Strain and Molecular Organization during Physiological Loading of Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamdar, Sheetal R; Knight, David P; Terrill, Nicholas J; Karunaratne, Angelo; Cacho-Nerin, Fernando; Knight, Martin M; Gupta, Himadri S

    2017-10-24

    Articular cartilage is a natural biomaterial whose structure at the micro- and nanoscale is critical for healthy joint function and where degeneration is associated with widespread disorders such as osteoarthritis. At the nanoscale, cartilage mechanical functionality is dependent on the collagen fibrils and hydrated proteoglycans that form the extracellular matrix. The dynamic response of these ultrastructural building blocks at the nanoscale, however, remains unclear. Here we measure time-resolved changes in collagen fibril strain, using small-angle X-ray diffraction during compression of bovine and human cartilage explants. We demonstrate the existence of a collagen fibril tensile pre-strain, estimated from the D-period at approximately 1-2%, due to osmotic swelling pressure from the proteoglycan. We reveal a rapid reduction and recovery of this pre-strain which occurs during stress relaxation, approximately 60 s after the onset of peak load. Furthermore, we show that this reduction in pre-strain is linked to disordering in the intrafibrillar molecular packing, alongside changes in the axial overlapping of tropocollagen molecules within the fibril. Tissue degradation in the form of selective proteoglycan removal disrupts both the collagen fibril pre-strain and the transient response during stress relaxation. This study bridges a fundamental gap in the knowledge describing time-dependent changes in collagen pre-strain and molecular organization that occur during physiological loading of articular cartilage. The ultrastructural details of this transient response are likely to transform our understanding of the role of collagen fibril nanomechanics in the biomechanics of cartilage and other hydrated soft tissues.

  8. THE SORPTION OF OFLOXACIN BY HYDRATED ALUMINA AND SILICON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Chebotarev

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of ofloxacin (OFL – the antibiotic from class of fluoroquinolones has been studied on alumina (γ-Al2O3 different acid-base modifications – acidic Al2O3(acidic, neutral Al2O3 (Neutral and the basic Al2O3 (core and amorphous silica – silica gel (SG L 5/40 and aerosil A-300. Determination of ofloxacin in solutions has been carried out by spectrophotometry on spectrophotometer SF-46 at λ = 291 nm and acidity 7. To clarify the nature of the sorption surfaces of OFL hydrated on aluminum and silicon oxides were studied according to the degree of extraction (S% from pH, contact time of the phases (min. sample from the sorbent mass (g; sorption isotherms were built and antibiotic desorption was studied. The OFL significant recovery (~ 60% is observed at the pH range of 4 ÷ 8, and reaches its maximum (80-85% at pH 7. The maximum degree of extraction of the antibiotic on aerosil A-300 and L 5/40 silica realized at pH 6 and it was ~ 80%. Comparative analysis of the forms constructed isotherms (L – type indicates a significant affinity investigated hydrated oxides to sorbate. The value of the static exchange capacity and concentration ratios can proof that. Differences in the quantitative characteristics of sorption of aluminum and silicon oxides are associated with nature and the acid-base properties of adsorption sites. In the study of the OFL concentrates desorption in static mode dilute NaOH and HNO3 solutions it was found that growth desorption degree occured with increasing concentration. Desorption was 2-3 times better in the case of aluminum oxide than silicon oxide when there were the same concentrations of acid and alkali. This is another confirmation of the participation in various sorption interactions forces of physical and chemical nature.

  9. Novel synthesis strategy for composite hydrogel of collagen/hydroxyapatite-microsphere originating from conversion of CaCO3 templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingrong; Lu, Jian; Wang, Qiaoying; Fan, Hongsong; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-03-20

    Inspired by coralline-derived hydroxyapatite, we designed a methodological route to synthesize carbonated-hydroxyapatite microspheres from the conversion of CaCO3 spherulite templates within a collagen matrix under mild conditions and thus constructed the composite hydrogel of collagen/hydroxyapatite-microspheres. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to confirm the successful generation of the carbonated hydroxyapatite phase originating from CaCO3, and the ratios of calcium to phosphate were tracked over time. Variations in the weight portion of the components in the hybrid gels before and after the phase transformation of the CaCO3 templates were identified via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows these composite hydrogels have a unique multiscale microstructure consisting of a collagen nanofibril network and hydroxyapatite microspheres. The relationship between the hydroxyapatite nanocrystals and the collagen fibrils was revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in detail, and the selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern further confirmed the results of the XRD analyses which show the typical low crystallinity of the generated hydroxyapatite. This smart synthesis strategy achieved the simultaneous construction of microscale hydroxyapatite particles and collagen fibrillar hydrogel, and appears to provide a novel route to explore an advanced functional hydrogel materials with promising potentials for applications in bone tissue engineering and reconstruction medicine.

  10. Influence of PCL on the material properties of collagen based biocomposites and in vitro evaluation of drug release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanungo, Ivy; Fathima, Nishter Nishad; Rao, Jonnalagadda Raghava; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2013-01-01

    Formulation of biodegradable collagen–poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) based biomaterials for the sustained release of insulin is the main objective of the present work. PCL has been employed to modulate the physico-chemical behavior of collagen to control the drug release. Designed formulations were employed to statistically optimize insulin release parameter profile at different collagen to PCL molar ratios. Circular dichroism, thermoporometry, FTIR, impedance and scanning electron microscopy techniques have been employed to investigate the effect of PCL on hydration dynamics of the collagen molecule, which in turn changes the dissolution parameters of the drug from the systems. Drug entrapment efficiency has been found to be maximum for collagen to PCL molar ratio of 1:2 (> 90%). In vitro dissolution test reveals that 99% of the drug was released from composite at collagen to PCL molar ratio of 1:3 and 1:4 within 2 h, which indicates that hydrophobicity of the matrix results in weak interaction between lipophilic drug and carrier materials. The least burst release was observed for collagen to PCL molar ratio at 1:2 as synergistic interactions between collagen and PCL was maximum at that particular polymer–polymer ratios. The drug release data indicates super case-II transport of drug (n > 1.0). - Graphical abstract: Collagen–poly-ε-caprolactone based biomaterials for the sustained release of insulin were formulated. Circular dichroism, thermoporometry, FTIR, impedance and scanning electron microscopy techniques have been employed to elucidate the effect of PCL on the structure of the collagen and in vitro drug release. The drug release data fitted to the kinetic model indicates super case-II transport due to the combination of diffusion and polymer relaxation/dissolution (n > 1.0). - Highlights: • Poly-ε-caprolactone influences physico-chemical behavior of collagen. • Poly-ε-caprolactone influences in vitro drug release mechanism from biocomposites.

  11. Micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of bauxite-calcination-method red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Na; Yao, Yuan; Sun, Henghu; Feng, Huan

    2013-11-15

    In this research, the micro-structural characterization of the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials has been investigated through SEM-EDS, (27)Al MAS NMR and (29)Si MAS NMR techniques, in which the used red mud was derived from the bauxite calcination method. The results show that the red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials mainly form fibrous C-A-S-H gel, needle-shaped/rod-like AFt in the early hydration period. With increasing of the hydration period, densification of the pastes were promoted resulting in the development of strength. EDS analysis shows that with the Ca/Si of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials increases, the average Ca/Si and Ca/(Si+Al) atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel increases, while the average Al/Si atomic ratio of C-A-S-H gel decreases. MAS NMR analysis reveals that Al in the hydration products of red mud-coal gangue based cementitious materials exists in the forms of Al(IV) and Al(VI), but mainly in the form of Al(VI). Increasing the Ca/Si ratio of raw material promotes the conversion of [AlO4] to [AlO6] and inhibits the combination between [AlO4] and [SiO4] to form C-A-S-H gel. Meanwhile, the polymerization degree of [SiO4] in the hydration products declines. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Collagen-binding peptidoglycans inhibit MMP mediated collagen degradation and reduce dermal scarring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Stuart

    Full Text Available Scarring of the skin is a large unmet clinical problem that is of high patient concern and impact. Wound healing is complex and involves numerous pathways that are highly orchestrated, leaving the skin sealed, but with abnormal organization and composition of tissue components, namely collagen and proteoglycans, that are then remodeled over time. To improve healing and reduce or eliminate scarring, more rapid restoration of healthy tissue composition and organization offers a unique approach for development of new therapeutics. A synthetic collagen-binding peptidoglycan has been developed that inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-1 and 13 (MMP-1 and MMP-13 mediated collagen degradation. We investigated the synthetic peptidoglycan in a rat incisional model in which a single dose was delivered in a hyaluronic acid (HA vehicle at the time of surgery prior to wound closure. The peptidoglycan treatment resulted in a significant reduction in scar tissue at 21 days as measured by histology and visual analysis. Improved collagen architecture of the treated wounds was demonstrated by increased tensile strength and transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis of collagen fibril diameters compared to untreated and HA controls. The peptidoglycan's mechanism of action includes masking existing collagen and inhibiting MMP-mediated collagen degradation while modulating collagen organization. The peptidoglycan can be synthesized at low cost with unique design control, and together with demonstrated preclinical efficacy in reducing scarring, warrants further investigation for dermal wound healing.

  13. A collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment targeting tumors with a collagen-rich extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hui; Li, Xiaoran; Wang, Bin; Chen, Bing; Zhao, Yannan; Sun, Jie; Zhuang, Yan; Shi, Jiajia; Shen, He; Zhang, Zhijun; Dai, Jianwu

    2016-02-17

    Many tumors over-express collagen, which constitutes the physical scaffold of tumor microenvironment. Collagen has been considered to be a target for cancer therapy. The collagen-binding domain (CBD) is a short peptide, which could bind to collagen and achieve the sustained release of CBD-fused proteins in collagen scaffold. Here, a collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment was designed and expressed for targeting the collagen-rich extracellular matrix in tumors. The antibody fragment (Fab) of cetuximab was fused with CBD (CBD-Fab) and expressed in Pichia pastoris. CBD-Fab maintained antigen binding and anti-tumor activity of cetuximab and obtained a collagen-binding ability in vitro. The results also showed CBD-Fab was mainly enriched in tumors and had longer retention time in tumors in A431 s.c. xenografts. Furthermore, CBD-Fab showed a similar therapeutic efficacy as cetuximab in A431 xenografts. Although CBD-Fab hasn't showed better therapeutic effects than cetuximab, its smaller molecular and special target may be applicable as antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) or immunotoxins.

  14. Adherence, proliferation and collagen turnover by human fibroblasts seeded into different types of collagen sponges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelkoop, E.; de Vries, H. J.; Ruuls, L.; Everts, V.; Wildevuur, C. H.; Westerhof, W.

    1995-01-01

    We describe an in vitro model that we have used to evaluate dermal substitutes and to obtain data on cell proliferation, the rate of degradation of the dermal equivalent, contractibility and de novo synthesis of collagen. We tested three classes of collagenous materials: (1) reconstituted

  15. Fluorescently labaled collagen binding proteins allow specific visualization of collagen in tissues and live cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krahn, K.B.N.; Bouten, C.V.C.; Tuijl, van S.; Zandvoort, van M.; Merkx, M.

    2006-01-01

    Visualization of the formation and orientation of collagen fibers in tissue engineering experiments is crucial for understanding the factors that determine the mechanical properties of tissues. In this study, collagen-specific fluorescent probes were developed using a new approach that takes

  16. ADHERENCE, PROLIFERATION AND COLLAGEN TURNOVER BY HUMAN FIBROBLASTS SEEDED INTO DIFFERENT TYPES OF COLLAGEN SPONGES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MIDDELKOOP, E; DEVRIES, HJC; RUULS, L; EVERTS, [No Value; WILDEVUUR, CHR; WESTERHOF, W

    We describe an in vitro model that we have used to evaluate dermal substitutes and to obtain data on cell proliferation, the rate of degradation of the dermal equivalent, contractibility and de novo synthesis of collagen. We tested three classes of collagenous materials: (1) reconstituted

  17. The influence of Na2O on the hydration of C3A II. Suspension hydration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierings, G.A.C.M.; Stein, H.N.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of Na2O on the hydration of C3A was studied in suspensions from the start of the reaction onwards. The heat evolution rate in very early stages of the hydration, measured at varying NaOH concentrations, and SEM, indicate that at NaOH concentrations larger then 0.1 M the reaction

  18. Distinguishing between hydrated, partially hydrated or unhydrated clinker in hardened concrete using microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valcke, S.L.A.; Rooij, M.R. de; Visser, J.H.M.; Nijland, T.G.

    2010-01-01

    Hydration of clinker particles is since long a topic of interest in both designing and optimizing cement composition and its quantity used in concrete. The interest for carefully observing and also quantifying the type or stage of clinker hydration in hardened cement paste is twofold. Firstly, the

  19. Methane hydrate dissociation using inverted five-spot water flooding method in cubic hydrate simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Gang; Li, Xiao-Sen; Li, Bo; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The combination forms of the hydrate dissociation methods in different well systems are divided into 6 main patterns. Dissociation processes of methane hydrate in porous media using the inverted five-spot water flooding method (Pattern 4) are investigated by the experimental observation and numerical simulation. In situ methane hydrate is synthesized in the Cubic Hydrate Simulator (CHS), a 5.832-L cubic reactor. A center vertical well is used as the hot water injection well, while the four vertical wells at the corner are the gas and water production wells. The gas production begins simultaneously with the hot water injection, while after approximately 20 min of compression, the water begins to be produced. One of the common characteristics of the inverted five-spot water flooding method is that both the gas and water production rates decrease with the reduction of the hydrate dissociation rate. The evaluation of the energy efficiency ratio might indicate the inverted five-spot water flooding as a promising gas producing method from the hydrate reservoir. - Highlights: • A three-dimensional 5.8-L cubic pressure vessel is developed. • Gas production of hydrate using inverted five-spot flooding method is studied. • Water/gas production rate and energy efficiency ratio are evaluated. • Temperature distributions of numerical simulation and experiment agree well. • Hydrate dissociation process is a moving boundary problem in this study

  20. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  1. Fractionation and solubility of cadmium in paddy soils amended with porous hydrated calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiu-Lan; Masaihiko, Saigusa

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that porous hydrated calcium silicate (PS) is very effective in decreasing cadmium (Cd) content in brown rice. However, it is unclear whether the PS influences cadmium transformation in soil. The present study examined the effect of PS on pH, cadmium transformation and cadmium solubility in Andosol and Alluvial soil, and also compared its effects with CaCO3, acidic porous hydrated calcium silicate (APS) and silica gel. Soil cadmium was operationally fractionationed into exchangeable (Exch), bound to carbonates (Carb), bound to iron and manganese oxides (FeMnO(x)), bound to organic matters (OM) and residual (Res) fraction. Application of PS and CaCO3 at hig rates enhanced soil pH, while APS and silica gel did not obviously change soil pH. PS and CaCO3 also increased the FeMnO(x)-Cd in Andosol and Carb-Cd in Alluvial soil, thus reducing the Exch-Cd in the tested soils. However, PS was less effective than CaCO3 at the same application rate. Cadmium fractions in the two soils were not changed by the treatments of APS and silica gel. There were no obvious differences in the solubility of cadmium in soils treated with PS, APS, silica gel and CaCO3 except Andosol treated 2.0% CaCO3 at the same pH of soil-CaCl2 suspensions. These findings suggested that the decrease of cadmium availability in soil was mainly attributed to the increase of soil pH caused by PS.

  2. Rheology and structure of milk protein gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van T.; Lakemond, C.M.M.; Visschers, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies on gel formation and rheology of milk gels are reviewed. A distinction is made between gels formed by aggregated casein, gels of `pure` whey proteins and gels in which both casein and whey proteins contribute to their properties. For casein' whey protein mixtures, it has been shown

  3. Hydration of urea and alkylated urea derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaatze, Udo

    2018-01-01

    Compressibility data and broadband dielectric spectra of aqueous solutions of urea and some of its alkylated derivatives have been evaluated to yield their numbers Nh of hydration water molecules per molecule of solute. Nh values in a broad range of solute concentrations are discussed and are compared to hydration numbers of other relevant molecules and organic ions. Consistent with previous results, it is found that urea differs from other solutes in its unusually small hydration number, corresponding to just one third of the estimated number of nearest neighbor molecules. This remarkable hydration behavior is explained by the large density φH of hydrogen bonding abilities offered by the urea molecule. In terms of currently discussed models of reorientational motions and allied dynamics in water and related associating liquids, the large density φH causes a relaxation time close to that of undisturbed water with most parts of water encircling the solute. Therefore only a small part of disturbed ("hydration") water is left around each urea molecule. Adding alkyl groups to the basic molecule leads to Nh values which, within the series of n-alkylurea derivatives, progressively increase with the number of methyl groups per solute. With n-butylurea, Nh from dielectric spectra, in conformity with many other organic solutes, slightly exceeds the number of nearest neighbors. Compared to such Nh values, hydration numbers from compressibility data are substantially smaller, disclosing incorrect assumptions in the formula commonly used to interpret the experimental compressibilities. Similar to other series of organic solutes, effects of isomerization have been found with alkylated urea derivatives, indicating that factors other than the predominating density φH of hydrogen bond abilities contribute also to the hydration properties.

  4. Pecan drying with silica gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghate, S.R.; Chhinnan, M.S.

    1983-07-01

    High moisture in-shell pecans were dried by keeping them in direct and indirect contact with silica gel to investigate their drying characteristics. In-shell pecans were also dried with ambient air from a controlled environment chamber and with air dehumidified by silica gel. Direct contact and dehumidified air drying seemed feasible approaches.

  5. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruska, Melissa A [Los Alamos, NM; Klimov, Victor L [Los Alamos, NM

    2007-06-05

    The present invention is directed to solid composites including colloidal nanocrystals within a sol-gel host or matrix and to processes of forming such solid composites. The present invention is further directed to alcohol soluble colloidal nanocrystals useful in formation of sol-gel based solid composites.

  6. Hydrates on tap: scientists say natural gas hydrates may be tough nut to crack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J.

    2001-12-01

    Gas hydrates are methane molecules trapped in cages of water molecules, yielding a substance with a slushy, sherbet-like consistency. Drilling for hydrates is similar to conventional oil and gas drilling, however, the secret to economic production still remains hidden. Hydrates exist in abundance in such places as deep ocean floor and below ground in some polar regions. The real challenge lies in producing gas from this resource, inasmuch as there is no existing technology for production of gas specifically from methane hydrates. This paper describes an international research program, involving a five-country partnership to spud the first of three wells into the permafrost of the Mackenzie River Delta in the Northwest Territories. The project, worth about $15 million, has brought together public funding and expertise from Japan, Germany, India as well as the Canadian and US Geological Surveys and the US Dept. of Energy in an effort to gain information on the production response of gas hydrates. The operator of the project is Japan Petroleum Exploration Company of Canada, a subsidiary of Japan National Oil Corporation. Since Japan is poor in domestic hydrocarbon resources, but is surrounded by deep water that contains potential for gas hydrates, Japan has a great deal riding on the success of this project. Germany and the United States are also very much interested. Current thinking is that gas is in contact with the hydrates and that it should be possible to develop a free gas reservoir as if it were a conventional deposit. As the free gas is drawn off, the pressure is reduced on the hydrates in contact with it , the hydrates dissociate from the gas and replenish the conventional reservoir. So far this is still only a theory, but it appears to be a sensible approach to hydrate production. 1 photo.

  7. Experimental Determination of Refractive Index of Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bylov, Martin; Rasmussen, Peter

    1997-01-01

    . For methane hydrate (structure I) the refractive index was found to be 1.346 and for natural gas hydrate (structure II) it was found to be 1.350. The measurements further suggest that the gas hydrate growth rate increases if the water has formed hydrates before. The induction time, on the other hand, seems......The refractive indexes of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate have been experimentally determined. The refractive indexes were determined in an indirect manner making use of the fact that two non-absorbing materials will have the same refractive index if they cannot be distinguished visually...

  8. Development of hydrate risk quantification in oil and gas production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Piyush N.

    Subsea flowlines that transport hydrocarbons from wellhead to the processing facility face issues from solid deposits such as hydrates, waxes, asphaltenes, etc. The solid deposits not only affect the production but also pose a safety concern; thus, flow assurance is significantly important in designing and operating subsea oil and gas production. In most subsea oil and gas operations, gas hydrates form at high pressure and low temperature conditions, causing the risk of plugging flowlines, with a undesirable impact on production. Over the years, the oil and gas industry has shifted their perspective from hydrate avoidance to hydrate management given several parameters such as production facility, production chemistry, economic and environmental concerns. Thus, understanding the level of hydrate risk associated with subsea flowlines is an important in developing efficient hydrate management techniques. In the past, hydrate formation models were developed for various flow-systems (e.g., oil dominated, water dominated, and gas dominated) present in the oil and gas production. The objective of this research is to extend the application of the present hydrate prediction models for assessing the hydrate risk associated with subsea flowlines that are prone to hydrate formation. It involves a novel approach for developing quantitative hydrate risk models based on the conceptual models built from the qualitative knowledge obtained from experimental studies. A comprehensive hydrate risk model, that ranks the hydrate risk associated with the subsea production system as a function of time, hydrates, and several other parameters, which account for inertial, viscous, interfacial forces acting on the flow-system, is developed for oil dominated and condensate systems. The hydrate plugging risk for water dominated systems is successfully modeled using The Colorado School of Mines Hydrate Flow Assurance Tool (CSMHyFAST). It is found that CSMHyFAST can be used as a screening tool in

  9. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom

  10. Experimental investigation of methane release from hydrate formation in sandstone through both hydrate dissociation and CO{sub 2} sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husebo, J.; Graue, A.; Kvamme, B. [Bergen Univ., Bergen (Norway). Dept. of Physics and Technology; Stevens, J.; Howard, J.J. [ConocoPhillips, Ponca City, OK (United States); Baldwin, B.A. [Green Country Petrophysics LLC, Dewey, OK (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Large amounts of natural gas trapped in hydrate reservoirs are found in Arctic regions and in deep offshore locations around the world. Natural gas production from hydrate deposits offer significant potential for future energy needs. However, research is needed in order to propose potential production schemes for natural gas hydrates. Natural gas molecules can be freed from hydrate structured cages by depressurization, by heating and by exposing the hydrate to a substance that will form a thermodynamically more stable hydrate structure. This paper provided a comparison of two approaches for releasing methane from methane hydrate in porous sandstone. The study scope covered the dissociation rate of methane hydrate in porous media through depressurization, and also referred to previous work done on producing methane from hydrates in sandstone while sequestering carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The study was conducted in a laboratory setting. The paper discussed the experimental design which included the placing of a pressure- and temperature-controlled sample holder inside the bore of a magnetic resonance imager. The experimental procedures were then outlined, with reference to hydrate formation; carbon dioxide sequestration; hydrate dissociation experiments with constant volume; and hydrate dissociation experiments at constant pressure. The constant volume experiments demonstrated that in order to dissociate a large amount of hydrate, the initial depressurization had to be significantly lower than the hydrate stability pressure. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  11. Strength Estimation for Hydrate-Bearing Sediments From Direct Shear Tests of Hydrate-Bearing Sand and Silt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhichao; Dai, Sheng; Ning, Fulong; Peng, Li; Wei, Houzhen; Wei, Changfu

    2018-01-01

    Safe and economic methane gas production, as well as the replacement of methane while sequestering carbon in natural hydrate deposits, requires enhanced geomechanical understanding of the strength and volume responses of hydrate-bearing sediments during shear. This study employs a custom-made apparatus to investigate the mechanical and volumetric behaviors of carbon dioxide hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to direct shear. The results show that both peak and residual strengths increase with increased hydrate saturation and vertical stress. Hydrate contributes mainly the cohesion and dilatancy constraint to the peak strength of hydrate-bearing sediments. The postpeak strength reduction is more evident and brittle in specimens with higher hydrate saturation and under lower stress. Significant strength reduction after shear failure is expected in silty sediments with high hydrate saturation Sh ≥ 0.65. Hydrate contribution to the residual strength is mainly by increasing cohesion at low hydrate saturation and friction at high hydrate saturation. Stress state and hydrate saturation are dominating both the stiffness and the strength of hydrate-bearing sediments; thus, a wave velocity-based peak strength prediction model is proposed and validated, which allows for precise estimation of the shear strength of hydrate-bearing sediments through acoustic logging data. This method is advantageous to geomechanical simulators, particularly when the experimental strength data of natural samples are not available.

  12. Hydraulic and Mechanical Effects from Gas Hydrate Conversion and Secondary Gas Hydrate Formation during Injection of CO2 into CH4-Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, N.; Deusner, C.; Kossel, E.; Schicks, J. M.; Spangenberg, E.; Priegnitz, M.; Heeschen, K. U.; Abendroth, S.; Thaler, J.; Haeckel, M.

    2014-12-01

    The injection of CO2 into CH4-hydrate-bearing sediments has the potential to drive natural gas production and simultaneously sequester CO2 by hydrate conversion. The process aims at maintaining the in situ hydrate saturation and structure and causing limited impact on soil hydraulic properties and geomechanical stability. However, to increase hydrate conversion yields and rates it must potentially be assisted by thermal stimulation or depressurization. Further, secondary formation of CO2-rich hydrates from pore water and injected CO2 enhances hydrate conversion and CH4 production yields [1]. Technical stimulation and secondary hydrate formation add significant complexity to the bulk conversion process resulting in spatial and temporal effects on hydraulic and geomechanical properties that cannot be predicted by current reservoir simulation codes. In a combined experimental and numerical approach, it is our objective to elucidate both hydraulic and mechanical effects of CO2 injection and CH4-CO2-hydrate conversion in CH4-hydrate bearing soils. For the experimental approach we used various high-pressure flow-through systems equipped with different online and in situ monitoring tools (e.g. Raman microscopy, MRI and ERT). One particular focus was the design of triaxial cell experimental systems, which enable us to study sample behavior even during large deformations and particle flow. We present results from various flow-through high-pressure experimental studies on different scales, which indicate that hydraulic and geomechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments are drastically altered during and after injection of CO2. We discuss the results in light of the competing processes of hydrate dissociation, hydrate conversion and secondary hydrate formation. Our results will also contribute to the understanding of effects of temperature and pressure changes leading to dissociation of gas hydrates in ocean and permafrost systems. [1] Deusner C, Bigalke N, Kossel E

  13. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.

    2014-07-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  14. Effect of overpressure on gas hydrate distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, G.; Chapman, W.G.; Hirasaki, G.J. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Dickens, G.R.; Dugan, B. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    2008-07-01

    Natural gas hydrate systems can be characterized by high sedimentation rates and/or low permeability sediments, which can lead to pore pressure higher than hydrostatic. This paper discussed a study that examined this effect of overpressure on gas hydrate and free gas distribution in marine sediments. A one-dimensional numerical model that coupled sedimentation, fluid flow, and gas hydrate formation was utilized. In order to quantify the relative importance of sedimentation rates and low permeability sediments, a dimensionless sedimentation-compaction group (scN) was defined, that compared the absolute permeability of the sediments to the sedimentation rate. Higher values of scN mean higher permeability or low sedimentation rate which generally yield hydrostatic pore pressure while lower values of scN normally create pore pressure greater than hydrostatic. The paper discussed non-hydrostatic consolidation in gas hydrate systems, including mass balances; constitutive relationships; normalized variables; and dimensionless groups. A numerical solution to the problem was presented. It was concluded that simulation results demonstrated that decreasing scN not only increased pore pressure above hydrostatic values, but also lowered the lithostatic stress gradient and gas hydrate saturation. This occurred because overpressure resulted in lower effective stress, causing higher porosity and lower bulk density of the sediment. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 appendix.

  15. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.; Yoon, S.; Wentzcovitch, R. M.; Monteiro, P. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  16. Methane hydrates in quaternary climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennett, J. P.; Hill, T. M.; Behl, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    The hydrate reservoir in marine sediments is known to contain a large volume of exchangeable carbon stored as solid methane hydrate and associated free gas. This reservoir has been shown to be potentially unstable in response to changing intermediate water temperature and sea level (pressure). Evidence continues to grow for past episodes of major methane release at times of climatic warming. Yet few studies of late Quaternary climate change include methane hydrates as an integral part of the global climate system, in spite of the largest known oscillations at this time in sea level and upper ocean temperature changes for the Cenozoic or earlier, conditions that favor instability of the methane hydrate reservoir. Abrupt increases in atmospheric methane recorded in polar ice cores are widely believed to have resulted, not from ocean-floor methane degassing, but instead from continental wetland activation, a hypothesis thus far unsupported by geological data. Furthermore, as part of this Wetland Methane Hypothesis, the abrupt methane increases have been seen as a response to climatic warming rather than contributing significantly to the change. An alternative view (formulated as the Clathrate Gun Hypothesis) is that the speed, magnitude and timing of abrupt climate change in the recent geologic past are consistent with the process of major degassing of methane hydrates. We summarize aspects of this hypothesis here and needs to test this hypothesis. (Author)

  17. Blue LED irradiation to hydration of skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Priscila F. C.; Requena, Michelle B.; Lizarelli, Rosane F., Z.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    Blue LED system irradiation shows many important properties on skin as: bacterial decontamination, degradation of endogenous skin chromophores and biostimulation. In this clinical study we prove that the blue light improves the skin hydration. In the literature none authors reports this biological property on skin. Then this study aims to discuss the role of blue light in the skin hydration. Twenty patients were selected to this study with age between 25-35 years old and phototype I, II and III. A defined area from forearm was pre determined (A = 4.0 cm2). The study was randomized in two treatment groups using one blue light device (power of 5.3mW and irradiance of 10.8mW/cm2). The first treatment group was irradiated with 3J/cm2 (277seconds) and the second with 6J/cm2 (555 seconds). The skin hydration evaluations were done using a corneometer. The measurements were collected in 7, 14, 21 and 30 days, during the treatment. Statistical test of ANOVA, Tukey and T-Student were applied considering 5% of significance. In conclusion, both doses were able to improve the skin hydration; however, 6J/cm2 has kept this hydration for 30 days.

  18. Changes in guinea-pig dermal collagen during development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuttleworth, C.A.; Forrest, L.

    1975-01-01

    Guinea-pig dermis was digested with pepsin and the solubilized collagen molecules separated by differential salt precipitation at pH 7.5. Differences in subunit composition and amino acid analysis were noted between type I and type III collagen. Incorporation of radioactive proline into the developing foetus enabled isolation of labelled type I and type III collagens. Comparison of the specific activity of the isolated collagen molecules showed that type III collagen had a high specific activity in the early stages of foetal development, which decreased dramatically during foetal development. The specific activity of pepsin-solubilized type I collagen remained fairly constant during foetal development. (orig.) [de

  19. PEMBUATAN DAN UJI AKTIVITAS SEDIAAN GEL SCARLESS WOUND DENGAN EKSTRAK BINAHONG DAN ZAT AKTIF PIROXICAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayaga Divadi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Wound is a condition where the tissue integrity is damaged so that body will attempt to repair the damaged tissue by wound healing mechanism. This mechanism usually results in the scar formed by its inflammatory phase. Binahong (Anredera cordifolia (Ten. Steenis contains ascorbic acid and flavonoids which are important for collagen formation, to improve the rate of the wound healing process. Piroxicam can shorten or detain the inflammatory phase by inhibiting the cyclooxygenase (COX enzymes in the prostaglandine synthesis process, which play an important role in scar formation. The aim of this research is to discover if the combination of piroxicam and binahong extract in the scarless wound gel could offer scar reduction effect. In this research, a gel preparation with binahong extract was combined with piroxicam to develop the scarless wound gel (BinPirox. The research was purely experimental. It was done by conducting a histopathological test followed by collagen area calculation. The data were analyzed by independent sample t-test with 95% significancy level. In this research, the addition of piroxicam was expected to reduce the scar formation on incisional wound of white Swiss Webster mice (Mus musculus. The result showed that BinPirox formed statistically less scar when compared to Bin (a gel preparation with binahong extract.

  20. Disorganized collagen scaffold interferes with fibroblast mediated deposition of organized extracellular matrix in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidi, Nima; Guo, Xiaoqing; Hutcheon, Audrey E K; Sander, Edward A; Bale, Shyam Sundar; Melotti, Suzanna A; Zieske, James D; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2012-10-01

    Many tissue engineering applications require the remodeling of a degradable scaffold either in vitro or in situ. Although inefficient remodeling or failure to fully remodel the temporary matrix can result in a poor clinical outcome, very few investigations have examined in detail, the interaction of regenerative cells with temporary scaffoldings. In a recent series of investigations, randomly oriented collagen gels were directly implanted into human corneal pockets and followed for 24 months. The resulting remodeling response exhibited a high degree of variability which likely reflects differing regenerative/synthetic capacity across patients. Given this variability, we hypothesize that a disorganized, degradable provisional scaffold could be disruptive to a uniform, organized reconstruction of stromal matrix. In this investigation, two established corneal stroma tissue engineering culture systems (collagen scaffold-based and scaffold-free) were compared to determine if the presence of the disorganized collagen gel influenced matrix production and organizational control exerted by primary human corneal fibroblast cells (PHCFCs). PHCFCs were cultured on thin disorganized reconstituted collagen substrate (RCS--five donors: average age 34.4) or on a bare polycarbonate membrane (five donors: average age 32.4 controls). The organization and morphology of the two culture systems were compared over the long-term at 4, 8, and 11/12 weeks. Construct thickness and extracellular matrix organization/alignment was tracked optically with bright field and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. The details of cell/matrix morphology and cell/matrix interaction were examined with standard transmission, cuprolinic blue and quick-freeze/deep-etch electron microscopy. Both the scaffold-free and the collagen-based scaffold cultures produced organized arrays of collagen fibrils. However, at all time points, the amount of organized cell-derived matrix in the scaffold

  1. Biophysical behavior of Scomberoides commersonianus skin collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolli, Nagamalleswari; Joseph, K Thomas; Ramasami, T

    2002-06-01

    Some biophysical characteristics of the skin collagen from Scomberoides commersonianus were measured and compared to those of rat tail tendon. Stress-strain data indicate that the strain at break as well as the tensile strength of the fish skin without scales increased significantly. The maximum tension in case of rat skin is at least a factor of two higher than that observed in fish skin. The much lower hydrothermal isometric tension measurements observed in fish skin are attributable to a lesser number of heat stable crosslinks. Stress relaxation measurements in the fish skin indicate that more than one relaxation process may be involved in the stabilization of collagenous matrix. The observed differences in the biophysical behavior of fish skin may well arise from combination of changes in extent of hydroxylation of proline in collagen synthesis, hydrogen bond network and fibril orientation as compared to rat tail tendon.

  2. Collagenous gastritis in the pediatric age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rosell-Camps

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Collagenous gastritis (CG is an uncommon condition known in the pediatric age. It is characterized by the presence of subepithelial collagen bands (> 10 μm associated with lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the stomach's lamina propria. Symptoms manifested by patients with CG may be common with many other disorders. It typically manifests with epigastralgia, vomiting, and iron deficiency during pre-adolescence. This condition's pathophysiology remains unclear. In contrast to adults, where association with collagenous colitis and other autoimmune conditions is more common, pediatric involvement is usually confined to the stomach. Drugs of choice include proton pump inhibitors and corticoids. A case is reported of a 12-year-old girl with abdominal pain and ferritin deficiency who was diagnosed with CG based on gastric biopsy and experienced a favorable outcome.

  3. Effects of Nanosilica on Early Age Stages of Cement Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forood Torabian Isfahani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of nanosilica on cement hydration have been broadly investigated in the literature and early age cement hydration, as a whole, has been mainly considered, disregarding the substages of the hydration. The hydration of cement is characterized by different substages and nanosilica effect on the hydration could be a result of diverse, even contradictory, behavior of nanosilica in individual stages of the hydration. In this study, effects of nanosilica on different substages of cement hydration are investigated. Isothermal calorimetry results show that at early ages (initial 72 hours the effects of nanosilica depend on the phenomenon by which the hydration is governed: when the hydration is chemically controlled, that is, during initial reaction, dormant period, and acceleratory period, the hydration rate is accelerated by adding nanosilica; when the hydration is governed by diffusion process, that is, during postacceleratory period, the hydration rate is decelerated by adding nanosilica. The Thermal Gravimetric Analysis on the samples at the hardened state (after 28 days of curing reveals that, after adding nanosilica, the hydration degree slightly increased compared to the plain paste.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of silica gel from siliceous sands of southern Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sdiri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work aimed to achieve valorization of Albian sands for the preparation of sodium silicates that are commonly used as a precursor to prepare silica gel. A siliceous sand sample was mixed with sodium carbonate and heated at a high temperature (1060 °C to prepare sodium silicates. The sodium silicates were dissolved in distilled water to obtain high quality sodium silicate solution. Hydrochloric acid was then slowly added to the hydrated sodium silicates to obtain silica gel. The collected raw siliceous sands, as well as the prepared silica gels, were characterized by different techniques, such as X-ray fluorescence (XRF, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and thermal analysis (DSC. XRF confirmed that the detrital sand deposits of southern Tunisia contain high amounts of silica, with content ranging from 88.8% to 97.5%. The internal porosity varied between 17% and 22%, and the specific surface area was less than 5 m2/g. After the treatment described above, it was observed that the porosity of the obtained silica gel reached 57% and the specific surface area exceeded 340 m2/g. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms showed that the prepared silica gels are microporous and mesoporous materials with high adsorption capacities. These results suggest that the obtained silica gels are promising materials for numerous environmental applications.

  5. The role of pH in the vapor hydration at 175 °C of the French SON68 glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Chaou, Abdelouahed; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; El Mendili, Yassine; Martin, Christelle

    2017-01-01

    The French simulated nuclear waste SON68 glass was altered in the presence of water vapor at 175 °C and 98% of relative humidity under several atmospheres (NH_3, H_2S, CO_2 and argon). The objectives were to study the role of pH on hydration kinetics and secondary phases formation. The hydration was followed by infrared spectroscopy and the nature and extent of alteration products were determined by characterizing the reacted glass surface with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), μ-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The glass hydration/alteration rate clearly increased with increasing pH, that is controlled by the gas atmosphere, as the following: NH_3 > Ar > CO_2 > H_2S. This can directly be linked to the secondary phases precipitated on the glass surface. Hence, the major alteration products observed at high pH (under NH_3 and Ar) are analcime and Ca-silicates hydrates (CSH) while at low pH (under CO_2 and H_2S) only a hydrated gel layer was identified. - Highlights: • The vapor hydration study of the SON68 glass under geological conditions. • The secondary phases formation in the alteration of SON68 glass. • The pH effect on the alteration kinetics of glass.

  6. Methane hydrates in nature - Current knowledge and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated effort, the United States Congress enacted the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. At the same time, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan launched a research program to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. India, China, the Republic of Korea, and other nations also have established large methane hydrate research and development programs. Government-funded scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrates in nature. Numerous studies have shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world may exceed the volume of known organic carbon sources. However, methane hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge, and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of methane hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various methane hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural methane hydrates, (5) analyzing the methane hydrate role as a geohazard, (6) establishing the means to detect and characterize methane hydrate accumulations using geologic and geophysical data, and (7) establishing the thermodynamic phase equilibrium properties of methane hydrates as a function of temperature, pressure, and gas composition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) combined their efforts in 2012 to assess the contributions that scientific drilling has made and could continue to make to advance

  7. Intestinal epithelial organoids fuse to form self-organizing tubes in floating collagen gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sachs, Norman; Tsukamoto, Yoshiyuki; Kujala, Pekka; Peters, Peter J; Clevers, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Multiple recent examples highlight how stem cells can self-organize in vitro to establish organoids that closely resemble their in vivo counterparts. Single Lgr5+ mouse intestinal stem cells can be cultured under defined conditions forming ever-expanding epithelial organoids that retain cell

  8. Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Delivery into Collagen Gels Using Chitosan Microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-17

    Porous CSM of uniform size and composition were prepared and used as a stem cell carrier. ASC were allowed to attach to the microspheres and infiltrate...and viable, could be retrieved from the spheres, and maintained expression of stem - cell -specific markers. Electron microscopic evaluation of the cell

  9. Distinct characteristics of mandibular bone collagen relative to long bone collagen: relevance to clinical dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Takashi; Tokutomi, Kentaro; Sasaki, Michiko; Katafuchi, Michitsuna; Mizumachi, Emiri; Sato, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    Bone undergoes constant remodeling throughout life. The cellular and biochemical mechanisms of bone remodeling vary in a region-specific manner. There are a number of notable differences between the mandible and long bones, including developmental origin, osteogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells, and the rate of bone turnover. Collagen, the most abundant matrix protein in bone, is responsible for determining the relative strength of particular bones. Posttranslational modifications of collagen, such as intermolecular crosslinking and lysine hydroxylation, are the most essential determinants of bone strength, although the amount of collagen is also important. In comparison to long bones, the mandible has greater collagen content, a lower amount of mature crosslinks, and a lower extent of lysine hydroxylation. The great abundance of immature crosslinks in mandibular collagen suggests that there is a lower rate of cross-link maturation. This means that mandibular collagen is relatively immature and thus more readily undergoes degradation and turnover. The greater rate of remodeling in mandibular collagen likely renders more flexibility to the bone and leaves it more suited to constant exercise. As reviewed here, it is important in clinical dentistry to understand the distinctive features of the bones of the jaw.

  10. Distinct Characteristics of Mandibular Bone Collagen Relative to Long Bone Collagen: Relevance to Clinical Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Matsuura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone undergoes constant remodeling throughout life. The cellular and biochemical mechanisms of bone remodeling vary in a region-specific manner. There are a number of notable differences between the mandible and long bones, including developmental origin, osteogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells, and the rate of bone turnover. Collagen, the most abundant matrix protein in bone, is responsible for determining the relative strength of particular bones. Posttranslational modifications of collagen, such as intermolecular crosslinking and lysine hydroxylation, are the most essential determinants of bone strength, although the amount of collagen is also important. In comparison to long bones, the mandible has greater collagen content, a lower amount of mature crosslinks, and a lower extent of lysine hydroxylation. The great abundance of immature crosslinks in mandibular collagen suggests that there is a lower rate of cross-link maturation. This means that mandibular collagen is relatively immature and thus more readily undergoes degradation and turnover. The greater rate of remodeling in mandibular collagen likely renders more flexibility to the bone and leaves it more suited to constant exercise. As reviewed here, it is important in clinical dentistry to understand the distinctive features of the bones of the jaw.

  11. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel O.; Walsh, Michael M.

    1999-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel in order to mix its respective portion of liquid water with the corresponding portion of the stream. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  12. Hydration dynamics of hyaluronan and dextran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Johannes; Bernecker, Anja; Bakker, Huib J; Bonn, Mischa; Richter, Ralf P

    2012-07-03

    Hyaluronan is a polysaccharide, which is ubiquitous in vertebrates and has been reported to be strongly hydrated in a biological environment. We study the hydration of hyaluronan in solution using the rotational dynamics of water as a probe. We measure these dynamics with polarization-resolved femtosecond-infrared and terahertz time-domain spectroscopies. Both experiments reveal that a subensemble of water molecules is slowed down in aqueous solutions of hyaluronan amounting to ∼15 water molecules per disaccharide unit. This quantity is consistent with what would be expected for the first hydration shell. Comparison of these results to the water dynamics in aqueous dextran solution, a structurally similar polysaccharide, yields remarkably similar results. This suggests that the observed interaction with water is a common feature for hydrophilic polysaccharides and is not specific to hyaluronan. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Multicavity SCRF calculation of ion hydration energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercksen, B.H.F.; Karelson, M.; Tamm, T.

    1994-01-01

    The hydration energies of the proton, hydroxyl ion, and several inorganic ions were calculated using the multicavity self-consistent reaction field (MCa SCRF) method developed for the quantum-mechanical modeling of rotationally or flexible systems in dielectric media. The ionic complexes H 3 O + (H2O) 4 , OH - (H2O) 4 , NH + 4 (H2O) 4 , and Hal - (H2O) 4 , where Hal = F, Cl, or Br, have been studied. Each complex was divided between five spheres, corresponding to the central ion and four water molecules in their first coordination sphere, respectively. Each cavity was surrounded by a polarizable medium with the dielectric permittivity of water at room temperature (80). The ionic hydration energies of ions were divided into specific and nonspecific parts. After accounting for the cavity-formation energy using scaled particle theory, good agreement between the total calculated and experimental hydration energies was obtained for all ions studied

  14. Thermal expansion properties of calcium aluminate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Tae Woong

    1986-01-01

    In order to eliminate the effect of impurities and aggregates on the thermomechanical properties of the various calcium aluminate hydrates, and to prepare clinkers in which all calcium aluminates are mixed homogeneously, chemically pure CaO and Al 2 O 3 were weighed, blended and heated in various conditions. After quantitative X-ray diffractometry(QXRD), the synthesized clinker was hydrated and cured under the conditions of 30 deg C, W/C=0.5, relative humidity> 90% respectively during 24 hours. And then differential thermal analysis(DTA), thermogravimetry(TG), micro calorimetry, thermomechanical analysis(TMA) and scanning electron microanalysis(SEM) were applied to examine the thermal properties of samples containing, calcium aluminate hydrates in various quantity. (Author)

  15. THz characterization of hydrated and anhydrous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolnikov, Andre

    2011-06-01

    The characterization of anhydrous and hydrated forms of materials is of great importance to science and industry. Water content poses difficulties for successful identification of the material structure by THz radiation. However, biological tissues and hydrated forms of nonorganic substances still may be investigated by THz radiation. This paper outlines the range of possibilities of the above characterization, as well as provides analysis of the physical mechanism that allows or prevents penetration of THz waves through the substance. THz-TDS is used to measure the parameters of the characterization of anhydrous and hydrated forms of organic and nonorganic samples. Mathematical methods (such as prediction models of time-series analysis) are used to help identifying the absorption coefficient and other parameters of interest. The discovered dependencies allow designing techniques for material identification/characterization (e.g. of drugs, explosives, etc. that may have water content). The results are provided.

  16. Relaxation mechanism of the hydrated electron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Madeline H; Williams, Holly L; Shreve, Alexander T; Neumark, Daniel M

    2013-12-20

    The relaxation dynamics of the photoexcited hydrated electron have been subject to conflicting interpretations. Here, we report time-resolved photoelectron spectra of hydrated electrons in a liquid microjet with the aim of clarifying ambiguities from previous experiments. A sequence of three ultrashort laser pulses (~100 femtosecond duration) successively created hydrated electrons by charge-transfer-to-solvent excitation of dissolved anions, electronically excited these electrons via the s→p transition, and then ejected them into vacuum. Two distinct transient signals were observed. One was assigned to the initially excited p-state with a lifetime of ~75 femtoseconds, and the other, with a lifetime of ~400 femtoseconds, was attributed to s-state electrons just after internal conversion in a nonequilibrated solvent environment. These assignments support the nonadiabatic relaxation model.

  17. The impact of zirconium oxide radiopacifier on the early hydration behaviour of white Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Nichola J; Li, Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium oxide has been identified as a candidate radiopacifying agent for use in Portland cement-based biomaterials. During this study, the impact of 20 wt.% zirconium oxide on the hydration and setting reactions of white Portland cement (WPC) was monitored by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), (29)Si and (27)Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Vicat apparatus. The presence of 20 wt.% zirconium oxide particles in the size-range of 0.2 to 5 μm was found to reduce the initial and final setting times of WPC from 172 to 147 min and 213 to 191 min, respectively. Zirconium oxide did not formally participate in the chemical reactions of the hydrating cement; however, the surface of the zirconium oxide particles presented heterogeneous nucleation sites for the precipitation and growth of the early C-S-H gel products which accelerated the initial setting reactions. The presence of zirconium oxide was found to have little impact on the development of the calcium (sulpho)aluminate hydrate phases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance of a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Na; Li, Hongxu [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Rare and Precious Metals Green Recycling and Extraction, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhao, Yazhao [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Xiaoming, E-mail: liuxm@ustb.edu.cn [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Rare and Precious Metals Green Recycling and Extraction, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-04-05

    Highlights: • Cementitious material was designed according to [SiO{sub 4}] polymerization degree of raw materials. • The cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag yields excellent physical and mechanical properties. • Amorphous C–A–S–H gel and rod-like ettringite are predominantly responsible for the strength development. • Leaching toxicity and radioactivity tests show the cementitious material is environmentally acceptable. - Abstract: Calcium silicate slag is an alkali leaching waste generated during the process of extracting Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} from high-alumina fly ash. In this research, a cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was developed, and its mechanical and physical properties, hydration characteristics and environmental friendly performance were investigated. The results show that an optimal design for the cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag was determined by the specimen CFSC7 containing 30% calcium silicate slag, 5% high-alumina fly ash, 24% blast furnace slag, 35% clinker and 6% FGD gypsum. This blended system yields excellent physical and mechanical properties, confirming the usefulness of CFSC7. The hydration products of CFSC7 are mostly amorphous C–A–S–H gel, rod-like ettringite and hexagonal-sheet Ca(OH){sub 2} with small amount of zeolite-like minerals such as CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}·4H{sub 2}O and Na{sub 2}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}·H{sub 2}O. As the predominant hydration products, rod-like ettringite and amorphous C–A–S–H gel play a positive role in promoting densification of the paste structure, resulting in strength development of CFSC7 in the early hydration process. The leaching toxicity and radioactivity tests results indicate that the developed cementitious material composed of calcium silicate slag is environmentally acceptable. This study points out a promising direction for the proper utilization of calcium silicate slag in large quantities.

  19. Chemical Gel for Surface Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Moon, J. K.; Won, H. J.; Lee, K. W.; Kim, C. K.

    2010-01-01

    Many chemical decontamination processes operate by immersing components in aggressive chemical solutions. In these applications chemical decontamination technique produce large amounts of radioactive liquid waste. Therefore it is necessary to develop processes using chemical gels instead of chemical solutions, to avoid the well-known disadvantages of chemical decontamination techniques while retaining their high efficiency. Chemical gels decontamination process consists of applying the gel by spraying it onto the surface of large area components (floors, walls, etc) to be decontaminated. The gel adheres to any vertical or complex surface due to their thixotropic properties and operates by dissolving the radioactive deposit, along with a thin layer of the gel support, so that the radioactivity trapped at the surface can be removed. Important aspects of the gels are that small quantities can be used and they show thixitropic properties : liquid during spraying, and solid when stationary, allowing for strong adherence to surfaces. This work investigates the decontamination behaviors of organic-based chemical gel for SS 304 metallic surfaces contaminated with radioactive materials

  20. Immune responses to implanted human collagen graft in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quteish, D.; Dolby, A.E.

    1991-01-01

    Immunity to collagen implants may be mediated by cellular and humoral immune responses. To examine the possibility of such immunological reactivity and crossreactivity to collagen, 39 Sprague-Dawley rats (female, 10 weeks old, approximately 250 g wt) were implanted subcutaneously at thigh sites with crosslinked, freeze-dried human placental type I collagen grafts (4x4x2 mm) which had been irradiated (520 Gray) or left untreated. Blood was obtained by intracardiac sampling prior to implantation or from normal rats, and at various times afterwards when the animals were sacrificed. The sera from these animals were examined for circulating antibodies to human, bovine and rat tail (type I) collagens by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Also, the lymphoblastogenic responses of spleen lymphocytes from the irradiated collagen-implanted animals were assessed in culture by measuring thymidine uptake with autologous and normal rat sera in the presence of human bovine type I collagens. Implantation of the irradiated and non-irradiated collagen graft in rats led to a significant increase in the level of circulating antibodies to human collagen. Also antibody to bovine and rat tail collagens was detectable in the animals implanted with irradiated collagen grafts but at a lower level than the human collagen. There was a raised lymphoblastogenic response to both human and bovine collagens. The antibody level and lymphoblastogenesis to the tested collagens gradually decreased towards the end of the post-implantation period. (author)

  1. Characterisation of products of tricalcium silicate hydration in the presence of heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Q.Y.; Hills, C.D.; Tyrer, M.; Slipper, I.; Shen, H.G.; Brough, A.

    2007-01-01

    The hydration of tricalcium silicate (C 3 S) in the presence of heavy metal is very important to cement-based solidification/stabilisation (s/s) of waste. In this work, tricalcium silicate pastes and aqueous suspensions doped with nitrate salts of Zn 2+ , Pb 2+ , Cu 2+ and Cr 3+ were examined at different ages by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), thermal analysis (DTA/TG) and 29 Si solid-state magic angle spinning/nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS/NMR). It was found that heavy metal doping accelerated C 3 S hydration, even though Zn 2+ doping exhibited a severe retardation effect at an early period of time of C 3 S hydration. Heavy metals retarded the precipitation of portlandite due to the reduction of pH resulted from the hydrolysis of heavy metal ions during C 3 S hydration. The contents of portlandite in the control, Cr 3+ -doped, Cu 2+ -doped, Pb 2+ -doped and Zn 2+ -doped C 3 S pastes aged 28 days were 16.7, 5.5, 5.5, 5.5, and 2 Cr(OH) 7 .3H 2 O, Ca 2 (OH) 4 4Cu(OH) 2 .2H 2 O and CaZn 2 (OH) 6 .2H 2 O). These compounds were identified as crystalline phases in heavy metal doping C 3 S suspensions and amorphous phases in heavy metal doping C 3 S pastes. 29 Si NMR data confirmed that heavy metals promoted the polymerisation of C-S-H gel in 1-year-old of C 3 S pastes. The average numbers of Si in C-S-H gel for the Zn 2+ -doped, Cu 2+ -doped, Cr 3+ -doped, control, and Pb 2+ -doped C 3 S pastes were 5.86, 5.11, 3.66, 3.62, and 3.52. And the corresponding Ca/Si ratios were 1.36, 1.41, 1.56, 1.57 and 1.56, respectively. This study also revealed that the presence of heavy metal facilitated the formation of calcium carbonate during C 3 S hydration process in the presence of carbon dioxide

  2. Ground movements associated with gas hydrate production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siriwardane, H.J.; Kutuk, B.

    1992-03-01

    This report deals with a study directed towards a modeling effort on production related ground movements and subsidence resulting from hydrate dissociation. The goal of this research study was to evaluate whether there could be subsidence related problems that could be an impediment to hydrate production. During the production of gas from a hydrate reservoir, it is expected that porous reservoir matrix becomes more compressible which may cause reservoir compression (compaction) under the influence of overburden weight. The overburden deformations can propagate its influence upwards causing subsidence near the surface where production equipment will be located. In the present study, the reservoir compaction is modeled by using the conventional ''stress equilibrium'' approach. In this approach, the overburden strata move under the influence of body force (i.e. self weight) in response to the ''cavity'' generated by reservoir depletion. The present study is expected to provide a ''lower bound'' solution to the subsidence caused by hydrate reservoir depletion. The reservoir compaction anticipated during hydrate production was modeled by using the finite element method, which is a powerful computer modeling technique. The ground movements at the reservoir roof (i.e. reservoir compression) cause additional stresses and disturbance in the overburden strata. In this study, the reservoir compaction was modeled by using the conventional ''stress equilibrium'' approach. In this approach, the overburden strata move under the influence of body force (i.e. self weight) in response to the ''cavity'' generated by reservoir depletion. The resulting stresses and ground movements were computed by using the finite element method. Based on the parameters used in this investigation, the maximum ground subsidence could vary anywhere from 0.50 to 6.50 inches depending on the overburden depth and the size of the depleted hydrate reservoir

  3. Irrigation port hydration in phacoemulsification surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki H

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hisaharu Suzuki,1 Yoichiro Masuda,2 Yuki Hamajima,1 Hiroshi Takahashi3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Nippon Medical School Musashikosugi Hospital, Kawasaki City, Kanagawa, 2Department of Ophthalmology, The Jikei University, Katsushika Medical Center, Tokyo, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan Background: In most cases, hydration is performed by water injection into the stromal tissue with a needle. The technique is simple, however it is sometimes troublesome.Purpose: We describe a simple technique for hydrating the corneal stroma in cataract surgery using an irrigation port.Patients and methods: The technique began by pushing the irrigation port against the corneal stroma for a few seconds during phacoemulsification, which generated edema in the corneal incision that subsequently prevented leakage. This procedure is called the hydration using irrigation port (HYUIP technique. A total of 60 eyes were randomized and placed in two groups, 30 eyes underwent surgeries using the HYUIP technique (HYUIP group and 30 eyes underwent surgeries without the HYUIP technique (control. The three points evaluated during each surgery included 1 the occurrence of anterior chamber collapse during the pulling out of the I/A tip after inserting the intraocular lens, 2 the need for conventional hydration, and 3 watertight completion at the end stage of surgery.Results: The anterior chamber collapse and the need for conventional hydration were significantly smaller in the HYUIP group compared to the control group. Regarding the self-sealing completion, no significant difference was observed between the two groups.Conclusion: The HYUIP technique is an effective method for creating self-sealing wound. In addition, this technique helps to prevent anterior chamber collapse. Keywords: cataract surgery, hydration, irrigation and aspiration, phacoemulsification, wound, self-sealing 

  4. Hydration and nutrition knowledge in adolescent swimmers. Does water intake affect urine hydration markers after swimming?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Altavilla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Little data exists regarding nutritional knowledge and hydration in adolescent swimmers. The aim of this study was to assess the level of nutrition and hydration knowledge and to describe the fluid balance in adolescent swimmers during training. A study was carried out with a cross-sectional descriptive part and a longitudinal part with repeated measurements over five swimming sessions. Eighty-six adolescent swimmers completed a questionnaire to assess their sport nutrition and hydration knowledge. Fluid balance and urine hydration markers were studied during training. Swimmers showed a limited nutrition knowledge (33.26 % ± SD 12.59 and meagre hydration knowledge (28.61 % ± SD 28.59. Females showed lower scores than male swimmers in nutrition and hydration knowledge. Based on urine specific gravity, swimmers started the training close to the euhydrated threshold (1.019 g/mL ± SD 0.008. Although urine specific gravity and urine colour were reduced after the training, there were minimal changes in body mass (-0.12 Kg ± SD 0.31. Sweat loss (2.67 g/min ± SD 3.23 and the net changes in the fluid balance (-0.22 % ± SD 0.59 were low. The poor knowledge in nutrition and hydration encountered in the swimmers can justify the development of a strategy to incorporate nutritional education programmes for this group. Body water deficit from swimming activity seems to be easily replaced with the water intake to maintain hydration. After the training, the urine of swimmers was diluted regardless of their water intake. Dilution of urine did not reflect real hydration state in swimming.

  5. Crosslinked collagen-gelatin-hyaluronic acid biomimetic film for cornea tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang; Ren, Li, E-mail: psliren@scut.edu.cn; Wang, Yingjun, E-mail: imwangyj@163.com

    2013-01-01

    Cornea disease may lead to blindness and keratoplasty is considered as an effective treatment method. However, there is a severe shortage of donor corneas worldwide. This paper presents the crosslinked collagen (Col)-gelatin (Gel)-hyaluronic acid (HA) films developed by making use of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) as the crosslinker. The test results on the physical and biological properties indicate that the CGH631 film (the mass ratio of Col:Gel:HA = 6:3:1) has appropriate optical performance, hydrophilicity and mechanical properties. The diffusion properties of the CGH631 film to NaCl and tryptophan are also satisfactory and the measured data are 2.43 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} cm{sup 2}/s and 7.97 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} cm{sup 2}/s, respectively. In addition, cell viability studies demonstrate that the CGH631 film has good biocompatibility, on which human corneal epithelial cells attached and proliferated well. This biocompatible film may have potential use in cornea tissue engineering. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crosslinked collagen-gelatin-hyaluronic acid films were fabricated in this study. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The film had appropriate physical properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diffusion coefficient of the film was comparable with the human cornea. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCEC viability studies confirmed the biocompatibility of the film.

  6. Stability of Collagen Scaffold Implants for Animals with Iatrogenic Articular Cartilage Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Jančář

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis and characterization of biodegradable hydrogels based on collagen modified by addition of synthetic biodegradable copolymer intended for preparation of porous scaffolds for mesenchymal stem cells used for possible implantation to animals with articular surface defects was investigated. The synthetic biodegradable tri-block copolymer used was the block copolymer of polyethylene glycol (PEG, polylactic acid (PLA, polyglycolic acid (PGA (PEG-PLGA endcapped with itaconic acid (ITA. The water-soluble carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccimide system (EDC-NHS was chosen as the cross-linking agent used to control the rate of hydrogel resorption. Dependence of the physical properties of the prepared hydrogels on the concentration of the EDC-NHS cross-linker, reaction time and concentration of PEG-PLGA-ITA copolymer was examined. Swelling behaviour, thermal stability, surface morphology and degradation rate were also characterized. Based on the obtained results, it can be concluded that increase in concentration of the cross-linking agent, as well as prolonged cross-linking time and increased amount of synthetic copolymer lead to enhanced thermal stability of the gels together with a reduced swelling ratio and degradation rate in saline. The resorption rate of these gels used in preparation of cartilage scaffolds can be controlled over a wide time interval by varying the collagen/(PEG-PLGA-ITA blend composition or the conditions of the cross-linking reaction.

  7. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocherginskaya, S.A.; Cann, I.K.O.; Mackie, R.I.

    2005-01-01

    It is worthwhile considering that only some 30 species make up the bulk of the bacterial population in human faeces at any one time based on the classical cultivation-based approach. The situation in the rumen is similar. Thus, it is practical to focus on specific groups of interest within the complex community. These may be the predominant or the most active species, specific physiological groups or readily identifiable (genetic) clusters of phylogenetically related organisms. Several 16S rDNA fingerprinting techniques can be invaluable for selecting and monitoring sequences or phylogenetic groups of interest and are described below. Over the past few decades, considerable attention was focussed on the identification of pure cultures of microbes on the basis of genetic polymorphisms of DNA encoding rRNA such as ribotyping, amplified fragment length polymorphism and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA. However, many of these methods require prior cultivation and are less suitable for use in analysis of complex mixed populations although important in describing cultivated microbial diversity in molecular terms. Much less attention was given to molecular characterization of complex communities. In particular, research into diversity and community structure over time has been revolutionized by the advent of molecular fingerprinting techniques for complex communities. Denaturing or temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE/TGGE) methods have been successfully applied to the analysis of human, pig, cattle, dog and rodent intestinal populations

  8. Electron density analysis of the effects of sugars on the structure of lipid bilayers at low hydration - a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenné, T.; Kent, B.; Koster, K.L.; Garvey, C.J.; Bryant, G. (ANSTO); (USD); (ANU); (RMIT)

    2012-02-06

    Small angle X-ray scattering is used to study the effects of sugars on membranes during dehydration. Previous work has shown that the bilayer and chain-chain repeat spacings of DPPC bilayers are relatively unaffected by the presence of sugars. In this work we present a preliminary analysis of the electron density profiles of DPPC in the presence of sugars at low hydration. The difficulties of determining the correct phasing are discussed. Sugars and other small solutes have been shown to have an important role in improving the tolerance of a range of species to desiccation and freezing. In particular it has been shown that sugars can stabilize membranes in the fluid membrane phase during dehydration, and in the fully dehydrated state. Equivalently, at a particular hydration, the presence of sugars lowers the transition temperature between the fluid and gel phases. There are two competing models for explaining the effects of sugars on membrane phase transition temperatures. One, designated the water replacement hypothesis (WRH) states that sugars hydrogen bond to phospholipid headgroups, thus hindering the fluid-gel phase transition. One version of this model suggests that certain sugars (such as trehalose) achieve the measured effects by inserting between the phospholipid head groups. An alternative model explains the observed effects of sugars in terms of the sugars effect on the hydration repulsion that develops between opposing membranes during dehydration. The hydration repulsion leads to a lateral compressive stress in the bilayer which squeezes adjacent lipids more closely together, resulting in a transition to the gel phase. When sugars are present, their osmotic and volumetric effects reduce the hydration repulsion, reduce the compressive stress in the membranes, and therefore tend to maintain the average lateral separation between lipids. This model is called the hydration forces explanation (HFE). We recently showed that neither mono- nor di

  9. Thermal decomposition of uranyl sulphate hydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, T.; Ozawa, F.; Ikoma, S.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of uranyl sulphate hydrate (UO 2 SO 4 .3H 2 O) has been investigated by thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and infrared spectrophotometry. As a result, it is concluded that uranyl sulphate hydrate decomposes thermally: UO 2 SO 4 .3H 2 O → UO 2 SO 4 .xH 2 O(2.5 = 2 SO 4 . 2H 2 O → UO 2 SO 4 .H 2 O → UO 2 SO 4 → α-UO 2 SO 4 → β-UO 2 SO 4 → U 3 O 8 . (author)

  10. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.; Chae, S. R.; Benmore, C. J.; Wenk, H. R.; Monteiro, P. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  11. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  12. Spectral Decomposition and Other Seismic Attributes for Gas Hydrate Prospecting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Dan

    2018-02-25

    Studying the sediments at the base of gas hydrate stability is ideal for determining the seismic response to gas hydrate saturation. First, assuming gas migration to the shallow section, this area is more likely to have concentrated gas hydrate because it encompasses the zone in which upward moving buoyant gas transitions to form immobile gas hydrate deposits. Second, this zone is interesting because these areas have the potential to show a hydrate filled zone and a gas filled zone within the same sediments. Third, the fundamental measurement within seismic data is impedance contrasts between velocity*density layers. High saturation gas hydrates and free gas inhabit opposite ends of these measurements making the study of this zone ideal for investigating the seismic characteristics of gas hydrate and, hence, the investigation of other seismic attributes that may indicate gas hydrate fill.

  13. The rates measurement of methane hydrate formation and dissociation using micro-drilling system application for gas hydrate exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bin Dou [Engineering Faculty, China Univ. of Geosciences, Wuhan (China)]|[Inst. of Petroleum Engineering, Technology Univ. of Clausthal (Germany); Reinicke, K.M. [Inst. of Petroleum Engineering, Technology Univ. of Clausthal (Germany); Guosheng Jiang; Xiang Wu; Fulong Ning [Engineering Faculty, China Univ. of Geosciences, Wuhan (China)

    2006-07-01

    When drilling through gas hydrate bearing formations, the energy supplied by virtue of the drilling process may lead to a destabilization of the hydrates surrounding the wellbore. Therefore, as the number of oil and gas fields being development in deepwater and onshore arctic environments increases, greater emphasis should be placed on quantifying the risks, gas hydrates pose to drilling operations. The qualification of these risks requires a comprehensive understanding of gas hydrate-formation and dissociation as a result of drilling induced processes. To develop the required understanding of gas hydrat formation and dissociation, the authors conducted laboratory experiments by using a micro-drilling system, to study the dissociation rates of methane hydrates contained in a tank reactor. The test facility used is a development of China University of Geosciences. The rates of methane hydrate formation and dissociation in the tank reactor were measured at steady-state conditions at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 25 MPa and temperatures ranging from -5 to 20 C. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by the fluid system used to form the hydrates, pressure and temperature, with the influence of the temperature on methane hydrate dissociation being stronger than that of the pressure. Drilling speed, drilling fluids and hydrate dissociation inhibitors were also shown to influence hydrate dissociation rate. The derived results have been used to predict hydrate drilling stability for several drilling fluid systems.

  14. Investigation of water mobility and diffusivity in hydrating micronized low-substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose, hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose, and hydroxypropyl cellulose matrix tablets by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Masazumi; Nakagami, Hiroaki

    2002-12-01

    The water mobility and diffusivity in the gel-layer of hydrating low-substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose (LH41) tablets with or without a drug were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and compared with those properties in the gel-layer of hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC) and hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) tablets. For this purpose, a localized image-analysis method was newly developed, and the spin-spin relaxation time (T(2)) and apparent self-diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water in the gel-layer were visualized in one-dimensional maps. Those maps showed that the extent of gel-layer growth in the tablets was in the order of HPC>HPMC>LH41, and there was a water mobility gradient across the gel-layers of all three tablet formulations. The T(2) and ADC in the outer parts of the gel-layers were close to those of free water. In contrast, these values in the inner parts of the gel-layer decreased progressively; suggesting that the water mobility and diffusivity around the core interface were highly restricted. Furthermore, the correlation between the T(2) of (1)H proton in the gel-layer of the tablets and the drug release rate from the tablets was observed.

  15. Investigation of water mobility and diffusivity in hydrating micronized low-substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose, hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose, and hydroxypropyl cellulose matrix tablets by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Masazumi; Nakagami, Hiroaki

    2002-01-01

    The water mobility and diffusivity in the gel-layer of hydrating low-substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose (LH41) tablets with or without a drug were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and compared with those properties in the gel-layer of hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC) and hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) tablets. For this purpose, a localized image-analysis method was newly developed, and the spin-spin relaxation time (T 2 ) and apparent self-diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water in the gel-layer were visualized in one-dimensional maps. Those maps showed that the extent of gel-layer growth in the tablets was in the order of HPC>HPMC>>LH41, and there was a water mobility gradient across the gel-layers of all three tablet formulations. The T 2 and ADC in the outer parts of the gel-layers were close to those of free water. In contrast, these values in the inner parts of the gel-layer decreased progressively; suggesting that the water mobility and diffusivity around the core interface were highly restricted. Furthermore, the correlation between the T 2 of 1 H proton in the gel-layer of the tablets and the drug release rate from the tablets was observed. (author)

  16. Marine Gas Hydrates - An Untapped Non-conventional Energy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Marine Gas Hydrates - An Untapped Non-conventional Energy Resource · Slide 2 · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Gas Hydrate Stability Zone · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Exploration of gas hydrates (seismic) · Characteristics of BSR · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Distribution of Gas Hydrates in KG ...

  17. Study of collagen metabolism after β radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yinghui; Xulan; Wu Shiliang; Zhang Xueguang; Chen Liesong

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the change of collagen metabolism and it's regulation after β radiation. Method: The animal model of β radiation injury was established by the β radiation produced by the linear accelerator; and irradiated NIH 3T3 cells were studied. In the experiment the contents of total collagen, collagen type I and type III were measured. The activity of MMPs-1 was tested. The contents of TGF-β 1 , IL-6 were also detected. Results: After exposure to β radiation, little change was found in the content of total collagen, but the content of collagen I decreased and the content of collagen III, MMPs-1 activity increased; the expression of TGF-β 1 , IL-6 increased. Conclusion: The changes in the metabolism of collagen play an important role in the irradiated injury of the skin; TGF-β 1 and IL-6 may be essential in the regulation of the collagen metabolism

  18. Correlation between the viscoelastic properties of the gel layer of swollen HPMC matrix tablets and their in vitro drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Rania; Al Baraghthi, Tamadur; Sunoqrot, Suhair

    2016-11-21

    Drug release from hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) hydrophilic matrix tablets is controlled by drug diffusion through the gel layer of the matrix-forming polymer upon hydration, matrix erosion or combination of diffusion and erosion mechanisms. In this study, the relationship between viscoelastic properties of the gel layer of swollen intact matrix tablets and drug release was investigated. Two sets of quetiapine fumarate (QF) matrix tablets were prepared using the high viscosity grade HPMC K4M at low (70 mg/tablet) and high (170 mg/tablet) polymer concentrations. Viscoelastic studies using a controlled stress rheometer were performed on swollen matrices following hydration in the dissolution medium for predetermined time intervals. The gel layer of swollen tablets exhibited predominantly elastic behavior. Results from the in vitro release study showed that drug release was strongly influenced by the viscoelastic properties of the gel layer of K4M tablets, which was further corroborated by results from water uptake studies conducted on intact tablets. The results provide evidence that the viscoelastic properties of the gel layer can be exploited to guide the selection of an appropriate matrix-forming polymer, to better understand the rate of drug release from matrix tablets in vitro and to develop hydrophilic controlled-release formulations.

  19. Hydrate bearing clayey sediments: Formation and gas production concepts

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Jaewon; Santamarina, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Hydro-thermo-chemo and mechanically coupled processes determine hydrate morphology and control gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments. Force balance, together with mass and energy conservation analyses anchored in published data provide robust asymptotic solutions that reflect governing processes in hydrate systems. Results demonstrate that hydrate segregation in clayey sediments results in a two-material system whereby hydrate lenses are surrounded by hydrate-free water-saturated clay. Hydrate saturation can reach ≈2% by concentrating the excess dissolved gas in the pore water and ≈20% from metabolizable carbon. Higher hydrate saturations are often found in natural sediments and imply methane transport by advection or diffusion processes. Hydrate dissociation is a strongly endothermic event; the available latent heat in a reservoir can sustain significant hydrate dissociation without triggering ice formation during depressurization. The volume of hydrate expands 2-to-4 times upon dissociation or CO2single bondCH4 replacement. Volume expansion can be controlled to maintain lenses open and to create new open mode discontinuities that favor gas recovery. Pore size is the most critical sediment parameter for hydrate formation and gas recovery and is controlled by the smallest grains in a sediment. Therefore any characterization must carefully consider the amount of fines and their associated mineralogy.

  20. Standardization and software infrastructure for gas hydrate data communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroenlein, K.; Chirico, R.D.; Kazakov, A.; Frenkel, M. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States). Physical and Chemical Properties Div.; Lowner, R. [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (Germany); Wang, W. [Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing (China). Computer Network Information Center; Smith, T. [MIT Systems, Flushing, NY (United States); Sloan, E.D. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Centre for Hydrate Research

    2008-07-01

    The perceived value of gas hydrates as an energy resource for the future has led to extensive hydrate research studies and experiments. The hydrate deposits are widely dispersed throughout the world, and many countries are now investigating methods of extracting gas hydrate resources. This paper described a gas hydrates markup language (GHML) developed as an international standard for data transfer and storage within the gas hydrates community. The language is related to a hydrates database developed to facilitate a greater understanding of naturally occurring hydrate interactions with geophysical processes, and aid in the development of hydrate technologies for resource recovery and storage. Recent updates to the GHML included the addition of ThermoML, a communication standard for thermodynamic data into the GHML schema. The standard will be used to represent all gas hydrates thermodynamic data. A new element for the description of crystal structures has also been developed, as well as a guided data capture tool. The tool is available free of charge and is publicly licensed for use by gas hydrate data producers. A web service has also been provided to ensure that access to GHML files for gas hydrates and data files are available for users. It was concluded that the tool will help to ensure data quality assurance for the conversion of data and meta-data within the database. 28 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Small angle X-ray scattering from hydrating tricalcium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollet, D.

    1983-01-01

    The small-angle X-ray scattering technique was used to study the structural evolution of hydrated tricalcium silicate at room temperature. The changes in specific area of the associated porosity and the evolution of density fluctuations in the solid hydrated phase were deduced from the scattering data. A correlation of these variations with the hydration mechanism is tried. (Author) [pt

  2. Hydrate bearing clayey sediments: Formation and gas production concepts

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Jaewon

    2016-06-20

    Hydro-thermo-chemo and mechanically coupled processes determine hydrate morphology and control gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments. Force balance, together with mass and energy conservation analyses anchored in published data provide robust asymptotic solutions that reflect governing processes in hydrate systems. Results demonstrate that hydrate segregation in clayey sediments results in a two-material system whereby hydrate lenses are surrounded by hydrate-free water-saturated clay. Hydrate saturation can reach ≈2% by concentrating the excess dissolved gas in the pore water and ≈20% from metabolizable carbon. Higher hydrate saturations are often found in natural sediments and imply methane transport by advection or diffusion processes. Hydrate dissociation is a strongly endothermic event; the available latent heat in a reservoir can sustain significant hydrate dissociation without triggering ice formation during depressurization. The volume of hydrate expands 2-to-4 times upon dissociation or CO2single bondCH4 replacement. Volume expansion can be controlled to maintain lenses open and to create new open mode discontinuities that favor gas recovery. Pore size is the most critical sediment parameter for hydrate formation and gas recovery and is controlled by the smallest grains in a sediment. Therefore any characterization must carefully consider the amount of fines and their associated mineralogy.

  3. Immunosuppression by fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in collagen arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCune, W.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Belli, J.A.; Trentham, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    Treatments with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and cyclophosphamide were evaluated for rats injected with type II collagen. Preadministration of TLI and repeated injections of cyclophosphamide suppressed the severity of arthritis and lowered antibody titers to collagen significantly. TLI initiated at the onset of collagen arthritis decreased humoral and cellular responses to collagen but did not affect the severity of arthritis. These data demonstrate that both TLi and cyclophosphamide are immunosuppressive in an experimentally inducible autoimmune disease

  4. Measurement of skeletal muscle collagen breakdown by microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, B F; Ellis, D; Robinson, M M

    2011-01-01

    Exercise increases the synthesis of collagen in the extracellular matrix of skeletal muscle. Breakdown of skeletal muscle collagen has not yet been determined because of technical limitations. The purpose of the present study was to use local sampling to determine skeletal muscle collagen breakdown...... collagen breakdown 17–21 h post-exercise, and our measurement of OHP using GC–MS was in agreement with traditional assays....

  5. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this conference paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence and summarize the findings of clinical trials published after 2002 using fluoride mouth rinses, fluoride gels or foams for the prevention of dental caries. METHODS: Relevant papers were selected after...... (6 on fluoride mouth rinse, 10 on fluoride gel and 3 on fluoride foam); 6 had a low risk of bias while 2 had a moderate risk. All fluoride measures appeared to be beneficial in preventing crown caries and reversing root caries, but the quality of evidence was graded as low for fluoride mouth rinse......, moderate for fluoride gel and very low for acidulated fluoride foam. No conclusions could be drawn on the cost-effectiveness. CONCLUSIONS: This review, covering the recent decade, has further substantiated the evidence for a caries-preventive effect of fluoride mouth rinse, fluoride gel and foam...

  6. Collagen gene interactions and endurance running performance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to complete any of the individual components (3.8 km swim, 180 km bike or 42.2 km run) of the 226 km event. The major ... may affect normal collagen fibrillogenesis and alter the mechanical properties of ... using a XP Thermal Cycler (Block model XP-G, BIOER Technology Co.,. Japan). ..... New insights into the function of.

  7. The collagenic architecture of human dura mater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protasoni, Marina; Sangiorgi, Simone; Cividini, Andrea; Culuvaris, Gloria Tiffany; Tomei, Giustino; Dell'Orbo, Carlo; Raspanti, Mario; Balbi, Sergio; Reguzzoni, Marcella

    2011-06-01

    Human dura mater is the most external meningeal sheet surrounding the CNS. It provides an efficient protection to intracranial structures and represents the most important site for CSF turnover. Its intrinsic architecture is made up of fibrous tissue including collagenic and elastic fibers that guarantee the maintenance of its biophysical features. The recent technical advances in the repair of dural defects have allowed for the creation of many synthetic and biological grafts. However, no detailed studies on the 3D microscopic disposition of collagenic fibers in dura mater are available. The authors report on the collagenic 3D architecture of normal dura mater highlighting the orientation, disposition in 3 dimensions, and shape of the collagen fibers with respect to the observed layer. Thirty-two dura mater specimens were collected during cranial decompressive surgical procedures, fixed in 2.5% Karnovsky solution, and digested in 1 N NaOH solution. After a routine procedure, the specimens were observed using a scanning electron microscope. The authors distinguished the following 5 layers in the fibrous dura mater of varying thicknesses, orientation, and structures: bone surface, external median, vascular, internal median, and arachnoid layers. The description of the ultrastructural 3D organization of the different layers of dura mater will give us more information for the creation of synthetic grafts that are as similar as possible to normal dura mater. This description will be also related to the study of the neoplastic invasion.

  8. Edaravone suppresses degradation of type II collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen; Liao, Guangjun; Han, Jian; Zhang, Guofeng; Zou, Benguo

    2016-05-13

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease affecting millions of people. The degradation and loss of type II collagen induced by proinflammatory cytokines secreted by chondrocytes, such as factor-α (TNF-α) is an important pathological mechanism to the progression of OA. Edaravone is a potent free radical scavenger, which has been clinically used to treat the neuronal damage following acute ischemic stroke. However, whether Edaravone has a protective effect in articular cartilage hasn't been reported before. In this study, we investigated the chondrocyte protective effects of Edaravone on TNF-α induced degradation of type Ⅱ collagen. And our results indicated that TNF-α treatment resulted in degradation of type Ⅱ collagen, which can be ameliorated by treatment with Edaravone in a dose dependent manner. Notably, it was found that the inhibitory effects of Edaravone on TNF-α-induced reduction of type Ⅱ collagen were mediated by MMP-3 and MMP-13. Mechanistically, we found that Edaravone alleviated TNF-α induced activation of STAT1 and expression of IRF-1. These findings suggest a potential protective effect of Edaravone in OA. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Multiscale structure and mechanics of collagen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amuasi, H.E.

    2012-01-01

    While we are 70% water, in a very real sense collagen is the stuff we are made of. It is the most abundant protein in multicellular organisms, such as ourselves, making up roughly 25% of our total protein content. If you have ever wondered how the human body holds together all its different parts in

  10. Peroxidase enzymes regulate collagen extracellular matrix biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Rayner, Timothy E; Borowicz, Romana A; Greenwood, John E; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase are heme-containing enzymes often physically associated with fibrotic tissue and cancer in various organs, without any direct involvement in promoting fibroblast recruitment and extracellular matrix (ECM) biosynthesis at these sites. We report herein novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes possess a well-conserved profibrogenic capacity to stimulate the migration of fibroblastic cells and promote their ability to secrete collagenous proteins to generate a functional ECM both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured fibroblasts show that these cells are capable of rapidly binding and internalizing both myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase. Peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl 4-hydroxylase-dependent manner that does not require ascorbic acid. This response was blocked by the irreversible myeloperoxidase inhibitor 4-amino-benzoic acid hydrazide, indicating peroxidase catalytic activity is essential for collagen biosynthesis. These results suggest that peroxidase enzymes, such as myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase, may play a fundamental role in regulating the recruitment of fibroblast and the biosynthesis of collagen ECM at sites of normal tissue repair and fibrosis, with enormous implications for many disease states where infiltrating inflammatory cells deposit peroxidases. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Reduced collagen accumulation after major surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, L N; Kallehave, F; Karlsmark, T

    1996-01-01

    .01)). This decline was significantly higher in the six patients who had a postoperative infection (median 3.02 (range -0.06 to 6.14) versus 0.36 (range -1.56 to 12.60) micrograms/cm, P = 0.02). This study shows that major surgery is associated with impairment of subcutaneous collagen accumulation in a test wound...

  12. Immunoadsorption for collagen and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaji, Ken

    2017-10-01

    The field of therapeutics has seen remarkable progress in the recent years, which has made mainstream drug treatment possible for collagen and rheumatic diseases. However, treatment of intractable cases where drug effectiveness is poor is a challenge. Furthermore, organ damage, concurrent illnesses or allergic reactions make adequate drug therapy impossible. For such cases, therapeutic apheresis is very significant, and it is important how this should be valued related to drug therapies. Therapeutic apheresis for collagen and rheumatic diseases involves the removal of factors that cause and exacerbate the disease; the aim of immunoadsorption, in particular, is to improve the clinical condition of patients with autoimmune disease by selectively removing pathogenic immune complexes and autoantibodies from their plasma. Immunoadsorption, in particular, unlike plasma exchange and DFPP, utilizes a high-affinity column that selectively removes autoantibodies and immune complexes, leaving other plasma components intact. There is no need to replenish fresh frozen plasma or blood products such as albumin and gamma globulin preparations. Immunoadsorption is thus superior in terms of safety, as the risk of infection or allergic reaction relating to these preparations can be avoided. We anticipate future investigations of application of synchronized therapy using drugs and therapeutic apheresis, most notably immunoadsorption, in combination to treat intractable clinical conditions such as collagen and rheumatic diseases. In this paper, our discussion includes the indications for immunoadsorption such as collagen and rheumatic diseases, the relevant conditions and types, as well as the latest understanding related to methods and clinical efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Controlled self assembly of collagen nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papi, Massimiliano; Palmieri, Valentina; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Arcovito, Giuseppe; Greco, Emanuela; Quintiliani, Gianluca; Fraziano, Maurizio; De Spirito, Marco

    2011-11-01

    In recent years carrier-mediated drug delivery has emerged as a powerful methodology for the treatment of various pathologies. The therapeutic index of traditional and novel drugs is enhanced via the increase of specificity due to targeting of drugs to a particular tissue, cell or intracellular compartment, the control over release kinetics, the protection of the active agent, or a combination of the above. Collagen is an important biomaterial in medical applications and ideal as protein-based drug delivery platform due to its special characteristics, such as biocompatibility, low toxicity, biodegradability, and weak antigenicity. While some many attempts have been made, further work is needed to produce fully biocompatible collagen hydrogels of desired size and able to release drugs on a specific target. In this article we propose a novel method to obtain spherical particles made of polymerized collagen surrounded by DMPC liposomes. The liposomes allow to control both the particles dimension and the gelling environment during the collagen polymerization. Furthermore, an optical based method to visualize and quantify each step of the proposed protocol is detailed and discussed.

  14. Collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bevaart, Lisette; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J.; Tak, Paul P.

    2010-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is an animal model for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and can be induced in DBA/1 and C57BL/6 mice using different protocols. The CIA model can be used to unravel mechanisms involved in the development of arthritis and is frequently used to study the effect of new

  15. The degree of collagen crosslinks in medical collagen membranes determined by water absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braczko, M.; Tederko, A.; Grzybowski, J.

    1994-01-01

    Collagen membranes were crosslinked by using three agents: glutaraldehyde, hexametylenediisocyanate, and UV irradiation. The increasing concentrations of above chemical agents or longer time of UV exposition resulted in the higher cross-links degree and in the decrease of collagen membranes swelling (measured as water absorption), their elasticity and mechanical resistance. According to American standards, the degree of collagen biomaterial cross-links is determined by measuring of the digestion time by pepsin. However, that method is very time-consuming. In our study, we have that a simple, linear regression between logarithm of digestion time by pepsin exists and it was identical for all three cross-linking agents used. We have concluded that determination of water absorption can be an alternative, simple and fast method for examination of collagen membrane cross-links degree. (author). 16 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  16. Corneal collagen crosslinking for keratoconus. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Bikbov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Photochemical crosslinking is widely applied in ophthalmology. Its biochemical effect is due to the release of singlet oxygen that promotes anaerobic photochemical reaction. Keratoconus is one of the most common corneal ectasia affecting 1 in 250 to 250 000 persons. Currently, the rate of iatrogenic ectasia following eximer laser refractive surgery increases due to biomechanical weakening of the cornea. Morphologically and biochemically, ectasia is characterized by corneal layers thinning, contact between the stroma and epithelium resulting from Bowman’s membrane rupture, chromatin fragmentation in keratocyte nuclei, phagocytosis, abnormal staining and arrangement of collagen fibers, enzyme system disorders, and keratocyte apoptosis. In corneal ectasia, altered enzymatic processes result in the synthesis of abnormal collagen. Collagen packing is determined by the activity of various extracellular matrix enzymes which bind amines and aldehydes of collagen fiber amino acids. In the late stage, morphological changes of Descemet’s membrane (i.e., rupture and detachment develop. Abnormal hexagonal-shaped keratocytes and their apoptosis are the signs of endothelial dystrophy. The lack of analogs in domestic ophthalmology encouraged the scientists of Ufa Eye Research Institute to develop a device for corneal collagen crosslinking. The parameters of ultraviolet (i.e., wavelength, exposure time, power to achieve the desired effect were identified. The specifics of some photosensitizers in the course of the procedure were studied. UFalink, a device for UV irradiation of cornea, and photosensitizer Dextralink were developed and adopted. Due to the high risk of endothelial damage, this treatment is contraindicated in severe keratoconus (CCT less than 400 microns. Major effects of corneal collagen crosslinking are the following: Young’s modulus (modulus of elasticity increase by 328.9 % (on average, temperature tolerance increase by 5

  17. Collagen derived serum markers in carcinoma of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudnicki, M; Jensen, L T; Iversen, P

    1995-01-01

    Three new collagen markers deriving from the collagenous matrix, e.g. carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP), carboxy-terminal pyridinoline cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP), and aminoterminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) were used for the diagnose...

  18. Collagen targeting using multivalent protein-functionalized dendrimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breurken, M.; Lempens, E.H.M.; Temming, R.P.; Helms, B.A.; Meijer, E.W.; Merkx, M.

    2011-01-01

    Collagen is an attractive marker for tissue remodeling in a variety of common disease processes. Here we report the preparation of protein dendrimers as multivalent collagen targeting ligands by native chemical ligation of the collagen binding protein CNA35 to cysteine-functionalized dendritic

  19. Compressive strength and hydration of wastepaper sludge ash-ground granulated blastfurnace slag blended pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, J.; Chaipanich, A.; Kinuthia, J.M.; O'Farrell, M.; Sabir, B.B.; Wild, S.; Lewis, M.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressive strength and hydration characteristics of wastepaper sludge ash-ground granulated blastfurnace slag (WSA-GGBS) blended pastes were investigated at a water to binder (w/b) ratio of 0.5. The strength results are compared to those of normal Portland cement (PC) paste and relative strengths are reported. Early relative strengths (1 day) of WSA-GGBS pastes were very low but a marked gain in relative strength occurred between 1 and 7 days and this increased further after 28 and 90 days. For the 50% WSA-50% GGBS blended paste, the strength achieved at 90 days was nearly 50% of that of the PC control paste. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric (TG) analysis were carried out to identify the mineral components in the WSA and the hydration products of WSA and WSA-GGBS pastes. The principal crystalline components in the WSA are gehlenite, calcium oxide, bredigite and α'-C 2 S (stabilised with Al and Mg) together with small amounts of anorthite and calcium carbonate and traces of calcium hydroxide and quartz. The α'-C 2 S and bredigite, which phase separate from liquid phase that forms a glass on cooling, are difficult to distinguish by XRD. The hydration products identified in WSA paste are CH, C 4 AH 13 , C 3 A.0.5CC-bar.0.5CH.H 11.5 and C-S-H gel plus possible evidence of small amounts of C 2 ASH 8 and C 3 A.3CS-bar.H 32 . Based upon the findings, a hydration mechanism is presented, and a model is proposed to explain the observed strength development

  20. Hydrogel-based ultra-moisturizing cream formulation for skin hydration and enhanced dermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Gon; Kim, Sung Rae; Cho, Hye In; Kang, Mean Hyung; Yeom, Dong Woo; Lee, Seo Hyun; Lee, Sangkil; Choi, Young Wook

    2014-01-01

    To develop an external vehicle for skin hydration and enhanced dermal drug delivery, a hydrogel-based ultra-moisturizing cream (HUMC) was successfully formulated with carbopol 934P, urea, Tinocare GL, grape seed oil, and other excipients. The HUMC showed plastic flow behavior due to a gel structure with a cream base. Different types of drug-free vehicles such as a hydrogel, conventional cream (CC), and three HUMCs were prepared and subjected to an in vivo skin hydration test on a hairless mouse using a corneometer. Hydration effect (∆AU) was in the order of HUMC2>HUMC1 ≥ CC>HUMC3>hydrogel. Using nile red (NR) and 5-carboxyfluorescein (5-CF) as lipophilic and hydrophilic fluorescent probes, respectively, in vitro skin permeation and accumulation studies were conducted using Franz diffusion cells. The values of steady-state flux (Jss, ng/h/cm(2)) were obtained: 74.8 (CC), 145.6 (HUMC1), and 161.9 (HUMC2) for NR delivery; 6.8 (CC), 8.3 (HUMC1), and 10.9 (HUMC2) for 5-CF delivery. The amounts retained in the skin at 12 h (Qr, ng/cm(2)) were determined: 86.4 (CC) and 102.0 (HUMC2) for NR; and 70.1 (CC) and 195.6 (HUMC2) for 5-CF. Confocal microscopy was used to visualize the distribution