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Sample records for hydrated biological macromolecules

  1. Terahertz spectroscopy of dry, hydrated, and thermally denatured biological macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, Dawn; Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope; Thomas, Robert J.; Peralta, Xomalin; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2012-03-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is an effective technique to probe the intermolecular and collective vibrational modes of biological macromolecules at THz frequencies. To date, the vast majority of spectroscopic studies have been performed on dehydrated biomolecular samples. Given the fact that all biochemical processes occur in aqueous environments and water is required for proper protein folding and function, we hypothesize that valuable information can be gained from spectroscopic studies performed on hydrated biomolecules in their native conformation. In this study, we used a THz-TDS system that exploits photoconductive techniques for THz pulse generation and freespace electro-optical sampling approaches for detection. We used the THz spectrometer to measure the time-dependent electric field of THz waves upon interaction with water, phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and collagen gels. By comparing these waveforms with references, we simultaneously determined each sample's index of refraction (n) and absorption coefficients (μa) as a function of frequency. Our data show that the properties we measure for the water, PBS and collagen are comparable to those reported in the literature. In the future, we plan to examine the effect that both temperature and pH have on the optical properties of other biological macromolecules. Studies will also be performed to compare our results to those generated using molecular dynamics simulations.

  2. Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 21 Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database (Web, free access)   The Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database and NASA Archive for Protein Crystal Growth Data (BMCD) contains the conditions reported for the crystallization of proteins and nucleic acids used in X-ray structure determinations and archives the results of microgravity macromolecule crystallization studies.

  3. Ion binding to biological macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukh, Marharyta; Alexov, Emil

    2014-11-01

    Biological macromolecules carry out their functions in water and in the presence of ions. The ions can bind to the macromolecules either specifically or non-specifically, or can simply to be a part of the water phase providing physiological gradient across various membranes. This review outlines the differences between specific and non-specific ion binding in terms of the function and stability of the corresponding macromolecules. Furthermore, the experimental techniques to identify ion positions and computational methods to predict ion binding are reviewed and their advantages compared. It is indicated that specifically bound ions are relatively easier to be revealed while non-specifically associated ions are difficult to predict. In addition, the binding and the residential time of non-specifically bound ions are very much sensitive to the environmental factors in the cells, specifically to the local pH and ion concentration. Since these characteristics differ among the cellular compartments, the non-specific ion binding must be investigated with respect to the sub-cellular localization of the corresponding macromolecule.

  4. An Overview of Biological Macromolecule Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Irene Russo; Merlino, Antonello; Vergara, Alessandro; Sica, Filomena

    2013-01-01

    The elucidation of the three dimensional structure of biological macromolecules has provided an important contribution to our current understanding of many basic mechanisms involved in life processes. This enormous impact largely results from the ability of X-ray crystallography to provide accurate structural details at atomic resolution that are a prerequisite for a deeper insight on the way in which bio-macromolecules interact with each other to build up supramolecular nano-machines capable of performing specialized biological functions. With the advent of high-energy synchrotron sources and the development of sophisticated software to solve X-ray and neutron crystal structures of large molecules, the crystallization step has become even more the bottleneck of a successful structure determination. This review introduces the general aspects of protein crystallization, summarizes conventional and innovative crystallization methods and focuses on the new strategies utilized to improve the success rate of experiments and increase crystal diffraction quality. PMID:23727935

  5. Crystallogenesis of biological macromolecules. Biological, microgravity and other physicochemical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giege, R; Drenth, J; Ducruix, A; McPherson, A; Saenger, W

    1995-01-01

    After an historical introduction and justification of the importance of proteins (as well as other macromolecules or macromolecular assemblies of biological origin) in modern biology but also in physics, this review presents the state of the field of macromolecular crystallogenesis. The basic questi

  6. Submillimeter wave spectroscopy of biological macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, Tatiana

    2005-03-01

    The recently emergence of submillimeter-wave or terahertz (THz) spectroscopy of biological molecules has demonstrated the capability to detect low-frequency internal molecular vibrations involving the weakest hydrogen bonds of the DNA base pairs and/or non-bonded interactions. These multiple bonds, although having only ˜ 5% of the strength of covalent bonds, stabilize the structure of bio-polymers, by holding the two strands of the DNA double helix together, or polypeptides together in different secondary structure conformations. There will be a review of THz-frequency transmission (absorption) results for biological materials obtained from Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy during the last few years^1,2. Multiple resonances, due to low frequency vibrational modes within biological macromolecules, have been unambiguously demonstrated in qualitative agreement with theoretical prediction, thereby confirming the fundamental physical nature of observed resonance features. The discovery of resonance character of interaction between THz radiation and biological materials opens many possible applications for THz spectroscopy technique in biological sensing and biomedicine using multiple resonances as distinctive spectral fingerprints. However, many issues still require investigation. Kinetics of interactions with radiation at THz has not been studied and vibrational lifetimes have not been measured directly as a function of frequency. The strength of resonant modes of bio-molecules in aqueous environment and strong dependence of spectra on molecular orientation need explanation. Vibrational modes have not been assigned to specific motions within molecules. THz spectroscopy of bio-polymers makes it only in first steps. 1. T. Globus, D. Woolard, M. Bykhovskaia, B. Gelmont, L. Werbos, A. Samuels. International Journal of High Speed Electronics and Systems (IJHSES), 13, No. 4, 903-936 (2003). 2. T. Globus, T. Khromova, D. Woolard and B. Gelmont. Proceedings of

  7. Organized monolayers of biological macromolecules on Au(111) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik

    2002-01-01

    Single-crystal electrochemistry and scanning tunneling microscopy directly in aqueous electrolyte solution (in situ STM) are established in physical electrochemistry but new in studies of adsorption and interfacial electrochemistry of biological macromolecules. These high-resolution techniques have...

  8. Physicochemical Properties of Ion Pairs of Biological Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwahara, Junji; Esadze, Alexandre; Zandarashvili, Levani

    2015-09-30

    Ion pairs (also known as salt bridges) of electrostatically interacting cationic and anionic moieties are important for proteins and nucleic acids to perform their function. Although numerous three-dimensional structures show ion pairs at functionally important sites of biological macromolecules and their complexes, the physicochemical properties of the ion pairs are not well understood. Crystal structures typically show a single state for each ion pair. However, recent studies have revealed the dynamic nature of the ion pairs of the biological macromolecules. Biomolecular ion pairs undergo dynamic transitions between distinct states in which the charged moieties are either in direct contact or separated by water. This dynamic behavior is reasonable in light of the fundamental concepts that were established for small ions over the last century. In this review, we introduce the physicochemical concepts relevant to the ion pairs and provide an overview of the recent advancement in biophysical research on the ion pairs of biological macromolecules.

  9. Measuring Equilibrium Binding Affinity of Biological Macromolecules in Solution by Thermophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-18

    Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Measuring Equilibrium Binding Affinity of Biological Macromolecules in Solution by...Equilibrium Binding Affinity of Biological Macromolecules in Solution by Thermophoresis Report Title The primary research focus of the San Diego State...equilibrium binding affinities of biological macromolecules in solution. This qauntitative information plays a vital role in supporting the static

  10. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS FOR STUDYING THE INTERACTION BETWEEN POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND BIOLOGICAL MACROMOLECULES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computational Methods for Studying the Interaction between Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Biological Macromolecules .The mechanisms for the processes that result in significant biological activity of PAHs depend on the interaction of these molecules or their metabol...

  11. Sub-terahertz resonance spectroscopy of biological macromolecules and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, Tatiana; Moyer, Aaron; Gelmont, Boris; Khromova, Tatyana; Sizov, Igor; Ferrance, Jerome

    2013-05-01

    Recently we introduced a Sub-THz spectroscopic system for characterizing vibrational resonance features from biological materials. This new, continuous-wave, frequency-domain spectroscopic sensor operates at room temperature between 315 and 480 GHz with spectral resolution of at least 1 GHz and utilizes the source and detector components from Virginia Diode, Inc. In this work we present experimental results and interpretation of spectroscopic signatures from bacterial cells and their biological macromolecule structural components. Transmission and absorption spectra of the bacterial protein thioredoxin, DNA and lyophilized cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli), as well as spores of Bacillus subtillis and B. atrophaeus have been characterized. Experimental results for biomolecules are compared with absorption spectra calculated using molecular dynamics simulation, and confirm the underlying physics for resonance spectroscopy based on interactions between THz radiation and vibrational modes or groups of modes of atomic motions. Such interactions result in multiple intense and narrow specific resonances in transmission/absorption spectra from nano-gram samples with spectral line widths as small as 3 GHz. The results of this study indicate diverse relaxation dynamic mechanisms relevant to sub-THz vibrational spectroscopy, including long-lasting processes. We demonstrate that high sensitivity in resolved specific absorption fingerprints provides conditions for reliable detection, identification and discrimination capability, to the level of strains of the same bacteria, and for monitoring interactions between biomaterials and reagents in near real-time. Additionally, it creates the basis for the development of new types of advanced biological sensors through integrating the developed system with a microfluidic platform for biomaterial samples.

  12. Selective extraction of proteins and other macromolecules from biological samples using molecular imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Derek; El-Sharif, Hazim F; Reddy, Subrayal M

    2016-11-01

    The accurate determination of intact macromolecules in biological samples, such as blood, plasma, serum, urine, tissue and feces is a challenging problem. The increased interest in macromolecules both as candidate drugs and as biomarkers for diagnostic purposes means that new method development approaches are needed. This review charts developments in the use of molecularly imprinted polymers first for small-molecular-mass compounds then for proteins and other macromolecules. Examples of the development of molecularly imprinted polymers for macromolecules are highlighted. The two main application areas to date are sensors and separation science, particularly SPE. Examples include peptides and polypeptides, lysozyme, hemoglobin, ovalbumin, bovine serum albumin and viruses.

  13. Development of modified release gliclazide biological macromolecules using natural biodegradable polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Vipulkumar D; Mashru, Krupa H; Solanki, Himanshu K; Jani, Girish K

    2013-04-01

    Modified release biological macromolecules (beads) of gliclazide using sodium alginate combined with either gellan gum or pectin in different ratios were prepared by Ionotropic gelation method. Biological macromolecules were evaluated for different physico-chemical parameters. Increase in polymers proportion showed difficulty in production of biological macromolecules due to high viscosity of dispersion. As the polymer concentration increases, the swelling and entrapment efficiency of drug increased. Compared to all other batches and commercial modified release gliclazide tablet, formulated biological macromolecules of sodium alginate with pectin (2:1 ratio) and with gellan gum (6:0.75 ratio) exhibited spherical shape, biphasic in vitro release profile and initial high drug release followed by moderate release up to 12 h as matrix diffusion kinetics and Higuchi model as well as Korsmeyer model. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Crystallization of biological macromolecules in a reduced gravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, E. J., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A battery of micro techniques were developed which allow the screening of a large number of conditions using only a small amount of the macromolecule. The need to develop methodologies for growing large crystals required for neutron diffraction studies is discussed.

  15. Neutron protein crystallography hydrogen protons and hydration in bio-macromolecules

    CERN Document Server

    Niimura, Nobuo

    2011-01-01

    This text is dedicated to the emerging field of neutron protein crystallography (NPC). It covers all of the practical aspects of NPC and demonstrates how NPC can explore protein features such as hydrogen bonds, protonation and deprotonation of amino acid residues, and hydration structures.

  16. Bimane Derivatives as Fluorescent Probes for Biological Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    with mBBr . 9 Suitable samples include sections of frozen tissues dried and fixed on slides and paraffin sections of fixed tis- sues, after treatment ...slides are treated only with DTT and washed prior to mBBr treatment . 9 Analytical Drocedures Spectroscopic data for bramobimanes and bimane-labeled...Kosower and Kosower three brcmobimanes for fluorescent labeling of biological systems. The three *: bromobimanes,2 6 mBBr (1), bBBr (2) and q8Br (3

  17. Tracking Electrons in Biological Macromolecules: From Ensemble to Single Molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro C. Tabares

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Nature utilizes oxido-reductases to cater to the energy demands of most biochemical processes in respiratory species. Oxido-reductases are capable of meeting this challenge by utilizing redox active sites, often containing transition metal ions, which facilitate movement and relocation of electrons/protons to create a potential gradient that is used to energize redox reactions. There has been a consistent struggle by researchers to estimate the electron transfer rate constants in physiologically relevant processes. This review provides a brief background on the measurements of electron transfer rates in biological molecules, in particular Cu-containing enzymes, and highlights the recent advances in monitoring these electron transfer events at the single molecule level or better to say, at the individual event level.

  18. A Method for Decomposition of the Basic Reaction of Biological Macromolecules into Exponential Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabash, Yu M; Lyamets, A K

    2016-12-01

    The structural and dynamical properties of biological macromolecules under non-equilibrium conditions determine the kinetics of their basic reaction to external stimuli. This kinetics is multiexponential in nature. This is due to the operation of various subsystems in the structure of macromolecules, as well as the effect of the basic reaction on the structure of macromolecules. The situation can be interpreted as a manifestation of the stationary states of macromolecules, which are represented by monoexponential components of the basic reaction (Monod-Wyman-Changeux model) Monod et al. (J Mol Cell Biol 12:88-118, 1965). The representation of multiexponential kinetics of the basic reaction in the form of a sum of exponential functions [Formula: see text] is a multidimensional optimization problem. To solve this problem, a gradient method of optimization with software determination of the amount of exponents and reasonable calculation time is developed. This method is used to analyze the kinetics of photoinduced electron transport in the reaction centers (RC) of purple bacteria and the fluorescence induction in the granum thylakoid membranes which share a common function of converting light energy.

  19. A Method for Decomposition of the Basic Reaction of Biological Macromolecules into Exponential Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabash, Yu. M.; Lyamets, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    The structural and dynamical properties of biological macromolecules under non-equilibrium conditions determine the kinetics of their basic reaction to external stimuli. This kinetics is multiexponential in nature. This is due to the operation of various subsystems in the structure of macromolecules, as well as the effect of the basic reaction on the structure of macromolecules. The situation can be interpreted as a manifestation of the stationary states of macromolecules, which are represented by monoexponential components of the basic reaction (Monod-Wyman-Changeux model) Monod et al. (J Mol Cell Biol 12:88-118, 1965). The representation of multiexponential kinetics of the basic reaction in the form of a sum of exponential functions (A(t)={sum}_{i=1}^n{a}_i{e}^{-{k}_it}) is a multidimensional optimization problem. To solve this problem, a gradient method of optimization with software determination of the amount of exponents and reasonable calculation time is developed. This method is used to analyze the kinetics of photoinduced electron transport in the reaction centers (RC) of purple bacteria and the fluorescence induction in the granum thylakoid membranes which share a common function of converting light energy.

  20. Marine-derived biological macromolecule-based biomaterials for wound healing and skin tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandika, Pathum; Ko, Seok-Chun; Jung, Won-Kyo

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex biological process that depends on the wound condition, the patient's health, and the physicochemical support given through external materials. The development of bioactive molecules and engineered tissue substitutes to provide physiochemical support to enhance the wound healing process plays a key role in advancing wound-care management. Thus, identification of ideal molecules in wound treatment is still in progress. The discovery of natural products that contain ideal molecules for skin tissue regeneration has been greatly advanced by exploration of the marine bioenvironment. Consequently, tremendously diverse marine organisms have become a great source of numerous biological macromolecules that can be used to develop tissue-engineered substitutes with wound healing properties. This review summarizes the wound healing process, the properties of macromolecules from marine organisms, and the involvement of these molecules in skin tissue regeneration applications.

  1. Encoding of Primary Structures of Biological Macromolecules Within a Data Mining Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mondher Maddouri; Mourad Elloumi

    2004-01-01

    An encoding method has a direct effect on the quality and the representation of the discovered knowledge in data mining systems. Biological macromolecules are encoded by strings of characters, called primary structures. Knowing that data mining systems usually use relational tables to encode data, we have then to reencode these strings and transform them into relational tables. In this paper, we do a comparative study of the existing static encoding methods, that are based on the Biologist know-how, and our new dynamic encoding one,that is based on the construction of Discriminant and Minimal Substrings (DMS). Different classification methods are used to do this study. The experimental results show that our dynamic encoding method is more efficient than the static ones, to encode biological macromolecules within a data mining perspective.

  2. Controls of ionic strength and macromolecule chemistry on calcite nucleation: Salinity and ion hydration as levers for regulating biomineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, P. M.; Giuffre, A. J.; Mergelsberg, S. T.; Han, N.; De Yoreo, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    Organisms form shells and skeletons with remarkable fidelity by controlling the timing and placement of the minerals that nucleate and subsequently grow. An extensive effort has identified features of the organic matrix that regulate this process. Recent measurements from our group show the energy barrier to nucleation onto polysaccharide (PS) substrates is dependent upon hydrophilicity through functional group chemistry and suggest that free energy of the macromolecule-liquid interface influences where and when mineral nucleation occurs (Giuffre et al., 2013, PNAS). The importance of interfacial free energy in regulating nucleation raises the question of whether local changes in salinity or electrolyte composition can be tuned to further modulate the onset of calcite nucleation. Using alginate (negatively charged by carboxyl groups) and chitosan (small positive charge by amine groups), the rate of calcite nucleation was measured at controlled supersaturations and pH as a function of NaCl concentration (65-600 mM). Analyses of the data show the thermodynamic barrier to calcite nucleation onto both types of PS increases with ionic strength. The evidence suggests this effect arises from an increasing concentration of solvated ions at the PS-water interface while also increasing the hydrophilic character of that interface; thus decreasing the substrate-liquid interfacial free energy. To test this explanation, a second group of nucleation experiments used a suite of electrolytes (alkali chlorides for alginate and sodium halides for chitosan) while holding ionic strength constant. Indeed, the nucleation barriers for calcite formation are electrolyte-specific and correlated with the hydration free energy of the ion. This suggests solvated electrolyte ions indirectly regulate calcite nucleation onto substrates through their competition with the substrate for water thereby influencing net interfacial free energy. These effects are consistent with the long

  3. Cryo-electron microscopy for structural analysis of dynamic biological macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kazuyoshi; Wolf, Matthias

    2017-07-27

    Since the introduction of what became today's standard for cryo-embedding of biological macromolecules at native conditions more than 30years ago, techniques and equipment have been drastically improved and the structure of biomolecules can now be studied at near atomic resolution by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) while capturing multiple dynamic states. Here we review the recent progress in cryo-EM for structural studies of dynamic biological macromolecules. We provide an overview of the cryo-EM method and introduce contemporary studies to investigate biomolecular structure and dynamics, including examples from the recent literature. Cryo-EM is a powerful tool for the investigation of biological macromolecular structures including analysis of their dynamics by using advanced image-processing algorithms. The method has become even more widely applicable with present-day single particle analysis and electron tomography. The cryo-EM method can be used to determine the three-dimensional structure of biomacromolecules in near native condition at close to atomic resolution, and has the potential to reveal conformations of dynamic molecular complexes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Biophysical Exploration of Dynamical Ordering of Biomolecular Systems" edited by Dr. Koichi Kato. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Bionic design for surface optimization combining hydrophilic and negative charged biological macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Fen; Song, Haiming; Niu, Xiaoqin; Yang, Aimei; Nie, Shengqiang; Wang, Lingren; Li, Jie; Sun, Shudong; Zhao, Changsheng

    2014-06-01

    While polyethersulfone (PES) membrane represents a promising option for blood purification, the blood compatibility must be dramatically enhanced to meet today's ever-increasing demands for many emerging application. In this study, we report a bionic design for optimization and development of a modified PES membrane combining hydrophilic and negative charged biological macromolecules on its surface. The hydrophilic and ionic charged biological macromolecules sulfonated poly(styrene)-b-poly(methyl methacrylate)-b-poly-(styrene) (PSSMSS) and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone)-b-poly(methyl methacrylate)-b-poly-(vinyl pyrrolidone) were synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization and used together to modify PES membranes by blending method. A hydrophilic membrane surface with negative charged surface coating was obtained, imitating the hydrophilic and negatively charged structure feature of heparin. The modified PES membranes showed suppressed platelet adhesion, and a prolonged blood clotting time, and thereby improved blood compatibility. In addition, the blood clotting time of the modified membranes increased with the blended PSSMSS amounts increment, indicating that both the hydrophilic and negative charged groups play important roles in improving the blood compatibility of PES membranes.

  5. Fast x-ray fluorescence microtomography of hydrated biological samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Lombi

    Full Text Available Metals and metalloids play a key role in plant and other biological systems as some of them are essential to living organisms and all can be toxic at high concentrations. It is therefore important to understand how they are accumulated, complexed and transported within plants. In situ imaging of metal distribution at physiological relevant concentrations in highly hydrated biological systems is technically challenging. In the case of roots, this is mainly due to the possibility of artifacts arising during sample preparation such as cross sectioning. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microtomography has been used to obtain virtual cross sections of elemental distributions. However, traditionally this technique requires long data acquisition times. This has prohibited its application to highly hydrated biological samples which suffer both radiation damage and dehydration during extended analysis. However, recent advances in fast detectors coupled with powerful data acquisition approaches and suitable sample preparation methods can circumvent this problem. We demonstrate the heightened potential of this technique by imaging the distribution of nickel and zinc in hydrated plant roots. Although 3D tomography was still impeded by radiation damage, we successfully collected 2D tomograms of hydrated plant roots exposed to environmentally relevant metal concentrations for short periods of time. To our knowledge, this is the first published example of the possibilities offered by a new generation of fast fluorescence detectors to investigate metal and metalloid distribution in radiation-sensitive, biological samples.

  6. Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering studies of biological macromolecules in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Boldon, Lauren; Urquhart, Melissa; Wang, Xiangyu

    2013-01-08

    In this paper, Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (SWAXS) analysis of macromolecules is demonstrated through experimentation. SWAXS is a technique where X-rays are elastically scattered by an inhomogeneous sample in the nm-range at small angles (typically 0.1 - 5°) and wide angles (typically > 5°). This technique provides information about the shape, size, and distribution of macromolecules, characteristic distances of partially ordered materials, pore sizes, and surface-to-volume ratio. Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) is capable of delivering structural information of macromolecules between 1 and 200 nm, whereas Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS) can resolve even smaller Bragg spacing of samples between 0.33 nm and 0.49 nm based on the specific system setup and detector. The spacing is determined from Bragg's law and is dependent on the wavelength and incident angle. In a SWAXS experiment, the materials can be solid or liquid and may contain solid, liquid or gaseous domains (so-called particles) of the same or another material in any combination. SWAXS applications are very broad and include colloids of all types: metals, composites, cement, oil, polymers, plastics, proteins, foods, and pharmaceuticals. For solid samples, the thickness is limited to approximately 5 mm. Usage of a lab-based SWAXS instrument is detailed in this paper. With the available software (e.g., GNOM-ATSAS 2.3 package by D. Svergun EMBL-Hamburg and EasySWAXS software) for the SWAXS system, an experiment can be conducted to determine certain parameters of interest for the given sample. One example of a biological macromolecule experiment is the analysis of 2 wt% lysozyme in a water-based aqueous buffer which can be chosen and prepared through numerous methods. The preparation of the sample follows the guidelines below in the Preparation of the Sample section. Through SWAXS experimentation, important structural parameters of lysozyme, e.g. the radius of gyration, can be analyzed.

  7. MASSIF-1: a beamline dedicated to the fully automatic characterization and data collection from crystals of biological macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowler, Matthew W., E-mail: mbowler@embl.fr [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, 71 avenue des Martyrs, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Université Grenoble Alpes-EMBL-CNRS, 71 avenue des Martyrs, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Nurizzo, Didier, E-mail: mbowler@embl.fr; Barrett, Ray; Beteva, Antonia; Bodin, Marjolaine [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 avenue des Martyrs, F-38043 Grenoble (France)

    2015-10-03

    MASSIF-1 (ID30A-1) is a new beamline dedicated to the completely automatic characterization and data collection from crystals of biological macromolecules. MASSIF-1 (ID30A-1) is an ESRF undulator beamline operating at a fixed wavelength of 0.969 Å (12.8 keV) that is dedicated to the completely automatic characterization of and data collection from crystals of biological macromolecules. The first of the ESRF Upgrade MASSIF beamlines to be commissioned, it has been open since September 2014, providing a unique automated data collection service to academic and industrial users. Here, the beamline characteristics and details of the new service are outlined.

  8. A Biology Laboratory Exercise Using Macromolecule Assays to Distinguish Four Types of Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte W. Pratt

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the drawbacks of cookbook-style laboratory exercises for General Biology courses is that students are not challenged to develop skills in scientific reasoning, such as formulating hypotheses and designing and carrying out experiments. Several traditional laboratory curricula include exercises involving semi-quantitative colorimetric assays to detect proteins (biuret test, reducing sugars (Benedict’s test, starch (Lugol’s test, and lipids (Sudan red test in a variety of easily prepared solutions (glucose, albumin, glycine, etc. and familiar food items (lemon juice, cornstarch, egg white, etc.. An extension of this lab exercise was developed to allow students to use their knowledge of the macromolecule assays to design an experiment to distinguish four types of “milk”: whole milk, skim milk, cream, and soy milk (rice milk or almond milk could also be included.

  9. New beamline dedicated to solution scattering from biological macromolecules at the ESRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pernot, P; Theveneau, P; Giraud, T; Fernandes, R Nogueira; Nurizzo, D; Spruce, D; Surr, J; McSweeney, S [ESRF, BP 220, Grenoble (France); Round, A; Felisaz, F; Foedinger, L; Gobbo, A; Huet, J; Villard, C; Cipriani, F, E-mail: rejma@esrf.f, E-mail: around@embl.f [EMBL Grenoble, BP 181, Grenoble (France)

    2010-10-01

    The new bio-SAXS beamline (ID14-3 at the ESRF, Grenoble, France) is dedicated exclusively to small-angle scattering experiments of biological macromolecules in solution and has been in user operation since November 2008. Originally a protein crystallography beamline, ID14-3 was refurbished, still as a part of the ESRF Structural Biology group, with the main aim to provide a facility with 'quick and easy' access to satisfy rapidly growing demands from crystallographers, biochemists and structural biologists. The beamline allows manual and automatic sample loading/unloading, data collection, processing (conversion of a 2D image to a normalized 1D X-ray scattering profile) and analysis. The users obtain on-line standard data concerning the size (radius of gyration, maximum dimension and volume) and molecular weight of samples which allow on-the fly ab-inito shape reconstruction in order to provide feedback enabling the data collection strategies to be optimized. Automation of sample loading is incorporated on the beamline using a device constructed in collaboration between the EMBL (Grenoble and Hamburg outstations) and the ESRF. Semi/automated data analysis is implemented following the model of the SAXS facility at X33, EMBL Hamburg. This paper describes the bio-SAXS beamline and set-up characteristics together with the examples of user data obtained.

  10. Glycoxidation of biological macromolecules: a critical approach to halt the menace of glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Saheem; Khan, M Salman; Akhter, Firoz; Khan, Mohd Sajid; Khan, Amir; Ashraf, J M; Pandey, Ramendra Pati; Shahab, Uzma

    2014-11-01

    Glycation is the result of covalent bonding of a free amino group of biological macromolecules with a reducing sugar, which results in the formation of a Schiff base that undergoes rearrangement, dehydration and cyclization to form a more stable Amadori product. The final products of nonenzymatic glycation of biomacromolecules like DNA, proteins and lipids are known as advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs may be generated rapidly or over long times stimulated by distinct triggering mechanisms, thereby accounting for their roles in multiple settings and disease states. Both Schiff base and Amadori glycation products generate free radicals resulting in decline of antioxidant defense mechanisms and can damage cellular organelles and enzymes. This critical review primarily focuses on the mechanistic insight of glycation and the most probable route for the formation of glycation products and their therapeutic interventions. Furthermore, the prevention of glycation reaction using therapeutic drugs such as metformin, pyridoxamine and aminoguanidine (AG) are discussed with special emphasis on the novel concept of the bioconjugation of these drugs like, AG with gold nanoparticles (GNPs). At or above 10 mM concentration, AG is found to be toxic and therefore has serious health concerns, and the study warrants doing this novel bioconjugation of AG with GNPs. This approach might increase the efficacy of the AG at a reduced concentration with low or no toxicity. Using the concept of synthesis of GNPs with abovementioned drugs, it is assumed that toxicity of various drugs which are used at high doses can be minimized more effectively.

  11. Antioxidant, antimicrobial, cell viability and enzymatic inhibitory of antioxidant polymers as biological macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Gahruie, Hadi; Niakousari, Mehrdad

    2017-11-01

    Polymeric antioxidants such as Catechinaldehyde Polycondensates, Catechin-acelaldehydepolycondensates, Flavonoid-grafted chitosan fibers, Ferulate hydrogel, Dextran ferulate hydrogel, Starch-quercetin conjugate, Gallic acid- and Caffeic acid-functionalized chitosan, Gallic acid - chitosan conjugate, Poly(rutin), Gallic acid grafted chitosan, Dextran-Catechin Conjugate belong to biological macromolecules. These kinds of compounds have stronger antioxidant potential and pharmacokinetic activities, as compared to similar low molecular weight preservatives. Most of these compounds sources are either antioxidants with low molecules polymerization, or polymers conjugation such as synthetic or natural preservatives. Additives are well known as being an important ingredient of food products due to their strong preservative potential. Many researchers and industries attempt to find synthesize materials with the same antioxidant potential and higher stability than the similar compounds with low molecular weight. Recently, macromolecular antioxidants have received wide attention as food additives and dietary supplements in functional foods. It seems that the main usage of these compounds is in the food packaging industry. Most of these compounds have strong antioxidant, antimicrobial, cell viability and enzymatic inhibitory properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Digital X-ray camera for quality evaluation three-dimensional topographic reconstruction of single crystals of biological macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgstahl, Gloria (Inventor); Lovelace, Jeff (Inventor); Snell, Edward Holmes (Inventor); Bellamy, Henry (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention provides a digital topography imaging system for determining the crystalline structure of a biological macromolecule, wherein the system employs a charge coupled device (CCD) camera with antiblooming circuitry to directly convert x-ray signals to electrical signals without the use of phosphor and measures reflection profiles from the x-ray emitting source after x-rays are passed through a sample. Methods for using said system are also provided.

  13. Combined small angle X-ray solution scattering with atomic force microscopy for characterizing radiation damage on biological macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Luca; Andriatis, Alexander; Brennich, Martha; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Chen, Shu-Wen W; Pellequer, Jean-Luc; Round, Adam

    2016-10-27

    Synchrotron radiation facilities are pillars of modern structural biology. Small-Angle X-ray scattering performed at synchrotron sources is often used to characterize the shape of biological macromolecules. A major challenge with high-energy X-ray beam on such macromolecules is the perturbation of sample due to radiation damage. By employing atomic force microscopy, another common technique to determine the shape of biological macromolecules when deposited on flat substrates, we present a protocol to evaluate and characterize consequences of radiation damage. It requires the acquisition of images of irradiated samples at the single molecule level in a timely manner while using minimal amounts of protein. The protocol has been tested on two different molecular systems: a large globular tetremeric enzyme (β-Amylase) and a rod-shape plant virus (tobacco mosaic virus). Radiation damage on the globular enzyme leads to an apparent increase in molecular sizes whereas the effect on the long virus is a breakage into smaller pieces resulting in a decrease of the average long-axis radius. These results show that radiation damage can appear in different forms and strongly support the need to check the effect of radiation damage at synchrotron sources using the presented protocol.

  14. Single molecule optical measurements of orientation and rotations of biological macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroder, Deborah Y.; Lippert, Lisa G.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2016-12-01

    Subdomains of macromolecules often undergo large orientation changes during their catalytic cycles that are essential for their activity. Tracking these rearrangements in real time opens a powerful window into the link between protein structure and functional output. Site-specific labeling of individual molecules with polarized optical probes and measurement of their spatial orientation can give insight into the crucial conformational changes, dynamics, and fluctuations of macromolecules. Here we describe the range of single molecule optical technologies that can extract orientation information from these probes, review the relevant types of probes and labeling techniques, and highlight the advantages and disadvantages of these technologies for addressing specific inquiries.

  15. MASSIF-1: a beamline dedicated to the fully automatic characterization and data collection from crystals of biological macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Matthew W.; Nurizzo, Didier; Barrett, Ray; Beteva, Antonia; Bodin, Marjolaine; Caserotto, Hugo; Delagenière, Solange; Dobias, Fabian; Flot, David; Giraud, Thierry; Guichard, Nicolas; Guijarro, Mattias; Lentini, Mario; Leonard, Gordon A.; McSweeney, Sean; Oskarsson, Marcus; Schmidt, Werner; Snigirev, Anatoli; von Stetten, David; Surr, John; Svensson, Olof; Theveneau, Pascal; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    MASSIF-1 (ID30A-1) is an ESRF undulator beamline operating at a fixed wavelength of 0.969 Å (12.8 keV) that is dedicated to the completely automatic characterization of and data collection from crystals of biological macromolecules. The first of the ESRF Upgrade MASSIF beamlines to be commissioned, it has been open since September 2014, providing a unique automated data collection service to academic and industrial users. Here, the beamline characteristics and details of the new service are outlined. PMID:26524320

  16. Application of Symmetry Adapted Function Method for Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Octahedral Biological Macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songjun Zeng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for three-dimensional (3D reconstruction of macromolecule assembles, that is, octahedral symmetrical adapted functions (OSAFs method, was introduced in this paper and a series of formulations for reconstruction by OSAF method were derived. To verify the feasibility and advantages of the method, two octahedral symmetrical macromolecules, that is, heat shock protein Degp24 and the Red-cell L Ferritin, were utilized as examples to implement reconstruction by the OSAF method. The schedule for simulation was designed as follows: 2000 random orientated projections of single particles with predefined Euler angles and centers of origins were generated, then different levels of noises that is signal-to-noise ratio (S/N =0.1,0.5, and 0.8 were added. The structures reconstructed by the OSAF method were in good agreement with the standard models and the relative errors of the structures reconstructed by the OSAF method to standard structures were very little even for high level noise. The facts mentioned above account for that the OSAF method is feasible and efficient approach to reconstruct structures of macromolecules and have ability to suppress the influence of noise.

  17. Function of terahertz spectra in monitoring the decomposing process of biological macromolecules and in investigating the causes of photoinhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yuangang; Zhang, Shuai; Lian, Yuji; Kuang, Tingyun

    2017-03-01

    Chlorophyll a and β-carotene play an important role in harvesting light energy, which is used to drive photosynthesis in plants. In this study, terahertz (THz) and visible range spectra of chlorophyll a and β-carotene and their changes under light treatment were investigated. The results show that the all THz transmission and absorption spectra of chlorophyll a and β-carotene changed upon light treatment, with the maximum changes at 15 min of illumination indicating the greatest changes of the collective vibrational mode of chlorophyll a and β-carotene. The absorption spectra of chlorophyll a in the visible light region decreased upon light treatment, signifying the degradation of chlorophyll a molecules. It can be inferred from these results that the THz spectra are very sensitive in monitoring the changes of the collective vibrational mode, despite the absence of changes in molecular configuration. The THz spectra can therefore be used to monitor the decomposing process of biological macromolecules; however, visible absorption spectra can only be used to monitor the breakdown extent of biological macromolecules.

  18. Exploring the structure of biological macromolecules in solution using Quokka, the small angle neutron scattering instrument, at ANSTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kathleen; Jeffries, Cy M.; Knott, Robert B.; Sokolova, Anna; Jacques, David A.; Duff, Anthony P.

    2015-10-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) is widely used to extract structural parameters, shape and other types of information from a vast array of materials. The technique is applied to biological macromolecules and their complexes in solution to reveal information often not accessible by other techniques. SANS measurements on biomolecules present some particular challenges however, one of which is suitable instrumentation. This review details SANS experiments performed on two well-characterised globular proteins (lysozyme and glucose isomerase) using Quokka, the recently commissioned SANS instrument at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The instrument configuration as well as data collection and reduction strategies for biological investigations are discussed and act as a general reference for structural biologists who use the instrument. Both model independent analysis of the two proteins and ab initio modelling illustrate that Quokka-SANS data can be used to successfully model the overall shapes of proteins in solution, providing a benchmark for users.

  19. Exploring the structure of biological macromolecules in solution using Quokka, the small angle neutron scattering instrument, at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Kathleen, E-mail: kw@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Rd, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Jeffries, Cy M.; Knott, Robert B.; Sokolova, Anna [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Rd, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Jacques, David A. [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Duff, Anthony P. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, New Illawarra Rd, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2015-10-21

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) is widely used to extract structural parameters, shape and other types of information from a vast array of materials. The technique is applied to biological macromolecules and their complexes in solution to reveal information often not accessible by other techniques. SANS measurements on biomolecules present some particular challenges however, one of which is suitable instrumentation. This review details SANS experiments performed on two well-characterised globular proteins (lysozyme and glucose isomerase) using Quokka, the recently commissioned SANS instrument at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The instrument configuration as well as data collection and reduction strategies for biological investigations are discussed and act as a general reference for structural biologists who use the instrument. Both model independent analysis of the two proteins and ab initio modelling illustrate that Quokka-SANS data can be used to successfully model the overall shapes of proteins in solution, providing a benchmark for users.

  20. 生物大分子结晶技术研究进展%Progress in Research of Technologies for Crystallization of Biological Macromolecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐乐慧; 洪鸣凰; 赵文杰; 任国宾

    2011-01-01

    获得具有高分辨率的晶体是目前生物大分子结构测定的主要瓶颈,生物大分子的结晶是一个复杂的物理化学过程,涉及多方面的影响因素.本文综述了近年来生物大分子结晶的热点方法和技术.%Obtaining the high-resolution crystal structure has become a bottleneck for structure determination of biological macromolecules. The crystallization of biological macromolecules is a complicated process influenced by many parameters. The recent technologies for preparing crystal of biological macromolecules as well as techniques for controlling the crystallization process are reviewed.

  1. Which properties of a spanning network of hydration water enable biological functions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovchenko, Ivan; Oleinikova, Alla

    2008-12-22

    The central role of water in biological functions is well-recognized, but numerous questions concerning the physical mechanisms behind the importance of water for life remain unanswered. Water in biosystems exists mainly as hydration water. Analysis of the phase diagram of hydration water shows that biological functions are possible only when the surfaces of biomolecules are covered by spanning hydrogen-bonded networks of hydration water. The comparative studies of the various properties of hydrated biosystems in the presence and in the absence of a spanning water network should clarify its specific physical properties, which are crucial for biological functions. Herein, we summarize the recent progress in these studies. The biological activity of the living organisms is maximal in a narrow temperature interval, where the spanning network of hydration water breaks up with heating via a percolation transition. The entropy of the hydration water related to the diversity of cluster size diverges at this percolation threshold. The possible role of this phenomenon in life processes is discussed.

  2. 生物大分子结晶过程的动力学%The Kinetics of Crystallization Process of Biological Macromolecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桂林; 李琳; 胡松青; 陈玲; 范治国; 李坚斌

    2006-01-01

    In this paper ,the crystallization process of biological macromolecules was presented, and the mechanisms and kinetics of crystallization were analyzed.%阐述了生物大分子结晶的一般过程,分析了结晶的机制和动力学.

  3. Spontaneous encapsulation and concentration of biological macromolecules in liposomes: an intriguing phenomenon and its relevance in origins of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Tereza Pereira; Fahr, Alfred; Luisi, Pier Luigi; Stano, Pasquale

    2014-12-01

    One of the main open questions in origin of life research focuses on the formation, by self-organization, of primitive cells composed by macromolecular compounds enclosed within a semi-permeable membrane. A successful experimental strategy for studying the emergence and the properties of primitive cells relies on a synthetic biology approach, consisting in the laboratory assembly of cell models of minimal complexity (semi-synthetic minimal cells). Despite the recent advancements in the construction and characterization of synthetic cells, an important physical aspect related to their formation is still not well known, namely, the mechanism of solute entrapment inside liposomes (in particular, the entrapment of macromolecules). In the past years, we have investigated this phenomenon and here we shortly review our experimental results. We show how the detailed cryo-transmission electron microscopy analyses of liposome populations created in the presence of ferritin (taken as model protein) or ribosomes have revealed that a small fraction of liposomes contains a high number of solutes, against statistical expectations. The local (intra-liposomal) macromolecule concentration in these liposomes largely exceeds the bulk concentration. A similar behaviour is observed when multi-molecular reaction mixtures are used, whereby the reactions occur effectively only inside those liposomes that have entrapped high number of molecules. If similar mechanisms operated in early times, these intriguing results support a scenario whereby the formation of lipid compartments plays an important role in concentrating the components of proto-metabolic systems-in addition to their well-known functions of confinement and protection.

  4. Highly Resolved Sub-Terahertz Vibrational Spectroscopy of Biological Macromolecules and Bacteria Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    4. DISCUSSION The ability to quickly and reliably discriminate between different bacterial species, toxins , and proteins using sub-THz...and more-tailored treatment for a patient or affected area once a bacterial organism or toxin is identified as the cause of an infection, spillage...transmission) spectra of large biological molecules and intact bacterial cells and spores. Improvements in sensitivity, especially in the discriminative

  5. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Grubb, Mikala; Hansen, Allan Glargaard

    2003-01-01

    Redox metalloproteins immobilized on metallic surfaces in contact with aqueous biological media are important in many areas of pure and applied sciences. Redox metalloprotein films are currently being addressed by new approaches where biotechnology including modified and synthetic proteins...... and single-molecule levels.We discuss here these advances with reference to two specific redox metalloproteins, the blue single-copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and the single-haem protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cytochrome c, and a short oligonucleotide. Both proteins can be immobilized...

  6. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Grubb, Mikala; Hansen, Allan G.; Kuznetsov, Alexander M.; Boisen, Anja; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-05-01

    Redox metalloproteins immobilized on metallic surfaces in contact with aqueous biological media are important in many areas of pure and applied sciences. Redox metalloprotein films are currently being addressed by new approaches where biotechnology including modified and synthetic proteins is combined with state-of-the-art physical electrochemistry with emphasis on single-crystal, atomically planar electrode surfaces, in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and other surface techniques. These approaches have brought bioelectrochemistry important steps forward towards the nanoscale and single-molecule levels. We discuss here these advances with reference to two specific redox metalloproteins, the blue single-copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and the single-haem protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cytochrome c, and a short oligonucleotide. Both proteins can be immobilized on Au(111) by chemisorption via exposed sulfur-containing residues. Voltammetric, interfacial capacitance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and microcantilever sensor data, together with in situ STM with single-molecule resolution, all point to a coherent view of monolayer organization with protein electron transfer (ET) function retained. In situ STM can also address the microscopic mechanisms for electron tunnelling through the biomolecules and offers novel notions such as coherent multi-ET between the substrate and tip via the molecular redox levels. This differs in important respects from electrochemical ET at a single metal/electrolyte interface. Similar data for a short oligonucleotide immobilized on Au(111) show that oligonucleotides can be characterized with comparable detail, with novel perspectives for addressing DNA electronic conduction mechanisms and for biological screening towards the single-molecule level.

  7. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jingdong [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Grubb, Mikala [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Hansen, Allan G [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Kuznetsov, Alexander M [A N Frumkin Institute of Electrochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskij Prospect 31, 117071 Moscow (Russian Federation); Boisen, Anja [Microelectronics Centre, Building 345, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Wackerbarth, Hainer [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Ulstrup, Jens [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark)

    2003-05-14

    Redox metalloproteins immobilized on metallic surfaces in contact with aqueous biological media are important in many areas of pure and applied sciences. Redox metalloprotein films are currently being addressed by new approaches where biotechnology including modified and synthetic proteins is combined with state-of-the-art physical electrochemistry with emphasis on single-crystal, atomically planar electrode surfaces, in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and other surface techniques. These approaches have brought bioelectrochemistry important steps forward towards the nanoscale and single-molecule levels. We discuss here these advances with reference to two specific redox metalloproteins, the blue single-copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and the single-haem protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cytochrome c, and a short oligonucleotide. Both proteins can be immobilized on Au(111) by chemisorption via exposed sulfur-containing residues. Voltammetric, interfacial capacitance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and microcantilever sensor data, together with in situ STM with single-molecule resolution, all point to a coherent view of monolayer organization with protein electron transfer (ET) function retained. In situ STM can also address the microscopic mechanisms for electron tunnelling through the biomolecules and offers novel notions such as coherent multi-ET between the substrate and tip via the molecular redox levels. This differs in important respects from electrochemical ET at a single metal/electrolyte interface. Similar data for a short oligonucleotide immobilized on Au(111) show that oligonucleotides can be characterized with comparable detail, with novel perspectives for addressing DNA electronic conduction mechanisms and for biological screening towards the single-molecule level.

  8. Fully automatic characterization and data collection from crystals of biological macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Olof; Malbet-Monaco, Stéphanie; Popov, Alexander; Nurizzo, Didier, E-mail: nurizzo@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 40220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Bowler, Matthew W., E-mail: nurizzo@esrf.fr [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); Université Grenoble Alpes–EMBL–CNRS, Grenoble Outstation, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 90181, 38042 Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 71 Avenue des Martyrs, CS 40220, 38043 Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-31

    A fully automatic system has been developed that performs X-ray centring and characterization of, and data collection from, large numbers of cryocooled crystals without human intervention. Considerable effort is dedicated to evaluating macromolecular crystals at synchrotron sources, even for well established and robust systems. Much of this work is repetitive, and the time spent could be better invested in the interpretation of the results. In order to decrease the need for manual intervention in the most repetitive steps of structural biology projects, initial screening and data collection, a fully automatic system has been developed to mount, locate, centre to the optimal diffraction volume, characterize and, if possible, collect data from multiple cryocooled crystals. Using the capabilities of pixel-array detectors, the system is as fast as a human operator, taking an average of 6 min per sample depending on the sample size and the level of characterization required. Using a fast X-ray-based routine, samples are located and centred systematically at the position of highest diffraction signal and important parameters for sample characterization, such as flux, beam size and crystal volume, are automatically taken into account, ensuring the calculation of optimal data-collection strategies. The system is now in operation at the new ESRF beamline MASSIF-1 and has been used by both industrial and academic users for many different sample types, including crystals of less than 20 µm in the smallest dimension. To date, over 8000 samples have been evaluated on MASSIF-1 without any human intervention.

  9. Application of flow field-flow fractionation for the characterization of macromolecules of biological interest: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qureshi, R.N.; Kok, W.T.

    2011-01-01

    An overview is given of the recent literature on (bio) analytical applications of flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF). FlFFF is a liquid-phase separation technique that can separate macromolecules and particles according to size. The technique is increasingly used on a routine basis in a variety

  10. Application of flow field-flow fractionation for the characterization of macromolecules of biological interest: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.N. Qureshi; W.T. Kok

    2011-01-01

    An overview is given of the recent literature on (bio) analytical applications of flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF). FlFFF is a liquid-phase separation technique that can separate macromolecules and particles according to size. The technique is increasingly used on a routine basis in a variety o

  11. Research Progress of Quantum Dots for Biological Macromolecules Detection%量子点在生物大分子检测中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志刚

    2011-01-01

    Optical properties of quantum dots are advantageous against convenrtional organic fluorescent dyes, including extreme brightness, good photochemical stability, and other unique properties. Quantum dots have been used as a fluorescent marker for biological molecules both in vivo and in vitro, cells and drugs imaging, and long - time tracer studies, with a great developmental prospect. In recent years, different quantum dot materials are coupled with various biological macromolecule phases for the study of biological macromolecules function, cellular positioning, interaction, and trajectory. In this article, we summarize the implications of quantum dots in biological macromolecules.%与传统的荧光标志物相比,量子点由于具有荧光度强、光化学稳定性好等独特的光学性质,已被作为荧光标志用于体内外生物分子、细胞及药物作用的成像和长时间示踪等研究,显示出了巨大的发展前景.近年来人们将不同材料的纳米量子点与各种生物大分子相耦联,用于对生物大分子的功能、细胞内定位、相互作用及运动轨迹等观察研究.现就目前量子点在生物大分子中的研究概况进行总结.

  12. Protein dynamics: hydration and cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Heremans

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-pressure behavior of proteins seems to be unique among the biological macromolecules. Thermodynamic as well as kinetic data show the typical elliptical stability diagram. This may be extended by assuming that the unfolded state gives rise to volume and enthalpy-driven liquid-liquid transitions. A molecular interpretation follows from the temperature and the pressure dependence of the hydration and cavities. We suggest that positron annihilation spectroscopy can provide additional quantitative evidence for the contributions of cavities to the dynamics of proteins. Only mature amyloid fibrils that form from unfolded proteins are very resistant to pressure treatment.

  13. Synthesis and biological incorporation of icons into macromolecules for NMR study. Progress report, June 1, 1976--May 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, D.M.

    1977-02-01

    Progress is reported on methods to synthesize novel /sup 13/C-labeled materials for incorporation into macromolecules. Gram quantities (9 grams) of labeled uracil have been synthesized and incorporated, by means of a mutant bacterial strain into t-RNA. The bulk t-RNA has been isolated, purified, and carbon-13 T/sub 1/ studies completed. Work now in progress is directed towards the production of greater quantities of t-RNA from E. coli instead of Salmonella and the ultimate isolation of individual t-RNA molecules.

  14. The role of cell hydration in realization of biological effects of non-ionizing radiation (NIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2015-09-01

    The weak knowledge on the nature of cellular and molecular mechanisms of biological effects of NIR such as static magnetic field, infrasound frequency of mechanical vibration, extremely low frequency of electromagnetic fields and microwave serves as a main barrier for adequate dosimetry from the point of Public Health. The difficulty lies in the fact that the biological effects of NIR depend not only on their thermodynamic characteristics but also on their frequency and intensity "windows", chemical and physical composition of the surrounding medium, as well as on the initial metabolic state of the organism. Therefore, only biomarker can be used for adequate estimation of biological effect of NIR on organisms. Because of the absence of such biomarker(s), organizations having the mission to monitor hazardous effects of NIR traditionally base their instruction on thermodynamic characteristics of NIR. Based on the high sensitivity to NIR of both aqua medium structure and cell hydration, it is suggested that cell bathing medium is one of the primary targets and cell hydration is a biomarker for NIR effects on cells and organisms. The purpose of this article is to present a short review of literature and our own experimental data on the effects of NIR on plants' seeds germination, microbe growth and development, snail neurons and heart muscle, rat's brain and heart tissues.

  15. Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory) and the explanation of the biological diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovskii, Victor E; Kadyshevich, Elena A

    2014-12-01

    The Life Origination Hydrate Theory (LOH-Theory) considers the life origination process as a sequence of thermodynamically caused regular and inevitable chemical transformations regulated by universal physical and chemical laws. The LOH-Theory bears on a number of experimental, thermodynamic, observation, and simulation researches. N-bases, riboses, nucleosides, and nucleotides and DNAs and RNAs are formed repeatedly within structural cavities of localizations of underground and underseabed honeycomb CH4-hydrate deposits from CH4 and nitrate and phosphate ions that diffused into the hydrate structures; proto-cells and their agglomerates originated from these DNAs and from the same minerals in the semi-liquid soup after liquation of the hydrate structures. Each localization gave rise to a multitude of different DNAs and living organisms. The species diversity is caused by the spatial and temporal repeatability of the processes of living matter origination under similar but not identical conditions, multiplicity of the DNA forms in each living matter origination event, variations in the parameters of the native medium, intraspecific variations, and interspecific variations. The contribution of the last to the species diversity is, likely, significant for prokaryotes and those eukaryotes that are only at low steps of their biological organization; however, in the light of the LOH-Theory, of available long-term paleontological investigations, and of studies of reproduction of proliferous organisms, we conclude that, in toto, the contribution of interspecific variations to the species diversity was earlier overestimated by some researchers. The reason of this overestimation is that origination of scores of «spores» of different organisms in any one event and multiple reproductions of such events in time and Earth's space were not taken into consideration.

  16. Second Harmonic Light Scattering from Macromolecules: Collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Shmuel

    In this work we present the theory and practice of optical second harmonic generation (SHG) as applied to rat-tail tendon collagen. Our work is the first quantitative application of SHG to biological systems. The angular dependence of SHG is found to display a sharp, intense, forward peak superimposed on a broad background. The sharp peak is shown to imply long-range polar order, while the broad background corresponds to that predicted for the random "up"/"down" array of collagen fibrils seen with the electron microscope. The dependence of fibril diameter distribution on age and state of hydration is measured. Our experiments also reveal information concerning the structure of the fibrils and their arrangement in the tendon. The degree of polar order, the coherence length of tendon for harmonic generation and the absolute magnitude of the nonlinear susceptibility of the collagen fibril are also determined. The biological significance of these findings and the many advantages of SHG for the structural study of biological macromolecules and tissues are discussed.

  17. A Mo-anode-based in-house source for small-angle X-ray scattering measurements of biological macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruetzel, Linda K.; Fischer, Stefan; Salditt, Annalena; Sedlak, Steffen M.; Nickel, Bert; Lipfert, Jan, E-mail: Jan.Lipfert@lmu.de [Department of Physics, Nanosystems Initiative Munich, and Center for Nanoscience, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Amalienstr. 54, 80799 Munich, Germany and Geschwister-Scholl Platz 1, 80539 Munich (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    We demonstrate the use of a molybdenum-anode-based in-house small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) setup to study biological macromolecules in solution. Our system consists of a microfocus X-ray tube delivering a highly collimated flux of 2.5 × 10{sup 6} photons/s at a beam size of 1.2 × 1.2 mm{sup 2} at the collimation path exit and a maximum beam divergence of 0.16 mrad. The resulting observable scattering vectors q are in the range of 0.38 Å{sup −1} down to 0.009 Å{sup −1} in SAXS configuration and of 0.26 Å{sup −1} up to 5.7 Å{sup −1} in wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) mode. To determine the capabilities of the instrument, we collected SAXS data on weakly scattering biological macromolecules including proteins and a nucleic acid sample with molecular weights varying from ∼12 to 69 kDa and concentrations of 1.5–24 mg/ml. The measured scattering data display a high signal-to-noise ratio up to q-values of ∼0.2 Å{sup −1} allowing for an accurate structural characterization of the samples. Moreover, the in-house source data are of sufficient quality to perform ab initio 3D structure reconstructions that are in excellent agreement with the available crystallographic structures. In addition, measurements for the detergent decyl-maltoside show that the setup can be used to determine the size, shape, and interactions (as characterized by the second virial coefficient) of detergent micelles. This demonstrates that the use of a Mo-anode based in-house source is sufficient to determine basic geometric parameters and 3D shapes of biomolecules and presents a viable alternative to valuable beam time at third generation synchrotron sources.

  18. Macromolecules Inquiry: Transformation of a Standard Biochemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Identification of macromolecules in food is a standard introductory high school biology lab. The intent of this article is to describe the conversion of this standard cookbook lab into an inquiry investigation. Instead of verifying the macromolecules found in food, students use their knowledge of the macromolecules in food to determine the…

  19. In-focus electron microscopy of frozen-hydrated biological samples with a Boersch phase plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, B.; Rhinow, D.; Walter, A.; Schroeder, R. [Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max-von-Laue Str. 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Benner, G.; Majorovits, E.; Matijevic, M.; Niebel, H. [Carl Zeiss NTS GmbH, D-73447 Oberkochen (Germany); Mueller, H.; Haider, M. [CEOS GmbH, Englerstr. 26, 69126 Heidleberg (Germany); Lacher, M.; Schmitz, S.; Holik, P. [Caesar Research Center, Ludwig-Erhard-Allee 2, D-53175 Bonn (Germany); Kuehlbrandt, W., E-mail: werner.kuehlbrandt@mpibp-frankfurt.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max-von-Laue Str. 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    We report the implementation of an electrostatic Einzel lens (Boersch) phase plate in a prototype transmission electron microscope dedicated to aberration-corrected cryo-EM. The combination of phase plate, C{sub s} corrector and Diffraction Magnification Unit (DMU) as a new electron-optical element ensures minimal information loss due to obstruction by the phase plate and enables in-focus phase contrast imaging of large macromolecular assemblies. As no defocussing is necessary and the spherical aberration is corrected, maximal, non-oscillating phase contrast transfer can be achieved up to the information limit of the instrument. A microchip produced by a scalable micro-fabrication process has 10 phase plates, which are positioned in a conjugate, magnified diffraction plane generated by the DMU. Phase plates remained fully functional for weeks or months. The large distance between phase plate and the cryo sample permits the use of an effective anti-contaminator, resulting in ice contamination rates of <0.6 nm/h at the specimen. Maximal in-focus phase contrast was obtained by applying voltages between 80 and 700 mV to the phase plate electrode. The phase plate allows for in-focus imaging of biological objects with a signal-to-noise of 5-10 at a resolution of 2-3 nm, as demonstrated for frozen-hydrated virus particles and purple membrane at liquid-nitrogen temperature. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We implement an electrostatic Boersch phase plate into a dedicated prototypical TEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase contrast aberration-corrected electron microscope (PACEM) includes a diffraction magnification unit (DMU). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DMU minimizes obstruction of low spatial frequencies by the phase plate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In-focus phase contrast generation is demonstrated for frozen-hydrated biological specimens.

  20. Cell hydration as a biomarker for estimation of biological effects of nonionizing radiation on cells and organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrapetyan, Sinerik; De, Jaysankar

    2014-01-01

    "Changes in cell hydration" have been hypothesized as an input signal for intracellular metabolic cascade responsible for biological effects of nonionizing radiation (NIR). To test this hypothesis a comparative study on the impacts of different temperature and NIR (infrasound frequency mechanical vibration (MV), static magnetic field (SMF), extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF), and microwave (MW)) pretreated water on the hydration of barley seeds in its dormant and germination periods was performed. In dormant state temperature sensitivity (Q 10) of seed hydration in distilled water (DW) was less than 2, and it was nonsensitive to NIR treated DW, whereas during the germination period (48-72 hours) seeds hydration exhibited temperature sensitivity Q 10 > 2 and higher sensitivity to NIR treated DW. Obtained data allow us to suggest that the metabolic driving of intracellular water dynamics accompanied by hydrogen bonding and breaking is more sensitive to NIR-induced water structure changes in seed bathing aqua medium than the simple thermodynamic processes such as osmotic gradient driven water absorption by seeds in dormant state. Therefore, cell hydration is suggested to be a universal and extrasensitive biomarker for detection of biological effects of NIR on cells and organisms.

  1. Humidity-controlled preparation of frozen-hydrated biological samples for cryogenic coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayama, Yuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Kanagawa 223-8522 (Japan); RIKEN Harima Institute/SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikaduki, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2012-05-15

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy (CXDM) has the potential to visualize the structures of micro- to sub-micrometer-sized biological particles, such as cells and organelles, at high resolution. Toward advancing structural studies on the functional states of such particles, here, we developed a system for the preparation of frozen-hydrated biological samples for cryogenic CXDM experiments. The system, which comprised a moist air generator, microscope, micro-injector mounted on a micromanipulator, custom-made sample preparation chamber, and flash-cooling device, allowed for the manipulation of sample particles in the relative humidity range of 20%-94%rh at 293 K to maintain their hydrated and functional states. Here, we report the details of the system and the operation procedure, including its application to the preparation of a frozen-hydrated chloroplast sample. Sample quality was evaluated through a cryogenic CXDM experiment conducted at BL29XUL of SPring-8. Taking the performance of the system and the quality of the sample, the system was suitable to prepare frozen-hydrated biological samples for cryogenic CXDM experiments.

  2. On the structural affinity of macromolecules with different biological properties: Molecular dynamics simulations of a series of TEM-1 mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giampaolo, Alessia Di [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, Universita’ degli Studi di l’Aquila, Via Vetoio snc, 67100 Coppito (AQ) (Italy); Mazza, Fernando [Department of Health Sciences, Univ. of L’Aquila, 67010 L’Aquila (Italy); Daidone, Isabella [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, Universita’ degli Studi di l’Aquila, Via Vetoio snc, 67100 Coppito (AQ) (Italy); Amicosante, Gianfranco; Perilli, Mariagrazia [Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche Applicate e Biotecnologiche, Università degli Studi di l’Aquila, Via Vetoio snc, 67100 Coppito (AQ) (Italy); Aschi, Massimiliano, E-mail: massimiliano.aschi@univaq.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, Universita’ degli Studi di l’Aquila, Via Vetoio snc, 67100 Coppito (AQ) (Italy)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of TEM-1 mutants. •Mutations effects on the mechanical properties are considered. •Mutants do not significantly alter the average enzymes structure. •Mutants produce sharp alterations in enzyme conformational repertoire. •Mutants also produce changes in the active site volume. -- Abstract: Molecular Dynamics simulations have been carried out in order to provide a molecular rationalization of the biological and thermodynamic differences observed for a class of TEM β-lactamases. In particular we have considered the TEM-1(wt), the single point mutants TEM-40 and TEM-19 representative of IRT and ESBL classes respectively, and TEM-1 mutant M182T, TEM-32 and TEM-20 which differ from the first three for the additional of M182T mutation. Results indicate that most of the thermodynamic, and probably biological behaviour of these systems arise from subtle effects which, starting from the alterations of the local interactions, produce drastic modifications of the conformational space spanned by the enzymes. The present study suggests that systems showing essentially the same secondary and tertiary structure may differentiate their chemical–biological activity essentially (and probably exclusively) on the basis of the thermal fluctuations occurring in their physiological environment.

  3. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vavpetič, P., E-mail: primoz.vavpetic@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vogel-Mikuš, K. [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jeromel, L. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ogrinc Potočnik, N. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); FOM-Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pongrac, P. [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Plant Physiology, University of Bayreuth, Universitätstr. 30, 95447 Bayreuth (Germany); Drobne, D.; Pipan Tkalec, Ž.; Novak, S.; Kos, M.; Koren, Š.; Regvar, M. [Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pelicon, P. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on–off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm{sup 2} and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation.

  4. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavpetič, P.; Vogel-Mikuš, K.; Jeromel, L.; Ogrinc Potočnik, N.; Pongrac, P.; Drobne, D.; Pipan Tkalec, Ž.; Novak, S.; Kos, M.; Koren, Š.; Regvar, M.; Pelicon, P.

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on-off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm2 and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation.

  5. Cell Hydration as a Biomarker for Estimation of Biological Effects of Nonionizing Radiation on Cells and Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinerik Ayrapetyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available “Changes in cell hydration” have been hypothesized as an input signal for intracellular metabolic cascade responsible for biological effects of nonionizing radiation (NIR. To test this hypothesis a comparative study on the impacts of different temperature and NIR (infrasound frequency mechanical vibration (MV, static magnetic field (SMF, extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF, and microwave (MW pretreated water on the hydration of barley seeds in its dormant and germination periods was performed. In dormant state temperature sensitivity (Q10 of seed hydration in distilled water (DW was less than 2, and it was nonsensitive to NIR treated DW, whereas during the germination period (48–72 hours seeds hydration exhibited temperature sensitivity Q10>2 and higher sensitivity to NIR treated DW. Obtained data allow us to suggest that the metabolic driving of intracellular water dynamics accompanied by hydrogen bonding and breaking is more sensitive to NIR-induced water structure changes in seed bathing aqua medium than the simple thermodynamic processes such as osmotic gradient driven water absorption by seeds in dormant state. Therefore, cell hydration is suggested to be a universal and extrasensitive biomarker for detection of biological effects of NIR on cells and organisms.

  6. Self-consistent QM/MM methodologies for structural refinement of photosystem II and other macromolecules of biological interest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sproviero, Eduardo M [YALE UNIV; Newcomer, Michael [YALE UNIV; Gascon, Jose A [YALE UNIV; Batista, Victor S [YALE UNIV

    2008-01-01

    The combination of quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) is one of the most promising approaches to study the structure, function, and properties of proteins and nucleic acids. However, there some instances in which the limitations of either the MM (lack of a proper electronic description) or QM (limited to a few number of atoms) methods prevent a proper description of the system. To address this issue, we review here our approach to fine-tune the structure of biological systems using post-QM/MM refinements. These protocols are based on spectroscopy data, and/or partitioning of the system to extend the QM description to a larger region of a protein. We illustrate these methodologies through applications to several biomolecules, which were pre-optimized at the QM/MM level and then further refined using postQM/MM refinement methodologies: mod(QM/MM), which refines the atomic charges of the residues included in the MM region accounting for polarization effects; mod(QM/MM)-opt that partition the MM region in smaller parts and optimizes each part in an iterative. self-consistent way, and the Polarized-Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (P-EXAFS) fitting procedure, which fine-tune the atomic coordinates to reproduce experimental polarized EXAFS spectra. The first two techniques were applied to the guanine quadruplex. while the P-EXAFS refinement was applied to the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

  7. Functionalized gold nanoparticles for the binding, stabilization, and delivery of therapeutic DNA, RNA, and other biological macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K DeLong

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Robert K DeLong1, Christopher M Reynolds1, Yaneika Malcolm1, Ashley Schaeffer1, Tiffany Severs2, Adam Wanekaya21Department of Biomedical Science (Cell and Molecular Biology Program, 2Department of Chemistry, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO, USAAbstract: Nanotechnology has virtually exploded in the last few years with seemingly limitless opportunity across all segments of our society. If gene and RNA therapy are to ever realize their full potential, there is a great need for nanomaterials that can bind, stabilize, and deliver these macromolecular nucleic acids into human cells and tissues. Many researchers have turned to gold nanomaterials, as gold is thought to be relatively well tolerated in humans and provides an inert material upon which nucleic acids can attach. Here, we review the various strategies for associating macromolecular nucleic acids to the surface of gold nanoparticles (GNPs, the characterization chemistries involved, and the potential advantages of GNPs in terms of stabilization and delivery.Keywords: gold, nanoparticles, nanomaterials, RNA, nucleic acid

  8. Direct imaging electron microscopy (EM) methods in modern structural biology: overview and comparison with X-ray crystallography and single-particle cryo-EM reconstruction in the studies of large macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaguchi, Katsuyuki

    2014-10-01

    Determining the structure of macromolecules is important for understanding their function. The fine structure of large macromolecules is currently studied primarily by X-ray crystallography and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (EM) reconstruction. Before the development of these techniques, macromolecular structure was often examined by negative-staining, rotary-shadowing and freeze-etching EM, which are categorised here as 'direct imaging EM methods'. In this review, the results are summarised by each of the above techniques and compared with respect to four macromolecules: the ryanodine receptor, cadherin, rhodopsin and the ribosome-translocon complex (RTC). The results of structural analysis of the ryanodine receptor and cadherin are consistent between each technique. The results obtained for rhodopsin vary to some extent within each technique and between the different techniques. Finally, the results for RTC are inconsistent between direct imaging EM and other analytical techniques, especially with respect to the space within RTC, the reasons for which are discussed. Then, the role of direct imaging EM methods in modern structural biology is discussed. Direct imaging methods should support and verify the results obtained by other analytical methods capable of solving three-dimensional molecular architecture, and they should still be used as a primary tool for studying macromolecule structure in vivo.

  9. A statistical mechanical description of biomolecular hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    We present an efficient and accurate theoretical description of the structural hydration of biological macromolecules. The hydration of molecules of almost arbitrary size (tRNA, antibody-antigen complexes, photosynthetic reaction centre) can be studied in solution and in the crystal environment. The biomolecular structure obtained from x-ray crystallography, NMR, or modeling is required as input information. The structural arrangement of water molecules near a biomolecular surface is represented by the local water density analogous to the corresponding electron density in an x-ray diffraction experiment. The water-density distribution is approximated in terms of two- and three-particle correlation functions of solute atoms with water using a potentials-of-mean-force expansion.

  10. Ion specificities of artificial macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lvdan; Kou, Ran; Liu, Guangming

    2016-12-21

    Artificial macromolecules are well-defined synthetic polymers, with a relatively simple structure as compared to naturally occurring macromolecules. This review focuses on the ion specificities of artifical macromolecules. Ion specificities are influenced by solvent-mediated indirect ion-macromolecule interactions and also by direct ion-macromolecule interactions. In aqueous solutions, the role of water-mediated indirect ion-macromolecule interactions will be discussed. The addition of organic solvents to aqueous solutions significantly changes the ion specificities due to the formation of water-organic solvent complexes. For direct ion-macromolecule interactions, we will discuss specific ion-pairing interactions for charged macromolecules and specific ion-neutral site interactions for uncharged macromolecules. When the medium conditions change from dilute solutions to crowded environments, the ion specificities can be modified by either the volume exclusion effect, the variation of dielectric constant, or the interactions between ions, macromolecules, and crowding agents.

  11. Macromolecular crowding: Macromolecules friend or foe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Shruti; Chowhan, Rimpy Kaur; Singh, Laishram Rajendrakumar

    2015-09-01

    Cellular interior is known to be densely crowded due to the presence of soluble and insoluble macromolecules, which altogether occupy ~40% of the total cellular volume. This results in altered biological properties of macromolecules. Macromolecular crowding is observed to have both positive and negative effects on protein folding, structure, stability and function. Significant data has been accumulated so far on both the aspects. However, most of the review articles so far have focused on the positive aspect of macromolecular crowding and not much attention has been paid on the deleterious aspect of crowding on macromolecules. In order to have a complete knowledge of the effect of macromolecular crowding on proteins and enzymes, it is important to look into both the aspects of crowding to determine its precise role under physiological conditions. To fill the gap in the understanding of the effect of macromolecular crowding on proteins and enzymes, this review article focuses on the deleterious influence of crowding on macromolecules. Macromolecular crowding is not always good but also has several deleterious effects on various macromolecular properties. Taken together, the properties of biological macromolecules in vivo appears to be finely regulated by the nature and level of the intracellular crowdedness in order to perform their biological functions appropriately. The information provided here gives an understanding of the role played by the nature and level of cellular crowdedness in intensifying and/or alleviating the burden of various proteopathies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Weakly Hydrated Surfaces and the Binding Interactions of Small Biological Solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, J. W.; Tavagnacco, L.; Ehrlich, L.; Chen, M.; Schnupf, U.; Himmel, M. E.; Saboungi, M. L.; Cesaro, A.

    2012-04-01

    Extended planar hydrophobic surfaces, such as are found in the side chains of the amino acids histidine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, exhibit an affinity for the weakly hydrated faces of glucopyranose. In addition, molecular species such as these, including indole, caffeine, and imidazole, exhibit a weak tendency to pair together by hydrophobic stacking in aqueous solution. These interactions can be partially understood in terms of recent models for the hydration of extended hydrophobic faces and should provide insight into the architecture of sugar-binding sites in proteins.

  13. Analysis of macromolecules, ligands and macromolecule-ligand complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Dreele, Robert B [Los Alamos, NM

    2008-12-23

    A method for determining atomic level structures of macromolecule-ligand complexes through high-resolution powder diffraction analysis and a method for providing suitable microcrystalline powder for diffraction analysis are provided. In one embodiment, powder diffraction data is collected from samples of polycrystalline macromolecule and macromolecule-ligand complex and the refined structure of the macromolecule is used as an approximate model for a combined Rietveld and stereochemical restraint refinement of the macromolecule-ligand complex. A difference Fourier map is calculated and the ligand position and points of interaction between the atoms of the macromolecule and the atoms of the ligand can be deduced and visualized. A suitable polycrystalline sample of macromolecule-ligand complex can be produced by physically agitating a mixture of lyophilized macromolecule, ligand and a solvent.

  14. Dynamic impact indentation of hydrated biological tissues and tissue surrogate gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilke Kalcioglu, Z.; Qu, Meng; Strawhecker, Kenneth E.; Shazly, Tarek; Edelman, Elazer; VanLandingham, Mark R.; Smith, James F.; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.

    2011-03-01

    For both materials engineering research and applied biomedicine, a growing need exists to quantify mechanical behaviour of tissues under defined hydration and loading conditions. In particular, characterisation under dynamic contact-loading conditions can enable quantitative predictions of deformation due to high rate 'impact' events typical of industrial accidents and ballistic insults. The impact indentation responses were examined of both hydrated tissues and candidate tissue surrogate materials. The goals of this work were to determine the mechanical response of fully hydrated soft tissues under defined dynamic loading conditions, and to identify design principles by which synthetic, air-stable polymers could mimic those responses. Soft tissues from two organs (liver and heart), a commercially available tissue surrogate gel (Perma-Gel™) and three styrenic block copolymer gels were investigated. Impact indentation enabled quantification of resistance to penetration and energy dissipative constants under the rates and energy densities of interest for tissue surrogate applications. These analyses indicated that the energy dissipation capacity under dynamic impact increased with increasing diblock concentration in the styrenic gels. Under the impact rates employed (2 mm/s to 20 mm/s, corresponding to approximate strain energy densities from 0.4 kJ/m3 to 20 kJ/m3), the energy dissipation capacities of fully hydrated soft tissues were ultimately well matched by a 50/50 triblock/diblock composition that is stable in ambient environments. More generally, the methodologies detailed here facilitate further optimisation of impact energy dissipation capacity of polymer-based tissue surrogate materials, either in air or in fluids.

  15. A Course on Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Arturo

    1985-01-01

    Describes a senior-level course that: (1) focuses on the structure and reactions of macromolecules; (2) treats industrial polymers in a unified way; and (3) uses analysis of conformation and conformational statistics as a unifying approach. Also discusses course topics, including polysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids, and others. (JN)

  16. Construction with macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Hecht

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The generation of nanosized features via the bottom-up organization of individual atoms and molecules represents one of the most rapidly emerging fields in modern science and technology. In order to gain general and modular access to nanostructures, a construction kit consisting of molecular building blocks with defined nanoscale dimensions, shape, and functionality is required. While nature has developed a hierarchical strategy to construct sophisticated and complex nanostructures, chemistry is just starting to explore artificial macromolecules as a means to synthesize specific nano-objects. In this review, recent advances in achieving control over conformation within macromolecules and the interconnection of conformationally defined subunits by either covalent bonds or self-assembly are discussed in analogy to natural structure evolution.

  17. Tailoring liquid crystalline lipid nanomaterials for controlled release of macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisset, Nicole B; Boyd, Ben J; Dong, Yao-Da

    2015-11-10

    Lipid-based liquid crystalline materials are being developed as drug delivery systems. However, the use of these materials for delivery of large macromolecules is currently hindered by the small size of the water channels in these structures limiting control over diffusion behaviour. The addition of the hydration-modulating agent, sucrose stearate, to phytantriol cubic phase under excess water conditions incrementally increased the size of these water channels. Inclusion of oleic acid enabled further control of swelling and de-swelling of the matrix via a pH triggerable system where at low pH the hexagonal phase is present and at higher pH the cubic phase is present. Fine control over the release of various sized model macromolecules is demonstrated, indicating future application to controlled loading and release of large macromolecules such as antibodies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Persistence Length of DNA Macromolecule with Kinks

    CERN Document Server

    Simonov, Kyrylo

    2014-01-01

    The study of configurational parameters of deformed DNA is a relevant problem in research of such important biological process as double helix compactization in cell. The deformations accompanied with local disruptions of the regular macromolecule structure cause significant bending of the double helix, or kinks. In this paper an approach for Kratky-Porod model to calculate persistence length of DNA macromolecule with kinks is developed. The presented approach considers kinks of arbitrary configuration, including two basic types of kinks, type 1 - sharp kink caused by unstacking a single base pair step, and type 2 - intrinsic-induced kink that involves several base pairs. Within developed approach analytical expressions for persistence length, coil size and gyration radius of kinky double helix were obtained.

  19. Diffusion of macromolecules through sclera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Heng; Wu, Bi-Dong; Tao, Yong; Li, Xiao-Xin

    2013-02-01

    To quantify the in vitro permeability coefficient over different topographical locations of porcine sclera to macromolecules with different molecular weight. Fresh equatorial and posterior superotemporal porcine sclera was mounted in a two-chamber diffusion apparatus, and its permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated dextrans ranging in molecular weight from 40 kDa to 150 kDa was determined by fluorescence spectrophotometry. The sclera was processed as frozen sections and viewed with a fluorescence microscope. The thickness of the area and the thickness that macromolecules enriched in the surface of sclera were measured. The permeability coefficient (Pc) of porcine sclera to macromolecules was significantly higher (40 kDa, p = 0.028; 70 kDa, p = 0.033; 150 kDa, p = 0.007) in equatorial region than posterior, which could be attributed to the significant difference of thickness (p macromolecules enriched in the scleral surface was thicker for those with larger MW (p macromolecules. Larger macromolecules are more likely to accumulate in scleral surface. The difference between topographical locations may have pharmacokinetic implications when considering transscleral diffusion of macromolecules. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2012 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  20. Translational diffusion of hydration water correlates with functional motions in folded and intrinsically disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirò, Giorgio; Fichou, Yann; Gallat, Francois-Xavier; Wood, Kathleen; Gabel, Frank; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Heyden, Matthias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Orecchini, Andrea; Paciaroni, Alessandro; Wuttke, Joachim; Tobias, Douglas J; Weik, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Hydration water is the natural matrix of biological macromolecules and is essential for their activity in cells. The coupling between water and protein dynamics has been intensively studied, yet it remains controversial. Here we combine protein perdeuteration, neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations to explore the nature of hydration water motions at temperatures between 200 and 300 K, across the so-called protein dynamical transition, in the intrinsically disordered human protein tau and the globular maltose binding protein. Quasi-elastic broadening is fitted with a model of translating, rotating and immobile water molecules. In both experiment and simulation, the translational component markedly increases at the protein dynamical transition (around 240 K), regardless of whether the protein is intrinsically disordered or folded. Thus, we generalize the notion that the translational diffusion of water molecules on a protein surface promotes the large-amplitude motions of proteins that are required for their biological activity.

  1. Effect of anionic macromolecules on intestinal permeability of furosemide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, Hadi; Fahimfar, Hadi; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Islambulchilar, Ziba; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2015-02-01

    Furosemide is an anionic molecule and has very low absorption in gastro intestinal tract. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of anionic macromolecules on the intestinal permeability of Furosemide. The intestinal permeability of Furosemide was determined using single-pass intestinal perfusion technique in rats. Briefly a jejunal segment of ∼10 cm was isolated and cannulated in both ends for inlet and outlet solution. The perfusate was collected every 10 min and samples were analyzed using the RP-HPLC method. Test samples containing furosemide and two anionic macromolecules, sodium carboxy methyl cellulose and sodium alginate, at different concentrations were used. The obtained data showed that existence of Sodium carboxy methyl cellulose significantly increased the Peff values in all three investigated concentrations (p macromolecules at specific concentrations could alter the permeability of anionic drugs across the biological membranes. Donnan phenomenon and chelating property of macromolecules could be attributed to the observed effect.

  2. Influence of hydration and cation binding on parvalbumin dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotti, J.-M.; Parello, J.; Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.

    Due to structural characteristics, parvalbumin exerts a major role in intracellular Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentration regulation during the muscular contraction-relieving cycle. This structure-function relationship being established, we are investigating the structure-dynamics-function relationship to take into account the protein dynamics. Because of the strong incoherent neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and of the abundance of this element in proteins, incoherent inelastic neutron scattering is a unique probe to study vibrations and localised motions in biological macromolecules. We take advantage of the complementarities in energy or time resolution of various neutron spectrometers (time of flight, backscattering, spin-echo) to probe the parvalbumin dynamics from a fraction of a picosecond to a few nanoseconds. Influences of hydration and of the nature of the cation on parvalbumin dynamics are discussed.

  3. Advances of the Application Research of Ionic Liquid in Biological Macromolecules%离子液体在生物大分子中的应用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭佳荣; 陈斌; 吴光瑜; 王国伟

    2013-01-01

      离子液体作为一种可设计性的绿色溶剂和高效催化剂,以其热稳定性好,催化性强,电导率高,溶解能力强,零蒸汽压等特性,在诸多领域具有广泛的应用。本文总结了离子液体的历史、制备、应用,主要介绍了目前离子液体在纤维素、胶原蛋白、角蛋白等生物大分子中的应用研究。同时重点介绍了离子液体在制革固废物和废水处理中的应用,并指出离子液体在皮革应用领域具有巨大前景。%As a kind of green solvent and efficient catalyst, ionic liquid with good molecule designability was widely used in many industry fields for its good thermal stability and catalytic ability, high electric conductivity, good dissolving ability, zero steam pressure and so on. In this paper, the development history, synthesis and application research in cellulose, collagen, keratin and other biological macromolecules of ionic liquid were mainly summarized. Especially, the application of ionic liquid in leather solid waste treatment were introduced, and it was also pointed out that the application of ionic liquids had great prospects in leather related fields.

  4. DEDUCTION OF EVOLUTIONARY RELATIONSHIPS FROM THE STRUCTURE OF MACROMOLECULES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BEINTEMA, JJ

    1992-01-01

    Macromolecules can be used to derive evolutionary relationships. This discovery has led to the development of a new discipline in biology, molecular evolution. A brief survey of several aspects of this new field of investigation is presented, together with references to historical and more recent li

  5. Macromolecules in Undergraduate Physical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattice, Wayne L.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests the topic of macromolecules and synthetic polymers be included in undergraduate courses. Two macromolecular systems (polyethylene in a state unperturbated by long-range interactions and a polypeptide undergoing a helix-coil transition) are described which are suitable for inclusion in the statistical mechanics section of physical…

  6. DNA compaction by nonbinding macromolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Compaction of DNA by nonbinding macromolecules such as uncharged flexible polymer chains and negatively charged globular proteins is thought to have various applications in biophysics, for example in the formation of a nucleoid structure in bacteria. A simple experimental model that has been very

  7. DNA compaction by nonbinding macromolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Compaction of DNA by nonbinding macromolecules such as uncharged flexible polymer chains and negatively charged globular proteins is thought to have various applications in biophysics, for example in the formation of a nucleoid structure in bacteria. A simple experimental model that has been very we

  8. INFLUENCE OF MACROMOLECULES ON CHEMICAL TRANSPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macromolecules in the pore fluid influence the mobility of hydrophobic compounds through soils. his study evaluated the significance of macromolecules in facilitating chemical transport under laboratory conditions. Partition coefficients between 14C-labeled hexachlorobenzene and ...

  9. Crystallization of Biological Macromolecules in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Edward H.; Chayen, N. E.; Helliwell, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    An overview of microgravity crystallization explaining why microgravity is used, factors which affect crystallization, the method of crystallization and the environment itself. Also covered is how best to make use of microgravity and what the future might hold.

  10. X-ray Analysis of Biological Macromolecules

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Im Rahmen dieser Dissertation wurden mehrere Proteinstrukturen mittels Röntgenstrukturanalyse bestimmt. Dabei kamen verschiedene Verfahren wie zum Beispiel "Molecular Replacement" und "Multiple Anomale Dispersion" (MAD) zum Einsatz. Gelöst wurden zwei C-terminale Fragmente von TonB, einem Protein aus Escherichia coli (E. coli), der C-Ring der F0F1-ATPase aus Ilyobacter tartaricus und GalU, ein Enzym, das ebenfalls aus E. coli stammt.

  11. Crystallization of Biological Macromolecules in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Edward H.; Chayen, N. E.; Helliwell, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    An overview of microgravity crystallization explaining why microgravity is used, factors which affect crystallization, the method of crystallization and the environment itself. Also covered is how best to make use of microgravity and what the future might hold.

  12. Application of a real-space three-dimensional image reconstruction method in the structural analysis of noncrystalline biological macromolecules enveloped by water in coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Wataru; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2011-08-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a novel technique in the structural analyses of particles that are difficult to crystallize, such as the biological particles composing living cells. As water is indispensable for maintaining particles in functional structures, sufficient hydration of targeted particles is required during sample preparation for diffraction microscopy experiments. However, the water enveloping particles also contributes significantly to the diffraction patterns and reduces the electron-density contrast of the sample particles. In this study, we propose a protocol for the structural analyses of particles in water by applying a three-dimensional reconstruction method in real space for the projection images phase-retrieved from diffraction patterns, together with a developed density modification technique. We examined the feasibility of the protocol through three simulations involving a protein molecule in a vacuum, and enveloped in either a droplet or a cube-shaped water. The simulations were carried out for the diffraction patterns in the reciprocal planes normal to the incident x-ray beam. This assumption and the simulation conditions corresponded to experiments using x-ray wavelengths of shorter than 0.03 Å. The analyses demonstrated that our protocol provided an interpretable electron-density map. Based on the results, we discuss the advantages and limitations of the proposed protocol and its practical application for experimental data. In particular, we examined the influence of Poisson noise in diffraction patterns on the reconstructed three-dimensional electron density in the proposed protocol.

  13. Ultrastructure, macromolecules, and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Dillon, Lawrence S

    1981-01-01

    Thus far in the history of biology, two, and only two, fundamental principles have come to light that pervade and unify the entire science-the cell theory and the concept of evolution. While it is true that recently opened fields of inves­ tigation have given rise to several generalizations of wide impact, such as the universality of DNA and the energetic dynamics of ecology, closer inspection reveals them to be part and parcel of either of the first two mentioned. Because in the final analysis energy can act upon an organism solely at the cellular level, its effects may be perceived basically to represent one facet of cell me­ tabolism. Similarly, because the DNA theory centers upon the means by which cells build proteins and reproduce themselves, it too proves to be only one more, even though an exciting, aspect of the cell theory. In fact, if the matter is given closer scrutiny, evolution itself can be viewed as being a fundamental portion of the cell concept, for its effects arise only as a consequence ...

  14. Application of Magnetic Microspheres in Purification of Cells and Biological Macromolecules%磁性微球在细胞与生物大分子分离纯化中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔梦楠; 田伟; 马素娟; 李明生; 马忠仁; 冯玉萍

    2014-01-01

    T he separation and purification of cells and a variety of biological macromolecules such as nucleic acid ,protein are indispensable part of the life sciences .The development of separation and purification technology plays a decisive role for the entire biology .Magnetic microsphere separation is a new type of separation technology based on solid-phase magnetic separation characteristics and integrated biological fac-tors ,such as biological molecules and cells .The high-purity target products can be isolated and purified by means of this technology conveniently ,quickly and softly .In recent years ,magnetic microspheres were progressively applied in many fields ,such as biomedicine ,cytology and separation engineering .In this pa-per ,the nearly five years of literatures at home and abroad were reviewed in the structure ,characteristics and separation principle of magnetic microspheres .The present application situation of magnetic micro-spheres in cell separation and classification ,protein purification ,immobilized enzyme ,DNA separation and immune analysis and detection were detailedly discussed ,and finally the application prospects of magnetic separation technology in of biological purification and detection were summarized .%细胞和各种生物大分子如核酸、蛋白质等的分离和纯化已逐渐成为生命科学领域内必不可少的技术手段。分离纯化技术的发展对促进整个生物学的发展具有举足轻重的作用。磁性微球分离技术是基于固相磁性材料分离特性,综合生物分子、细胞等因素而发展出的一种新型分离技术。该技术能够简便、快速、柔和、高纯度地分离所需物质。近年来,磁性微球已逐步应用于生物医学、细胞学和生物工程等领域。论文主要回顾了国内外近5年的文献,介绍了磁性微球的结构、特性和分离原理,并详细论述了磁性微球在细胞分离和分类、蛋白质提纯、酶固定化

  15. Potential-of-mean-force description of ionic interactions and structural hydration in biomolecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummer, G.; Garcia, A.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Biology and Biophysics Group; Soumpasis, D.M. [Max-Planck-Inst for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany). Biocomputation Group

    1994-10-01

    To understand the functioning of living organisms on a molecular level, it is crucial to dissect the intricate interplay of the immense number of biological molecules. Most of the biochemical processes in cells occur in a liquid environment formed mainly by water and ions. This solvent environment plays an important role in biological systems. The potential-of-mean-force (PMF) formalism attempts to describe quantitatively the interactions of the solvent with biological macromolecules on the basis of an approximate statistical-mechanical representation. At its current status of development, it deals with ionic effects on the biomolecular structure and with the structural hydration of biomolecules. The underlying idea of the PMF formalism is to identify the dominant sources of interactions and incorporate these interactions into the theoretical formalism using PMF`s (or particle correlation functions) extracted from bulk-liquid systems. In the following, the authors shall briefly outline the statistical-mechanical foundation of the PMF formalism and introduce the PMF expansion formalism, which is intimately linked to superposition approximations for higher-order particle correlation functions. The authors shall then sketch applications, which describe the effects of the ionic environment on nucleic-acid structure. Finally, the authors shall present the more recent extension of the PMF idea to describe quantitatively the structural hydration of biomolecules. Results for the interface of ice and water and for the hydration of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) will be discussed.

  16. Dermal and transdermal delivery of pharmaceutically relevant macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münch, S; Wohlrab, J; Neubert, R H H

    2017-10-01

    The skin offers an attractive way for dermal and transdermal drug delivery that is why the drug still needs certain qualities to transcend the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum. The requirements are: drugs with a maximum molecular weight of 1kDa, high lipophilicity and a certain polarity. This would restrict the use of a transdermal delivery of macromolecules, which would make the drug more effective in therapeutic administration. Various studies have shown that macromolecules without support do not penetrate the human skin. This effect can be achieved using physical and chemical methods, as well as biological peptides. The most popular physical method is the use of microneedles to create micropores in the skin and release the active agent in different sections. But also, other methods have been tested. Microjets, lasers, electroporation, sonophoresis and iontophoresis are also promising methods to successfully deliver dermal and transdermal macromolecules. Additionally, there are different penetration enhancer groups and biological peptides, which are also considered to be interesting approaches of enabling macromolecules to travel along the skin. All these methods will be described and evaluated in this review article. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The radiation chemistry of macromolecules

    CERN Document Server

    1973-01-01

    The Radiation Chemistry of Macromolecules, Volume II is a collection of papers that discusses radiation chemistry of specific systems. Part 1 deals with radiation chemistry of substituted vinyl polymers, particularly polypropylene (PP) as its structure is intermediate between polyethylene and polyisobutylene. This part also discusses polypropylene oxide (PPOx) for it can be prepared in the atactic, isotactic, and optically active forms. One paper focuses on the fundamental chemical processes and the changes in physical properties that give rise to many different applications of polystyrene. An

  18. Configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Tarrer, A.R.; Kim, S.; Hwang, D.; Chen, C.C.; Chiou, Z.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of our research was to obtain fundamental information regarding the functional dependence of the diffusion coefficient of coal molecules on the ratio of molecule to pore diameter. That is, the objective of our study was to examine the effect of molecule size and configuration on hindered diffusion of coal macromolecules through as porous medium. To best accomplish this task, we circumvented the complexities of an actual porous catalyst by using a well defined porous matrix with uniform capillaric pores, i.e., a track-etched membrane. In this way, useful information was obtained regarding the relationship of molecular size and configuration on the diffusion rate of coal derived macromolecules through a pore structure with known geometry. Similar studies were performed using a pellet formed of porous alumina, to provide a link between the idealized membranes and the actual complex pore structure of real catalyst extrudates. The fundamental information from our study will be useful toward the tailoring of catalysts to minimize diffusional influences and thereby increase coal conversion and selectivity for desirable products. (VC)

  19. Synthesis, Characterisation and Application of 68Ga-labelled Macromolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Velikyan, Irina

    2005-01-01

    The positron emitting radionuclide 68Ga (T1/2 = 68 min) might become of practical interest for clinical positron emission tomography (PET). The metallic cation, 68Ga(III), is suitable for complexation with chelators, either naked or conjugated with biological macromolecules. Such labelling procedures require pure and concentrated preparations of 68Ga(III), which cannot be sufficiently fulfilled by the presently available 68Ge/68Ga generator eluate. This thesis presents methods to increase the...

  20. MEASURING THE SHAPES OF MACROMOLECULES – AND WHY IT MATTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The molecular basis of life rests on the activity of biological macromolecules, mostly nucleic acids and proteins. A perhaps surprising finding that crystallized over the last handful of decades is that geometric reasoning plays a major role in our attempt to understand these activities. In this paper, we address this connection between geometry and biology, focusing on methods for measuring and characterizing the shapes of macromolecules. We briefly review existing numerical and analytical approaches that solve these problems. We cover in more details our own work in this field, focusing on the alpha shape theory as it provides a unifying mathematical framework that enable the analytical calculations of the surface area and volume of a macromolecule represented as a union of balls, the detection of pockets and cavities in the molecule, and the quantification of contacts between the atomic balls. We have shown that each of these quantities can be related to physical properties of the molecule under study and ultimately provides insight on its activity. We conclude with a brief description of new challenges for the alpha shape theory in modern structural biology.

  1. Measuring the shapes of macromolecules – and why it matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The molecular basis of life rests on the activity of biological macromolecules, mostly nucleic acids and proteins. A perhaps surprising finding that crystallized over the last handful of decades is that geometric reasoning plays a major role in our attempt to understand these activities. In this paper, we address this connection between geometry and biology, focusing on methods for measuring and characterizing the shapes of macromolecules. We briefly review existing numerical and analytical approaches that solve these problems. We cover in more details our own work in this field, focusing on the alpha shape theory as it provides a unifying mathematical framework that enable the analytical calculations of the surface area and volume of a macromolecule represented as a union of balls, the detection of pockets and cavities in the molecule, and the quantification of contacts between the atomic balls. We have shown that each of these quantities can be related to physical properties of the molecule under study and ultimately provides insight on its activity. We conclude with a brief description of new challenges for the alpha shape theory in modern structural biology.

  2. Measuring the shapes of macromolecules - and why it matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Mach, Paul; Koehl, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    The molecular basis of life rests on the activity of biological macromolecules, mostly nucleic acids and proteins. A perhaps surprising finding that crystallized over the last handful of decades is that geometric reasoning plays a major role in our attempt to understand these activities. In this paper, we address this connection between geometry and biology, focusing on methods for measuring and characterizing the shapes of macromolecules. We briefly review existing numerical and analytical approaches that solve these problems. We cover in more details our own work in this field, focusing on the alpha shape theory as it provides a unifying mathematical framework that enable the analytical calculations of the surface area and volume of a macromolecule represented as a union of balls, the detection of pockets and cavities in the molecule, and the quantification of contacts between the atomic balls. We have shown that each of these quantities can be related to physical properties of the molecule under study and ultimately provides insight on its activity. We conclude with a brief description of new challenges for the alpha shape theory in modern structural biology.

  3. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    and the role it plays in the global climate and the future of fuels. Russia, Japan, Nigeria, Peru, Chile, Pakistan, Indonesia, Korea, etc are various countries who are perusing the gas hydrates studies as a future resource for fuel. Indian Initiative..., 1993, Free gas at the base of the gas hydrate zone in the vicinity of the Chile Triple junction: Geology, v. 21, pp. 905-908. Borowski, W.S., C.K. Paull, and U. William, III, 1999, Global and local variations of interstitial sulfate gradients...

  4. Synthesis of biocontrol macromolecules by derivative of chitosan with surfactin and antifungal evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; Xu, Pei-Yuan; Zhang, Yue-Ji; Wang, Pei-Pei; Yu, Hong; Jiang, Ji-Hong

    2014-05-01

    A derivative of chitosan was prepared with chitosan and β-cyclodextrins, which was synthesized by the immobilization reaction, as a carrier to adsorb surfactin produced from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and got biological macromolecules. The antifungal activity against three sapstain fungi by a combination of macromolecules was tested. The results showed that the macromolecules inhibited the mycelium growth of sapstain fungi Lasiodiplodia rubropurpurea, L. crassispora, and L. theobromae by about 73.22%, 76.72%, and 70.22%, respectively. The macromolecules were relatively thermally stable with more than 50% of the antifungal activity even after being held at 121°C for 30 min. Meanwhile, the activity of the macromolecules remained more than 55% at a pH value ranging from 4 to 12. The macromolecules were resistant to hydrolysis by most protein-denaturing detergents and other enzymes. The results indicated the macromolecules might provide an alternative bioresource for the bio-control of sapstain. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry for Measuring Macromolecule-Ligand Affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff,, Michael R.; Grubbs, Jordan; Howell, Elizabeth E.

    2011-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a useful tool for understanding the complete thermodynamic picture of a binding reaction. In biological sciences, macromolecular interactions are essential in understanding the machinery of the cell. Experimental conditions, such as buffer and temperature, can be tailored to the particular binding system being studied. However, careful planning is needed since certain ligand and macromolecule concentration ranges are necessary to obtain useful data. Concentrations of the macromolecule and ligand need to be accurately determined for reliable results. Care also needs to be taken when preparing the samples as impurities can significantly affect the experiment. When ITC experiments, along with controls, are performed properly, useful binding information, such as the stoichiometry, affinity and enthalpy, are obtained. By running additional experiments under different buffer or temperature conditions, more detailed information can be obtained about the system. A protocol for the basic setup of an ITC experiment is given. PMID:21931288

  6. Application of Glow Discharge Aes for Investigation of Metal Ions and Water in Biology and Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Bregadze, Vasil G; Tsakadze, Ketevan J

    2007-01-01

    AES VHF inductively coupled plasmatron may be applied to wide range of studies. It enables rapid microanalysis of various solutions including biological objects and peripheral blood serum. In addition, it may be used for investigation of water desorption from solid bodies and for determination of energetic metal-macromolecule complexes. Study of hydration energy and hydration number by kinetic curves of water glow discharge atomic spectral analysis of hydrogen (GD EAS analysis of hydrogen) desorption from Na-DNA humidified fibers allowed to reveal that structural and conformational changes in activation energy of hydrated water molecules increases by 0.65kcal/Mole of water. The developed method of analysis of elements in solutions containing high concentrations of organic materials allows systematic study of practically healthy persons and reveals risk factors for several diseases. Microelemental content of blood serum fractions showed that amount of not bounded with ceruloplasmin copper was three times more ...

  7. Relaxation Dynamics of Semiflexible Fractal Macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Mielke

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We study the dynamics of semiflexible hyperbranched macromolecules having only dendritic units and no linear spacers, while the structure of these macromolecules is modeled through T-fractals. We construct a full set of eigenmodes of the dynamical matrix, which couples the set of Langevin equations. Based on the ensuing relaxation spectra, we analyze the mechanical relaxation moduli. The fractal character of the macromolecules reveals itself in the storage and loss moduli in the intermediate region of frequencies through scaling, whereas at higher frequencies, we observe the locally-dendritic structure that is more pronounced for higher stiffness.

  8. Bond Tension in Tethered Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheiko, Sergei S; Panyukov, Sergey; Rubinstein, Michael

    2011-06-14

    The paper presents scaling analysis of mechanical tension generated in densely branched macromolecules tethered to a solid substrate with a short linker. Steric repulsion between branches results in z-fold amplification of tension in the linker, where z is the number of chain-like arms. At large z ~ 100-1000, the generated tension may exceed the strength of covalent bonds and sever the linker. Two types of molecular architectures were considered: polymer stars and polymer "bottlebrushes" tethered to a solid substrate. Depending on the grafting density, one distinguishes the so-called mushroom, loose grafting, and dense grafting regimes. In isolated (mushroom) and loosely tethered bottlebrushes, the linker tension is by a factor of [Formula: see text] smaller than the tension in a tethered star with the same number of arms z. In densely tethered stars, the effect of interchain distance (d) and number of arms (z) on the magnitude of linker tension is given by f ≅ f0z(3/2)(b/d) for stars in a solvent environment and f ≅ f0z(2) (b/d)(2) for dry stars, where b is the Kuhn length and f0 ≅ kBT/b is intrinsic bond tension. These relations are also valid for tethered bottlebrushes with long side chains. However, unlike molecular stars, bottlebrushes demonstrate variation of tension along the backbone f ≅ f0s z(1/2) / d as a function of distance s from the free end of the backbone. In dense brushes [Formula: see text] with z ≅ 1000, the backbone tension increases from f ≅ f0 = 1 pN at the free end of the backbone (s ≅ b) to its maximum f ≅ zf0 ≅ 1 nN at the linker to the substrate (s ≅ zb).

  9. Macromolecule-Assisted de novo Protein Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seong Il; Son, Ahyun; Lim, Keo-Heun; Jeong, Hotcherl; Seong, Baik L.

    2012-01-01

    In the processes of protein synthesis and folding, newly synthesized polypeptides are tightly connected to the macromolecules, such as ribosomes, lipid bilayers, or cotranslationally folded domains in multidomain proteins, representing a hallmark of de novo protein folding environments in vivo. Such linkage effects on the aggregation of endogenous polypeptides have been largely neglected, although all these macromolecules have been known to effectively and robustly solubilize their linked heterologous proteins in fusion or display technology. Thus, their roles in the aggregation of linked endogenous polypeptides need to be elucidated and incorporated into the mechanisms of de novo protein folding in vivo. In the classic hydrophobic interaction-based stabilizing mechanism underlying the molecular chaperone-assisted protein folding, it has been assumed that the macromolecules connected through a simple linkage without hydrophobic interactions and conformational changes would make no effect on the aggregation of their linked polypeptide chains. However, an increasing line of evidence indicates that the intrinsic properties of soluble macromolecules, especially their surface charges and excluded volume, could be important and universal factors for stabilizing their linked polypeptides against aggregation. Taken together, these macromolecules could act as folding helpers by keeping their linked nascent chains in a folding-competent state. The folding assistance provided by these macromolecules in the linkage context would give new insights into de novo protein folding inside the cell. PMID:22949867

  10. Alignment of synaptic vesicle macromolecules with the macromolecules in active zone material that direct vesicle docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Mark L; Szule, Joseph A; Xu, Jing; Jung, Jae Hoon; Marshall, Robert M; McMahan, Uel J

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles dock at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of a neuron's axon terminals as a precondition for fusing with the membrane and releasing their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Typically, docked vesicles are next to aggregates of plasma membrane-bound macromolecules called active zone material (AZM). Electron tomography on tissue sections from fixed and stained axon terminals of active and resting frog neuromuscular junctions has led to the conclusion that undocked vesicles are directed to and held at the docking sites by the successive formation of stable connections between vesicle membrane proteins and proteins in different classes of AZM macromolecules. Using the same nanometer scale 3D imaging technology on appropriately stained frog neuromuscular junctions, we found that ∼10% of a vesicle's luminal volume is occupied by a radial assembly of elongate macromolecules attached by narrow projections, nubs, to the vesicle membrane at ∼25 sites. The assembly's chiral, bilateral shape is nearly the same vesicle to vesicle, and nubs, at their sites of connection to the vesicle membrane, are linked to macromolecules that span the membrane. For docked vesicles, the orientation of the assembly's shape relative to the AZM and the presynaptic membrane is the same vesicle to vesicle, whereas for undocked vesicles it is not. The connection sites of most nubs on the membrane of docked vesicles are paired with the connection sites of the different classes of AZM macromolecules that regulate docking, and the membrane spanning macromolecules linked to these nubs are also attached to the AZM macromolecules. We conclude that the luminal assembly of macromolecules anchors in a particular arrangement vesicle membrane macromolecules, which contain the proteins that connect the vesicles to AZM macromolecules during docking. Undocked vesicles must move in a way that aligns this arrangement with the AZM macromolecules for docking

  11. Molecular Imprinting of Macromolecules for Sensor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylan, Yeşeren; Yilmaz, Fatma; Özgür, Erdoğan; Derazshamshir, Ali; Yavuz, Handan; Denizli, Adil

    2017-04-19

    Molecular recognition has an important role in numerous living systems. One of the most important molecular recognition methods is molecular imprinting, which allows host compounds to recognize and detect several molecules rapidly, sensitively and selectively. Compared to natural systems, molecular imprinting methods have some important features such as low cost, robustness, high recognition ability and long term durability which allows molecularly imprinted polymers to be used in various biotechnological applications, such as chromatography, drug delivery, nanotechnology, and sensor technology. Sensors are important tools because of their ability to figure out a potentially large number of analytical difficulties in various areas with different macromolecular targets. Proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, antibodies, viruses and cells are defined as macromolecules that have wide range of functions are very important. Thus, macromolecules detection has gained great attention in concerning the improvement in most of the studies. The applications of macromolecule imprinted sensors will have a spacious exploration according to the low cost, high specificity and stability. In this review, macromolecules for molecularly imprinted sensor applications are structured according to the definition of molecular imprinting methods, developments in macromolecular imprinting methods, macromolecular imprinted sensors, and conclusions and future perspectives. This chapter follows the latter strategies and focuses on the applications of macromolecular imprinted sensors. This allows discussion on how sensor strategy is brought to solve the macromolecules imprinting.

  12. Recent Patents in Pulmonary Delivery of Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Animikh; Mandal, Abhirup; Mitra, Ashim K

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary delivery is a non-invasive form of delivery that holds tremendous therapeutic promise for topical and systemic administration of several macromolecules. Oral administration of macromolecules has several limitations such as low bioavailability, degradation of drug before reaching circulation and insufficient absorption across intestinal membrane. Administration of macromolecules such as proteins, peptides and nucleic acids via inhalation offers great potential due to the avoidance of first pass metabolism, higher surface area and rapid clinical response. However, delivery of reproducible, uniform and safe doses of inhaled particles remains a major challenge for clinical translation. Recent advances in the fields of biotechnology and particle engineering led to progress in novel pulmonary drug delivery systems. Moreover, significant developments in carriers and delivery devices prevent denaturation of macromolecules and control their release within the lungs. This article reviews the advances in pulmonary drug delivery systems by focusing on the recent patents in delivery of macromolecules. Furthermore, recent patents in gene delivery to the lungs have also been discussed. List of patents included in this review is comprehensive in terms of pulmonary delivery of therapeutics. It includes inventions related to proteins and peptides, DNA therapeutics, siRNA and other genetic materials with therapeutic applications. The diseases targeted by these therapeutic molecules are varied including but not limited to different forms of cancer, respiratory diseases etc.

  13. Clathrate hydrates in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Keith C; Brewer, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    Scientific knowledge of natural clathrate hydrates has grown enormously over the past decade, with spectacular new findings of large exposures of complex hydrates on the sea floor, the development of new tools for examining the solid phase in situ, significant progress in modeling natural hydrate systems, and the discovery of exotic hydrates associated with sea floor venting of liquid CO2. Major unresolved questions remain about the role of hydrates in response to climate change today, and correlations between the hydrate reservoir of Earth and the stable isotopic evidence of massive hydrate dissociation in the geologic past. The examination of hydrates as a possible energy resource is proceeding apace for the subpermafrost accumulations in the Arctic, but serious questions remain about the viability of marine hydrates as an economic resource. New and energetic explorations by nations such as India and China are quickly uncovering large hydrate findings on their continental shelves.

  14. General Differential Contact Identities for Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, Jonathan; Pincus, P A; Jho, YongSeok

    2015-10-16

    We discuss general Maxwell identities relating a macromolecule's charge, the forces acting at its surface, and the osmotic pressure of the solution in which it sits. The identities are closely related to the contact value relations that hold for certain special geometries, but are more general. In particular, the Maxwell identities can be applied to any macromolecule geometry, and they hold both within and outside of mean-field theory. Examples illustrate that combining the identities with approximate treatments of screening can often return simple, accurate osmotic pressure estimates.

  15. Preface: Special Topic on Coarse Graining of Macromolecules, Biopolymers, and Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Christian; Gompper, Gerhard; Dill, Ken A

    2015-12-28

    This special issue highlights new developments in theory and coarse-graining in biological and synthetic macromolecules and membranes. Such approaches give unique insights into the principles and design of the structures, dynamics, and assembly processes of these complex fluids and soft materials, where the length and time scales are often prohibitively long for fully atomistic modeling.

  16. Preface: Special Topic on Coarse Graining of Macromolecules, Biopolymers, and Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, Christian [Institut für Computerphysik, Universität Stuttgart, Allmandring 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Gompper, Gerhard [Theoretical Soft Matter and Biophysics, Institute of Complex Systems and Institute for Advanced Simulation, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52428 Jülich (Germany); Dill, Ken A. [Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    This special issue highlights new developments in theory and coarse-graining in biological and synthetic macromolecules and membranes. Such approaches give unique insights into the principles and design of the structures, dynamics, and assembly processes of these complex fluids and soft materials, where the length and time scales are often prohibitively long for fully atomistic modeling.

  17. Advances in industrial prospective of cellulosic macromolecules enriched banana biofibre resources: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappu, Asokan; Patil, Vikas; Jain, Sonal; Mahindrakar, Amit; Haque, Ruhi; Thakur, Vijay Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Biological macromolecules enriched resources are rapidly emerging as sustainable, cost effective and environmental friendly materials for several industrial applications. Among different biological macromolecules enriched resources, banana fibres are one of the unexplored high potential bio-resources. Compared to various natural fibres such as jute, coir, palm etc., the banana fibres exhibits a better tensile strength i.e. 458 MPa with 17.14 GPa tensile modulus. Traditionally used petroleum based synthetic fibres have been proven to be toxic, non-biodegradable and energy intensive for manufacturing. Cellulosic banana fibres are potential engineering materials having considerable scope to be used as an environmental friendly reinforcing element for manufacturing of polymer based green materials. This paper summarizes the world scenario of current production of biological macromolecules rich banana residues and fibres; major user's of banana fibres. The quality and quantity of biological macromolecules especially the cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, wax, engineering and mechanical properties of banana biofibre resources are reported and discussed. Subsequently, the findings of the recent research on bio resource composites, materials performance and opportunities have been discussed which would be a real challenge for the tomorrow world to enhance the livelihood environmental friendly advancement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Place of Macromolecules in Freshman Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Bernhard

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the inclusion of knowledge on macromolecules into a freshman chemistry course which emphasizes topics in organic chemistry, polymer science and biochemistry, atoms, chemical thermodynamics, and inorganic chemistry. Indicates that the program is the only way to keep chemistry education up to date. (CC)

  19. Macromolecule diffusion and confinement in prokaryotic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mika, Jacek T.; Poolman, Bert

    We review recent observations on the mobility of macromolecules and their spatial organization in live bacterial cells. We outline the major fluorescence microscopy-based methods to determine the mobility and thus the diffusion coefficients (D) of molecules, which is not trivial in small cells. The

  20. Macromolecule diffusion and confinement in prokaryotic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mika, Jacek T.; Poolman, Bert

    2011-01-01

    We review recent observations on the mobility of macromolecules and their spatial organization in live bacterial cells. We outline the major fluorescence microscopy-based methods to determine the mobility and thus the diffusion coefficients (D) of molecules, which is not trivial in small cells. The

  1. Macromolecule diffusion and confinement in prokaryotic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mika, Jacek T.; Poolman, Bert

    2011-01-01

    We review recent observations on the mobility of macromolecules and their spatial organization in live bacterial cells. We outline the major fluorescence microscopy-based methods to determine the mobility and thus the diffusion coefficients (D) of molecules, which is not trivial in small cells. The

  2. Method for selective immobilization of macromolecules on self assembled monolayer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, Julia [Richland, WA; Wang, Peng [Billerica, MA

    2011-11-29

    Disclosed is a method for selective chemical binding and immobilization of macromolecules on solid supports in conjunction with self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces. Immobilization involves selective binding of peptides and other macromolecules to SAM surfaces using reactive landing (RL) of mass-selected, gas phase ions. SAM surfaces provide a simple and convenient platform for tailoring chemical properties of a variety of substrates. The invention finds applications in biochemistry ranging from characterization of molecular recognition events at the amino acid level and identification of biologically active motifs in proteins, to development of novel biosensors and substrates for stimulated protein and cell adhesion.

  3. Active macromolecules of honey form colloidal particles essential for honey antibacterial activity and hydrogen peroxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Miotto, Danielle; Kim, Linda; Sjaarda, Calvin; Maldonado-Alvarez, Liset; Fukś, Henryk

    2017-08-09

    Little is known about the global structure of honey and the arrangement of its main macromolecules. We hypothesized that the conditions in ripened honeys resemble macromolecular crowding in the cell and affect the concentration, reactivity, and conformation of honey macromolecules. Combined results from UV spectroscopy, DLS and SEM showed that the concentration of macromolecules was a determining factor in honey structure. The UV spectral scans in 200-400 nm visualized and allowed quantification of UV-absorbing compounds in the following order: dark > medium > light honeys (p macromolecules promoted their self-assembly to micron-size superstructures, visible in SEM as two-phase system consisting of dense globules distributed in sugar solution. These particles showed increased conformational stability upon dilution. At the threshold concentration, the system underwent phase transition with concomitant fragmentation of large micron-size particles to nanoparticles in hierarchical order. Honey two-phase conformation was an essential requirement for antibacterial activity and hydrogen peroxide production. These activities disappeared beyond the phase transition point. The realization that active macromolecules of honey are arranged into compact, stable multicomponent assemblies with colloidal properties reframes our view on global structure of honey and emerges as a key property to be considered in investigating its biological activity.

  4. Distribution volumes of macromolecules in human ovarian and endometrial cancers--effects of extracellular matrix structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslene-Hox, Hanne; Oveland, Eystein; Woie, Kathrine; Salvesen, Helga B; Tenstad, Olav; Wiig, Helge

    2015-01-01

    Elements of the extracellular matrix (ECM), notably collagen and glucosaminoglycans, will restrict part of the space available for soluble macromolecules simply because the molecules cannot occupy the same space. This phenomenon may influence macromolecular drug uptake. To study the influence of steric and charge effects of the ECM on the distribution volumes of macromolecules in human healthy and malignant gynecologic tissues we used as probes 15 abundant plasma proteins quantified by high-resolution mass spectrometry. The available distribution volume (VA) of albumin was increased in ovarian carcinoma compared with healthy ovarian tissue. Furthermore, VA of plasma proteins between 40 and 190 kDa decreased with size for endometrial carcinoma and healthy ovarian tissue, but was independent of molecular weight for the ovarian carcinomas. An effect of charge on distribution volume was only found in healthy ovaries, which had lower hydration and high collagen content, indicating that a condensed interstitium increases the influence of negative charges. A number of earlier suggested biomarker candidates were detected in increased amounts in malignant tissue, e.g., stathmin and spindlin-1, showing that interstitial fluid, even when unfractionated, can be a valuable source for tissue-specific proteins. We demonstrate that the distribution of abundant plasma proteins in the interstitium can be elucidated by mass spectrometry methods and depends markedly on hydration and ECM structure. Our data can be used in modeling of drug uptake, and give indications on ECM components to be targeted to increase the uptake of macromolecular substances.

  5. Sperm macromolecules associated with bull fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Abdullah; Memili, Erdoğan

    2016-06-01

    Bull fertility, ability of the sperm to fertilize and activate the egg that sustain embryo development, is vitally important for effective and efficient production of cattle. Fertility is a complex trait with low heritability. Despite recent advances in genomic selection and possibility of enormous paternal benefits to profitable cattle production, there exist no reliable tests for evaluating semen quality and predicting bull fertility. This review focuses on sperm macromolecules such as transcripts, proteins and the epigenome, i.e., the functional genome that are associated with bull fertility. Generating new information in these systems is important beyond agriculture because such progress advances the fundamental science of the mammalian male gamete while at the same time introduces biotechnology into livestock production. Sperm macromolecules and epigenome markers associated with bull fertility can be used alone or in combination with the current SNP microarrays to determine sperm quality and to indicate bull fertility.

  6. Behavior of macromolecules in adsorbed layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A model for describing the behavior of macromolecules in adsorbed layers is developed by introducing a concept of distribution density of layer thickness U based on stochastic process and probabilistic statistics. The molecular behavior of layers adsorbed on clay particle surfaces is discussed; the random distribution and its statistics of the layer thickness are given by incorporating experimental results with an ionic polyelectrolyte with the molecular weight of 1.08×106 and chain charged density of 0.254.

  7. Identifiability, reducibility, and adaptability in allosteric macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohner, Gergő; Venkataraman, Gaurav

    2017-05-01

    The ability of macromolecules to transduce stimulus information at one site into conformational changes at a distant site, termed "allostery," is vital for cellular signaling. Here, we propose a link between the sensitivity of allosteric macromolecules to their underlying biophysical parameters, the interrelationships between these parameters, and macromolecular adaptability. We demonstrate that the parameters of a canonical model of the mSlo large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) ion channel are non-identifiable with respect to the equilibrium open probability-voltage relationship, a common functional assay. We construct a reduced model with emergent parameters that are identifiable and expressed as combinations of the original mechanistic parameters. These emergent parameters indicate which coordinated changes in mechanistic parameters can leave assay output unchanged. We predict that these coordinated changes are used by allosteric macromolecules to adapt, and we demonstrate how this prediction can be tested experimentally. We show that these predicted parameter compensations are used in the first reported allosteric phenomena: the Bohr effect, by which hemoglobin adapts to varying pH. © 2017 Bohner and Venkataraman.

  8. Shape transformation of lipid vesicles induced by diffusing macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góźdź, W T

    2011-01-14

    The attachment of macromolecules to the surface of a lipid vesicle may cause its deformations such as budding or creation of cylindrical protrusions. Diffusion of the macromolecules in the membranes may cause its shape transformations. The process of shrinking the protrusions due to diffusion of the macromolecules is investigated. It is assumed that macromolecules modify locally the spontaneous curvature and bending rigidity of the lipid membrane. Both spontaneous curvature and bending rigidities depend on the concentration of membrane components. It has been shown that cylindrical protrusions are created when the macromolecules which induce large spontaneous curvature are accumulated at a piece of the vesicle surface. It has been observed that here the elastic constants influence very little the evolution of the vesicle shape caused by diffusing macromolecules and the most important is the value the spontaneous curvature imposed by the macromolecules.

  9. Towards a green hydrate inhibitor: imaging antifreeze proteins on clathrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimond Gordienko

    Full Text Available The formation of hydrate plugs in oil and gas pipelines is a serious industrial problem and recently there has been an increased interest in the use of alternative hydrate inhibitors as substitutes for thermodynamic inhibitors like methanol. We show here that antifreeze proteins (AFPs possess the ability to modify structure II (sII tetrahydrofuran (THF hydrate crystal morphologies by adhering to the hydrate surface and inhibiting growth in a similar fashion to the kinetic inhibitor poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP. The effects of AFPs on the formation and growth rate of high-pressure sII gas mix hydrate demonstrated that AFPs are superior hydrate inhibitors compared to PVP. These results indicate that AFPs may be suitable for the study of new inhibitor systems and represent an important step towards the development of biologically-based hydrate inhibitors.

  10. Current Progress in Research on the Nanomaterials for Biological Macromolecules Recognition%用于识别生物大分子的纳米基体材料研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何柳; 李进; 宋丹丹; 曹一平

    2013-01-01

    The combination of nanotechnology and molecular imprinting technique, including their application research in biomedical domain, provides a new solution to the problem of the substitutes for antibodies, enzymes, and other native biological structures as well as cell bracket materials. Nanocavity biomaterials with recognition specificity imprinted by using proteins as templates have numerous applications in biotechnology, medicine and so on. This review presents the aspects of molecular imprinting nanostructure involved in the biomacromolecules imprinting, and it explores the precent developments and achievements of nanomaterials for molecular imprinting technology.%纳米技术和分子印迹技术的结合及其在生物医学领域的应用探索,为抗体、酶或其它天然生物结构的替代物及细胞支架材料提供新的解决途径.特别是以蛋白质为模板进行分子印迹得到的纳米“孔穴”结构生物材料,在生物技术和医学领域均显示出广阔的应用前景.本文对纳米薄膜、硅纳米粒子、二氧化硅纳米管和纳米线等纳米分子印迹材料在生物大分子印迹技术方面的应用研究进展进行综合评述.

  11. 微纳米多孔不锈钢表面高效吸附活性生物大分子%Effective Adsorption of Functional Biological Macromolecules on Stainless Steel Surface with Micro/Nanoporous Texture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余占江; 陈永强; 杨晓达

    2013-01-01

    Stainless steel (AISI 316L) is commonly used as a material in medical devices.Modification of the metal surface with bioactive molecules and/or nanoparticles to develop next-generation smart biomaterial,e.g.,cardiovascular stents,has recently attracted great attention.The present work investigated adsorption of antibodies and enzymes on micro/nanoporous 316L stainless steel compared with that on smooth and gold-coated stainless steel surfaces.The experimental results showed that the micro/nanoporous stainless steel surface produced by electrochemical erosion can adsorb a large amount of proteins (antibodies or horse radish peroxidase (HRP)),with comparable or better results than the sputtered-gold surface.Washes with surfactants (e.g.,10% bull serum albumin (BSA) or 0.2% Tween 20 solution) did not remove the enzymes/antibodies.In contrast,pretreatment of the metal plates with 5% Tween 20 halved antibody adsorption but did not affect adsorption of HRP.The wettability of the porous metal surface coated with proteins depended on the protein species and amount of protein adsorbed.The protein-coated porous surface was hydrophilic (water contact angle<50°),which should make it biocompatible.The proteins on the micro/nanoporous stainless steel surface retained their high biological activity; in particular,micro/nanoporous stainless steel stents modified with an anti-CD34 antibody using the present method can effectively and selectively capture KG-1 cells.Our work provides a basis for developing novel polymer-free,smart,economic biomaterials with stainless steel for biomedical applications.%不锈钢(AISI 316L)是目前在医药器械中应用最为广泛的商业化材料.下一代的不锈钢智能材料将特殊功能的生物活性分子(或纳米粒子)修饰在金属表面以模拟组织功能、提高生物/细胞相容性,这是目前材料科学研究的热点领域之一.本文研究了具有微纳米多孔表面结构的316L不锈钢对抗体和生物

  12. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-14

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  13. Flexibility and Stability of Metal Coordination Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Heyan; Geng, Diya; Liu, Dapeng; Lanigan, Nicholas; Wang, Xiaosong

    2017-06-16

    The effect of chain structure on flexibility and stability of macromolecules containing weak P-Fe metal coordination bonds is studied. Migration insertion polymerization (MIP) of FpCX Fp (1) and PR2 CY PR2 (2) (Fp: CpFe(CO)2 ; CX and CY : alkyl spacers; P: phosphine; R: phenyl or isopropyl) generates P(1/2), in which the P-Fe and Fe-P bonds with opposite bonding direction are alternatively arranged in the backbone. On the other hand, P(FpCX P) synthesized from AB-type monomers (FpCX P) has P-Fe bonds arranged in the same direction. P(1/2) is more rigid and stable than P(FpCX P), which is attributed to the chain conformation resulting from the P-Fe bonding direction. In addition, the longer spacers render P(1/2) relatively flexible; the phenyl substituents, as compared with the isopropyl groups, improves the rigidity, thermal, and solution stability of P(1/2). It is therefore possible to incorporate weak metal coordination bonds into macromolecules with improved stability and adjustable flexibility for material processing. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Hybrid Opto-electric Manipulation of Macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wereley, Steve

    2013-11-01

    Recently our research group has developed an innovative method for capturing, concentrating, manipulating and sorting populations of micro- and nanometer-scaled entities-particles, cells, macro-molecules, etc. These populations range from individual particles to thousands of particles (Lab-on-a-Chip, 2008; Microfluidics and Nanofluidics, 2008) while the sizes range from microns to nanometers. This novel technique combines features of optical trapping and dielectrophoresis in an innovative, dynamic way using a simple parallel plate electrode configuration. Transparent electrodes comprised of Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) on glass substrates are used to generate an electric field in the fluid while at the same time allowing light into and out of the fluid. Near-IR optical illumination causes subtle localized heating, creating an electric permittivity gradient that in turn drives a microscopic toroidal vortex. The vortex efficiently transports particles to a preferred location, usually the surface of the electrode. Recent advances have extended have allowed us to apply this technique to macromolecules (DNA, proteins) as well as nanoscale particles (quantum dots, nanowires and PSL particles).

  15. Bioinformatic science and devices for computer analysis and visualization of macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.B. Porozov

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The goals and objectives of bioinformatic science are presented in the article. The main methods and approaches used in computer biology are highlighted. Areas in which bioinformatic science can greatly facilitate and speed up the work of practical biologist and pharmacologist are revealed. The features of both the basic packages and software devices for complete, thorough analysis of macromolecules and for development and modeling of ligands and binding centers are described

  16. Top-Down Interrogation And Characterization Of Biological Macromolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Analytical mass spectrometry has been widely applied in the field of biomolecule identification and characterization. It provides fast, accurate and robust information relevant to the molecular mass, composition and structure of the target analytes. This thesis is focused on the top-down analysis of various macrobiomolecules, nucleic acids and proteins, in the context of ion/ion reaction and gas-phase unimolecular dissociation. The first part of the thesis deals with gas phase fragmentatio...

  17. VISUALIZATION APPROACH TO STRUCTURE-FUNCTION RELATIONSHIP IN BIOLOGICAL MACROMOLECULES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Luetić

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Most of recent research in the field of education strongly recommends the use of visualization in the daily teacher’s practice, especially when it comes to teaching science. Objectives: We investigated the impact of different kinds of visualization on student’s accomplishments, and the relationship between 2D and 3D visualization on the learning outcomes in biochemistry teaching, as well as gender-related differences in 2D vs 3D perception abilities. Materials and Methods: The research study was conducted on a sample of 149 senior secondary school students, devided into three groups: control group (usual teaching approach, and two experimental groups taught using different kinds of visualization: E1 (2D and 3D static visualization tools, and E2 (3D dynamic visualization tools, in addition. Discussion and results: We measured the students’ learning outcomes in biochemistry, as well as the level of satisfaction with different teaching methods. The data were interpreted by performing statistical measures and analyses. In order to validate our hypothesis, we used one-tail and two-tail ANOVA analyses (along with the t-test.Conclusions: There was no statistical significance regarding 2D vs 3D visualization tools in biochemistry teaching. Although there existed some gender-related differences in students’ achievements (in favor of females, it was not established that they were related to the type of visualization (2D or 3D tools applied. However students from the E2 group (additional computer animations were more interested and involved in this kind of teaching. Although the results do not show a statistical significance in favor of 3D visualization, we must conclude that in teaching biochemistry it is certainly a more efficient approach than traditional teacher-oriented lessons. By using this kind of visualization tools in everyday teaching practice, chemistry teachers are given the opportunity to enlighten students with somewhat complex and abstract biochemical concepts.

  18. Kinetics of quasi-isoenergetic transition processes in biological macromolecules

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    A master equation describing the evolution of averaged molecular state occupancies in molecular systems where alternation of molecular energy levels is caused by discrete dichotomous and trichotomous stochastic fields, is derived. This study is focused on the kinetics of quasi-isoenergetic transition processes in the presence of moderately high frequency stochastic field. A novel physical mechanism for temperature-independent transitions in flexible molecular systems is proposed. This mechanism becomes effective when the conformation transitions between quasi-isoenergetic molecular states take place. At room temperatures, stochastic broadening of molecular energy levels predominates the energy of low frequency vibrations accompanying the transition. This leads to a cancellation of the temperature dependence in the stochastically averaged rate constants. As examples, physical interpretations of the temperature-independent onset of P2X$_3$ receptor desensitization in neuronal membranes, as well as degradation o...

  19. Conformational space of flexible biological macromolecules from average data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertini, Ivano; Giachetti, Andrea; Luchinat, Claudio; Parigi, Giacomo; Petoukhov, Maxim V; Pierattelli, Roberta; Ravera, Enrico; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2010-09-29

    The concept of maximum occurrence (MO), i.e., the maximum percent of time that flexible proteins can spend in any given conformation, is introduced, and a rigorous method is developed to extensively sample the conformational space and to construct MO maps from experimental data. The method is tested in a case study, the flexible two-domain protein calmodulin (CaM), using SAXS and NMR data (i.e., pseudocontact shifts and self-orientation residual dipolar couplings arising from the presence of paramagnetic lanthanide ions), revealing that the "closed" and "fully extended" conformations trapped in the crystalline forms of CaM have MOs of only 5 and 15%, respectively. Compact conformations in general have small MOs, whereas some extended conformations have MO as high as 35%, strongly suggesting these conformations to be most abundant in solution. The method is universally applicable as it requires only standard SAXS data and specific NMR data on lanthanide derivatives of the protein (using native metal sites or lanthanide tagging). The computer program is publicly available using the grid computing infrastructure through the authors' Web portal.

  20. Hydration Assessment of Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS · Although there is no scientific consensus for 1 ) howbest to assess the hydration status of athletes, 2)what criteria to use as acceptable outcome measurements, or 3) the best time to apply practical assessment methods, there are methods that can be used toprovide athletes with useful feedback about their hydration status

  1. Inhalation therapy of macromolecules%大分子的吸入治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周煜

    2001-01-01

    随着重组DNA技术和分子生物学的发展,以蛋白质和多肽为主的大分子成为一类新型药物,并越来越受到重视,新兴的基因治疗技术使得核酸大分子也有可能成为药物。目前,绝大部分大分子药物都是通过注射途径给药, 病人在医院注射费用昂贵且不方便,因而许多注射替代给药途径成为研究热门,通过肺部吸入给药就是一种很有吸引力的非侵入性给药途径。本文介绍了肺吸收大分子的可能机制和大分子吸入治疗的临床与基础研究以及面临的问题。%Advances in molecular biology and recombinant DNA technology have led to the development of macromolecule as therapeutic agents for a variety of diseases including proteins, peptides and even nucleic acids. At present most of macromolecules are delivered by injection. Other routes of drug administration are being actively investigated. The inhalation therapy of macromolecule is an attractive noninvasive drug delivery method. In this review we describe the possible mechanisms of macromolecule absorption by the lung, then discuss the clinical and basic research of macromolecular inhalation therapy and analyze the problems of macromolecule inhalation delivery.

  2. Controlled doping by self-assembled dendrimer-like macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haigang; Guan, Bin; Sun, Yingri; Zhu, Yiping; Dan, Yaping

    2017-02-01

    Doping via self-assembled macromolecules might offer a solution for developing single atom electronics by precisely placing individual dopants at arbitrary location to meet the requirement for circuit design. Here we synthesize dendrimer-like polyglycerol macromolecules with each carrying one phosphorus atom in the core. The macromolecules are immobilized by the coupling reagent onto silicon surfaces that are pre-modified with a monolayer of undecylenic acid. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are employed to characterize the synthesized macromolecules and the modified silicon surfaces, respectively. After rapid thermal annealing, the phosphorus atoms carried by the macromolecules diffuse into the silicon substrate, forming dopants at a concentration of 10(17) cm(-3). Low-temperature Hall effect measurements reveal that the ionization process is rather complicated. Unlike the widely reported simple ionization of phosphorus dopants, nitrogen and carbon are also involved in the electronic activities in the monolayer doped silicon.

  3. Controlled doping by self-assembled dendrimer-like macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haigang; Guan, Bin; Sun, Yingri; Zhu, Yiping; Dan, Yaping

    2017-02-01

    Doping via self-assembled macromolecules might offer a solution for developing single atom electronics by precisely placing individual dopants at arbitrary location to meet the requirement for circuit design. Here we synthesize dendrimer-like polyglycerol macromolecules with each carrying one phosphorus atom in the core. The macromolecules are immobilized by the coupling reagent onto silicon surfaces that are pre-modified with a monolayer of undecylenic acid. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are employed to characterize the synthesized macromolecules and the modified silicon surfaces, respectively. After rapid thermal annealing, the phosphorus atoms carried by the macromolecules diffuse into the silicon substrate, forming dopants at a concentration of 1017 cm‑3. Low-temperature Hall effect measurements reveal that the ionization process is rather complicated. Unlike the widely reported simple ionization of phosphorus dopants, nitrogen and carbon are also involved in the electronic activities in the monolayer doped silicon.

  4. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years.

  5. QUANTUM MECHANICAL STUDY OF THE COMPETITIVE HYDRATION BETWEEN PROTONATED QUINAZOLINE AND LI+, NA+, AND CA2+ IONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydration reactions are fundamental to many biological functions and environmental processes. The energetics of hydration of inorganic and organic chemical species influences their fate and transport behavior in the environment. In this study, gas-phase quantum mechanical calcula...

  6. Biomimetic Transmembrane Channels with High Stability and Transporting Efficiency from Helically Folded Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Chao; Li, Wenfang; Dong, Zeyuan; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Feihu; Yang, Bing; Deng, Xiaoli; Zhang, Chenyang; Xu, Jiayun; Liu, Junqiu

    2016-08-08

    Membrane channels span the cellular lipid bilayers to transport ions and molecules into cells with sophisticated properties including high efficiency and selectivity. It is of particular biological importance in developing biomimetic transmembrane channels with unique functions by means of chemically synthetic strategies. An artificial unimolecular transmembrane channel using pore-containing helical macromolecules is reported. The self-folding, shape-persistent, pore-containing helical macromolecules are able to span the lipid bilayer, and thus result in extraordinary channel stability and high transporting efficiency for protons and cations. The lifetime of this artificial unimolecular channel in the lipid bilayer membrane is impressively long, rivaling those of natural protein channels. Natural channel mimics designed by helically folded polymeric scaffolds will display robust and versatile transport-related properties at single-molecule level. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Thermodynamic studies of ionic hydration and interactions for amino acid ionic liquids in aqueous solutions at 298.15 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagade, Dilip H; Madkar, Kavita R; Shinde, Sandeep P; Barge, Seema S

    2013-01-31

    Amino acid ionic liquids are a special class of ionic liquids due to their unique acid-base behavior, biological significance, and applications in different fields such as templates in synthetic chemistry, stabilizers for biological macromolecules, etc. The physicochemical properties of these ionic liquids can easily be altered by making the different combinations of amino acids as anion along with possible cation modification which makes amino acid ionic liquids more suitable to understand the different kinds of molecular and ionic interactions with sufficient depth so that they can provide fruitful information for a molecular level understanding of more complicated biological processes. In this context, volumetric and osmotic coefficient measurements for aqueous solutions containing 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ([Emim]) based amino acid ionic liquids of glycine, alanine, valine, leucine, and isoleucine are reported at 298.15 K. From experimental osmotic coefficient data, mean molal activity coefficients of ionic liquids were estimated and analyzed using the Debye-Hückel and Pitzer models. The hydration numbers of ionic liquids in aqueous solutions were obtained using activity data. Pitzer ion interaction parameters are estimated and compared with other electrolytes reported in the literature. The nonelectrolyte contribution to the aqueous solutions containing ionic liquids was studied by calculating the osmotic second virial coefficient through an application of the McMillan-Mayer theory of solution. It has been found that the second osmotic virial coefficient which includes volume effects correlates linearly with the Pitzer ion interaction parameter estimated independently from osmotic data as well as the hydrophobicity of ionic liquids. The enthalpy-entropy compensation effect, explained using the Starikov-Nordén model of enthalpy-entropy compensation, and partial molar entropy analysis for aqueous [Emim][Gly] solutions are made by using experimental Gibb

  8. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  9. Diffusion and partitioning of macromolecules in casein microgels: evidence for size-dependent attractive interactions in a dense protein system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Paulo D S; Bouchoux, Antoine; Huet, Sébastien; Madec, Marie-Noëlle; Thomas, Daniel; Floury, Juliane; Gésan-Guiziou, Geneviève

    2015-02-10

    Understanding the mechanisms that determine the diffusion and interaction of macromolecules (such as proteins and polysaccharides) that disperse through dense media is an important fundamental issue in the development of innovative technological and medical applications. In the current work, the partitioning and diffusion of macromolecules of different sizes (from 4 to 10 nm in diameter) and shapes (linear or spherical) within dispersions of casein micelles (a protein microgel) is studied. The coefficients for diffusion and partition are measured using FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching) and analyzed with respect to the structural characteristics of the microgel determined by the use of TEM (transmission electron microscopy) tomography. The results show that the casein microgel displays a nonspecific attractive interaction for all macromolecules studied. When the macromolecular probes are spherical, this affinity is clearly size-dependent, with stronger attraction for the larger probes. The current data show that electrostatic effects cannot account for such an attraction. Rather, nonspecific hydration molecular forces appear to explain these results. These findings show how weak nonspecific forces affect the diffusion and partitioning of proteins and polysaccharides in a dense protein environment. These results could be useful to better understand the mechanisms of diffusion and partitioning in other media such as cells and tissues. Furthermore, there arises the possibility of using the casein micelle as a size-selective molecular device.

  10. Wet hydrate dissolution plant

    OpenAIRE

    Stanković Mirjana S.; Kovačević Branimir T.; Pezo Lato L.

    2003-01-01

    The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant with capacity of 50,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE), Italy, in 1997, for increasing detergent zeolite production from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate ...

  11. Channel-Forming Bacterial Toxins in Biosensing and Macromolecule Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. Gurnev

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To intoxicate cells, pore-forming bacterial toxins are evolved to allow for the transmembrane traffic of different substrates, ranging from small inorganic ions to cell-specific polypeptides. Recent developments in single-channel electrical recordings, X-ray crystallography, protein engineering, and computational methods have generated a large body of knowledge about the basic principles of channel-mediated molecular transport. These discoveries provide a robust framework for expansion of the described principles and methods toward use of biological nanopores in the growing field of nanobiotechnology. This article, written for a special volume on “Intracellular Traffic and Transport of Bacterial Protein Toxins”, reviews the current state of applications of pore-forming bacterial toxins in small- and macromolecule-sensing, targeted cancer therapy, and drug delivery. We discuss the electrophysiological studies that explore molecular details of channel-facilitated protein and polymer transport across cellular membranes using both natural and foreign substrates. The review focuses on the structurally and functionally different bacterial toxins: gramicidin A of Bacillus brevis, α-hemolysin of Staphylococcus aureus, and binary toxin of Bacillus anthracis, which have found their “second life” in a variety of developing medical and technological applications.

  12. Channel-forming bacterial toxins in biosensing and macromolecule delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnev, Philip A; Nestorovich, Ekaterina M

    2014-08-21

    To intoxicate cells, pore-forming bacterial toxins are evolved to allow for the transmembrane traffic of different substrates, ranging from small inorganic ions to cell-specific polypeptides. Recent developments in single-channel electrical recordings, X-ray crystallography, protein engineering, and computational methods have generated a large body of knowledge about the basic principles of channel-mediated molecular transport. These discoveries provide a robust framework for expansion of the described principles and methods toward use of biological nanopores in the growing field of nanobiotechnology. This article, written for a special volume on "Intracellular Traffic and Transport of Bacterial Protein Toxins", reviews the current state of applications of pore-forming bacterial toxins in small- and macromolecule-sensing, targeted cancer therapy, and drug delivery. We discuss the electrophysiological studies that explore molecular details of channel-facilitated protein and polymer transport across cellular membranes using both natural and foreign substrates. The review focuses on the structurally and functionally different bacterial toxins: gramicidin A of Bacillus brevis, α-hemolysin of Staphylococcus aureus, and binary toxin of Bacillus anthracis, which have found their "second life" in a variety of developing medical and technological applications.

  13. Graphical Methods for Quantifying Macromolecules through Bright Field Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Hang; DeFilippis, Rosa Anna; Tlsty, Thea D.; Parvin, Bahram

    2008-08-14

    Bright ?eld imaging of biological samples stained with antibodies and/or special stains provides a rapid protocol for visualizing various macromolecules. However, this method of sample staining and imaging is rarely employed for direct quantitative analysis due to variations in sample fixations, ambiguities introduced by color composition, and the limited dynamic range of imaging instruments. We demonstrate that, through the decomposition of color signals, staining can be scored on a cell-by-cell basis. We have applied our method to Flbroblasts grown from histologically normal breast tissue biopsies obtained from two distinct populations. Initially, nuclear regions are segmented through conversion of color images into gray scale, and detection of dark elliptic features. Subsequently, the strength of staining is quanti?ed by a color decomposition model that is optimized by a graph cut algorithm. In rare cases where nuclear signal is significantly altered as a result of samplepreparation, nuclear segmentation can be validated and corrected. Finally, segmented stained patterns are associated with each nuclear region following region-based tessellation. Compared to classical non-negative matrix factorization, proposed method (i) improves color decomposition, (ii) has a better noise immunity, (iii) is more invariant to initial conditions, and (iv) has a superior computing performance

  14. Quantification of the Molecular Topology for Hierarchical Macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaucage, Gregory

    2009-03-01

    Hierarchical structures are often produced from ramified macromolecules such as comb, star, hyperbranched and dendritic polymers. We have recently derived a method for the description of complex molecular and nanostructural topologies based on a statistical analysis [1,2]. The method has been applied to a wide range of hierarchical materials from long chain branched polyolefins, hyperbranched polymers [3], star polymers, H-branched polymers to cyclics, biopolymers [4], and branched nanostructured aggregates. This method, when applied to neutron scattering data, yields the mole fraction of a structure involved in branching, the number of branch sites, the average branch length, and the number if inner chain segments. Further, quantitative measures of the convolution or tortuosity of the structure and the connectivity of the branching network can be made, opening a new window for our understanding of complex molecular topologies. This understanding has recently been applied to biological chain molecules to understand protein and RNA folding [4] for example as well as to aggregated, nanostructured, carbon soot. [0pt] [1] Beaucage, G, Phys. Rev. E 2004, 70, 031401. [2] Kulkarni, AS & Beaucage, G, J. Polym. Sci. Part B: Polym. Phys. 2006, 44, 1395. [3] Kulkarni, AS & Beaucage, G, Macromol. Rapid Comm. 2007, 28, 1312.?4) Beaucage, G, Biophysical J. 2008, 95, 503.

  15. Discovery of Reversible Crystallization of Macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Bernhard

    2004-03-01

    For 10 years "reversing melting" was observed with temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry, TMDSC. This reversing melting is the first harmonic response beyond that caused by the heat capacity of a metastable, semicrystalline macromolecular sample. Before one can identify "reversible melting," the calorimeter response must be corrected for loss of linearity, stationarity, frequency, amplitude, and instrument lag, or proper experiment-design must avoid these problems. Using quasi-isothermal TMDSC, the following observations were made [Prog. Polymer Sci. 28 (2003) 383-450]: Equilibrium crystals of polymers may melt at the equilibrium melting-temperature, but crystallization needs supercooling, even in the presence of crystal nuclei, making the overall process irreversible. Metastable, folded-chain crystals of the same molecules also melt irreversibly, however, may have some specific reversibility. Flexible, linear molecules of up to 10 nm length may melt fully reversibly. Macromolecules of less flexibility may lose the ability to melt reversibly. Decoupling of molecular segments, molecular nucleation, segregation of molar masses, rigid amorphous fractions, effects of equilibrium point defects in crystals and glasses, and transition-less ordering and solidification will be discussed in some detail. Supported by NSF, Polymers Program, DMR-0312233, and the Div. of Mat. Sci., BES, of DOE at ORNL, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, DOE-AC05-00OR22725.

  16. Sandwich complex-containing macromolecules: property tunability through versatile synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-El-Aziz, Alaa S; Agatemor, Christian; Etkin, Nola

    2014-03-01

    Sandwich complexes feature unique properties as the physical and electronic properties of a hydrocarbon ligand or its derivative are integrated into the physical, electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of a metal. Incorporation of these complexes into macromolecules results in intriguing physical, electrical, and optical properties that were hitherto unknown in organic-based macromolecules. These properties are tunable through well-designed synthetic strategies. This review surveys many of the synthetic approaches that have resulted in tuning the properties of sandwich complex-containing macromolecules. While the past two decades have seen an ever-growing number of research publications in this field, gaps remain to be filled. Thus, we expect this review to stimulate research interest towards bridging these gaps, which include the insolubility of some of these macromolecules as well as expanding the scope of the sandwich complexes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Ligand Binding to Macromolecules: Allosteric and Sequential Models of Cooperativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, V. L.; Szabo, Attila

    1979-01-01

    A simple model is described for the binding of ligands to macromolecules. The model is applied to the cooperative binding by hemoglobin and aspartate transcarbamylase. The sequential and allosteric models of cooperative binding are considered. (BB)

  18. A general method to study equilibrium partitioning of macromolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The distribution of macromolecules between a confined microscopic solution and a macroscopic bulk solution plays an important role in understanding separation processes such as Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC). In this study, we have developed an efficient computational algorithm for obtaining...

  19. Silica-based systems for oral delivery of drugs, macromolecules and cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, Roudayna; Canilho, Nadia; Pavel, Ileana A; Haffner, Fernanda B; Girardon, Maxime; Pasc, Andreea

    2017-04-20

    According to the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Food Safety Authority, amorphous forms of silica and silicates are generally recognized to be safe as oral delivery ingredients in amounts up to 1500mg per day. Silica is used in the formulation of solid dosage forms, e.g. tablets, as glidant or lubricant. The synthesis of silica-based materials depends on the payload nature, drug, macromolecule or cell, and on the target release (active or passive). In the literature, most of the examples deal with the encapsulation of drugs in mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Still to date limited reports concerning the delivery of encapsulated macromolecules and cells have been reported in the field of oral delivery, despite the multiple promising examples demonstrating the compatibility of the sol-gel route with biological entities, likewise the interest of silica as an oral carrier. Silica diatoms appear as an elegant, cost-effective and promising alternative to synthetic sol-gel-based materials. This review reports the latest advances silica-based systems and discusses the potential benefits and drawbacks of using silica for oral delivery of drugs, macromolecules or cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Formation and characterization of calcium orthophosphates in the presence of two different acidic macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelin, Irina M.; Maier, Vasilica; Suflet, Dana M.; Popescu, Irina; Darie-Nita, Raluca N.; Aflori, Magdalena; Butnaru, Maria

    2017-10-01

    The synthetic nanocrystalline calcium orthophosphates have a notable bioactivity due to the chemical similarity with biological apatite from calcified tissues. In mineralized tissues, the highly ordered structures come from organized assemblies of biomacromolecules and inorganic nanoparticles. One of the purposes of this work was to study the effect of two types of acidic macromolecules: atelocollagen and phosphorylated curdlan onto calcium orthophosphates formation after 30 days of maturation at 2 ± 2 °C. The resulted samples after a long aging time, either calcium orthophosphates or composites, were first investigated by FT-IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry and the results indicated that precipitated hydroxyapatite with low crystallinity was obtained when the synthesis was performed in the presence of phosphorylated curdlan. The macromolecules influenced the morphology of the particles as shown by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The presence of macromolecules as demonstrated by thermal investigation also influenced the rheological properties of the samples. The second purpose of the work was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the samples using the MTT assay, and the results revealed very good cells viability. The preliminary results are encouraging regarding the use of these materials for further tests in order to develop injectable bone substitutes.

  1. Electrically assisted delivery of macromolecules into the corneal epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    HAO, JINSONG; Li, S. Kevin; Liu, Chia-Yang; Kao, Winston W. Y.

    2009-01-01

    Electrically assisted delivery is noninvasive and has been investigated in a number of ocular drug delivery studies. The objectives of this study were to examine the feasibility of electrically assisted delivery of macromolecules such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the corneal epithelium, to optimize the iontophoresis and electroporation methods, and to study the mechanisms of corneal iontophoresis for macromolecules. Anodal and cathodal iontophoresis, electroporation and their combina...

  2. Electrically assisted delivery of macromolecules into the corneal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jinsong; Li, S Kevin; Liu, Chia-Yang; Kao, Winston W Y

    2009-12-01

    Electrically assisted delivery is noninvasive and has been investigated in a number of ocular drug delivery studies. The objectives of this study were to examine the feasibility of electrically assisted delivery of macromolecules such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the corneal epithelium, to optimize the iontophoresis and electroporation methods, and to study the mechanisms of corneal iontophoresis for macromolecules. Anodal and cathodal iontophoresis, electroporation and their combinations were the methods examined with mice in vivo. Cyanine 3 (Cy3)-labeled glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) siRNA and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextran of different molecular weights (4-70 kDa) were the macromolecules studied. Microscopy and histology after cryostat sectioning were used to analyze and compare the delivery of the macromolecules to the cornea. Iontophoresis was effective in delivering siRNA and dextran up to 70 kDa into the cornea. The electroporation method studied was less effective than that of iontophoresis. Although both iontophoresis and electroporation alone can deliver the macromolecules into the cornea, these methods alone were not as effective as the combination of iontophoresis and electroporation (iontophoresis followed by electroporation). The significant enhancement of dextran delivery in anodal iontophoresis suggests that electroosmosis can be a significant flux-enhancing mechanism during corneal iontophoresis. These results illustrate the feasibility of electrically assisted delivery of macromolecules such as siRNA into the cornea.

  3. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  4. Advanced ensemble modelling of flexible macromolecules using X-ray solution scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tria, Giancarlo; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Kachala, Michael; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic ensembles of macromolecules mediate essential processes in biology. Understanding the mechanisms driving the function and molecular interactions of 'unstructured' and flexible molecules requires alternative approaches to those traditionally employed in structural biology. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is an established method for structural characterization of biological macromolecules in solution, and is directly applicable to the study of flexible systems such as intrinsically disordered proteins and multi-domain proteins with unstructured regions. The Ensemble Optimization Method (EOM) [Bernadó et al. (2007 ▶). J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 5656-5664] was the first approach introducing the concept of ensemble fitting of the SAXS data from flexible systems. In this approach, a large pool of macromolecules covering the available conformational space is generated and a sub-ensemble of conformers coexisting in solution is selected guided by the fit to the experimental SAXS data. This paper presents a series of new developments and advancements to the method, including significantly enhanced functionality and also quantitative metrics for the characterization of the results. Building on the original concept of ensemble optimization, the algorithms for pool generation have been redesigned to allow for the construction of partially or completely symmetric oligomeric models, and the selection procedure was improved to refine the size of the ensemble. Quantitative measures of the flexibility of the system studied, based on the characteristic integral parameters of the selected ensemble, are introduced. These improvements are implemented in the new EOM version 2.0, and the capabilities as well as inherent limitations of the ensemble approach in SAXS, and of EOM 2.0 in particular, are discussed.

  5. Advanced ensemble modelling of flexible macromolecules using X-ray solution scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Tria

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic ensembles of macromolecules mediate essential processes in biology. Understanding the mechanisms driving the function and molecular interactions of `unstructured' and flexible molecules requires alternative approaches to those traditionally employed in structural biology. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS is an established method for structural characterization of biological macromolecules in solution, and is directly applicable to the study of flexible systems such as intrinsically disordered proteins and multi-domain proteins with unstructured regions. The Ensemble Optimization Method (EOM [Bernadó et al. (2007. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 5656–5664] was the first approach introducing the concept of ensemble fitting of the SAXS data from flexible systems. In this approach, a large pool of macromolecules covering the available conformational space is generated and a sub-ensemble of conformers coexisting in solution is selected guided by the fit to the experimental SAXS data. This paper presents a series of new developments and advancements to the method, including significantly enhanced functionality and also quantitative metrics for the characterization of the results. Building on the original concept of ensemble optimization, the algorithms for pool generation have been redesigned to allow for the construction of partially or completely symmetric oligomeric models, and the selection procedure was improved to refine the size of the ensemble. Quantitative measures of the flexibility of the system studied, based on the characteristic integral parameters of the selected ensemble, are introduced. These improvements are implemented in the new EOM version 2.0, and the capabilities as well as inherent limitations of the ensemble approach in SAXS, and of EOM 2.0 in particular, are discussed.

  6. Lysozyme in water-acetonitrile mixtures: Preferential solvation at the inner edge of excess hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkin, Vladimir A.; Kuchierskaya, Alexandra A.

    2017-06-01

    Preferential solvation/hydration is an effective way for regulating the mechanism of the protein destabilization/stabilization. Organic solvent/water sorption and residual enzyme activity measurements were performed to monitor the preferential solvation/hydration of hen egg-white lysozyme at high and low water content in acetonitrile at 25 °C. The obtained results show that the protein destabilization/stabilization depends essentially on the initial hydration level of lysozyme and the water content in acetonitrile. There are three composition regimes for the dried lysozyme. At high water content, the lysozyme has a higher affinity for water than for acetonitrile. The residual enzyme activity values are close to 100%. At the intermediate water content, the dehydrated lysozyme has a higher affinity for acetonitrile than for water. A minimum on the residual enzyme activity curve was observed in this concentration range. At the lowest water content, the organic solvent molecules are preferentially excluded from the dried lysozyme, resulting in the preferential hydration. The residual catalytic activity is ˜80%, compared with that observed after incubation in pure water. Two distinct schemes are operative for the hydrated lysozyme. At high and intermediate water content, lysozyme is preferentially hydrated. However, in contrast to the dried protein, at the intermediate water content, the initially hydrated lysozyme has the increased preferential hydration parameters. At low water content, the preferential binding of the acetonitrile molecules to the initially hydrated lysozyme was detected. No residual enzyme activity was observed in the water-poor acetonitrile. Our data clearly show that the initial hydration level of the protein macromolecules is one of the key factors that govern the stability of the protein-water-organic solvent systems.

  7. Formation of porous gas hydrates

    CERN Document Server

    Salamatin, Andrey N

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates grown at gas-ice interfaces are examined by electron microscopy and found to have a submicron porous texture. Permeability of the intervening hydrate layers provides the connection between the two counterparts (gas and water molecules) of the clathration reaction and makes further hydrate formation possible. The study is focused on phenomenological description of principal stages and rate-limiting processes that control the kinetics of the porous gas hydrate crystal growth from ice powders. Although the detailed physical mechanisms involved in the porous hydrate formation still are not fully understood, the initial stage of hydrate film spreading over the ice surface should be distinguished from the subsequent stage which is presumably limited by the clathration reaction at the ice-hydrate interface and develops after the ice grain coating is finished. The model reveals a time dependence of the reaction degree essentially different from that when the rate-limiting step of the hydrate formation at...

  8. Differential scanning calorimetry: An invaluable tool for a detailed thermodynamic characterization of macromolecules and their interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H Chiu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC is a highly sensitive technique to study the thermotropic properties of many different biological macromolecules and extracts. Since its early development, DSC has been applied to the pharmaceutical field with excipient studies and DNA drugs. In recent times, more attention has been applied to lipid-based drug delivery systems and drug interactions with biomimetic membranes. Highly reproducible phase transitions have been used to determine values, such as, the type of binding interaction, purity, stability, and release from a drug delivery mechanism. This review focuses on the use of DSC for biochemical and pharmaceutical applications.

  9. Differential scanning calorimetry: An invaluable tool for a detailed thermodynamic characterization of macromolecules and their interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Michael H.; Prenner, Elmar J.

    2011-01-01

    Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) is a highly sensitive technique to study the thermotropic properties of many different biological macromolecules and extracts. Since its early development, DSC has been applied to the pharmaceutical field with excipient studies and DNA drugs. In recent times, more attention has been applied to lipid-based drug delivery systems and drug interactions with biomimetic membranes. Highly reproducible phase transitions have been used to determine values, such as, the type of binding interaction, purity, stability, and release from a drug delivery mechanism. This review focuses on the use of DSC for biochemical and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:21430954

  10. [Hydration in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maristany, Cleofé Pérez-Portabella; Segurola Gurruchaga, Hegoi

    2011-01-01

    Water is an essential foundation for life, having both a regulatory and structural function. The former results from active and passive participation in all metabolic reactions, and its role in conserving and maintaining body temperature. Structurally speaking it is the major contributer to tissue mass, accounting for 60% of the basis of blood plasma, intracellular and intersticial fluid. Water is also part of the primary structures of life such as genetic material or proteins. Therefore, it is necessary that the nurse makes an early assessment of patients water needs to detect if there are signs of electrolyte imbalance. Dehydration can be a very serious problem, especially in children and the elderly. Dehydrations treatment with oral rehydration solution decreases the risk of developing hydration disorders, but even so, it is recommended to follow preventive measures to reduce the incidence and severity of dehydration. The key to having a proper hydration is prevention. Artificial nutrition encompasses the need for precise calculation of water needs in enteral nutrition as parenteral, so the nurse should be part of this process and use the tools for calculating the patient's requirements. All this helps to ensure an optimal nutritional status in patients at risk. Ethical dilemmas are becoming increasingly common in clinical practice. On the subject of artificial nutrition and hydration, there isn't yet any unanimous agreement regarding hydration as a basic care. It is necessary to take decisions in consensus with the health team, always thinking of the best interests of the patient.

  11. Hydration dynamics near a model protein surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-09-01

    The evolution of water dynamics from dilute to very high concentration solutions of a prototypical hydrophobic amino acid with its polar backbone, N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA), is studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation for both the completely deuterated and completely hydrogenated leucine monomer. We observe several unexpected features in the dynamics of these biological solutions under ambient conditions. The NALMA dynamics shows evidence of de Gennes narrowing, an indication of coherent long timescale structural relaxation dynamics. The translational water dynamics are analyzed in a first approximation with a jump diffusion model. At the highest solute concentrations, the hydration water dynamics is significantly suppressed and characterized by a long residential time and a slow diffusion coefficient. The analysis of the more dilute concentration solutions takes into account the results of the 2.0M solution as a model of the first hydration shell. Subtracting the first hydration layer based on the 2.0M spectra, the translational diffusion dynamics is still suppressed, although the rotational relaxation time and residential time are converged to bulk-water values. Molecular dynamics analysis shows spatially heterogeneous dynamics at high concentration that becomes homogeneous at more dilute concentrations. We discuss the hydration dynamics results of this model protein system in the context of glassy systems, protein function, and protein-protein interfaces.

  12. Impacts of Organic Macromolecules, Chlorophyll and Soot on Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunro, O. O.; Wingenter, O. W.; Elliott, S.; Flanner, M.; Dubey, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    Recent intensification of Arctic amplification can be strongly connected to positive feedback relating black carbon deposition to sea ice surface albedo. In addition to soot deposition on the ice and snow pack, ice algal chlorophyll is likely to compete as an absorber and redistributor of energy. Hence, solar radiation absorption by chlorophyll and some components of organic macromolecules in/under the ice column is currently being examined to determine the level of influence on predicted rate of ice loss. High amounts of organic macromolecules and chlorophyll are produced in global sea ice by the bottom microbial community and also in vertically distributed layers where substantial biological activities take place. Brine channeling in columnar ice can allow for upward flow of nutrients which leads to greater primary production in the presence of moderate light. Modeling of the sea-ice processes in tandem with experiments and field observations promises rapid progress in enhancing Arctic ice predictions. We are designing and conducting global climate model experiments to determine the impact of organic macromolecules and chlorophyll on Arctic sea ice. Influences on brine network permeability and radiation/albedo will be considered in this exercise. Absorption by anthropogenic materials such as soot and black carbon will be compared with that of natural pigments. We will indicate areas of soot and biological absorption dominance in the sense of single scattering, then couple into a full radiation transfer scheme to attribute the various contributions to polar climate change amplification. The work prepares us to study more traditional issues such as chlorophyll warming of the pack periphery and chemical effects of the flow of organics from ice internal communities. The experiments started in the Arctic will broaden to include Antarctic sea ice and shelves. Results from the Arctic simulations will be presented.

  13. Dielectric relaxation in biological systems physical principles, methods, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Feldman, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    This title covers the theoretical basis and practical aspects of the study of dielectric properties of biological systems, such as water, electrolyte and polyelectrolytes, solutions of biological macromolecules, cells suspensions and cellular systems.

  14. A general method to study equilibrium partitioning of macromolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The distribution of macromolecules between a confined microscopic solution and a macroscopic bulk solution plays an important role in understanding separation processes such as Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC). In this study, we have developed an efficient computational algorithm for obtaining...... the equilibrium partition coefficient (pore-to-bulk concentration ratio) and the concentration profile inside the confining geometry. The algorithm involves two steps. First, certain characteristic structure properties of the studied macromolecule are obtained by sampling its configuration space, and second those...... data are used for the computation of partition coefficient and concentration profile for any confinement size. Our algorithm is versatile to the model and type of the macromolecule studied, and is capable of handling three types of confining geometries (slit, rectangular channel and rectangular box...

  15. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  16. Intellective high-precision macromolecule resistance temperature/humidity instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guixiong; Zhou, Qinhe; Kuang, Yongcong; Xu, Jing; Zeng, Zhixin

    2001-09-01

    Considering that the resistance of macromolecule resistor varies in a wide range and humidity sensor component is sensitive to temperature as well, a intelligent high- precision macromolecule resistance temperature/humidity instrument was proposed in this paper, the instrument is based on the integration of frequency-and-period-measuring method, and sensing characteristic calculation and compensation using interpolation. Practical applications show that the instrument has the advantages of high precision, simple peripheral circuit, low cost, suitability for remote measurement, strong ability of anti-interference and wide operation range.

  17. ASPHERICITY AND PROLATENESS OF LINEAR AND CIRCULAR MACROMOLECULES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Gaoyuan

    1995-01-01

    The shape asymmetry of gaussian models of linear and circular macromolecules has been numerically invesigated in terms of asphericity and prolateness parameters. These parameters are found to decrease with increasing length for the macromolecule either confined to a plane or in three dimensions. The effect of dimensionality on these parameters is visible only for low dimensions and is generally weak. As dimensionality goes to infinity, it is found that asphericity and prolateness for both chains and rings approach slowly yet descendingly values of corresponding asphericity and prolateness factors, with the exception of the chain which shows a minimum value of asphericity when the embedding space has a dimensionality of four.

  18. Dynamics of Hydration Water in Sugars and Peptides Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perticaroli, Stefania [ORNL; Nakanishi, Masahiro [ORNL; Pashkovski, Eugene [Unilever R& D Trumbull, Trumbull CT; Sokolov, Alexei P [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed solute and solvent dynamics of sugars and peptides aqueous solutions using extended epolarized light scattering (EDLS) and broadband dielectric spectroscopies (BDS). Spectra measured with both techniques reveal the same mechanism of rotational diffusion of peptides molecules. In the case of sugars, this solute reorientational relaxation can be isolated by EDLS measurements, whereas its ontribution to the dielectric spectra is almost negligible. In the presented analysis, we characterize the hydration water in terms of hydration number and retardation ratio between relaxation times of hydration and bulk water. Both techniques provide similar estimates of . The retardation imposed on the hydration water by sugars is 3.3 1.3 and involves only water molecules hydrogen-bonded (HB) to solutes ( 3 water molecules per sugar OH-group). In contrast, polar peptides cause longer range erturbations beyond the first hydration shell, and between 2.8 and 8, increasing with the number of chemical groups engaged in HB formation. We demonstrate that chemical heterogeneity and specific HB interactions play a crucial role in hydration dynamics around polar solutes. The obtained results help to disentangle the role of excluded volume and enthalpic contributions in dynamics of hydration water at the interface with biological molecules.

  19. Hydrates of nat­ural gas in continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Barnard, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates in continental margin sediment can be inferred from the widespread occurrence of an anomalous seismic reflector which coincides with the predicted transition boundary at the base of the gas hydrate zone. Direct evidence of gas hydrates is provided by visual observations of sediments from the landward wall of the Mid-America Trench off Mexico and Guatemala, from the Blake Outer Ridge off the southeastern United States, and from the Black Sea in the U.S.S.R. Where solid gas hydrates have been sampled, the gas is composed mainly of methane accompanied by CO2 and low concentrations of ethane and hydrocarbons of higher molecular weight. The molecular and isotopic composition of hydrocarbons indicates that most of the methane is of biolog cal origin. The gas was probably produced by the bacterial alteration of organic matter buried in the sediment. Organic carbon contents of the sediment containing sampled gas hydrates are higher than the average organic carbon content of marine sediments. The main economic importance of gas hydrates may reside in their ability to serve as a cap under which free gas can collect. To be producible, however, such trapped gas must occur in porous and permeable reservoirs. Although gas hydrates are common along continental margins, the degree to which they are associated with significant reservoirs remains to be investigated.

  20. Effects of high hydrostatic pressures on living cells: a consequence of the properties of macromolecules and macromolecule-associated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentré, P; Hui Bon Hoa, G

    2001-01-01

    Sixty percent of the Earth's biomass is found in the sea, at depths greater than 1000 m, i.e., at hydrostatic pressures higher than 100 atm. Still more surprising is the fact that living cells can reversibly withstand pressure shifts of 1000 atm. One explanation lies in the properties of cellular water. Water forms a very thin film around macromolecules, with a heterogeneous structure that is an image of the heterogeneity of the macromolecular surface. The density of water in contact with macromolecules reflects the physical properties of their different domains. Therefore, any macromolecular shape variations involving the reorganization of water and concomitant density changes are sensitive to pressure (Le Chatelier's principle). Most of the pressure-induced changes to macromolecules are reversible up to 2000 atm. Both the effects of pressure shifts on living cells and the characteristics of pressure-adapted species are opening new perspectives on fundamental problems such as regulation and adaptation.

  1. Rayleigh Scattering of Moessbauer Radiation (RSMR) data, hydration effects and glass-like dynamical model of biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gol' danskii, V.I.; Krupyanskii, Yu.F.; Fleurov, V.N.

    1986-06-01

    Specific features of the Rayleigh Scattering of Moessbauer Radiation (RSMR) technique in the study of biological systems are described. Experimental data show that the temperature and hydration degree are the principal parameters which influence intramolecular mobility in biopolymers. Data on temperature dependencies of elastic fraction, f, and spectrum line-shape do not fit neither Debye or Einstein models of solids nor the free diffusion in liquids and demand for their explanation a multimode approximation (i.e. a wide spectrum of correlation times, at T=293 K from 10/sup -6/s to 10/sup -12/-10/sup -13/s). On the basis of RSMR, low temperature specific heat and X-ray dynamic analysis data and from the general conditions that information macromolecule must be in a non-equilibrium state (an independent confirmation of this fact comes from the kinetic model of protein folding) a glass-like dynamical model of biopolymers is formulated. A possible interpretation of RSMR data shows that fluctuatively prepared tunneling between quasiequilibrium positions (QEP) can prevail activated transitions up to a room temperature.

  2. Modeling Hydrates and the Gas Hydrate Markup Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Wang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates, as an important potential fuels, flow assurance hazards, and possible factors initiating the submarine geo-hazard and global climate change, have attracted the interest of scientists all over the world. After two centuries of hydrate research, a great amount of scientific data on gas hydrates has been accumulated. Therefore the means to manage, share, and exchange these data have become an urgent task. At present, metadata (Markup Language is recognized as one of the most efficient ways to facilitate data management, storage, integration, exchange, discovery and retrieval. Therefore the CODATA Gas Hydrate Data Task Group proposed and specified Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML as an extensible conceptual metadata model to characterize the features of data on gas hydrate. This article introduces the details of modeling portion of GHML.

  3. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  4. A study on gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byoung Jae; Jung, Tae Jin; Sunwoo, Don [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Sufficient documents were reviewed to understand solid components of water and gaseous hydrocarbon known as gas hydrates, which represent an important potential energy resource of the future. The review provides us with valuable information on crystal structures, kinetics, origin and distribution of gas hydrates. In addition, the review increased our knowledge of exploration and development methods of gas hydrates. Large amounts of methane, the principal component of natural gas, in the form of solid gas hydrate are found mainly offshore in outer continental margin sediment and, to a lesser extent, in polar regions commonly associated with permafrost. Natural gas hydrates are stable in some environments where the hydrostatic pressure exerted by overlying water column is sufficient for hydrate formation and stability. The required high pressures generally restrict gas hydrate to sediments beneath water of approximately 400 m. Higher sediment temperatures at greater subbottom depths destabilize gas hydrates. Based on the pressure- temperature condition, the outer continental margin of East Sea where water depth is deep enough to form gas hydrate is considered to have high potential of gas hydrate accumulations. (author). 56 refs., tabs., figs.

  5. Insulin facilitates transport of macromolecules and nutrients to muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N J; Hilsted, J

    1993-01-01

    , systolic blood pressure and plasma noradrenaline. These changes were absent or attenuated in diabetic patients (without neuropathy) after an oral glucose load. These responses were normalized by insulin infusion. Our results suggest that insulin facilitates the transfer of macromolecules and nutrients from...

  6. Reduced adipose tissue lymphatic drainage of macromolecules in obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, N; Simonsen, L; Holst, Jens Juul

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate subcutaneous adipose tissue lymphatic drainage (ATLD) of macromolecules in lean and obese subjects and, furthermore, to evaluate whether ATLD may change in parallel with adipose tissue blood flow. Lean and obese male subjects were studied before and after ...... online publication, 3 July 2012; doi:10.1038/ijo.2012.98....

  7. Chaperoning roles of macromolecules interacting with proteins in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seong Il; Lim, Keo-Heun; Seong, Baik L

    2011-01-01

    The principles obtained from studies on molecular chaperones have provided explanations for the assisted protein folding in vivo. However, the majority of proteins can fold without the assistance of the known molecular chaperones, and little attention has been paid to the potential chaperoning roles of other macromolecules. During protein biogenesis and folding, newly synthesized polypeptide chains interact with a variety of macromolecules, including ribosomes, RNAs, cytoskeleton, lipid bilayer, proteolytic system, etc. In general, the hydrophobic interactions between molecular chaperones and their substrates have been widely believed to be mainly responsible for the substrate stabilization against aggregation. Emerging evidence now indicates that other features of macromolecules such as their surface charges, probably resulting in electrostatic repulsions, and steric hindrance, could play a key role in the stabilization of their linked proteins against aggregation. Such stabilizing mechanisms are expected to give new insights into our understanding of the chaperoning functions for de novo protein folding. In this review, we will discuss the possible chaperoning roles of these macromolecules in de novo folding, based on their charge and steric features.

  8. Antimicrobial resistance challenged with metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-El-Aziz, Alaa S; Agatemor, Christian; Etkin, Nola

    2017-02-01

    Antimicrobial resistance threatens the achievements of science and medicine, as it deactivates conventional antimicrobial therapeutics. Scientists respond to the threat by developing new antimicrobial platforms to prevent and treat infections from these resistant strains. Metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules are emerging as an alternative to conventional platforms because they combine multiple mechanisms of action into one platform due to the distinctive properties of metals. For example, metals interact with intracellular proteins and enzymes, and catalyse various intracellular processes. The macromolecular architecture offers a means to enhance antimicrobial activity since several antimicrobial moieties can be conjugated to the scaffold. Further, these macromolecules can be fabricated into antimicrobial materials for contact-killing medical implants, fabrics, and devices. As volatilization or leaching out of the antimicrobial moieties from the macromolecular scaffold is reduced, these medical implants, fabrics, and devices can retain their antimicrobial activity over an extended period. Recent advances demonstrate the potential of metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules as effective platforms that prevent and treat infections from resistant strains. In this review these advances are thoroughly discussed within the context of examples of metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules, their mechanisms of action and biocompatibility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Microfluidic device and method for processing of macromolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    to the first set of outlets is guided through the reaction channels, and second inlet and outlet channels for feeding an enzymatic reagent to the reaction chamber essentially without displacing the macromolecule containers trapped in the reaction channels, wherein the second set of inlets and outlets...

  10. Interactions between adsorbed macromolecules : measurements on emulsions and liquid films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van T.

    1977-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain more insight into the factors, determining the inter- and intramolecular interactions between adsorbed macromolecules. To that end several experimental and theoretical approaches were followed, using well-defined systems. It was shown that these interactions could c

  11. Synthesis of main-chain metal carbonyl organometallic macromolecules (MCMCOMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Kai; Murshid, Nimer; Wang, Xiaosong

    2015-04-01

    Synthesis of main-chain metal carbonyl organometallic macromolecules (MCMCOMs) is difficult, mainly due to the instability of metal carbonyl complexes. Despite its challenge a number of MCMCOMs has been prepared by strategically using organometallic, organic, and polymer synthetic chemistry. Main contributions to this research field were reported by the groups of Tyler, Pannell, and Wang and are briefly summarized in this article.

  12. Adsorption of charged macromolecules on a gold electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barten, D.

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis we have examined the role of electrostatic interactions in the adsorption of charged macromolecules from aqueous solution to a solid surface and the possibilitiesfor manipulatingthis process through the electric potential

  13. Bioenergetic aspects of the translocation of macromolecules across bacterial membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palmen, Ronald; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Hellingwerf, K

    1994-01-01

    Bacteria are extremely versatile in the sense that they have gained the ability to transport all three major classes of biopolymers through their cell envelope: proteins, nucleic acids, and polysaccharides. These macromolecules are translocated across membranes in a large number of cellular processe

  14. Chaperoning Roles of Macromolecules Interacting with Proteins in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baik L. Seong

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The principles obtained from studies on molecular chaperones have provided explanations for the assisted protein folding in vivo. However, the majority of proteins can fold without the assistance of the known molecular chaperones, and little attention has been paid to the potential chaperoning roles of other macromolecules. During protein biogenesis and folding, newly synthesized polypeptide chains interact with a variety of macromolecules, including ribosomes, RNAs, cytoskeleton, lipid bilayer, proteolytic system, etc. In general, the hydrophobic interactions between molecular chaperones and their substrates have been widely believed to be mainly responsible for the substrate stabilization against aggregation. Emerging evidence now indicates that other features of macromolecules such as their surface charges, probably resulting in electrostatic repulsions, and steric hindrance, could play a key role in the stabilization of their linked proteins against aggregation. Such stabilizing mechanisms are expected to give new insights into our understanding of the chaperoning functions for de novo protein folding. In this review, we will discuss the possible chaperoning roles of these macromolecules in de novo folding, based on their charge and steric features.

  15. Drilling Gas Hydrates on hydrate Ridge, Oregon continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehu, A. M.; Bohrmann, G.; Leg 204 Science Party

    2002-12-01

    During Leg 204, we cored and logged 9 sites on the Oregon continental margin to determine the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates in an accretionary ridge and adjacent slope basin, investigate the mechanisms that transport methane and other gases into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and obtain constraints on physical properties of hydrates in situ. A 3D seismic survey conducted in 2000 provided images of potential subsurface fluid conduits and indicated the position of the GHSZ throughout the survey region. After coring the first site, we acquired Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) data at all but one site to provide an overview of downhole physical properties. The LWD data confirmed the general position of key seismic stratigraphic horizons and yielded an initial estimate of hydrate concentration through the proxy of in situ electrical resistivity. These records proved to be of great value in planning subsequent coring. The second new hydrate proxy to be tested was infrared thermal imaging of cores on the catwalk as rapidly as possible after retrieval. The thermal images were used to identify hydrate samples and to estimate the distribution and texture of hydrate within the cores. Geochemical analyses of interstitial waters and of headspace and void gases provide additional information on the distribution and concentration of hydrate within the stability zone, the origin and pathway of fluids into and through the GHSZ, and the rates at which gas hydrate is forming. Bio- and lithostratigraphic description of cores, measurement of physical properties, and in situ pressure core sampling and thermal measurements complement the data set, providing ground-truth tests of inferred physical and sedimentological properties. Among the most interesting preliminary results are: 1) that gas hydrates are distributed through a broad depth range within the GHSZ and that different physical and chemical proxies for hydrate distribution and concentration give generally

  16. Aqueous self-assembly of hydrophobic macromolecules with adjustable rigidity of the backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhou; Liu, Dapeng; Lin, Jiaping; Wang, Xiaosong

    2017-08-02

    P(FpC3P) (Fp: CpFe(CO)2; C3P: propyl diphenyl phosphine) has a helical backbone, resulting from piano stool metal coordination geometry, which is rigid with intramolecular aromatic interaction of the phenyl groups. The macromolecule is hydrophobic, but the polarized CO groups can interact with water for aqueous self-assembly. The stiffness of P(FpC3P), which is adjustable by temperature, is an important factor influencing the morphologies of kinetically trapped assemblies. P(FpC3P)7 self-assembles in DMSO/water (10/90 by volume) into lamellae at 25 °C, vesicles at 40 °C and irregular aggregates at higher temperatures (60 and 70 °C). The colloidal stability decreases in the order of lamellae, vesicles and irregular aggregates. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation reveals the same temperature-dependent self-assembled morphologies with an interior of hydrophobic aromatic groups covered with the metal coordination units. The rigid backbone at 25 °C accounts for the formation of the layered morphology, while the reduced rigidity of the same P(FpC3P)7 at 40 °C curves up the lamellae into vesicles. At a higher temperature (60 or 70 °C), P(FpC3P)7 behaves as a random coil without obvious amphiphilic segregation, resulting in irregular aggregates. The stiffness is, therefore, a crucial factor for the aqueous assembly of macromolecules without obvious amphiphilic segregation, which is reminiscent of the solution behavior observed for many hydrophobic biological macromolecules such as proteins.

  17. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  18. Light-Switchable Azobenzene-Containing Macromolecules: From UV to Near Infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Philipp; Wu, Si

    2017-06-23

    Azobenzene-containing macromolecules (azo-macromolecules) such as azobenzene-containing polymers (azopolymers) and azobenzene-functionalized biomacromolecules are photoswitchable macromolecules. Trans-to-cis photoisomerization in conventional azo-macromolecules is induced by ultraviolet (UV) light. However, UV light cannot penetrate deeply into issue and has a very small fraction in sunlight. Therefore, conventional azo-macromolecules are problematic for biomedical and solar-energy-related applications. In this Feature Article, the strategies for constructing visible and near-infrared (NIR) light-responsive azo-macromolecules are reviewed, and the potential applications of visible- and NIR-light-responsive azo-macromolecules in biomedicine and solar energy conversion are highlighted. The remaining challenges in the field of photoswitchable azo-macromolecules are discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Surface Characteristics and Adhesion Behavior of Escherichia coli O157:H7: Role of Extracellular Macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface macromolecule cleavage experiments were conducted on enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells to investigate the influence of these macromolecules on cell surface properties. Electrophoretic mobility, hydrophobicity, and titration experiments were carried out on proteinase K treate...

  20. Vesicular uptake of macromolecules by human placental amniotic epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharshiner, Rita; Brace, Robert A; Cheung, Cecilia Y

    2017-09-01

    Studies in animal models have shown that unidirectional vesicular transport of amniotic fluid across the amnion plays a primary role in regulating amniotic fluid volume. Our objective was to explore vesicle type, vesicular uptake and intracellular distribution of vesicles in human amnion cells using high- and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Placental amnion was obtained at cesarean section and amnion cells were prepared and cultured. At 20%-50% confluence, the cells were incubated with fluorophore conjugated macromolecules for 1-30 min at 22 °C or 37 °C. Fluorophore labeled macromolecules were selected as markers of receptor-mediated caveolar and clathrin-coated vesicular uptake as well as non-specific endocytosis. After fluorophore treatment, the cells were fixed, imaged and vesicles counted using Imaris(®) software. Vesicular uptake displayed first order saturation kinetics with half saturation times averaging 1.3 min at 37 °C compared to 4.9 min at 22 °C, with non-specific endocytotic uptake being more rapid at both temperatures. There was extensive cell-to-cell variability in uptake rate. Under super-resolution microscopy, the pattern of intracellular spatial distribution was distinct for each macromolecule. Co-localization of fluorescently labeled macromolecules was very low at vesicular dimensions. In human placental amnion cells, 1) vesicular uptake of macromolecules is rapid, consistent with the concept that vesicular transcytosis across the amnion plays a role in the regulation of amniotic fluid volume; 2) uptake is temperature dependent and variable among individual cells; 3) the unique intracellular distributions suggest distinct functions for each vesicle type; 4) non-receptor mediated vesicular uptake may be a primary vesicular uptake mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Electron Microscopy and Image Processing: Essential Tools for Structural Analysis of Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belnap, David M

    2015-11-02

    Macromolecular electron microscopy typically depicts the structures of macromolecular complexes ranging from ∼200 kDa to hundreds of MDa. The amount of specimen required, a few micrograms, is typically 100 to 1000 times less than needed for X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Micrographs of frozen-hydrated (cryogenic) specimens portray native structures, but the original images are noisy. Computational averaging reduces noise, and three-dimensional reconstructions are calculated by combining different views of free-standing particles ("single-particle analysis"). Electron crystallography is used to characterize two-dimensional arrays of membrane proteins and very small three-dimensional crystals. Under favorable circumstances, near-atomic resolutions are achieved. For structures at somewhat lower resolution, pseudo-atomic models are obtained by fitting high-resolution components into the density. Time-resolved experiments describe dynamic processes. Electron tomography allows reconstruction of pleiomorphic complexes and subcellular structures and modeling of macromolecules in their cellular context. Significant information is also obtained from metal-coated and dehydrated specimens. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Photoregulation of polymer conformation. A modelstudy for biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Gerlof van der

    1972-01-01

    SUMMARY A conformational transition of a macromolecule is often postulated to occur in biological energy transductions. When +he energy of a photon is transduced, a photochromic ligand mediates in the transfer of energy from the sun to the macromolecule. In this thesis the molecular mechanism of tho

  3. Interactions of Organic Additives with Ionic Crystal Hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füredi-Milhofer, H.; Sikirić, M.; Tunik, L.; Filipović-Vinceković, N.; Garti, N.

    The interactions of two groups of hydrated model crystals, calcium hydrogenphosphate dihydrate (DCPD) vs. octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) vs. calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) with different organic additives are considered. DCPD precipitates as platelet-like crystals with the dominant faces shielded by hydrated layers and charged lateral faces. In the second system COM has charged surfaces, while all faces of COD are covered with layers containing water molecules. The organic molecules tested include negatively charged, flexible and rigid small and macromolecules (glutamic and aspartic acid, citrate, hexaammonium polyphosphate, phytate and polyaspartate) and anionic surfactants (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS, sodium diisooctyl sulfosuccinate, AOT, sodium cholate NaC and disodium oleoamido PEG-2 sulfosuccinate, PEG). Two types of effects have been demonstrated: (1) Effect on crystal growth morphology: Flexible organic molecules with high charge density and anionic surfactants affected the growth morphology of DCPD and COM by selectively interacting with the charged lateral faces while rigid molecules (phytate, polyaspartate) specifically recognized the dominant (010) face of DCPD due to structural and stereochemical compatibility. (2) Effect on phase composition: Anionic surfactants at concentrations above the cmc promoted growth of OCP and COD respectively by selectively adsorbing at, and inhibiting growth oif nuclei of DCPD and/or COM, which were dominant in the respective control systems. The effect was especially pronounced in the calcium oxalate precipitation system, where in some cases complete reversal of the phase composition occurred. The important role of the hydrated layer, as part of the structure of the investigated crystal hydrates, in the above crystal additive interactions is discussed.

  4. Macromolecule Mediated Transport and Retention of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Saturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of extracellular macromolecules on Escherichia coli O157:H7 transport and retention was investigated in saturated porous media. To compare the relative transport and retention of E. coli cells that are macromolecule rich and deficient, macromolecules were partially cleaved using a proteolyt...

  5. ConSurf 2016: an improved methodology to estimate and visualize evolutionary conservation in macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazy, Haim; Abadi, Shiran; Martz, Eric; Chay, Ofer; Mayrose, Itay; Pupko, Tal; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2016-07-08

    The degree of evolutionary conservation of an amino acid in a protein or a nucleic acid in DNA/RNA reflects a balance between its natural tendency to mutate and the overall need to retain the structural integrity and function of the macromolecule. The ConSurf web server (http://consurf.tau.ac.il), established over 15 years ago, analyses the evolutionary pattern of the amino/nucleic acids of the macromolecule to reveal regions that are important for structure and/or function. Starting from a query sequence or structure, the server automatically collects homologues, infers their multiple sequence alignment and reconstructs a phylogenetic tree that reflects their evolutionary relations. These data are then used, within a probabilistic framework, to estimate the evolutionary rates of each sequence position. Here we introduce several new features into ConSurf, including automatic selection of the best evolutionary model used to infer the rates, the ability to homology-model query proteins, prediction of the secondary structure of query RNA molecules from sequence, the ability to view the biological assembly of a query (in addition to the single chain), mapping of the conservation grades onto 2D RNA models and an advanced view of the phylogenetic tree that enables interactively rerunning ConSurf with the taxa of a sub-tree.

  6. Upgraded ESRF BM29 beamline for SAXS on macromolecules in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pernot, Petra, E-mail: rejma@esrf.fr [ESRF, 6 Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Round, Adam [EMBL, 6 Jules Horowitz, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Barrett, Ray; De Maria Antolinos, Alejandro [ESRF, 6 Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Gobbo, Alexandre [EMBL, 6 Jules Horowitz, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Gordon, Elspeth [ESRF, 6 Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Huet, Julien [EMBL, 6 Jules Horowitz, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Kieffer, Jerôme; Lentini, Mario; Mattenet, Muriel; Morawe, Christian; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph; Ohlsson, Staffan; Schmid, Werner; Surr, John; Theveneau, Pascal; Zerrad, Louiza; McSweeney, Sean [ESRF, 6 Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble (France)

    2013-07-01

    A description of the new ESRF BioSAXS beamline is given. The beamline presented is dedicated to small-angle X-ray scattering of macromolecules in solution operating with a high-throughput sample-changer robot and automated data analysis for quality control and feedback. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements of proteins in solution are becoming increasingly popular with biochemists and structural biologists owing to the presence of dedicated high-throughput beamlines at synchrotron sources. As part of the ESRF Upgrade program a dedicated instrument for performing SAXS from biological macromolecules in solution (BioSAXS) has been installed at the renovated BM29 location. The optics hutch has been equipped with new optical components of which the two principal elements are a fixed-exit double multilayer monochromator and a 1.1 m-long toroidal mirror. These new dedicated optics give improved beam characteristics (compared with the previous set-up on ID14-3) regarding the energy tunability, flux and focusing at the detector plane leading to reduced parasitic scattering and an extended s-range. User experiments on the beamline have been successfully carried out since June 2012. A description of the new BioSAXS beamline and the set-up characteristics are presented together with examples of obtained data.

  7. Precision Measurement in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quake, Stephen

    Is biology a quantitative science like physics? I will discuss the role of precision measurement in both physics and biology, and argue that in fact both fields can be tied together by the use and consequences of precision measurement. The elementary quanta of biology are twofold: the macromolecule and the cell. Cells are the fundamental unit of life, and macromolecules are the fundamental elements of the cell. I will describe how precision measurements have been used to explore the basic properties of these quanta, and more generally how the quest for higher precision almost inevitably leads to the development of new technologies, which in turn catalyze further scientific discovery. In the 21st century, there are no remaining experimental barriers to biology becoming a truly quantitative and mathematical science.

  8. Hydration and physical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Bob

    2007-10-01

    There is a rich scientific literature regarding hydration status and physical function that began in the late 1800s, although the relationship was likely apparent centuries before that. A decrease in body water from normal levels (often referred to as dehydration or hypohydration) provokes changes in cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, metabolic, and central nervous function that become increasingly greater as dehydration worsens. Similarly, performance impairment often reported with modest dehydration (e.g., -2% body mass) is also exacerbated by greater fluid loss. Dehydration during physical activity in the heat provokes greater performance decrements than similar activity in cooler conditions, a difference thought to be due, at least in part, to greater cardiovascular and thermoregulatory strain associated with heat exposure. There is little doubt that performance during prolonged, continuous exercise in the heat is impaired by levels of dehydration >or= -2% body mass, and there is some evidence that lower levels of dehydration can also impair performance even during relatively short-duration, intermittent exercise. Although additional research is needed to more fully understand low-level dehydration's effects on physical performance, one can generalize that when performance is at stake, it is better to be well-hydrated than dehydrated. This generalization holds true in the occupational, military, and sports settings.

  9. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  10. Static and dynamic light scattering approach to the hydration of hemoglobin and its supertetramers in the presence of osmolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosio, Daniele; Kwansa, Herman E; Gering, Henry; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Bucci, Enrico

    2002-01-01

    scattering offer unique means for investigating the relevance of water activity on the structure and function of biological macromolecules. In the case of hemoglobin, the data suggest that the decreased oxygen affinity in the presence of osmolites reported by Colombo et al. (M. F. Colombo, D. C. Rau, and V. A. Parsegian Science, 1992, Vol. 256, pp. 655-659), as due to ligand linked water binding on hemoglobin surface, is part of a complex phenomenon involving the hydration shell of hemoglobin and the formation of low affinity supertetrameric molecules.

  11. Some thermodynamical aspects of protein hydration water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallamace, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.mallamace@unime.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Corsaro, Carmelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Mallamace, Domenico [Dipartimento SASTAS, Università di Messina, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Sebastiano [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Cirino [CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Stanley, H. Eugene [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Chen, Sow-Hsin [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    We study by means of nuclear magnetic resonance the self-diffusion of protein hydration water at different hydration levels across a large temperature range that includes the deeply supercooled regime. Starting with a single hydration shell (h = 0.3), we consider different hydrations up to h = 0.65. Our experimental evidence indicates that two phenomena play a significant role in the dynamics of protein hydration water: (i) the measured fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover temperature is unaffected by the hydration level and (ii) the first hydration shell remains liquid at all hydrations, even at the lowest temperature.

  12. High and low thermal conductivity of amorphous macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xu; Yang, Kexin; Li, Dongyao; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Shin, Jungwoo; Braun, Paul V.; Cahill, David G.

    2017-01-01

    We measure the thermal conductivity, heat capacity and sound velocity of thin films of five polymers, nine polymer salts, and four caged molecules to advance the fundamental understanding of the lower and upper limits to heat conduction in amorphous macromolecules. The thermal conductivities vary by more than one order of magnitude, from 0.06 W m-1K-1 for [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester to 0.67 W m-1K-1 for poly(vinylphosphonic acid calcium salt). Minimum thermal conductivity calculated from the measured sound velocity and effective atomic density is in good agreement with the thermal conductivity of macromolecules with various molecular structures and intermolecular bonding strength.

  13. Plasmodesmata: intercellular tunnels facilitating transport of macromolecules in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragler, Friedrich

    2013-04-01

    In plants, intercellular structures named plasmodesmata (PD) form a continuous cytoplasmic network between neighboring cells. PD pores provide channels for intercellular symplasmic (cell-to-cell) transport throughout most tissues of the plant body. Cell-defining proteins, such as transcription factors, and regulatory non-coding sequences, such as short interfering RNA, micro RNA, protein-encoding messenger RNAs, viroids, and viral RNA/DNA genomes move via PD channels to adjacent cells. PD-mediated intercellular transport of macromolecules is a regulated process depending on the tissue, developmental stage, and nature of the transported macromolecule. In this review, PD channels and their similarity to tunneling nanotubes present in animals are highlighted. In addition, homeodomain protein movement and cellular components regulating transport are discussed.

  14. Flow assurance intervention, hydrates remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Christopher S. [Oceaneering International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the issues of removing hydrates in sub sea flow lines and associated equipment with an Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) of opportunity and a multi-service-vessel (MSV). The paper is split into three topics: the equipment used with the ROV, assessing the interface points and handling fluids produced from drawing down the pressure. Each section is explained thoroughly and backed up with real world experience. The equipment section details information from actual jobs performed and why the particular components were utilized. The system is generally contained in an ROV mounted skid. Pumps are utilized to draw down the pressure inside the hydrated section of equipment, removing one of the three necessary components for hydrates formation. Once the section is pumped down, several options exist for handling the fluids pumped out of the system: pumping to surface, re-injection into the well, or injection into an operating flow line. This method of hydrates remediation is both economical and timely. Hydrate blockages form in low temperatures and high pressures. Reducing the pressure or increasing the temperature so the conditions lie to the right of the hydrate dissociation curve will slowly decompose the blockage. Depressurization and the use of MEG or methanol will give favorable conditions to remove the hydrate plug. Oceaneering has the capabilities to remove hydrates using the FRS in conjunction with an installation vessel to dispose of the gas and fluid removed from the flow line. Hydrate remediation techniques should be implemented into the initial design to reduce costs later. The cost of stopped production combined with the day rate for equipment needed for hydrate removal outweighs the costs if no technique is utilized. (author)

  15. Localization of intracrystalline organic macromolecules in mollusk shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Michio; Okumura, Taiga; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2011-12-01

    As a crucial first step for understanding the organic-inorganic interaction in biomineralization of mollscan shells, localization of the intracrystalline organic macromolecules in biogenic calcium carbonate crystals of the nacreous, prismatic ( Pinctada fucata) and foliated ( Cellana toreuma) microstructures were investigated using Fresnel contrast analysis in a transmission electron microscope. Spherular Fresnel contrasts in the crystals correspond to organic substances, which was confirmed by the detection of 1s→π * (CC) transition peak at 284 eV in electron energy loss spectroscopy. Nano-sized (5-10 nm) spherules in the aragonite tablets constituting the nacreous layer of P. fucata specifically concentrate in the vicinity of the interlamellar membrane between the aragonite tablets. The dominant sizes of the organic macromolecules extracted by dissolving the aragonite tablets in the nacreous layer of P. fucata were estimated using the gel-filtration analysis to be roughly 10 and 4 nm, which dimensionally corresponds to the sizes observed by Fresnel contrast imaging in the tablets. These results will serve for understanding the functions of intracrystalline organic macromolecules in mollusk shells.

  16. Self-organization of amphiphilic macromolecules with local helix structure in concentrated solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glagolev, M K; Vasilevskaya, V V; Khokhlov, A R

    2012-08-28

    Concentrated solutions of amphiphilic macromolecules with local helical structure were studied by means of molecular dynamic simulations. It is shown that in poor solvent the macromolecules are assembled into wire-like aggregates having complex core-shell structure. The core consists of a hydrophobic backbone of the chains which intertwine around each other. It is protected by the shell of hydrophilic side groups. In racemic mixture of right-hand and left-hand helix macromolecules the wire-like complex is a chain of braid bundles of macromolecules with the same chirality stacking at their ends. The average number of macromolecules in the wire cross-section is close to that of separate bundles observed in dilute solutions of such macromolecules. The effects described here could serve as a simple model of self-organization in solutions of macromolecules with local helical structure.

  17. Gas hydrates in Krishna-Godavari offshore basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.; Mazumdar, A.; Dewangan, P.

    or in the permafrost regions in the form of methane hydrates is twice that are found in the fossil fuels. The biological debris/remnants of the dead animals and plants from land areas transported by the river system, as well as the dead flora/fauna in oceanic...

  18. Investigation on Gas Storage in Methane Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigao Sun; Rongsheng Ma; Shuanshi Fan; Kaihua Guo; Ruzhu Wang

    2004-01-01

    The effect of additives (anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), nonionic surfactant alkyl polysaccharide glycoside (APG), and liquid hydrocarbon cyclopentane (CP)) on hydrate induction time and formation rate, and storage capacity was studied in this work. Micelle surfactant solutions were found to reduce hydrate induction time, increase methane hydrate formation rate and improve methane storage capacity in hydrates. In the presence of surfactant, hydrate could form quickly in a quiescent system and the energy costs of hydrate formation were reduced. The critical micelle concentrations of SDS and APG water solutions were found to be 300× 10-6 and 500× 10-6 for methane hydrate formation system respectively. The effect of anionic surfactant (SDS) on methane storage in hydrates is more pronounced compared to a nonionic surfactant (APG). CP also reduced hydrate induction time and improved hydrate formation rate, but could not improve methane storage in hydrates.

  19. Using a water-confined carbon nanotube to probe the electricity of sequential charged segments of macromolecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yu; Zhao Yan-Jiao; Huang Ji-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The detection of macromolecular conformation is particularly important in many physical and biological applications.Here we theoretically explore a method for achieving this detection by probing the electricity of sequential charged segments of macromolecules.Our analysis is based on molecular dynamics simulations,and we investigate a single file of water molecules confined in a half-capped single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with an external electric charge of +e or -e (e is the elementary charge).The charge is located in the vicinity of the cap of the SWCNT and along the centerline of the SWCNT.We reveal the picosecond timescaie for the re-orientation (namely,from one unidirectional direction to the other) of the water molecules in response to a switch in the charge signal,-e → +e or +e → e.Our results are well understood by taking into account the electrical interactions between the water molecules and between the water molecules and the external charge.Because such signals of re-orientation can be magnified and transported according to Tu et al.[2009 Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.USA 106 18120],it becomes possible to record fingerprints of electric signals arising from sequential charged segments of a macromolecule,which are expected to be useful for recognizing the conformations of some particular macromolecules.

  20. Specific features of 5S rRNA structure - its interactions with macromolecules and possible functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A V; Entelis, N S; Krasheninnikov, I A; Martin, R; Tarassov, I A

    2008-12-01

    Small non-coding RNAs are today a topic of great interest for molecular biologists because they can be regarded as relicts of a hypothetical "RNA world" which, apparently, preceded the modern stage of organic evolution on Earth. The small molecule of 5S rRNA (approximately 120 nucleotides) is a component of large ribosomal subunits of all living beings (5S rRNAs are not found only in mitoribosomes of fungi and metazoans). This molecule interacts with various protein factors and 23S (28S) rRNA. This review contains the accumulated data to date concerning 5S rRNA structure, interactions with other biological macromolecules, intracellular traffic, and functions in the cell.

  1. Theoretical and computational studies of hydrophobic and hydrophilic hydration: Towards a molecular description of the hydration of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garde, Shekhar

    The unique balance of forces underlying biological processes-such as protein folding, aggregation, molecular recognition, and the formation of biological membranes-owes its origin in large part to the surrounding aqueous medium. A quantitative description of fundamental noncovalent interactions, in particular hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions at molecular- scale separations, requires an accurate description of water structure. Thus, the primary goals of our research are to understand the role of water in mediating interactions between molecules and to incorporate this understanding into molecular theories for calculating water-mediated interactions. We have developed a molecular model of hydrophobic interactions that uses methods of information theory to relate hydrophobic effects to the density fluctuations in liquid water. This model provides a quantitative description of small-molecule hydration thermodynamics, as well as insights into the entropies of unfolding globular proteins. For larger molecular solutes, we relate the inhomogeneous water structure in their vicinity to their hydration thermodynamics. We find that the water structure in the vicinity of nonpolar solutes is only locally sensitive to the molecular details of the solute. Water structures predicted using this observation are used to study the association of two neopentane molecules and the conformational equilibria of n-pentane molecule. We have also studied the hydration of a model molecular ionic solute, a tetramethylammonium ion, over a wide range of charge states of the solute. We find that, although the charge dependence of the ion hydration free energy is quadratic, negative ions are more favorably hydrated compared to positive ions. Moreover, this asymmetry of hydration can be reconciled by considering the differences in water organization surrounding positive and negative ions. We have also developed methods for predicting water structure surrounding molecular ions and relating

  2. Hydrates fighting tools; Des outils de lutte contre les hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2003-04-01

    Shell Exploration and Production company (SEPCo) is the operator of the 'Popeye' deep offshore field in the Gulf of Mexico. Thanks to the introduction of a low dosing hydrates inhibitor (LDHI) elaborated by Shell Global Solutions, the company has added a 7.5 Gpc extra volume of gas to its recoverable reserves. This new technology avoids the plugging of pipes by hydrates formation. (J.S.)

  3. Compositional characteristics and hydration behavior of mineral trioxide aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hsi Wang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA was one of most popular biomaterials for endodontic treatment in the past decade. Its superb biocompatibility, sealing ability and surface for tissue adhesion all make MTA a potential candidate for many dental applications, such as apexification, perforation repair, repair of root resorption, and as a root-end filling material. There are many review articles regarding the physical, chemical and biological properties of MTA. However, there are few reviews discussing the relationship between the composition and hydration behavior of MTA. The aim of this article was to provide a systematic review regarding the compositional characteristics and hydration behavior of MTA.

  4. Long distance run induced hydration and kidney function changes in marathoners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Guilherme Cruz Gonçalves

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe aim of the study was to verify the hydration status and the kidney function in marathoners during the training season and after a marathon race. Nine male runners were investigated during 12 weeks of training. Urine was collected in four moments; in the beginning (C1 and during (C2 the training program, before (C3 and after (C4 the competition. Urine pH was measured using reagent tapes, urine density with a refractometer, protein excretion by Bradford assay and erythrocytes and leucocytes by microscopy. Changes were observed when C-4 was compared to the other collection times for all variables investigated. It is possible to conclude that physical exertion induced important changes in the hydration status and glomerular membrane selectivity to macromolecules, modifying the kidney function of the marathoners in C4.

  5. Obsidian Hydration: A New Paleothermometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Riciputi, Lee R [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Fayek, Mostafa [ORNL; Elam, J. Michael [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2006-01-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  6. Obsidian hydration: A new paleothermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Riciputi, Lee R.; Cole, David R.; Fayek, Mostafa; Elam, J. Michael

    2006-07-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  7. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  8. A Circuit Model of Real Time Human Body Hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asogwa, Clement Ogugua; Teshome, Assefa K; Collins, Stephen F; Lai, Daniel T H

    2016-06-01

    Changes in human body hydration leading to excess fluid losses or overload affects the body fluid's ability to provide the necessary support for healthy living. We propose a time-dependent circuit model of real-time human body hydration, which models the human body tissue as a signal transmission medium. The circuit model predicts the attenuation of a propagating electrical signal. Hydration rates are modeled by a time constant τ, which characterizes the individual specific metabolic function of the body part measured. We define a surrogate human body anthropometric parameter θ by the muscle-fat ratio and comparing it with the body mass index (BMI), we find theoretically, the rate of hydration varying from 1.73 dB/min, for high θ and low τ to 0.05 dB/min for low θ and high τ. We compare these theoretical values with empirical measurements and show that real-time changes in human body hydration can be observed by measuring signal attenuation. We took empirical measurements using a vector network analyzer and obtained different hydration rates for various BMI, ranging from 0.6 dB/min for 22.7 [Formula: see text] down to 0.04 dB/min for 41.2 [Formula: see text]. We conclude that the galvanic coupling circuit model can predict changes in the volume of the body fluid, which are essential in diagnosing and monitoring treatment of body fluid disorder. Individuals with high BMI would have higher time-dependent biological characteristic, lower metabolic rate, and lower rate of hydration.

  9. Determination of Nucleic Acid Hydration Using Osmotic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozners, Eriks

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the role water plays in biological processes requires detailed knowledge of the phenomena of biopolymer hydration. Crystal structures have identified exact sites occupied by the water molecules in immediate hydration layers. NMR and molecular modeling have provided information on dynamics of water molecules occupying these sites. However, these studies give little information on the thermodynamic contribution of water molecules to conformational equilibria and recognition affinity. This unit describes probing of nucleic acid hydration using osmotic stress, a method that provides thermodynamic information complementary to crystallography, NMR and molecular modeling. Osmotic stress monitors the depression of melting temperature upon decreasing the water activity and calculates the number of thermodynamically unique water molecules associated with the double helix and released from the single strands upon melting. PMID:21154532

  10. Heuristic modeling of macromolecule release from PLGA microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szlęk J

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Jakub Szlęk,1 Adam Pacławski,1 Raymond Lau,2 Renata Jachowicz,1 Aleksander Mendyk11Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland; 2School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (NTU, SingaporeAbstract: Dissolution of protein macromolecules from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA particles is a complex process and still not fully understood. As such, there are difficulties in obtaining a predictive model that could be of fundamental significance in design, development, and optimization for medical applications and toxicity evaluation of PLGA-based multiparticulate dosage form. In the present study, two models with comparable goodness of fit were proposed for the prediction of the macromolecule dissolution profile from PLGA micro- and nanoparticles. In both cases, heuristic techniques, such as artificial neural networks (ANNs, feature selection, and genetic programming were employed. Feature selection provided by fscaret package and sensitivity analysis performed by ANNs reduced the original input vector from a total of 300 input variables to 21, 17, 16, and eleven; to achieve a better insight into generalization error, two cut-off points for every method was proposed. The best ANNs model results were obtained by monotone multi-layer perceptron neural network (MON-MLP networks with a root-mean-square error (RMSE of 15.4, and the input vector consisted of eleven inputs. The complicated classical equation derived from a database consisting of 17 inputs was able to yield a better generalization error (RMSE of 14.3. The equation was characterized by four parameters, thus feasible (applicable to standard nonlinear regression techniques. Heuristic modeling led to the ANN model describing macromolecules release profiles from PLGA microspheres with good predictive efficiency. Moreover genetic programming technique resulted in classical equation with

  11. Storing natural gas as frozen hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudmundsson, J.S.; Khokhar, A.A. (Univ. of Trondheim (Norway)); Parlaktuna, M. (Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey))

    1994-02-01

    The formation of natural gas hydrates is a well-known problem in the petroleum and natural gas industries. Hydrates are solid materials that form when liquid water and natural gas are brought in contact under pressure. Hydrate formation need not be a problem. On the contrary, it can be an advantage. The volume of hydrates is much less than that of natural gas. At standard conditions, hydrates occupy 150 to 170 times less volume than the corresponding gas. Typically, natural gas hydrates contain 15% gas and 85% water by mass. It follows that hydrates can be used for large-scale storage of natural gas. Benesh proposed using hydrates to improve the load factor of natural gas supply systems. The author suggested that hydrates could be produced by bringing liquid water into contact with natural gas at the appropriate temperature and high pressure. The hydrate then would be stored at a temperature and pressure where it was stable. When gas was needed for the supply system, the hydrate would be melted at low pressure. The stability of a natural gas hydrate during storage at atmospheric pressure and below-freezing temperatures was studied in the laboratory. The gas hydrate was produced in a stirred vessel at 2- to 6-MPa pressure and temperatures from 0 to 20 C. The hydrate was refrigerated and stored in deep freezers at [minus]5, [minus]10, and [minus]18 C for up to 10 days. The natural gas hydrate remained stable when kept frozen at atmospheric pressure.

  12. Bending dynamics of semi-flexible macromolecules in isotropic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, Aamir; Vincenzi, Dario

    2014-01-01

    We study the Lagrangian dynamics of semi-flexible macromolecules in laminar as well as in homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flows by means of analytically solvable stochastic models and direct numerical simulations. The statistics of the bending angle is qualitatively different in laminar and turbulent flows and exhibits a strong dependence on the topology of the velocity field. In particular, in two-dimensional turbulence, particles are either found in a fully extended or in a fully folded configuration; in three dimensions, the predominant configuration is the fully extended one.

  13. Conformations of Macromolecules and their Complexes from Heterogeneous Datasets

    CERN Document Server

    Schwander, P; Ourmazd, A

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new generation of algorithms capable of mapping the structure and conformations of macromolecules and their complexes from large ensembles of heterogeneous snapshots, and demonstrate the feasibility of determining both discrete and continuous macromolecular conformational spectra. These algorithms naturally incorporate conformational heterogeneity without resort to sorting and classification, or prior knowledge of the type of heterogeneity present. They are applicable to single-particle diffraction and image datasets produced by X-ray lasers and cryo-electron microscopy, respectively, and particularly suitable for systems not easily amenable to purification or crystallization.

  14. Airway Hydration and COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arunava; Boucher, R.C.; Tarran, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the prevalent causes of worldwide mortality and encompasses two major clinical phenotypes, i.e., chronic bronchitis (CB) and emphysema. The most common cause of COPD is chronic tobacco inhalation. Research focused on the chronic bronchitic phenotype of COPD has identified several pathological processes that drive disease initiation and progression. For example, the lung’s mucociliary clearance (MCC) system performs the critical task of clearing inhaled pathogens and toxic materials from the lung. MCC efficiency is dependent on: (i) the ability of apical plasma membrane ion channels such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) to maintain airway hydration; (ii) ciliary beating; and, (iii) appropriate rates of mucin secretion. Each of these components is impaired in CB and likely contributes to the mucus stasis/accumulation seen in CB patients. This review highlights the cellular components responsible for maintaining MCC and how this process is disrupted following tobacco exposure and with CB. We shall also discuss existing therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic bronchitis and how components of the MCC can be used as biomarkers for the evaluation of tobacco or tobacco-like-product exposure. PMID:26068443

  15. Mechanism of gypsum hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco, G.

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an hypothesis that the mechanism o f gypsum hydration and dehydration is performed through two simultaneous phenomena. In this study we try to clear up this phenomenon using chlorides as accelerators or a mixture of ethanol-methanol as retarders to carry out the gypsum setting. Natural Mexican gypsum samples and a hemihydrate prepared in the laboratory are used. The following analytical techniques are used: MO, DRX, DTA, TG and DTG. In agreement with the obtained results, it can be concluded: that colloid formation depends on the action of accelerators or retarders and the crystals are a consequence of the quantity of hemihydrate formed.

    En el mecanismo de hidratación y deshidratación del yeso existe la hipótesis de que éste se efectúa por dos fenómenos simultáneos. Este estudio intenta esclarecer estos fenómenos, empleando: cloruros como aceleradores o mezcla etanol-metanol como retardadores para efectuar el fraguado del yeso. Se emplean muestras de yeso de origen natural mexicano y hemihydrate preparado en laboratorio; se utilizan técnicas analíticas: MO, DRX, DTA, TG y DTG. De acuerdo a los resultados obtenidos se puede deducir: que la formación del coloide depende de la acción de los agentes aceleradores o retardadores y que los cristales son consecuencia de la cantidad de hemihidrato formado.

  16. Electrospun ECM macromolecules as biomimetic scaffold for regenerative medicine: challenges for preserving conformation and bioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Emma Campiglio

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM, the physiological scaffold for cells in vivo, provides structural support to cells and guaranties tissue integrity. At the same time, however, it represents an extremely complex and finely tuned signaling environment that contributes in regulating tissue homeostasis and repair. ECM can bind, release and activate signaling molecules and also modulate cell reaction to soluble factors. Cell-ECM interactions, as a result, are recognized to be critical for physiological wound healing, and consequently in guiding regeneration. Due to its complexity, mimicking ECM chemistry and architecture appears a straightforward strategy to exploit the benefits of a biologically recognizable and cell-instructive environment. As ECM consists primarily of sub-micrometric fibers, electrospinning, a simple and versatile technique, has attracted the majority efforts aimed at reprocessing of biologically occurring molecules. However, the ability to trigger specific cellular behavior is likely to depend on both the chemical and conformational properties of biological molecules. As a consequence, when ECM macromolecules are electrospun, investigating the effect of processing on their structure, and the extent to which their potential in directing cellular behavior is preserved, appears crucial. In this perspective, this review explores the electrospinning of ECM molecules specifically focusing on the effect of processing on polymer structure and on in vitro or in vivo experiments designed to confirm the maintenance of their instructive role.

  17. Arrangement of a nanostructure array to control equilibrium and nonequilibrium transports of macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Takao; Kaji, Noritada; Ogawa, Ryo; Hashioka, Shingi; Tokeshi, Manabu; Horiike, Yasuhiro; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2015-05-13

    Exploiting the nonequilibrium transport of macromolecules makes it possible to increase the separation speed without any loss of separation resolution. Here we report the arrangement of a nanostructure array in microchannels to control equilibrium and nonequilibrium transports of macromolecules. The direct observation and separation of macromolecules in the nanopillar array reported here are the first to reveal the nonequilibrium transport, which has a potential to overcome the intrinsic trade-off between the separation speed and resolution.

  18. Dual Use of Amphiphilic Macromolecules As Cholesterol Efflux Triggers and Inhibitors of Macrophage Athero-inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Nicole; Plourde, Nicole M.; Sparks, Sarah M.; Wang, Jinzhong; Patel, Ekta; Shah, Pratik; Lewis, Daniel R.; Zablocki, Kyle; Nackman, Gary B.; Uhrich, Kathryn E.; Moghe, Prabhas V.

    2011-01-01

    Activated vascular wall macrophages can rapidly internalize modified lipoproteins and escalate the growth of atherosclerotic plaques. This article proposes a biomaterials-based therapeutic intervention for depletion of non-regulated cholesterol accumulation and inhibition of inflammation of macrophages. Macromolecules with high scavenger receptor (SR)-binding activity were investigated for SR-mediated delivery of agonists to cholesterol-trafficking nuclear liver-X receptors. From a diverse feature space of a family of amphiphilic macromolecules of linear and aromatic mucic acid backbones modified with varied aliphatic chains and conjugated with differentially branched poly(ethylene glycol), a key molecule (carboxyl-terminated, C12-derivatized, linear mucic acid backbone) was selected for its ability to preferentially bind scavenger receptor A (SR-A) as the key target. At a basal level, this macromolecule suppressed the pro-inflammatory signaling of activated THP-1 macrophages while competitively lowering oxLDL uptake in vitro through scavenger receptor SRA-1 targeting. To further deplete intracellular cholesterol, the core macromolecule structure was exploited to solubilize a hydrophobic small molecule agonist for nuclear Liver-X Receptors, which regulate the efflux of intracellular cholesterol. The macromolecule-encapsulated agonist system was found to reduce oxLDL accumulation by 88% in vitro in comparison to controls. In vivo studies were designed to release the macromolecules (with or without encapsulated agonist) to injured carotid arteries within Sprague Dawley rats fed a high fat diet, conditions that yield enhanced cholesterol accumulation and macrophage recruitment. The macromolecules lowered intimal levels of accumulated cholesterol (50% for macromolecule alone; 70% for macromolecule-encapsulated agonist) and inhibited macrophage retention (92% for macromolecule; 96% for macromolecule-encapsulated agonist; 4 days) relative to non-treated controls. Thus

  19. A statistical model of macromolecules dynamics for Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri Koroliouk

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a new mathematical model to describe the mechanisms of biological macromolecules interactions. Our model consists of a discrete stationary random sequence given by a solution of difference stochastic equation, characterized by a drift predictive component and by a diffusion term. The relative statistical estimations are very simple and effective, promising to be a good tool for the mathematical description of collective biological reactions. This paper presents the mathematical model and its verification on a simulated data set, obtained on the basis of the well-known Stokes-Einsteinmodel. In particular, we considered several mix of particles of different diffusion coefficient, respectively: D1=10 mm2/sec and D2=100 mm2/sec. The parameters evaluated by this new mathematical model on simulated data show good estimation accuracy, in comparison with the prior parameters used in the simulations. Furthermore, when analyzing the data for the mix of particles with different diffusion coefficient, the proposed model parameters  (regression and  (square variance of the stochastic component have a good discriminative ability for the molar fraction determination.  In this paper, we propose a new mathematical model to describe the mechanisms of biological macromolecules interactions. Our model consists of a discrete stationary random sequence given by a solution of difference stochastic equation, characterized by a drift predictive component and by a diffusion term. The relative statistical estimations are very simple and effective, promising to be a good tool for mathematical description of collective biological reactions. This paper presents the mathematical model and its verification on simulated data set, obtained on the basis of the well-known Stokes-Einsteinmodel. In particular we considered several mix of particles of different diffusion coefficient, respectively: D1=10 mm2/sec and D2=100 mm2/sec. The parameters

  20. Expanding the biological periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seravalli, Javier; Ragsdale, Stephen W

    2010-08-27

    Metal ions play an indispensable role in biology, enabling enzymes to perform their functions and lending support to the structures of numerous macromolecules. Despite their prevalence and importance, the metalloproteome is still relatively unexplored. Cvetkovic et al. (2010) now describe an approach to identify metalloproteins on a genome-wide scale. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetically targeted fluorogenic macromolecules for subcellular imaging and cellular perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magenau, Andrew J D; Saurabh, Saumya; Andreko, Susan K; Telmer, Cheryl A; Schmidt, Brigitte F; Waggoner, Alan S; Bruchez, Marcel P

    2015-10-01

    The alteration of cellular functions by anchoring macromolecules to specified organelles may reveal a new area of therapeutic potential and clinical treatment. In this work, a unique phenotype was evoked by influencing cellular behavior through the modification of subcellular structures with genetically targetable macromolecules. These fluorogen-functionalized polymers, prepared via controlled radical polymerization, were capable of exclusively decorating actin, cytoplasmic, or nuclear compartments of living cells expressing localized fluorgen-activating proteins. The macromolecular fluorogens were optimized by establishing critical polymer architecture-biophysical property relationships which impacted binding rates, binding affinities, and the level of internalization. Specific labeling of subcellular structures was realized at nanomolar concentrations of polymer, in the absence of membrane permeabilization or transduction domains, and fluorogen-modified polymers were found to bind to protein intact after delivery to the cytosol. Cellular motility was found to be dependent on binding of macromolecular fluorogens to actin structures causing rapid cellular ruffling without migration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Tetrahydrofuran hydrate decomposition characteristics in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongchen; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Shenglong; Zhao, Jiafei; Yang, Mingjun

    2016-12-01

    Many tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate properties are similar to those of gas hydrates. In the present work THF hydrate dissociation in four types of porous media is studied. THF solution was cooled to 275.15 K with formation of the hydrate under ambient pressure, and then it dissociated under ambient conditions. THF hydrate dissociation experiments in each porous medium were conducted three times. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to obtain images. Decomposition time, THF hydrate saturation and MRI mean intensity (MI) were measured and analyzed. The experimental results showed that the hydrate decomposition time in BZ-4 and BZ-3 was similar and longer than that in BZ-02. In each dissociation process, the hydrate decomposition time of the second and third cycles was shorter than that of the first cycle in BZ-4, BZ-3, and BZ-02. The relationship between THF hydrate saturation and time is almost linear.

  3. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.;

    1999-01-01

    Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations...... and experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6...

  4. Progress of Gas Hydrate Studies in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊栓狮; 汪集旸

    2006-01-01

    A brief overview is given on the gas hydrate-related research activities carried out by Chinese researchers in the past 15 years. The content involves: (1) Historical review. Introducing the gas hydrate research history in China; (2) Gas hydrate research groups in China. There are nearly 20 groups engaged in gas hydrate research now; (3) Present studies.Including fundamental studies, status of the exploration of natural gas hydrate resources in the South China Sea region, and development of hydrate-based new techniques; (4) Future development.

  5. Hydration of fly ash cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etsuo Sakai; Shigeyoshi Miyahara; Shigenari Ohsawa; Seung-Heun Lee; Masaki Daimon [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Graduate School of Science and Engineering

    2005-06-01

    It is necessary to establish the material design system for the utilization of large amounts of fly ash as blended cement instead of disposing of it as a waste. Cement blended with fly ash is also required as a countermeasure to reduce the amount of CO{sub 2} generation. In this study, the influences of the glass content and the basicity of glass phase on the hydration of fly ash cement were clarified and hydration over a long curing time was characterized. Two kinds of fly ash with different glass content, one with 38.2% and another with 76.6%, were used. The hydration ratio of fly ash was increased by increasing the glass content in fly ash in the specimens cured for 270 days. When the glass content of fly ash is low, the basicity of glass phase tends to decrease. Reactivity of fly ash is controlled by the basicity of the glass phase in fly ash during a period from 28 to 270 days. However, at an age of 360 days, the reaction ratios of fly ash show almost identical values with different glass contents. Fly ash also affected the hydration of cement clinker minerals in fly ash cement. While the hydration of alite was accelerated, that of belite was retarded at a late stage.

  6. Comparison of stromal hydration techniques for clear corneal cataract incisions: conventional hydration versus anterior stromal pocket hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifflin, Mark D; Kinard, Krista; Neuffer, Marcus C

    2012-06-01

    Anterior stromal pocket hydration was compared with conventional hydration for preventing wound leak after 2.8 mm uniplanar clear corneal incisions (CCIs) in patients having routine cataract surgery. Conventional hydration involves hydration of the lateral walls of the main incision with visible whitening of the stroma. The anterior stromal pocket hydration technique involves creation of an additional supraincisional stromal pocket overlying the main incision, which is then hydrated instead of the main incision. Sixty-six eyes of 48 patients were included in the data analysis with 33 assigned to each study group. The anterior stromal pocket hydration technique was significantly better than conventional hydration in preventing wound leak due to direct pressure on the posterior lip of the incision. Copyright © 2012 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Gas hydrates forming and decomposition conditions analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Павленко

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of gas hydrates has been defined; their brief description has been given; factors that affect the formation and decomposition of the hydrates have been reported; their distribution, structure and thermodynamic conditions determining the gas hydrates formation disposition in gas pipelines have been considered. Advantages and disadvantages of the known methods for removing gas hydrate plugs in the pipeline have been analyzed, the necessity of their further studies has been proved. In addition to the negative impact on the process of gas extraction, the hydrates properties make it possible to outline the following possible fields of their industrial use: obtaining ultrahigh pressures in confined spaces at the hydrate decomposition; separating hydrocarbon mixtures by successive transfer of individual components through the hydrate given the mode; obtaining cold due to heat absorption at the hydrate decomposition; elimination of the open gas fountain by means of hydrate plugs in the bore hole of the gushing gasser; seawater desalination, based on the hydrate ability to only bind water molecules into the solid state; wastewater purification; gas storage in the hydrate state; dispersion of high temperature fog and clouds by means of hydrates; water-hydrates emulsion injection into the productive strata to raise the oil recovery factor; obtaining cold in the gas processing to cool the gas, etc.

  8. Hydration and Nanoconfined Water: Insights from Computer Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, Laureano M; Rodríguez Fris, J A; Morini, Marcela A; Sierra, M Belén; Accordino, S A; Montes de Oca, J M; Pedroni, Viviana I; Appignanesi, Gustavo A

    2015-01-01

    The comprehension of the structure and behavior of water at interfaces and under nanoconfinement represents an issue of major concern in several central research areas like hydration, reaction dynamics and biology. From one side, water is known to play a dominant role in the structuring, the dynamics and the functionality of biological molecules, governing main processes like protein folding, protein binding and biological function. In turn, the same principles that rule biological organization at the molecular level are also operative for materials science processes that take place within a water environment, being responsible for the self-assembly of molecular structures to create synthetic supramolecular nanometrically-sized materials. Thus, the understanding of the principles of water hydration, including the development of a theory of hydrophobicity at the nanoscale, is imperative both from a fundamental and an applied standpoint. In this work we present some molecular dynamics studies of the structure and dynamics of water at different interfaces or confinement conditions, ranging from simple model hydrophobic interfaces with different geometrical constraints (in order to single out curvature effects), to self-assembled monolayers, proteins and phospholipid membranes. The tendency of the water molecules to sacrifice the lowest hydrogen bond (HB) coordination as possible at extended interfaces is revealed. This fact makes the first hydration layers to be highly oriented, in some situations even resembling the structure of hexagonal ice. A similar trend to maximize the number of HBs is shown to hold in cavity filling, with small subnanometric hydrophobic cavities remaining empty while larger cavities display an alternation of filled and dry states with a significant inner HB network. We also study interfaces with complex chemical and geometrical nature in order to determine how different conditions affect the local hydration properties. Thus, we show some

  9. Rappertk: a versatile engine for discrete restraint-based conformational sampling of macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmali Anjum M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macromolecular structures are modeled by conformational optimization within experimental and knowledge-based restraints. Discrete restraint-based sampling generates high-quality structures within these restraints and facilitates further refinement in a continuous all-atom energy landscape. This approach has been used successfully for protein loop modeling, comparative modeling and electron density fitting in X-ray crystallography. Results Here we present a software toolkit (Rappertk which generalizes discrete restraint-based sampling for use in structural biology. Modular design and multi-layered architecture enables Rappertk to sample conformations of any macromolecule at many levels of detail and within a variety of experimental restraints. Performance against a Cα-tracing benchmark shows that the efficiency has not suffered despite the overhead required by this flexibility. We demonstrate the toolkit's capabilities by building high-quality β-sheets and by introducing restraint-driven sampling. RNA sampling is demonstrated by rebuilding a protein-RNA interface. Ability to construct arbitrary ligands is used in sampling protein-ligand interfaces within electron density. Finally, secondary structure and shape information derived from EM are combined to generate multiple conformations of a protein consistent with the observed density. Conclusion Through its modular design and ease of use, Rappertk enables exploration of a wide variety of interesting avenues in structural biology. This toolkit, with illustrative examples, is freely available to academic users from http://www-cryst.bioc.cam.ac.uk/~swanand/mysite/rtk/index.html.

  10. Hydration of highly charged ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Thomas S; Weiss, Alexander K H; Randolf, Bernhard R; Rode, Bernd M

    2011-08-01

    Based on a series of ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) simulations, the broad spectrum of structural and dynamical properties of hydrates of trivalent and tetravalent ions is presented, ranging from extreme inertness to immediate hydrolysis. Main group and transition metal ions representative for different parts of the periodic system are treated, as are 2 threefold negatively charged anions. The results show that simple predictions of the properties of the hydrates appear impossible and that an accurate quantum mechanical simulation in cooperation with sophisticated experimental investigations seems the only way to obtain conclusive results.

  11. Recent Advances in Non-Invasive Delivery of Macromolecules using Nanoparticulate Carriers System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadab, Md; Haque, Shadabul; Sheshala, Ravi; Meng, Lim Wei; Meka, Venkata Srikanth; Ali, Javed

    2017-01-01

    The drug delivery of macromolecules such as proteins and peptides has become an important area of research and represents the fastest expanding share of the market for human medicines. The most common method for delivering macromolecules is parenterally. However parenteral administration of some therapeutic macromolecules has not been effective because of their rapid clearance from the body. As a result, most macromolecules are only therapeutically useful after multiple injections, which causes poor compliance and systemic side effects. Therefore, there is a need to improve delivery of therapeutic macromolecules to enable non-invasive delivery routes, less frequent dosing through controlled-release drug delivery, and improved drug targeting to increase efficacy and reduce side effects. Non-invasive administration routes such as intranasal, pulmonary, transdermal, ocular and oral delivery have been attempted intensively by formulating macromolecules into nanoparticulate carriers system such as polymeric and lipidic nanoparticles. This review discusses barriers to drug delivery and current formulation technologies to overcome the unfavorable properties of macromolecules via non-invasive delivery (mainly intranasal, pulmonary, transdermal oral and ocular) with a focus on nanoparticulate carrier systems. This review also provided a summary and discussion of recent data on non-invasive delivery of macromolecules using nanoparticulate formulations. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. The Origin and the Future of Macromolecule Ionization by Laser Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KoichiTanaka

    2004-01-01

    Starting in 1984,a Shimadzu Corporation Central Research Laboratory development team set about the challenge of developinng an instrument for analyzing macromolecules such as proteins. At the time, the conventional consensus among chemists was that, “laser ionization of macromolecules exceeding a molecular weight of 10,000 is imposible”. However, not being a chemist, I was unaware of this widelyheld belief.

  13. Organometallic macromolecules with piano stool coordination repeating units: chain configuration and stimulated solution behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Kai; Ward, Jonathan; Amos, Ryan C; Jeong, Moon Gon; Kim, Kyoung Taek; Gauthier, Mario; Foucher, Daniel; Wang, Xiaosong

    2014-09-11

    Theoretical calculations illustrate that organometallic macromolecules with piano stool coordination repeating units (Fe-acyl complex) adopt linear chain configuration with a P-Fe-C backbone surrounded by aromatic groups. The macromolecules show molecular weight-dependent and temperature stimulated solution behaviour in DMSO.

  14. The flavonoid herbacetin diglucoside as a constituent of the lignan macromolecule from flaxseed hulls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, K.; Vincken, J.P.; Verhoef, R.P.; Oostveen, van W.H.M.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Gruppen, H.

    2007-01-01

    Lignans in flaxseed are known to be part of a macromolecule in which they are connected through the linker-molecule hydroxy-methyl-glutaric acid (HMGA). In this study, the lignan macromolecule was extracted from flaxseed hulls and degraded to its monomeric constituents by complete saponification. Be

  15. Responsive inverse opal hydrogels for the sensing of macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, Jean-Philippe; Sütterlin, Martin; Laschewsky, André; Hettrich, Cornelia; Wischerhoff, Erik

    2015-05-26

    Dual responsive inverse opal hydrogels were designed as autonomous sensor systems for (bio)macromolecules, exploiting the analyte-induced modulation of the opal's structural color. The systems that are based on oligo(ethylene glycol) macromonomers additionally incorporate comonomers with various recognition units. They combine a coil-to-globule collapse transition of the LCST type with sensitivity of the transition temperature toward molecular recognition processes. This enables the specific detection of macromolecular analytes, such as glycopolymers and proteins, by simple optical methods. While the inverse opal structure assists the effective diffusion even of large analytes into the photonic crystal, the stimulus responsiveness gives rise to strong shifts of the optical Bragg peak of more than 100 nm upon analyte binding at a given temperature. The systems' design provides a versatile platform for the development of easy-to-use, fast, and low-cost sensors for pathogens.

  16. Covalent binding of foreign chemicals to tissue macromolecules. [Acetaminophen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorgeirsson, S.S.; Wirth, P.J.

    1977-03-01

    In vivo and in vitro covalent binding of foreign chemicals to tissue macromolecules via metabolic activation is described, using the analgesic acetaminophen as an example. Acetaminophen is metabolized through a variety of pathways. The arylating metabolite is formed by a cytochrome P-450 dependent N-hydroxylation process. The resulting hydroxamic acid is then conjugated with glutathione, and the resulting conjugate is subsequently excreted as the mercapturic acid in the urine. It is not until the glutathione concentration is reduced to about 20% of the initial concentration that covalent binding of acetaminophen to amino acids of proteins occurs and subsequent liver necrosis is seen. The extent of in vitro binding correlates with treatments that alter hepatic necrosis and in vivo binding, indicating that in vitro binding is a valid index of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. A simple bacterial test system for detecting chemical carcinogens as mutagens is described.

  17. Novel macromolecules derived from coumarin: synthesis and antioxidant activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amiery, Ahmed A.; Al-Majedy, Yasameen K.; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2015-07-01

    The rational design of 4-hydroxycoumarins with tailor-made antioxidant activities is required nowadays due to the wide variety of pharmacologically significant, structurally interesting of coumarins and researcher orientation toward green chemistry and natural products. A simple and unique coumarins have been achieved by reaction of 4-hydroxycoumarin with aromatic aldehyde accompanied with the creation of a macromolecules have 2-aminothiazolidin-4-one. The molecular structures of the compounds were characterized by the Fourier transformation infrared and Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, in addition to CHN analysis. The scavenging abilities of new compounds against stable DPPH radical (DPPH•) and hydrogen peroxide were done and the results show that the compounds exhibited high antioxidant activates.

  18. Surface induced self-organization of comb-like macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Konstantin I; Palyulin, Vladimir V; Möller, Martin; Khokhlov, Alexei R

    2011-01-01

    Summary We present a review of the theoretical and experimental evidence for the peculiar properties of comb copolymers, demonstrating the uniqueness of these materials among other polymer architectures. These special properties include an increase in stiffness upon increasing side-chain length, the spontaneous curvature of adsorbed combs, rod–globule transition, and specific intramolecular self-assembly. We also propose a theory of chemically heterogeneous surface nanopattern formation in ultrathin films of comblike macromolecules containing two different types (A and B) of incompatible side chains (so-called binary combs). Side chains of the binary combs are strongly adsorbed on a surface and segregated with respect to the backbone. The thickness of surface domains formed by the B side chains is controlled by the interaction with the substrate. We predict the stability of direct and inverse disc-, torus- and stripelike nanostructures. Phase diagrams of the film are constructed. PMID:22003463

  19. Great Market Potential of Hydrazine Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Yuying

    2007-01-01

    @@ Stable consumption growth worldwide Hydrazine hydrate is an organic chemical raw material with extensive applications. The world's capacity to produce hydrazine hydrate has reached more than 200 thousand t/atoday (based on 100% hydrazine content).

  20. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  1. Novel understanding of calcium silicate hydrate from dilute hydration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lina

    2017-05-13

    The perspective of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is still confronting various debates due to its intrinsic complicated structure and properties after decades of studies. In this study, hydration at dilute suspension of w/s equaling to 10 was conducted for tricalcium silicate (C3S) to interpret long-term hydration process and investigate the formation, structure and properties of C-S-H. Based on results from XRD, IR, SEM, NMR and so forth, loose and dense clusters of C-S-H with analogous C/S ratio were obtained along with the corresponding chemical formulae proposed as Ca5Si4O13∙6.2H2O. Crystalline structure inside C-S-H was observed by TEM, which was allocated at the foil-like proportion as well as the edge of wrinkles of the product. The long-term hydration process of C3S in dilute suspension could be sketchily described as migration of calcium hydroxide and in-situ growth of C-S-H with equilibrium silicon in aqueous solution relatively constant and calcium varied.

  2. Determination of membrane hydration numbers of alkali metal ions by insertion in a conducting polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Steen; Junaid Mohamed Jafeen, Mohamed; Careem, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    , and a secondary (or outer) solvation shell, consisting of all other water molecules whose properties are still influenced significantly by the cation. Knowing the hydration number is important when considering, for instance, the transport of Na+ and K+ in biological cell membranes, since their different behavior...... of the number of M+ ions entering the film, and therefore the inserted M+ mass. The mass of the water molecules can then be calculated as a difference. The values determined this way may be called membrane hydration numbers. The results yield the following membrane hydration numbers: Li+: 5.3-5.5; Na+ 4...... membrane....

  3. Synthesis and application of functional branched macromolecules: From site isolation and energy harvesting to catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Stefan

    The symbiosis of our understanding of structure property relationships in many biological macromolecules and our increased ability to prepare large synthetic macromolecules with exquisite structural precision has generated a new area of research where chemistry and materials science join with biology. For example, numerous biological systems utilize the concept of site isolation whereby an active center or catalytic site is encapsulated, frequently within a protein, to afford properties that would not be encountered in the bulk state. The ability of a dendritic shell to encapsulate functional core moieties and to create specific site-isolated nanoenvironments, thereby affecting molecular properties, not only mimics natural systems but affords novel materials with unique characteristics. Furthermore, introduction of donor chromophores at periphery of dendrimers having a central acceptor dye enables spatial and spectral energy concentration at the core. Continuing the effort towards designing bio-inspired macromolecules, this dissertation describes the use of different polymer architectures to encapsulate active sites that have either photophysical, photochemical, or catalytic functions and the evaluation of site isolation using a variety of different techniques. While the first part is mainly concerned with different synthetic approaches towards site isolation of porphyrin moieties, the second part describes the design of light-driven catalytic systems incorporating both light harvesting and energy conversion. The fundamental knowledge that can be gleaned from such investigations has implications that range from the preliminary design of artificial enzymes to the construction of molecular-scale devices. After an overview of dendritically encapsulated functions (Chapter 1) and a brief account of a novel synthetic approach to benzene core dendrimers (Chapter 2), site isolation of porphyrin moieties within dendrimers, their linear structural isomers, and branched star

  4. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-30

    properties of key hydrated cement constituent calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) at the molecular, nanometer scale level. Due to complexity, still unknown...public release; distribution is unlimited. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate- Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure The views... Cement Molecular Structure Report Title Multi-scale modeling of complex material systems requires starting from fundamental building blocks to

  5. Hydration and Thermal Expansion in Anatase Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, He; Li, Qiang; Ren, Yang; Fan, Longlong; Chen, Jun; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2016-08-01

    A tunable thermal expansion is reported in nanosized anatase by taking advantage of surface hydration. The coefficient of thermal expansion of 4 nm TiO2 along a-axis is negative with a hydrated surface and is positive without a hydrated surface. High-energy synchrotron X-ray pair distribution function analysis combined with ab initio calculations on the specific hydrated surface are carried out to reveal the local structure distortion that is responsible for the unusual negative thermal expansion.

  6. Hydration and Thermal Expansion in Anatase Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, He [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Li, Qiang [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Ren, Yang [Argonne National Laboratory, X-Ray Science Division, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Fan, Longlong [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Chen, Jun [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Deng, Jinxia [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Xing, Xianran [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China

    2016-06-06

    A tunable thermal expansion is reported in nanosized anatase by taking advantage of surface hydration. The coefficient of thermal expansion of 4 nm TiO2 along a-axis is negative with a hydrated surface and is positive without a hydrated surface. High-energy synchrotron X-ray pair distribution function analysis combined with ab initio calculations on the specific hydrated surface are carried out to reveal the local structure distortion that is responsible for the unusual negative thermal expansion.

  7. Supramolecular Chemistry and Mechanochemistry of Macromolecules: Recent Advances by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bo; Cui, Shuxun

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force spectroscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) was invented in the 1990s. Since then, SMFS has been developed into a powerful tool to study the inter- and intra-molecular interactions of macromolecules. Using SMFS, a number of problems in the field of supramolecular chemistry and mechanochemistry have been studied at the single-molecule level, which are not accessible by traditional ensemble characterization methods. In this review, the principles of SMFS are introduced, followed by the discussion of several problems of contemporary interest at the interface of supramolecular chemistry and mechanochemistry of macromolecules, including single-chain elasticity of macromolecules, interactions between water and macromolecules, interactions between macromolecules and solid surface, and the interactions in supramolecular polymers.

  8. Single Cell Assay for Molecular Diagnostics and Medicine: Monitoring Intracellular Concentrations of Macromolecules by Two-photon Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliss, Artem; Peng, Xiao; Liu, Lixin; Kuzmin, Andrey; Wang, Yan; Qu, Junle; Li, Yuee; Prasad, Paras N

    2015-01-01

    Molecular organization of a cell is dynamically transformed along the course of cellular physiological processes, pathologic developments or derived from interactions with drugs. The capability to measure and monitor concentrations of macromolecules in a single cell would greatly enhance studies of cellular processes in heterogeneous populations. In this communication, we introduce and experimentally validate a bio-analytical single-cell assay, wherein the overall concentration of macromolecules is estimated in specific subcellular domains, such as structure-function compartments of the cell nucleus as well as in nucleoplasm. We describe quantitative mapping of local biomolecular concentrations, either intrinsic relating to the functional and physiological state of a cell, or altered by a therapeutic drug action, using two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). The proposed assay utilizes a correlation between the fluorescence lifetime of fluorophore and the refractive index of its microenvironment varying due to changes in the concentrations of macromolecules, mainly proteins. Two-photon excitation in Near-Infra Red biological transparency window reduced the photo-toxicity in live cells, as compared with a conventional single-photon approach. Using this new assay, we estimated average concentrations of proteins in the compartments of nuclear speckles and in the nucleoplasm at ~150 mg/ml, and in the nucleolus at ~284 mg/ml. Furthermore, we show a profound influence of pharmaceutical inhibitors of RNA synthesis on intracellular protein density. The approach proposed here will significantly advance theranostics, and studies of drug-cell interactions at the single-cell level, aiding development of personal molecular medicine.

  9. Terahertz sensing of corneal hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul S; Tewari, Priyamvada; Bourges, Jean Louis; Hubschman, Jean Pierre; Bennett, David B; Taylor, Zachary D; Lee, H; Brown, Elliott R; Grundfest, Warren S; Culjat, Martin O

    2010-01-01

    An indicator of ocular health is the hydrodyanmics of the cornea. Many corneal disorders deteriorate sight as they upset the normal hydrodynamics of the cornea. The mechanisms include the loss of endothelial pump function of corneal dystophies, swelling and immune response of corneal graft rejection, and inflammation and edema, which accompany trauma, burn, and irritation events. Due to high sensitivity to changes of water content in materials, a reflective terahertz (300 GHz and 3 THz) imaging system could be an ideal tool to measure the hydration level of the cornea. This paper presents the application of THz technology to visualize the hydration content across ex vivo porcine corneas. The corneas, with a thickness variation from 470 - 940 µm, were successfully imaged using a reflective pulsed THz imaging system, with a maximum SNR of 50 dB. To our knowledge, no prior studies have reported on the use of THz in measuring hydration in corneal tissues or other ocular tissues. These preliminary findings indicate that THz can be used to accurately sense hydration levels in the cornea using a pulsed, reflective THz imaging system.

  10. Physical properties of gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliner, J.T.R.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Gas hydrates are naturally occurring, solid crystalline compounds (clathrates) that encapsulate gas molecules inside the lattices of hydrogen bonded water molecules within a specific temperature-pressure stability zone. Estimates of the total quantity of available methane gas in natural occurring hydrates are based on twice the energy content of known conventional fossil fuels reservoirs. Accurate and reliable in-situ quantification techniques are essential in determining the economic viability of this potential energy yield, which is dependent upon several factors such as sensitivity of the temperature-pressure stability zone, sediment type, porosity, permeability, concentration/abundance of free gas, spatial distribution in pore spaces, specific cage occupancy, and the influence of inhibitors. Various techniques like acoustic P and S waves, time domain reflectometry, and electrical resistance have been used to analyze the quantity and spatial distribution of the gas hydrate samples. These techniques were reviewed and the results obtained in the course of gas hydrate research were presented. 34 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Hydration kinetics of transgenic soybeans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Francielle Fracasso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic and experimental analyses of the hydration process of transgenic soybeans (BRS 225 RR are provided. The importance of the hydration process consists of the grain texture modifications which favor grinding and extraction of soybeans. The soaking isotherms were obtained for four different temperatures. Results showed that temperature affected transgenic soybeans´ hydration rate and time. Moisture content d.b. of the soybeans increased from 0.12 ± 0.01 kg kg-1 to 1.45 ± 0.19 kg kg-1 during 270 min. of process. Two models were used to fit the kinetic curves: an empirical model developed by Peleg (1988 and a phenomenological one, proposed by Omoto et al. (2009. The two models adequately represented the hydration kinetics. Peleg model was applied to the experimental data and the corresponding parameters were obtained and correlated to temperature. The model by Omoto et al. (2009 showed a better statistical fitting. Although Ks was affected by temperature (Ks = 0.38079 exp (-2289.3 T-1, the equilibrium concentration remained practically unchanged.

  12. Physical activity, hydration and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascensión Marcos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of mankind, man has sought ways to promote and preserve health as well as to prevent disease. Hydration, physical activity and exercise are key factors for enhancing human health. However, either a little dose of them or an excess can be harmful for health maintenance at any age. Water is an essential nutrient for human body and a major key to survival has been to prevent dehydration. However, there is still a general controversy regarding the necessary amount to drink water or other beverages to properly get an adequate level of hydration. In addition, up to now the tools used to measure hydration are controversial. To this end, there are several important groups of variables to take into account such as water balance, hydration biomarkers and total body water. A combination of methods will be the most preferred tool to find out any risk or situation of dehydration at any age range. On the other hand, physical activity and exercise are being demonstrated to promote health, avoiding or reducing health problems, vascular and inflammatory diseases and helping weight management. Therefore, physical activity is also being used as a pill within a therapy to promote health and reduce risk diseases, but as in the case of drugs, dose, intensity, frequency, duration and precautions have to be evaluated and taken into account in order to get the maximum effectiveness and success of a treatment. On the other hand, sedentariness is the opposite concept to physical activity that has been recently recognized as an important factor of lifestyle involved in the obesogenic environment and consequently in the risk of the non-communicable diseases. In view of the literature consulted and taking into account the expertise of the authors, in this review a Decalogue of global recommendations is included to achieve an adequate hydration and physical activity status to avoid overweight/obesity consequences.

  13. Role of hydration on the functionality of a proteolytic enzyme α-chymotrypsin under crowded environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Pramod Kumar; Rakshit, Surajit; Mitra, Rajib Kumar; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2011-09-01

    Enzymes and other bio-macromolecules are not only sensitive to physical parameters such as pH, temperature and solute composition but also to water activity. A universally instructive way to vary water activity is the addition of osmotically active but otherwise inert solvents which also mimic the condition of an intercellular milieu. In the present contribution, the role of hydration on the functionality of a proteolytic enzyme α-chymotrypsin (CHT) is investigated by modulating the water activity with the addition of polyethylene glycols (PEG with an average molecular weight of 400). The addition of PEG increases the affinity of the enzyme to its substrate, however, followed by a decrease in the turnover number (k(cat)). Energetic calculations show that entrance path for the substrate is favoured, whereas the exit channel is restricted with increasing concentration of the crowding agent. This decrease is attributed to the thinning of the hydration shell of the enzyme due to the loss of critical water residues from the hydration surface of the enzyme as evidenced from volumetric and compressibility measurements. The overall secondary and tertiary structures of CHT determined from far-UV and near-UV circular dichroism (CD) measurements show no considerable change in the studied osmotic stress range. From kinetic and equilibrium data, we calculate 115 ± 30 numbers of water molecules to be altered during the enzymatic catalysis of CHT. Spectroscopic observation of water relaxation and rotational dynamics of ANS-CHT complex at various concentrations of the osmoting agent also support the dehydration of the hydration layer. Such dehydration/hydration processes during turnover imply a significant contribution of solvation to the energetics of the conformational changes.

  14. The status and direction of hydrate research - a discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneafsey, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    An open discussion will be moderated on the direction of gas hydrate research around the world. Please bring your ideas and thoughts to concisely present and discuss as time allows. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in understanding the deposition, location, configuration, and properties of hydrate-bearing sediments. Field, lab, and numerical studies have been performed covering a wide range of interests having geological, energy, safety, and climate foci. As we continue our investigations into the second most common form of solid water on earth, let's take a few minutes to thoughtfully discuss our current position and future important topics. Some questions to inspire thought/discussion: Incredible modeling capabilities have been developed to understand hydrate systems. What is now needed to enhance model reliability? Are the constitutive models adequately supported? How should confidence be built? What physics, chemistry, biology is needed but not included? The ability to locate subsurface and subsea gas hydrate deposits has improved dramatically. What additional developments are needed, and how will those developments be evaluated, selected, and validated? Are we adequately considering climate and environmental impacts? Are our gas production concepts adequate and robust? What processes are missing? What is novel?

  15. Seismic reflections associated with submarine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassen, K.

    1995-12-31

    Gas hydrates are often suggested as a future energy resource. This doctoral thesis improves the understanding of the concentration and distribution of natural submarine gas hydrates. The presence of these hydrates are commonly inferred from strong bottom simulating reflection (BSR). To investigate the nature of BSR, this work uses seismic studies of hydrate-related BSRs at two different locations, one where gas hydrates are accepted to exist and interpreted to be very extensive (in the Beaufort Sea), the other with good velocity data and downhole logs available (offshore Oregon). To ascertain the presence of free gas under the BSR, prestack offset data must supplement near-vertical incidence seismic data. A tentative model for physical properties of sediments partially saturated with gas hydrate and free gas is presented. This model, together with drilling information and seismic data containing the BSR beneath the Oregon margin and the Beaufort Sea, made it possible to better understand when to apply the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) method to constrain BSR gas hydrate and gas models. Distribution of natural gas hydrates offshore Norway and Svalbard is discussed and interpreted as reflections from the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, overlying sediments containing free gas. Gas hydrates inferred to exist at the Norwegian-Svalbard continental margin correlate well with Cenozoic depocenters, and the associated gas is assumed to be mainly biogenic. Parts of that margin have a high potential for natural gas hydrates of both biogenic and thermogenic origin. 235 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Handbook of gas hydrate properties and occurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuustraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.

    1983-12-01

    This handbook provides data on the resource potential of naturally occurring hydrates, the properties that are needed to evaluate their recovery, and their production potential. The first two chapters give data on the naturally occurring hydrate potential by reviewing published resource estimates and the known and inferred occurrences. The third and fourth chapters review the physical and thermodynamic properties of hydrates, respectively. The thermodynamic properties of hydrates that are discussed include dissociation energies and a simplified method to calculate them; phase diagrams for simple and multi-component gases; the thermal conductivity; and the kinetics of hydrate dissociation. The final chapter evaluates the net energy balance of recovering hydrates and shows that a substantial positive energy balance can theoretically be achieved. The Appendices of the Handbook summarize physical and thermodynamic properties of gases, liquids and solids that can be used in designing and evaluating recovery processes of hydrates. 158 references, 67 figures, 47 tables.

  17. Separation of water through gas hydrate formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boch Andersen, Torben; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goa...... volumes and the needs for high pressure. The process could be interesting for concentration of heat sensitive, high value products......Gas hydrate is normally recognized as a troublemaker in the oil and gas industry. However, gas hydrate has some interesting possibilities when used in connection with separation of water. Nordic Sugar has investigated the possibility of using gas hydrates for concentration of sugar juice. The goal...... of the project was to formulate an alternative separation concept, which can replace the traditional water evaporation process in the sugar production. Work with the separation concept showed that gas hydrates can be used for water separation. The process is not suitable for sugar production because of large...

  18. Transpapillary (Nipple) Delivery of Macromolecules to the Breast: Proof of Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Kaushalkumar; Alsharif, Fahd M; Perumal, Omathanu

    2016-11-07

    Localized drug delivery to the breast can maximize drug concentration at the target site and minimize systemic drug distribution. To this end, the study explored the feasibility of delivering macromolecules to the breast through mammary papilla (nipple). The in vitro penetration of model macromolecules (inulin, dextran, ovalbumin, and bovine serum albumin) varying in molecular weight from 5 to 67 kDa was studied using excised porcine and human mammary papilla. The penetration of macromolecules decreased with increase in molecular weight. The penetration of the macromolecules was significantly higher through the mammary papilla in comparison to breast skin. In vitro penetration of the macromolecules was similar in human and porcine mammary papilla. Iontophoresis was used to enhance the transport of bovine serum albumin (BSA) through the mammary papilla. The flux and cumulative amount permeated was increased by 2- to 4-fold by iontophoresis. The macromolecules were transported through the ducts and the surrounding connective tissue in the mammary papilla. Overall, the results from this study for the first time demonstrate the feasibility of delivering macromolecules through the mammary papilla. These findings have implications for developing safe and effective localized therapeutic approaches for breast cancer.

  19. Enhanced pulmonary absorption of a macromolecule through coupling to a sequence-specific phage display-derived peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher J; Smith, Mathew W; Griffiths, Peter C; McKeown, Neil B; Gumbleton, Mark

    2011-04-10

    With the aim of identifying a peptide sequence that promotes pulmonary epithelial transport of macromolecule cargo we used a stringent peptide-phage display library screening protocol against rat lung alveolar epithelial primary cell cultures. We identified a peptide-phage clone (LTP-1) displaying the disulphide-constrained 7-mer peptide sequence, C-TSGTHPR-C, that showed significant pulmonary epithelial translocation across highly restrictive polarised cell monolayers. Cell biological data supported a differential alveolar epithelial cell interaction of the LTP-1 peptide-phage clone and the corresponding free synthetic LTP-1 peptide. Delivering select phage-clones to the intact pulmonary barrier of an isolated perfused rat lung (IPRL) resulted in 8.7% of lung deposited LTP-1 peptide-phage clone transported from the IPRL airways to the vasculature compared (pprobes. This study shows proof-of principle that array technologies can be effectively exploited to identify peptides mediating enhanced transmucosal delivery of macromolecule therapeutics across an intact organ.

  20. Vesicular Trans-Cell Wall Transport in Fungi: A Mechanism for the Delivery of Virulence-Associated Macromolecules?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio L. Rodrigues

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal cells are encaged in rigid, complex cell walls. Until recently, there was remarkably little information regarding the trans-fungal cell wall transfer of intracellular macromolecules to the extracellular space. Recently, several studies have begun to elucidate the mechanisms that fungal cells utilize to secrete a wide variety of macromolecules through the cell wall. The combined use of transmission electron microscopy, serology, biochemistry, proteomics and lipidomics have revealed that the fungal pathogens Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum, Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis and Sporothrix schenckii, as well as the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, each produces extracellular vesicles that carry lipids, proteins, polysaccharides and pigment-like structures of unquestionable biological significance. Compositional analysis of the C. neoformans and H. capsulatum extracellular vesicles suggests that they may function as ‘virulence bags’, with the potential to modulate the host-pathogen interaction in favor of the fungus. The cellular origin of the extracellular vesicles remains unknown, but morphological and biochemical features indicate that they are similar to the well-described mammalian exosomes.

  1. Microvillus-Specific Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase SAP-1 Plays a Role in Regulating the Intestinal Paracellular Transport of Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shingo; Kamei, Noriyasu; Murata, Yoji; Takayama, Kozo; Matozaki, Takashi; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2017-09-01

    The stomach cancer-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SAP-1) is a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase that is specifically expressed on the apical membrane of the intestinal epithelium. SAP-1 is known to maintain the balance of phosphorylation of proteins together with protein kinases; however, its biological function and impact on pharmacokinetics in the intestine remain unclear. The present study, therefore, aimed at clarifying the relationship between SAP-1 and the intestinal absorption behaviors of typical transporter substrates and macromolecules. The endogenous levels of glucose and total cholesterol in the blood were similar between wild-type and SAP-1-deficient mice (Sap1(-/-)), suggesting no contribution of SAP-1 to biogenic influx. Moreover, in vitro transport study with everted ileal sacs demonstrated that there was no difference in the absorption of breast cancer resistance protein, P-glycoprotein, and peptide transporter substrates between both mice. However, absorptive clearance of macromolecular model dextrans (FD-4 and FD-10) in Sap1(-/-) mice was significantly higher than that in wild-type mice, and this was confirmed by the trend of increased FD-4 absorption from colonic loops of Sap1(-/-) mice. Therefore, the results of this study suggest the partial contribution of SAP-1 to the regulated transport of hydrophilic macromolecules through paracellular tight junctions. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. New Insights into the Dynamics of Zwitterionic Micelles and Their Hydration Waters by Gigahertz-to-Terahertz Dielectric Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    George, Deepu K; Hull, Olivia A; Mishra, Archana; Capelluto, Daniel G S; Mitchell-Koch, Katie R; Vinh, Nguyen Q

    2016-01-01

    Gigahertz-to-terahertz spectroscopy of macromolecules in aqueous environments provides an important approach for identifying their global and transient molecular structures, as well as directly assessing hydrogen-bonding. We report dielectric properties of zwitterionic dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles in aqueous solutions over a wide frequency range, from 50 MHz to 1.12 THz. The dielectric relaxation spectra reveal different polarization mechanisms at the molecular level, reflecting the complexity of DPC micelle-water interactions. We have made a deconvolution of the spectra into different components and combined them with the effective-medium approximation to separate delicate processes of micelles in water. Our measurements demonstrate reorientational motion of the DPC surfactant head groups within the micelles, and two levels of hydration water shells, including tightly- and loosely-bound hydration water layers. From the dielectric strength of bulk water in DPC solutions, we found that the number of wa...

  3. Well log characterization of natural gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2011-01-01

    In the last 25 years we have seen significant advancements in the use of downhole well logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrate in nature: From an early start of using wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gas hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments to today where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. The most established and well known use of downhole log data in gas hydrate research is the use of electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data (both compressional- and shear-wave data) to make estimates of gas hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. New downhole logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation resistivity log measurements have provided the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly inter-bedded and fracture dominated gas hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing have also allowed for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids (i.e., free-water along with clay and capillary bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms controlling the formation and occurrence of gas hydrate in nature along with data on gas hydrate reservoir properties (i.e., permeabilities) needed to accurately predict gas production rates for various gas hydrate

  4. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn

    2009-11-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  5. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, D.D.; Martin, A.I.; Yun, T.S.; Francisca, F.M.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Molecular properties of aqueous solutions: a focus on the collective dynamics of hydration water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comez, L; Paolantoni, M; Sassi, P; Corezzi, S; Morresi, A; Fioretto, D

    2016-07-07

    When a solute is dissolved in water, their mutual interactions determine the molecular properties of the solute on one hand, and the structure and dynamics of the surrounding water particles (the so-called hydration water) on the other. The very existence of soft matter and its peculiar properties are largely due to the wide variety of possible water-solute interactions. In this context, water is not an inert medium but rather an active component, and hydration water plays a crucial role in determining the structure, stability, dynamics, and function of matter. This review focuses on the collective dynamics of hydration water in terms of retardation with respect to the bulk, and of the number of molecules whose dynamics is perturbed. Since water environments are in a dynamic equilibrium, with molecules continuously exchanging from around the solute towards the bulk and vice versa, we examine the ability of different techniques to measure the water dynamics on the basis of the explored time scales and exchange rates. Special emphasis is given to the collective dynamics probed by extended depolarized light scattering and we discuss whether and to what extent the results obtained in aqueous solutions of small molecules can be extrapolated to the case of large biomacromolecules. In fact, recent experiments performed on solutions of increasing complexity clearly indicate that a reductionist approach is not adequate to describe their collective dynamics. We conclude this review by presenting current ideas that are being developed to describe the dynamics of water interacting with macromolecules.

  7. The effect of hydrate saturation on water retention curves in hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabadi, Nariman; Zheng, Xianglei; Jang, Jaewon

    2016-05-01

    The experimental measurement of water retention curve in hydrate-bearing sediments is critically important to understand the behavior of hydrate dissociation and gas production. In this study, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is selected as hydrate former. The pore habit of THF hydrates is investigated by visual observation in a transparent micromodel. It is confirmed that THF hydrates are not wetting phase on the quartz surface of the micromodel and occupy either an entire pore or part of pore space resulting in change in pore size distribution. And the measurement of water retention curves in THF hydrate-bearing sediments with hydrate saturation ranging from Sh = 0 to Sh = 0.7 is conducted for excess water condition. The experimental results show that the gas entry pressure and the capillary pressure increase with increasing hydrate saturation. Based on the experimental results, fitting parameters for van Genuchten equation are suggested for different hydrate saturation conditions.

  8. Characterization of magnetically oriented phospholipid micelles for measurement of dipolar couplings in macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottiger, M; Bax, A

    1998-10-01

    Weak alignment of solute molecules with the magnetic field can be achieved in a dilute liquid crystalline medium, consisting of an aqueous mixture of dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dihexanoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DHPC). For a certain range of molar ratios, DMPC and DHPC can form large, disc-shaped particles, commonly referred to as bicelles (Sanders and Schwonek, 1992), which cooperatively align in the magnetic field and induce a small degree of alignment on asymmetrically shaped solute molecules. As a result, dipolar couplings between pairs of 1H, 13C or 15N nuclei are no longer averaged to zero by rotational diffusion and they can be readily measured, providing valuable structural information. The stability of these liquid crystals and the degree of alignment of the solute molecules depend strongly on experimental variables such as the DMPC:DHPC ratio and concentration, the preparation protocol of the DMPC/DHPC mixtures, as well as salt, temperature, and pH. The lower temperature limit for which the liquid crystalline phase is stable can be reduced to 20 degrees C by using a ternary mixture of DHPC, DMPC, and 1-myristoyl-2-myristoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, or a binary mixture of DHPC and ditridecanoyl-phosphatidylcholine. These issues are discussed, with an emphasis on the use of the medium for obtaining weak alignment of biological macromolecules.

  9. Characterization of magnetically oriented phospholipid micelles for measurement of dipolar couplings in macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottiger, Marcel; Bax, Ad [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    1998-10-15

    Weak alignment of solute molecules with the magnetic field can be achieved in a dilute liquid crystalline medium, consisting of an aqueous mixture of dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dihexanoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DHPC). For a certain range of molar ratios, DMPC and DHPC can form large, disc-shaped particles, commonly referred to as bicelles (Sanders and Schwonek, 1992), which cooperatively align in the magnetic field and induce a small degree of alignment on asymmetrically shaped solute molecules. As a result, dipolar couplings between pairs of {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N nuclei are no longer averaged to zero by rotational diffusion and they can be readily measured, providing valuable structural information. The stability of these liquid crystals and the degree of alignment of the solute molecules depend strongly on experimental variables such as the DMPC:DHPC ratio and concentration, the preparation protocol of the DMPC/DHPC mixtures, as well as salt, temperature, and pH. The lower temperature limit for which the liquid crystalline phase is stable can be reduced to 20 deg. C by using a ternary mixture of DHPC, DMPC, and 1-myristoyl-2-myristoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, or a binary mixture of DHPC and ditridecanoyl-phosphatidylcholine. These issues are discussed, with an emphasis on the use of the medium for obtaining weak alignment of biological macromolecules.

  10. Upgraded ESRF BM29 beamline for SAXS on macromolecules in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernot, Petra; Round, Adam; Barrett, Ray; De Maria Antolinos, Alejandro; Gobbo, Alexandre; Gordon, Elspeth; Huet, Julien; Kieffer, Jerôme; Lentini, Mario; Mattenet, Muriel; Morawe, Christian; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph; Ohlsson, Staffan; Schmid, Werner; Surr, John; Theveneau, Pascal; Zerrad, Louiza; McSweeney, Sean

    2013-07-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements of proteins in solution are becoming increasingly popular with biochemists and structural biologists owing to the presence of dedicated high-throughput beamlines at synchrotron sources. As part of the ESRF Upgrade program a dedicated instrument for performing SAXS from biological macromolecules in solution (BioSAXS) has been installed at the renovated BM29 location. The optics hutch has been equipped with new optical components of which the two principal elements are a fixed-exit double multilayer monochromator and a 1.1 m-long toroidal mirror. These new dedicated optics give improved beam characteristics (compared with the previous set-up on ID14-3) regarding the energy tunability, flux and focusing at the detector plane leading to reduced parasitic scattering and an extended s-range. User experiments on the beamline have been successfully carried out since June 2012. A description of the new BioSAXS beamline and the set-up characteristics are presented together with examples of obtained data.

  11. Detection of Macromolecules in Desert Cyanobacteria Mixed with a Lunar Mineral Analogue After Space Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baqué, Mickael; Verseux, Cyprien; Rabbow, Elke; de Vera, Jean-Pierre Paul; Billi, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    In the context of future exposure missions in Low Earth Orbit and possibly on the Moon, two desert strains of the cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis, strains CCMEE 029 and 057, mixed or not with a lunar mineral analogue, were exposed to fractionated fluencies of UVC and polychromatic UV (200-400 nm) and to space vacuum. These experiments were carried out within the framework of the BIOMEX (BIOlogy and Mars EXperiment) project, which aims at broadening our knowledge of mineral-microorganism interaction and the stability/degradation of their macromolecules when exposed to space and simulated Martian conditions. The presence of mineral analogues provided a protective effect, preserving survivability and integrity of DNA and photosynthetic pigments, as revealed by testing colony-forming abilities, performing PCR-based assays and using confocal laser scanning microscopy. In particular, DNA and pigments were still detectable after 500 kJ/m2 of polychromatic UV and space vacuum (10-4 Pa), corresponding to conditions expected during one-year exposure in Low Earth Orbit on board the EXPOSE-R2 platform in the presence of 0.1 % Neutral Density (ND) filter. After exposure to high UV fluencies (800 MJ/m2) in the presence of minerals, however, altered fluorescence emission spectrum of the photosynthetic pigments were detected, whereas DNA was still amplified by PCR. The present paper considers the implications of such findings for the detection of biosignatures in extraterrestrial conditions and for putative future lunar missions.

  12. Physical Delivery of Macromolecules using High-Aspect Ratio Nanostructured Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kunwoo; Lingampalli, Nithya; Pisano, Albert P; Murthy, Niren; So, Hongyun

    2015-10-28

    There is great need for the development of an efficient delivery method of macromolecules, including nucleic acids, proteins, and peptides, to cell cytoplasm without eliciting toxicity or changing cell behavior. High-aspect ratio nanomaterials have addressed many challenges present in conventional methods, such as cell membrane passage and endosomal degradation, and have shown the feasibility of efficient high-throughput macromolecule delivery with minimal perturbation of cells. This review describes the recent advances of in vitro and in vivo physical macromolecule delivery with high-aspect ratio nanostructured materials and summarizes the synthesis methods, material properties, relevant applications, and various potential directions.

  13. Hydration Forces Between Lipid Bilayers: A Theoretical Overview and a Look on Methods Exploring Dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Helge

    2015-01-01

    Although, many biological systems fulfil their functions under the condition of excess hydration, the behaviour of bound water as well as the processes accompanying dehydration are nevertheless important to investigate. Dehydration can be a result of applied mechanical pressure, lowered humidity or cryogenic conditions. The effort required to dehydrate a lipid membrane at relatively low degree of hydration can be described by a disjoining pressure which is called hydration pressure or hydration force. This force is short-ranging (a few nm) and is usually considered to be independent of other surface forces, such as ionic or undulation forces. Different theories were developed to explain hydration forces that are usually not consistent with each other and which are also partially in conflict with experimental or numerical data.Over the last decades it has been more and more realised that one experimental method alone is not capable of providing much new insight into the world of such hydration forces. Therefore, research requires the comparison of results obtained from the different methods. This chapter thus deals with an overview on the theory of hydration forces, ranging from polarisation theory to protrusion forces, and presents a selection of experimental techniques appropriate for their characterisation, such as X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and even calorimetry.

  14. The Circle of Dust: From Nanoparticles to Macromolecules and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micelotta, E.; Jones, A.; Bocchio, M.; Cami, J.; Peeters, E.; Bernard-Salas, J.

    There is increasing observational evidence that a non-negligible fraction of the cosmic carbon is locked up into macromolecules and nanoparticles. Carbonaceous nanoparticles and Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon (HAC) nanoparticles represent one of the main components of interstellar dust. HAC nanoparticles have been proposed as a viable carrier for the Unidentified InfraRed (UIR) bands, which dominate the mid-infrared spectrum of almost any astronomical object. Fullerene molecules C60 and C70 have been detected in various circumstellar and interstellar environments. We present some of our recent results about the evolution of such carbonaceous structures and the possible connections between each other. We show how photo-processing of HAC nanoparticles can lead to the formation of C60 and C70 in space. There the low density of the gas precludes the formation of fullerene materials following known vaporization or combustion synthesis routes, even on astronomical timescales. We then discuss the processing of small hydrocarbon dust by energetic ions and electrons under extreme conditions, e.g., in shocked regions. Finally, we derive the astrophysical implications of such processing in terms of the observed emission.

  15. Synthesis of hydrated lutetium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Liu [South China Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Guangdong (China); Rong-jun Ma [Changsha Research Institute of Minig and Metallurgy, Hunan (China)

    1997-09-01

    Crystalline lutetium carbonate was synthesized for the corresponding chloride using ammonium bicarbonate as precipitant. The chemical analyses suggest that the synthesized lutetium carbonate is a hydrated basic carbonate or oxycarbonate. The X-ray powder diffraction data are presented. The IR data for the compound show the presence of two different carbonate groups. There is no stable intermediate carbonate in the process of thermal decomposition of the lutetium carbonate. (au) 15 refs.

  16. Crystallite size distributions of marine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klapp, S.A.; Bohrmann, G.; Abegg, F. [Bremen Univ., Bremen (Germany). Research Center of Ocean Margins; Hemes, S.; Klein, H.; Kuhs, W.F. [Gottingen Univ., Gottingen (Germany). Dept. of Crystallography

    2008-07-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to determine the crystallite size distributions of natural gas hydrate samples retrieved from the Gulf of Mexico, the Black Sea, and a hydrate ridge located near offshore Oregon. Synchrotron radiation technology was used to provide the high photon fluxes and high penetration depths needed to accurately analyze the bulk sediment samples. A new beam collimation diffraction technique was used to measure gas hydrate crystallite sizes. The analyses showed that gas hydrate crystals were globular in shape. Mean crystallite sizes ranged from 200 to 400 {mu}m for hydrate samples taken from the sea floor. Larger grain sizes in the hydrate ridge samples suggested differences in hydrate formation ages or processes. A comparison with laboratory-produced methane hydrate samples showed half a lognormal curve with a mean value of 40{mu}m. Results of the study showed that a cautious approach must be adopted when transposing crystallite-size sensitive physical data from laboratory-made gas hydrates to natural settings. It was concluded that crystallite size information may also be used to resolve the formation ages of gas hydrates when formation processes and conditions are constrained. 48 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  17. IMPORTANCE OF HYDRATION IN SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Vasić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Importance of hydration is detrmined by importance of functions of water in the human organism: i.e. regulation of body temperature, transport, excretion of waste materials through urine, digestion of food which is facilititated by saliva and gastric juices, maintenance of flexibility of organs and tissues About 60 % body mass of an adult person (males: 61 %, females: 54 % is made up of water. Water content of a newly born baby reaches 77 %, and it is up to 50 % in adults. It is very important for sportsmen to provide adequate hydration during and after the time of bodily activities. A symptom of water shortage is thirst. However, thirst is a late response of an organism and it occurs when dehydration has already taken place. Minimum in take of fluids in humans should range between one-and-half to two liters. It has been known for a long time that there is no success in sport without proper hydration in a sportsman.

  18. Electric Birefringence: A Simple Apparatus for Determining Physical Parameters of Macromolecules and Colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimm, Harold H.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes a birefringence apparatus that can be assembled for less than $100 and can be used to measure both the dimensions and dipole moments of many macromolecules. Details are given of the construction and manipulation of the apparatus. (JN)

  19. Conformation-independent structural comparison of macromolecules with ProSMART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholls, Robert A., E-mail: nicholls@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Fischer, Marcus [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States); McNicholas, Stuart [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Murshudov, Garib N. [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-01

    The Procrustes Structural Matching Alignment and Restraints Tool (ProSMART) has been developed to allow local comparative structural analyses independent of the global conformations and sequence homology of the compared macromolecules. This allows quick and intuitive visualization of the conservation of backbone and side-chain conformations, providing complementary information to existing methods. The identification and exploration of (dis)similarities between macromolecular structures can help to gain biological insight, for instance when visualizing or quantifying the response of a protein to ligand binding. Obtaining a residue alignment between compared structures is often a prerequisite for such comparative analysis. If the conformational change of the protein is dramatic, conventional alignment methods may struggle to provide an intuitive solution for straightforward analysis. To make such analyses more accessible, the Procrustes Structural Matching Alignment and Restraints Tool (ProSMART) has been developed, which achieves a conformation-independent structural alignment, as well as providing such additional functionalities as the generation of restraints for use in the refinement of macromolecular models. Sensible comparison of protein (or DNA/RNA) structures in the presence of conformational changes is achieved by enforcing neither chain nor domain rigidity. The visualization of results is facilitated by popular molecular-graphics software such as CCP4mg and PyMOL, providing intuitive feedback regarding structural conservation and subtle dissimilarities between close homologues that can otherwise be hard to identify. Automatically generated colour schemes corresponding to various residue-based scores are provided, which allow the assessment of the conservation of backbone and side-chain conformations relative to the local coordinate frame. Structural comparison tools such as ProSMART can help to break the complexity that accompanies the constantly growing

  20. Study of Formation Mechanisms of Gas Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    Gas hydrates, which had been found in subsurface geological environments of deep-sea sediments and permafrost regions, are solid crystalline compounds of gas molecules and water. The estimated energy resources of hydrates are at least twice of that of the conventional fossil fuel in the world. Gas hydrates have a great opportunity to become a dominating future energy. In the past years, many laboratory experiments had been conducted to study chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of gas hydrates in order to investigate the formation and dissociation mechanisms of hydrates. However, it is difficult to observe the formation and dissociation of hydrates in a porous media from a physical experiment directly. The purpose of this study was to model the dynamic formation mechanisms of gas hydrate in porous media by reservoir simulation. Two models were designed for this study: 1) a closed-system static model with separated gas and water zones; this model was a hydrate equilibrium model to investigate the behavior of the formation of hydrates near the initial gas-water contact; and 2) an open-system dynamic model with a continuous bottom-up gas flow; this model simulated the behavior of gas migration and studied the formation of hydrates from flowed gas and static formation water in porous media. A phase behavior module was developed in this study for reservoir simulator to model the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) behavior of hydrates. The thermodynamic equilibriums and chemical reactions were coupled with the phase behavior module to have functions modelling the formation and dissociation of hydrates from/to water and gas. The simulation models used in this study were validated from the code-comparison project proposed by the NETL. According to the modelling results of the closed-system static model, we found that predominated location for the formation of hydrates was below the gas-water contact (or at the top of water zone). The maximum hydrate saturation

  1. Insights and Lessons from a Scientific Conference on Non-Invasive Delivery of Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savla, Ronak; Mrsny, Randall J; Park, Kinam; Aubert, Isabelle; Stamoran, Cornell

    2017-06-01

    A growing share of the pharmaceutical development pipeline is occupied by macromolecule drugs, which are primarily administered by injection. Despite decades of attempts, non-invasive delivery of macromolecules has seen only a few success stories. Potential benefits of non-invasive administration include better patient acceptance and adherence and potentially better efficacy and safety. Greater inter-disciplinary dialogue and collaboration are integral to realizing these benefits.

  2. SEISMIC STUDIES OF MARINE GAS HYDRATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Haibin

    2003-01-01

    We give a brief introduction of developments of seismic methods in the studies of marine gas hydrates. Then we give an example of seismic data processing for BSRs in western Nankai accretionary prism, a typical gas hydrate distribution region. Seismic data processing is proved to be important to obtain better images of BSRs distribution. Studies of velocity structure of hydrated sediments are useful for better understanding the distribution of gas hydrates. Using full waveform inversion, we successfully derived high-resolution velocity model of a double BSR in eastern Nankai Trough area. Recent survey and research show that gas hydrates occur in the marine sediments of the South China Sea and East China Sea.But we would like to say seismic researches on gas hydrate in China are very preliminary.

  3. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  4. Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy for Structure-II Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeya, Kei; Zhang, Caihong; Kawayama, Iwao

    2009-01-01

    For the nondestructive inspection of gas hydrates, terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) was applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate and propane hydrate. The absorption of propane hydrate monotonically increases with frequency, similar to the case of ice, while THF hydrate has a charact...

  5. The flavonoid herbacetin diglucoside as a constituent of the lignan macromolecule from flaxseed hulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struijs, Karin; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Verhoef, René; van Oostveen-van Casteren, Willemiek H M; Voragen, Alphons G J; Gruppen, Harry

    2007-04-01

    Lignans in flaxseed are known to be part of a macromolecule in which they are connected through the linker-molecule hydroxy-methyl-glutaric acid (HMGA). In this study, the lignan macromolecule was extracted from flaxseed hulls and degraded to its monomeric constituents by complete saponification. Besides secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), the phenolic compounds p-coumaric acid glucoside (CouAG) and ferulic acid glucoside (FeAG) were isolated, which was expected based on indications from the literature. Also the flavonoid herbacetin diglucoside (HDG) was found. The presence of HDG was confirmed by NMR following preparative RP-HPLC purification. Also the presence of the three other constituents (CouAG, FeAG and SDG) was confirmed by NMR. To prove that HDG is a substructure of the lignan macromolecule, the macromolecule was fragmented by partial saponification. A fragment consisting of HDG and HMGA was indicated. This fragment was isolated by preparative RP-HPLC and its identity was confirmed by NMR. It is concluded that the flavonoid HDG is a substructure of the lignan macromolecule from flaxseed hulls and that it is incorporated in the macromolecule via the same linker-molecule as SDG.

  6. PlaMoM: a comprehensive database compiles plant mobile macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Daogang; Yan, Bin; Thieme, Christoph; Hua, Jingmin; Zhu, Hailong; Boheler, Kenneth R.; Zhao, Zhongying; Kragler, Friedrich; Xia, Yiji; Zhang, Shoudong

    2017-01-01

    In plants, various phloem-mobile macromolecules including noncoding RNAs, mRNAs and proteins are suggested to act as important long-distance signals in regulating crucial physiological and morphological transition processes such as flowering, plant growth and stress responses. Given recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies, numerous mobile macromolecules have been identified in diverse plant species from different plant families. However, most of the identified mobile macromolecules are not annotated in current versions of species-specific databases and are only available as non-searchable datasheets. To facilitate study of the mobile signaling macromolecules, we compiled the PlaMoM (Plant Mobile Macromolecules) database, a resource that provides convenient and interactive search tools allowing users to retrieve, to analyze and also to predict mobile RNAs/proteins. Each entry in the PlaMoM contains detailed information such as nucleotide/amino acid sequences, ortholog partners, related experiments, gene functions and literature. For the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, protein–protein interactions of mobile transcripts are presented as interactive molecular networks. Furthermore, PlaMoM provides a built-in tool to identify potential RNA mobility signals such as tRNA-like structures. The current version of PlaMoM compiles a total of 17 991 mobile macromolecules from 14 plant species/ecotypes from published data and literature. PlaMoM is available at http://www.systembioinfo.org/plamom/. PMID:27924044

  7. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...... prehydration may occur. In the report both theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during water vapour exposure is nucleation controlled....

  8. Prediction of Refrigerant Gas Hydrates Formation Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deqing Liang; Ruzhu Wang; Kaihua Guo; Shuanshi Fan

    2001-01-01

    A fugacity model was developed for prediction of mixed refrigerant gas hydrates formation conditions based on the molecule congregation and solution theories. In this model, g as hydrates were regarded as non-ideal solid solution composed of water groups and guest molecules, and the expressions of fugacity of guest molecules in hydrate phase was proposed accordingly. It has been shown that the developed model can indicate successfully the effect of guest-guest molecule interaction. The results showed that the model can describe better the characteristics of phase equilibrium of mixed refrigerant gas hydrates and predictions are in good agreement with experimental data.

  9. Desalination utilizing clathrate hydrates (LDRD final report).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Greathouse, Jeffery A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Majzoub, Eric H. (University of Missouri, Columbia, MO)

    2008-01-01

    Advances are reported in several aspects of clathrate hydrate desalination fundamentals necessary to develop an economical means to produce municipal quantities of potable water from seawater or brackish feedstock. These aspects include the following, (1) advances in defining the most promising systems design based on new types of hydrate guest molecules, (2) selection of optimal multi-phase reactors and separation arrangements, and, (3) applicability of an inert heat exchange fluid to moderate hydrate growth, control the morphology of the solid hydrate material formed, and facilitate separation of hydrate solids from concentrated brine. The rate of R141b hydrate formation was determined and found to depend only on the degree of supercooling. The rate of R141b hydrate formation in the presence of a heat exchange fluid depended on the degree of supercooling according to the same rate equation as pure R141b with secondary dependence on salinity. Experiments demonstrated that a perfluorocarbon heat exchange fluid assisted separation of R141b hydrates from brine. Preliminary experiments using the guest species, difluoromethane, showed that hydrate formation rates were substantial at temperatures up to at least 12 C and demonstrated partial separation of water from brine. We present a detailed molecular picture of the structure and dynamics of R141b guest molecules within water cages, obtained from ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and Raman spectroscopy. Density functional theory calculations were used to provide an energetic and molecular orbital description of R141b stability in both large and small cages in a structure II hydrate. Additionally, the hydrate of an isomer, 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, does not form at ambient conditions because of extensive overlap of electron density between guest and host. Classical molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory trials support the results for the isomer hydrate. Molecular dynamics simulations

  10. Waters of Hydration of Cupric Hydrates: A Comparison between Heating and Absorbance Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2011-01-01

    The empirical formulas of four cupric hydrates are determined by measuring the absorbance in aqueous solution. The Beer-Lambert Law is verified by constructing a calibration curve of absorbance versus known Cu[superscript 2+](aq) concentration. A solution of the unknown hydrate is prepared by using 0.2-0.3 g of hydrate, and water is added such…

  11. Biological biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge-Herrero, E. [Servicio de Cirugia Experimental. Clinica Puerta de Hierro, Madrid (Spain)

    1997-05-01

    There are a number of situations in which substances of biological origin are employed as biomaterials. Most of them are macromolecules derived from isolated connective tissue or the connective tissue itself in membrane form, in both cases, the tissue can be used in its natural form or be chemically treated. In other cases, certain blood vessels can be chemically pretreated and used as vascular prostheses. Proteins such as albumin, collagen and fibrinogen are employed to coat vascular prostheses. Certain polysaccharides have also been tested for use in controlled drug release systems. Likewise, a number of tissues, such as dura mater, bovine pericardium, procine valves and human valves, are used in the preparation of cardiac prostheses. We also use veins from animals or humans in arterial replacement. In none of these cases are the tissues employed dissimilar to the native tissues as they have been chemically modified, becoming a new bio material with different physical and biochemical properties. In short, we find that natural products are being utilized as biomaterials and must be considered as such; thus, it is necessary to study both their chemicobiological and physicomechanical properties. In the present report, we review the current applications, problems and future prospects of some of these biological biomaterials. (Author) 84 refs.

  12. Hydration in soccer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Cristiano Ralo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydration should be considered before, during and after the exercise. This review intends to approach the main points of hydration process in soccer. The replacement of fluids during exercise is proportional to some factors, such as: exercise intensity; climatic conditions; the athlete's acclimatization; the athlete's physical conditioning; physiologic individual characteristics and the player's biomechanics. Performance is improved when players ingest not only water but also carbohydrate. The rates that carbohydrate and water are absorbed by the organism are limited by the rates of gastric emptying and intestinal absorption. The composition of drinks offered to the players should be influenced by the relative importance of the need of supplying carbohydrates or water; it should be remembered that the depletion of carbohydrate can result in fatigue and decrease of performance, but it is not usually a life-threatening condition. The addition of carbohydrate in these drinks increases the concentrations of blood glucose, increases the use of external fuel through the increase of the glucose oxidation in the muscles and it spares muscle glycogen. So, the ingestion of carbohydrate before and during the exercise can delay the emergence of fatigue and increase the players' performance. Several tactics can be used to avoid dehydration, like hyperhydration before exercise and player's acclimatization. The ideal situation to restore the player's fluid losses is between the sessions of exercises. Since soccer is a sport with quite peculiar characteristics related to hydration, the players should be concerned and educated about the importance of fluid ingestion before, during and after the exercise.

  13. Hydration behaviour of polyhydroxylated fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Zavala, J G [Departamento de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnologicas, Centro Universitario de Los Lagos, Universidad de Guadalajara, Enrique Diaz de Leon S/N, 47460 Jalisco (Mexico); Barajas-Barraza, R E [Departamento de Matematicas y Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Occidente, Periferico Sur, Manuel Gomez MorIn No 8585, 45604 Jalisco (Mexico); Padilla-Osuna, I; Guirado-Lopez, R A, E-mail: jgrz@culagos.udg.mx, E-mail: ebarajas@iteso.mx, E-mail: ismael@ifisica.uaslp.mx, E-mail: guirado@ifisica.uaslp.mx [Instituto de Fisica ' Manuel Sandoval Vallarta' , Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, 78000 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2011-10-28

    We have performed semi-empirical as well as density functional theory calculations in order to analyse the hydration properties of both bare C{sub 60} and highly hydroxylated C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} fullerenes. In all of our calculations, a total of 42 and 98 water molecules are always surrounding our here-considered carbon nanostructures. We found different wetting properties as a function of the chemical composition and structure of the OH-molecular over-layer covering the fullerene surface. In the case of bare C{sub 60}, water adsorption reveals that the H{sub 2}O species are not uniformly arranged around the carbon network but rather forms water droplets of different sizes, clearly revealing the hydrophobic nature of the C{sub 60} structure. In contrast, in the polyhydroxylated C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} fullerenes, the degree of wetting is strongly influenced by the precise location of the hydroxyl groups. We found that different adsorbed configurations for the OH-molecular coating can lead to the formation of partially hydrated or completely covered C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} compounds, a result that could be used to synthesize fullerene materials with different degrees of wettability. By comparing the relative stability of our hydroxylated structures in both bare and hydrated conditions we obtain that the energy ordering of the C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} isomers can change in the presence of water. The radial distribution function of our hydrated fullerenes reveals that water near these kinds of surfaces is densely packed. In fact, by counting the number of H{sub 2}O molecules which are adsorbed, by means of hydrogen bonds, to the surface of our more stable C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} isomer, we found that it varies in the range of 5-10, in good agreement with experiments. Finally, by comparing the calculated optical absorption spectra of various C{sub 60}(OH){sub 26} structures in the presence and absence of water molecules, we note that only slight variations in the position and

  14. Formation rate of natural gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, Marit

    2002-07-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 deg C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted to hydrate. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by gas injection rate and pressure. The effect of stirring rate is less significant and subcooling has no observable effect on the formation rate. Hydrate crystal concentration and gas composition do not influence the hydrate formation rate. Observations of produced hydrate crystals indicate that the crystals are elongated, about 5 micron in diameter and 10 micron long. Analysis of the results shows that the rate of hydrate formation is dominated by gas-liquid mass transfer. A mass transfer model, the bubble-to-crystal model, was developed for the hydrate formation rate in a continuous stirred tank reactor, given in terms of concentration driving force and an overall mass transfer coefficient. The driving force is the difference between the gas concentration at the gas-liquid interface and at the hydrate crystal surface. These concentrations correspond to the solubility of gas in water at experimental temperature and pressure and the solubility of gas at hydrate equilibrium temperature and experimental pressure, respectively. The overall mass transfer coefficient is expressed in terms of superficial gas velocity and impeller power consumption, parameters commonly used in study of stirred tank reactors. Experiments and modeling show that the stirred tank reactor has a considerable potential for increased production capacity. However, at higher hydrate production rates the

  15. Small angle X-ray and neutron scattering from solutions of biological macromolecules

    CERN Document Server

    Svergun, Dmitri I; May, Roland P; Timmins, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    In this book, following the presentation of the basics of scattering from isotropic macromolecular solutions, modern instrumentation, experimental practice and advanced analysis techniques are explained. Advantages of X-rays (rapid data collection, small sample volumes) and of neutrons (contrast variation by hydrogen/deuterium exchange) are specifically highlighted. Examples of applications of the technique to different macromolecular systems are considered with specific emphasis on the synergistic use of SAXS/SANS with other structural, biophysical and computational techniques.

  16. The origin of biological macromolecules on the earth. The hypothesis of inorganic template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, T. S.

    1977-01-01

    Studies about the origin of life are reviewed. The nonrandom organization of organelles is discussed from a structural and functional point of view. After postulating that the origin of biomacromolecules was not a random event, the paper develops the hypothesis that polypeptides and polynucleotides were formed on an inorganic template. Only information-containing structures can pass natural selection and develop through evolution.

  17. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Grubb, Mikala; Hansen, Allan Glargaard

    2003-01-01

    on Au(111) by chemisorption via exposed sulfur-containing residues. Voltammetric, interfacial capacitance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and microcantilever sensor data, together with in situ STM with single-molecule resolution, all point to a coherent view of monolayer organization with protein...

  18. Gas-Phase Covalent And Non-Covalent Ion/ion Chemistry Of Biological Macromolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Stutzman, John Robert

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase ion/ion chemistry involves the interaction of oppositely charged ions inside of the mass spectrometer. During this gas-phase chemistry, particle transfer (i.e., proton and electron) or synthesis can occur at rapid reaction rates. Particle transfer represents a mature area of ion/ion chemistry, while selective covalent modification represents a fairly new area of gas-phase chemistry. Gas-phase covalent chemistry is based on traditional solution phase organic chemistry. The work de...

  19. Monodisperse spherical meso-macroporous silica particles: Synthesis and adsorption of biological macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovpiaga, E. Yu.; Grudinkin, S. A.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Kukushkina, Yu. A.; Nashchekin, A. V.; Sokolov, V. V.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Golubev, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    Monodispersed spherical silica particles, including large mesopores (over 10 nm) and macropores (up to 100 nm) were obtained by chemical etching in an autoclave. A method for introducing globular protein myoglobin molecules into the pores is developed. The method of filling is based on a high adsorption capacity of the developed internal pore structure of the particles. The structure and adsorption properties of the materials are studied.

  20. Super-paramagnetic loaded nanoparticles based on biological macromolecules for in vivo targeted MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjai, Chutimon; Kothan, Suchart; Gonil, Pattarapond; Saesoo, Somsak; Sajomsang, Warayuth

    2016-05-01

    Target-specific MRI contrast agent based on super-paramagnetic iron oxide-chitosan-folic acid (SPIONP-CS-FA) nanoparticles was fabricated by using an ionotropic gelation method, which involved the loading of SPIONPs at various concentrations into CS-FA nanoparticles by electrostatic interaction. The SPIONP-CS-FA nanoparticles were characterized by ATR-FTIR, XRD, TEM, and VSM techniques. This study revealed that the advantages of this system would be green fabrication, low cytotoxicity at iron concentrations ranging from 0.52 mg/L to 4.16 mg/L, and high water stability (pH 6) at 4°C over long periods. Average particle size and positive zeta-potential of the SPIONP-CS-FA nanoparticles was found to be 130 nm with narrow size distribution and 42 mV, respectively. In comparison to SPIONP-0.5-CS nanoparticles, SPIONP-0.5-CS-FA nanoparticles showed higher and specific cellular uptake levels into human cervical adenocarcinoma cells due to the presence of folate receptors, while in vivo results (Wistar rat) indicated that only liver tissue showed significant decreases in MR image intensity on T2 weighted images and T2* weighted images after post-injection, in comparison with other organs. Our results demonstrated that SPIONP-CS-FA nanoparticles can be applied as an either tumor or organ specific MRI contrast agents.

  1. Crosslinked hydrogels based on biological macromolecules with potential use in skin tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulpe, Raluca; Popa, Marcel; Picton, Luc; Balan, Vera; Dulong, Virginie; Butnaru, Maria; Verestiuc, Liliana

    2016-03-01

    Zero-length crosslinked hydrogels have been synthesized by covalent linking of three natural polymers (collagen, hyaluronic acid and sericin), in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide. The hydrogels have been investigated by FT-IR spectroscopy, microcalorimetry, in vitro swelling, enzymatic degradation, and in vitro cell viability studies. The obtained crosslinked hydrogels showed a macroporous structure, high swelling degree and in vitro enzymatic resistance compared to uncrosslinked collagen. The in vitro cell viability studies performed on normal human dermal fibroblasts assessed the sericin proliferation properties indicating a potential use of the hydrogels based on collagen, hyaluronic acid and sericin in skin tissue engineering.

  2. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-08-16

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes.

  3. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes.

  4. A closure relation to molecular theory of solvation for macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobryn, Alexander E.; Gusarov, Sergey; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2016-10-01

    We propose a closure to the integral equations of molecular theory of solvation, particularly suitable for polar and charged macromolecules in electrolyte solution. This includes such systems as oligomeric polyelectrolytes at a finite concentration in aqueous and various non-aqueous solutions, as well as drug-like compounds in solution. The new closure by Kobryn, Gusarov, and Kovalenko (KGK closure) imposes the mean spherical approximation (MSA) almost everywhere in the solvation shell but levels out the density distribution function to zero (with the continuity at joint boundaries) inside the repulsive core and in the spatial regions of strong density depletion emerging due to molecular associative interactions. Similarly to MSA, the KGK closure reduces the problem to a linear equation for the direct correlation function which is predefined analytically on most of the solvation shells and has to be determined numerically on a relatively small (three-dimensional) domain of strong depletion, typically within the repulsive core. The KGK closure leads to the solvation free energy in the form of the Gaussian fluctuation (GF) functional. We first test the performance of the KGK closure coupled to the reference interaction site model (RISM) integral equations on the examples of Lennard-Jones liquids, polar and nonpolar molecular solvents, including water, and aqueous solutions of simple ions. The solvation structure, solvation chemical potential, and compressibility obtained from RISM with the KGK closure favorably compare to the results of the hypernetted chain (HNC) and Kovalenko-Hirata (KH) closures, including their combination with the GF solvation free energy. We then use the KGK closure coupled to RISM to obtain the solvation structure and thermodynamics of oligomeric polyelectrolytes and drug-like compounds at a finite concentration in electrolyte solution, for which no convergence is obtained with other closures. For comparison, we calculate their solvation

  5. Macromolecule simulation and CH4 adsorption mechanism of coal vitrinite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Song; Yan-ming, Zhu; Wu, Li

    2017-02-01

    The microscopic mechanism of interactions between CH4 and coal macromolecules is of significant practical and theoretical importance in CBM development and methane storage. Under periodic boundary conditions, the optimal energy configuration of coal vitrinite, which has a higher torsion degree and tighter arrangement, can be determined by the calculation of molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD), and annealing kinetics simulation based on ultimate analysis, 13C NMR, FT IR and HRTEM. Macromolecular stabilization is primarily due to the van der Waals energy and covalent bond energy, mainly consisting of bond torsion energy and bond angle energy. Using the optimal configuration as the adsorbent, GCMC simulation of vitrinite adsorption of CH4 is conducted. A saturated state is reached after absorbing 17 CH4s per coal vitrinite molecule. CH4 is preferentially adsorbed on the edge, and inclined to gathering around the branched chains of the inner vitrinite sites. Finally, the adsorption parameters are calculated through first principle DFT. The adsorbability order is as follows: aromatic structure> heteroatom rings > oxygen functional groups. The adsorption energy order is as follows: Top < Bond < Center, Up < Down. The order of average RDF better reflects the adsorption ability and that of [-COOH] is lower than those of [sbnd Cdbnd O] and [Csbnd Osbnd C]. CH4 distributed in the distance of 0.99-16 Å to functional groups in the type of monolayer adsorption and the average distance order manifest as [sbnd Cdbnd O] (1.64 Å) < [Csbnd Osbnd C] (1.89 Å) < [sbnd COOH] (3.78 Å) < [-CH3] (4.11 Å) according to the average RDF curves. CH4 enriches around [sbnd Cdbnd O] and [Csbnd O-C] whereas is rather dispersed about [-COOH] and [CH3]. Simulation and experiment data are both in strong agreement with the Langmuir and D-A isothermal adsorption model and the D-A model fit better than Langmuir model. Preferential adsorption sites and orientations in vitrinite are

  6. Regulation of synaptic vesicle docking by different classes of macromolecules in active zone material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szule, Joseph A; Harlow, Mark L; Jung, Jae Hoon; De-Miguel, Francisco F; Marshall, Robert M; McMahan, Uel J

    2012-01-01

    The docking of synaptic vesicles at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of axon terminals is essential for their fusion with the membrane and exocytosis of their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Dense networks of macromolecules, called active zone material, (AZM) are attached to the presynaptic membrane next to docked vesicles. Electron tomography has shown that some AZM macromolecules are connected to docked vesicles, leading to the suggestion that AZM is somehow involved in the docking process. We used electron tomography on the simply arranged active zones at frog neuromuscular junctions to characterize the connections of AZM to docked synaptic vesicles and to search for the establishment of such connections during vesicle docking. We show that each docked vesicle is connected to 10-15 AZM macromolecules, which fall into four classes based on several criteria including their position relative to the presynaptic membrane. In activated axon terminals fixed during replacement of docked vesicles by previously undocked vesicles, undocked vesicles near vacated docking sites on the presynaptic membrane have connections to the same classes of AZM macromolecules that are connected to docked vesicles in resting terminals. The number of classes and the total number of macromolecules to which the undocked vesicles are connected are inversely proportional to the vesicles' distance from the presynaptic membrane. We conclude that vesicle movement toward and maintenance at docking sites on the presynaptic membrane are directed by an orderly succession of stable interactions between the vesicles and distinct classes of AZM macromolecules positioned at different distances from the membrane. Establishing the number, arrangement and sequence of association of AZM macromolecules involved in vesicle docking provides an anatomical basis for testing and extending concepts of docking mechanisms provided by biochemistry.

  7. Surface characteristics and adhesion behavior of Escherichia coli O157:H7: role of extracellular macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunjung N; Hong, Yongsuk; Lee, Ilkeun; Bradford, Scott A; Walker, Sharon L

    2009-09-14

    Experiments were conducted using enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells to investigate the influence of extracellular macromolecules on cell surface properties and adhesion behavior to quartz sand. Partial removal of the extracellular macromolecules on cells by a proteolytic enzyme (proteinase K) was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses. The proteinase K treated cells exhibited more negative electrophoretic mobility (EPM) at an ionic strength (IS) macromolecules resulted in polymeric layers outside the cell surface that were less electrophoretically soft. The more negative mobility for the treated cells was likely due to the combined effects of a change in the distribution of functional groups and an increase in the charges per unit volume after enzyme treatment and not just removal of extracellular macromolecules. The proteolytic digestion of extracellular macromolecules led to a significant difference in the cell adhesion to quartz sand. The adhesion behavior for treated cells was consistent with DLVO theory and increased with IS due to less negativity in the EPM. In contrast, the adhesion behavior of untreated cells was much more complex and exhibited a maximum at IS = 1 mM. The treated cells exhibited less adhesion than the untreated cells when the IS or = 10 mM, a sudden decrease in the removal efficiency was observed only for the untreated cells even through EPM values were similar for both treated and untreated cells. This result suggested that an additional non-DLVO type interaction, electrosteric repulsion, occurred at higher IS (> or =10 mM in this study) for the untreated cells due to the presence of extracellular macromolecules that hindered cell adhesion to the quartz surface. This finding provides important insight into the role of macromolecule-induced E. coli O157:H7 interactions in aquatic environments.

  8. Dynamics of a photoexcited hydrated electron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pshenichnikov, M.S.; Baltuška, A.; Wiersma, D.A.; Kärtner, F.X.

    2004-01-01

    Combining photon-echo and frequency-resolved pump-probe techniques with extremely short laser pulses that consist of only few optical cycles, we investigate the dynamics of the equilibrated hydrated electron. The pure dephasing time of the hydrated electron deduced from the photon-echo measurements

  9. Gas hydrate inhibition of drilling fluid additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaolan, L.; Baojiang, S.; Shaoran, R. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Dongying (China). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates that form during offshore well drilling can have adverse impacts on well operational safety. The hydrates typically form in the risers and the annulus between the casing and the drillstring, and can stop the circulation of drilling fluids. In this study, experiments were conducted to measure the effect of drilling fluid additives on hydrate inhibition. Polyalcohols, well-stability control agents, lubricating agents, and polymeric materials were investigated in a stirred tank reactor at temperatures ranging from -10 degree C to 60 degrees C. Pressure, temperature, and torque were used to detect onset points of hydrate formation and dissociation. The inhibitive effect of the additives on hydrate formation was quantified. Phase boundary shifts were measured in terms of temperature difference or sub-cooling gained when chemicals were added to pure water. Results showed that the multiple hydroxyl groups in polyalcohol chemicals significantly inhibited hydrate formation. Polymeric and polyacrylamide materials had only a small impact on hydrate formation, while sulfonated methyl tannins were found to increase hydrate formation. 6 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  10. Hydration shells exchange charge with their protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abitan, Haim; Lindgård, Per-Anker; Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert;

    2010-01-01

    Investigation of the interaction between a protein and its hydration shells is an experimental and theoretical challenge. Here, we used ultrasonic pressure waves in aqueous solutions of a protein to explore the conformational states of the protein and its interaction with its hydration shells. In...

  11. A new geotechnical gas hydrates research laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Gas hydrates encapsulate natural gas molecules in a very compact form, as ice-like compounds composed of water molecules. Permafrost environments and offshore areas contain vast quantities of gas hydrates within soil and rock. This paper describes the role played by gas hydrates in submarine slope instability, their potential as a sustainable energy source, and their effects on global climate change. A new state-of-the-art laboratory located at the University of Calgary, which was developed to study the geomechanical behaviour of gas hydrate-sediment mixtures, was also presented. A specialized high pressure low temperature triaxial apparatus capable of performing a suite of tests on gas hydrate-sediment mixtures is housed in this laboratory. Extensive renovations were required in order to enable the use of methane gas to simulate natural hydrate formation conditions. The laboratory is specifically designed to examine the properties and behaviour of reconstituted gas hydrate-sediment mixtures and natural gas hydrate core samples. 26 refs., 9 figs.

  12. Investigations into surfactant/gas hydrate relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Rudy; Zhang, Guochang; Dearman, Jennifer; Woods, Charles [Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Gas hydrates have unique physical properties portending useful industrial applications of gas storage, gas separation, or water desalination. When gas hydrates were found in the early 1990s to occur naturally and abundantly in seafloors, three other primary interests and concerns emerged: potential new energy source, climate threat from their greenhouse gases, and seafloor instabilities. This paper presents research showing how anionic synthetic surfactants helped develop an industrial gas hydrate storage process for natural gas and how naturally-occurring in-situ anionic biosurfactants influence the formation and placement of gas hydrates in ocean sediments. The catalytic effects, mechanisms, and surface specificities imparted by synthetic surfactants in the gas storage process and imparted by biosurfactants in porous media are discussed. The Bacillus subtilis bacterium that is indigenous to gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico was cultured in the laboratory. Its biosurfactant was separated and found to catalyze gas hydrates in porous media. The experiments indicate that seafloor-biosurfactants can be produced rapidly in-situ to achieve threshold concentrations whereby hydrates are promoted. The biosurfactants accumulate and promote hydrate formation on specific mineral surfaces such as sodium montmorillonite. (author)

  13. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  14. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the

  15. Non-equilibrium simulation of CH4 production through the depressurization method from gas hydrate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qorbani, Khadijeh; Kvamme, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas hydrates (NGHs) in nature are formed from various hydrate formers (i.e. aqueous, gas, and adsorbed phases). As a result, due to Gibbs phase rule and the combined first and second laws of thermodynamics CH4-hydrate cannot reach thermodynamic equilibrium in real reservoir conditions. CH4 is the dominant component in NGH reservoirs. It is formed as a result of biogenic degradation of biological material in the upper few hundred meters of subsurface. It has been estimated that the amount of fuel-gas reserve in NGHs exceed the total amount of fossil fuel explored until today. Thus, these reservoirs have the potential to satisfy the energy requirements of the future. However, released CH4 from dissociated NGHs could find its way to the atmosphere and it is a far more aggressive greenhouse gas than CO2, even though its life-time is shorter. Lack of reliable field data makes it difficult to predict the production potential, as well as safety of CH4 production from NGHs. Computer simulations can be used as a tool to investigate CH4 production through different scenarios. Most hydrate simulators within academia and industry treat hydrate phase transitions as an equilibrium process and those which employ the kinetic approach utilize simple laboratory data in their models. Furthermore, it is typical to utilize a limited thermodynamic description where only temperature and pressure projections are considered. Another widely used simplification is to assume only a single route for the hydrate phase transitions. The non-equilibrium nature of hydrate indicates a need for proper kinetic models to describe hydrate dissociation and reformation in the reservoir with respect to thermodynamics variables, CH4 mole-fraction, pressure and temperature. The RetrasoCodeBright (RCB) hydrate simulator has previously been extended to model CH4-hydrate dissociation towards CH4 gas and water. CH4-hydrate is added to the RCB data-base as a pseudo mineral. Phase transitions are treated

  16. Compound Natural Gas Hydrate: A Natural System for Separation of Hydrate-Forming Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, M. D.; Osegovic, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Natural processes that separate materials from a mixture may exert a major influence on the development of the atmospheres and surfaces of planets, moons, and other planetary bodies. Natural distillation and gravity separation, amongst others, are well known means of differentiating materials through liquid-gas partitioning. One of the least known attributes of clathrate (gas) hydrates is their potential effect on the evolution of planetary system oceans and atmospheres. Gas hydrates separate gases from mixtures of gases by concentrating preferred hydrate-forming materials (HFM) guests within the water-molecule cage structure of crystalline hydrate. Different HFMs have very different fields of stability. When multiple hydrate formers are present, a preference series based on their selective uptake exists. Compound hydrate, which is formed from two or more species of HFM, extract preferred HFM from a mixture in very different proportions to their relative percentages of the original mixture. These compound hydrates can have different formation and dissociation conditions depending on the evolution of the environment. That is, the phase boundary of the compound hydrate that is required for dissociation lies along a lower pressure - higher temperature course. Compound hydrates respond to variations in temperature, pressure, and HFM composition. On Earth, the primary naturally occurring hydrate of interest to global climate modeling is methane hydrate. Oceanic hydrate on Earth is the largest store of carbon in the biosphere that is immediately reactive to environmental change, and is capable of releasing large amounts of methane into the atmosphere over a short geological time span. Hydrate formation is essentially metastable and is very sensitive to environmental change and to gas flux. Where natural variations in temperature and pressure varies so that hydrate will form and dissociate in some cyclical manner, such as in oceans where sea level is capable of rising and

  17. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  18. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated

  19. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-07-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  20. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-06-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  1. Assessment of permeability barriers to macromolecules in the rodent endometrium at the onset of implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bany, Brent M; Hamilton, G Scot

    2011-01-01

    In rodents, embryo implantation is an invasive process, which begins with its attachment to the uterine wall and culminates in the formation of the definitive placenta several days later. It is critical that the endometrium provide a supportive environment for the implanting embryo during this process, as the placenta is not yet established. The concept of changing permeability barriers to macromolecules between different extracellular compartments in the rodent uterus at the onset of implantation has been established. This chapter provides protocols that can be used to assess this changing permeability barrier and the associated redistribution of macromolecules during the early phases of implantation in rodents. An increased permeability of the endometrial vasculature to plasma proteins occurs in areas adjacent to the implanting blastocyst. In addition, alterations in the extracellular matrix enhance the accumulation of fluid and extravasated macromolecules. We describe several protocols proven to be effective in studying and quantifying early vascular and extravascular responses to natural and artificial "implantation stimuli." The first three protocols represent qualitative and quantitative methods to assess the early endometrial "vascular permeability" response. On the contrary, the fourth protocol addresses the onset of decidualization and the arising permeability barrier, which restricts the movement of macromolecules through the extracellular space. This barrier is believed to provide transient protection for the implanting embryo against potentially harmful maternal serum proteins. This protocol describes assessment of resistance of the primary decidual zone to the movement of macromolecules across the compartments of the extracellular space.

  2. Nanoscale amphiphilic macromolecules as lipoprotein inhibitors: the role of charge and architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinzhong; Plourde, Nicole M; Iverson, Nicole; Moghe, Prabhas V; Uhrich, Kathryn E

    2007-01-01

    A series of novel amphiphilic macromolecules composed of alkyl chains as the hydrophobic block and poly(ethylene glycol) as the hydrophilic block were designed to inhibit highly oxidized low density lipoprotein (hoxLDL) uptake by synthesizing macromolecules with negatively charged moieties (ie, carboxylic acids) located in the two different blocks. The macromolecules have molecular weights around 5,500 g/mol, form micelles in aqueous solution with an average size of 20–35 nm, and display critical micelle concentration values as low as 10−7 M. Their charge densities and hydrodynamic size in physiological buffer solutions correlated with the hydrophobic/hydrophilic block location and quantity of the carboxylate groups. Generally, carboxylate groups located in the hydrophobic block destabilize micelle formation more than carboxylate groups in the hydrophilic block. Although all amphiphilic macromolecules inhibited unregulated uptake of hoxLDL by macrophages, inhibition efficiency was influenced by the quantity and location of the negatively charged-carboxylate on the macromolecules. Notably, negative charge is not the sole factor in reducing hoxLDL uptake. The combination of smaller size, micellar stability and charge density is critical for inhibiting hoxLDL uptake by macrophages. PMID:18203436

  3. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of macromolecules and strategy to enhance their transport in alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Mikihisa; Kawami, Masashi; Aoki, Ayako; Yumoto, Ryoko

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary delivery is an attractive administration route for therapeutic proteins and peptides. In this context, endocytosis/transcytosis at the distal lung epithelial barrier is an important process in the pulmonary absorption of therapeutic macromolecules. The alveolar epithelium is comprised of type I and type II cells. Understanding the transport mechanisms in these cells is essential for the development of efficient pulmonary delivery systems of therapeutic macromolecules. Endocytic pathways for albumin and insulin in alveolar epithelial cells and possible receptors for the endocytosis are discussed. Strategies to enhance the endocytosis and pulmonary absorption of macromolecules are also discussed, by focusing on the effects of cationic poly(amino acid)s. Although the surface area occupied by type II cells in alveoli is much smaller than that covered by type I cells, type II cells may significantly contribute to the endocytosis/transcytosis of macromolecules such as albumin. Identification of the receptors involved in the cellular uptake of each macromolecule is prerequisite for the understanding and regulation of its transport into and across alveolar epithelial cells. Establishment of novel in-vitro culture cell models of type I and type II cells would be a great help for the future advance of this research field.

  4. Cathepsin B degradable star-shaped peptidic macromolecules for delivery of 2-methoxyestradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Ravi; Samykutty, Abhilash; Riggin, Corinne; Kannan, Sneha; Wenzel, Ursula; Kolhatkar, Rohit

    2013-10-07

    2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME), a natural metabolite of estradiol, has antiproliferative and antiangiogenic activity. However, its clinical success is limited due to poor water solubility and poor pharmacokinetic parameters suggesting the need for a delivery vehicle. In this study we evaluated cathepsin B degradable star-shaped peptidic macromolecules (SPMs) that can potentially be used to create higher generation and high molecular weight peptidic polymer as delivery vehicle of 2ME. Two peptidic macromolecules having positively charged amine (ASPM) or negatively charged carboxyl surface groups (CSPM) were synthesized and evaluated for their degradation in the presence of cathepsin B and stability in the presence of neutral or acidic buffer and serum. Both ASPM and CSPM degraded rapidly in the presence of cathepsin B. Both were stable in neutral and acidic buffer whereas only CSPM exhibited substantial stability in the presence of serum. Both macromolecules were nontoxic toward breast cancer cells whereas 2ME-containing macromolecules exhibited antiproliferative activity in the micromolar range. Overall, results from the current study indicate that tetrapeptide GFLG can be used to create star-shaped macromolecules that are degraded in the presence of cathepsin B and have the potential to be developed as delivery vehicles of 2ME.

  5. Locust bean gum in the development of sustained release mucoadhesive macromolecules of aceclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Vipul D; Jani, Girish K; Moradiya, Naresh G; Randeria, Narayan P; Maheriya, Pankaj M; Nagar, Bhanu J

    2014-11-26

    The study shows the development and optimization of locust bean gum (LBG)-alginate mucoadhesive macromolecules containing aceclofenac through ionotropic-gelation using 3(2) factorial design. The effect of amount of LBG and sodium alginate on drug entrapment efficiency (%DEE), % mucoadhesion at 8h (M8) and % in vitro drug release at 10h (%Q10h) were optimized. The percentage yield, average size and DEE of macromolecules were found within the range of 93.19 to 96.65%, 1.328 ± 0.11 to 1.428 ± 0.13 μm, and 56.37 to 68.54%, respectively. The macromolecules were also characterized by SEM, FTIR and DSC. The in vitro drug release from these macromolecules (84.95 ± 2.02 to 95.33 ± 1.56% at 10h) exhibited sustained release (first-order) pattern with super case-II transport mechanism. The swelling and mucoadhesivity of these macromolecules were affected by pH of the medium. The design established the role of derived polynomial equations and plots in predicting the values of dependent variables for the preparation and optimization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanoporation of living cells for delivery of macromolecules using nanoneedle array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Daisuke; Yamagishi, Ayana; Saito, Megumi; Sathuluri, Ramachandra Rao; Silberberg, Yaron R; Iwata, Futoshi; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Chikashi

    2016-12-01

    Efficient and rapid delivery of macromolecule probes, such as quenchbodies and other large biomarkers that cannot readily pass through the plasma membrane, is necessary for live-cell imaging and other intracellular analyses. We present here an alternative, simple method for delivery of macromolecules into live cells. In this method, which we term here mechanoporation, a nanoneedle array is used for making transient pores in the plasma membrane to allow access of desired macromolecules into thousands of live cells, simultaneously. This rapid, 3-step method facilitates an efficient delivery by adding macromolecules into the medium, inserting nanoneedles into the cells and oscillating the nanoneedle array, a process that takes no more than 5 min in total. In addition, we demonstrate here how this method can repeatedly and reproducibly deliver molecules into specifically-selected locations on a given cell culture dish. The results presented here show how this unique mechanoporation method enables rapid and high-throughput bio-macromolecule delivery and live-cell imaging. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Experimental Study of Natural Gas Storage in Hydrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙志高; 王如竹; 郭开华; 樊栓狮

    2004-01-01

    Hydrate formation rate plays an important role in the making of hydrates for natural gas storage. The effect of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), alkyl polysaccharide glycoside (APG) and cyclopentane (CP) on natural gas hydrate formation rate, induction time and storage capacity was studied. Micellar surfactant solutions were found to increase hydrate formation rate in a quiescent system and improve hydrate formation rate and natural gas storage capacity. The process of hydrate formation includes two stages with surfactant presence. Hydrate forms quickly in the first stage, and then the formation rate is slowed down. Surfactants (SDS or APG) reduce the induction time of hydrate formation. The effect of an anionic surfactant (SDS) on gas storage in hydrates is more pronounced compared to a nonionic surfactant (APG). CP also reduces the induction time of hydrate formation, but can not improve the natural gas storage capacity in hydrates.

  8. Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

    2011-04-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with

  9. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a

  10. Mass fractionation of noble gases in synthetic methane hydrate: Implications for naturally occurring gas hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Stern, Laura; Pohlman, John W.; Ruppel, Carolyn; Moscati, Richard J.; Landis, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of contemporary or longer term (since 15 ka) climate warming, gas hydrates in some settings may presently be dissociating and releasing methane and other gases to the ocean-atmosphere system. A key challenge in assessing the impact of dissociating gas hydrates on global atmospheric methane is the lack of a technique able to distinguish between methane recently released from gas hydrates and methane emitted from leaky thermogenic reservoirs, shallow sediments (some newly thawed), coal beds, and other sources. Carbon and deuterium stable isotopic fractionation during methane formation provides a first-order constraint on the processes (microbial or thermogenic) of methane generation. However, because gas hydrate formation and dissociation do not cause significant isotopic fractionation, a stable isotope-based hydrate-source determination is not possible. Here, we investigate patterns of mass-dependent noble gas fractionation within the gas hydrate lattice to fingerprint methane released from gas hydrates. Starting with synthetic gas hydrate formed under laboratory conditions, we document complex noble gas fractionation patterns in the gases liberated during dissociation and explore the effects of aging and storage (e.g., in liquid nitrogen), as well as sampling and preservation procedures. The laboratory results confirm a unique noble gas fractionation pattern for gas hydrates, one that shows promise in evaluating modern natural gas seeps for a signature associated with gas hydrate dissociation.

  11. Hydration Properties of Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag (GGBS Under Different Hydration Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua LIU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The hydration properties of various cementitious materials containing Ground Granulated Blast-furnace Slag (GGBS, two alkali-activated slag cements (AAS-1 and AAS-2 in which sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide act as alkaline activators respectively, supersulfated cement (SSC and slag Portland cement(PSC, are compared with ordinary Portland cement (OPC to investigate the effect of activating environment on the hydration properties in this study by determining the compressive strength of the pastes, the hydration heat of binders within 96 hours, and the hydration products at age of 28 days. The results show that C-S-H gels are the main hydrated products for all cementitious systems containing GGBS. Ca(OH2 is the hydration products of OPC and PSC paste. However, ettringite and gypsum crystals instead of Ca(OH2 are detected in SSC paste. Additionally, tobermorite, a crystalline C-S-H, and calcite are hydrated products in AAS-1. Tobermorite, cowlesite and calcite are hydrated products of AAS-2 as well. Based on strength results, AAS-1 paste exhibits the highest compressive strength followed by POC, PSC, SSC in order at all testing ages and AAS-2 give the lowest compressive strength except for the early age at 3 days, which is higher than SSC but still lower than PSC. From hydration heat analysis, alkalinity in the reaction solution is a vital factor influencing the initial hydration rate and the initial hydration rate from higher to lower is AAS-2, AAS-1, OPC, PSC and SSC. Although AAS possesses a faster reaction rate in the initial hours, cumulative hydration heat of AAS is comparably lower than that of OPC, but higher than those of PSC and SSC in turn, which indicates that the hydration heat of clinkers is much higher than that of slag.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.1.14934

  12. The effect of composition on diffusion of macromolecules in a crowded environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrat, Svyatoslav; Zimmermann, Olav; Wiechert, Wolfgang; von Lieres, Eric

    2015-05-28

    We study diffusion of macromolecules in a crowded cytoplasm-like environment, focusing on its dependence on composition and its crossover to the anomalous subdiffusion. The crossover and the diffusion itself depend on both the volume fraction and the relative concentration of macromolecules. In accordance with previous theoretical and experimental studies, diffusion slows down when the volume fraction increases. Contrary to expectations, however, the diffusion is also strongly dependent on the molecular composition. The crossover time decreases and diffusion slows down when the smaller macromolecules start to dominate. Interestingly, diffusion is faster in a cytoplasm-like (more polydisperse) system than it is in a two-component system, at comparable packing fractions, or even when the cytoplasm packing fraction is larger.

  13. Anisotropic diffusion of macromolecules in the contiguous nucleocytoplasmic fluid during eukaryotic cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Nisha; Donth, Claudia; Weiss, Matthias

    2014-08-18

    Character and rapidity of protein diffusion in intracellular fluids are key determinants of the dynamics and steady state of a plethora of biochemical reactions. So far, an anomalous diffusion in cytoplasmic fluids with viscoelastic and even glassy characteristics has been reported in a variety of organisms on several length scales and timescales. Here, we show that the contiguous fluid of former cytoplasm and nucleoplasm features an anisotropically varying diffusion of macromolecules during eukaryotic cell division. In metaphase, diffusion in the contiguous nucleocytoplasmic fluid appears less anomalous along the spindle axis as compared to perpendicular directions. As a consequence, the long-time diffusion of macromolecules preferentially points along the spindle axis, leading to prolonged residence of macromolecules in the spindle region. Based on our experimental data, we suggest that anisotropic diffusion facilitates the encounter and interaction of spindle-associated proteins, e.g., during the formation of a dynamic spindle matrix. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Nonuniform elastic properties of macromolecules and effect of prestrain on their continuum nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ankush; May, Eric R; Brooks, Charles L; Klug, William S

    2016-01-01

    Many experimental and theoretical methods have been developed to calculate the coarse-grained continuum elastic properties of macromolecules. However, all of those methods assume uniform elastic properties. Following the continuum mechanics framework, we present a systematic way of calculating the nonuniform effective elastic properties from atomic thermal fluctuations obtained from molecular dynamics simulation at any coarse-grained scale using a potential of the mean-force approach. We present the results for a mutant of Sesbania mosaic virus capsid, where we calculate the elastic moduli at different scales and observe an apparent problem with the chosen reference configuration in some cases. We present a possible explanation using an elastic network model, where inducing random prestrain results in a similar behavior. This phenomenon provides a novel insight into the continuum nature of macromolecules and defines the limits on details that the elasticity theory can capture. Further investigation into prestrains could elucidate important aspects of conformational dynamics of macromolecules.

  15. Scalable synthesis of sequence-defined, unimolecular macromolecules by Flow-IEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibfarth, Frank A; Johnson, Jeremiah A; Jamison, Timothy F

    2015-08-25

    We report a semiautomated synthesis of sequence and architecturally defined, unimolecular macromolecules through a marriage of multistep flow synthesis and iterative exponential growth (Flow-IEG). The Flow-IEG system performs three reactions and an in-line purification in a total residence time of under 10 min, effectively doubling the molecular weight of an oligomeric species in an uninterrupted reaction sequence. Further iterations using the Flow-IEG system enable an exponential increase in molecular weight. Incorporating a variety of monomer structures and branching units provides control over polymer sequence and architecture. The synthesis of a uniform macromolecule with a molecular weight of 4,023 g/mol is demonstrated. The user-friendly nature, scalability, and modularity of Flow-IEG provide a general strategy for the automated synthesis of sequence-defined, unimolecular macromolecules. Flow-IEG is thus an enabling tool for theory validation, structure-property studies, and advanced applications in biotechnology and materials science.

  16. Improved microchip design and application for in situ transmission electron microscopy of macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukes, Madeline J; Thomas, Rebecca; Damiano, John; Klein, Kate L; Balasubramaniam, Sharavanan; Kayandan, Sanem; Riffle, Judy S; Davis, Richey M; McDonald, Sarah M; Kelly, Deborah F

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the fundamental properties of macromolecules has enhanced the development of emerging technologies used to improve biomedical research. Currently, there is a critical need for innovative platforms that can illuminate the function of biomedical reagents in a native environment. To address this need, we have developed an in situ approach to visualize the dynamic behavior of biomedically relevant macromolecules at the nanoscale. Newly designed silicon nitride devices containing integrated "microwells" were used to enclose active macromolecular specimens in liquid for transmission electron microscopy imaging purposes.We were able to successfully examine novel magnetic resonance imaging contrast reagents, micelle suspensions, liposome carrier vehicles, and transcribing viral assemblies. With each specimen tested, the integrated microwells adequately maintained macromolecules in discrete local environments while enabling thin liquid layers to be produced.

  17. Equilibrium partitioning of macromolecules in confining geometries: Improved universality with a new molecular size parameter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yanwei; Peters, Günther H.J.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2008-01-01

    We present a new framework for the description of macromolecules subject to confining geometries. The two main ingredients are a new computational method and the definition of a new molecular size parameter. The computational method, hereafter referred to the confinement analysis from bulk...... structures (CABS), allows the computation of equilibrium partition coefficients as a function of confinement size solely based on a single sampling of the configuration space of a macromolecule in bulk. Superior in computational speed to previous computational methods, CABS is capable of handling slits...... parameter for characterization of spatial confinement effects on macromolecules. Results for the equilibrium partition coefficient in the weak confinement regime depend only on the ratio ofR-s to the confinement size regardless of molecular details....

  18. Extracellular matrix macromolecules: potential tools and targets in cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainio, Annele; Järveläinen, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Tumour cells create their own microenvironment where they closely interact with a variety of soluble and non-soluble molecules, different cells and numerous other components within the extracellular matrix (ECM). Interaction between tumour cells and the ECM is bidirectional leading to either progression or inhibition of tumourigenesis. Therefore, development of novel therapies targeted primarily to tumour microenvironment (TME) is highly rational. Here, we give a short overview of different macromolecules of the ECM and introduce mechanisms whereby they contribute to tumourigenesis within the TME. Furthermore, we present examples of individual ECM macromolecules as regulators of cell behaviour during tumourigenesis. Finally, we focus on novel strategies of using ECM macromolecules as tools or targets in cancer gene therapy in the future.

  19. Intracellular uptake of macromolecules by brain lymphatic endothelial cells during zebrafish embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lessen, Max; Shibata-Germanos, Shannon; van Impel, Andreas; Hawkins, Thomas A; Rihel, Jason; Schulte-Merker, Stefan

    2017-05-12

    The lymphatic system controls fluid homeostasis and the clearance of macromolecules from interstitial compartments. In mammals brain lymphatics were only recently discovered, with significant implications for physiology and disease. We examined zebrafish for the presence of brain lymphatics and found loosely connected endothelial cells with lymphatic molecular signature covering parts of the brain without forming endothelial tubular structures. These brain lymphatic endothelial cells (BLECs) derive from venous endothelium, are distinct from macrophages, and are sensitive to loss of Vegfc. BLECs endocytose macromolecules in a selective manner, which can be blocked by injection of mannose receptor ligands. This first report on brain lymphatic endothelial cells in a vertebrate embryo identifies cells with unique features, including the uptake of macromolecules at a single cell level. Future studies will address whether this represents an uptake mechanism that is conserved in mammals and how these cells affect functions of the embryonic and adult brain.

  20. Silicification and biosilicification: The role of macromolecules in bioinspired silica synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Siddharth Vijay

    Diatoms, sponges and grasses are all known to produce ornate biogenic silica structures under ambient conditions. Some aspects of the molecular mechanism controlling biosilicification have recently been elucidated. The entrapment of the catalyzing/templating/scaffolding biomacromolecules enables them to be recovered by selective dissolution of biosilica. The proteins extracted from the diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis (silaffins) and the sponge Tethya aurantia (silicateins) have been shown to precipitate silica from silica precursors in vitro. The identification of synthetic macromolecules that can act as catalysts/templates/scaffolds for silica formation gives exciting possibilities for bioinspired silica synthesis. Herein, the role of various synthetic (bio)macromolecules in silicification is studied. Attempts have also been made to understand the mechanism(s) governing (bio)macromolecule mediated (bio)silicification. Furthermore, the results and the understanding gained from various synthetic systems are used to demonstrate the potential of such bioinspired routes to develop new materials.

  1. Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

    2011-12-31

    This project seeks to understand regional differences in gas hydrate systems from the perspective of as an energy resource, geohazard, and long-term climate influence. Specifically, the effort will: (1) collect data and conceptual models that targets causes of gas hydrate variance, (2) construct numerical models that explain and predict regional-scale gas hydrate differences in 2-dimensions with minimal 'free parameters', (3) simulate hydrocarbon production from various gas hydrate systems to establish promising resource characteristics, (4) perturb different gas hydrate systems to assess potential impacts of hot fluids on seafloor stability and well stability, and (5) develop geophysical approaches that enable remote quantification of gas hydrate heterogeneities so that they can be characterized with minimal costly drilling. Our integrated program takes advantage of the fact that we have a close working team comprised of experts in distinct disciplines. The expected outcomes of this project are improved exploration and production technology for production of natural gas from methane hydrates and improved safety through understanding of seafloor and well bore stability in the presence of hydrates. The scope of this project was to more fully characterize, understand, and appreciate fundamental differences in the amount and distribution of gas hydrate and how this would affect the production potential of a hydrate accumulation in the marine environment. The effort combines existing information from locations in the ocean that are dominated by low permeability sediments with small amounts of high permeability sediments, one permafrost location where extensive hydrates exist in reservoir quality rocks and other locations deemed by mutual agreement of DOE and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations were Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location was Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the project was to understand

  2. Prospecting for marine gas hydrate resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Shipp, Craig; Reichel, Thomas; Shelander, Dianna; Saeki, Tetsuo; Frye, Matthew; Shedd, William; Collett, Timothy S.; McConnell, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    As gas hydrate energy assessment matures worldwide, emphasis has evolved away from confirmation of the mere presence of gas hydrate to the more complex issue of prospecting for those specific accumulations that are viable resource targets. Gas hydrate exploration now integrates the unique pressure and temperature preconditions for gas hydrate occurrence with those concepts and practices that are the basis for conventional oil and gas exploration. We have aimed to assimilate the lessons learned to date in global gas hydrate exploration to outline a generalized prospecting approach as follows: (1) use existing well and geophysical data to delineate the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), (2) identify and evaluate potential direct indications of hydrate occurrence through evaluation of interval of elevated acoustic velocity and/or seismic events of prospective amplitude and polarity, (3) mitigate geologic risk via regional seismic and stratigraphic facies analysis as well as seismic mapping of amplitude distribution along prospective horizons, and (4) mitigate further prospect risk through assessment of the evidence of gas presence and migration into the GHSZ. Although a wide range of occurrence types might ultimately become viable energy supply options, this approach, which has been tested in only a small number of locations worldwide, has directed prospect evaluation toward those sand-hosted, high-saturation occurrences that were presently considered to have the greatest future commercial potential.

  3. Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2009-12-09

    Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

  4. Gas hydrate dissociation structures in submarine slopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidley, I.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Studies have suggested that gas hydrates may play a role in submarine slope failures. However, the mechanics surrounding such failures are poorly understood. This paper discussed experimental tests conducted on a small-scale physical model of submarine soils with hydrate inclusions. The laboratory tests investigated the effects of slope angle and depth of burial of the hydrate on gas escape structures and slope stability. Laponite was used to model the soils due to its ability to swell and produce a clear, colorless thixotropic gel when dispersed in water. An R-11 refrigerant was used to form hydrate layers and nodules. The aim of the experiment was to investigate the path of the fluid escape structures and the development of a subsequent slip plane caused by the dissociation of the R-11 hydrates. Slope angles of 5, 10, and 15 degrees were examined. Slopes were examined using high-resolution, high-speed imaging techniques. Hydrate placement and slope inclinations were varied in order to obtain stability data. Results of the study showed that slope angle influenced the direction of travel of the escaping gas, and that the depth of burial affected sensitivity to slope angle. Theoretical models developed from the experimental data have accurately mapped deformations and stress states during testing. Further research is being conducted to investigate the influence of the size, shape, and placement of the hydrates. 30 refs., 15 figs.

  5. Global analysis of fluorescence decays to probe the internal dynamics of fluorescently labeled macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhamel, Jean

    2014-03-11

    The aim of this review is to introduce the reader first to the mathematical complexity associated with the analysis of fluorescence decays acquired with solutions of macromolecules labeled with a fluorophore and its quencher that are capable of interacting with each other via photophysical processes within the macromolecular volume, second to the experimental and mathematical approaches that have been proposed over the years to handle this mathematical complexity, and third to the information that one can expect to retrieve with respect to the internal dynamics of such fluorescently labeled macromolecules. In my view, the ideal fluorophore-quencher pair to use in studying the internal dynamics of fluorescently labeled macromolecules would involve a long-lived fluorophore, a fluorophore and a quencher that do not undergo energy migration, and a photophysical process that results in a change in fluorophore emission upon contact between the excited fluorophore and quencher. Pyrene, with its ability to form an excimer on contact between excited-state and ground-state species, happens to possess all of these properties. Although the concepts described in this review apply to any fluorophore and quencher pair sharing pyrene's exceptional photophysical properties, this review focuses on the study of pyrene-labeled macromolecules that have been characterized in great detail over the past 40 years and presents the main models that are being used today to analyze the fluorescence decays of pyrene-labeled macromolecules reliably. These models are based on Birks' scheme, the DMD model, the fluorescence blob model, and the model free analysis. The review also provides a step-by-step protocol that should enable the noneducated user to achieve a successful decay analysis exempt of artifacts. Finally, some examples of studies of pyrene-labeled macromolecules are also presented to illustrate the different types of information that can be retrieved from these fluorescence decay

  6. PlaMoM: a comprehensive database compiles plant mobile macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Daogang; Yan, Bin; Thieme, Christoph; Hua, Jingmin; Zhu, Hailong; Boheler, Kenneth R; Zhao, Zhongying; Kragler, Friedrich; Xia, Yiji; Zhang, Shoudong

    2017-01-04

    In plants, various phloem-mobile macromolecules including noncoding RNAs, mRNAs and proteins are suggested to act as important long-distance signals in regulating crucial physiological and morphological transition processes such as flowering, plant growth and stress responses. Given recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies, numerous mobile macromolecules have been identified in diverse plant species from different plant families. However, most of the identified mobile macromolecules are not annotated in current versions of species-specific databases and are only available as non-searchable datasheets. To facilitate study of the mobile signaling macromolecules, we compiled the PlaMoM (Plant Mobile Macromolecules) database, a resource that provides convenient and interactive search tools allowing users to retrieve, to analyze and also to predict mobile RNAs/proteins. Each entry in the PlaMoM contains detailed information such as nucleotide/amino acid sequences, ortholog partners, related experiments, gene functions and literature. For the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, protein-protein interactions of mobile transcripts are presented as interactive molecular networks. Furthermore, PlaMoM provides a built-in tool to identify potential RNA mobility signals such as tRNA-like structures. The current version of PlaMoM compiles a total of 17 991 mobile macromolecules from 14 plant species/ecotypes from published data and literature. PlaMoM is available at http://www.systembioinfo.org/plamom/. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Hydrodynamic Forces on Macromolecules Protruding from Lipid Bilayers Due to External Liquid Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Peter; Jönsson, Bengt

    2015-11-24

    It has previously been observed that an externally applied hydrodynamic shear flow above a fluid lipid bilayer can change the local concentration of macromolecules that are associated with the lipid bilayer. The external liquid flow results in a hydrodynamic force on molecules protruding from the lipid bilayer, causing them to move in the direction of the flow. However, there has been no quantitative study about the magnitude of these forces. We here use finite element simulations to investigate how the magnitude of the external hydrodynamic forces varies with the size and shape of the studied macromolecule. The simulations show that the hydrodynamic force is proportional to the effective hydrodynamic area of the studied molecule, Ahydro, multiplied by the mean hydrodynamic shear stress acting on the membrane surface, σhydro. The parameter Ahydro depends on the size and shape of the studied macromolecule above the lipid bilayer and scales with the cross-sectional area of the molecule. We also investigate how hydrodynamic shielding from other surrounding macromolecules decreases Ahydro when the surface coverage of the shielding macromolecules increases. Experiments where the protein streptavidin is anchored to a supported lipid bilayer on the floor of a microfluidic channel were finally performed at three different surface concentrations, Φ = 1%, 6%, and 10%, where the protein is being moved relative to the lipid bilayer by a liquid flow through the channel. From photobleaching measurements of fluorescently labeled streptavidin we found the experimental drift data to be within good accuracy of the simulated results, less than 12% difference, indicating the validity of the results obtained from the simulations. In addition to giving a deeper insight into how a liquid flow can affect membrane-associated molecules in a lipid bilayer, we also see an interesting potential of using hydrodynamic flow experiments together with the obtained results to study the size and

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of a Chondroitin Sulfate Based Hybrid Bio/Synthetic Biomimetic Aggrecan Macromolecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sumona

    Lower back pain resulting from intervertebral disc degeneration is one of the leading musculoskeletal disorders confronting our health system. In order to mechanically stabilize the disc early in the degenerative cascade and prevent the need for spinal fusion surgeries, we have proposed the development of a hybrid-bio/synthetic biomimetic proteoglycan macromolecule for injection into the disc in the early stages of degeneration. The goal of this thesis was to incorporate natural chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains into bottle brush polymer synthesis strategies for the fabrication of CS-macromolecules which mimic the proteoglycan structure and function while resisting enzymatic degradation. Both the "grafting-to" and "grafting-through" techniques of bottle brush synthesis were explored. CS was immobilized via a terminal primary amine onto a model polymeric backbone (polyacrylic acid) for investigation of the "grafting-to" strategy and an epoxy-amine step-growth polymerization technique was utilized for the "grafting-through" synthesis of CS-macromolecules with polyethylene glycol backbone segments. Incorporation of a synthetic polymeric backbone at the terminal amine of CS was confirmed via biochemical assays, 1H-NMR and FTIR spectroscopy, and CS-macromolecule size was demonstrated to be higher than that of natural CS via gel permeation chromatography, transmission electron microscopy and viscosity measurements. Further analysis of CS-macromolecule functionality indicated maintenance of natural CS properties such as high fixed charge density, high osmotic potential and low cytotoxicity with nucleus pulposus cells. These studies are the first attempt at the incorporation of natural CS into biomimetic bottle brush structures. CS-macromolecules synthesized via the methods developed in these studies may be utilized in the treatment and prevention of debilitating back pain as well as act as mimetics for other proteoglycans implicated in cartilage, heart valve, and nervous

  9. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by Maurer Technology, Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. We plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. We also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. We are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. We hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, our goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

  10. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release as much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  11. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  12. 高分子材料的老化研究%Aging studies of macromolecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周勇

    2012-01-01

    The paper demonstrated the changes of surface physical properties, mechanical properties electrical properties caused by the aging of macromolecule, analyzed the internal factors and external factors inducing aging, such as chemical structure, physical morphology, stereo structure, molecular weight distribution, metal impurities, temperature, humidity, oxygen, light, chemical mediator, biological factors and so on; explained the aging evaluation method such as the natural aging test, artificial aging test, weather resistance method, heating aging experiment, hydrothermal aging test, ozone aging test, salt fog test, cold resistant test and anti fungus test; introduced the aging performance evaluation index on the physical properties, mechanical properties, microanalysis, durability and systematic analysis technology, inferred the future trend of preventive measures on heating aging, hydrothermal aging, oxidative aging photo aging and biological aging%本文介绍了由高分子材料老化引起的外观、物理性能、力学性能、电性能的变化;分析了引起高分子材料老化的内在因素和外在因素,例如化学结构、物理形态、立体规整性、分子量及其分布情况、金属杂质、温度、湿度、氧气、光照、化学介质、生物等;阐述了自然环境老化实验、人工加速老化实验、耐候性实验、热老化实验、湿热老化实验、臭氧老化实验、盐雾腐蚀实验、耐寒性实验、抗霉实验等老化评价方法和物理性能、力学性能、微观分析、耐久性能以及系统分析技术等老化性能评价指标;并对热老化预防措施、湿热老化预防措施、氧老化预防措施、光老化预防措施以及生物老化预防措施进行了展望。

  13. "Bio"-macromolecules: polymer-protein conjugates as emerging scaffolds for therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchmann, Dorothee E; Carberry, Tom P; Weck, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Polymer-protein conjugates are biohybrid macromolecules derived from covalently connecting synthetic polymers with polypeptides. The resulting materials combine the properties of both worlds: chemists can engineer polymers to stabilize proteins, to add functionality, or to enhance activity; whereas biochemists can exploit the specificity and complexity that Nature has bestowed upon its macromolecules. This has led to a wealth of applications, particularly within the realm of biomedicine. Polymer-protein conjugation has expanded to include scaffolds for drug delivery, tissue engineering, and microbial inhibitors. This feature article reflects upon recent developments in the field and discusses the applications of these hybrids from a biomaterials standpoint.

  14. Templated and self-limiting calcite formation directed by coccolith organic macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Assaf; Wirth, Richard; Barkay, Zahava; Eliaz, Noam; Scheffel, André; Faivre, Damien

    2017-07-06

    The formation of intricately shaped crystalline minerals by organisms is orchestrated by specialized biomacromolecules. The macromolecules associated with coccoliths, nanometer-sized calcite crystal arrays produced by marine microalgae, can form a distinct calcium-rich phase via macromolecular recognition. Here, we show that this calcium-rich phase can be mineralized into a thin film of single-crystalline calcite by the balanced addition of carbonate ions. Such a crystallization process provides a strategy to direct crystalline products via local interactions between soluble macromolecules and compatible templates.

  15. Click chemistry approach to functionalize two-dimensional macromolecules of graphene oxide nanosheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Kou; Hongkun He; Chao Gao

    2010-01-01

    A facile “click chemistry” approach to functionalize 2D macromolecules of graphene oxide nanosheets with poly (ethylene glycol) of different molecular weights, polystyrene, palmitic acid and various amino acids was presented. FTIR, TGA, Raman spectroscopy, XPS, XRD, TEM, AFM and SEM were utilized to characterize the products. High degree of functionalization was achieved on the flat surfaces of graphene oxide, affording polymer-grafted 2D brushes and amino acids-immobilized nanosheets, which show improved solubility in organic solvents. The click chemistry strategy reported herein provides a facile and general method for functionalization of graphene oxide with macromolecules and desired biomolecules.

  16. A new bead-spring model for simulation of semi-flexible macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Amir; Khomami, Bamin

    2016-11-01

    A bead-spring model for semi-flexible macromolecules is developed to overcome the deficiencies of the current coarse-grained bead-spring models. Specifically, model improvements are achieved through incorporation of a bending potential. The new model is designed to accurately describe the correlation along the backbone of the chain, segmental length, and force-extension behavior of the macromolecule even at the limit of 1 Kuhn step per spring. The relaxation time of different Rouse modes is used to demonstrate the capabilities of the new model in predicting chain dynamics.

  17. Proton percolation on hydrated lysozyme powders

    OpenAIRE

    Careri, G; Giansanti, A; Rupley, John A.

    1986-01-01

    The framework of percolation theory is used to analyze the hydration dependence of the capacitance measured for protein samples of pH 3-10, at frequencies from 10 kHz to 4 MHz. For all samples there is a critical value of the hydration at which the capacitance sharply increases with increase in hydration level. The threshold hc = 0.15 g of water per g of protein is independent of pH below pH 9 and shows no solvent deuterium isotope effect. The fractional coverage of the surface at hc is in cl...

  18. Glass powder blended cement hydration modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Huda

    The use of waste materials in construction is among the most attractive options to consume these materials without affecting the environment. Glass is among these types of potential waste materials. In this research, waste glass in powder form, i.e. glass powder (GP) is examined for potential use in enhancing the characteristics of concrete on the basis that it is a pozzolanic material. The experimental and the theoretical components of the work are carried out primarily to prove that glass powder belongs to the "family" of the pozzolanic materials. The chemical and physical properties of the hydrated activated glass powder and the hydrated glass powder cement on the microstructure level have been studied experimentally and theoretically. The work presented in this thesis consists of two main phases. The first phase contains experimental investigations of the reaction of glass powder with calcium hydroxide (CH) and water. In addition, it includes experiments that are aimed at determining the consumption of water and CH with time. The reactivity, degree of hydration, and nature of the pore solution of the glass powder-blended cement pastes and the effect of adding different ratios of glass powder on cement hydration is also investigated. The experiments proved that glass powder has a pozzolanic effect on cement hydration; hence it enhances the chemical and physical properties of cement paste. Based on the experimental test results, it is recommended to use a glass powder-to-cement ratio (GP/C) of 10% as an optimum ratio to achieve the best hydration and best properties of the paste. Two different chemical formulas for the produced GP C-S-H gel due to the pure GP and GP-CH pozzolanic reaction hydration are proposed. For the pure GP hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a calcium-to-silica ratio (C/S) of 0.164, water-to-silica ratio (H/S) of 1.3 and sodium/silica ratio (N/S) of 0.18. However, for the GP-CH hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a C/S ratio of 1

  19. Effect of Some Admixtures on the Hydration of Silica Fume and Hydrated Lime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The effects of sodium salt of naphthalene formaldehyde sulfonic acid and stearic acid on the hydration of silica fume and Ca(0H)2 have been investigated. The hydration was carried out at 60℃ and W/S ratio of 4 for various time intervals namely, 1, 3, 7 and 28 days and in the presence of 0.2% and 5% superplasticizer and stearic acid. The results of the hydration kinetics show that both admixtures accelerate the hydration reaction of silica fume and calcium hydroxide during the first 7 days. Whereas, after 28 days hydration there is no significant effect. Generally, most of free calcium hydroxide seems to be consumed after 28 days. In addition, the phase composition as well as the microstructure of the formed hydrates was examined by using X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) respectively.

  20. Three-dimensional distribution of gas hydrate beneath southern Hydrate Ridge: Constraints from ODP Leg 204

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehu, A.M.; Long, P.E.; Torres, M.E.; Bohrmann, G.; Rack, F.R.; Collett, T.S.; Goldberg, D.S.; Milkov, A.V.; Riedel, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Bangs, N.L.; Barr, S.R.; Borowski, W.S.; Claypool, G.E.; Delwiche, M.E.; Dickens, G.R.; Gracia, E.; Guerin, G.; Holland, M.; Johnson, J.E.; Lee, Y.-J.; Liu, C.-S.; Su, X.; Teichert, B.; Tomaru, H.; Vanneste, M.; Watanabe, M. E.; Weinberger, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Large uncertainties about the energy resource potential and role in global climate change of gas hydrates result from uncertainty about how much hydrate is contained in marine sediments. During Leg 204 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) to the accretionary complex of the Cascadia subduction zone, we sampled the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) from the seafloor to its base in contrasting geological settings defined by a 3D seismic survey. By integrating results from different methods, including several new techniques developed for Leg 204, we overcome the problem of spatial under-sampling inherent in robust methods traditionally used for estimating the hydrate content of cores and obtain a high-resolution, quantitative estimate of the total amount and spatial variability of gas hydrate in this structural system. We conclude that high gas hydrate content (30-40% of pore space or 20-26% of total volume) is restricted to the upper tens of meters below the seafloor near the summit of the structure, where vigorous fluid venting occurs. Elsewhere, the average gas hydrate content of the sediments in the gas hydrate stability zone is generally <2% of the pore space, although this estimate may increase by a factor of 2 when patchy zones of locally higher gas hydrate content are included in the calculation. These patchy zones are structurally and stratigraphically controlled, contain up to 20% hydrate in the pore space when averaged over zones ???10 m thick, and may occur in up to ???20% of the region imaged by 3D seismic data. This heterogeneous gas hydrate distribution is an important constraint on models of gas hydrate formation in marine sediments and the response of the sediments to tectonic and environmental change. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Effect on Hydrate Formation in Spray Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of reaction condition on hydrate formation were conducted in spray reactor. The temperature, pressure, and gas volume of reaction on hydrate formation were measured in pure water and SDS solutions at different temperature and pressure with a high-pressure experimental rig for hydrate formation. The experimental data and result reveal that additives could improve the hydrate formation rate and gas storage capacity. Temperature and pressure can restrict the hydrate formation. Lower temperature and higher pressure can promote hydrate formation, but they can increase production cost. So these factors should be considered synthetically. The investigation will promote the advance of gas storage technology in hydrates.

  2. A Hydrate Database: Vital to the Technical Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Sloan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrates may contain more energy than all the combined other fossil fuels, causing hydrates to be a potentially vital aspect of both energy and climate change. This article is an overview of the motivation, history, and future of hydrate data management using a CODATA vehicle to connect international hydrate databases. The basis is an introduction to the Gas Hydrate Markup Language (GHML to connect various hydrate databases. The accompanying four articles on laboratory hydrate data by Smith et al., on field hydrate data by L?wner et al., on hydrate modeling by Wang et al., and on construction of a Chinese gas hydrate system by Xiao et al. provide details of GHML in their respective areas.

  3. Dielectric saturation of the ion hydration shell and interaction between two double helices of DNA in mono- and multivalent electrolyte solutions: foundations of the epsilon-modified Poisson-Boltzmann theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavryushov, Sergei

    2007-05-17

    Potentials of mean force between single Na+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ cations and a highly charged spherical macroion in SPC/E water have been determined using molecular dynamics simulations. Results are compared to the electrostatic energy calculations for the primitive polarization model (PPM) of hydrated cations describing the ion hydration shell as a dielectric sphere of low permittivity (Gavryushov, S.; Linse, P. J. Phys. Chem. B 2003, 107, 7135). Parameters of the ion dielectric sphere and radius of the macroion/water dielectric boundary were extracted by means of this comparison to approximate the short-range repulsion of ions near the interface. To explore the counterion distributions around a simplified model of DNA, the obtained PPM parameters for Na+ and Ca2+ have been substituted into the modified Poisson-Boltzmann (MPB) equations derived for the PPM and named the epsilon-MPB (epsilon-MPB) theory. epsilon-MPB results for DNA suggest that such polarization effects are important in the case of 2:1 electrolyte and highly charged macromolecules. The three-dimensional implementation of the epsilon-MPB theory was also applied to calculation of the energies of interaction between two parallel macromolecules of DNA in solutions of NaCl and CaCl2. Being compared to results of MPB calculations without the ion polarization effects, it suggests that the ion hydration shell polarization and inhomogeneous solvent permittivity might be essential factors in the experimentally known hydration forces acting between charged macromolecules and bilayers at separations of less than 20 A between their surfaces.

  4. Nanoscale amphiphilic macromolecules with variable lipophilicity and stereochemistry modulate inhibition of oxidized low-density lipoprotein uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poree, Dawanne E; Zablocki, Kyle; Faig, Allison; Moghe, Prabhas V; Uhrich, Kathryn E

    2013-08-12

    Amphiphilic macromolecules (AMs) based on carbohydrate domains functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol) can inhibit the uptake of oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and counteract foam cell formation, a key characteristic of early atherogenesis. To investigate the influence of lipophilicity and stereochemistry on the AMs' physicochemical and biological properties, mucic acid-based AMs bearing four aliphatic chains (2a) and tartaric acid-based AMs bearing two (2b and 2l) and four aliphatic chains (2g and 2k) were synthesized and evaluated. Solution aggregation studies suggested that both the number of hydrophobic arms and the length of the hydrophobic domain impact AM micelle sizes, whereas stereochemistry impacts micelle stability. 2l, the meso analogue of 2b, elicited the highest reported oxLDL uptake inhibition values (89%), highlighting the crucial effect of stereochemistry on biological properties. This study suggests that stereochemistry plays a critical role in modulating oxLDL uptake and must be considered when designing biomaterials for potential cardiovascular therapies.

  5. Vibrational dynamics of hydration water in amylose

    CERN Document Server

    Cavatorta, F; Albanese, G; Angelini, N

    2002-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamical properties of hydration water associated with amylose helices, based on low-temperature vibrational spectra collected using the TOSCA inelastic spectrometer at ISIS. The structural constraints of the polysaccharidic chains favour the formation of a high-density structure for water, which has been suggested by Imberty and Perez on the basis of conformational analysis. According to this model, hydration water can only enter the pores formed by six adjacent helices and completely fills the pores at a hydration level of about 0.27-g water/g dry amylose. Our measurements show that the dynamical behaviour of hydration water is similar to that observed in high-density amorphous ice. (orig.)

  6. ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrate Production Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoderbek, David; Farrell, Helen; Howard, James; Raterman, Kevin; Silpngarmlert, Suntichai; Martin, Kenneth; Smith, Bruce; Klein, Perry

    2013-06-30

    Work began on the ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrates Production Test (DOE award number DE-NT0006553) on October 1, 2008. This final report summarizes the entire project from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013.

  7. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Thomas Williams; Bjorn Paulsson; Alexander Goertz

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a drilling hazard by the oil and gas industry for years. Drilling engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous problems, including drilling kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates as a potential energy source agree that the resource potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained from physical samples taken from actual hydrate-bearing rocks. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The project team drilled and continuously cored the Hot Ice No. 1 well on Anadarko-leased acreage beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and used for determining physical characteristics of hydrates and surrounding rock. After the well was logged, a 3D vertical seismic profile (VSP) was recorded to calibrate the shallow geologic section with seismic data and to investigate techniques to better resolve lateral subsurface variations of potential hydrate-bearing strata. Paulsson Geophysical Services, Inc. deployed their 80 level 3C clamped borehole seismic receiver array in the wellbore to record samples every 25 ft. Seismic vibrators were successively positioned at 1185 different surface positions in a circular pattern around the wellbore. This technique generated a 3D image of the subsurface. Correlations were

  8. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  9. Polyethylene oxide hydration in grafted layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Wang, Zilu

    Hydration of water soluble polymers is one of the key-factors defining their conformation and properties, similar to biopolymers. Polyethylene oxide (PEO) is one of the most important biomedical-applications polymers and is known for its reverse temperature solubility due to hydrogen bonding with water. As in many practical applications PEO chains are grafted to surfaces, e.g. of nanoparticles or planar surfaces, it is important to understand PEO hydration in such grafted layers. Using atomistic molecular dynamic simulations we investigate the details of molecular conformation and hydration of PEO end-grafted to gold surfaces. We analyze polymer and water density distribution as a function of distance from the surface for different grafting densities. Based on a detailed analysis of hydrogen bonding between polymer and water in grafted PEO layers, we will discuss the extent of PEO hydration and its implication for polymer conformation, mobility and layer properties. This research is supported by NSF (DMR-1410928).

  10. Formulating formation mechanism of natural gas hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palodkar, Avinash V; Jana, Amiya K

    2017-07-25

    A large amount of energy, perhaps twice the total amount of all other hydrocarbon reserves combined, is trapped within gas hydrate deposits. Despite emerging as a potential energy source for the world over the next several hundred years and one of the key factors in causing future climate change, gas hydrate is poorly known in terms of its formation mechanism. To address this issue, a mathematical formulation is proposed in the form of a model to represent the physical insight into the process of hydrate growth that occurs on the surface and in the irregular nanometer-sized pores of the distributed porous particles. To evaluate the versatility of this rigorous model, the experimental data is used for methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) hydrates grown in different porous media with a wide range of considerations.

  11. Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Savidge

    2008-10-31

    The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

  12. Quantifying hydrate formation and kinetic inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloan, E.D.; Subramanian, S.; Matthews, P.N.; Lederhos, J.P.; Khokhar, A.A. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Hydrate Research

    1998-08-01

    In the Prausnitz tradition, molecular and macroscopic evidence of hydrate formation and kinetic inhibition is presented. On the microscopic level, the first Raman spectra are presented for the formation of both uninhibited and inhibited methane hydrates with time. This method has the potential to provide a microscopic-based kinetics model. Three macroscopic aspects of natural gas hydrate kinetic inhibition are also reported: (1) The effect of hydrate dissociation residual structures was measured, which has application in decreasing the time required for subsequent formation. (2) The performance of a kinetic inhibitor (poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) or PVCap) was measured and correlated as a function of PVCap molecular weight and concentrations of PVCap, methanol, and salt in the aqueous phase. (3) Long-duration test results indicated that the use of PVCap can prevent pipeline blockage for a time exceeding the aqueous phase residence time in some gas pipelines.

  13. Induced liquid-crystalline ordering in solutions of stiff and flexible amphiphilic macromolecules: Effect of mixture composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glagolev, Mikhail K; Vasilevskaya, Valentina V; Khokhlov, Alexei R

    2016-07-28

    Impact of mixture composition on self-organization in concentrated solutions of stiff helical and flexible macromolecules was studied by means of molecular dynamics simulation. The macromolecules were composed of identical amphiphilic monomer units but a fraction f of macromolecules had stiff helical backbones and the remaining chains were flexible. In poor solvents the compacted flexible macromolecules coexist with bundles or filament clusters from few intertwined stiff helical macromolecules. The increase of relative content f of helical macromolecules leads to increase of the length of helical clusters, to alignment of clusters with each other, and then to liquid-crystalline-like ordering along a single direction. The formation of filament clusters causes segregation of helical and flexible macromolecules and the alignment of the filaments induces effective liquid-like ordering of flexible macromolecules. A visual analysis and calculation of order parameter relaying the anisotropy of diffraction allow concluding that transition from disordered to liquid-crystalline state proceeds sharply at relatively low content of stiff components.

  14. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  15. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2004-11-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained

  16. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained

  17. Hydro-bio-geomechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments from Nankai Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamarina, J.C.; Dai, Shifeng; Terzariol, M.; Jang, Jeonghwan; Waite, William F.; Winters, William J.; Nagao, J.; Yoneda, J.; Konno, Y.; Fujii, T.; Suzuki, K.

    2015-01-01

    Natural hydrate-bearing sediments from the Nankai Trough, offshore Japan, were studied using the Pressure Core Characterization Tools (PCCTs) to obtain geomechanical, hydrological, electrical, and biological properties under in situ pressure, temperature, and restored effective stress conditions. Measurement results, combined with index-property data and analytical physics-based models, provide unique insight into hydrate-bearing sediments in situ. Tested cores contain some silty-sands, but are predominantly sandy- and clayey-silts. Hydrate saturations Sh range from 0.15 to 0.74, with significant concentrations in the silty-sands. Wave velocity and flexible-wall permeameter measurements on never-depressurized pressure-core sediments suggest hydrates in the coarser-grained zones, the silty-sands where Sh exceeds 0.4, contribute to soil-skeletal stability and are load-bearing. In the sandy- and clayey-silts, where Sh < 0.4, the state of effective stress and stress history are significant factors determining sediment stiffness. Controlled depressurization tests show that hydrate dissociation occurs too quickly to maintain thermodynamic equilibrium, and pressure–temperature conditions track the hydrate stability boundary in pure-water, rather than that in seawater, in spite of both the in situ pore water and the water used to maintain specimen pore pressure prior to dissociation being saline. Hydrate dissociation accompanied with fines migration caused up to 2.4% vertical strain contraction. The first-ever direct shear measurements on never-depressurized pressure-core specimens show hydrate-bearing sediments have higher sediment strength and peak friction angle than post-dissociation sediments, but the residual friction angle remains the same in both cases. Permeability measurements made before and after hydrate dissociation demonstrate that water permeability increases after dissociation, but the gain is limited by the transition from hydrate saturation

  18. Experimental Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Through Depressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgfeldt, T.; Flemings, P. B.; Meyer, D.; You, K.

    2015-12-01

    We dissociated methane hydrates by stepwise depressurization. The initial hydrates were formed by injecting gas into a cylindrical sample of brine-saturated, coarse-grained sand at hydrate-stable conditions with the intention of reaching three-phase equilibrium. The sample was initially at 1°C with a pore pressure of 1775 psi and a salinity of 7 wt. % NaBr. The depressurization setup consisted of one pump filled with tap water attached to the confining fluid port and a second pump attached to the inlet port where the methane was injected. Depressurization was conducted over sixteen hours at a constant temperature of 1°C. The pore pressure was stepwise reduced from 1775 psi to atmospheric pressure by pulling known volumes of gas from the sample. After each extraction, we recorded the instantaneous and equilibrium pore pressure. 0.503 moles of methane were removed from the sample. The pore pressure decreased smoothly and nonlinearly with the cumulative gas withdrawn from the sample. We interpret that hydrate began to dissociate immediately with depressurization, and it continued to dissociate when the pressure decreased below the three-phase pressure for 1°C and 0 wt. % salinity. Two breaks in slope in the pressure vs. mass extracted data are bounded by smooth, nonlinear curves with differing slopes on either side. We attribute the breaks to dissociation of three zones of hydrate concentration. We created a box model to simulate the experimental behavior. For a 10% initial gas saturation (estimated from the hydrate formation experiment and based on mass conservation), an initial hydrate saturation of 55% is required to match the total methane extracted from the sample. Future experiments will be conducted over a longer timespan while monitoring hydrate dissociation with CT imaging throughout the process.

  19. Hydration of polyethylene glycol-grafted liposomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Tirosh, O; Barenholz, Y.; Katzhendler, J; Priev, A

    1998-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the effect of polyethylene glycol of 2000 molecular weight (PEG2000) attached to a dialkylphosphatidic acid (dihexadecylphosphatidyl (DHP)-PEG2000) on the hydration and thermodynamic stability of lipid assemblies. Differential scanning calorimetry, densitometry, and ultrasound velocity and absorption measurements were used for thermodynamic and hydrational characterization. Using a differential scanning calorimetry technique we showed that each molecule of PEG...

  20. Exploitation of subsea gas hydrate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas hydrates are considered to be a potential energy resource in the future. They occur in permafrost areas as well as in subsea sediments and are stable at high pressure and low temperature conditions. According to estimations the amount of carbon bonded in natural gas hydrates worldwide is two times larger than in all known conventional fossil fuels. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e.g. depressurization and/or injection of carbon dioxide) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR«. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into a numerical model. The physics of the process leads to strong non-linear couplings between hydraulic fluid flow, hydrate dissociation and formation, hydraulic properties of the sediment, partial pressures and seawater solution of components and the thermal budget of the system described by the heat equation. This paper is intended to provide an overview of the recent development regarding the production of natural gas from subsea gas hydrate reservoirs. It aims at giving a broad insight into natural gas hydrates and covering relevant aspects of the exploitation process. It is focused on the thermodynamic principles and technological approaches for the exploitation. The effects occurring during natural gas production within hydrate filled sediment layers are identified and discussed by means of numerical simulation results. The behaviour of relevant process parameters such as pressure, temperature and phase saturations is described and compared for different strategies. The simulations are complemented by calculations for different safety relevant problems.

  1. Preservation of methane hydrate at 1 atm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    A "pressure-release" method that enables reproducible bulk preservation of pure, porous, methane hydrate at conditions 50 to 75 K above its equilibrium T (193 K) at 1 atm is refined. The amount of hydrate preserved by this method appears to be greatly in excess of that reported in the previous citations, and is likely the result of a mechanism different from ice shielding.

  2. Effects of Several Natural Macromolecules on the Stability and Controlled Release Properties of Water-in-Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinlong; Shi, Yiheng; Zhu, Yunping; Teng, Chao; Li, Xiuting

    2016-05-18

    Water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsions are effective vehicles for embedding application of active compounds but limited by their thermodynamic instability and rapid release properties. The present study added bovine serum albumin, whey protein isolate, whey protein hydrolysate, sodium caseinate, carboxymethylcellulose sodium, fish gelatin, apple pectin, gum arabic, ι-carrageenan, and hydroxypropyl chitosan separately to the internal or external aqueous phase to investigate their effects on the physical stabilities and controlled release properties of W/O/W emulsions. The effects of the natural macromolecules in the internal and external aqueous phases were different and depended upon the macromolecule structure and its mass fraction. The addition of the natural macromolecule strengthened the interfaces of emulsions, which improved the physical stability. The natural macromolecules that improved the stability often did not improve controlled release. Therefore, the balance between these properties needs to be considered when adding natural macromolecules to a W/O/W emulsion.

  3. Surfactant effects on SF6 hydrate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo Ram; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Ryu, Young Bok; Lee, Man Sig; Kim, Young Seok; Englezos, Peter; Kim, Myung Hyun; Kim, Yang Do

    2009-03-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) has been widely used in a variety of industrial processes, but it is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. For this reason, it is necessary to separate or collect it from waste gas streams. One separation method is through hydrate crystal formation. In this study, SF(6) hydrate was formed in aqueous surfactant solutions of 0.00, 0.01, 0.05, 0.15 and 0.20 wt% to investigate the effects of surfactants on the hydrate formation rates. Three surfactants, Tween 20 (Tween), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LABS), were tested in a semi-batch stirred vessel at the constant temperature and pressures of 276.2 K and 0.78 MPa, respectively. All surfactants showed kinetic promoter behavior for SF(6) hydrate formation. It was also found that SF(6) hydrate formation proceeded in two stages with the second stage being the most rapid. In situ Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that the increased gas consumption rate with the addition of surfactant was possibly due to the increased gas filling rate in the hydrate cavity.

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Tailored Macromolecules via Stable Free Radical Polymerization Methodologies

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The stable free radical polymerization methodology for production of controlled macromolecules was investigated using a novel monomer, 2-vinylnaphthalene. Initial polymerizations resulted in molecular weight distributions typical of conventional free radical polymerization techniques (>2.0). Manipulation of the initiator concentration and the molar ratio of initiator to nitroxide demonstrated no significant control over the resulting polymer products. Analysis of the polymerization kinetics...

  5. A novel method for imaging sites of paracellular passage of macromolecules in epithelial sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Jan F; Schmauder, Ralf; Krug, Susanne M; Gebert, Andreas; Schumann, Michael

    2016-05-10

    Understanding the dynamics of intestinal barrier function is key to elucidating oral delivery routes of therapeutics as well as to understanding various diseases that involve the mucosal immune system. Passage of macromolecules across barrier-forming epithelia is classically analyzed by means of various tracer flux measurements. This approach averages over contributions from many cells and lacks labeling of passage-sites. Thus, abundance and nature of involved cells have remained unidentified. We present a novel method that allowed for optical analysis of passage of various macromolecules on large-scale and single-cell level. To achieve tracking of passage loci in epithelia at submicrometer resolution we used biotinylated and fluorescent macromolecules that bind to basolateral membranes pre-labeled with cell-adherent avidin. We applied this method to epithelial cell lines and isolated mucosae in order to 3-dimensionally determine barrier leak properties over time. Tracer passage was found in all epithelia examined. However, it was infrequent, strikingly inhomogeneous, depended on culture duration and tightness of the monolayer. Stimulating passage with barrier-perturbing agents increased the number of leaks exposition time-dependently in cell lines and explanted mucosae. After stepwise opening of the paracellular passage pathway, integrated tracer-signal measured by our assay strictly correlated to simultaneously performed standard fluxes. Thus, our assay allows for the study of transepithelial macromolecule passage in various physiological and pathological conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. New strategy to create ultra-thin surface layer of grafted amphiphilic macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazutin, A A; Govorun, E N; Vasilevskaya, V V; Khokhlov, A R

    2015-05-14

    It was found first that macromolecules made of amphiphilic monomer units could form spontaneously an ultra-thin layer on the surface which the macromolecules are grafted to. The width of such layer is about double size of monomer unit consisting of hydrophilic A (repulsive) and hydrophobic (attractive) B beads. The hydrophilic A beads are connected in a polymer chain while hydrophobic B beads are attached to A beads of the backbone as side groups. Three characteristic regimes are distinguished. At low grafting density, the macromolecules form ultra-thin micelles of the shape changing with decrease of distance d between grafting points as following: circular micelles-prolonged micelles-inverse micelles-homogeneous bilayer. Those micelles have approximately constant height and specific top-down A-BB-A structure. At higher grafting density, the micelles start to appear above the single bilayer of amphiphilic macromolecules. The thickness of grafted layer in these cases is different in different regions of grafting surface. Only at rather high density of grafting, the height of macromolecular layer becomes uniform over the whole grafting surface. The study was performed by computer modeling experiments and confirmed in framework of analytical theory.

  7. Prospective frequency correction for macromolecule-suppressed GABA editing at 3T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edden, Richard A E; Oeltzschner, Georg; Harris, Ashley D

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of B0 field offsets and drift on macromolecule (MM)-suppressed GABA-editing experiments, and to implement and test a prospective correction scheme. "Symmetric" editing schemes are proposed to suppress unwanted coedited MM signals in GABA editing. MATERIALS...

  8. Stress growth and relaxation of dendritically branched macromolecules in shear and uniaxial extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Qian; Costanzo, S.; Das, C.

    2017-01-01

    of the remarkable properties of these highly branched macromolecules. In particular, we address three questions pertinent to the specific molecular structure: (i) is steady state attainable during uniaxial extension? (ii) what is the respective transient response in simple shear? and (iii) how does stress relax...

  9. Intermediate scattering function for macromolecules in solutions probed by neutron spin echo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun

    2017-02-01

    The neutron-spin-echo method (NSE) is a powerful technique for studying internal dynamics of macromolecules in solutions because it can simultaneously probe length and time scales comparable to intramolecular density fluctuations of macromolecules. Recently, there has been increased, strong interest in studying protein internal motions using NSE. The coherent intermediate scattering function (ISF) measured by NSE depends on internal, rotational, and translational motions of macromolecules in solutions. It is thus critical, but highly nontrivial, to separate the internal motion from other motions in order to properly understand protein internal dynamics. Even though many experiments are performed at relatively high concentrations, current theories of calculating the ISF of concentrated protein solutions are either inaccurate or flawed by incorrect assumptions for realistic protein systems with anisotropic shapes. Here, a theoretical framework is developed to establish the quantitative relationship of different motions included in the ISF. This theory based on the dynamic decoupling approximation is applicable to a wide range of protein concentrations, including dilute cases. It is also, in general, useful for studying many other types of macromolecule systems studied by NSE.

  10. The spectral properties of DNA and RNA macromolecules at low temperatures: fundamental and applied aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy M; Kudrya, Vladislav Yu

    2017-01-18

    This paper summarizes the results of studies of the spectral properties-optical absorption, fluorescence and phosphorescence-of DNA and RNA macromolecules and synthetic poly-, oligo- and mono-nucleotides, which have been carried out in our laboratory. The system of first excited singlet and triplet energy levels for DNA and RNA is evaluated using low-temperature (4.2 K-77 K) luminescent measurements. The traps of the singlet and triplet electronic excitations in these compounds are identified. An important self-protection mechanism against photo-damage of DNA and RNA by UV photons or penetrative radiation based on the capture of triplet electronic-energy excitations by the most photostable centers-in DNA, the complex formed by neighboring adenosine (A) and thymidine (T) links; in RNA, the adenosine links-is described. It is confirmed that despite similarities in the chemical and partly energy structures DNA is more stable than RNA. The spectral manifestation of the telomeres (the important functional system) in DNA macromolecules is examined. The results obtained on telomere fragments provide the possibility of finding the configuration peculiarities of the triplet excitations traps in DNA macromolecules. The resulting spreading length of the migrating singlet (l s) and triplet (l t) excitations for DNA and RNA macromolecules are evaluated.

  11. Theory of Brushes Formed by Ψ-Shaped Macromolecules at Solid-Liquid Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhulina, Ekaterina B; Leermakers, Frans A M; Borisov, Oleg V

    2015-06-16

    We present a theoretical analysis targeted to describe the structural properties of brushes formed by Ψ-shaped macromolecules tethered by terminal segment of stem to planar surface while exposing multiple free branches to the surrounding solution. We use an analytical self-consistent field approach based on the strong stretching approximation, and the assumption of Gaussian elasticity for linear chain fragments of the tethered macromolecules. The effect of weak and strong polydispersity of branches is analyzed. In the case of weakly polydisperse macromolecules, variations in length of branches lead to a more uniform polymer density distribution with slight increase in the brush thickness compared to the case of monodisperse chains with the same degree of polymerization. We demonstrate that in contrast to linear chains, strong polydispersity of Ψ-shaped macromolecules does not necessarily lead to strong perturbations in polymer density distribution. In particular, mixed brushes of the so-called "mirror" dendrons (in which number of stem monomers in one component coincides with number of monomers in a branch of the other component, and vice versa) give rise to a unified polymer density distribution with shape independent of the brush composition. The predictions of analytical theory are systematically compared to the results of numerical self-consistent field modeling based on the Scheutjens-Fleer approach.

  12. Tonal Interface to MacroMolecules (TIMMol): A Textual and Tonal Tool for Molecular Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, Timothy J.; Carlson, C. Britt; Forest, Katrina T.

    2008-01-01

    We developed the three-dimensional visualization software, Tonal Interface to MacroMolecules or TIMMol, for studying atomic coordinates of protein structures. Key features include audio tones indicating x, y, z location, identification of the cursor location in one-dimensional and three-dimensional space, textual output that can be easily linked…

  13. A screening-corrected additivity rule for the calculation of electron scattering from macro-molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, F [Departamento de Fisica Atomica Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas. Universidad Complutense, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Garcia, G [Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: pacobr@fis.ucm.es

    2009-07-28

    A simplified form of the well-known screening-corrected additivity rule procedure for the calculation of electron-molecule cross sections is proposed for the treatment of some very large macro-molecules. While the comparison of the standard and simplified treatments for a DNA dodecamer reveals very similar results, the new treatment presents some important advantages for large molecules.

  14. Distribution of various forms of organic nitrogen in a lignite macromolecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.; Shavyrina, O.A.; Ryl' tsova, S.V. [Lev Tolstoi State Pedalogical University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    The chemical composition of organic bases from tars of stepwise semicoking of lignite was studied. The features of distribution of organic nitrogen in a coal macromolecule and the most probable pathways of thermal degradation of the nitrogen-containing fragments were examined.

  15. Intermediate scattering function for macromolecules in solutions probed by neutron spin echo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun

    2017-02-01

    The neutron-spin-echo method (NSE) is a powerful technique for studying internal dynamics of macromolecules in solutions because it can simultaneously probe length and time scales comparable to intramolecular density fluctuations of macromolecules. Recently, there has been increased, strong interest in studying protein internal motions using NSE. The coherent intermediate scattering function (ISF) measured by NSE depends on internal, rotational, and translational motions of macromolecules in solutions. It is thus critical, but highly nontrivial, to separate the internal motion from other motions in order to properly understand protein internal dynamics. Even though many experiments are performed at relatively high concentrations, current theories of calculating the ISF of concentrated protein solutions are either inaccurate or flawed by incorrect assumptions for realistic protein systems with anisotropic shapes. Here, a theoretical framework is developed to establish the quantitative relationship of different motions included in the ISF. This theory based on the dynamic decoupling approximation is applicable to a wide range of protein concentrations, including dilute cases. It is also, in general, useful for studying many other types of macromolecule systems studied by NSE.

  16. The spectral properties of DNA and RNA macromolecules at low temperatures: fundamental and applied aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy M.; Kudrya, Vladislav Yu

    2017-03-01

    This paper summarizes the results of studies of the spectral properties—optical absorption, fluorescence and phosphorescence—of DNA and RNA macromolecules and synthetic poly-, oligo- and mono-nucleotides, which have been carried out in our laboratory. The system of first excited singlet and triplet energy levels for DNA and RNA is evaluated using low-temperature (4.2 K-77 K) luminescent measurements. The traps of the singlet and triplet electronic excitations in these compounds are identified. An important self-protection mechanism against photo-damage of DNA and RNA by UV photons or penetrative radiation based on the capture of triplet electronic-energy excitations by the most photostable centers—in DNA, the complex formed by neighboring adenosine (A) and thymidine (T) links; in RNA, the adenosine links—is described. It is confirmed that despite similarities in the chemical and partly energy structures DNA is more stable than RNA. The spectral manifestation of the telomeres (the important functional system) in DNA macromolecules is examined. The results obtained on telomere fragments provide the possibility of finding the configuration peculiarities of the triplet excitations traps in DNA macromolecules. The resulting spreading length of the migrating singlet (l s) and triplet (l t) excitations for DNA and RNA macromolecules are evaluated.

  17. Classification of the ejection mechanisms of charged macromolecules from liquid droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consta, Styliani; Malevanets, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    The relation between the charge state of a macromolecule and its ejection mechanism from droplets is one of the important questions in electrospray ionization methods. In this article, effects of solvent-solute interaction on the manifestation of the charge induced instability in a droplet are examined. We studied the instabilities in a prototype system of a droplet comprised of charged poly(ethylene glycol) and methanol, acetonitrile, and water solvents. We observed instances of three, previously only conjectured, [S. Consta, J. Phys. Chem. B 114, 5263 (2010), 10.1021/jp912119v] mechanisms of macroion ejection. The mechanism of ejection of charged macroion in methanol is reminiscent of "pearl" model in polymer physics. In acetonitrile droplets, the instability manifests through formation of solvent spines around the solvated macroion. In water, we find that the macroion is ejected from the droplet through contiguous extrusion of a part of the chain. The difference in the morphology of the instabilities is attributed to the interplay between forces arising from the macroion solvation energy and the surface energy of the droplet interface. For the contiguous extrusion of a charged macromolecule from a droplet, we demonstrate that the proposed mechanism leads to ejection of the macromolecule from droplets with sizes well below the Rayleigh limit. The ejected macromolecule may hold charge significantly higher than that suggested by prevailing theories. The simulations reveal new mechanisms of macroion evaporation that differ from conventional charge residue model and ion evaporation mechanisms.

  18. A chip sustem for size separation of macromolecules and particles by hydrodynamic chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chmela, Emil; Tijssen, Robert; Blom, M.T.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; van den Berg, Albert

    2002-01-01

    For the first time, a miniaturized hydrodynamic chromatography chip system has been developed and tested on separation of fluorescent nanospheres and macromolecules. The device can be applied to size characterization of synthetic polymers, biopolymers, and particles, as an attractive alternative to

  19. Reading polymers: sequencing of natural and synthetic macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Hatice; Lutz, Jean-François

    2014-11-24

    The sequencing of biopolymers such as proteins and DNA is among the most significant scientific achievements of the 20th century. Indeed, modern chemical methods for sequence analysis allow reading and understanding the codes of life. Thus, sequencing methods currently play a major role in applications as diverse as genomics, gene therapy, biotechnology, and data storage. However, in terms of fundamental science, sequencing is not really a question of molecular biology but rather a more general topic in macromolecular chemistry. Broadly speaking, it can be defined as the analysis of comonomer sequences in copolymers. However, relatively different approaches have been used in the past to study monomer sequences in biological and manmade polymers. Yet, these "cultural" differences are slowly fading away with the recent development of synthetic sequence-controlled polymers. In this context, the aim of this Minireview is to present an overview of the tools that are currently available for sequence analysis in macromolecular science. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. In Situ Raman Analyses of Natural Gas and Gas Hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, E. T.; White, S. N.; Dunk, R. M.; Brewer, P. G.; Sherman, A. D.; Schmidt, K.; Hester, K. C.; Sloan, E. D.

    2004-12-01

    During a July 2004 cruise to Hydrate Ridge, Oregon, MBARI's sea-going laser Raman spectrometer was used to obtain in situ Raman spectra of natural gas hydrates and natural gas venting from the seafloor. This was the first in situ analysis of gas hydrates on the seafloor. The hydrate spectra were compared to laboratory analyses performed at the Center for Hydrate Research, Colorado School of Mines. The natural gas spectra were compared to MBARI gas chromatography (GC) analyses of gas samples collected at the same site. DORISS (Deep Ocean Raman In Situ Spectrometer) is a laboratory model laser Raman spectrometer from Kaiser Optical Systems, Inc modified at MBARI for deployment in the deep ocean. It has been successfully deployed to depths as great as 3600 m. Different sampling optics provide flexibility in adapting the instrument to a particular target of interest. An immersion optic was used to analyze natural gas venting from the seafloor at South Hydrate Ridge ( ˜780 m depth). An open-bottomed cube was placed over the vent to collect the gas. The immersion optic penetrated the side of the cube as did a small heater used to dissociate any hydrate formed during sample collection. To analyze solid hydrates at both South and North Hydrate Ridge ( ˜590 m depth), chunks of hydrate were excavated from the seafloor and collected in a glass cylinder with a mesh top. A stand-off optic was used to analyze the hydrate inside the cylinder. Due to the partial opacity of the hydrate and the small focal volume of the sampling optic, a precision underwater positioner (PUP) was used to focus the laser spot onto the hydrate. PUP is a stand-alone system with three degrees-of-freedom, capable of moving the DORISS probe head with a precision of 0.1 mm. In situ Raman analyses of the gas indicate that it is primarily methane. This is verified by GC analyses of samples collected from the same site. Other minor constituents (such as CO2 and higher hydrocarbons) are present but may be in

  1. Methane seeps, methane hydrate destabilization, and the late Neoproterozoic postglacial cap carbonates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ganqing; SHI Xiaoying; ZHANG Shihong

    2006-01-01

    Methane hydrates constitute the largest pool of readily exchangeable carbon at the Earth's sedimentary carapace and may destabilize, in some cases catastrophically, during times of global-scale warming and/or sea level changes. Given the extreme cold during Neoproterozoic ice ages, the aftermath of such events is perhaps amongst the most likely intervals in Earth history to witness a methane hydrate destabilization event. The coincidence of localized but widespread methane seep-like structures and textures, methane-derived isotopic signal,low sulfate concentration, marine barites, and a prominent, short-lived carbon isotope excursion (δ13C≤-5‰) from the post-Marinoan cap carbonates (~635 Ma) provides strong evidence for a methane hydrate destabilization event during the late Neoproterozoic postglacial warming and transgression. Methane release from hydrates could cause a positive feedback to global warming and oxidation of methane could result in ocean anoxia and fluctuation of atmospheric oxygen, providing an environmental force for the early animal evolution in the latest Neoproterozoic. The issues that remain to be clarified for this event include the trigger of methane hydrate destabilization, the time of initial methane release, the predicted ocean anoxia event and its relationship with the biological innovation, additional geochemical signals in response to methane release, and the regional and global synchrony of cap carbonate precipitation. The Doushantuo cap carbonate in South China provides one of the best examples of its age for a better understanding of these issues.

  2. The importance of hydration in wound healing: reinvigorating the clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousey, K; Cutting, K F; Rogers, A A; Rippon, M G

    2016-03-01

    Balancing skin hydration levels is important as any disruption in skin integrity will result in disturbance of the dermal water balance. The discovery that a moist environment actively supports the healing response when compared with a dry environment highlights the importance of water and good hydration levels for optimal healing. The benefits of 'wet' or 'hyper-hydrated' wound healing appear similar to those offered by moist over a dry environment. This suggests that the presence of free water may not be detrimental to healing, but any adverse effects of wound fluid on tissues is more likely related to the biological components contained within chronic wound exudate, for example elevated protease levels. Appropriate dressings applied to wounds must not only be able to absorb the exudate, but also retain this excess fluid together with its protease solutes, while concurrently preventing desiccation. This is particularly important in the case of chronic wounds where peri-wound skin barrier properties are compromised and there is increased permeation across the injured skin. This review discusses the importance of appropriate levels of hydration in skin, with a particular focus on the need for optimal hydration levels for effective healing. Declaration of interest: This paper was supported by Paul Hartmann Ltd. The authors have provided consultative services to Paul Hartmann Ltd.

  3. Hydration of the cyanide ion: an ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moin, Syed Tarique; Hofer, Thomas S

    2014-12-21

    This paper presents an ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics simulation study of the cyanide anion (CN(-)) in aqueous solution where hydrogen bond formation plays a dominant role in the hydration process. Preferential orientation of water hydrogens compared to oxygen atoms was quantified in terms of radial, angular as well as coordination number distributions. All structural results indicate that the water hydrogens are attracted towards CN(-) atoms, thus contributing to the formation of the hydration layer. Moreover, a clear picture of the local arrangement of water molecules around the ellipsoidal CN(-) ion is provided via angular-radial distribution and spatial distribution functions. Apart from the structural analysis, the evaluation of water dynamics in terms of ligand mean residence times and H-bond correlation functions indicates the weak structure making capacity of the CN(-) ion. The similar values of H-bond lifetimes obtained for the NHwat and CHwat bonds indicate an isokinetic behaviour of these H-bonds, since there is a very small difference in the magnitude of the lifetimes. On the other hand, the H-bond lifetimes between water molecules of the hydration shell, and between solute and solvent evidence the slightly stable hydration of the CN(-). Overall, the H-bonding dominates in the hydration process of the cyanide anion enabling it to become soluble in the aqueous environment associated to chemical and biological processes.

  4. Hollow fiber membrane modification with functional zwitterionic macromolecules for improved thromboresistance in artificial lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Sang-Ho; Arazawa, David T; Zhu, Yang; Shankarraman, Venkat; Malkin, Alexander D; Kimmel, Jeremy D; Gamble, Lara J; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Federspiel, William J; Wagner, William R

    2015-03-03

    Respiratory assist devices seek optimized performance in terms of gas transfer efficiency and thromboresistance to minimize device size and reduce complications associated with inadequate blood biocompatibility. The exchange of gas with blood occurs at the surface of the hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) used in these devices. In this study, three zwitterionic macromolecules were attached to HFM surfaces to putatively improve thromboresistance: (1) carboxyl-functionalized zwitterionic phosphorylcholine (PC) and (2) sulfobetaine (SB) macromolecules (mPC or mSB-COOH) prepared by a simple thiol-ene radical polymerization and (3) a low-molecular weight sulfobetaine (SB)-co-methacrylic acid (MA) block copolymer (SBMAb-COOH) prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Each macromolecule type was covalently immobilized on an aminated commercial HFM (Celg-A) by a condensation reaction, and HFM surface composition changes were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Thrombotic deposition on the HFMs was investigated after contact with ovine blood in vitro. The removal of CO2 by the HFMs was also evaluated using a model respiratory assistance device. The HFMs conjugated with zwitterionic macromolecules (Celg-mPC, Celg-mSB, and Celg-SBMAb) showed expected increases in phosphorus or sulfur surface content. Celg-mPC and Celg-SBMAb experienced rates of platelet deposition significantly lower than those of unmodified (Celg-A, >95% reduction) and heparin-coated (>88% reduction) control HFMs. Smaller reductions were seen with Celg-mSB. The CO2 removal rate for Celg-SBMAb HFMs remained comparable to that of Celg-A. In contrast, the rate of removal of CO2 for heparin-coated HFMs was significantly reduced. The results demonstrate a promising approach to modifying HFMs using zwitterionic macromolecules for artificial lung devices with improved thromboresistance without degradation of gas transfer.

  5. Using magnetic resonance imaging to monitor CH4 hydrate formation and spontaneous conversion of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Bernard A; Stevens, Jim; Howard, James J; Graue, Arne; Kvamme, Bjorn; Aspenes, Erick; Ersland, Geir; Husebø, Jarle; Zornes, David R

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was used to monitor and quantify methane hydrate formation and exchange in porous media. Conversion of methane hydrate to carbon dioxide hydrate, when exposed to liquid carbon dioxide at 8.27 MPa and approximately 4 degrees C, was experimentally demonstrated with MRI data and verified by mass balance calculations of consumed volumes of gases and liquids. No detectable dissociation of the hydrate was measured during the exchange process.

  6. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  7. Solid state tungsten oxide hydrate/tin oxide hydrate electrochromic device prepared by electrochemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Kentaro; Matsuo, Ryo; Sasano, Junji; Yokoyama, Seiji; Izaki, Masanobu

    2017-03-01

    The solid state electrochromic device composed of tungsten oxide hydrate (WO3(H2O)0.33) and tin oxide hydrate (Sn(O,OH)) has been constructed by anodic deposition of WO3(H2O)0.33 and Sn(O,OH) layers and showed the color change from clear to blue by applying voltage through an Au electrode.

  8. Kinetic studies of gas hydrate formation with low-dosage hydrate inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Pipeline blockage by gas hydrates is a serious problem in the petroleum industry.Low-dosage inhibitors have been developed for its cost-effective and environmentally acceptable characteristics.In a 1.072-L reactor with methane,ethane and propane gas mixture under the pressure of about 8.5 MPa at 4 °C,hydrate formation was investigated with low-dosage hydrate inhibitors PVP and GHI1,the change of the compressibility factor and gas composition in the gas phase was analyzed,the gas contents in hydrates were compared with PVP and GHI1 added,and the inhibition mechanism of GHI1 was discussed.The results show that PVP and GHI1 could effectively inhibit the growth of gas hydrates but not nucleation.Under the experimental condition with PVP added,methane and ethane occupied the small cavities of the hydrate crystal unit and the ability of ethane entering into hydrate cavities was weaker than that of methane.GHI1 could effectively inhibit molecules which could more readily form hydrates.The ether and hydroxy group of diethylene glycol monobutyl ether have the responsibility for stronger inhibition ability of GHI1 than PVP.

  9. Experimental characterization of production behavior accompanying the hydrate reformation in methane hydrate bearing sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, T.; Kang, J.M.; Nguyen, H.T. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, C. [Kangwon National Univ., (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. [Korea Inst., of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    This study investigated the production behaviour associated with gas hydrate reformation in methane hydrate-bearing sediment by hot-brine injection. A range of different temperature and brine injection rates were used to analyze the pressure and temperature distribution, the gas production behaviour and the movement of the dissociation front. The study showed that hydrate reformation reduces the production rate considerably at an early time. However, gas production increases during the dissociation, near the outlet because the dissociated methane around the inlet is consumed in reforming the hydrate and increases the hydrate saturation around the outlet. Higher temperature also increases the gas production rate and the speed of the dissociation front. 12 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  10. Permselectivity of the liver blood-lymph (ascitic fluid) barrier to macromolecules in decompensated cirrhosis: relation to calculated pore-size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1983-01-01

    ) exchange of endogeneous macromolecules. A significant 'sieving' is present in this barrier to the largest macromolecule (IgM). Calculations of pore-size equivalent to the observed permselectivity of macromolecules suggest microvascular gaps (or channels) with an average radius about 300 A, i...

  11. Authigenic gypsum found in gas hydrate-associated sediments from Hydrate Ridge, the eastern North Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Jiasheng; Erwin; Suess; Dirk; Rickert

    2004-01-01

    Characteristic gypsum micro-sphere and granular mass were discovered by binocular microscope in the gas hydrate-associated sediments at cores SO143-221 and SO143/TVG40-2A respectively on Hydrate Ridge of Cascadia margin, the eastern North Pacific. XRD patterns and EPA analyses show both micro-sphere and granular mass of the crystals have the typical peaks and the typical main chemical compositions of gypsum, although their weight percents are slightly less than the others in the non-gas hydrate-associated marine regions. SEM pictures show that the gypsum crystals have clear crystal boundaries, planes, edges and cleavages of gypsum in form either of single crystal or of twin crystals. In view of the fact that there are meanwhile gas hydrate-associated authigenic carbonates and SO42(-rich pore water in the same sediment cores, it could be inferred reasonably that the gypsums formed also authigenically in the gas hydrate-associated environment too, most probably at the interface between the downward advecting sulfate-rich seawater and the below gas hydrate, which spilled calcium during its formation on Hydrate Ridge. The two distinct forms of crystal intergrowth, which are the granular mass of series single gypsum crystals at core SO143/TVG40-2A and the microsphere of gypsum crystals accompanied with detrital components at core SO143-221 respectively, indicate that they precipitated most likely in different interstitial water dynamic environments. So, the distinct authigenic gypsums found in gas hydrate-associated sediments on Hydrate Ridge could also be believed as one of the parameters which could be used to indicate the presence of gas hydrate in an unknown marine sediment cores.

  12. Imaging Macromolecules with X-ray laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The short wavelength of X-rays allows us to resolve atoms, but in practise for biological materials the achievable resolution is limited by the destruction of the sample by the radiation that forms the image.  For over 100 years, the workaround to this problem of radiation damage has been to average signals from repeating copies of the object arranged in a large crystal.  It is now possible to overcome damage limits by using intense X-ray pulses that vaporise the sample, but which are short enough in duration to freeze any motion of the sample on the atomic scale.  With the advent of X-ray FELs we have been able to confirm this principle, and are now applying it to overcoming a major bottleneck for protein crystallography, which is the need for large well-diffracting crystals.  The intense pulses also open up opportunities to help solve the crystallographic phase problem.  In particular we have found that commonly-occurring disordered crystals that are usually not ...

  13. Hydroxycinnamic acids are ester-linked directly to glucosyl moieties within the lignan macromolecule from flaxseed hulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struijs, Karin; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Verhoef, René; Voragen, Alphons G J; Gruppen, Harry

    2008-03-01

    In flaxseed hulls, lignans are present in an oligomeric structure. Secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), ester-linked to hydroxy-methyl-glutaric acid (HMGA), forms the backbone of this lignan macromolecule. The hydroxycinnamic acids p-coumaric acid glucoside (CouAG) and ferulic acid glucoside (FeAG) are also part of the lignan macromolecule. However, their position and type of linkage are still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate how CouAG and FeAG are linked within the lignan macromolecule from flaxseed hulls. Fragments of the lignan macromolecule were obtained by partial saponification. After isolation of the fragments by preparative RP-HPLC, several key structures were identified by MS and NMR. Within the lignan macromolecule, CouAG is attached to the C-6 position of a glucosyl moiety of SDG. FeA is linked to the C-2 position of a glucosyl moiety of SDG. FeAG is ester-linked within the lignan macromolecule with its carboxyl group, but it remains unclear whether FeAG links to the C-2 or C-6 position of SDG. Attachment of HMGA to the glucosyl moiety of CouAG or FeAG was not observed. The results clearly show that within the lignan macromolecule, the hydroxycinnamic acids are linked directly via an ester bond to the glucosyl moiety of SDG.

  14. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom

  15. Experimental Determination of Refractive Index of Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bylov, Martin; Rasmussen, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The refractive indexes of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate have been experimentally determined. The refractive indexes were determined in an indirect manner making use of the fact that two non-absorbing materials will have the same refractive index if they cannot be distinguished visually....... For methane hydrate (structure I) the refractive index was found to be 1.346 and for natural gas hydrate (structure II) it was found to be 1.350. The measurements further suggest that the gas hydrate growth rate increases if the water has formed hydrates before. The induction time, on the other hand, seems...

  16. Complex admixtures of clathrate hydrates in a water desalination method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Blake A.; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Anderson, David W.

    2009-07-14

    Disclosed is a method that achieves water desalination by utilizing and optimizing clathrate hydrate phenomena. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds of gas and water that desalinate water by excluding salt molecules during crystallization. Contacting a hydrate forming gaseous species with water will spontaneously form hydrates at specific temperatures and pressures through the extraction of water molecules from the bulk phase followed by crystallite nucleation. Subsequent dissociation of pure hydrates yields fresh water and, if operated correctly, allows the hydrate-forming gas to be efficiently recycled into the process stream.

  17. Verification of simple hydration/dehydration methods to characterize multiple water compartments on tendon type 1 collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Ivan L; Short, Nicholas J; Fullerton, Gary D

    2007-06-01

    A molecular model of collagen hydration is used to validate centrifugal dehydration force (CDF) and re-hydration isotherm (RHI) methods to measure and characterize hydration compartments on bovine tendon. The CDF method assesses fluid flow rate from flexor and extensor tendons expressed in (g-water/g-dry mass-minute) and hydration capacity of compartments in (g-water/g-dry mass). Measured water compartment capacities agree with the molecular model of collagen hydration [Fullerton GD, Rahal A. Collagen structure: the molecular source of tendon magic angle effect. J Mag Reson Imag 2007;25:345-361; Fullerton GD, Amurao MR. Evidence that collagen and tendon have monolayer water coverage in the native state. Cell Biol Int 2006;30(1):56-65]. Native tendon hydration has monolayer coverage on collagen h(m)=1.6 g/g which divides into primary hydration on polar surfaces h(pp)=0.8 g/g and secondary hydration h(s)=0.8 g/g bridging over hydrophobic surfaces. Primary hydration is hydrogen bonded to collagen polar side chains h(psc)=0.54 g/g with small free energy or to the protein main chain hydration h(pmc)=0.26 g/g with greater free energy of binding. The CDF method replaces the more time consuming water proton NMR spin-lattice dehydration (NMR titration) method, confirms the presence of three non-bulk water compartments on collagen (h(pmc)=0.26 g/g, h(pp)=0.8 g/g and h(m)=1.6 g/g). This CDF method provides the most reproducible experimental measure of total tissue non-bulk water (TNBW). The re-hydration isotherm method, on the other hand, provides the most accurate measure of the Ramachandran water-bridge capacity h(Ra)=0.0656 g/g. The only equipment needed are: microfilterfuge tubes, a microcentrifuge capable of 14,000 x g or 4MPa, a vacuum drying oven, an accurate balance and curve fitting ability. The newly validated methods should be useful for characterizing multiple water compartments in biological and non-biological materials by allowing direct measurement of water

  18. First-principles elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, J.

    2014-07-01

    The elasticity of monocarboaluminate hydrates, 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·xH2O (x = 11 or 8), has been investigated by first-principles calculations. Previous experimental study revealed that the fully hydrated monocarboaluminate (x = 11) exhibits exceptionally low compressibility compared to other reported calcium aluminate hydrates. This stiff hydration product can contribute to the strength of concrete made with Portland cements containing calcium carbonates. In this study, full elastic tensors and mechanical properties of the crystal structures with different water contents (x = 11 or 8) are computed by first-principles methods based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the compressibility of monocarboaluminate is highly dependent on the water content in the interlayer region. The structure also becomes more isotropic with the addition of water molecules in this region. Since the monocarboaluminate is a key hydration product of limestone added cement, elasticity of the crystal is important to understand its mechanical impact on concrete. Besides, it is put forth that this theoretical calculation will be useful in predicting the elastic properties of other complex cementitous materials and the influence of ion exchange on compressibility.

  19. Interfacial phenomena in gas hydrate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Zachary M; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-03-21

    Gas hydrates are crystalline inclusion compounds, where molecular cages of water trap lighter species under specific thermodynamic conditions. Hydrates play an essential role in global energy systems, as both a hinderance when formed in traditional fuel production and a substantial resource when formed by nature. In both traditional and unconventional fuel production, hydrates share interfaces with a tremendous diversity of materials, including hydrocarbons, aqueous solutions, and inorganic solids. This article presents a state-of-the-art understanding of hydrate interfacial thermodynamics and growth kinetics, and the physiochemical controls that may be exerted on both. Specific attention is paid to the molecular structure and interactions of water, guest molecules, and hetero-molecules (e.g., surfactants) near the interface. Gas hydrate nucleation and growth mechanics are also presented, based on studies using a combination of molecular modeling, vibrational spectroscopy, and X-ray and neutron diffraction. The fundamental physical and chemical knowledge and methods presented in this review may be of value in probing parallel systems of crystal growth in solid inclusion compounds, crystal growth modifiers, emulsion stabilization, and reactive particle flow in solid slurries.

  20. Stability evaluation of hydrate-bearing sediments during thermally-driven hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, T.; Cho, G.; Santamarina, J.; Kim, H.; Lee, J.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrate-bearing sediments may destabilize spontaneously as part of geological processes, unavoidably during petroleum drilling/production operations, or intentionally as part of gas extraction from the hydrate itself. In all cases, high pore fluid pressure generation is anticipated during hydrate dissociation. This study examined how thermal changes destabilize gas hydrate-bearing sediments. First, an analytical formulation was derived for predicting fluid pressure evolution in hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to thermal stimulation without mass transfer. The formulation captures the self-preservation behavior, calculates the hydrate and free gas quantities during dissociation, considering effective stress-controlled sediment compressibility and gas solubility in aqueous phase. Pore fluid pressure generation is proportional to the initial hydrate fraction and the sediment bulk stiffness; is inversely proportional to the initial gas fraction and gas solubility; and is limited by changes in effective stress that cause the failure of the sediment. Second, the analytical formulation for hydrate dissociation was incorporated as a user-defined function into a verified finite difference code (FLAC2D). The underlying physical processes of hydrate-bearing sediments, including hydrate dissociation, self-preservation, pore pressure evolution, gas dissolution, and sediment volume expansion, were coupled with the thermal conduction, pore fluid flow, and mechanical response of sediments. We conducted the simulations for a duration of 20 years, assuming a constant-temperature wellbore transferred heat to the surrounding hydrate-bearing sediments, resulting in dissociation of methane hydrate in the well vicinity. The model predicted dissociation-induced excess pore fluid pressures which resulted in a large volume expansion and plastic deformation of the sediments. Furthermore, when the critical stress was reached, localized shear failure of the sediment around the borehole was

  1. Role of natural product diversity in chemical biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jiyong

    2011-06-01

    Through the natural selection process, natural products possess a unique and vast chemical diversity and have been evolved for optimal interactions with biological macromolecules. Owing to their diversity, target affinity, and specificity, natural products have demonstrated enormous potential as modulators of biomolecular function, been an essential source for drug discovery, and provided design principles for combinatorial library development.

  2. Analysis of Mammalian Cell Proliferation and Macromolecule Synthesis Using Deuterated Water and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria C. Foletta

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Deuterated water (2H2O, a stable isotopic tracer, provides a convenient and reliable way to label multiple cellular biomass components (macromolecules, thus permitting the calculation of their synthesis rates. Here, we have combined 2H2O labelling, GC-MS analysis and a novel cell fractionation method to extract multiple biomass components (DNA, protein and lipids from the one biological sample, thus permitting the simultaneous measurement of DNA (cell proliferation, protein and lipid synthesis rates. We have used this approach to characterize the turnover rates and metabolism of a panel of mammalian cells in vitro (muscle C2C12 and colon cancer cell lines. Our data show that in actively-proliferating cells, biomass synthesis rates are strongly linked to the rate of cell division. Furthermore, in both proliferating and non-proliferating cells, it is the lipid pool that undergoes the most rapid turnover when compared to DNA and protein. Finally, our data in human colon cancer cell lines reveal a marked heterogeneity in the reliance on the de novo lipogenic pathway, with the cells being dependent on both ‘self-made’ and exogenously-derived fatty acid.

  3. Methane hydrates in nature - Current knowledge and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated effort, the United States Congress enacted the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. At the same time, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan launched a research program to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. India, China, the Republic of Korea, and other nations also have established large methane hydrate research and development programs. Government-funded scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrates in nature. Numerous studies have shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world may exceed the volume of known organic carbon sources. However, methane hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge, and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of methane hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various methane hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural methane hydrates, (5) analyzing the methane hydrate role as a geohazard, (6) establishing the means to detect and characterize methane hydrate accumulations using geologic and geophysical data, and (7) establishing the thermodynamic phase equilibrium properties of methane hydrates as a function of temperature, pressure, and gas composition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) combined their efforts in 2012 to assess the contributions that scientific drilling has made and could continue to make to advance

  4. Apparatus investigates geological aspects of gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, J.S.; Winters, W.J.; Dillon, William P.

    1999-01-01

    The US Geological Survey has developed a laboratory research system which allows the study of the creation and dissociation of gas hydrates under deepwater conditions and with different sediment types and pore fluids. The system called GHASTLI (gas hydrate and sediment test laboratory instrument) comprises a pressure chamber which holds a sediment specimen, and which can simulate water depths to 2,500m and different sediment overburden. Seawater and gas flow through a sediment specimen can be precisely controlled and monitored. It can simulate a wide range of geology and processes and help to improve understanding of gas hydrate processes and aid prediction of geohazards, their control and potential use as an energy source. This article describes GHASTLI and how it is able to simulate natural conditions, focusing on fluid volume, acoustic velocity-compressional and shear wave, electric resistance, temperature, pore pressure, shear strength, and permeability.

  5. Simulation of Methane Recovery from Gas Hydrates Combined with Storing Carbon Dioxide as Hydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Janicki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the medium term, gas hydrate reservoirs in the subsea sediment are intended as deposits for carbon dioxide (CO2 from fossil fuel consumption. This idea is supported by the thermodynamics of CO2 and methane (CH4 hydrates and the fact that CO2 hydrates are more stable than CH4 hydrates in a certain P-T range. The potential of producing methane by depressurization and/or by injecting CO2 is numerically studied in the frame of the SUGAR project. Simulations are performed with the commercial code STARS from CMG and the newly developed code HyReS (hydrate reservoir simulator especially designed for hydrate processing in the subsea sediment. HyReS is a nonisothermal multiphase Darcy flow model combined with thermodynamics and rate kinetics suitable for gas hydrate calculations. Two scenarios are considered: the depressurization of an area 1,000 m in diameter and a one/two-well scenario with CO2 injection. Realistic rates for injection and production are estimated, and limitations of these processes are discussed.

  6. Mitochondrial transit peptide exhibits cell penetration ability and efficiently delivers macromolecules to mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Aastha; Chugh, Archana

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial malfunction under various circumstances can lead to a variety of disorders. Effective targeting of macromolecules (drugs) is important for restoration of mitochondrial function and treatment of related disorders. We have designed a novel cell-penetrating mitochondrial transit peptide (CpMTP) for delivery of macromolecules to mitochondria. Comparison between properties of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and mitochondrial signal sequences enabled prediction of peptides with dual ability for cellular translocation and mitochondrial localization. Among the predicted peptides, CpMTP translocates across HeLa cells and shows successful delivery of noncovalently conjugated cargo molecules to mitochondria. CpMTP may have applications in transduction and transfection of mitochondria for therapeutics. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. Recent Progress in the Design of Monodisperse, Sequence-Defined Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solleder, Susanne C; Schneider, Rebekka V; Wetzel, Katharina S; Boukis, Andreas C; Meier, Michael A R

    2017-05-01

    This review describes different synthetic strategies towards sequence-defined, monodisperse macromolecules, which are built up by iterative approaches and lead to linear non-natural polymer structures. The review is divided in three parts: solution phase-, solid phase-, and fluorous- and polymer-tethered approaches. Moreover, synthesis procedures leading to conjugated and non-conjugated macromolecules are considered and discussed in the respective sections. A major focus in the evaluation is the applicability of the different approaches in polymer chemistry. In this context, simple procedures for monomer and oligomer synthesis, overall yields, scalability, purity of the oligomers, and the achievable level of control (side-chains, backbone, stereochemistry) are important benchmarks. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. A Stochastic Finite Element Model for the Dynamics of Globular Macromolecules

    CERN Document Server

    Oliver, Robin; Harlen, Oliver G; Harris, Sarah A

    2012-01-01

    We describe a novel coarse-grained simulation method for modelling the dynamics of globular macromolecules, such as proteins. The macromolecule is treated as a continuum that is subject to thermal fluctuations. The model includes a non-linear treatment of elasticity and viscosity with thermal noise that is solved using finite element analysis. We have validated the method by demonstrating that the model provides average kinetic and potential energies that are in agreement with the classical equipartition theorem. In addition, we have performed Fourier analysis on the simulation trajectories obtained for a series of linear beams to confirm that the correct average energies are present in the first two Fourier bending modes. We have then used the new modelling method to simulate the thermal fluctuations of a representative protein over 500ns timescales. Using reasonable parameters for the material properties, we have demonstrated that the overall deformation of the biomolecule is consistent with the results obt...

  9. Synthesis and mechanisms of formation of polymers composed of different macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korshak, V.V.; Askadskii, A.A.; Vointseva, I.I.; Mustafaeva, B.B.; Slonimskii, G.L.; Suprun, A.P.

    1983-02-01

    The fundamental possibility of synthesizing soluble and fusible aggregates of different macromolecules was discovered in the reaction of chlorinated and aromatic polymers under the conditions of the Friedel-Crafts reaction. Such an approach opens the prospects of combining in one macromolecule two or more different types of chain, and of the synthesis of polymers with a new combination of properties. In this reaction poly-1,1,2-trichlorobutadiene (PTCB) and polyvinylcholoride can be used as chlorine-containing compounds, and polystyrene (PS), poly-..cap alpha..-methyl-styrene, polyarylates, polycarbonates, etc., as the aromatic polymers. The mechanism of the reaction of chlorinated and aromatic polymers was studied with PTCB and PS as the model pair of polymers.

  10. Spreading of a chain macromolecule onto a cell membrane by a computer simulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jun; Pandey, Ras

    2002-03-01

    Computer simulations are performed to study conformation and dynamics of a relatively large chain macromolecule at the surface of a model membrane - a preliminary attempt to ultimately realistic model for protein on a cell membrane. We use a discrete lattice of size Lx × L × L. The chain molecule of length Lc is modeled by consecutive nodes connected by bonds on the trail of a random walk with appropriate constraints such as excluded volume, energy dependent configurational bias, etc. Monte Carlo method is used to move chains via segmental dynamics, i.e., end-move, kink-jump, crank-shaft, reptation, etc. Membrane substrate is designed by a self-assemble biased short chains on a substrate. Large chain molecule is then driven toward the membrane by a field. We investigate the dynamics of chain macromolecule, spread of its density, and conformation.

  11. Load-release of small and macromolecules from elastomers with reversible gyroid mesoporosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Fengxiao; Schulte, Lars; Ndoni, Sokol

    2012-01-01

    . However, in the gel state in the presence of a good solvent the swollen matrix did show a nanoporous structure originated from the gyroid block copolymer precursor. Nanopores can be opened or closed depending on the presence or absence of a solvent. Macromolecules like PEG of different molecular weights...... or small molecules like the surfactant SDS were loaded into the opened nanoporous matrix in the presence of a solvent and remained trapped. The loaded molecules could be released again in the presence of a solvent. The load and release of the molecules in deuterated form were monitored by in situ time......-resolved small angle neutron scattering, SANS. The bicontinuous gyroid pore structure is accessible to macromolecules without the need for sample pre-alignment. The materials presented here are model systems for a novel type of load-delivery systems that could show great potential in e.g. diagnostics or drug...

  12. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  13. Simulation of subsea gas hydrate exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2014-05-01

    The recovery of methane from gas hydrate layers that have been detected in several subsea sediments and permafrost regions around the world is a promising perspective to overcome future shortages in natural gas supply. Being aware that conventional natural gas resources are limited, research is going on to develop technologies for the production of natural gas from such new sources. Thus various research programs have started since the early 1990s in Japan, USA, Canada, India, and Germany to investigate hydrate deposits and develop required technologies. In recent years, intensive research has focussed on the capture and storage of CO2 from combustion processes to reduce climate impact. While different natural or man-made reservoirs like deep aquifers, exhausted oil and gas deposits or other geological formations are considered to store gaseous or liquid CO2, the storage of CO2 as hydrate in former methane hydrate fields is another promising alternative. Due to beneficial stability conditions, methane recovery may be well combined with CO2 storage in the form of hydrates. Regarding technological implementation many problems have to be overcome. Especially mixing, heat and mass transfer in the reservoir are limiting factors causing very long process times. Within the scope of the German research project »SUGAR« different technological approaches for the optimized exploitation of gas hydrate deposits are evaluated and compared by means of dynamic system simulations and analysis. Detailed mathematical models for the most relevant chemical and physical processes are developed. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into simulation programs. Simulations based on geological field data have been carried out. The studies focus on the potential of gas production from turbidites and their fitness for CO2 storage. The effects occurring during gas production and CO2 storage within

  14. GLASS TRANSITION OF HYDRATED WHEAT GLIADIN POWDERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-min Sun; Li Zhao; Yi-hu Song; Qiang Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Modulated-temperature differential scanning calorimetric and dynamic mechanical analyses and dielectric spectroscopy were used to investigate the glass transition of hydrated wheat gliadin powders with moisture absorption ranged from 2.30 db% to 18.21 db%. Glass transition temperature (Tg) of dry wheat gliadin was estimated according to the GordonTaylor equation. Structural heterogeneity at high degrees of hydration was revealed in dielectric temperature and frequency spectra. The activation energies (Ea) of the two relaxations were calculated from Arrhenius equation.

  15. Component analysis of the protein hydration entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2012-05-01

    We report the development of an atomic decomposition method of the protein solvation entropy in water, which allows us to understand global change in the solvation entropy in terms of local changes in protein conformation as well as in hydration structure. This method can be implemented via a combined approach based on molecular dynamics simulation and integral-equation theory of liquids. An illustrative application is made to 42-residue amyloid-beta protein in water. We demonstrate how this method enables one to elucidate the molecular origin for the hydration entropy change upon conformational transitions of protein.

  16. Ultrasound-enhanced penetration through sclera depends on frequency of sonication and size of macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Ying; Suen, Wai Leung Langston; Tse, Ho Yan; Wong, Hoi Sang

    2017-03-30

    We previously employed ultrasound as a needleless approach to deliver macromolecules via the transscleral route to the back of the eye in live animals (Suen et al., 2013). Here, we investigated the nature of the ultrasound-enhanced transport through sclera, the outermost barrier in the transscleral route. Thus, the possible role of cavitation from ultrasound was explored; its effect during and after sonication on scleral penetration was measured; and the dependence on the size of macromolecules was determined. We applied ultrasound frequency from 40kHz to 3MHz at ISATA (spatial-average-temporal-average intensity) of 0.05W/cm(2) to fresh rabbit sclera ex vivo. Fluorescent dextran of size 20kDa to 150kDa was used as macromolecular probes. We measured the distance of penetration of the probes through the sclera over 30s during sonication and over 15min after sonication from cryosectioned tissue images. Deeper penetration in the sclera was observed with decreasing frequency. The presence of stable cavitation was further verified by passive acoustic detection. The effect during sonication increased penetration distance up to 20 fold and was limited to macromolecular probes ≤70kDa. The effect post sonication increased penetration distance up to 3 fold and attributed to the improved intrasscleral transport of macromolecules ≥70kDa. Post-sonication enhancement diminished gradually in 3h. As the extent of cavitation increased with decreasing frequency, the trend observed supports the contribution of (stable) cavitation to enhancing transport through sclera. Effect during sonication was attributed to flow associated with acoustic microstreaming. Effect post sonication was attributed to the temporary increase in scleral permeability. Flow-associated effect was more pronounced but only applied to smaller macromolecules. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation in the study of water-soluble macromolecules

    OpenAIRE

    Yohannes, Gebrenegus

    2007-01-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) was constructed, and its applicability to industrial, biochemical, and pharmaceutical applications was studied. The effect of several parameters, such as pH, ionic strength, temperature and the reactants mixing ratios on the particle sizes, molar masses, and the formation of aggregates of macromolecules was determined by AsFlFFF. In the case of industrial application AsFlFFF proved to be a valuable tool in the characterization of the hydrod...

  18. Gas hydrate of Lake Baikal: Discovery and varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlystov, Oleg; De Batist, Marc; Shoji, Hitoshi; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Nishio, Shinya; Naudts, Lieven; Poort, Jeffrey; Khabuev, Andrey; Belousov, Oleg; Manakov, Andrey; Kalmychkov, Gennаdy

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of recent gas-hydrate studies in Lake Baikal, the only fresh-water lake in the world containing gas hydrates in its sedimentary infill. We provide a historical overview of the different investigations and discoveries and highlight some recent breakthroughs in our understanding of the Baikal hydrate system. So far, 21 sites of gas hydrate occurrence have been discovered. Gas hydrates are of structures I and II, which are of thermogenic, microbial, and mixed origin. At the 15 sites, gas hydrates were found in mud volcanoes, and the rest six - near gas discharges. Additionally, depending on type of discharge and gas hydrate structure, they were visually different. Investigations using MIR submersibles allowed finding of gas hydrates at the bottom surface of Lake Baikal at the three sites.

  19. Prevention of H-Aggregates Formation in Cy5 Labeled Macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Kang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available H-aggregates of the cyanine dye Cy5 are formed during covalent linkage to the cationic macromolecule Poly(allylamine (PAH. The nonfluorescent H-aggregates strongly restrict the usage of the dye for analytical purposes and prevent a quantitative determination of the labeled macromolecules. The behavior of the H-aggregates has been studied by investigation of the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the dye polymer in dependence on solvent, label degree and additional sulfonate groups. H-aggregate formation is caused by an inhomogeneous distribution of the Cy5 molecules on the polymer chain. The H-aggregates can be destroyed by conformational changes of the PAH induced by interactions with polyanions or in organic solvents. It has been found that the polymer labeling process in high content of organic solvents can prevent the formation of H-aggregates. The results offer a better understanding and improvement of the use of the Cy5 dye for labeling purposes in fluorescence detection of macromolecules.

  20. Synthetic mimetics of the endogenous gastrointestinal nanomineral: Silent constructs that trap macromolecules for intracellular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pele, Laetitia C; Haas, Carolin T; Hewitt, Rachel E; Robertson, Jack; Skepper, Jeremy; Brown, Andy; Hernandez-Garrido, Juan Carlos; Midgley, Paul A; Faria, Nuno; Chappell, Helen; Powell, Jonathan J

    2017-02-01

    Amorphous magnesium-substituted calcium phosphate (AMCP) nanoparticles (75-150nm) form constitutively in large numbers in the mammalian gut. Collective evidence indicates that they trap and deliver luminal macromolecules to mucosal antigen presenting cells (APCs) and facilitate gut immune homeostasis. Here, we report on a synthetic mimetic of the endogenous AMCP and show that it has marked capacity to trap macromolecules during formation. Macromolecular capture into AMCP involved incorporation as shown by STEM tomography of the synthetic AMCP particle with 5nm ultra-fine iron (III) oxohydroxide. In vitro, organic cargo-loaded synthetic AMCP was taken up by APCs and tracked to lysosomal compartments. The AMCP itself did not regulate any gene, or modify any gene regulation by its cargo, based upon whole genome transcriptomic analyses. We conclude that synthetic AMCP can efficiently trap macromolecules and deliver them to APCs in a silent fashion, and may thus represent a new platform for antigen delivery. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Structure-Correlation NMR Spectroscopy for Macromolecules Using Repeated Bidirectional Photoisomerization of Azobenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Toshio; Ueda, Keisuke; Nishimura, Chiaki; Yamazaki, Toshio

    2015-11-17

    Control over macromolecular structure offers bright potentials for manipulation of macromolecular functions. We here present structure-correlation NMR spectroscopy to analyze the correlation between polymorphic macromolecular structures driven by photoisomerization of azobenzene. The structural conversion of azobenzene was induced within the mixing time of a NOESY experiment using a colored light source, and the reverse structural conversion was induced during the relaxation delay using a light source of another color. The correlation spectrum between trans- and cis-azobenzene was then obtained. To maximize the efficiency of the bidirectional photoisomerization of azobenzene-containing macromolecules, we developed a novel light-irradiation NMR sample tube and method for irradiating target molecules in an NMR radio frequency (rf) coil. When this sample tube was used for photoisomerization of an azobenzene derivative at a concentration of 0.2 mM, data collection with reasonable sensitivity applicable to macromolecules was achieved. We performed isomerization of an azobenzene-cross-linked peptide within the mixing time of a NOESY experiment that produced cross-peaks between helix and random-coil forms of the peptide. Thus, these results indicate that macromolecular structure manipulation can be incorporated into an NMR pulse sequence using an azobenzene derivative and irradiation with light of two types of wavelengths, providing a new method for structural analysis of metastable states of macromolecules.

  2. Nasal Absorption of Macromolecules from Powder Formulations and Effects of Sodium Carboxymethyl Cellulose on Their Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akiko; Furubayashi, Tomoyuki; Matsushita, Akifumi; Inoue, Daisuke; Kimura, Shunsuke; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The nasal absorption of macromolecules from powder formulations and the effect of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Na) as a pharmaceutical excipient on their absorption were studied. Model macromolecules were fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran (average molecular weight of 4.4kDa, FD4) and insulin. The plasma concentration of FD4 after application of the powder containing 50% starch (control) was higher than that after application of the solution, and the absorption from 50% starch powder was enhanced by the substitution of starch with CMC-Na. The fractional absorption of FD4 after administration of the CMC-Na powder formulation was 30% and 40% higher than that after administration from the solution and the starch powder, respectively. The nasal absorption of insulin from the powder and the effect of CMC-Na were similar with those of FD4. The effective absorption of FD4 and insulin after application of powder with CMC-Na could be due to the increase in the nasal residence of FD4 and insulin. No damage in the nasal mucosa or dysfunction of the mucociliary clearance was observed after application of the drug powder and CMC-Na. The present findings indicate that nasal delivery of powder formulations with the addition of CMC-Na as an excipient is a promising approach for improving the nasal absorption of macromolecules.

  3. Ordinary-extraordinary transition in dynamics of solutions of charged macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2016-10-24

    The occurrence of the ubiquitous and intriguing "ordinary-extraordinary" behavior of dynamics in solutions of charged macromolecules is addressed theoretically by explicitly considering counterions around the macromolecules. The collective and coupled dynamics of macromolecules and their counterion clouds in salt-free conditions are shown to lead to the "ordinary" behavior (also called the "fast" mode) where diffusion coefficients are independent of molar mass and polymer concentration and are comparable to those of isolated metallic ions in aqueous media, in agreement with experimental facts observed repeatedly over the past four decades. The dipoles arising from adsorbed counterions on polymer backbones can form many pairwise physical cross-links, leading to microgel-like aggregates. Balancing the swelling from excluded volume effects and counterion pressure with elasticity of the microgel, we show that there is a threshold value of a combination of polymer concentration and electrolyte concentration for the occurrence of the "extraordinary" phase (also called the "slow" mode) and the predicted properties of diffusion coefficient for this phase are in qualitative agreement with well-known experimental data.

  4. Immunomodulatory Properties of Taranjebin (Camel's Thorn) Manna and Its Isolated Carbohydrate Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, Azadeh; Farjadian, Shirin; Karami, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    Taranjebin manna is a substance produced by Poophilus nebulosus Leth. (Aphrophoridae) larva that feed from host plant Alhagi maurorum (Leguminosae). In Persian ethnomedicine, it is used as an antipyretic, antiviral, antimicrobial, demulcent, and adaptogen. But it is contraindicated in acute fever and some infections. This controversy might be due to its immunomodulatory properties. This study evaluated immunomodulatory properties of Taranjebin and its macromolecules. Taranjebin solution was prepared as described in traditional literature. After dialysis and precipitation, the macromolecules were isolated on DEAE Sephadex A-25. The cytotoxic/proliferative properties of Taranjebin and its isolated macromolecules on human Jurkat E6.1 cells were investigated (15.62-1000 μg/mL) using WST-1 reagent. Three of 4 isolated acidic polysaccharides inhibited the proliferation of Jurkat cells in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations higher than 31.25 μg/mL (IC50 range of 44.81-147.97 μg/mL). The crude aqueous Taranjebin solution had proliferative effects. These results indicate the immunomodulatory properties of Taranjebin. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Diffusion profile of macromolecules within and between human skin layers for (trans)dermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römgens, Anne M; Bader, Dan L; Bouwstra, Joke A; Baaijens, Frank P T; Oomens, Cees W J

    2015-10-01

    Delivering a drug into and through the skin is of interest as the skin can act as an alternative drug administration route for oral delivery. The development of new delivery methods, such as microneedles, makes it possible to not only deliver small molecules into the skin, which are able to pass the outer layer of the skin in therapeutic amounts, but also macromolecules. To provide insight into the administration of these molecules into the skin, the aim of this study was to assess the transport of macromolecules within and between its various layers. The diffusion coefficients in the epidermis and several locations in the papillary and reticular dermis were determined for fluorescein dextran of 40 and 500 kDa using a combination of fluorescent recovery after photobleaching experiments and finite element analysis. The diffusion coefficient was significantly higher for 40 kDa than 500 kDa dextran, with median values of 23 and 9 µm(2)/s in the dermis, respectively. The values only marginally varied within and between papillary and reticular dermis. For the 40 kDa dextran, the diffusion coefficient in the epidermis was twice as low as in the dermis layers. The adopted method may be used for other macromolecules, which are of interest for dermal and transdermal drug delivery. The knowledge about diffusion in the skin is useful to optimize (trans)dermal drug delivery systems to target specific layers or cells in the human skin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nasal Absorption of Macromolecules from Powder Formulations and Effects of Sodium Carboxymethyl Cellulose on Their Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akiko; Furubayashi, Tomoyuki; Matsushita, Akifumi; Inoue, Daisuke; Kimura, Shunsuke; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The nasal absorption of macromolecules from powder formulations and the effect of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Na) as a pharmaceutical excipient on their absorption were studied. Model macromolecules were fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran (average molecular weight of 4.4kDa, FD4) and insulin. The plasma concentration of FD4 after application of the powder containing 50% starch (control) was higher than that after application of the solution, and the absorption from 50% starch powder was enhanced by the substitution of starch with CMC-Na. The fractional absorption of FD4 after administration of the CMC-Na powder formulation was 30% and 40% higher than that after administration from the solution and the starch powder, respectively. The nasal absorption of insulin from the powder and the effect of CMC-Na were similar with those of FD4. The effective absorption of FD4 and insulin after application of powder with CMC-Na could be due to the increase in the nasal residence of FD4 and insulin. No damage in the nasal mucosa or dysfunction of the mucociliary clearance was observed after application of the drug powder and CMC-Na. The present findings indicate that nasal delivery of powder formulations with the addition of CMC-Na as an excipient is a promising approach for improving the nasal absorption of macromolecules. PMID:27598527

  7. Size and average density spectra of macromolecules obtained from hydrodynamic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, G M

    2007-02-01

    It is proposed to normalize the Mark-Kuhn-Houwink-Sakurada type of equation relating the hydrodynamic characteristics, such as intrinsic viscosity, velocity sedimentation coefficient and translational diffusion coefficient of linear macromolecules to their molecular masses for the values of linear density M(L) and the statistical segment length A. When the set of data covering virtually all known experimental information is normalized for M(L), it is presented as a size spectrum of linear polymer molecules. Further normalization for the A value reduces all data to two regions: namely the region exhibiting volume interactions and that showing hydrodynamic draining. For chains without intachain excluded volume effects these results may be reproduced using the Yamakawa-Fujii theory of wormlike cylinders. Data analyzed here cover a range of contour lengths of linear chains varying by three orders of magnitude, with the range of statistical segment lengths varying approximately 500 times. The plot of the dependence of [eta]M on M represents the spectrum of average specific volumes occupied by linear and branched macromolecules. Dendrimers and globular proteins for which the volume occupied by the molecule in solution is directly proportional to M have the lowest specific volume. The homologous series of macromolecules in these plots are arranged following their fractal dimensionality.

  8. Monitoring membrane hydration with 2-(dimethylamino)-6-acylnaphtalenes fluorescent probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2015-01-01

    , were used to study membrane lateral structure and associated dynamics. Once incorporated into membranes, the (nanosecond) fluorescent decay of these probes is strongly affected by changes in the local polarity and relaxation dynamics of restricted water molecules existing at the membrane....../water interface. For instance, when glycerophospholipid containing membranes undertake a solid ordered (gel) to liquid disordered phase transition the fluorescence emission maximum of these probes shift ~ 50 nm with a significant change in their fluorescence lifetime. Furthermore, the fluorescence parameters...... of LAURDAN and PRODAN are exquisitely sensitive to cholesterol effects, allowing interpretations that correlate changes in membrane packing with membrane hydration. Different membrane model systems as well as innate biological membranes have been studied with this family of probes allowing interesting...

  9. Biological Sciences Division 1991 Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    from S. microadriaticum. PUBLICATIONS AND REPORTS: Govind, N.S., Roman, S.J., Iglesias- Prieto , R., Trench, R.K., Triplett, E.L., and Prezelin, B.B...growth in vitro under varied oxygen tensions. Symbiosis 11 (in press). Markell, D.A., Trench, R.K. and Iglesias- Prieto , R. 1991, Macromolecules...Oppenheim, M. Kluger, and C.A. Dinarello), Molecular and Cellular Biology of Cytokines, New York, Alan R. Lies, pp. 407-412. Kovacs, E.J. (1991) Control

  10. Hydrate bearing clayey sediments: Formation and gas production concepts

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Jaewon

    2016-06-20

    Hydro-thermo-chemo and mechanically coupled processes determine hydrate morphology and control gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments. Force balance, together with mass and energy conservation analyses anchored in published data provide robust asymptotic solutions that reflect governing processes in hydrate systems. Results demonstrate that hydrate segregation in clayey sediments results in a two-material system whereby hydrate lenses are surrounded by hydrate-free water-saturated clay. Hydrate saturation can reach ≈2% by concentrating the excess dissolved gas in the pore water and ≈20% from metabolizable carbon. Higher hydrate saturations are often found in natural sediments and imply methane transport by advection or diffusion processes. Hydrate dissociation is a strongly endothermic event; the available latent heat in a reservoir can sustain significant hydrate dissociation without triggering ice formation during depressurization. The volume of hydrate expands 2-to-4 times upon dissociation or CO2single bondCH4 replacement. Volume expansion can be controlled to maintain lenses open and to create new open mode discontinuities that favor gas recovery. Pore size is the most critical sediment parameter for hydrate formation and gas recovery and is controlled by the smallest grains in a sediment. Therefore any characterization must carefully consider the amount of fines and their associated mineralogy.

  11. Foam drilling in natural gas hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Na

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The key problem of foam drilling in natural gas hydrate is prediction of characteristic parameters of bottom hole. The simulation shows that when the well depth increases, the foam mass number reduces and the pressure increases. At the same depth, pressure in drill string is always higher than annulus. The research findings provide theoretical basis for safety control.

  12. Alkali binding in hydrated Portland cement paste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, W.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2010-01-01

    The alkali-binding capacity of C–S–H in hydrated Portland cement pastes is addressed in this study. The amount of bound alkalis in C–S–H is computed based on the alkali partition theories firstly proposed by Taylor (1987) and later further developed by Brouwers and Van Eijk (2003). Experimental data

  13. A positron annihilation study of hydrated DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warman, J. M.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1986-01-01

    Positron annihilation measurements are reported for hydrated DNA as a function of water content and as a function of temperature (20 to -180.degree. C) for samples containing 10 and 50% wt of water. The ortho-positronium mean lifetime and its intensity show distinct variations with the degree...

  14. Hydration of protein–RNA recognition sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Amita; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the role of water molecules in 89 protein–RNA complexes taken from the Protein Data Bank. Those with tRNA and single-stranded RNA are less hydrated than with duplex or ribosomal proteins. Protein–RNA interfaces are hydrated less than protein–DNA interfaces, but more than protein–protein interfaces. Majority of the waters at protein–RNA interfaces makes multiple H-bonds; however, a fraction do not make any. Those making H-bonds have preferences for the polar groups of RNA than its partner protein. The spatial distribution of waters makes interfaces with ribosomal proteins and single-stranded RNA relatively ‘dry’ than interfaces with tRNA and duplex RNA. In contrast to protein–DNA interfaces, mainly due to the presence of the 2′OH, the ribose in protein–RNA interfaces is hydrated more than the phosphate or the bases. The minor groove in protein–RNA interfaces is hydrated more than the major groove, while in protein–DNA interfaces it is reverse. The strands make the highest number of water-mediated H-bonds per unit interface area followed by the helices and the non-regular structures. The preserved waters at protein–RNA interfaces make higher number of H-bonds than the other waters. Preserved waters contribute toward the affinity in protein–RNA recognition and should be carefully treated while engineering protein–RNA interfaces. PMID:25114050

  15. Binding Hydrated Anions with Hydrophobic Pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokkalingam, Punidha; Shraberg, Joshua; Rick, Steven W; Gibb, Bruce C

    2016-01-13

    Using a combination of isothermal titration calorimetry and quantum and molecular dynamics calculations, we demonstrate that relatively soft anions have an affinity for hydrophobic concavity. The results are consistent with the anions remaining partially hydrated upon binding, and suggest a novel strategy for anion recognition.

  16. Obsidian Hydration Dating in the Undergraduate Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manche, Emanuel P.; Lakatos, Stephen

    1986-01-01

    Provides an overview of obsidian hydration dating for the instructor by presenting: (1) principles of the method; (2) procedures; (3) applications; and (4) limitations. The theory of the method and one or more laboratory exercises can be easily introduced into the undergraduate geology curriculum. (JN)

  17. Obsidian Hydration Dating in the Undergraduate Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manche, Emanuel P.; Lakatos, Stephen

    1986-01-01

    Provides an overview of obsidian hydration dating for the instructor by presenting: (1) principles of the method; (2) procedures; (3) applications; and (4) limitations. The theory of the method and one or more laboratory exercises can be easily introduced into the undergraduate geology curriculum. (JN)

  18. [Terminal phase hydration, pain and delirium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heick, A.

    2009-01-01

    Hydration of the terminal patient may relieve confusion and complaints of "dry mouth". But it may worsen oedema of the brain, lungs, and extremities, worsen terminal rattling and cause a need for frequent changing of diapers. The decision of whether and how to treat a dying patient with fluids...

  19. Acoustic Determination of Methane Hydrate Disssociation Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    centered- cubic orientation which forms naturally in deep oceans from biogenic gases. It is worth not- ing that this molecular geometry can trap great...until January 2010. At that time, the hydrates were packed in a dewar with liquid nitrogen and shipped from the storage fa- cility at the Naval Research

  20. Hydration of Acetylene: A 125th Anniversary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Dmitry A.; Shevchenko, Sergey M.

    2007-01-01

    The year 2006 is the 125th anniversary of a chemical reaction, the discovery of which by Mikhail Kucherov had a profound effect on the development of industrial chemistry in the 19-20th centuries. This was the hydration of alkynes catalyzed by mercury ions that made possible industrial production of acetaldehyde from acetylene. Historical…

  1. Structural and functional properties of hydration and confined water in membrane interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disalvo, E A; Lairion, F; Martini, F; Tymczyszyn, E; Frías, M; Almaleck, H; Gordillo, G J

    2008-12-01

    The scope of the present review focuses on the interfacial properties of cell membranes that may establish a link between the membrane and the cytosolic components. We present evidences that the current view of the membrane as a barrier of permeability that contains an aqueous solution of macromolecules may be replaced by one in which the membrane plays a structural and functional role. Although this idea has been previously suggested, the present is the first systematic work that puts into relevance the relation water-membrane in terms of thermodynamic and structural properties of the interphases that cannot be ignored in the understanding of cell function. To pursue this aim, we introduce a new definition of interphase, in which the water is organized in different levels on the surface with different binding energies. Altogether determines the surface free energy necessary for the structural response to changes in the surrounding media. The physical chemical properties of this region are interpreted in terms of hydration water and confined water, which explain the interaction with proteins and could affect the modulation of enzyme activity. Information provided by several methodologies indicates that the organization of the hydration states is not restricted to the membrane plane albeit to a region extending into the cytoplasm, in which polar head groups play a relevant role. In addition, dynamic properties studied by cyclic voltammetry allow one to deduce the energetics of the conformational changes of the lipid head group in relation to the head-head interactions due to the presence of carbonyls and phosphates at the interphase. These groups are, apparently, surrounded by more than one layer of water molecules: a tightly bound shell, that mostly contributes to the dipole potential, and a second one that may be displaced by proteins and osmotic stress. Hydration water around carbonyl and phosphate groups may change by the presence of polyhydroxylated compounds

  2. Anaerobic oxidation of methane above gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, NE Pacific Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treude, T.; Boetius, A.; Knittel, K.;

    2003-01-01

    At Hydrate Ridge (HR), Cascadia convergent margin, surface sediments contain massive gas hydrates formed from methane that ascends together with fluids along faults from deeper reservoirs. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), mediated by a microbial consortium of archaea and sulfate-reducing...... bacteria, generates high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide in the surface sediments. The production of sulfide supports chemosynthetic communities that gain energy from sulfide oxidation. Depending on fluid flow, the surface communities are dominated either by the filamentous sulfur bacteria Beggiatoa...

  3. Modeling DNA hydration: comparison of calculated and experimental hydration properties of nuclic acid bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltev, V I; Malenkov, G G; Gonzalez, E J; Teplukhin, A V; Rein, R; Shibata, M; Miller, J H

    1996-02-01

    Hydration properties of individual nucleic acid bases were calculated and compared with the available experimental data. Three sets of classical potential functions (PF) used in simulations of nucleic acid hydration were juxtaposed: (i) the PF developed by Poltev and Malenkov (PM), (ii) the PF of Weiner and Kollman (WK), which together with Jorgensen's TIP3P water model are widely used in the AMBER program, and (iii) OPLS (optimized potentials for liquid simulations) developed by Jorgensen (J). The global minima of interaction energy of single water molecules with all the natural nucleic acid bases correspond to the formation of two water-base hydrogen bonds (water bridging of two hydrophilic atoms of the base). The energy values of these minima calculated via PM potentials are in somewhat better conformity with mass-spectrometric data than the values calculated via WK PF. OPLS gave much weaker water-base interactions for all compounds considered, thus these PF were not used in further computations. Monte Carlo simulations of the hydration of 9-methyladenine, 1-methyluracil and 1-methylthymine were performed in systems with 400 water molecules and periodic boundary conditions. Results of simulations with PM potentials give better agreement with experimental data on hydration energies than WK PF. Computations with PM PF of the hydration energy of keto and enol tautomers of 9-methylguanine can account for the shift in the tautomeric equilibrium of guanine in aqueous media to a dominance of the keto form in spite of nearly equal intrinsic stability of keto and enol tautomers. The results of guanine hydration computations are discussed in relation to mechanisms of base mispairing errors in nucleic acid biosynthesis. The data presented in this paper along with previous results on simulation of hydration shell structures in DNA duplex grooves provide ample evidence for the advantages of PM PF in studies of nucleic-acid hydration.

  4. Direct measurement of methane hydrate composition along the hydrate equilibrium boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    The composition of methane hydrate, namely nW for CH 4??nWH2O, was directly measured along the hydrate equilibrium boundary under conditions of excess methane gas. Pressure and temperature conditions ranged from 1.9 to 9.7 MPa and 263 to 285 K. Within experimental error, there is no change in hydrate composition with increasing pressure along the equilibrium boundary, but nW may show a slight systematic decrease away from this boundary. A hydrate stoichiometry of n W = 5.81-6.10 H2O describes the entire range of measured values, with an average composition of CH4??5.99(??0.07) H2O along the equilibrium boundary. These results, consistent with previously measured values, are discussed with respect to the widely ranging values obtained by thermodynamic analysis. The relatively constant composition of methane hydrate over the geologically relevant pressure and temperature range investigated suggests that in situ methane hydrate compositions may be estimated with some confidence. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  5. Clathrate Hydrates for Thermal Energy Storage in Buildings: Overview of Proper Hydrate-Forming Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Castellani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing energy costs are at the origin of the great progress in the field of phase change materials (PCMs. The present work aims at studying the application of clathrate hydrates as PCMs in buildings. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline structures in which guest molecules are enclosed in the crystal lattice of water molecules. Clathrate hydrates can form also at ambient pressure and present a high latent heat, and for this reason, they are good candidates for being used as PCMs. The parameter that makes a PCM suitable to be used in buildings is, first of all, a melting temperature at about 25 °C. The paper provides an overview of groups of clathrate hydrates, whose physical and chemical characteristics could meet the requirements needed for their application in buildings. Simulations with a dynamic building simulation tool are carried out to evaluate the performance of clathrate hydrates in enhancing thermal comfort through the moderation of summer temperature swings and, therefore, in reducing energy consumption. Simulations suggest that clathrate hydrates have a potential in terms of improvement of indoor thermal comfort and a reduction of energy consumption for cooling. Cooling effects of 0.5 °C and reduced overheating hours of up to 1.1% are predicted.

  6. MORPHOLOGY OF METHANE HYDRATE HOST SEDIMENTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JONES,K.W.; FENG,H.; TOMOV,S.; WINTER,W.J.; EATON,M.; MAHAJAN,D.

    2004-12-01

    Results from simulated experiments in several laboratories show that host sediments influence hydrate formation in accord with known heterogeneity of host sediments at sites of gas hydrate occurrence (1). For example, in Mackenzie Delta, NWT Canada (Mallik 2L-38 well), coarser-grained units (pore-filling model) are found whereas in the Gulf of Mexico, the found hydrate samples do not appear to be lithologically controlled. We have initiated a systematic study of sediments, initially focusing on samples from various depths at a specific site, to establish a correlation with hydrate occurrence (or variations thereof) to establish differences in their microstructure, porosity, and other associated properties. The synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) set-up at the X-27A tomography beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory was used as a tool to study sediments from Blake Ridge at three sub bottom depths of 0.2, 50, and 667 meters. Results from the tomographic analysis of the deepest sample (667 m) are presented here to illustrate how tomography can be used to obtain new insights into the structures of methane hydrate host sediments. The investigation shows the internal grain/pore space resolution in the microstructure and a 3-D visualization of the connecting pathways obtained following data segmentation into pore space and grains within the sediment sample. The analysis gives the sample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity, as well. An earlier report on the experimental program has been given by Mahajan et al. (2).

  7. Antioxidant defences in hydrated and desiccated states of the tardigrade Paramacrobiotus richtersi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Angela M; Negroni, Manuela; Altiero, Tiziana; Montorfano, Gigliola; Corsetto, Paola; Berselli, Patrizia; Berra, Bruno; Guidetti, Roberto; Rebecchi, Lorena

    2010-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are formed in all aerobic organisms, potentially leading to oxidative damage of all biological molecules. A number of defence mechanisms have developed to protect the organism from attack by ROS. Desiccation tolerance is correlated with an increase in the antioxidant potential in several organisms, but the regulation of the antioxidant defence system is complex and its role in desiccation-tolerant organisms is not yet firmly established. To determine if anhydrobiotic tardigrades have an antioxidant defence system, capable of counteracting ROS, we compared the activity of several antioxidant enzymes, the fatty acid composition and Heat shock protein expression in two physiological states (desiccated vs. hydrated) of the tardigrade Paramacrobiotus richtersi. In hydrated tardigrades, superoxide dismutase and catalase show comparable activities, while in desiccated specimens the activity of superoxide dismutase increases. Both glutathione peroxidase and glutathione were induced by desiccation. The percentage of fatty acid composition of polyunsaturated fatty acids and the amount of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances are higher in desiccated animals than in hydrated ones. Lastly, desiccated tardigrades did not differ significantly from the hydrated ones in the relative levels of Hsp70 and Hsp90. These results indicate that the possession of antioxidant metabolism could represent a crucial strategy to avoid damages during desiccation in anhydrobiotic tardigrades.

  8. Computer simulations of aqua metal ions for accurate reproduction of hydration free energies and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Tu, Yaoquan; Tian, He; Ågren, Hans

    2010-03-01

    Metal ions play essential roles in biological processes and have attracted much attention in both experimental and theoretical fields. By using the molecular dynamics simulation technology, we here present a fitting-refining procedure for deriving Lennard-Jones parameters of aqua metal ions toward the ultimate goal of accurately reproducing the experimentally observed hydration free energies and structures. The polarizable SWM4-DP water model {proposed by Lamoureux et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 5185 (2003)]} is used to properly describe the polarization effects of water molecules that interact with the ions. The Lennard-Jones parameters of the metal ions are first obtained by fitting the quantum mechanical potential energies of the hexahydrated complex and are subsequently refined through comparison between the calculated and experimentally measured hydration free energies and structures. In general, the derived Lennard-Jones parameters for the metal ions are found to reproduce hydration free energies accurately and to predict hydration structures that are in good agreement with experimental observations. Dynamical properties are also well reproduced by the derived Lennard-Jones parameters.

  9. Synthesis of New Hydrated Geranylphenols and in Vitro Antifungal Activity against Botrytis cinerea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Soto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Geranylated hydroquinones and other geranylated compounds isolated from Aplydium species have shown interesting biological activities. This fact has prompted a number of studies where geranylated phenol derivatives have been synthesized in order to assay their bioactivities. In this work, we report the synthesis of a series of new hydrated geranylphenols using two different synthetic approaches and their inhibitory effects on the mycelial growth of Botrytis cinerea. Five new hydrated geranylphenols were obtained by direct coupling reaction between geraniol and phenol in dioxane/water and using BF3·Et2O as the catalyst or by the reaction of a geranylated phenol with BF3·Et2O. Two new geranylated quinones were also obtained. The synthesis and structural elucidation of all new compounds is presented. All hydrated geranylphenols efficiently inhibit the mycelial growth of B. cinerea. Their activity is higher than that observed for non-hydrated compounds. These results indicate that structural modification on the geranyl chain brings about an enhancement of the inhibition effect of geranylated phenol derivatives.

  10. China's Research on Non-conventional Energy Resources- Gas Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu Ming; Ma Jianguo

    2002-01-01

    @@ Methane exists in ice-like formations called gas hydrate. Hydrate traps methane molecules inside a cage of frozen water. The magnitude of this previously unknown global storehouse of methane is truly staggering and has raised serious inquiry into the possibility of using methane hydrate as a substitute source of energy for oil and conventional natural gas. According to the estimation by PGC, gas hydrate deposits amount to 7.6 × 1018m3 and contain more than twice as much organic carbon as all the world's coal, oil and non-hydrate natural gas combined.

  11. Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Riedel, M.; Boswell, R.; Presley, J.; Kumar, P.; Sathe, A.; Sethi, A.; Lall, M.; ,

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a naturally occurring “ice-like” combination of natural gas and water that has the potential to serve as an immense resource of natural gas from the world’s oceans and polar regions. However, gas-hydrate recovery is both a scientific and a technical challenge and much remains to be learned about the geologic, engineering, and economic factors controlling the ultimate energy resource potential of gas hydrate. The amount of natural gas contained in the world’s gas-hydrate accumulations is enormous, but these estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 2,800 to 8,000,000 trillion cubic meters of gas. By comparison, conventional natural gas accumulations (reserves and undiscovered, technically recoverable resources) for the world are estimated at approximately 440 trillion cubic meters. Gas recovery from gas hydrate is hindered because the gas is in a solid form and because gas hydrate commonly occurs in remote Arctic and deep marine environments. Proposed methods of gas recovery from gas hydrate generally deal with disassociating or “melting” in situ gas hydrate by heating the reservoir beyond the temperature of gas-hydrate formation, or decreasing the reservoir pressure below hydrate equilibrium. The pace of energy-related gas hydrate assessment projects has accelerated over the past several years.

  12. Solid state interconversion between anhydrous norfloxacin and its hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongcharoen, Wanchai; Byrn, Stephen R; Sutanthavibul, Narueporn

    2008-01-01

    This work is focused on characterizing and evaluating the solid state interconversion of norfloxacin (NF) hydrates. Four stoichiometric NF hydrates, dihydrate, hemipentahydrate, trihydrate, pentahydrate and a disordered NF state, were generated by various methods and characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD), thermal analysis and Karl Fisher titrimetry. XRPD patterns of all NF hydrates exhibited crystalline structures. NF hydrate conversion was studied with respect to mild elevated temperature and various degrees of moisture levels. NF hydrates transformed to anhydrous NF Form A after gentle heating at 60 degrees C for 48 h except dihydrate and trihydrate where mixture in XRPD patterns between anhydrous NF Form A and former structures existed. Desiccation of NF hydrates at 0% RH for 7 days resulted in only partial removal of water molecules from the hydrated structures. The hydrated transitional phase and the disordered NF state were obtained from the incomplete dehydration of NF hydrates after thermal treatment and pentahydrate NF after desiccation, respectively. Anhydrous NF Form A and NF hydrates transformed to pentahydrate NF when exposed to high moisture environment except dihydrate. In conclusion, surrounding moisture levels, temperatures and the duration of exposure strongly influenced the interconversion pathways and stoichiometry of anhydrous NF and its hydrates. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Characterization of un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate™ and MTA Angelus™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J; Sorrentino, F; Damidot, D

    2015-04-01

    BioAggregate™ is a novel material introduced for use as a root-end filling material. It is tricalcium silicate-based, free of aluminium and uses tantalum oxide as radiopacifier. BioAggregate contains additives to enhance the material performance. The purpose of this research was to characterize the un-hydrated and hydrated forms of BioAggregate using a combination of techniques, verify whether the additives if present affect the properties of the set material and compare these properties to those of MTA Angelus™. Un-hydrated and hydrated BioAggregate and MTA Angelus were assessed. Un-hydrated cement was tested for chemical composition, specific surface area, mineralogy and kinetics of hydration. The set material was investigated for mineralogy, microstructure and bioactivity. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopic analysis, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and isothermal calorimetry were employed. The specific surface area was investigated using a gas adsorption method with nitrogen as the probe. BioAggregate was composed of tricalcium silicate, tantalum oxide, calcium phosphate and silicon dioxide and was free of aluminium. On hydration, the tricalcium silicate produced calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide. The former was deposited around the cement grains, while the latter reacted with the silicon dioxide to form additional calcium silicate hydrate. This resulted in reduction of calcium hydroxide in the aged cement. MTA Angelus reacted in a similar fashion; however, since it contained no additives, the calcium hydroxide was still present in the aged cement. Bioactivity was demonstrated by deposition of hydroxyapatite. BioAggregate exhibited a high specific surface area. Nevertheless, the reactivity determined by isothermal calorimetry appeared to be slow compared to MTA Angelus. The tantalum oxide as opposed to bismuth oxide was inert, and tantalum was not leached in solution. BioAggregate exhibited

  14. Natural Gas Evolution in a Gas Hydrate Melt: Effect of Thermodynamic Hydrate Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujith, K S; Ramachandran, C N

    2017-01-12

    Natural gas extraction from gas hydrate sediments by injection of hydrate inhibitors involves the decomposition of hydrates. The evolution of dissolved gas from the hydrate melt is an important step in the extraction process. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, we study the evolution of dissolved methane from its hydrate melt in the presence of two thermodynamic hydrate inhibitors, NaCl and CH3OH. An increase in the concentration of hydrate inhibitors is found to promote the nucleation of methane nanobubbles in the hydrate melt. Whereas NaCl promotes bubble formation by enhancing the hydrophobic interaction between aqueous CH4 molecules, CH3OH molecules assist bubble formation by stabilizing CH4 bubble nuclei formed in the solution. The CH3OH molecules accumulate around the nuclei leading to a decrease in the surface tension at their interface with water. The nanobubbles formed are found to be highly dynamic with frequent exchange of CH4 molecules between the bubble and the surrounding liquid. A quantitative analysis of the dynamic behavior of the bubble is performed by introducing a unit step function whose value depends on the location of CH4 molecules with respect to the bubble. It is observed that an increase in the concentration of thermodynamic hydrate inhibitors reduces the exchange process, making the bubble less dynamic. It is also found that for a given concentration of the inhibitor, larger bubbles are less dynamic compared to smaller ones. The dependence of the dynamic nature of nanobubbles on bubble size and inhibitor concentration is correlated with the solubility of CH4 and the Laplace pressure within the bubble. The effect of CO2 on the formation of nanobubble in the CH4-CO2 mixed gas hydrate melt in the presence of inhibitors is also examined. The simulations show that the presence of CO2 molecules significantly reduces the induction time for methane nanobubble nucleation. The role of CO2 in the early nucleation of bubble is explained

  15. Water retention curve for hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Santamarina, J. Carlos

    2013-11-01

    water retention curve plays a central role in numerical algorithms that model hydrate dissociation in sediments. The determination of the water retention curve for hydrate-bearing sediments faces experimental difficulties, and most studies assume constant water retention curves regardless of hydrate saturation. This study employs network model simulation to investigate the water retention curve for hydrate-bearing sediments. Results show that (1) hydrate in pores shifts the curve to higher capillary pressures and the air entry pressure increases as a power function of hydrate saturation; (2) the air entry pressure is lower in sediments with patchy rather than distributed hydrate, with higher pore size variation and pore connectivity or with lower specimen slenderness along the flow direction; and (3) smaller specimens render higher variance in computed water retention curves, especially at high water saturation Sw > 0.7. Results are relevant to other sediment pore processes such as bioclogging and mineral precipitation.

  16. A Wearable Hydration Sensor with Conformal Nanowire Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shanshan; Myers, Amanda; Malhotra, Abhishek; Lin, Feiyan; Bozkurt, Alper; Muth, John F; Zhu, Yong

    2017-01-27

    A wearable skin hydration sensor in the form of a capacitor is demonstrated based on skin impedance measurement. The capacitor consists of two interdigitated or parallel electrodes that are made of silver nanowires (AgNWs) in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. The flexible and stretchable nature of the AgNW/PDMS electrode allows conformal contact to the skin. The hydration sensor is insensitive to the external humidity change and is calibrated against a commercial skin hydration system on an artificial skin over a wide hydration range. The hydration sensor is packaged into a flexible wristband, together with a network analyzer chip, a button cell battery, and an ultralow power microprocessor with Bluetooth. In addition, a chest patch consisting of a strain sensor, three electrocardiography electrodes, and a skin hydration sensor is developed for multimodal sensing. The wearable wristband and chest patch may be used for low-cost, wireless, and continuous monitoring of skin hydration and other health parameters.

  17. Comparative Assessment of Advanced Gay Hydrate Production Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. D. White; B. P. McGrail; S. K. Wurstner

    2009-06-30

    Displacing natural gas and petroleum with carbon dioxide is a proven technology for producing conventional geologic hydrocarbon reservoirs, and producing additional yields from abandoned or partially produced petroleum reservoirs. Extending this concept to natural gas hydrate production offers the potential to enhance gas hydrate recovery with concomitant permanent geologic sequestration. Numerical simulation was used to assess a suite of carbon dioxide injection techniques for producing gas hydrates from a variety of geologic deposit types. Secondary hydrate formation was found to inhibit contact of the injected CO{sub 2} regardless of injectate phase state, thus diminishing the exchange rate due to pore clogging and hydrate zone bypass of the injected fluids. Additional work is needed to develop methods of artificially introducing high-permeability pathways in gas hydrate zones if injection of CO{sub 2} in either gas, liquid, or micro-emulsion form is to be more effective in enhancing gas hydrate production rates.

  18. In-situ gas hydrate hydrate saturation estimated from various well logs at the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed detailed analysis and interpretation of available 2-D and 3-D seismic data and proposed a viable method for identifying sub-permafrost gas hydrate prospects within the gas hydrate stability zone in the Milne Point area of northern Alaska. To validate the predictions of the USGS and to acquire critical reservoir data needed to develop a long-term production testing program, a well was drilled at the Mount Elbert prospect in February, 2007. Numerous well log data and cores were acquired to estimate in-situ gas hydrate saturations and reservoir properties.Gas hydrate saturations were estimated from various well logs such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), P- and S-wave velocity, and electrical resistivity logs along with pore-water salinity. Gas hydrate saturations from the NMR log agree well with those estimated from P- and S-wave velocity data. Because of the low salinity of the connate water and the low formation temperature, the resistivity of connate water is comparable to that of shale. Therefore, the effect of clay should be accounted for to accurately estimate gas hydrate saturations from the resistivity data. Two highly gas hydrate-saturated intervals are identified - an upper ???43 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 54% and a lower ???53 ft zone with an average gas hydrate saturation of 50%; both zones reach a maximum of about 75% saturation. ?? 2009.

  19. Hydration index--a better parameter for explaining small molecule hydration in inhibition of ice recrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Roger Y; Ferreira, Sandra S; Czechura, Pawel; Chaytor, Jennifer L; Ben, Robert N

    2008-12-24

    Several simple mono- and disaccharides have been assessed for their ability to inhibit ice recrystallization. Two carbohydrates were found to be effective recrystallization inhibitors. D-galactose (1) was the best monosaccharide and D-melibiose (5) was the most active disaccharide. The ability of each carbohydrate to inhibit ice growth was correlated to its respective hydration number reported in the literature. A hydration number reflects the number of tightly bound water molecules to the carbohydrate and is a function of carbohydrate stereochemistry. It was discovered that using the absolute hydration number of a carbohydrate does not allow one to accurately predict its ability to inhibit ice recrystallization. Consequently, we have defined a hydration index in which the hydration number is divided by the molar volume of the carbohydrate. This new parameter not only takes into account the number of water molecules tightly bound to a carbohydrate but also the size or volume of a particular solute and ultimately the concentration of hydrated water molecules. The hydration index of both mono- and disaccharides correlates well with experimentally measured RI activity. C-Linked derivatives of the monosaccharides appear to have RI activity comparable to that of their O-linked saccharides but a more thorough investigation is required. The relationship between carbohydrate concentration and RI activity was shown to be noncolligative and a 0.022 M solution of D-galactose (1) and C-linked galactose derivative (10) inhibited recrystallization as well as a 3% DMSO solution. The carbohydrates examined in this study did not possess any thermal hysteresis activity (selective depression of freezing point relative to melting point) or dynamic ice shaping. As such, we propose that they are inhibiting recrystallization at the interface between bulk water and the quasi liquid layer (a semiordered interface between ice and bulk water) by disrupting the preordering of water.

  20. Geologic implications of gas hydrates in the offshore of India: results of the National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Boswell, Ray; Cochran, J.R.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Lall, Malcolm; Mazumdar, Aninda; Ramana, Mangipudi Venkata; Ramprasad, Tammisetti; Riedel, Michael; Sain, Kalachand; Sathe, Arun Vasant; Vishwanath, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 (NGHP-01) is designed to study the occurrence of gas hydrate along the passive continental margin of the Indian Peninsula and in the Andaman convergent margin, with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. The NGHP-01 expedition established the presence of gas hydrates in the Krishna-Godavari and Mahanadi Basins, and the Andaman Sea. The expedition discovered in the Krishna-Godavari Basin one of the thickest gas hydrate accumulations ever documented, in the Andaman Sea one of the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zones in the world, and established the existence of a fully developed gas hydrate petroleum system in all three basins.