WorldWideScience

Sample records for hydrate thermal measurements

  1. Thermal conductivity measurements in Porous mixtures of methane hydrate and quartz sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; deMartin, B.J.; Kirby, S.H.; Pinkston, J.; Ruppel, C.D.

    2002-01-01

    Using von Herzen and Maxwell's needle probe method, we measured thermal conductivity in four porous mixtures of quartz sand and methane gas hydrate, with hydrate composing 0, 33, 67 and 100% of the solid volume. Thermal conductivities were measured at a constant methane pore pressure of 24.8 MPa between -20 and +15??C, and at a constant temperature of -10??C between 3.5 and 27.6 MPa methane pore pressure. Thermal conductivity decreased with increasing temperature and increased with increasing methane pore pressure. Both dependencies weakened with increasing hydrate content. Despite the high thermal conductivity of quartz relative to methane hydrate, the largest thermal conductivity was measured in the mixture containing 33% hydrate rather than in hydrate-free sand. This suggests gas hydrate enhanced grain-to-grain heat transfer, perhaps due to intergranular contact growth during hydrate synthesis. These results for gas-filled porous mixtures can help constrain thermal conductivity estimates in porous, gas hydrate-bearing systems.

  2. Active downhole thermal property measurement system for characterization of gas hydrate-bearing formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuhara, Masafumi; Fujii, Kasumi; Tertychnyi, Vladimir; Shandrygin, Alexander; Popov, Yuri; Matsubayashi, Osamu; Kusaka, Koji; Yasuda, Masato

    2005-07-01

    Gas hydrates dissociate or form when temperature and/or pressure conditions cross the equilibrium border. When we consider gas hydrates as an energy resource, understanding those parameters is very important for developing efficient production schemes. Therefore, thermal measurement is one of the key components of the characterization of the gas hydrate-bearing formation, not only statically but also dynamically. To estimate thermal properties such as thermal conductivity and diffusivity of subsurface formations, the conventional method has been to monitor temperature passively at several underground locations and interpret collected information with assumptions such as steady heat flow or relaxation from thermal disturbance by fluid flow, etc. Because the thermal properties are estimated based on several assumptions, these passive measurement methods sometimes leave a lot of uncertainties. On the other hand, active thermal property measurement, which could minimize those uncertainties, is commonly used in a laboratory and many types of equipment exist commercially for the purpose. The concept of measurement is very simple: creating a known thermal disturbance with a thermal source and then monitoring the response of the specimen. However, simply applying this method to subsurface formation measurement has many technical and logistical difficulties. In this paper, newly developed thermal property measurement equipment and its measurement methodology are described. Also discussed are the theoretical background for the application of the methodology to a gas hydrate-bearing formation through numerical simulation and the experimental results of laboratory mockup in a controlled environment. (Author)

  3. Opto-thermal in-vivo skin hydration measurements - a comparison study of different measurement techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, P; Singh, H; Imhof, R E [Faculty of ESBE, London South Bank University, 103 Borough Road, London SE1 0AA (United Kingdom); Ciortea, L I; Berg, E P [Biox Systems Ltd, 103 Borough Road, London SE1 0AA (United Kingdom); Cui, Y, E-mail: xiaop@lsbu.ac.u [Sunrise Systems Limited, Flint Bridge Business Centre, Ely Road, Waterbeach, Cambridge CB5 9QZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-01

    We compared five different skin hydration measurement techniques, namely OTTER, Fingerprint sensors, Corneometer, Nova, and Moisture Checker, in order to understand the correlations between different skin hydration measurement techniques and to understand the repeatability of each technique. The measurements are performed on different in-vivo skin sites from different volunteers and at different hydration levels. The repeatability of different techniques is achieved by measuring the same skin site repeatedly. The correlations between different skin hydration measurement techniques are achieved by plotting results from different techniques against each other. The different skin hydration levels are achieved through the recovery period after a skin immersive hydration.

  4. Protocol for Measuring the Thermal Properties of a Supercooled Synthetic Sand-water-gas-methane Hydrate Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Michihiro; Susuki, Naoko; Yamaguchi, Hiroko; Tsuji, Tomoya; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka

    2016-03-21

    Methane hydrates (MHs) are present in large amounts in the ocean floor and permafrost regions. Methane and hydrogen hydrates are being studied as future energy resources and energy storage media. To develop a method for gas production from natural MH-bearing sediments and hydrate-based technologies, it is imperative to understand the thermal properties of gas hydrates. The thermal properties' measurements of samples comprising sand, water, methane, and MH are difficult because the melting heat of MH may affect the measurements. To solve this problem, we performed thermal properties' measurements at supercooled conditions during MH formation. The measurement protocol, calculation method of the saturation change, and tips for thermal constants' analysis of the sample using transient plane source techniques are described here. The effect of the formation heat of MH on measurement is very small because the gas hydrate formation rate is very slow. This measurement method can be applied to the thermal properties of the gas hydrate-water-guest gas system, which contains hydrogen, CO2, and ozone hydrates, because the characteristic low formation rate of gas hydrate is not unique to MH. The key point of this method is the low rate of phase transition of the target material. Hence, this method may be applied to other materials having low phase-transition rates.

  5. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn

    2009-11-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  6. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, D.D.; Martin, A.I.; Yun, T.S.; Francisca, F.M.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Hydration and Thermal Expansion in Anatase Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, He; Li, Qiang; Ren, Yang; Fan, Longlong; Chen, Jun; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2016-08-01

    A tunable thermal expansion is reported in nanosized anatase by taking advantage of surface hydration. The coefficient of thermal expansion of 4 nm TiO2 along a-axis is negative with a hydrated surface and is positive without a hydrated surface. High-energy synchrotron X-ray pair distribution function analysis combined with ab initio calculations on the specific hydrated surface are carried out to reveal the local structure distortion that is responsible for the unusual negative thermal expansion.

  8. Hydration and Thermal Expansion in Anatase Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, He [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Li, Qiang [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Ren, Yang [Argonne National Laboratory, X-Ray Science Division, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Fan, Longlong [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Chen, Jun [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Deng, Jinxia [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China; Xing, Xianran [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 China

    2016-06-06

    A tunable thermal expansion is reported in nanosized anatase by taking advantage of surface hydration. The coefficient of thermal expansion of 4 nm TiO2 along a-axis is negative with a hydrated surface and is positive without a hydrated surface. High-energy synchrotron X-ray pair distribution function analysis combined with ab initio calculations on the specific hydrated surface are carried out to reveal the local structure distortion that is responsible for the unusual negative thermal expansion.

  9. Simultaneous determination of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat in sI methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat of sI methane hydrate were measured as functions of temperature and pressure using a needle probe technique. The temperature dependence was measured between −20°C and 17°C at 31.5 MPa. The pressure dependence was measured between 31.5 and 102 MPa at 14.4°C. Only weak temperature and pressure dependencies were observed. Methane hydrate thermal conductivity differs from that of water by less than 10 per cent, too little to provide a sensitive measure of hydrate content in water-saturated systems. Thermal diffusivity of methane hydrate is more than twice that of water, however, and its specific heat is about half that of water. Thus, when drilling into or through hydrate-rich sediment, heat from the borehole can raise the formation temperature more than 20 per cent faster than if the formation's pore space contains only water. Thermal properties of methane hydrate should be considered in safety and economic assessments of hydrate-bearing sediment.

  10. Measurement of thermal conductivity of gas hydrate with transient hot-wire method%瞬态热线法测定瓦斯水合物导热系数

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文胜; 潘长虹

    2013-01-01

    为研究瓦斯水合物的热量传递机理,基于瞬态热线法原理,建立一套实验设备对瓦斯水合物及纯甲烷水合物的导热系数进行了测试.结果表明,实验所选瓦斯气体生成水合物的导热系数与甲烷水合物导热系数均随温度的升高而升高.该研究从瓦斯水合物的热物性因素方面论证了对煤矿抽采瓦斯进行水合固化分离后以NGH(水合物储运)形式进行储运的可行性.%This paper is an effort to study the heat transfer mechanism of gas hydrate by developing an experiment apparatus based on the principle of transient hot-wire method in order to measure thermal conductivity of methane hydrate and gas hydrate.The results show an increase in the thermal conductivity of the selected gas hydrate formation and methane hydrate due to the increasing temperature.From the aspects of thermal factors of gas hydrate,the study verifies the feasibility of gas storage and transportation in the form of NGH (natural gas hydrate) following the hydration solidification and separation of coal mine gas.

  11. The impact of hydrate saturation on the mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties of hydrate-bearing sand, silts, and clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamarina, J.C. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Ruppel, C. [United States Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    A study was conducted to provide an internally-consistent, systematically-acquired database that could help in evaluating gas hydrate reservoirs. Other objectives were to assist in geomechanical analyses, hazards evaluation and the development of methane hydrate production techniques in sandy lithologies and fine-grained sediments that exist in the northern Gulf of Mexico. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments facilitates the interpretation of geophysical field data, borehole and slope stability analyses, and reservoir simulation and production models. This paper reported on the key findings derived from 5 years of laboratory experiments conducted on synthetic samples of sand, silts, or clays subjected to various confining pressures. The samples contained controlled saturations of tetrahydrofuran hydrate formed from the dissolved phase. This internally-consistent data set was used to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the trends in geophysical and geotechnical properties as a function of hydrate saturation, soil characteristics, and other parameters. The experiments emphasized measurements of seismic velocities, electrical conductivity and permittivity, large strain deformation and strength, and thermal conductivity. The impact of hydrate formation technique on the resulting physical properties measurements were discussed. The data set was used to identify systematic effects of sediment characteristics, hydrate concentration, and state of stress. The study showed that the electrical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments are less sensitive to the method used to form hydrate in the laboratory than to hydrate saturation. It was concluded that mechanical properties are strongly influenced by both soil properties and the hydrate loci. Since the thermal conductivity depends on the interaction of several factors, it cannot be readily predicted by volume average formulations. 23 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  12. In-situ study of the thermal properties of hydrate slurry by high pressure DSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sari, O.; Hu, J.; Brun, F.; Erbeau, N. [Institute of Thermal Engineering, University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland, Yverdon-les-Bains (Switzerland); Homsy, P. [Nestec, Vevey (Switzerland); Logel, J.-C. [Axima Refrigeration, Bischheim (France)

    2008-07-01

    Knowing the enthalpy of hydrate slurry is very essential for energy balance and industrial applications. No direct measurement processes had been developed in this field in the past time. A new experimental method with special device has been developed to carry out on-line measurement of the thermal properties for hydrate slurry under dynamic conditions. With this special device, it is possible to deliver the hydrate slurry to the high pressure DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry) directly from the production tank or pipes. Thermal data acquisition will be performed afterwards by DSC. The investigated conditions were at pressure of 30 bar and temperature of {approx}+7 {sup o}C. The dissociation enthalpy of CO{sub 2} hydrate slurry was about 54 kJ/kg, corresponding 10.8% of solid fraction. The on-line measurement results for CO{sub 2} hydrate slurry give a good tendency to apply this phase change slurry to the industrial refrigeration process. (author)

  13. Stability evaluation of hydrate-bearing sediments during thermally-driven hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, T.; Cho, G.; Santamarina, J.; Kim, H.; Lee, J.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrate-bearing sediments may destabilize spontaneously as part of geological processes, unavoidably during petroleum drilling/production operations, or intentionally as part of gas extraction from the hydrate itself. In all cases, high pore fluid pressure generation is anticipated during hydrate dissociation. This study examined how thermal changes destabilize gas hydrate-bearing sediments. First, an analytical formulation was derived for predicting fluid pressure evolution in hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to thermal stimulation without mass transfer. The formulation captures the self-preservation behavior, calculates the hydrate and free gas quantities during dissociation, considering effective stress-controlled sediment compressibility and gas solubility in aqueous phase. Pore fluid pressure generation is proportional to the initial hydrate fraction and the sediment bulk stiffness; is inversely proportional to the initial gas fraction and gas solubility; and is limited by changes in effective stress that cause the failure of the sediment. Second, the analytical formulation for hydrate dissociation was incorporated as a user-defined function into a verified finite difference code (FLAC2D). The underlying physical processes of hydrate-bearing sediments, including hydrate dissociation, self-preservation, pore pressure evolution, gas dissolution, and sediment volume expansion, were coupled with the thermal conduction, pore fluid flow, and mechanical response of sediments. We conducted the simulations for a duration of 20 years, assuming a constant-temperature wellbore transferred heat to the surrounding hydrate-bearing sediments, resulting in dissociation of methane hydrate in the well vicinity. The model predicted dissociation-induced excess pore fluid pressures which resulted in a large volume expansion and plastic deformation of the sediments. Furthermore, when the critical stress was reached, localized shear failure of the sediment around the borehole was

  14. Bioimpedance in medicine: Measuring hydration influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlubik, J.; Hlubik, P.; Lhotska, L.

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the paper is to present results of our ongoing research focused on the influence of body hydration on the body impedance measurements and also on the influence of the frequency used for the measurement. The question is why to measure human body composition and if these values have beneficial results. First goal of the work deals with a question of measuring human body composition. The performed measurements showed certain influence which must be verified by repeated experiments.

  15. Clathrate Hydrates for Thermal Energy Storage in Buildings: Overview of Proper Hydrate-Forming Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Castellani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing energy costs are at the origin of the great progress in the field of phase change materials (PCMs. The present work aims at studying the application of clathrate hydrates as PCMs in buildings. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline structures in which guest molecules are enclosed in the crystal lattice of water molecules. Clathrate hydrates can form also at ambient pressure and present a high latent heat, and for this reason, they are good candidates for being used as PCMs. The parameter that makes a PCM suitable to be used in buildings is, first of all, a melting temperature at about 25 °C. The paper provides an overview of groups of clathrate hydrates, whose physical and chemical characteristics could meet the requirements needed for their application in buildings. Simulations with a dynamic building simulation tool are carried out to evaluate the performance of clathrate hydrates in enhancing thermal comfort through the moderation of summer temperature swings and, therefore, in reducing energy consumption. Simulations suggest that clathrate hydrates have a potential in terms of improvement of indoor thermal comfort and a reduction of energy consumption for cooling. Cooling effects of 0.5 °C and reduced overheating hours of up to 1.1% are predicted.

  16. Thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of methane-carbon dioxide mixed hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, T.H.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.

    2011-02-15

    Replacement of methane with carbon dioxide in hydrate has been proposed as a strategy for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and/or production of methane (CH{sub 4}) from natural hydrate deposits. This replacement strategy requires a better understanding of the thermodynamic characteristics of binary mixtures of CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} hydrate (CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrates), as well as thermophysical property changes during gas exchange. This study explores the thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrates. We prepared CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate samples from two different, well-defined gas mixtures. During thermal dissociation of a CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate sample, gas samples from the head space were periodically collected and analyzed using gas chromatography. The changes in CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} compositions in both the vapor phase and hydrate phase during dissociation were estimated based on the gas chromatography measurements. It was found that the CO{sub 2} concentration in the vapor phase became richer during dissociation because the initial hydrate composition contained relatively more CO{sub 2} than the vapor phase. The composition change in the vapor phase during hydrate dissociation affected the dissociation pressure and temperature; the richer CO{sub 2} in the vapor phase led to a lower dissociation pressure. Furthermore, the increase in CO{sub 2} concentration in the vapor phase enriched the hydrate in CO{sub 2}. The dissociation enthalpy of the CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate was computed by fitting the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to the pressure-temperature (PT) trace of a dissociation test. It was observed that the dissociation enthalpy of the CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate lays between the limiting values of pure CH{sub 4} hydrate and CO{sub 2} hydrate, increasing with the CO{sub 2} fraction in the hydrate phase.

  17. Thermally induced evolution of phase transformations in gas hydrate sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Thermally induced evolution of phase transformations is a basic physical-chemical process in the dissociation of gas hydrate in sediment (GHS). Heat transfer leads to the weakening of the bed soil and the simultaneous establishment of a time varying stress field accompanied by seepage of fluids and deformation of the soil. As a consequence, ground failure could occur causing engineering damage or/and environmental disaster. This paper presents a simplified analysis of the thermal process by assuming that thermal conduction can be decoupled from the flow and deformation process. It is further assumed that phase transformations take place instantaneously. Analytical and numerical results are given for several examples of simplified geometry. Experiments using Tetra-hydro-furan hydrate sediments were carried out in our laboratory to check the theory. By comparison, the theoretical, numerical and experimental results on the evolution of dissociation fronts and temperature in the sediment are found to be in good agreement.

  18. Hydration of Portoguese cements, measurement and modelling of chemical shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maia, Lino; Geiker, Mette Rica; Figueiras, Joaquim A.

    2008-01-01

    form of the dispersion model. The development of hydration varied between the investigated cements; based on the measured data the degree of hydration after 24 h hydration at 20 C varied between 40 and 50%. This should be taken into account when comparing properties of concrete made from the different......Development of cement hydration was studied by measuring the chemical shrinkage of pastes. Five types of Portuguese Portland cement were used in cement pastes with . Chemical shrinkage was measured by gravimetry and dilatometry. In gravimeters results were recorded automatically during at least...

  19. Compressibility, thermal expansion coefficient and heat capacity of CH4 and CO2 hydrate mixtures using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, F L; Glavatskiy, K; Ji, Z; Kjelstrup, S; H Vlugt, T J

    2015-01-28

    Understanding the thermal and mechanical properties of CH4 and CO2 hydrates is essential for the replacement of CH4 with CO2 in natural hydrate deposits as well as for CO2 sequestration and storage. In this work, we present isothermal compressibility, isobaric thermal expansion coefficient and specific heat capacity of fully occupied single-crystal sI-CH4 hydrates, CO2 hydrates and hydrates of their mixture using molecular dynamics simulations. Eight rigid/nonpolarisable water interaction models and three CH4 and CO2 interaction potentials were selected to examine the atomic interactions in the sI hydrate structure. The TIP4P/2005 water model combined with the DACNIS united-atom CH4 potential and TraPPE CO2 rigid potential were found to be suitable molecular interaction models. Using these molecular models, the results indicate that both the lattice parameters and the compressibility of the sI hydrates agree with those from experimental measurements. The calculated bulk modulus for any mixture ratio of CH4 and CO2 hydrates varies between 8.5 GPa and 10.4 GPa at 271.15 K between 10 and 100 MPa. The calculated thermal expansion and specific heat capacities of CH4 hydrates are also comparable with experimental values above approximately 260 K. The compressibility and expansion coefficient of guest gas mixture hydrates increase with an increasing ratio of CO2-to-CH4, while the bulk modulus and specific heat capacity exhibit the opposite trend. The presented results for the specific heat capacities of 2220-2699.0 J kg(-1) K(-1) for any mixture ratio of CH4 and CO2 hydrates are the first reported so far. These computational results provide a useful database for practical natural gas recovery from CH4 hydrates in deep oceans where CO2 is considered to replace CH4, as well as for phase equilibrium and mechanical stability of gas hydrate-bearing sediments. The computational schemes also provide an appropriate balance between computational accuracy and cost for predicting

  20. Direct measurement of methane hydrate composition along the hydrate equilibrium boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    The composition of methane hydrate, namely nW for CH 4??nWH2O, was directly measured along the hydrate equilibrium boundary under conditions of excess methane gas. Pressure and temperature conditions ranged from 1.9 to 9.7 MPa and 263 to 285 K. Within experimental error, there is no change in hydrate composition with increasing pressure along the equilibrium boundary, but nW may show a slight systematic decrease away from this boundary. A hydrate stoichiometry of n W = 5.81-6.10 H2O describes the entire range of measured values, with an average composition of CH4??5.99(??0.07) H2O along the equilibrium boundary. These results, consistent with previously measured values, are discussed with respect to the widely ranging values obtained by thermodynamic analysis. The relatively constant composition of methane hydrate over the geologically relevant pressure and temperature range investigated suggests that in situ methane hydrate compositions may be estimated with some confidence. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  1. Measurement of thermal properties of PCM materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domanski, R.; Jaworski, M. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology (Poland). Inst. of Heat Engineering

    1994-12-31

    In the article results of measurements of thermal properties of PCM (phase change materials) and their stability are presented. These include specific heat, temperature of phase change, latent heat and enthalpy as a function of temperature. Different kind of materials were considered, especially some waxes, n-alkanes and salt hydrates. Measurements of thermal capacity of materials were performed using two techniques - standard DSC (for small samples and pure materials) and simple thermal analysis based on the measurement of temperature field in relatively big samples (about 20-50 g). Stability of thermal properties in many cycles of melting and solidification for some materials obtained in special set-up (for fast cycling) are presented. On the base of measurements mathematical formulas describing enthalpy vs. temperature for some materials were developed. These are very useful in computer simulation of thermal storage systems with PCM. (orig.)

  2. Hydration of Portoguese cements, measurement and modelling of chemical shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maia, Lino; Geiker, Mette Rica; Figueiras, Joaquim A.

    2008-01-01

    Development of cement hydration was studied by measuring the chemical shrinkage of pastes. Five types of Portuguese Portland cement were used in cement pastes with . Chemical shrinkage was measured by gravimetry and dilatometry. In gravimeters results were recorded automatically during at least...

  3. Terahertz spectroscopy of dry, hydrated, and thermally denatured biological macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, Dawn; Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope; Thomas, Robert J.; Peralta, Xomalin; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2012-03-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is an effective technique to probe the intermolecular and collective vibrational modes of biological macromolecules at THz frequencies. To date, the vast majority of spectroscopic studies have been performed on dehydrated biomolecular samples. Given the fact that all biochemical processes occur in aqueous environments and water is required for proper protein folding and function, we hypothesize that valuable information can be gained from spectroscopic studies performed on hydrated biomolecules in their native conformation. In this study, we used a THz-TDS system that exploits photoconductive techniques for THz pulse generation and freespace electro-optical sampling approaches for detection. We used the THz spectrometer to measure the time-dependent electric field of THz waves upon interaction with water, phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and collagen gels. By comparing these waveforms with references, we simultaneously determined each sample's index of refraction (n) and absorption coefficients (μa) as a function of frequency. Our data show that the properties we measure for the water, PBS and collagen are comparable to those reported in the literature. In the future, we plan to examine the effect that both temperature and pH have on the optical properties of other biological macromolecules. Studies will also be performed to compare our results to those generated using molecular dynamics simulations.

  4. Evaluation of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model. [Cyclic thermal injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hammersheimb, E.; Sawyer, W.

    1985-05-01

    The objective of the work performed under this directive is to assess whether gas hydrates could potentially be technically and economically recoverable. The technical potential and economics of recovering gas from a representative hydrate reservoir will be established using the cyclic thermal injection model, HYDMOD, appropriately modified for this effort, integrated with economics model for gas production on the North Slope of Alaska, and in the deep offshore Atlantic. The results from this effort are presented in this document. In Section 1, the engineering cost and financial analysis model used in performing the economic analysis of gas production from hydrates -- the Hydrates Gas Economics Model (HGEM) -- is described. Section 2 contains a users guide for HGEM. In Section 3, a preliminary economic assessment of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model is presented. Section 4 contains a summary critique of existing hydrate gas recovery models. Finally, Section 5 summarizes the model modification made to HYDMOD, the cyclic thermal injection model for hydrate gas recovery, in order to perform this analysis.

  5. Thermal Stability and Proton Conductivity of Rare Earth Orthophosphate Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anfimova, Tatiana; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2014-01-01

    Hydrated orthophosphate powders of three rare earth metals, lanthanum, neodymium and gadolinium, were prepared and studied as potential proton conducting materials for intermediate temperature electrochemical applications. The phosphates undergo a transformation from the rhabdophane structure...

  6. Evaluation of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hammersheimb, E.; Sawyer, W.

    1985-05-01

    The objective of the work performed under this directive is to assess whether gas hydrates could potentially be technically and economically recoverable. The technical potential and economics of recovering gas from a representative hydrate reservoir will be established using the cyclic thermal injection model, HYDMOD, appropriately modified for this effort, integrated with economics model for gas production on the North Slope of Alaska, and in the deep offshore Atlantic. The results from this effort are presented in this document. In Section 1, the engineering cost and financial analysis model used in performing the economic analysis of gas production from hydrates -- the Hydrates Gas Economics Model (HGEM) -- is described. Section 2 contains a users guide for HGEM. In Section 3, a preliminary economic assessment of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model is presented. Section 4 contains a summary critique of existing hydrate gas recovery models. Finally, Section 5 summarizes the model modification made to HYDMOD, the cyclic thermal injection model for hydrate gas recovery, in order to perform this analysis.

  7. Thermal Properties Measurement Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, Jon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Braase, Lori [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Papesch, Cynthia [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hurley, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tonks, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gofryk, Krzysztof [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fielding, Randy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Knight, Collin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Meyer, Mitch [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The Thermal Properties Measurement Report summarizes the research, development, installation, and initial use of significant experimental thermal property characterization capabilities at the INL in FY 2015. These new capabilities were used to characterize a U3Si2 (candidate Accident Tolerant) fuel sample fabricated at the INL. The ability to perform measurements at various length scales is important and provides additional data that is not currently in the literature. However, the real value of the data will be in accomplishing a phenomenological understanding of the thermal conductivity in fuels and the ties to predictive modeling. Thus, the MARMOT advanced modeling and simulation capability was utilized to illustrate how the microstructural data can be modeled and compared with bulk characterization data. A scientific method was established for thermal property measurement capability on irradiated nuclear fuel samples, which will be installed in the Irradiated Material Characterization Laboratory (IMCL).

  8. Heat Transfer Analysis of Methane Hydrate Sediment Dissociation in a Closed Reactor by a Thermal Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjun Yang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The heat transfer analysis of hydrate-bearing sediment involved phase changes is one of the key requirements of gas hydrate exploitation techniques. In this paper, experiments were conducted to examine the heat transfer performance during hydrate formation and dissociation by a thermal method using a 5L volume reactor. This study simulated porous media by using glass beads of uniform size. Sixteen platinum resistance thermometers were placed in different position in the reactor to monitor the temperature differences of the hydrate in porous media. The influence of production temperature on the production time was also investigated. Experimental results show that there is a delay when hydrate decomposed in the radial direction and there are three stages in the dissociation period which is influenced by the rate of hydrate dissociation and the heat flow of the reactor. A significant temperature difference along the radial direction of the reactor was obtained when the hydrate dissociates and this phenomenon could be enhanced by raising the production temperature. In addition, hydrate dissociates homogeneously and the temperature difference is much smaller than the other conditions when the production temperature is around the 10 °C. With the increase of the production temperature, the maximum of ΔToi grows until the temperature reaches 40 °C. The period of ΔToi have a close relation with the total time of hydrate dissociation. Especially, the period of ΔToi with production temperature of 10 °C is twice as much as that at other temperatures. Under these experimental conditions, the heat is mainly transferred by conduction from the dissociated zone to the dissociating zone and the production temperature has little effect on the convection of the water in the porous media.

  9. Hydration of calcium aluminate cement determined by thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinherrová, Lenka; Trník, Anton

    2017-07-01

    Calcium aluminate cements (CACs) are a very important type of non-Portland or special cements. Since they are considerably more expensive, they are not used as a simple substitute for Portland cement. Their structure allows them to achieve high compressive strength. They resist very well to high temperatures and temperature changes, or also to chemical attacks. The original motivation, why the CACs were developed, was the idea of finding new cement chemistries that would be more resistant to sulfate attack then Portland cements. Nowadays, the main usage of the CACs is in high temperatures applications. In this paper, we study the hydration of a CAC up to one year of age to control what happens in CACs structure during aging. The variety in the main products of hydration is studied using differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry in the temperature range from 25 °C to 1000 °C with a heating rate of 5 °C/min in an argon atmosphere. The basic physical and mechanical properties are also determined.

  10. Physicochemical properties and thermal stability of quercetin hydrates in the solid state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghetti, G.S., E-mail: greicefarm@yahoo.com.br [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga 2752, CEP 90.610-000, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Carini, J.P. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga 2752, CEP 90.610-000, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Honorato, S.B.; Ayala, A.P. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Caixa Postal 6030, CEP 60.455-970, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Moreira, J.C.F. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Instituto de Ciencias Basicas da Saude, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2600, CEP 90035-003, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Bassani, V.L. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga 2752, CEP 90.610-000, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2012-07-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quercetin raw materials may present different degree of hydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal stability of quercetin in the solid state depends on its degree of hydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quercetin dehydrate is thermodynamically more stable than the other crystal forms. - Abstract: In the present work three samples of quercetin raw materials (QCTa, QCTb and QCTc), purchased from different Brazilian suppliers, were characterized employing scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, simultaneous thermogravimetry and infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and variable temperature-powder X-ray diffraction, in order to know their physicochemical properties, specially the thermal stability in solid state. The results demonstrated that the raw materials of quercetin analyzed present distinct crystalline structures, ascribed to the different degree of hydration of their crystal lattice. The thermal stability of these quercetin raw materials in the solid state was highly dependent on their degree of hydration, where QCTa (quercetin dihydrate) was thermodynamically more stable than the other two samples.

  11. Thermal stability and hydration behavior of ritonavir sulfate: A vibrational spectroscopic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaweri Gambhir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ritonavir sulfate is a protease inhibitor widely used in the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In order to elucidate the inherent stability and sensitivity characteristics of ritonavir sulfate, it was investigated under forced thermal and hydration stress conditions as recommended by the International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. In addition, competency of vibrational (infrared and Raman spectroscopy was assessed to identify structural changes of the drug symbolizing its stress degradation. High performance liquid chromatography was used as a confirmatory technique for both thermal and hydration stress study, while thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis and atomic force microscopy substantiated the implementation of vibrational spectroscopy in this framework. The results exhibited high thermal stability of the drug as significant variations were observed in the diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectra only after the drug exposure to thermal radiations at 100 °C. Hydration behavior of ritonavir sulfate was evaluated using Raman spectroscopy and the value of critical relative humidity was found to be >67%. An important aspect of this study was to utilize vibrational spectroscopic technique to address stability issues of pharmacological molecules, not only for their processing in pharmaceutical industry, but also for predicting their shelf lives and suitable storage conditions.

  12. Thermal stability and hydration behavior of ritonavir sulfate:A vibrational spectroscopic approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaweri Gambhir; Parul Singh; Deepak K Jangir; Ranjana Mehrotra

    2015-01-01

    abstract Ritonavir sulfate is a protease inhibitor widely used in the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In order to elucidate the inherent stability and sensitivity characteristics of ritonavir sulfate, it was investigated under forced thermal and hydration stress conditions as recommended by the Inter-national Conference on Harmonization guidelines. In addition, competency of vibrational (infrared and Raman) spectroscopy was assessed to identify structural changes of the drug symbolizing its stress de-gradation. High performance liquid chromatography was used as a confirmatory technique for both thermal and hydration stress study, while thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis and atomic force microscopy substantiated the implementation of vibrational spectroscopy in this frame-work. The results exhibited high thermal stability of the drug as significant variations were observed in the diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectra only after the drug exposure to thermal ra-diations at 100 °C. Hydration behavior of ritonavir sulfate was evaluated using Raman spectroscopy and the value of critical relative humidity was found to be 4 67%. An important aspect of this study was to utilize vibrational spectroscopic technique to address stability issues of pharmacological molecules, not only for their processing in pharmaceutical industry, but also for predicting their shelf lives and suitable storage conditions.

  13. Thermal microstructure measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Michael J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A thermal microstructure measurement system (TMMS) operates autonomously h its own internal power supply and telemeters data to a platform. A thermal array is mounted on a cross-braced frame designed to orient itself normal to existing currents with fixed sensor positioning bars protruding from the cross bars. A plurality of matched thermistors, conductivity probes and inclinometers are mounted on the frame. A compass and pressure transducer are contained in an electronics package suspended below the array. The array is deployed on a taut mooring below a subsurface float. Data are digitized, transmitted via cable to a surface buoy and then telemetered to the platform where the data is processed via a computer, recorded and/or displayed. The platform computer also sends commands to the array via telemetry.

  14. Controls on gas hydrate stability in methane depleted sediments: Laboratory and field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, L.; Chanton, J.; Martens, C. S.

    2009-12-01

    Gas hydrate deposits are the Earth’s largest reservoir of the powerful greenhouse gas methane and thus a key future energy resource. However, hydrate stability in sedimentary environments featuring highly variable methane concentrations needs to be understood to allow resource estimation and recovery. Hydrates are at chemical equilibrium and therefore stable where high pressures, low temperatures, and moderate salinities coexist with methane-saturated pore waters. When all of these conditions are not met, hydrates should dissociate or dissolve, releasing methane to the overlying water and possibly the atmosphere. In addition, other natural factors may control the kinetics of their degradation complicating models for hydrate stability and occurrence. Our measurements indicate that the pore-waters surrounding some shallow buried hydrates are not methane-saturated suggesting that dissolution should occur relatively rapidly. Yet, these hydrate deposits are known to persist relatively unchanged for years. We hypothesize that, once formed, hydrate deposits may be stabilized by natural factors inhibiting dissolution, including oil or microbial biofilm coatings. While most studies have focused on pressure and temperature changes where hydrates occur, relatively few have included measurements of in situ methane concentration gradients because of the difficulties inherent to making such measurements. Here we present recent measurements of methane concentration and stable carbon isotope gradients immediately adjacent to undisturbed hydrate surfaces obtained through deployments of novel seafloor instruments. Our results suggest that the hydrates studied are relatively stable when exposed to overlying and pore-waters that are undersaturated with methane. Concurrent laboratory measurements of methane concentration gradients next to artificial hydrate surfaces were utilized to test our protective coating hypothesis. After a stable dissolution rate for hydrate samples was

  15. Micromechanical measurements of the effect of surfactants on cyclopentane hydrate shell properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Erika P; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the effect of surfactants on clathrate hydrate growth and morphology, especially particle shell strength and cohesion force, is critical to advancing new strategies to mitigate hydrate plug formation. In this study, dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid and polysorbate 80 surfactants were included during the growth of cyclopentane hydrates at several concentrations above and below the critical micelle concentration. A novel micromechanical method was applied to determine the force required to puncture the hydrate shell using a glass cantilever (with and without surfactants), with annealing times ranging from immediately after the hydrate nucleated to 90 minutes after formation. It was shown that the puncture force was decreased by the addition of both surfactants up to a maximum of 79%. Over the entire range of annealing times (0-90 minutes), the thickness of the hydrate shell was also measured. However, there was no clear change in shell thickness with the addition of surfactants. The growth rate of the hydrate shell was found to vary less than 15% with the addition of surfactants. The cohesive force between two hydrate particles was measured for each surfactant and found to be reduced by 28% to 78%. Interfacial tension measurements were also performed. Based on these results, microscopic changes to the hydrate shell morphology (due to the presence of surfactants) were proposed to cause the decrease in the force required to break the hydrate shell, since no macroscopic morphology changes were observed. Understanding the hydrate shell strength can be critical to reducing the capillary bridge interaction between hydrate particles or controlling the release of unconverted water from the interior of the hydrate particle, which can cause rapid hydrate conversion.

  16. Obsidian hydration profiles measured by sputter-induced optical emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsong, I S; Houser, C A; Yusef, N A; Messier, R F; White, W B; Michels, J W

    1978-07-28

    The variation of concentrations of hydrogen, sodium, potassium, lithium, calcium, magnesium, silicon, and aluminum as a function of depth in the hydration layer of obsidian artifacts has been determined by sputter-induced optical emission. The surface hydration is accompanied by dealkalization, and there is a buildup of alkaline earths, calcium and magnesium in the outermost layers. These results have clarified the phenomena underlying the obsidian hydration dating technique.

  17. Thermal expansion behavior of hydrate paramylon in the low-temperature region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kayoko; Kimura, Satoshi; Togawa, Eiji; Wada, Masahisa

    2013-01-16

    The thermal expansion behavior of hydrate paramylon between 100 and 300K has been investigated using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. The X-ray diffraction profile at 300K showed a typical pattern of the hydrate triple helical (1→3)-β-d-glucan with a hexagonal unit cell (a=15.782Å and c=18.580Å). On cooling, the hydrate paramylon had converted to a "low-temperature phase" around 270K. On passing through the phase transition, the a-axis and c-axis values decreased and increased, respectively, and the low-temperature phase at 100K exhibited a hexagonal unit cell (a=15.586Å and c=18.619Å). The phase transition took place reversibly. Below the transition point, both the a-axis and c-axis values decreased linearly. The thermal expansion coefficients are: α(a)=1.50×10(-5)K(-1), α(c)=0.33×10(-5)K(-1), and β=3.08×10(-5)K(-1).

  18. Thermal regulation of methane hydrate dissociation: Implications for gas production models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal self-regulation of methane hydrate dissociation at pressure, temperature conditions along phase boundaries, illustrated by experiment in this report, is a significant effect with potential relevance to gas production from gas hydrate. In surroundings maintained at temperatures above the ice melting point, the temperature in the vicinity of dissociating methane hydrate will decrease because heat flow is insufficient to balance the heat absorbed by the endothermic reaction: CH4??nH2O (s) = CH4 (g) + nH2O (l). Temperature decreases until either all of the hydrate dissociates or a phase boundary is reached. At pressures above the quadruple point, the temperature-limiting phase boundary is that of the dissociation reaction itself. At lower pressures, the minimum temperature is limited by the H2O solid/liquid boundary. This change in the temperature-limiting phase boundary constrains the pressure, temperature conditions of the quadruple point for the CH4-H2O system to 2.55 ?? 0.02 MPa and 272.85 ?? 0.03 K. At pressures below the quadruple point, hydrate dissociation proceeds as the liquid H2O produced by dissociation freezes. In the laboratory experiments, dissociation is not impeded by the formation of ice byproduct per se; instead rates are proportional to the heat flow from the surroundings. This is in contrast to the extremely slow dissociation rates observed when surrounding temperatures are below the H2O solid/liquid boundary, where no liquid water is present. This "anomalous" or "self" preservation behavior, most pronounced near 268 K, cannot be accessed when surrounding temperatures are above the H2O solid/liquid boundary. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  19. Thermal diffusivity effect in opto-thermal skin measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, P; Imhof, R E [Faculty of ESBE, London South Bank University, 103 Borough Road, London SE1 0AA (United Kingdom); Cui, Y [Sunrise Systems Limited, Flint Bridge Business Centre, Ely Road, Waterbeach, Cambridge CB5 9QZ (United Kingdom); Ciortea, L I; Berg, E P, E-mail: xiaop@lsbu.ac.u [Biox Systems Ltd, 103 Borough Road, London SE1 0AA (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-01

    We present our latest study on the thermal diffusivity effect in opto-thermal skin measurements. We discuss how thermal diffusivity affects the shape of opto-thermal signal, and how to measure thermal diffusivity in opto-thermal measurements of arbitrary sample surfaces. We also present a mathematical model for a thermally gradient material, and its corresponding opto-thermal signal. Finally, we show some of our latest experimental results of this thermal diffusivity effect study.

  20. Thermomechanical measurements on thermal microactuators.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Michael Sean; Epp, David S.; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Gorby, Allen D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2009-01-01

    Due to the coupling of thermal and mechanical behaviors at small scales, a Campaign 6 project was created to investigate thermomechanical phenomena in microsystems. This report documents experimental measurements conducted under the auspices of this project. Since thermal and mechanical measurements for thermal microactuators were not available for a single microactuator design, a comprehensive suite of thermal and mechanical experimental data was taken and compiled for model validation purposes. Three thermal microactuator designs were selected and fabricated using the SUMMiT V{sup TM} process at Sandia National Laboratories. Thermal and mechanical measurements for the bent-beam polycrystalline silicon thermal microactuators are reported, including displacement, overall actuator electrical resistance, force, temperature profiles along microactuator legs in standard laboratory air pressures and reduced pressures down to 50 mTorr, resonant frequency, out-of-plane displacement, and dynamic displacement response to applied voltages.

  1. Electrical Measurement to Assess Hydration Process and the Porosity Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Xiaosheng; XIAO Lianzhen; LI Zongjin

    2008-01-01

    The change of electrical resistivity with time at early ages was used to investigate the hydration process and the porosity development. Porosity reduction process of cement-based materials hydration was developed by a proposed method. The porosity reduction is fast at the setting period. The results find that the pore discontinuity occurs faster at lower water/cement ratios than at higher water/cement ratios which is similar to the results of the Percolation method.

  2. Model-based temperature measurement system development for marine methane hydrate-bearing sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuhara, Masafumi; Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Igarashi, Juei; Fujii, Kasumi; Shun' etsu, Onodera; Tertychnyi, Vladimir; Shandrygin, Alexander; Pimenov, Viacheslav; Shako, Valery; Matsubayashi, Osamu; Ochiai, Koji

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes the effect of the sensor installation on the temperature of the hydrate-bearing sediments through modeling, how the system was deployed in Nankai Trough area in Japan, and the features of the marine methane hydrate temperature measurement system. (Author)

  3. Confined Water in Layered Silicates: The Origin of Anomalous Thermal Expansion Behavior in Calcium-Silicate-Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, N M Anoop; Wang, Bu; Falzone, Gabriel; Le Pape, Yann; Neithalath, Narayanan; Pilon, Laurent; Bauchy, Mathieu; Sant, Gaurav

    2016-12-28

    Water, under conditions of nanoscale confinement, exhibits anomalous dynamics, and enhanced thermal deformations, which may be further enhanced when such water is in contact with hydrophilic surfaces. Such heightened thermal deformations of water could control the volume stability of hydrated materials containing nanoconfined structural water. Understanding and predicting the thermal deformation coefficient (TDC, often referred to as the CTE, coefficient of thermal expansion), which represents volume changes induced in materials under conditions of changing temperature, is of critical importance for hydrated solids including: hydrogels, biological tissues, and calcium silicate hydrates, as changes in their volume can result in stress development, and cracking. By pioneering atomistic simulations, we examine the physical origin of thermal expansion in calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the binding agent in concrete that is formed by the reaction of cement with water. We report that the TDC of C-S-H shows a sudden increase when the CaO/SiO2 (molar ratio; abbreviated as Ca/Si) exceeds 1.5. This anomalous behavior arises from a notable increase in the confinement of water contained in the C-S-H's nanostructure. We identify that confinement is dictated by the topology of the C-S-H's atomic network. Taken together, the results suggest that thermal deformations of hydrated silicates can be altered by inducing compositional changes, which in turn alter the atomic topology and the resultant volume stability of the solids.

  4. Mössbauer, XRD, and Complex Thermal Analysis of the Hydration of Cement with Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vili Lilkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydration of cement with and without fly ash is studied with Mössbauer spectroscopy, XRD, and thermal analysis. Iron in cement is present as Fe3+-ions and occupies two octahedral positions, with close isomer shifts and quadrupole splittings. Iron in fly ash is present as Fe2+ and Fe3+, and the Mössbauer spectra display three doublets—two for Fe3+ in octahedral coordination and one for Fe2+. A third doublet was registered in the hydrating plain cement pastes after the 5th day, due to Fe3+ in tetrahedral coordination in the structure of the newly formed monosulphate aluminate. In cement pastes with fly ash, the doublet of tetrahedral iron is formed earlier because the quantity of ettringite and portlandite is low and more monosulphate crystallizes. No Fe(OH3 phase forms during hydration of C4AF. The fly ash displays pozzolanic properties, which lead to lowering of the portlandite quantity in the cement mixtures and increasing of the high temperature products.

  5. A Smoking Gun for Methane Hydrate Release During the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieling, J.; Peterse, F.; Lunt, D. J.; Bohaty, S. M.; S Sinninghe Damsté, J.; Reichart, G. J.; Sluijs, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; 56 Ma) was a period of rapid 4-5ºC global warming and a global negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) of 3-4.5‰, signaling the input of at least 1500 Gt of δ13C-depleted carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system. Methane from submarine hydrates has long been proposed as a carbon source, but direct and indirect evidence is lacking. We generated a new high-resolution TEX86 and δ13C record from Ocean Drilling Program Site 959 in the eastern tropical Atlantic and find that initial warming preceded the PETM CIE by 10 kyr. Moreover, time-shifted cross-correlations on these new and published temperature-δ13C data imply that substantial (2-3 °C) warming lead 13C-depleted carbon injection by an average of 2-3 kyr globally. Finally, a data compilation shows that global burial fluxes of biogenic Ba approximately doubled across all depths of the ocean studied, which on PETM time scales can only be explained by significant Ba addition to the oceans. Submarine hydrates are Ba-rich and require warming to dissociate. The simplest explanation for the temperature lead and Ba addition to the ocean is that methane hydrate dissociated as a response to initial warming and acted as a positive carbon cycle feedback during the PETM.

  6. A Counter-Current Heat-Exchange Reactor for the Thermal Stimulation of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manja Luzi-Helbing

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Since huge amounts of CH4 are bound in natural gas hydrates occurring at active and passive continental margins and in permafrost regions, the production of natural gas from hydrate-bearing sediments has become of more and more interest. Three different methods to destabilize hydrates and release the CH4 gas are discussed in principle: thermal stimulation, depressurization and chemical stimulation. This study focusses on the thermal stimulation using a counter-current heat-exchange reactor for the in situ combustion of CH4. The principle of in situ combustion as a method for thermal stimulation of hydrate bearing sediments has been introduced and discussed earlier [1,2]. In this study we present the first results of several tests performed in a pilot plant scale using a counter-current heat-exchange reactor. The heat of the flameless, catalytic oxidation of CH4 was used for the decomposition of hydrates in sand within a LArge Reservoir Simulator (LARS. Different catalysts were tested, varying from diverse elements of the platinum group to a universal metal catalyst. The results show differences regarding the conversion rate of CH4 to CO2. The promising results of the latest reactor test, for which LARS was filled with sand and ca. 80% of the pore space was saturated with CH4 hydrate, are also presented in this study. The data analysis showed that about 15% of the CH4 gas released from hydrates would have to be used for the successful dissociation of all hydrates in the sediment using thermal stimulation via in situ combustion.

  7. Thermal measurements and inverse techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Orlande, Helcio RB; Maillet, Denis; Cotta, Renato M

    2011-01-01

    With its uncommon presentation of instructional material regarding mathematical modeling, measurements, and solution of inverse problems, Thermal Measurements and Inverse Techniques is a one-stop reference for those dealing with various aspects of heat transfer. Progress in mathematical modeling of complex industrial and environmental systems has enabled numerical simulations of most physical phenomena. In addition, recent advances in thermal instrumentation and heat transfer modeling have improved experimental procedures and indirect measurements for heat transfer research of both natural phe

  8. Enhancement of the antimicrobial properties of orthorhombic molybdenum trioxide by thermal induced fracturing of the hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafaei, Shahram; Van Opdenbosch, Daniel [Technische Universität München (TUM), Chair for Biogenic Polymers, Schulgasse 16, D-94315 Straubing (Germany); Fey, Tobias [Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Department of Materials Science and Engineering 3: Glass and Ceramics, Martensstraße 5, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Koch, Marcus; Kraus, Tobias [INM, Leibniz Institute for New Materials, Campus D2 2, D-66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Guggenbichler, Josef Peter [AMiSTec GmbH & Co. KG, Leitweg 23, A-6345 Kössen (Austria); Zollfrank, Cordt, E-mail: cordt.zollfrank@tum.de [Technische Universität München (TUM), Chair for Biogenic Polymers, Schulgasse 16, D-94315 Straubing (Germany)

    2016-01-01

    The oxides of the transition metal molybdenum exhibit excellent antimicrobial properties. We present the preparation of molybdenum trioxide dihydrate (MoO{sub 3} × 2H{sub 2}O) by an acidification method and demonstrate the thermal phase development and morphological evolution during and after calcination from 25 °C to 600 °C. The thermal dehydration of the material was found to proceed in two steps. Microbiological roll-on tests using Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were performed and exceptional antimicrobial activities were determined for anhydrous samples with orthorhombic lattice symmetry and a large specific surface area. The increase in the specific surface area is due to crack formation and to the loss of the hydrate water after calcination at 300 °C. The results support the proposed antimicrobial mechanism for transition metal oxides, which based on a local acidity increase as a consequence of the augmented specific surface area. - Highlights: • Molybdenum trioxide dihydrate (MoO{sub 3} × 2H{sub 2}O) and anhydrous MoO{sub 3} after calcination exhibit exceptional antimicrobial activities • Especially the orthorhombic samples with a large specific surface area show excellent antimicrobial properties. • The increased specific surface area is due to crack formation and to loss of hydrate water after calcination at 300 °C. • Increased a local acidity as a consequence of the augmented surface area is related to the antimicrobial characteristics.

  9. Obsidian hydration profile measurements using a nuclear reaction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R.R.; Leich, D.A.; Tombrello, T.A.; Ericson, J.E.; Friedman, I.

    1974-01-01

    AMBIENT water diffuses into the exposed surfaces of obsidian, forming a hydration layer which increases in thickness with time to a maximum depth of 20-40 ??m (ref. 1), this layer being the basic foundation of obsidian dating2,3. ?? 1974 Nature Publishing Group.

  10. Thermal Plasma Synthesis of Crystalline Gallium Nitride Nanopowder from Gallium Nitrate Hydrate and Melamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hee Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Gallium nitride (GaN nanopowder used as a blue fluorescent material was synthesized by using a direct current (DC non-transferred arc plasma. Gallium nitrate hydrate (Ga(NO33∙xH2O was used as a raw material and NH3 gas was used as a nitridation source. Additionally, melamine (C3H6N6 powder was injected into the plasma flame to prevent the oxidation of gallium to gallium oxide (Ga2O3. Argon thermal plasma was applied to synthesize GaN nanopowder. The synthesized GaN nanopowder by thermal plasma has low crystallinity and purity. It was improved to relatively high crystallinity and purity by annealing. The crystallinity is enhanced by the thermal treatment and the purity was increased by the elimination of residual C3H6N6. The combined process of thermal plasma and annealing was appropriate for synthesizing crystalline GaN nanopowder. The annealing process after the plasma synthesis of GaN nanopowder eliminated residual contamination and enhanced the crystallinity of GaN nanopowder. As a result, crystalline GaN nanopowder which has an average particle size of 30 nm was synthesized by the combination of thermal plasma treatment and annealing.

  11. Drilling Gas Hydrates on hydrate Ridge, Oregon continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehu, A. M.; Bohrmann, G.; Leg 204 Science Party

    2002-12-01

    During Leg 204, we cored and logged 9 sites on the Oregon continental margin to determine the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates in an accretionary ridge and adjacent slope basin, investigate the mechanisms that transport methane and other gases into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and obtain constraints on physical properties of hydrates in situ. A 3D seismic survey conducted in 2000 provided images of potential subsurface fluid conduits and indicated the position of the GHSZ throughout the survey region. After coring the first site, we acquired Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) data at all but one site to provide an overview of downhole physical properties. The LWD data confirmed the general position of key seismic stratigraphic horizons and yielded an initial estimate of hydrate concentration through the proxy of in situ electrical resistivity. These records proved to be of great value in planning subsequent coring. The second new hydrate proxy to be tested was infrared thermal imaging of cores on the catwalk as rapidly as possible after retrieval. The thermal images were used to identify hydrate samples and to estimate the distribution and texture of hydrate within the cores. Geochemical analyses of interstitial waters and of headspace and void gases provide additional information on the distribution and concentration of hydrate within the stability zone, the origin and pathway of fluids into and through the GHSZ, and the rates at which gas hydrate is forming. Bio- and lithostratigraphic description of cores, measurement of physical properties, and in situ pressure core sampling and thermal measurements complement the data set, providing ground-truth tests of inferred physical and sedimentological properties. Among the most interesting preliminary results are: 1) that gas hydrates are distributed through a broad depth range within the GHSZ and that different physical and chemical proxies for hydrate distribution and concentration give generally

  12. Measurement of ambient aerosol hydration state at Great Smoky Mountains National Park in the southeastern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Taylor

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We present results from two field deployments of a unique tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA configuration with two primary capabilities: identifying alternative stable or meta-stable ambient aerosol hydration states associated with hysteresis in aerosol hydration behavior and determining the actual Ambient hydration State (AS-TDMA. This data set is the first to fully classify the ambient hydration state of aerosols despite recognition that hydration state significantly impacts the roles of aerosols in climate, visibility and heterogeneous chemistry. The AS-TDMA was installed at a site in eastern Tennessee on the border of Great Smoky Mountains National Park for projects during the summer of 2006 and winter of 2007–2008. During the summer, 12% of the aerosols sampled in continuous AS-TDMA measurements were found to posses two possible hydration states under ambient conditions. In every case, the more hydrated of the possible states was occupied. The remaining 88% did not posses multiple possible states. In continuous measurements during the winter, 49% of the aerosols sampled possessed two possible ambient hydration states; the remainder possessed only one. Of those aerosols with multiple possible ambient hydration states, 65% occupied the more hydrated state; 35% occupied the less hydrated state. This seasonal contrast is supported by differences in the fine particulate (PM2.5 composition and ambient RH as measured during the two study periods. In addition to seasonal summaries, this work includes case studies depicting the variation of hydration state with changing atmospheric conditions.

  13. Geomechanical, Hydraulic and Thermal Characteristics of Deep Oceanic Sandy Sediments Recovered during the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Expedition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohan Cha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the geomechanical, hydraulic and thermal characteristics of natural sandy sediments collected during the Ulleung Basin gas hydrate expedition 2, East Sea, offshore Korea. The studied sediment formation is considered as a potential target reservoir for natural gas production. The sediments contained silt, clay and sand fractions of 21%, 1.3% and 77.7%, respectively, as well as diatomaceous minerals with internal pores. The peak friction angle and critical state (or residual state friction angle under drained conditions were ~26° and ~22°, respectively. There was minimal or no apparent cohesion intercept. Stress- and strain-dependent elastic moduli, such as tangential modulus and secant modulus, were identified. The sediment stiffness increased with increasing confining stress, but degraded with increasing strain regime. Variations in water permeability with water saturation were obtained by fitting experimental matric suction-water saturation data to the Maulem-van Genuchen model. A significant reduction in thermal conductivity (from ~1.4–1.6 to ~0.5–0.7 W·m−1·K−1 was observed when water saturation decreased from 100% to ~10%–20%. In addition, the electrical resistance increased quasi-linearly with decreasing water saturation. The geomechanical, hydraulic and thermal properties of the hydrate-free sediments reported herein can be used as the baseline when predicting properties and behavior of the sediments containing hydrates, and when the hydrates dissociate during gas production. The variations in thermal and hydraulic properties with changing water and gas saturation can be used to assess gas production rates from hydrate-bearing deposits. In addition, while depressurization of hydrate-bearing sediments inevitably causes deformation of sediments under drained conditions, the obtained strength and stiffness properties and stress-strain responses of the sedimentary formation under drained loading conditions

  14. Measurement of the anisotropic thermal conductivity of the porcine cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Michael D; Trembly, B Stuart

    2013-10-01

    Accurate thermal models for the cornea of the eye support the development of thermal techniques for reshaping the cornea and other scientific purposes. Heat transfer in the cornea must be quantified accurately so that a thermal treatment does not destroy the endothelial layer, which cannot regenerate, and yet is responsible for maintaining corneal transparency. We developed a custom apparatus to measure the thermal conductivity of ex vivo porcine corneas perpendicular to the surface and applied a commercial apparatus to measure thermal conductivity parallel to the surface. We found that corneal thermal conductivity is 14% anisotropic at the normal state of corneal hydration. Small numbers of ex vivo feline and human corneas had a thermal conductivity perpendicular to the surface that was indistinguishable from the porcine corneas. Aqueous humor from ex vivo porcine, feline, and human eyes had a thermal conductivity nearly equal to that of water. Including the anisotropy of corneal thermal conductivity will improve the predictive power of thermal models of the eye. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Thermally highly stable amorphous zinc phosphate intermediates during the formation of zinc phosphate hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Sven; Celinski, Vinicius R; Dietzsch, Michael; Panthöfer, Martin; Bienert, Ralf; Emmerling, Franziska; Schmedt auf der Günne, Jörn; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2015-02-18

    The mechanisms by which amorphous intermediates transform into crystalline materials are still poorly understood. Here we attempt to illuminate the formation of an amorphous precursor by investigating the crystallization process of zinc phosphate hydrate. This work shows that amorphous zinc phosphate (AZP) nanoparticles precipitate from aqueous solutions prior to the crystalline hopeite phase at low concentrations and in the absence of additives at room temperature. AZP nanoparticles are thermally stable against crystallization even at 400 °C (resulting in a high temperature AZP), but they crystallize rapidly in the presence of water if the reaction is not interrupted. X-ray powder diffraction with high-energy synchrotron radiation, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and small-angle X-ray scattering showed the particle size (≈20 nm) and confirmed the noncrystallinity of the nanoparticle intermediates. Energy dispersive X-ray, infrared, and Raman spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and optical emission spectrometry as well as thermal analysis were used for further compositional characterization of the as synthesized nanomaterial. (1)H solid-state NMR allowed the quantification of the hydrogen content, while an analysis of (31)P{(1)H} C rotational echo double resonance spectra permitted a dynamic and structural analysis of the crystallization pathway to hopeite.

  16. Endurance Cyclist Fluid Intake, Hydration Status, Thirst, and Thermal Sensations: Gender Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Lawrence E; Johnson, Evan C; McKenzie, Amy L; Ellis, Lindsay A; Williamson, Keith H

    2016-04-01

    This field investigation assessed differences (e.g., drinking behavior, hydration status, perceptual ratings) between female and male endurance cyclists who completed a 164-km event in a hot environment (35 °C mean dry bulb) to inform rehydration recommendations for athletes. Three years of data were pooled to create 2 groups of cyclists: women (n = 15) and men (n = 88). Women were significantly smaller (p < .001) than men in height (166 ± 5 vs. 179 ± 7 cm), body mass (64.6 ± 7.3 vs. 86.4 ± 12.3 kg), and body mass index (BMI; 23.3 ± 1.8 vs. 26.9 ± 3.4) and had lower preevent urinary indices of hydration status, but were similar to men in age (43 ± 7 years vs. 44 ± 9 years) and exercise time (7.77 ± 1.24 hr vs. 7.23 ± 1.75 hr). During the 164-km ride, women lost less body mass (-0.7 ± 1.0 vs. -1.7 ± 1.5 kg; -1.1 ± 1.6% vs. -1.9 ± 1.8% of body weight; p < .005) and consumed less fluid than men (4.80 ± 1.28 L vs. 5.59 ± 2.13 L; p < .005). Women consumed a similar volume of fluid as men, relative to body mass (milliliters/kilogram). To control for performance and anthropomorphic characteristics, 15 women were pair-matched with 15 men on the basis of exercise time on the course and BMI; urine-specific gravity, urine color, and body mass change (kilograms and percentage) were different (p < .05) in 4 of 6 comparisons. No gender differences were observed for ratings of thirst, thermal sensation, or perceived exertion. In conclusion, differences in relative fluid volume consumed and hydration indices suggest that professional sports medicine organizations should consider gender and individualized drinking plans when formulating pronouncements regarding rehydration during exercise.

  17. Feasibility Study on a Microwave-Based Sensor for Measuring Hydration Level Using Human Skin Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rico Brendtke

    Full Text Available Tissue dehydration results in three major types of exsiccosis--hyper-, hypo-, or isonatraemia. All three types entail alterations of salt concentrations leading to impaired biochemical processes, and can finally cause severe morbidity. The aim of our study was to demonstrate the feasibility of a microwave-based sensor technology for the non-invasive measurement of the hydration status. Electromagnetic waves at high frequencies interact with molecules, especially water. Hence, if a sample contains free water molecules, this can be detected in a reflected microwave signal. To develop the sensor system, human three-dimensional skin equivalents were instituted as a standardized test platform mimicking reproducible exsiccosis scenarios. Therefore, skin equivalents with a specific hydration and density of matrix components were generated and microwave measurements were performed. Hydration-specific spectra allowed deriving the hydration state of the skin models. A further advantage of the skin equivalents was the characterization of the impact of distinct skin components on the measured signals to investigate mechanisms of signal generation. The results demonstrate the feasibility of a non-invasive microwave-based hydration sensor technology. The sensor bears potential to be integrated in a wearable medical device for personal health monitoring.

  18. MOLECULE DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF THERMAL CONDUCTIVITIES OF STRUCTURE H HYDRATE%H型气体水合物导热系数的分子动力学模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王璐琨; 陈光进; 等

    2001-01-01

    Molecule dynamic simulation was carried out to predict the thermal conductivity of structure H hydrate at 100?K,180?K and 260?K. In order to get a reliable potential model and stable simulation method the simulations of thermal conductivities of ice and empty hydrate were performed firstly at 100K, 180K and 260K. The simulation results of ice, empty hydrate and structure H hydrate show that thermal conductivities of ice and hydrates have different temperature dependence: for structure H hydrate it is not so distinct while that of ice is inversely proportional to temperature.

  19. Infrared spectroscopic measurement of skin hydration and sebum levels and comparison to corneometer and sebumeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezerskaia, Anna; Pereira, S. F.; Urbach, H. P.; Varghese, Babu

    2016-05-01

    Skin health characterized by a system of water and lipids in Stratum Corneum provide protection from harmful external elements and prevent trans-epidermal water loss. Skin hydration (moisture) and sebum (skin surface lipids) are considered to be important factors in skin health; a right balance between these components is an indication of skin health and plays a central role in protecting and preserving skin integrity. In this manuscript we present an infrared spectroscopic method for simultaneous and quantitative measurement of skin hydration and sebum levels utilizing differential detection with three wavelengths 1720, 1750, and 1770 nm, corresponding to the lipid vibrational bands that lie "in between" the prominent water absorption bands. The skin sebum and hydration values on the forehead under natural conditions and its variations to external stimuli were measured using our experimental set-up. The experimental results obtained with the optical set-up show good correlation with the results obtained with the commercially available instruments Corneometer and Sebumeter.

  20. The impact of hydration changes in fresh bio-tissue on THz spectroscopic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Png, G. M.; Choi, J. W.; W-H Ng, B.; Mickan, S. P.; Abbott, D.; Zhang, X.-C.

    2008-07-01

    We present a study of how residual hydration in fresh rat tissue samples can vastly alter their extracted terahertz (THz) optical properties and influence their health assessment. Fresh (as opposed to preserved) tissue most closely mimics in vivo conditions, but high water content creates many challenges for tissue handling and THz measurement. Our THz measurements of fresh tissue over time highlight the effect of tissue hydration on tissue texture and dimension, the latter directly influencing the accuracy of calculated optical properties. We then introduce lyophilization (freeze drying) as a viable solution for overcoming hydration and freshness problems. Lyophilization removes large amounts of water while retaining sample freshness. In addition, lyophilized tissue samples are easy to handle and their textures and dimensions do not vary over time, allowing for consistent and stable THz measurements. A comparison of lyophilized and fresh tissue shows for the first time that freeze drying may be one way of overcoming tissue hydration issues while preserving tissue cellular structure. Finally, we compare THz measurements from fresh tissue against necrotic tissue to verify freshness over time. Indeed, THz measurements from fresh and necrotic tissues show marked differences.

  1. A thermal comparator sensor for measuring autogenous deformation in hardening Portland cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Thomas; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2003-01-01

    of the thermal comparator is based on thermal expansion of aluminium. A particular characteristic of the measuring system is the fixation of the thermal comparator sensor to the deforming specimen. The modular system ensures effective thermostatic control of the hydrating cement paste samples. The technique......This paper describes a simple and accurate experimental device specially developed to measure autogenous deformation in hardening cement-based materials. The measuring system consists of a so-called thermal comparator sensor and a modular thermostatically controlled system. The operating principle...

  2. STEREOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF HYDRATION OF CARBOHYDRATES IN AQUEOUS-SOLUTIONS .3. DENSITY AND ULTRASOUND MEASUREMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GALEMA, SA; HOILAND, H

    1991-01-01

    Density and ultrasound measurements have been performed in aqueous solutions of pentoses, hexoses, methylpyranosides, and disaccharides as a function of molality of carbohydrate (0-0.3 mol kg-1). Partial molar volumes, partial molar isentropic compressibilities, and hydration numbers have been calcu

  3. STEREOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF HYDRATION OF CARBOHYDRATES IN AQUEOUS-SOLUTIONS .3. DENSITY AND ULTRASOUND MEASUREMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GALEMA, SA; HOILAND, H

    1991-01-01

    Density and ultrasound measurements have been performed in aqueous solutions of pentoses, hexoses, methylpyranosides, and disaccharides as a function of molality of carbohydrate (0-0.3 mol kg-1). Partial molar volumes, partial molar isentropic compressibilities, and hydration numbers have been

  4. Sialic acid-to-urea ratio as a measure of airway surface hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esther, Charles R; Hill, David B; Button, Brian; Shi, Shuai; Jania, Corey; Duncan, Elizabeth A; Doerschuk, Claire M; Chen, Gang; Ranganathan, Sarath; Stick, Stephen M; Boucher, Richard C

    2017-03-01

    Although airway mucus dehydration is key to pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) and other airways diseases, measuring mucus hydration is challenging. We explored a robust method to estimate mucus hydration using sialic acid as a marker for mucin content. Terminal sialic acid residues from mucins were cleaved by acid hydrolysis from airway samples, and concentrations of sialic acid, urea, and other biomarkers were analyzed by mass spectrometry. In mucins purified from human airway epithelial (HAE), sialic acid concentrations after acid hydrolysis correlated with mucin concentrations (r(2) = 0.92). Sialic acid-to-urea ratios measured from filters applied to the apical surface of cultured HAE correlated to percent solids and were elevated in samples from CF HAEs relative to controls (2.2 ± 1.1 vs. 0.93 ± 1.8, P gold standard measure of mucus hydration. The method proved robust and has potential to serve as flexible techniques to assess mucin hydration, particularly in samples like BALF in which established methods such as percent solids cannot be utilized.

  5. Using open hole and cased-hole resistivity logs to monitor gas hydrate dissociation during a thermal test in the mallik 5L-38 research well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B.I.; Collett, T.S.; Lewis, R.E.; Dubourg, I.

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrates, which are naturally occurring ice-like combinations of gas and water, have the potential to provide vast amounts of natural gas from the world's oceans and polar regions. However, producing gas economically from hydrates entails major technical challenges. Proposed recovery methods such as dissociating or melting gas hydrates by heating or depressurization are currently being tested. One such test was conducted in northern Canada by the partners in the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program. This paper describes how resistivity logs were used to determine the size of the annular region of gas hydrate dissociation that occurred around the wellbore during the thermal test in the Mallik 5L-38 well. An open-hole logging suite, run prior to the thermal test, included array induction, array laterolog, nuclear magnetic resonance and 1.1-GHz electromagnetic propagation logs. The reservoir saturation tool was run both before and after the thermal test to monitor formation changes. A cased-hole formation resistivity log was run after the test.Baseline resistivity values in each formation layer (Rt) were established from the deep laterolog data. The resistivity in the region of gas hydrate dissociation near the wellbore (Rxo) was determined from electromagnetic propagation and reservoir saturation tool measurements. The radius of hydrate dissociation as a function of depth was then determined by means of iterative forward modeling of cased-hole formation resistivity tool response. The solution was obtained by varying the modeled dissociation radius until the modeled log overlaid the field log. Pretest gas hydrate production computer simulations had predicted that dissociation would take place at a uniform radius over the 13-ft test interval. However, the post-test resistivity modeling showed that this was not the case. The resistivity-derived dissociation radius was greatest near the outlet of the pipe that circulated hot water in the wellbore

  6. Thermal Diffusivity Measurements in Edible Oils using Transient Thermal Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, R. Carbajal.; Pérez, J. L. Jiménez.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Martín-Martínez, E. San.

    2006-11-01

    Time resolved thermal lens (TL) spectrometry is applied to the study of the thermal diffusivity of edible oils such as olive, and refined and thermally treated avocado oils. A two laser mismatched-mode experimental configuration was used, with a He Ne laser as a probe beam and an Ar+ laser as the excitation one. The characteristic time constant of the transient thermal lens was obtained by fitting the experimental data to the theoretical expression for a transient thermal lens. The results showed that virgin olive oil has a higher thermal diffusivity than for refined and thermally treated avocado oils. This measured thermal property may contribute to a better understanding of the quality of edible oils, which is very important in the food industry. The thermal diffusivity results for virgin olive oil, obtained from this technique, agree with those reported in the literature.

  7. Kinetics of thermal decomposition of hydrated minerals associated with hematite ore in a fluidized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuria, P. C.; Biswal, S. K.; Mishra, B. K.; Roy, G. G.

    2017-03-01

    The kinetics of removal of loss on ignition (LOI) by thermal decomposition of hydrated minerals present in natural iron ores (i.e., kaolinite, gibbsite, and goethite) was investigated in a laboratory-scale vertical fluidized bed reactor (FBR) using isothermal methods of kinetic analysis. Experiments in the FBR in batch processes were carried out at different temperatures (300 to 1200°C) and residence time (1 to 30 min) for four different iron ore samples with various LOIs (2.34wt% to 9.83wt%). The operating velocity was maintained in the range from 1.2 to 1.4 times the minimum fluidization velocity ( U mf). We observed that, below a certain critical temperature, the FBR did not effectively reduce the LOI to a desired level even with increased residence time. The results of this study indicate that the LOI level could be reduced by 90% within 1 min of residence time at 1100°C. The kinetics for low-LOI samples (reaction mechanisms in two temperature regimes. At lower temperatures (300 to 700°C), the kinetics is characterized by a lower activation energy (diffusion-controlled physical moisture removal), followed by a higher activation energy (chemically controlled removal of LOI). In the case of high-LOI samples, three different kinetics mechanisms prevail at different temperature regimes. At temperature up to 450°C, diffusion kinetics prevails (removal of physical moisture); at temperature from 450 to 650°C, chemical kinetics dominates during removal of matrix moisture. At temperatures greater than 650°C, nucleation and growth begins to influence the rate of removal of LOI.

  8. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  9. HEAT OF HYDRATION OF SALTSTONE MIXES-MEASUREMENT BY ISOTHERMAL CALORIMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harbour, J; Vickie Williams, V; Tommy Edwards, T

    2007-07-02

    This report provides initial results on the measurement of heat of hydration of Saltstone mixes using isothermal calorimetry. The results were obtained using a recently purchased TAM Air Model 3116 Isothermal Conduction Calorimeter. Heat of hydration is an important property of Saltstone mixes. Greater amounts of heat will increase the temperature of the curing mix in the vaults and limit the processing rate. The heat of hydration also reflects the extent of the hydraulic reactions that turn the fluid mixture into a ''stone like'' solid and consequently impacts performance properties such as permeability. Determining which factors control these reactions, as monitored by the heat of hydration, is an important goal of the variability study. Experiments with mixes of portland cement in water demonstrated that the heats measured by this technique over a seven day period match very well with the literature values of (1) seven day heats of hydration using the standard test method for heat of hydration of hydraulic cement, ASTM C 186-05 and (2) heats of hydration measured using isothermal calorimetry. The heats of hydration of portland cement or blast furnace slag in a Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) simulant revealed that if the cure temperature is maintained at 25 C, the amount of heat released over a seven day period is roughly 62% less than the heat released by portland cement in water. Furthermore, both the blast furnace slag and the portland cement were found to be equivalent in heat production over the seven day period in MCU. This equivalency is due to the activation of the slag by the greater than 1 Molar free hydroxide ion concentration in the simulant. Results using premix (a blend of 10% cement, 45% blast furnace slag, and 45% fly ash) in MCU, Deliquification, Dissolution and Adjustment (DDA) and Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) simulants reveal that the fly ash had not significantly reacted (undergone hydration

  10. Laboratory measurement of longitudinal wave velocity of artificial gas hydrate under different temperatures and pressures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The longitudinal wave velocity and attenuation measurements of artificial gas hy- drate samples at a low temperature are reported. And the temperature and pressure dependence of longitudinal wave velocity is also investigated. In order to under- stand the acoustic properties of gas hydrate, the pure ice, the pure tetrahydrofuran (THF), the pure gas hydrate samples and sand sediment containing gas hydrate are measured at a low temperature between 0℃ and –15℃. For the pure ice, the pure THF and the pure gas hydrate samples, whose density is 898 kg/m3, 895 kg/m3 and 475 kg/m3, the velocity of longitudinal wave is respectively 3574 m/s, 3428 m/s and 2439 m/s. For synthesized and compacted samples, the velocity of synthesized samples is lower than that of compacted samples. The velocities increase when the densities of the samples increase, while the attenuation decreases. Under the con- dition of low temperature, the results show that the velocity is slightly affected by the temperature. The results also show that wave velocities increase with the in- crease of piston pressures. For example, the velocity of one sample increases from 3049 up to 3337 m/s and the other increases from 2315 up to 2995 m/s. But wave velocity decreases from 3800 to 3546 m/s when the temperature increases from –15℃ to 5℃ and changes significantly close to the melting point. Formation con- ditions of the two samples are the same but with different conversion ratios of wa- ter. The results of the experiment are important for exploration of the gas hydrate resources and development of acoustic techniques.

  11. Quantitative and simultaneous non-invasive measurement of skin hydration and sebum levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezerskaia, Anna; Pereira, S. F.; Urbach, H. Paul; Verhagen, Rieko; Varghese, Babu

    2016-01-01

    We report a method on quantitative and simultaneous non-contact in-vivo hydration and sebum measurements of the skin using an infrared optical spectroscopic set-up. The method utilizes differential detection with three wavelengths 1720, 1750, and 1770 nm, corresponding to the lipid vibrational bands that lay “in between” the prominent water absorption bands. We have used an emulsifier containing hydro- and lipophilic components to mix water and sebum in various volume fractions which was applied to the skin to mimic different oily-dry skin conditions. We also measured the skin sebum and hydration values on the forehead under natural conditions and its variations to external stimuli. Good agreement was found between our experimental results and reference values measured using conventional biophysical methods such as Corneometer and Sebumeter. PMID:27375946

  12. A DFT-based comparative equilibrium study of thermal dehydration and hydrolysis of CaCl₂ hydrates and MgCl₂ hydrates for seasonal heat storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Amar Deep; Nedea, Silvia; Zondag, Herbert; Rindt, Camilo; Smeulders, David

    2016-04-21

    Salt hydrates store solar energy in chemical form via a reversible dehydration-hydration reaction. However, as a side reaction to dehydration, hydrolysis (HCl formation) may occur in chloride based salt hydrates (specially in MgCl2 hydrates), affecting the durability of the storage system. The mixture of CaCl2 and MgCl2 hydrates has been shown experimentally to have exceptional cycle stability and improved kinetics. However, the optimal operating conditions for the mixture are unknown. To understand the appropriate balance between dehydration and hydrolysis kinetics in the mixtures, it is essential to gain in-depth insight into the mixture components. We present a GGA-DFT level study to investigate the various gaseous structures of CaCl2 hydrates and to understand the relative stability of their conformers. The hydration strength and relative stability of conformers are dominated by electrostatic interactions. A wide network of intramolecular homonuclear and heteronuclear hydrogen bonds is observed in CaCl2 hydrates. Equilibrium product concentrations are obtained during dehydration and hydrolysis reactions under various temperature and pressure conditions. The trend of the dehydration curve with temperature in CaCl2 hydrates is similar to the experiments. Comparing these results to those of MgCl2 hydrates, we find that CaCl2 hydrates are more resistant towards hydrolysis in the temperature range of 273-800 K. Specifically, the present study reveals that the onset temperatures of HCl formation, a crucial design parameter for MgCl2 hydrates, are lower than for CaCl2 hydrates except for the mono-hydrate.

  13. Laboratory measurements of rock thermal properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bording, Thue Sylvester; Balling, N.; Nielsen, S.B.

    The thermal properties of rocks are key elements in understanding and modelling the temperature field of the subsurface. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity can be measured in the laboratory if rock samples can be provided. We have introduced improvements to the divided bar and needle...... probe methods to be able to measure both thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity. The improvements we implement include, for both methods, a combination of fast numerical finite element forward modelling and a Markov Chain Monte Carlo inversion scheme for estimating rock thermal parameters...

  14. Laboratory measurements of rock thermal properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bording, Thue Sylvester; Balling, N.; Nielsen, S.B.

    The thermal properties of rocks are key elements in understanding and modelling the temperature field of the subsurface. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity can be measured in the laboratory if rock samples can be provided. We have introduced improvements to the divided bar and needle...... probe methods to be able to measure both thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity. The improvements we implement include, for both methods, a combination of fast numerical finite element forward modelling and a Markov Chain Monte Carlo inversion scheme for estimating rock thermal parameters...

  15. Measurements of thermal parameters of solar modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górecki, K.; Krac, E.

    2016-04-01

    In the paper the methods of measuring thermal parameters of photovoltaic panels - transient thermal impedance and the absorption factor of light-radiation are presented. The manner of realising these methods is described and the results of measurements of the considered thermal parameters of selected photovoltaic panels are presented. The influence of such selected factors as a type of the investigated panel and its mounting manner on transient thermal impedance of the considered panels is also discussed.

  16. Spectroscopic, optical, thermal, antimicrobial and density functional theory studies of 4-aminopyridinium 4-hydroxy benzoate hydrate crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthiga Devi, P.; Venkatachalam, K.; Poonkothai, M.

    2016-09-01

    The organic crystal 4-aminopyridinium 4-hydroxy benzoate hydrate was grown using slow evaporation method. Various characterization techniques such as single crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR, UV-visible-NIR spectroscopy and thermal analysis (TG-DSC) were employed to assay the structure and properties of the grown crystal. The antimicrobial evaluation of 4-aminopyridinium 4-hydroxy benzoate hydrate crystal was also performed against some bacteria and fungi. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 4-aminopyridinium 4-hydroxy benzoate hydrate were determined for bacterial and fungal strains. The assessment of optimized structure of the molecule and vibrational frequencies were done using DFT/B3LYP method with 6-31 G (d, p) basis set. The stability of the molecule, hyperconjugative interactions, delocalization of charges and intermolecular hydrogen bond were studied by applying natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. TD-DFT method employing polarizable continuum model (PCM) was used to examine the electronic absorption spectrum. Evaluation of molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), Mulliken population charges and nonlinear optical (NLO) properties were also carried out. In addition, from the optimized geometry, frontier molecular orbitals analysis was executed.

  17. ATR-FTIR study of water in Nafion membrane combined with proton conductivity measurements during hydration/dehydration cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimatsu, Keiji; Bae, Byungchan; Miyatake, Kenji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2011-04-21

    We have conducted combined time-resolved attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and proton conductivity measurements of Nafion NRE211 membrane during hydration/dehydration cycles at room temperature. Conductivity change was interpreted in terms of different states of water in the membrane based on its δ(HOH) vibrational spectra. It was found that hydration of a dry membrane leads first to complete dissociation of the sulfonic acid groups to liberate hydrated protons, which are isolated from each other and have δ(HOH) vibrational frequency around 1740 cm(-1). The initial hydration is not accompanied by a significant increase of the proton conductivity. Further hydration gives rise to a rapid increase of the conductivity in proportion to intensity of a new δ(HOH) band around 1630 cm(-1). This was interpreted in terms of formation of channels of weakly hydrogen-bonded water to combine the isolated hydrophilic domains containing hydrated protons and hydrated sulfonate ions produced during the initial stage of hydration. Upon dehydration, proton conductivity drops first very rapidly due to loss of the weakly hydrogen bonded water from the channels to leave hydrophilic domains isolated in the membrane. Dehydration of the protons proceeds very slowly after significant loss of the proton conductivity.

  18. Opto-thermal transient emission radiometry for rapid, non-destructive and non-contact determination of hydration and hydration depth profile in the skin of a grape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, X.; Bicanic, D.D.; Keijser, K.; Imhof, R.

    2003-01-01

    .The concept of optothermal transient emission radiometry at a wavelength of 2.94 µm was applied to non-destructively determine the level of hydration and the profile of hydration in the skin of intact fresh grapes taken from top and bottom sections of the same bunch.

  19. Permeability of laboratory-formed methane-hydrate-bearing sand: Measurements and observations using x-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Seol, Y.; Gupta, A.; Tomutsa, L.

    2010-09-15

    Methane hydrate was formed in two moist sands and a sand/silt mixture under a confining stress in an X-ray-transparent pressure vessel. Three initial water saturations were used to form three different methane-hydrate saturations in each medium. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to observe location-specific density changes caused by hydrate formation and flowing water. Gas-permeability measurements in each test for the dry, moist, frozen, and hydrate-bearing states are presented. As expected, the effective permeabilities (intrinsic permeability of the medium multiplied by the relative permeability) of the moist sands decreased with increasing moisture content. In a series of tests on a single sample, the effective permeability typically decreased as the pore space became more filled, in the order of dry, moist, frozen, and hydrate-bearing. In each test, water was flowed through the hydrate-bearing medium and we observed the location-specific changes in water saturation using CT scanning. We compared our data to a number of models, and our relative permeability data compare most favorably with models in which hydrate occupies the pore bodies rather than the pore throats. Inverse modeling (using the data collected from the tests) will be performed to extend the relative permeability measurements.

  20. Nanostructural analysis of water distribution in hydrated multicomponent gels using thermal analysis and NMR relaxometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codoni, Doroty; Belton, Peter; Qi, Sheng

    2015-06-01

    Highly complex, multicomponent gels and water-containing soft materials have varied applications in biomedical, pharmaceutical, and food sciences, but the characterization of these nanostructured materials is extremely challenging. The aim of this study was to use stearoyl macrogol-32 glycerides (Gelucire 50/13) gels containing seven different species of glycerides, PEG, and PEG-esters, as model, complex, multicomponent gels, to investigate the effect of water content on the micro- and nanoarchitecture of the gel interior. Thermal analysis and NMR relaxometry were used to probe the thermal and diffusional behavior of water molecules within the gel network. For the highly concentrated gels (low water content), the water activity was significantly lowered due to entrapment in the dense gel network. For the gels with intermediate water content, multiple populations of water molecules with different thermal responses and diffusion behavior were detected, indicating the presence of water in different microenvironments. This correlated with the network architecture of the freeze-dried gels observed using SEM. For the gels with high water content, increased quantities of water with similar diffusion characteristics as free water could be detected, indicating the presence of large water pockets in these gels. The results of this study provide new insights into structure of Gelucire gels, which have not been reported before because of the complexity of the material. They also demonstrate that the combination of thermal analysis and NMR relaxometry offers insights into the structure of soft materials not available by the use of each technique alone. However, we also note that in some instances the results of these measurements are overinterpreted and we suggest limitations of the methods that must be considered when using them.

  1. The Water Retention Curves in THF Hydrate-Bearing Sediments - Experimental Measurement and Pore Scale Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabadi, N.; Zheng, X.; Dai, S.; Seol, Y.; Zapata, C.; Yun, T.; Jang, J.

    2015-12-01

    The water retention curve (WRC) of hydrate-bearing sediments is critically important to understand the behaviour of hydrate dissociation for gas production. Most gas hydrates in marine environment have been formed from an aqueous phase (gas-dissolved water). However, the gas hydrate formation from an aqueous phase in a laboratory requires long period due to low gas solubility in water and is also associated with many experimental difficulties such as hydrate dissolution, difficult hydrate saturation control, and dynamic hydrate dissolution and formation. In this study, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is chosen to form THF hydrate because the formation process is faster than gas hydrate formation and hydrate saturation is easy to control. THF hydrate is formed at water-excess condition. Therefore, there is only water in the pore space after a target THF hydrate saturation is obtained. The pore habit of THF hydrate is investigated by visual observation in a transparent micromodel and X-ray computed tomography images; and the water retention curves are obtained under different THF hydrate saturation conditions. Targeted THF hydrate saturations are Sh=0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8. Results shown that at a given water saturation the capillary pressure increases as THF hydrate saturation increases. And the gas entry pressure increases with increasing hydrate saturation. The WRC obtained by experiments is also compared with the results of a pore-network model simulation and Lattice Boltzmann Method. The fitting parameters of van Genuchten equation for different hydrate saturation conditions are suggested for the use as input parameters of reservoir simulators.

  2. Final Report for the September 2001 Workshop on Physical Property Measurements for the Gas Hydrate R&D Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, N D; Durham, W B; Kirby, S; Brewer, P

    2001-10-01

    A 2-day workshop ''Physical and Chemical Property Measurements for the Gas Hydrate R&D Community'' was held on 17-18 September 2001. Putting together this workshop was a joint effort by LLNL, MBARI and the USGS, Menlo Park. Twenty-two people from a wide variety of institutions and backgrounds participated. An additional eighteen people were forced to cancel at the last minute due to the events of 11 September 2001. The premise of the workshop was that progress in nearly every aspect of gas hydrate research depends fundamentally on the availability of high-quality property data and the development of laboratory insights into the physics and chemistry that govern gas hydrates in nature. One objective of the workshop was to develop a dialogue between laboratory scientists who make property measurements of gas hydrates and scientists who use these data for quantitative modeling. A second objective was to help facilitate research among experimentalists and the acquisition of reliable gas hydrate properties. The latter focused mainly, but not exclusively, on researchers from institutions in the San Francisco Bay Area to energize a community that has a geographic advantage in collaborative relationships. The workshop was successful at meeting both of these objectives, although the unique perspectives of the invitees who weren't able to attend were missed. After reviewing the current state of gas hydrate R&D with respect to property measurements, there was general agreement that it is time to move forward with new approaches (e.g., seafloor experiments, lab experiments with hydrate-sediment aggregates) and new applications of techniques (e.g., improved seismics, in situ x-ray and neutron diffraction and tomography, and NMR scanning). The workshop consensus is summarized at the end of this document in a table of fundamental questions pertaining to natural gas hydrates and possible experimental lab and seafloor approaches to answering them.

  3. New method for measuring the thermal conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldratt, E; Greenfield, A J

    1978-11-01

    A new experimental method is presented for measuring the thermal conductivity as a function of temperature. The basic innovation lies in extracting from the measured temperature profile of a sample in vacuo, the thermal conductivity of each individual cross-sectional sample element. The estimated experimental error is +/-1%. Not only is high accuracy achieved, but also a self-checking procedure offers the possibility of avoiding systematic errors. Measurements on two samples of type 304 stainless steel are presented. Three independent sets of measurements give consistent values for the thermal conductivity to well within the estimated error of +/-1%.

  4. Direct measurement of the correlated dynamics of the protein-backbone and proximal waters of hydration in mechanically strained elastin

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Cheng; Huang, Jiaxin; Boutis, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    We report on the direct measurement of the correlation times of the protein backbone carbons and proximal waters of hydration in mechanically strained elastin by nuclear magnetic resonance methods. The experimental data indicate a decrease in the correlation times of the carbonyl carbons as the strain on the biopolymer is increased. These observations are in good agreement with short 4ns molecular dynamics simulations of (VPGVG)3, a well studied mimetic peptide of elastin. The experimental results also indicate a reduction in the correlation time of proximal waters of hydration with increasing strain applied to the elastomer. A simple model is suggested that correlates the increase in the motion of proximal waters of hydration to the increase in frequency of libration of the protein backbone that develops with increasing strain. Together, the reduction in the protein entropy accompanied with the increase in entropy of the proximal waters of hydration with increasing strain, support the notion that the source ...

  5. Measurements of Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Diffusivity of Molten Carbonates

    OpenAIRE

    Wicaksono, Hendro; Zhang, Xing; Fujiwara, Seiji; Fujii, Motoo

    2001-01-01

    The thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of molten carbonates (Li_2CO_3/K_2CO_3 and Li_2CO_3/Na_2CO_3) were measured using the transient short-hot-wire method in the temperature range from 530 to 670℃. Two types of probes were examined. One was a platinum short-hot-wire probe coated with alumina (Al_2O_3) thin film to prevent current leakage and corrosion. The other was a bare gold short-hot-wire probe. For the platinum probe, the quality of coating reduces gradually during the measur...

  6. The degree of hydration assessment of blended cement pastes by differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis. Morphological evolution of the solid phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteagudo, S.M., E-mail: sm.monteagudo@alumnos.upm.es [Departamento de Ingeniería Civil: Construcción, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Moragues, A., E-mail: amoragues@caminos.upm.es [Departamento de Ingeniería Civil: Construcción, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Gálvez, J.C., E-mail: jaime.galvez@upm.es [Departamento de Ingeniería Civil: Construcción, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Casati, M.J., E-mail: mariajesus.casati@upm.es [Departamento de Vehículos Aeroespaciales, Escuela de Ingeniería Aeronáutica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain); Reyes, E., E-mail: encarnacion.reyes@upm.es [Departamento de Ingeniería Civil: Construcción, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2014-09-20

    Highlights: • A proposal of hydration degree calculation for blended cement pastes is presented. • The method is based both on the contributions of various authors and on DTA–TG results. • Paste and mortar specimens with BFS, FA and SF mineral admixtures were used. • The evaluation of CH gives information on hydration and pozzolanic reactions. • The assessment of α provides an insight into future strength evolution. - Abstract: The degree of hydration assessment of cement paste from differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis data has been performed by several authors that have offered a number of proposals for technical application to blended cements. In this paper, two calculation methods are studied in detail. Then, a proposal of the degree of hydration calculation for blended cements, based on the analysis of experimental results of DTA–TG, is presented. The proposed method combines the contributions of the authors and allows straightforward calculation of the degree of hydration from the experimental results. Validation of the methodology was performed by macroscopic and microstructural tests through paste and mortar specimens with blast furnace slag, flying ash and silica fume mineral admixtures bei(g)ng used. Tests of scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive analyser on paste specimens, and of mechanical strength on mortar specimens with the same percentages of substitution, were performed. They showed good agreement with the information derived from the differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis data.

  7. Accurate measurement of phase equilibria and dissociation enthalpies of HFC-134a hydrates in the presence of NaCl for potential application in desalination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dongyoung; Lee, Yohan; Choi, Wonjung; Seo, Yongwon [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seungmin [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Phase equilibria, structure identification, and dissociation enthalpies of HFC-134a hydrates in the presence of NaCl are investigated for potential application in desalination. To verify the influence of NaCl on the thermodynamic hydrate stability of the HFC-134a hydrate, the three-phase (hydrate (H) - liquid water (L{sub W}) - vapor (V)) equilibria of the HFC-134a+NaCl (0, 3.5, and 8.0 wt%)+water systems are measured by both a conventional isochoric (pVT) method and a stepwise differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) method. Both pVT and DSC methods demonstrate reliable and consistent hydrate phase equilibrium points of the HFC-134a hydrates in the presence of NaCl. The HFC- 134a hydrate is identified as sII via powder X-ray diffraction. The dissociation enthalpies (ΔH{sub d}) of the HFC-134a hydrates in the presence of NaCl are also measured with a high pressure micro-differential scanning calorimeter. The salinity results in significant thermodynamic inhibition of the HFC-134a hydrates, whereas it has little effect on the dissociation enthalpy of the HFC-134a hydrates. The experimental results obtained in this study can be utilized as foundational data for the hydrate-based desalination process.

  8. Thermal conductivity measurements of Summit polycrystalline silicon.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemens, Rebecca; Kuppers, Jaron D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2006-11-01

    A capability for measuring the thermal conductivity of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) materials using a steady state resistance technique was developed and used to measure the thermal conductivities of SUMMiT{trademark} V layers. Thermal conductivities were measured over two temperature ranges: 100K to 350K and 293K to 575K in order to generate two data sets. The steady state resistance technique uses surface micromachined bridge structures fabricated using the standard SUMMiT fabrication process. Electrical resistance and resistivity data are reported for poly1-poly2 laminate, poly2, poly3, and poly4 polysilicon structural layers in the SUMMiT process from 83K to 575K. Thermal conductivity measurements for these polysilicon layers demonstrate for the first time that the thermal conductivity is a function of the particular SUMMiT layer. Also, the poly2 layer has a different variation in thermal conductivity as the temperature is decreased than the poly1-poly2 laminate, poly3, and poly4 layers. As the temperature increases above room temperature, the difference in thermal conductivity between the layers decreases.

  9. Inter- and intra-individual differences in skin hydration and surface lipids measured with mid-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezerskaia, A.; Pereira, S. F.; Urbach, H. P.; Varghese, B.

    2016-03-01

    Skin health is characterized by heterogeneous system of water and lipids in upper layers providing protection from external environment and preventing loss of vital components of the body. Skin hydration (moisture) and sebum (skin surface lipids) are considered to be important factors in skin health; a right balance between these components is an indication of healthy skin and plays a central role in protecting and preserving skin integrity. In this manuscript we present inter- and intra-individual variation in skin hydration and surface lipids measured with a home-built experimental prototype based on infrared spectroscopy. Results show good agreement with measurements performed by commercially available instruments Corneometer and Sebumeter used for skin hydration and sebum measurements respectively.

  10. Estimation of membrane hydration status for active proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems by impedance measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Török, Lajos; Sahlin, Simon Lennart; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2016-01-01

    , the membrane of which PEMFCs are made of tends to dry out when not in use. This increases the time interval required to start the system up and could lead to the destruction of the fuel cell. In this article a start-up time measurement setup is presented, which is part of a larger project, the membrane......Fuel cells are getting growing interest in industrial areas like backup systems for telecom applications or power source for electric vehicles. Although these systems are characterized by long periods of inactivity, they must be able to start at any instant in the shortest time. However...... hydration status estimator for monitoring the humidity of a fuel cell stack during standby. The fuel cell has been placed in a climatic chamber, connected to hydrogen and the start-up time has been measured with different environmental conditions. Based on the previous results and the ones presented...

  11. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of strontium(II) coordination. I. Static and thermal disorder in crystalline, hydrated, and precipitated solids and in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Day, P.A.; Newville, M.; Neuhoff, P.S.; Sahai, N.; Carroll, S.A.

    2000-02-15

    Detailed analyses of crystalline, hydrated, and precipitated strontium compounds and an aqueous strontium solution by synchrotron extended X-ray adsorption fine structure (EXAFS) were used to quantify local thermal and static disorder and the characterize strontium coordination in a variety of oxygen-ligated bonding environments. Comparison of strontium structural coordination determined in this and previous studies suggest that previous EXAFS determinations of hydrated strontium may have underestimated first-shell interatomic distances and coordination numbers because minor contributions to the EXAFS phase-shift and amplitude functions were not accounted for, either theoretically or empirically.

  12. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  13. Zinc acetylacetonate hydrate adducted with nitrogen donor ligands: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, and thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahma, Sanjaya; Shivashankar, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We report synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, and thermal analysis of zinc acetylacetonate complex adducted by nitrogen donor ligands, such as pyridine, bipyridine, and phenanthroline. The pyridine adducted complex crystallizes to monoclinic crystal structure, whereas other two adducted complexes have orthorhombic structure. Addition of nitrogen donor ligands enhances the thermal property of these complexes as that with parent metal-organic complex. Zinc acetylacetonate adducted with pyridine shows much higher volatility (106 °C), decomposition temperature (202 °C) as that with zinc acetylacetonate (136 °C, 220 °C), and other adducted complexes. All the adducted complexes are thermally stable, highly volatile and are considered to be suitable precursors for metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The formation of these complexes is confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The complexes are widely used as starting precursor materials for the synthesis of ZnO nanostructures by microwave irradiation assisted coating process.

  14. Evaluation of Different CH4-CO2 Replacement Processes in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments by Measuring P-Wave Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei Liu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of methane with carbon dioxide in natural gas hydrate-bearing sediments is considered a promising technology for simultaneously recovering natural gas and entrapping CO2. During the CH4-CO2 replacement process, the variations of geophysical property of the hydrate reservoir need to be adequately known. Since the acoustic wave velocity is an important geophysical property, in this work, the variations of P-wave velocity of hydrate-bearing sediments were measured during different CH4-CO2 replacement processes using pure gaseous CO2 and CO2/N2 gas mixtures. Our experimental results show that P-wave velocity continually decreased during all replacement processes. Compared with injecting pure gaseous CO2, injection of CO2/N2 mixture can promote the replacement process, however, it is found that the sediment experiences a loss of stiffness during the replacement process, especially when using CO2/N2 gas mixtures.

  15. Evaluation of Hydrate Inhibition Performance of Water-soluble Polymers using Torque Measurement and Differential Scanning Calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kyuchul; Park, Juwoon; Kim, Jakyung; Kim, Hyunho; Seo, Yutaek [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yohan; Seo, Yongwon [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    In this work, hydrate inhibition performance of water-soluble polymers including pyrrolidone, caprolactam, acrylamide types were evaluated using torque measurement and high pressure differential scanning calorimeter (HP µ-DSC). The obtained experimental results suggest that the studied polymers represent the kinetic hydrate inhibition (KHI) performance. 0.5 wt% polyvinylcaprolactam (PVCap) solution shows the hydrate onset time of 34.4 min and subcooling temperature of 15.9 K, which is better KHI performance than that of pure water - hydrate onset time of 12.3 min and subcooling temperature of 6.0 K. 0.5 wt% polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solution shows the hydrate onset time of 27.6 min and the subcooling temperature of 13.2 K while polyacrylamide-co-acrylic acid partial sodium salt (PAM-co-AA) solution shows less KHI performance than PVP solution at both 0.5 and 5.0 wt%. However, PAM-co-AA solution shows slow growth rate and low hydrate amount than PVCap. In addition to hydrate onset and growth condition, torque change with time was investigated as one of KHI evaluation methods. 0.5 wt% PVCap solution shows the lowest average torque of 6.4 N cm and 0.5 wt% PAM-co-AA solution shows the average torque of 7.2 N cm. For 0.5 wt% PVP solution, it increases 11.5 N cm and 5.0 wt% PAM-co-AA solution shows the maximum average torque of 13.4 N cm, which is similar to the average torque of pure water, 15.2 N cm. Judging from the experimental results obtained by both an autoclave and a HP µ-DSC, the PVCap solution shows the best performance among the KHIs in terms of delaying hydrate nucleation. From these results, it can be concluded that the torque change with time is useful to identify the flow ability of tested solution, and the further research on the inhibition of hydrate formation can be approached in various aspects using a HP µ-DSC.

  16. Hydration process in Portland cement blended with activated coal gangue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-ping LIU; Pei-ming WANG; Min-ju DING

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the hydration of a blend of Portland cement and activated coal gangue in order to determine the relationship between the degree of hydration and compressive strength development.The hydration process was investigated by various means:isothermal calorimetry,thermal analysis,non-cvaporable water measurement,and X-ray diffraction analysis.The results show that the activated coal gangue is a pozzolanic material that contributes to the hydration of the cement blend.The pozzolanic reaction occurs over a period of between 7 and 90 d,consuming portlandite and forming both crystal hydrates and ill-crystallized calcium silicate hydrates.These hydrates are similar to those found in pure Portland cement.The results show that if activated coal gangue is substituted for cement at up to 30% (w/w),it does not significantly affect the final compressive strength of the blend.A long-term compressive strength improvement can in fact be achieved by using activated coal gangue as a supplementary cementing material.The relationship between compressive strength and degree of hydration for both pure Portland cement and blended cement can be described with the same equation.However,the parameters are different since blended cement produces fewer calcium silicate hydrates than pure Portland cement at the same degree of hydration.

  17. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  18. Thermal conductivity measurement in clay dominant consolidated material by Transient Hot-Wire method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milcent D.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The transient hot-wire (THW technique is widely used for measurements of the thermal-conductivity of most fluids and some attempts have also been carried out for simultaneous measurements of the thermal-diffusivity with the same hot wire. This technique was also tried to determine thermal properties of soils by the mean of probes which can be considered as wire with some assumptions. The purpose of this paper is to validate the thermal conductivity measurement by the THW technique in geomaterials, composed of compacted sand + clay mineral that can be used for earth construction (Compacted Earth Brick. The thermal transfer behaviors are mainly governed by the texture and moisture of the geomaterials. Thus the investigations were performed (1 in media made of glass beads of different diameters in dry and saturated state in order to observe the role of grain sizes and saturation state on the wire temperature (Δt measurements and (2 in the compacted clay-geomaterial at different moisture states. The Δt / ln(t diagrams allow the calculation of two thermal conductivities. The first one, measured in the short time acquisition (< 1s, characterizes the microtexture of the material and its hydrated state. The second one, measured for longer time acquisitions, characterizes the mean thermal conductivity of the material.

  19. EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENT OF NANOFLUIDS THERMAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan M. Hussein

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Solid particles dispersed in a liquid with sizes no larger than 100nm, known as nanofluids, are used to enhance Thermophysical properties compared to the base fluid. Preparations of alumina (Al2O3, titania (TiO2 and silica (SiO2 in water have been experimentally conducted in volume concentrations ranging between 1 and 2.5%. Thermal conductivity is measured by the hot wire method and viscosity with viscometer equipment. The results of thermal conductivity and viscosity showed an enhancement (0.5–20% and 0.5–60% respectively compared with the base fluid. The data measured agreed with experimental data of other researchers with deviation of less than 5%. The study showed that alumina has the highest thermal conductivity, followed silica and titania, on the other hand silica has the highest viscosity followed alumina and titania.

  20. Thermal Conductivity Measurements of Caged Structural Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, H.; Hida, K.; Kase, N.; Nakano, T.; Takeda, N.

    Thermal conductivity of Ca3Rh4Sn13 and Sr3Ir4Sn13 were measured in magnetic fields to reveal superconducting state. From magnetic susceptibility χ(T) and electrical resistivity ρ(T) measurements, superconducting transition temperature Tc of Ca3Rh4Sn13 and Sr3Ir4Sn13 is determined to be 8 and 5 K, respectively. Thermal conductivity κ(T) of Ca3Rh4Sn13 indicates that superconducting state is nodeless s-wave, because residual thermal conductivity κ0/T in zero magnetic field is very small. On the other hand, κ(T) of Sr3Ir4Sn13 in zero magnetic field suggests that superconductivity possesses nodal gap rather than full gap. Whether nodal superconducting gap exists or not still remains to be clarified, because there is a possibility that the achieving temperature is insufficient to discuss superconducting state.

  1. Thermal Conductivity Measurement of Synthesized Mantle Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimow, P. D.; Luo, S.; Mosenfelder, J. L.; Liu, W.; Staneff, G. D.; Ahrens, T. J.; Chen, G.

    2002-12-01

    Direct thermal conductivity (k) measurement of mantle minerals is crucial to constrain the thermal profile of the Earth as well as geodynamic studies of the mantle (e.g., to determine the Rayleigh number). We have embarked on systematic multi-anvil syntheses of dense polycrystalline specimens of mantle phases of adequate size and zero porosity for precise thermal conductivity measurements by the 3ω method (\\textit{Cahill and Pohl, Phys. Rev. B, 1987}) under elevated temperatures (T). Coesite and stishovite (see \\textit{Luo et al., GRL, 2002}) as well as majorite and wadsleyite have been synthesized; ringwoodite and perovskite are scheduled. Preliminary thermal conductivity measurements at ambient pressure on coesite (120 - 300 K, 9.53 Wm-1K-1 at 300 K) are consistent with prior room temperature data (\\textit{Yukutake & Shimada, PEPI, 1978}), while our stishovite data at 300 K appear to be low (1.96 Wm-1K-1). Efforts are being made to extend the measurement to higher temperatures (e.g., above Debye temperature Θ D), thus allowing determination of k(T) relationship (say, k~ T-n); success will depend on the decomposition kinetics of these metastable phases. The pressure dependence of k of these synthesized samples can also be measured (\\textit{e.g., Osako et al., HPMPS-6, 2002; Xu et al., EOS, 2001}). Recent thermal conductivity measurement on LiF and Al2O_3 from shock wave loading (\\textit{Holland & Ahrens, 1998}) is consistent with the modeling on MgO and Al2O_3 (\\textit{Manga & Jeanloz, JGR, 1997}) with classical theories. Thus, k values at modest pressures and T (say, above Θ D) would allow extrapolation of k to appropriate mantle conditions.

  2. Workshop on thin film thermal conductivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Albert; Balzaretti, Naira M.; Guenther, Arthur H.

    1998-04-01

    On a subject of considerable import to the laser-induced damage community, a two day workshop on the topic, Thin Film Thermal Conductivity Measurement was held as part of the 13th Symposium on Thermophysical Properties at the University of Colorado in Boulder CO, June 25 and 26, 1997. The Workshop consisted of 4 sessions of 17 oral presentations and two discussion sessions. Two related subjects of interest were covered; 1) methods and problems associated with measuring thermal conductivity ((kappa) ) of thin films, and 2) measuring and (kappa) of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond. On the subject of thin film (kappa) measurement, several recently developed imaginative techniques were reviewed. However, several authors disagreed on how much (kappa) in a film differs from (kappa) in a bulk material of the same nominal composition. A subject of controversy was the definition of an interface. In the first discussion session, several questions were addressed, a principal one being, how do we know that the values of (kappa) we obtain are correct and is there a role for standards in thin film (kappa) measurement. The second discussion session was devoted to a round-robin interlaboratory comparison of (kappa) measurements on a set of CVD diamond specimens and several other specimens of lower thermal conductivity. Large interlaboratory differences obtained in an earlier round robin had been attributed to specimen inhomogeneity. Unfortunately, large differences were also observed in the second round robin even though the specimens were more homogenous. There was good consistency among the DC measurements, however, the AC measurements showed much greater variability. There was positive feedback from most of the attenders regarding the Workshop with nearly all respondents recommending another Workshop in three or fewer years. There was general recognition that thin film thermal conductivity measurements are important for predicting the resistance of optical coating

  3. Measurement of thermal neutron capture cross section

    CERN Document Server

    Huang Xiao Long; LuHanLin; Yu Wei Xiang; Zhao Wen Rong

    2001-01-01

    The thermal neutron capture cross sections of sup 7 sup 1 Ga(n, gamma) sup 7 sup 2 Ga, sup 9 sup 4 Zr(n, gamma) sup 9 sup 5 Zr and sup 1 sup 9 sup 1 Ir(n, gamma) sup 1 sup 9 sup 2 Ir sup m sup 1 sup + sup g sup , sup m sup 2 reactions were measured by using activation method and compared with other measured data. Meanwhile the half-life of sup 7 sup 2 Ga was also measured. The samples were irradiated with the neutron in the thermal column of heavy water reactor of China Institute of Atomic Energy. The activities of the reaction products were measured by well-calibrated Ge(Li) detector

  4. Correlating steric hydration forces with water dynamics through surface force and diffusion NMR measurements in a lipid–DMSO–H2O system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Alex M.; Donaldson, Stephen H.; Song, Jinsuk; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Dong Woog; Han, Songi; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2015-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a common solvent and biological additive possessing well-known utility in cellular cryoprotection and lipid membrane permeabilization, but the governing mechanisms at membrane interfaces remain poorly understood. Many studies have focused on DMSO–lipid interactions and the subsequent effects on membrane-phase behavior, but explanations often rely on qualitative notions of DMSO-induced dehydration of lipid head groups. In this work, surface forces measurements between gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membranes in DMSO–water mixtures quantify the hydration- and solvation-length scales with angstrom resolution as a function of DMSO concentration from 0 mol% to 20 mol%. DMSO causes a drastic decrease in the range of the steric hydration repulsion, leading to an increase in adhesion at a much-reduced intermembrane distance. Pulsed field gradient NMR of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) head group analogs, dimethyl phosphate and tetramethylammonium ions, shows that the ion hydrodynamic radius decreases with increasing DMSO concentration up to 10 mol% DMSO. The complementary measurements indicate that, at concentrations below 10 mol%, the primary effect of DMSO is to decrease the solvated volume of the PC head group and that, from 10 mol% to 20 mol%, DMSO acts to gradually collapse head groups down onto the surface and suppress their thermal motion. This work shows a connection between surface forces, head group conformation and dynamics, and surface water diffusion, with important implications for soft matter and colloidal systems. PMID:26261313

  5. Local measurement of thermal conductivity and diffusivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, David H.; Schley, Robert S. [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415-2209 (United States); Khafizov, Marat [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, The Ohio State University, 201 W. 19th Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Wendt, Brycen L. [Nuclear Science and Engineering, Idaho State University, 921 S. 8th Ave., Pocatello, Idaho 83209-8060 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Simultaneous measurement of local thermal diffusivity and conductivity is demonstrated on a range of ceramic samples. This was accomplished by measuring the temperature field spatial profile of samples excited by an amplitude modulated continuous wave laser beam. A thin gold film is applied to the samples to ensure strong optical absorption and to establish a second boundary condition that introduces an expression containing the substrate thermal conductivity. The diffusivity and conductivity are obtained by comparing the measured phase profile of the temperature field to a continuum based model. A sensitivity analysis is used to identify the optimal film thickness for extracting the both substrate conductivity and diffusivity. Proof of principle studies were conducted on a range of samples having thermal properties that are representatives of current and advanced accident tolerant nuclear fuels. It is shown that by including the Kapitza resistance as an additional fitting parameter, the measured conductivity and diffusivity of all the samples considered agreed closely with the literature values. A distinguishing feature of this technique is that it does not require a priori knowledge of the optical spot size which greatly increases measurement reliability and reproducibility.

  6. Local measurement of thermal conductivity and diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, David H.; Schley, Robert S.; Khafizov, Marat; Wendt, Brycen L.

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous measurement of local thermal diffusivity and conductivity is demonstrated on a range of ceramic samples. This was accomplished by measuring the temperature field spatial profile of samples excited by an amplitude modulated continuous wave laser beam. A thin gold film is applied to the samples to ensure strong optical absorption and to establish a second boundary condition that introduces an expression containing the substrate thermal conductivity. The diffusivity and conductivity are obtained by comparing the measured phase profile of the temperature field to a continuum based model. A sensitivity analysis is used to identify the optimal film thickness for extracting the both substrate conductivity and diffusivity. Proof of principle studies were conducted on a range of samples having thermal properties that are representatives of current and advanced accident tolerant nuclear fuels. It is shown that by including the Kapitza resistance as an additional fitting parameter, the measured conductivity and diffusivity of all the samples considered agreed closely with the literature values. A distinguishing feature of this technique is that it does not require a priori knowledge of the optical spot size which greatly increases measurement reliability and reproducibility.

  7. A Comparative Study Between the Early Stages Hydration of a High Strength and Sulphate Resistant Portland Cement and the Type II F Portland Cement Through Non Conventional Differential Thermal Analysis and Thermogravimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Neves Junior,Alex; Viana,Marcelo Mendes; Dweck,Jo; Toledo Filho,Romildo Dias

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a study, which compares the early stages of hydration of a High Initial Strength and Sulphate Resistant Portland Cement (HIS SR PC) with those of Type II F Portland Cement (PC II), by Non-Conventional Differential Thermal Analysis (NCDTA) within the first 24 hours of hydration. Water/cement (w/c) ratios equal to 0.5, 0.6 and 0.66 were used to prepare the pastes. The hydration of these two types of cement was monitored on real time by NCDTA curves, through the thermal effect...

  8. The application of thermal analysis, XRD and SEM to study the hydration behavior of tricalcium silicate in the presence of a polycarboxylate superplasticizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Lei, Jiaheng, E-mail: lm3706370@163.com [School of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Life Sciences, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Guo, Liping; Du, Xiaodi; Li, Junsheng [School of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Life Sciences, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2015-08-10

    Highlights: • The initial hydration process of C{sub 3}S is markedly retarded by PC. • The decomposition temperature of Ca(OH){sub 2} is slightly lower after PC modification. • The adsorption amount of PC on C{sub 3}S increases progressively with the hydration time. • The size of Ca(OH){sub 2} crystals are changed due to the adsorption of PC. - Abstract: Hydration behavior of tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S) in the presence of a polycarboxylate (PC) superplasticizer was investigated by means of isothermal calorimetry, differential thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction. In addition, the adsorption characteristics of PC and morphology change of Ca(OH){sub 2} crystals were also examined, respectively. The results showed that initial hydration process of C{sub 3}S was markedly retarded by PC and the retardation effect depended on the dosage of PC. The decomposition temperature of the Ca(OH){sub 2} was slightly lower after PC modification. Moreover, the size of Ca(OH){sub 2} crystals were found to be changed due to the adsorption of PC. The results obtained in this research allowed us to gain insights into the interactions between PC and cement.

  9. Thermal Conductivity Measurements on consolidated Soil Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiferlin, K.; Heimberg, M.; Thomas, N.

    2007-08-01

    Heat transport in porous media such as soils and regolith is significantly reduced compared to the properties of compact samples of the same material. The bottle neck for solid state heat transport is the contact area between adjacent grains. For "dry" and unconsolidated materials the contact areas and thus the thermal conductivity are extremely small. Sintering and cementation are two processes that can increase the cross section of interstitial bonds signifcantly. On Mars, cementation can be caused by condensation of water or carbon dioxide ice from the vapor phase, or from salts and minerals that fall out from aqueous solutions. We produced several artificially cemented samples, using small glass beads of uniform size as soil analog. The cementation is achieved by initially molten wax that is mixed with the glass beads while liqiud. The wax freezes preferably at the contact points between grains, thus minimizing surface energy, and consolidates the samples. The thermal conductivity of these samples is then measured in vacuum. We present the results of these measurements and compare them with theoretical models. The observed range of thermal conductivity values can explain some, but not all of the variations in thermal intertia that can be seen in TES remote sensing data.

  10. Measuring thermal conductivity of thin films by Scanning Thermal Microscopy combined with thermal spreading resistance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszczyk, J; Kaźmierczak-Bałata, A; Firek, P; Bodzenta, J

    2017-01-27

    While measuring the thermal properties of a thin film, one of the most often encountered problems is the influence of the substrate thermal properties on measured signal and the need for its separation. In this work an approach for determining the thermal conductivity κ of a thin layer is presented. It bases on Scanning Thermal Microscopy (SThM) measurement combined with thermal spreading resistance analysis for a system consisting of a single layer on a substrate. Presented approach allows to take into account the influence of the substrate thermal properties on SThM signal and to estimate the true value of a thin film κ. It is based on analytical solution of the problem being a function of dimensionless parameters and requires numerical solution of relatively simple integral equation. As the analysis utilizes a solution in dimensionless parameters it can be used for any substrate-layer system. As an example, the method was applied for determination of the thermal conductivities of 4 different thin layers of thicknesses from 12 to 100nm. The impact of model parameters on the uncertainty of the estimated final κ value was analyzed.

  11. Continental growth and mantle hydration as intertwined feedback cycles in the thermal evolution of Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höning, Dennis; Spohn, Tilman

    2016-06-01

    A model of Earth's continental coverage and mantle water budget is discussed along with its thermal evolution. The model links a thermal evolution model based on parameterized mantle convection with a model of a generic subduction zone that includes the oceanic crust and a sedimentary layer as carriers of water. Part of the subducted water is used to produce continental crust while the remainder is subducted into the mantle. The total length of the subduction zones is calculated from the total surface area of continental crust assuming randomly distributed continents. The mantle viscosity is dependent of temperature and the water concentration. Sediments are generated by continental crust erosion, and water outgassing at mid-oceanic ridges closes the water cycle. We discuss the strongly coupled, non-linear model using a phase plane defined by the continental coverage and mantle water concentration. Fixed points are found in the phase plane at which the rates of change of both variables are zero. These fixed points evolve with time, but in many cases, three fixed points emerge of which two are stable and an intermediate point is unstable with respect to continental coverage. With initial conditions from a Monte-Carlo scheme we calculate evolution paths in the phase plane and find a large spread of final states that all have a mostly balanced water budget. The present day observed 40% continental surface coverage is found near the unstable fixed point. Our evolution model suggests that Earth's continental coverage formed early and has been stable for at least 1.5 Gyr. The effect of mantle water regassing (and mantle viscosity depending on water concentration) is found to lower the present day mantle temperature by about 120 K, but the present day mantle viscosity is affected little. The water cycle thus complements the well-known thermostat effect of viscosity and mantle temperature. Our results further suggest that the biosphere could impact the feedback cycles by

  12. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetic resonance measurements of the moisture content and hydration condition of a magnetic mixture material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, K., E-mail: tsukada@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp; Kusaka, T.; Saari, M. M.; Takagi, R.; Sakai, K.; Kiwa, T. [The Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushima-Naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Bito, Y. [Central Research Lab., Hitachi. Ltd., 1-280 Higashi-Koigakubo, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185-8601 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    We developed a magnetic measurement method to measure the moisture content and hydration condition of mortar as a magnetic mixture material. Mortar is a mixture of Portland cement, sand, and water, and these materials exhibit different magnetic properties. The magnetization–magnetic field curves of these components and of mortars with different moisture contents were measured, using a specially developed high-temperature-superconductor superconducting quantum interference device. Using the differences in magnetic characteristics, the moisture content of mortar was measured at the ferromagnetic saturation region over 250 mT. A correlation between magnetic susceptibility and moisture content was successfully established. After Portland cement and water are mixed, hydration begins. At the early stage of the hydration/gel, magnetization strength increased over time. To investigate the magnetization change, we measured the distribution between bound and free water in the mortar in the early stage by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI results suggest that the amount of free water in mortar correlates with the change in magnetic susceptibility.

  13. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetic resonance measurements of the moisture content and hydration condition of a magnetic mixture material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, K.; Kusaka, T.; Saari, M. M.; Takagi, R.; Sakai, K.; Kiwa, T.; Bito, Y.

    2014-05-01

    We developed a magnetic measurement method to measure the moisture content and hydration condition of mortar as a magnetic mixture material. Mortar is a mixture of Portland cement, sand, and water, and these materials exhibit different magnetic properties. The magnetization-magnetic field curves of these components and of mortars with different moisture contents were measured, using a specially developed high-temperature-superconductor superconducting quantum interference device. Using the differences in magnetic characteristics, the moisture content of mortar was measured at the ferromagnetic saturation region over 250 mT. A correlation between magnetic susceptibility and moisture content was successfully established. After Portland cement and water are mixed, hydration begins. At the early stage of the hydration/gel, magnetization strength increased over time. To investigate the magnetization change, we measured the distribution between bound and free water in the mortar in the early stage by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI results suggest that the amount of free water in mortar correlates with the change in magnetic susceptibility.

  14. Measurement of body fat and hydration of the fat-free body in health and disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streat, S.J.; Beddoe, A.H.; Hill, G.L.

    1985-06-01

    Body fat mass, fat-free body mass and body water are basic components of body composition which are used in nutritional and metabolic studies and in patient care. A method of measuring total body fat (TBF), fat-free mass (FFM) and its hydration (TBW/FFM) involving prompt gamma in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) and tritium dilution has been compared with the more traditional methods of densitometry and skinfold anthropometry in 36 normal volunteers, and with skinfold anthropometry in 56 patients presenting for nutritional support. While the mean values of TBF were in reasonable agreement for the three methods in normals it was founds that skinfold anthropometry underestimated TBF relative to the IVNAA/tritium method by, on average, 3.0 kg (19%) in patients. Furthermore, the ranges of values in normals of the ratio TBW/FFM for the anthropometric (0.62 to 0.80) and densitometric (0.65 to 0.80) methods were much wider than the range for the IVNAA/tritium method (0.69 to 0.76), in which TBW was measured by tritium dilution in all cases. In the patients, the ranges of this ratio were 0.52 to 0.90 for the anthropometric method and 0.67 to 0.82 for the IVNAA/tritium method; clearly anthropometry yields values of TBW/FFM which are outside accepted biological limits. On the basis of these findings, ranges of TBW/FFM are suggested for both normal adults (0.69 to 0.75) and patients requiring nutritional support (0.67 to 0.83). Finally it is concluded that the IVNAA/tritium method is a suitable method for measuring TBF and FFM and particularly so when body composition is abnormal.

  15. Improvement measures of urban thermal environment

    CERN Document Server

    Takebayashi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Maximizing readers' insights into urban and architectural environmental planning with consideration for the thermal environment, this work highlights how various urban heat-island strategies have been developed and their effectiveness in urban areas. Specific measures to combat the urban heat-island phenomenon, including improvement of surface cover, reduction of exhaust heat, improvement of ventilation are summarized and various heat-island measurement technologies, which have been proposed in recent years, are organized systematically based on surface- heat budget and surface boundary layer

  16. Hydration energies of deprotonated amino acids from gas phase equilibria measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincel, Henryk

    2008-08-01

    Singly hydrated clusters of deprotonated amino acids were studied using an electrospray high-pressure mass spectrometer equipped with a pulsed ion-beam reaction chamber. Thermochemical data, DeltaH(o), DeltaS(o), and DeltaG(o), for the hydration reaction [AA - H](-) + H(2)O = [AA - H](-).(H(2)O) were obtained from gas-phase equilibria determinations for AA = Gly, Ala, Val, Pro, Phe, Lys, Met, Trp, Gln, Arg, and Asp. The hydration free-energy changes are found to depend significantly on the side-chain substituents. The water binding energy in [AA - H](-).(H(2)O) increases with the gas-phase acidity of AA. The anionic hydrogen bond strengths in [AA - H](-).(H(2)O) are compared with those of the cationic bonds in the corresponding AAH(+).(H(2)O) systems.

  17. Nuclear Well Log Properties of Natural Gas Hydrate Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchwell, A.; Cook, A.

    2015-12-01

    Characterizing gas hydrate in a reservoir typically involves a full suite of geophysical well logs. The most common method involves using resistivity measurements to quantify the decrease in electrically conductive water when replaced with gas hydrate. Compressional velocity measurements are also used because the gas hydrate significantly strengthens the moduli of the sediment. At many gas hydrate sites, nuclear well logs, which include the photoelectric effect, formation sigma, carbon/oxygen ratio and neutron porosity, are also collected but often not used. In fact, the nuclear response of a gas hydrate reservoir is not known. In this research we will focus on the nuclear log response in gas hydrate reservoirs at the Mallik Field at the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada, and the Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg 2 sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Nuclear logs may add increased robustness to the investigation into the properties of gas hydrates and some types of logs may offer an opportunity to distinguish between gas hydrate and permafrost. For example, a true formation sigma log measures the thermal neutron capture cross section of a formation and pore constituents; it is especially sensitive to hydrogen and chlorine in the pore space. Chlorine has a high absorption potential, and is used to determine the amount of saline water within pore spaces. Gas hydrate offers a difference in elemental composition compared to water-saturated intervals. Thus, in permafrost areas, the carbon/oxygen ratio may vary between gas hydrate and permafrost, due to the increase of carbon in gas hydrate accumulations. At the Mallik site, we observe a hydrate-bearing sand (1085-1107 m) above a water-bearing sand (1107-1140 m), which was confirmed through core samples and mud gas analysis. We observe a decrease in the photoelectric absorption of ~0.5 barnes/e-, as well as an increase in the formation sigma readings of ~5 capture units in the water-bearing sand as

  18. Multiple-pressure-tapped core holder combined with X-ray computed tomography scanning for gas-water permeability measurements of methane-hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Yoshihiro; Jin, Yusuke; Uchiumi, Takashi; Nagao, Jiro

    2013-06-01

    We present a novel setup for measuring the effective gas-water permeability of methane-hydrate-bearing sediments. We developed a core holder with multiple pressure taps for measuring the pressure gradient of the gas and water phases. The gas-water flooding process was simultaneously detected using an X-ray computed tomography scanner. We successfully measured the effective gas-water permeability of an artificial sandy core with methane hydrate during the gas-water flooding test.

  19. Studies of Reaction Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Dissocation in Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moridis, George J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2005-03-10

    The objective of this study is the description of the kinetic dissociation of CH4-hydrates in porous media, and the determination of the corresponding kinetic parameters. Knowledge of the kinetic dissociation behavior of hydrates can play a critical role in the evaluation of gas production potential of gas hydrate accumulations in geologic media. We analyzed data from a sequence of tests of CH4-hydrate dissociation by means of thermal stimulation. These tests had been conducted on sand cores partially saturated with water, hydrate and CH4 gas, and contained in an x-ray-transparent aluminum pressure vessel. The pressure, volume of released gas, and temperature (at several locations within the cores) were measured. To avoid misinterpreting local changes as global processes, x-ray computed tomography scans provided accurate images of the location and movement of the reaction interface during the course of the experiments. Analysis of the data by means of inverse modeling (history matching ) provided estimates of the thermal properties and of the kinetic parameters of the hydration reaction in porous media. Comparison of the results from the hydrate-bearing porous media cores to those from pure CH4-hydrate samples provided a measure of the effect of the porous medium on the kinetic reaction. A tentative model of composite thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing media was also developed.

  20. Association of plasma adiponectin levels with cellular hydration state measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikawa T

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Takahiro Yoshikawa,1 Hiroshi Kanazawa21Department of Sports Medicine, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, JapanBackground: It is widely recognized that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD includes a variety of extra pulmonary complications and comorbidities. Recently, adiponectin was shown to regulate cellular metabolism in humans. Cellular hydration state is affected by a variety of hormonal factors and regulates cellular metabolic state. Therefore, this study was designed to determine whether adiponectin is a possible factor involved in cellular hydration state in COPD.Methods: Thirty patients with COPD and 41 age-matched controls participated in the study. Plasma levels of total and high molecular weight (HMW adiponectin were measured and anthropometry and pulmonary function tests were conducted. Intracellular water (ICW, extracellular water (ECW, and ECW/ICW ratio, which are parameters of cellular hydration state, were measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis.Results: Higher levels of total and HMW adiponectin in plasma were found in patients with COPD compared with levels in controls. A significant inverse correlation was observed between body mass index and plasma levels of total and HMW adiponectin in the control group. However, this significant correlation was not observed in patients with COPD. The plasma levels of total and HMW adiponectin were also not significantly correlated with any pulmonary function parameters in patients with COPD. Regarding the state of cellular hydration, the plasma levels of total adiponectin were inversely correlated with the ECW/ICW ratio and positively with ICW values in patients with COPD. Moreover, closer correlations were found between these parameters and plasma HMW adiponectin levels.Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest a novel association of the plasma

  1. Hydration Assessment of Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS · Although there is no scientific consensus for 1 ) howbest to assess the hydration status of athletes, 2)what criteria to use as acceptable outcome measurements, or 3) the best time to apply practical assessment methods, there are methods that can be used toprovide athletes with useful feedback about their hydration status

  2. Measuring Thermal Characteristics of Urban Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Rickman, Doug L.

    1999-01-01

    The additional heating of the air over the city is the result of the replacement of naturally vegetated surfaces with those composed of asphalt, concrete, rooftops and other man-made materials. The temperatures of these artificial surfaces can be 20 to 40 C higher than vegetated surfaces. Materials such as asphalt store much of the sun's energy and remains hot long after sunset. This produces a dome of elevated air temperatures 5 to 8 C greater over the city, compared to the air temperatures over adjacent rural areas. This effect is called the "urban heat island". Urban landscapes are a complex mixture of vegetated and nonvegetated surfaces. It is difficult to take enough temperature measurements over a large city area to characterize the complexity of urban radiant surface temperature variability. However, the use of remotely sensed thermal data from airborne scanners are ideal for the task. In a study funded by NASA, a series of flights over Huntsville, Alabama were performed in September 1994 and over Atlanta, Georgia in May 1997. Analysis of thermal energy responses for specific or discrete surfaces typical of the urban landscape (e.g., asphalt, building rooftops, vegetation) requires measurements at a very fine spatial scale (i.e., spatial resolution thermal infrared data, such as that obtained from aircraft, are very useful for demonstrating to planning officials, policy makers, and the general populace, what the benefits are of the urban forest in both mitigating the urban heat island effect, in making cities more aesthetically pleasing and more habitable environments, and in overall cooling of the community. In this presentation we will examine the techniques of analyzing remotely sensed data for measuring the effect of various urban surfaces on their contribution to the urban heat island effect.

  3. Comparison of the values of measured hydratation of sporting youths with normative values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Kutáč

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKROUND: When measuring body composition, we monitor the fractionalization of body weight and the share of the individual elements in its aggregate value. The total body water (TBW is a very important element in addition to the share of body fat (BF, muscle mass and bone minerals. Water is the largest element of the body weight and its sufficient amount (organism hydration is a condition for maintaining the physiological functions of the person and thus has an immediate effect on the health of the individual. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study is to check the standard values of the percentage share of the representation of the total body water in the total body weight in different age groups of sporting youths using the tetrapolar bio-impedance Tanita 418 MA scale. METHODS: The research group included a total of 532 individuals (332 men and 200 women at the age from 12 to 17 years. They were individuals with regular physical activity and without any health problems. The measurement was carried out using the tetrapolar bio-impedance TANITA 418 MA scale. The confidence interval at the reliability level of .99 was used to define the range of the standard values of the percentage share of the total body water representation. The normalization index Ni was used to compare the mean values of the total body water representation with the reference file. RESULTS: The mean values of the TBW representation in boys ranged from 61.75 to 64.34% and in girls from 55.51 to 58.69%, always in relation to the age. The value of the upper bound of (95% the confidence interval of the Tanita 418 MA device software did not exceed the lower bound of the standard (65% in any of the monitored files. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed significant gender differences in the total body water representation that, however, the standard of the used device does not respect. The standard values are set high which was also confirmed by the comparison of our results with other studies

  4. Modeling pure methane hydrate dissociation using a numerical simulator from a novel combination of X-ray computed tomography and macroscopic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A.; Moridis, G.J.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Sloan, Jr., E.D.

    2009-08-15

    The numerical simulator TOUGH+HYDRATE (T+H) was used to predict the transient pure methane hydrate (no sediment) dissociation data. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to visualize the methane hydrate formation and dissociation processes. A methane hydrate sample was formed from granular ice in a cylindrical vessel, and slow depressurization combined with thermal stimulation was applied to dissociate the hydrate sample. CT images showed that the water produced from the hydrate dissociation accumulated at the bottom of the vessel and increased the hydrate dissociation rate there. CT images were obtained during hydrate dissociation to confirm the radial dissociation of the hydrate sample. This radial dissociation process has implications for dissociation of hydrates in pipelines, suggesting lower dissociation times than for longitudinal dissociation. These observations were also confirmed by the numerical simulator predictions, which were in good agreement with the measured thermal data during hydrate dissociation. System pressure and sample temperature measured at the sample center followed the CH{sub 4} hydrate L{sub w}+H+V equilibrium line during hydrate dissociation. The predicted cumulative methane gas production was within 5% of the measured data. Thus, this study validated our simulation approach and assumptions, which include stationary pure methane hydrate-skeleton, equilibrium hydrate-dissociation and heat- and mass-transfer in predicting hydrate dissociation in the absence of sediments. It should be noted that the application of T+H for the pure methane hydrate system (no sediment) is outside the general applicability limits of T+H.

  5. Measuring the seeds of thermal ion outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Philip A.

    The ionosphere is the primary source for heavy ions which are ubiquitous in the terrestrial magnetosphere. Low-altitude energization in the auroral ionosphere results in bulk heating and transverse acceleration of ions, which begin to upwell and/or be accelerated upward by the mirror force, starting upflow and leading to the outflow process. The details of the processes that seed ion outflow at low altitudes are difficult to measure in situ and thus remain an open question. We examine the observational parameter regime in which ion upflow/outflow initiates. Emphasis is placed on making measurements of the thermal ion kinetic distribution function, allowing for accounting of processes which affect in situ plasma measurements. We consider an electrostatic analyzer (ESA) instrument capable of making the measurements necessary to quantify the roles of various heating mechanisms in initiating ion upflow in the low-altitude auroral ionosphere. We present the difficulties associated with making these measurements and identify instrument design choices that mitigate some of these measurement challenges. Analysis of ESA measurements of the thermal ion distribution function taken on the MICA auroral sounding rocket is presented. Using a Maxwellian model to replicate possible measured spectra, we calculate integrated parameters from the model and compare with equivalent parameters calculated from the in situ data. Through Liouville's theorem and the thin-sheath approximation we couple the measured and forward-modeled parameters such that measurements inside the sheath provide information about the state of the plasma outside the sheath. Throughout the MICA flight, ion upflow is observed and attributed to ambipolar electric fields and/or ion-neutral interactions. Late in the flight we observe quasi-static frictional process driving the ion temperature. Early in the flight we observe ion heating weakly correlated with ELF wave activity; our analysis suggests we must consider

  6. Some thermodynamical aspects of protein hydration water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallamace, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.mallamace@unime.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Corsaro, Carmelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Mallamace, Domenico [Dipartimento SASTAS, Università di Messina, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Sebastiano [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Cirino [CNR-IPCF, Viale F. Stagno D’Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Stanley, H. Eugene [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Chen, Sow-Hsin [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    We study by means of nuclear magnetic resonance the self-diffusion of protein hydration water at different hydration levels across a large temperature range that includes the deeply supercooled regime. Starting with a single hydration shell (h = 0.3), we consider different hydrations up to h = 0.65. Our experimental evidence indicates that two phenomena play a significant role in the dynamics of protein hydration water: (i) the measured fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover temperature is unaffected by the hydration level and (ii) the first hydration shell remains liquid at all hydrations, even at the lowest temperature.

  7. Reliability of Calf Bioelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy and Magnetic-Resonance-Imaging-Acquired Skeletal Muscle Hydration Measures in Healthy People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Sawant

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the test-retest reliability, relative variability, and agreement between calf bioelectrical impedance-spectroscopy (cBIS acquired extracellular fluid (ECF, intracellular fluid (ICF, total water and the ratio of ECF : ICF, magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI acquired transverse relaxation times (T2, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC of calf muscles of the same segment in healthy individuals. Methods. Muscle hydration measures were collected in 32 healthy individuals on two occasions and analyzed by a single rater. On both occasions, MRI measures were collected from tibialis anterior (TA, medial (MG, and lateral gastrocnemius (LG and soleus muscles following the cBIS data acquired using XiTRON Hydra 4200 BIS device. The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC2,1, coefficient of variation (CV, and agreement between MRI and cBIS data were also calculated. Results. ICC2,1 values for cBIS, T2, and ADC ranged from 0.56 to 0.92, 0.96 to 0.99, and 0.05 to 0.56, respectively. Relative variability between measures (CV ranged from 14.6 to 25.6% for the cBIS data and 4.2 to 10.0% for the MRI-acquired data. The ratio of ECF : ICF could significantly predict T2 of TA and soleus muscles. Conclusion. MRI-acquired measures of T2 had the highest test-retest reliability of muscle hydration with the least error and variation on repeated testing. Hence, T2 of a muscle is the most reliable and stable outcome measure for evaluating individual muscle hydration.

  8. Bone assessment via thermal photoacoustic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ting; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Tian, Chao; Perosky, Joseph; Du, Sidan; Yuan, Jie; Deng, Cheri X.; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    The feasibility of an innovative biomedical diagnostic technique, thermal photoacoustic (TPA) measurement, for nonionizing and non-invasive assessment of bone health is investigated. Unlike conventional photoacoustic PA methods which are mostly focused on the measurement of absolute signal intensity, TPA targets the change in PA signal intensity as a function of the sample temperature, i.e. the temperature dependent Grueneisen parameter which is closely relevant to the chemical and molecular properties in the sample. Based on the differentiation measurement, the results from TPA technique is less susceptible to the variations associated with sample and system, and could be quantified with improved accurately. Due to the fact that the PA signal intensity from organic components such as blood changes faster than that from non-organic mineral under the same modulation of temperature, TPA measurement is able to objectively evaluate bone mineral density (BMD) and its loss as a result of osteoporosis. In an experiment on well established rat models of bone loss and preservation, PA measurements of rat tibia bones were conducted over a temperature range from 370 C to 440 C. The slope of PA signal intensity verses temperature was quantified for each specimen. The comparison among three groups of specimens with different BMD shows that bones with lower BMD have higher slopes, demonstrating the potential of the proposed TPA technique in future clinical management of osteoporosis.

  9. Thermal performance measurements on ATLAS-SCT KB forward modules

    CERN Document Server

    Donegà, M; D'Onofrio, M; Ferrère, D; Hirt, C; Ikegami, Y; Kohriki, T; Kondo, T; Lindsay, S; Mangin-Brinet, M; Niinikoski, T O; Pernegger, H; Perrin, E; Taylor, G; Terada, S; Unno, Y; Wallny, R; Weber, M

    2003-01-01

    The thermal design of the KB module is presented. A Finite Elements Analysis (FEA) has been used to finalize the module design. The thermal performance of an outer irradiated KB module has been measured at different cooling conditions. The thermal runaway of the module has been measured. The FEA model has been compared with the measurements and has been used to predict the thermal performance in a realistic SCT scenario.

  10. Proposal of novel measurement method for thermal diffusivity from infrared thermal movie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yoichi; Watanabe, Shin; Ogata, Kento; Hiramatsu, Koji; Miyazaki, Hisashi; Morimoto, Jun

    2017-05-01

    A brand new thermal diffusivity measurement method was developed. In this new noncontact and absolute measurement method, thermal diffusivity was measured from infrared movie data. The model of one-dimensional thermal conduction was constructed by taking into account the thermal flow other than one-dimensional thermal conduction in the sample. On the basis of this thermal conduction model, the analytical equation for calculating thermal diffusivity was derived. A single-crystal sapphire plate was used as a test specimen for the new method. The test specimen was arranged to cause one-dimensional heat conduction. Infrared movies were taken by using an infrared camera at room temperature. Then, thermal diffusivity was numerically calculated from the acquired movie data using the analytical equation. It was experimentally demonstrated that thermal diffusivity was measured with an accuracy of around 10% error, from an infrared movie of a single-crystal sapphire sample.

  11. Thermal properties measurements in biodiesel oils using photothermal techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, M. P. P.; Andrade, A. A.; Franco, R. W. A.; Miranda, P. C. M. L.; Sthel, M.; Vargas, H.; Constantino, R.; Baesso, M. L.

    2005-08-01

    In this Letter, thermal lens and open cell photoacoustic techniques are used to measure the thermal properties of biodiesel oils. The absolute values of the thermal effusivity, thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and the temperature coefficient of the refractive index were determined for samples obtained from soy, castor bean, sunflower and turnip. The results suggest that the employed techniques may be useful as complementary methods for biodiesel certification.

  12. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years.

  13. Luminescence investigation of Dy2O2S and Dy2O2SO4 obtained by thermal decomposition of sulfate hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RV Rodrigues; L Marciniak; LU Khan; JR Matos; HF Brito; W Strk

    2016-01-01

    The yellow emitting dysprosium oxysulfide (Dy2O2S) and dysprosium oxysulfate (Dy2O2SO4) compounds were prepared from the thermal decomposition of hydrated dysprosium sulphate. The materials were characterized by using thermogravimetry (TG/DTG), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopies. The thermal stability temperatures at around 1151 and 1313 K were determined for the Dy2O2S and Dy2O2SO4 materials, respectively. The photolumines-cence properties of the dysprosium oxysulfide were investigated, showing narrow emission bands assigned to the 4F9/2→6HJ intracon-figurational transitions of the Dy3+ion. The yellow emission color of this phosphor suggests that the Dy2O2S is a promising material for applications in LEDs.

  14. Early-age acoustic emission measurements in hydrating cement paste: Evidence for cavitation during solidification due to self-desiccation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Couch, J.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the acoustic emission activity of cement pastes was investigated during the first day of hydration. Deaired, fresh cement pastes were cast in sealed sample holders designed to minimize friction and restraint. The majority of acoustic emission events occurred in lower water to cement....... According to these experimental results, the acoustic emission measured around setting time was attributed to cavitation events occurring in the pores of the cement paste due to self-desiccation. This paper shows how acoustic emission might be used to indicate the time when the fluid–solid transition occurs...

  15. Measurement of Clathrate Hydrate Thermodynamic Stability in the Presence of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Marc

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of data available for the stability of clathrate hydrates in the presence of ammonia for low-to-moderate pressures in the 0-10 MPa range. Providing such data will allow for a better understanding of natural mass transfer processes on celestial bodies like Titan and Enceladus, on which destabilization of clathrates may be responsible for replenishment of gases in the atmosphere. The experimental process utilizes a custom-built gas handling system (GHS) and a cryogenic calorimeter to allow for the efficient testing of samples under varying pressures and gas species.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation on influence of guest molecule number on methane hydrate thermal performance%客体分子数对甲烷水合物导热性能影响的分子动力学模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万丽华; 梁德青; 吴能友; 关进安

    2012-01-01

    采用EMD方法Green-Kubo理论计算263.15 K晶穴占有率0~100% sI甲烷水合物的热导率,研究客体分子数对甲烷水合物导热性能的影响.模拟结果显示,甲烷水合物的低导热性能由主体分子构建的笼形结构决定.而在相同温压条件下,随着客体分子甲烷进入晶胞数目增多,晶穴占有率增大后,密度增大,同时客体分子对声子的散射也增强,二者均导致导热性能增强.%Thermal conductivity of methane hydrate is an important physical parameter in processes of methane hydrate exploration, mining, gas hydrate storage and transportation as well as other applications. In this paper, equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulation and the Green-Kubo method are used for the systems with 0-100% occupancy of sI methane hydrate to evaluate the influence of guest molecule number on the thermal performance of methane hydrate. The EMD simulation for the thermodynamics of equilibrium state of si methane hydrate is performed via the Green-Kubo approach for the thermal conductivity of methane hydrates. The DL-POLY molecular dynamics simulation package is employed. TIP4P/Ice water model is used for water-water interactions and the Lennard-Jones potential for methane-methane and methane-water interactions. The Lorentz-Berthelot combination rule is used to determine the parameters of Lennard-Jones potentials between water and methane molecules. The equations of motion are integrated using the Verlet algorithm and the Ewald method is used to handle long-range electrostatic interactions. Results indicate that the poor thermal conduction of methane hydrate is resultedfrom the framework of cage. The thermal conduction of methane hydrate is improved when the framework of cage has slightly higher thermal conductivity with more guest molecules enclosed in the cage> since higher cage occupancy ratio by guest molecules increases the density and their scattering.

  17. Cooperative hydration effect causes thermal unfolding of proteins and water activity plays a key role in protein stability in solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Osato; Dozen, Michiko; Hirota, Kaede

    2016-08-01

    The protein unfolding process observed in a narrow temperature range was clearly explained by evaluating the small difference in the enthalpy of hydrogen-bonding between amino acid residues and the hydration of amino acid residue separately. In aqueous solutions, the effect of cosolute on the protein stability is primarily dependent on water activity, aw, the role of which has been long neglected in the literature. The effect of aw on protein stability works as a power law so that a small change in aw is amplified substantially through the cooperative hydration effect. In the present approach, the role of hydrophobic interaction stands behind. This affects protein stability indirectly through the change in solution structure caused by the existence of cosolute.

  18. Measuring and modelling of the combined thermodynamic promoting effect of tetrahydrofuran and cyclopentane on carbon dioxide hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Peter Jørgensen; Daraboina, Nagu; Thomsen, Kaj

    2014-01-01

    promoters due to its significant pressure reducing effect in hydrate forming systems such as those related to carbon dioxide capture.The present work shows that hydrate dissociation pressures may be lowered by up to 22% compared to those of the cyclopentane promoted carbon dioxide hydrate system by addition......This work documents both experimental data, and by thermodynamic modelling, the synergistic effect occurring in promoted carbon dioxide hydrate systems at the simultaneous presence of tetrahydrofuran and cyclopentane.Cyclopentane has previously been considered a reference among gas hydrate...

  19. 3 omega method for specific heat and thermal conductivity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Lü, L; Zhang, D L

    2001-01-01

    We present a 3 omega method for simultaneously measuring the specific heat and thermal conductivity of a rod- or filament-like specimen using a way similar to a four-probe resistance measurement. The specimen in this method needs to be electrically conductive and with a temperature-dependent resistance, for acting both as a heater to create a temperature fluctuation and as a sensor to measure its thermal response. With this method we have successfully measured the specific heat and thermal conductivity of platinum wire specimens at cryogenic temperatures, and measured those thermal quantities of tiny carbon nanotube bundles some of which are only 10^-9 g in mass.

  20. Direct measurement of the intermolecular forces between counterion-condensed DNA double helices. Evidence for long range attractive hydration forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, D C; Parsegian, V A

    1992-01-01

    Rather than acting by modifying van der Waals or electrostatic double layer interactions or by directly bridging neighboring molecules, polyvalent ligands bound to DNA double helices appear to act by reconfiguring the water between macromolecular surfaces to create attractive long range hydration forces. We have reached this conclusion by directly measuring the repulsive forces between parallel B-form DNA double helices pushed together from the separations at which they have self organized into hexagonal arrays of parallel rods. For all of the wide variety of "condensing agents" from divalent Mn to polymeric protamines, the resulting intermolecular force varies exponentially with a decay rate of 1.4-1.5 A, exactly one-half that seen previously for hydration repulsion. Such behavior qualitatively contradicts the predictions of all electrostatic double layer and van der Waals force potentials previously suggested. It fits remarkably well with the idea, developed and tested here, that multivalent counterion adsorption reorganizes the water at discrete sites complementary to unadsorbed sites on the apposing surface. The measured strength and range of these attractive forces together with their apparent specificity suggest the presence of a previously unexpected force in molecular organization.

  1. Effects of Agitation and Storage Temperature on Measurements of Hydration Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Hypohydration can have significant implications on normal physiological functions of the body. Objectives This study aimed to determine the impact of agitation, storage temperature, and storage time on urine osmolality compared to the criterion control. Patients and Methods We used a descriptive diagnostic validity test design. To investigate agitation, we recruited 75 healthy individuals (males = 41, females = 34; mean age = 22 ± 5 years; mean self-reported height = 172 ± 23 cm and mass = 77 ± 17 kg who provided one or more samples (total = 81. The independent variables were agitation (vortex, hand shaken, no agitation and temperature (room temperature, freezer, and refrigerator type. Participants completed informed consent, a health questionnaire and were asked to provide a urine sample, which was split and labeled according to agitation type or storage temperature. Urine osmolality was used to determine hydration status at two time points (within 2 hours [control], 48 hours. We used t-tests to determine the difference between each condition and the control and calculated percent error for each condition. Results No significant differences for no agitation (t79 = -0.079, P = 0.937, hand shaken (t79 = 1.395, P = 0.167 or vortex mixed (t79 = -0.753, P = 0.453 were identified when compared to the criterion control. No significant differences for room temperature (t82 = -0.720, P = 0.474, refrigerator (t82 = -2.697, P = 0.008 or freezer (t82 = 2.576, P = 0.012 were identified when compared to the criterion control. Conclusions Our findings suggest agitation of urine specimen is not necessary and samples do not require refrigeration or freezing if assessed within 48 hours. Analysis within two hours of collection is not necessary and samples can be stored for up to 48 hours without impacting the hydration status of the sample.

  2. Chemo-physical modeling of cement mortar hydration: Role of aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jena, E-mail: jeong@profs.estp.fr [Université Paris-Est, Institut de Recherche en Constructibilité, ESTP, 28 Avenue Président Wilson, 94234 Cachan (France); Ramézani, Hamidréza, E-mail: hamidreza.ramezani@univ-orleans.fr [CRMD, CNRS FRE 3520-Research Center on Divided Materials, École Polytechnique de l’Université d’Orléans, 8 rue Léonrad de Vinci, 45072 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Leklou, Nordine, E-mail: nordine.leklou@univ-nantes.fr [LUNAM Université, Université de Nantes-IUT Saint-Nazaire, GeM, CNRS UMR 6183, Research Institute in Civil Engineering and Mechanics, 58 rue Michel Ange BP 420 44606 Saint Nazaire Cedex (France); Mounanga, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.mounanga@univ-nantes.fr [LUNAM Université, Université de Nantes-IUT Saint-Nazaire, GeM, CNRS UMR 6183, Research Institute in Civil Engineering and Mechanics, 58 rue Michel Ange BP 420 44606 Saint Nazaire Cedex (France)

    2013-07-20

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: After mixing of the cement with water, most of the anhydride products sustain the hydration process and this leads to the hydrate products, e.g. CSH, Ca(OH){sub 2}, Afm and Aft. The mentioned hydration process is a highly complex phenomenon involving the chemically based thermo-activation inside the cement mortars during the early age hydration process. The chemo-thermal hydration reactions drasticaly increase at the early age of hydration after the mixing action and then it becomes less important and turns to be nearly asymptotic. The progress of the hydration phenomenon drives the material properties change during the very early age of cement hydration. Regarding the mortar and concrete, such hydration process would not be homogeneous through the cement matrix due to the aggregates presence. These inclusions will affect the temperature distribution as well as degree of hydration. In the current contribution, the chemical and thermal hydration have been firstly investigated by means of SEM observations using replica method and secondly by the 3D-FEM numerical experiments including two different case studies using glass beads as aggregates. The numerical experiments match fairly good the experimental measurements obtained using a pseudo-adiabatic testing setup for the case studies herein. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images observation demonstrates the gap spaces around the glass beads next to the external surfaces. These gaps can be essentially seen for the multi-glass beads case study. The role of the temperature and degree of hydration gradients are clearly obtained using the numerical samples. Some fresh routes and outlooks have been afterwards discussed.

  3. Are diagnostic criteria for acute malnutrition affected by hydration status in hospitalized children? A repeated measures study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fegan Gregory

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Dehydration and malnutrition commonly occur together among ill children in developing countries. Dehydration (change in total body water is known to alter weight. Although muscle tissue has high water content, it is not known whether mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC may be altered by changes in tissue hydration. We aimed to determine whether rehydration alters MUAC, MUAC Z score (MUACz, weight-for-length Z-score (WFLz and classification of nutritional status among hospitalised Kenyan children admitted with signs of dehydration. Study procedure We enrolled children aged from 3 months to 5 years admitted to a rural Kenyan district hospital with clinical signs compatible with dehydration, and without kwashiorkor. Anthropometric measurements were taken at admission and repeated after 48 hours of treatment, which included rehydration by WHO protocols. Changes in weight observed during this period were considered to be due to changes in hydration status. Results Among 325 children (median age 11 months the median weight gain (rehydration after 48 hours was 0.21 kg, (an increase of 2.9% of admission body weight. Each 1% change in weight was associated with a 0.40 mm (95% CI: 0.30 to 0.44 mm, p Conclusion MUAC is less affected by dehydration than WFLz and is therefore more suitable for nutritional assessment of ill children. However, both WFLz and MUAC misclassify SAM among dehydrated children. Nutritional status should be re-evaluated following rehydration, and management adjusted accordingly.

  4. Direct measurement of the Mn(II) hydration state in metal complexes and metalloproteins through 17O NMR line widths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Eric M; Zhu, Jiang; Caravan, Peter

    2013-12-11

    Here we describe a simple method to estimate the inner-sphere hydration state of the Mn(II) ion in coordination complexes and metalloproteins. The line width of bulk H2(17)O is measured in the presence and absence of Mn(II) as a function of temperature, and transverse (17)O relaxivities are calculated. It is demonstrated that the maximum (17)O relaxivity is directly proportional to the number of inner-sphere water ligands (q). Using a combination of literature data and experimental data for 12 Mn(II) complexes, we show that this method provides accurate estimates of q with an uncertainty of ±0.2 water molecules. The method can be implemented on commercial NMR spectrometers working at fields of 7 T and higher. The hydration number can be obtained for micromolar Mn(II) concentrations. We show that the technique can be extended to metalloproteins or complex:protein interactions. For example, Mn(II) binds to the multimetal binding site A on human serum albumin with two inner-sphere water ligands that undergo rapid exchange (1.06 × 10(8) s(-1) at 37 °C). The possibility of extending this technique to other metal ions such as Gd(III) is discussed.

  5. Application of thermal lens technique to measure the thermal diffusivity of biodiesel blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Noor, A. S. M.; Mehdipour, Lotf Ali; Noura, Amin; Mahdi, Mohd Adzir

    2015-04-01

    Thermal diffusivity of palm biodiesel blends was measured using a thermal lens double beam setup. Palm biodiesel blends were prepared from a mixture of normal palm oil biodiesel and diesel fuel with the percentage of the mixture set in the range of 10-90 %. The thermal diffusivity of the palm biodiesel blends consistently increased by increasing the concentration of palm biodiesel from 0.784 × 10-7 to 1.056 × 10-7 m2/s and average of measurement limitation was 0.629 × 10-7 m2/s. Hence, thermal lens technique is suitable and accurate to assess the thermal diffusivity of palm biodiesel.

  6. Measured temperature and pressure dependence of Vp and Vs in compacted, polycrystalline sI methane and sII methane-ethane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgerud, M.B.; Waite, W.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Nur, A.

    2003-01-01

    We report on compressional- and shear-wave-speed measurements made on compacted polycrystalline sI methane and sII methane-ethane hydrate. The gas hydrate samples are synthesized directly in the measurement apparatus by warming granulated ice to 17??C in the presence of a clathrate-forming gas at high pressure (methane for sI, 90.2% methane, 9.8% ethane for sII). Porosity is eliminated after hydrate synthesis by compacting the sample in the synthesis pressure vessel between a hydraulic ram and a fixed end-plug, both containing shear-wave transducers. Wave-speed measurements are made between -20 and 15??C and 0 to 105 MPa applied piston pressure.

  7. A four-probe thermal transport measurement method for nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehyun; Ou, Eric; Sellan, Daniel P; Shi, Li

    2015-04-01

    Several experimental techniques reported in recent years have enabled the measurement of thermal transport properties of nanostructures. However, eliminating the contact thermal resistance error from the measurement results has remained a critical challenge. Here, we report a different four-probe measurement method that can separately obtain both the intrinsic thermal conductance and the contact thermal resistance of individual nanostructures. The measurement device consists of four microfabricated, suspended metal lines that act as resistive heaters and thermometers, across which the nanostructure sample is assembled. The method takes advantage of the variation in the heat flow along the suspended nanostructure and across its contacts to the four suspended heater and thermometer lines, and uses sixteen sets of temperature and heat flow measurements to obtain nine of the thermal resistances in the measurement device and the nanostructure sample, including the intrinsic thermal resistance and the two contact thermal resistances to the middle suspended segment of the nanostructure. Two single crystalline Si nanowires with different cross sections are measured in this work to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. This four-probe thermal transport measurement method can lead to future discoveries of unique size-dependent thermal transport phenomena in nanostructures and low-dimensional materials, in addition to providing reliable experimental data for calibrating theoretical models.

  8. A four-probe thermal transport measurement method for nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jaehyun; Ou, Eric; Sellan, Daniel P.; Shi, Li, E-mail: lishi@mail.utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Several experimental techniques reported in recent years have enabled the measurement of thermal transport properties of nanostructures. However, eliminating the contact thermal resistance error from the measurement results has remained a critical challenge. Here, we report a different four-probe measurement method that can separately obtain both the intrinsic thermal conductance and the contact thermal resistance of individual nanostructures. The measurement device consists of four microfabricated, suspended metal lines that act as resistive heaters and thermometers, across which the nanostructure sample is assembled. The method takes advantage of the variation in the heat flow along the suspended nanostructure and across its contacts to the four suspended heater and thermometer lines, and uses sixteen sets of temperature and heat flow measurements to obtain nine of the thermal resistances in the measurement device and the nanostructure sample, including the intrinsic thermal resistance and the two contact thermal resistances to the middle suspended segment of the nanostructure. Two single crystalline Si nanowires with different cross sections are measured in this work to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. This four-probe thermal transport measurement method can lead to future discoveries of unique size-dependent thermal transport phenomena in nanostructures and low-dimensional materials, in addition to providing reliable experimental data for calibrating theoretical models.

  9. Time Evolution of Reflective Thermal Lenses and Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity in Bulk Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Serge; Haché, Alain

    2004-07-01

    A simple method for optically measuring the thermal diffusivity of solids is demonstrated. The thermal displacement created on a substrate by a focused laser beam is determined from the divergence that it induces in a weak probe beam. The dynamics of the surface lens and the amplitude of the probe beam's divergence are then used to determine the thermal diffusivity of the substrate. Several materials that span a wide range of thermal properties are studied.

  10. Influence of Calcium Sulfate State and Fineness of Cement on Hydration of Portland Cements Using Electrical Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Xiaosheng; LI Zongjin; XIAO Lianzhen; THONG Wangfai

    2006-01-01

    The influence of calcium sulfate state and fineness of cement on hydration of Portland cement was studied using electrical resistivity measurement. The bulk resistivity curve of the paste from the abnormal cement mainly with hemihydrate had a characteristic abnormal peak and rapid increase in early period. The resistivity measurement technique can be used to discriminate abnormal setting. For normal cement with gypsum, the increase in fineness of the Portland cement decreases the minimum resistivity due to a higher ionic concentration and increases the 24 hour resistivity due to a reduction in macroscopic pore size. Thesetting time, compressive strength, pore structure of pastes made from different cements were carried out to compare the influence of water to cement ratio, calcium sulfate state and fineness. It is found that the electrical and mechanical properties are strongly affected by the initial porosity, the presence of hemihydrate or gypsum, and the fineness of cement.

  11. CO2 hydrate: Synthesis, composition, structure, dissociation behavior, and a comparison to structure I CH4 hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.; Chakoumakos, B.C.; Rawn, C.J.; Rondinone, A.J.; Ishii, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Structure I (sI) carbon dioxide (CO2) hydrate exhibits markedly different dissociation behavior from sI methane (CH4) hydrate in experiments in which equilibrated samples at 0.1 MPa are heated isobarically at 13 K/h from 210 K through the H2O melting point (273.15 K). The CO2 hydrate samples release only about 3% of their gas content up to temperatures of 240 K, which is 22 K above the hydrate phase boundary. Up to 20% is released by 270 K, and the remaining CO2 is released at 271.0 plusmn; 0.5 K, where the sample temperature is buffered until hydrate dissociation ceases. This reproducible buffering temperature for the dissociation reaction CO2??nH2O = CO2(g) + nH2O(1 to s) is measurably distinct from the pure H2O melting point at 273.15 K, which is reached as gas evolution ceases. In contrast, when si CH4 hydrate is heated at the same rate at 0.1 MPa, >95% of the gas is released within 25 K of the equilibrium temperature (193 K at 0.1 MPa). In conjunction with the dissociation study, a method for efficient and reproducible synthesis of pure polycrystalline CO2 hydrate with suitable characteristics for material properties testing was developed, and the material was characterized. CO2 hydrate was synthesized from CO2 liquid and H2O solid and liquid reactants at pressures between 5 and 25 MPa and temperatures between 250 and 281 K. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination indicates that the samples consist of dense crystalline hydrate and 50-300 ??m diameter pores that are lined with euhedral cubic hydrate crystals. Deuterated hydrate samples made by this same procedure were analyzed by neutron diffraction at temperatures between 4 and 215 K; results confirm that complete conversion of water to hydrate has occurred and that the measured unit cell parameter and thermal expansion are consistent with previously reported values. On the basis of measured weight gain after synthesis and gas yields from the dissociation experiments, approximately all cages in the

  12. The role of echocardiography measurement index collapsing VCI in the evaluation of dialysis and determining the state of hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šulović Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Often the only available way of checking the adequacy of HD reaching dry weight after completion of dialysis treatment or monitoring arterial blood pressure. The goal of this paper is to show whether echocardiographic index measuring inspiratory collapse VCI can further assist in assessing the state of hydration of patients on HD. Method: In a study that we conducted on the UDK in Belgrade Centre for HD at 20 toro children on HD (before and after HD and 20 healthy children, the control group. The M mode echocardiography we measured the diameter of the inferior vena cava (VCI and calculated the index VCI inspiratory collapse. Also, accompanied by the correlation of these parameters with the dimensions of the left atrium, left ventricular in diastolic and body weight. Results: Children were before HD was significantly higher static diameter VCI and LA diameter compared to the control group (p <0.05. Index is collapsed before the HD was be substantially lower than in the control group (p <0.05. After HD LA diameter was still significantly higher than in the control group (p <0.05, while the other parameters were not statistically be substantially different. Index collapsing VCI differed significantly before and after HD (p <0.05, examining the correlation between VCI and diameter dimensions of the left ventricle during diastole (LVD found a statistically significant positive correlation between these two parameters in all three groups of measurements (p <0.01. A statistically significant positive linear correlation was found between the VCI diameter and diameter of the left atrium (LA in all three of measurements (p <0.01. A statistically significant positive linear correlation was found between the diameter of VCI and body weight in children after HD and control groups (p <0.01. CONCLUSION: Index collapsing and VCI in combination with other parameters can further improve the monitoring of the state of hydration and improve the quality of life of

  13. Reliability of a Cryoscopic Micro-Osmometer Using 15-µL Plasma Samples to Measure Hydration Status in Varied Environmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Aaron T.; Richter-Stretton, Gina L.; Madueno, Maria C.; Borges, Nattai R.; Fenning, Andrew S.

    2017-01-01

    Measurement of plasma osmolality (P[subscript osm]) remains popular for assessing hydration status in exercise science. However, a controlled reliability assessment of micro-osmometry using small sample volumes to measure Posm remains to be performed. This study aimed to examine the reliability of a cryoscopic micro-osmometer requiring 15-µL…

  14. Reliability of a Cryoscopic Micro-Osmometer Using 15-µL Plasma Samples to Measure Hydration Status in Varied Environmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Aaron T.; Richter-Stretton, Gina L.; Madueno, Maria C.; Borges, Nattai R.; Fenning, Andrew S.

    2017-01-01

    Measurement of plasma osmolality (P[subscript osm]) remains popular for assessing hydration status in exercise science. However, a controlled reliability assessment of micro-osmometry using small sample volumes to measure Posm remains to be performed. This study aimed to examine the reliability of a cryoscopic micro-osmometer requiring 15-µL…

  15. Thermal Conductivity Measurement of Anisotropic Biological Tissue In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Kai; Cheng, Liang; Yang, Lina; Jin, Bitao; Zhang, Xinxin

    2017-06-01

    The accurate determination of the thermal conductivity of biological tissues has implications on the success of cryosurgical/hyperthermia treatments. In light of the evident anisotropy in some biological tissues, a new modified stepwise transient method was proposed to simultaneously measure the transverse and longitudinal thermal conductivities of anisotropic biological tissues. The physical and mathematical models were established, and the analytical solution was derived. Sensitivity analysis and experimental simulation were performed to determine the feasibility and measurement accuracy of simultaneously measuring the transverse and longitudinal thermal conductivities. The experimental system was set up, and its measurement accuracy was verified by measuring the thermal conductivity of a reference standard material. The thermal conductivities of the pork tenderloin and bovine muscles were measured using the traditional 1D and proposed methods, respectively, at different temperatures. Results indicate that the thermal conductivities of the bovine muscle are lower than those of the pork tenderloin muscle, whereas the bovine muscle was determined to exhibit stronger anisotropy than the pork tenderloin muscle. Moreover, the longitudinal thermal conductivity is larger than the transverse thermal conductivity for the two tissues and all thermal conductivities increase with the increase in temperature. Compared with the traditional 1D method, results obtained by the proposed method are slightly higher although the relative deviation is below 5 %.

  16. Estimation of Membrane Hydration Status for Standby Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems by Impedance Measurement: First Results on Stack Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bidoggia, Benoit; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    Fuel cells have started replacing traditional lead-acid battery banks in backup systems. Although these systems are characterized by long periods of standby, they must be able to start at any instant in the shortest time. In the case of low temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems......, a precise estimation of hydration status of the fuel cell during standby is important for a fast and safe startup. In this article, the measurement of the complex impedance of the fuel cell is suggested as a method to estimate the membrane hydration status. A 56-cell fuel cell stack has been symmetrically...... was applied, and the relationship between module of impedance and relative humidity was found. The results showed that measuring the impedance of a fuel cell during standby can be a viable way for estimating the hydration status of its membrane....

  17. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rack, Frank; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Trehu, Anne; Storms, Michael; Schroeder, Derryl

    2002-09-30

    The primary accomplishment of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter was the deployment of tools and measurement systems on ODP Leg 204 to study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon from July through September, 2002. During Leg 204, we cored and logged 9 sites on the Oregon continental margin to determine the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates in an accretionary ridge and adjacent slope basin, investigate the mechanisms that transport methane and other gases into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and obtain constraints on physical properties of hydrates in situ. A 3D seismic survey conducted in 2000 provided images of potential subsurface fluid conduits and indicated the position of the GHSZ throughout the survey region. After coring the first site, we acquired Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) data at all but one site to provide an overview of downhole physical properties. The LWD data confirmed the general position of key seismic stratigraphic horizons and yielded an initial estimate of hydrate concentration through the proxy of in situ electrical resistivity. These records proved to be of great value in planning subsequent coring. The second new hydrate proxy to be tested was infrared thermal imaging of cores on the catwalk as rapidly as possible after retrieval. The thermal images were used to identify hydrate samples and to map estimate the distribution and texture of hydrate within the cores. Geochemical analyses of interstitial waters and of headspace and void gases provide additional information on the distribution and concentration of hydrate within the stability zone, the origin and pathway of fluids into and through the GHSZ, and the rates at which the process of gas hydrate formation is occurring. Bio- and lithostratigraphic description of cores, measurement of physical properties, and in situ pressure core sampling and thermal measurements complement the data set, providing ground-truth tests of inferred

  18. Measurement of Thermal Properties of Biosourced Building Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Thomas; Colinart, Thibaut; Glouannec, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents both experimental and theoretical works concerning the evaluation of the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of hemp concrete. Experimental measurements of thermal properties are performed using a hot-strip technique for temperatures ranging from 3 to 30 and relative humidities ranging from 0 % to 95 %, thus creating a large database for this material. These experimental thermal conductivities are then compared with the results from the Krischer theoretical predictive model. The comparison shows good agreement, and a predictive analytical relation between the hemp concrete thermal conductivity, temperature, and relative humidity is determined.

  19. Standard test method for measuring waste glass or glass ceramic durability by vapor hydration test

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 The vapor hydration test method can be used to study the corrosion of a waste forms such as glasses and glass ceramics upon exposure to water vapor at elevated temperatures. In addition, the alteration phases that form can be used as indicators of those phases that may form under repository conditions. These tests; which allow altering of glass at high surface area to solution volume ratio; provide useful information regarding the alteration phases that are formed, the disposition of radioactive and hazardous components, and the alteration kinetics under the specific test conditions. This information may be used in performance assessment (McGrail et al, 2002 (1) for example). 1.2 This test method must be performed in accordance with all quality assurance requirements for acceptance of the data. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practice...

  20. Measuring temperature and ammonia hydrate ice on Charon in 2015 from Keck/OSIRIS spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Holler, Bryan J; Buie, Marc W; Grundy, William M; Lyke, James E; Young, Eliot F; Roe, Henry G

    2016-01-01

    In this work we investigated the longitudinal (zonal) variability of H$_2$O and ammonia (NH$_3$) hydrate ices on the surface of Charon through analysis of the 1.65 $\\mu$m and 2.21 $\\mu$m absorption features, respectively. Near-infrared spectra presented here were obtained between 2015-07-14 and 2015-08-30 UT with the OSIRIS integral field spectrograph on Keck I. Spectra centered on six different sub-observer longitudes were obtained through the Hbb (1.473-1.803 $\\mu$m) and Kbb (1.965-2.381 $\\mu$m) filters. Gaussian functions were fit to the aforementioned bands to obtain information on band center, band depth, full width at half maximum, and band area. The shift in the band center of the temperature-dependent 1.65 $\\mu$m feature was used to calculate the H$_2$O ice temperature. The mean temperature of the ice on the observable portion of Charon's surface is 45$\\pm$14 K and we report no statistically significant variations in temperature across the surface. We hypothesize that the crystalline and amorphous pha...

  1. Rapid thermal conductivity measurements for combinatorial thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Matthew G; Hill, Ian G

    2013-05-01

    A simple and inexpensive automated method for determining the thermal conductivity of a combinatorial library of thin films is demonstrated by measuring the thermal conductivity of a sputtered silicon dioxide film of varying thickness deposited on single crystal silicon. Using 3ω measurements, two methods for calculating the substrate thermal conductivity and two methods for determining the film thermal conductivity are demonstrated and compared. The substrate thermal conductivity was found to be 139 ± 3 W/m·K. Using the measured variation in film thickness, the film thermal conductivity was found to be 1.11 ± 0.05 W/m·K, in excellent agreement with published values for sputtered SiO2, demonstrating the accuracy of the method.

  2. Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity of Transparent Adhesives by Photoacoustic Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Yoshiaki; Minamide, Akiyuki; Nakada, Naotaka

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, we describe a method by which thermal diffusivity of transparent epoxy adhesive on a substrate can easily be measured from the frequency dependence of a photoacoustic (PA) signal. In order to eliminate the influence of the substrate, the phase difference between a PA signal of the adhesive on the substrate and a PA signal of only the substrate was measured. This method was tested for cases of thermally thin and thick graphite (high thermal conductivity) substrates and a polypropylene (low thermal conductivity) substrate. It has the advantage that the thermal diffusivity of a transparent adhesive on a substrate can be measured regardless of the thickness and the thermal properties of the substrate.

  3. Nanofluids Thermal Conductivity Measurement in a Bénard Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mojahed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal conductivity measurements of nanofluids were the subject of a considerable amount of published research works. Up to now, the experimental results reported in the current literature are still scarce and show many discrepancies. In this paper we propose measurements of this parameter using another experimental set-up. Because of very good thermal controls and big aspect ratio, the Bénard set-up is particularly well suited to determine the thermal conductivity. The aim of this paper is to detail the experimental measurement protocol. The investigated liquid is composed of single walled carbon nanotubes dispersed in water. The effect of liquid temperature on thermal conductivity was investigated. Obtained results confirm the potential of nanofluids in enhancing thermal conductivity and also show that the thermal conductivity temperature dependence is nonlinear, which is different from the results for metal/metal oxide nanofluids.

  4. The HD molecule in small and medium cages of clathrate hydrates: Quantum dynamics studied by neutron scattering measurements and computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colognesi, Daniele; Celli, Milva; Ulivi, Lorenzo, E-mail: lorenzo.ulivi@isc.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Powers, Anna; Xu, Minzhong [Department of Chemistry, New York University, New York, New York 10003 (United States); Bačić, Zlatko, E-mail: zlatko.bacic@nyu.edu [Department of Chemistry, New York University, New York, New York 10003 (United States); NYU-ECNU Center for Computational Chemistry at NYU Shanghai, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2014-10-07

    We report inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements on molecular hydrogen deuteride (HD) trapped in binary cubic (sII) and hexagonal (sH) clathrate hydrates, performed at low temperature using two different neutron spectrometers in order to probe both energy and momentum transfer. The INS spectra of binary clathrate samples exhibit a rich structure containing sharp bands arising from both the rotational transitions and the rattling modes of the guest molecule. For the clathrates with sII structure, there is a very good agreement with the rigorous fully quantum simulations which account for the subtle effects of the anisotropy, angular and radial, of the host cage on the HD microscopic dynamics. The sH clathrate sample presents a much greater challenge, due to the uncertainties regarding the crystal structure, which is known only for similar crystals with different promoter, but nor for HD (or H{sub 2}) plus methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE-d12)

  5. Hydration index--a better parameter for explaining small molecule hydration in inhibition of ice recrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Roger Y; Ferreira, Sandra S; Czechura, Pawel; Chaytor, Jennifer L; Ben, Robert N

    2008-12-24

    Several simple mono- and disaccharides have been assessed for their ability to inhibit ice recrystallization. Two carbohydrates were found to be effective recrystallization inhibitors. D-galactose (1) was the best monosaccharide and D-melibiose (5) was the most active disaccharide. The ability of each carbohydrate to inhibit ice growth was correlated to its respective hydration number reported in the literature. A hydration number reflects the number of tightly bound water molecules to the carbohydrate and is a function of carbohydrate stereochemistry. It was discovered that using the absolute hydration number of a carbohydrate does not allow one to accurately predict its ability to inhibit ice recrystallization. Consequently, we have defined a hydration index in which the hydration number is divided by the molar volume of the carbohydrate. This new parameter not only takes into account the number of water molecules tightly bound to a carbohydrate but also the size or volume of a particular solute and ultimately the concentration of hydrated water molecules. The hydration index of both mono- and disaccharides correlates well with experimentally measured RI activity. C-Linked derivatives of the monosaccharides appear to have RI activity comparable to that of their O-linked saccharides but a more thorough investigation is required. The relationship between carbohydrate concentration and RI activity was shown to be noncolligative and a 0.022 M solution of D-galactose (1) and C-linked galactose derivative (10) inhibited recrystallization as well as a 3% DMSO solution. The carbohydrates examined in this study did not possess any thermal hysteresis activity (selective depression of freezing point relative to melting point) or dynamic ice shaping. As such, we propose that they are inhibiting recrystallization at the interface between bulk water and the quasi liquid layer (a semiordered interface between ice and bulk water) by disrupting the preordering of water.

  6. Measuring the thermal diffusivity in a student laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes a method for measuring the thermal diffusivity of materials having a high thermal conductivity. The apparatus is rather simple and low-cost, being therefore suitable in a laboratory for undergraduate students of engineering schools, where several set-ups are often required. A recurrence numerical approach solves the thermal field in the specimen, which is depending on the thermal diffusivity of its material. The numerical method requires the temperature data from two different positions in the specimen, measured by two thermocouples connected to a temperature logger.

  7. Simplified Transient Hot-Wire Method for Effective Thermal Conductivity Measurement in Geo Materials: Microstructure and Saturation Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Merckx

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity measurement by a simplified transient hot-wire technique is applied to geomaterials in order to show the relationships which can exist between effective thermal conductivity, texture, and moisture of the materials. After a validation of the used “one hot-wire” technique in water, toluene, and glass-bead assemblages, the investigations were performed (1 in glass-bead assemblages of different diameters in dried, water, and acetone-saturated states in order to observe the role of grain sizes and saturation on the effective thermal conductivity, (2 in a compacted earth brick at different moisture states, and (3 in a lime-hemp concrete during 110 days following its manufacture. The lime-hemp concrete allows the measurements during the setting, desiccation and carbonation steps. The recorded Δ/ln( diagrams allow the calculation of one effective thermal conductivity in the continuous and homogeneous fluids and two effective thermal conductivities in the heterogeneous solids. The first one measured in the short time acquisitions (<1 s mainly depends on the contact between the wire and grains and thus microtexture and hydrated state of the material. The second one, measured for longer time acquisitions, characterizes the mean effective thermal conductivity of the material.

  8. 甲烷水合物导热机理的分子动力学模拟%Molecular dynamics simulation on the mechanisms of thermal conduction in methane hydrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万丽华; 梁德青; 吴能友; 关进安

    2012-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of methane hydrate is an important physical parameter serving in processes of methane hydrate exploration, mining, gas hydrate storage and transportation as well as other applications. In this paper, equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation and the Green-Kubo method for the systems of from fully occupied to vacant occupied si methane hydrate have been performed to estimate their thermal conductivity. The estimation was carried out at temperatures about 203.1-5263.15 K and at pressures around 3-100 MPa. Potential models selected for water were TIP4P, TIP4P-Ew, TIP4P/2005, TIP4P-FQ and TIP4P/lce. Effects of composition in the host and guest molecules and the outside thermobaric condition on the methane hydrate heat performance were studied. Results indicate that the thermal conduction of methane hydrate is determined by framework of cage which constitutes the hydrate lattices and, in reverse, framework of cage has slightly higher thermal conductivity after the presence of the guest molecules. Further, more guest molecules enclosed the cage improve on the poor thermal conduction of methane hydrate. It is also revealed that all sI hydrate has the similar heat performance with the effect of high temperature(T> TDDebye/3). Pressure has certain effect on the thermal conductivity, particularly under the higher pressure. As the pressure increases, it encounters slightly higher thermal conductivity. With the effects of temperatures and pressures, density shift has little impact on thermal conductivity from methane hydrate.%甲烷水合物导热系数是甲烷水合物勘探、开采、储运以及其他应用过程中一个十分重要的物理参数.我们采用平衡分子动力学(EMD)方法Green-Kubo理论计算温度203.15~263.15K、压力范围3~100MPa、晶穴占有率为0~1的sI甲烷水合物的导热系数,采用的水分子模型包括TIP4P、TIP4P-Ew、TIP4P-FQ、TIP4P/2005、TIP4P/Ice.研究了主客体分子、外界温压条件等

  9. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  10. High resolution steady-state measurements of thermal contact resistance across thermal interface material junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warzoha, Ronald J.; Donovan, Brian F.

    2017-09-01

    Thermal interface materials (TIMs) are meant to reduce the interfacial thermal resistance (RT) across bare metal contacts in commercial electronics packaging systems. However, there is little scientific consensus governing material design for optimized thermal performance. This is principally due to the inability to separate the effects of the intrinsic material thermal properties from the magnitude of heat flow crossing the TIM-substrate junction (RC). To date, efforts to isolate these effects using standard thermal interface material characterization techniques have not been successful. In this work, we develop an infrared thermography-based steady-state heat meter bar apparatus with a novel in situ thickness measurement system having 0.5 nm sensitivity. These in situ thickness measurements allow us to simultaneously determine RT and RC independently across current state-of-the-art TIMs with ±5% uncertainty. In this work, thermal pastes with bond line thicknesses ranging between 5 and 50 μ m are used to illustrate the capability of the apparatus to measure extremely thin materials that are expected to achieve relatively low values of RT. Results suggest that the contribution of the thermal contact resistance to the total thermal resistance can range from 5% to 80% for these materials. This finding highlights the need for appropriate metrology and independent measurements of RC and RT to better optimize thermal interface materials for a number of important electronics applications.

  11. A transient divided-bar method for simultaneous measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bording, Thue Sylvester; Nielsen, Søren Bom; Balling, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Accurate information on thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of materials is of central importance in relation to geoscience and engineering problems involving the transfer of heat. Within the geosciences, this applies to all aspects regarding the determination of terrestrial heat flow...... and volumetric heat capacity, and thereby also thermal diffusivity, are measured simultaneously. As the density of samples is easily determined independently, specific heat capacity may also be determined. Finite element formulation provides a flexible forward solution for heat transfer across the bar...... and subsurface temperature modelling. Several methods, including the classical divided-bar technique, are available for laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity, and much fewer for thermal diffusivity. We have generalized the divided-bar technique to the transient case, in which thermal conductivity...

  12. A transient divided-bar method for simultaneous measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bording, Thue Sylvester; Nielsen, Søren Bom; Balling, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Accurate information on thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of materials is of central importance in relation to geoscience and engineering problems involving the transfer of heat. Within the geosciences, this applies to all aspects regarding the determination of terrestrial heat flow...... and subsurface temperature modelling. Several methods, including the classical divided-bar technique, are available for laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity, and much fewer for thermal diffusivity. We have generalized the divided-bar technique to the transient case, in which thermal conductivity...... and volumetric heat capacity, and thereby also thermal diffusivity, are measured simultaneously. As the density of samples is easily determined independently, specific heat capacity may also be determined. Finite element formulation provides a flexible forward solution for heat transfer across the bar...

  13. Constraining gas hydrate occurrence in the northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope : fine scale analysis of grain-size in hydrate-bearing sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hangsterfer, A.; Driscoll, N.; Kastner, M. [Scripps Inst. of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States). Geosciences Research Division

    2008-07-01

    Methane hydrates can form within the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) in sea beds. The Gulf of Mexico (GOM) contains an underlying petroleum system and deeply buried, yet dynamic salt deposits. Salt tectonics and fluid expulsion upward through the sediment column result in the formation of fractures, through which high salinity brines migrate into the GHSZ, destabilizing gas hydrates. Thermogenic and biogenic hydrocarbons also migrate to the seafloor along the GOMs northern slope, originating from the thermal and biogenic degradation of organic matter. Gas hydrate occurrence can be controlled by either primary permeability, forming in coarse-grained sediment layers, or by secondary permeability, forming in areas where hydrofracture and faulting generate conduits through which hydrocarbon-saturated fluids flow. This paper presented a study that attempted to determine the relationship between grain-size, permeability, and gas hydrate distribution. Grain-size analyses were performed on cores taken from Keathley Canyon and Atwater Valley in the GOM, on sections of cores that both contained and lacked gas hydrate. Using thermal anomalies as proxies for the occurrence of methane hydrate within the cores, samples of sediment were taken and the grain-size distributions were measured to see if there was a correlation between gas hydrate distribution and grain-size. The paper described the methods, including determination of hydrate occurrence and core analysis. It was concluded that gas hydrate occurrence in Keathley Canyon and Atwater Valley was constrained by secondary permeability and was structurally controlled by hydrofractures and faulting that acted as conduits through which methane-rich fluids flowed. 11 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  14. 天然气水合物生成焓的测定%Measurement of the Molar Enthalpies of Formation of Natural Gas Hydrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高军; Kenneth N.Marsh

    2003-01-01

    实验测定了在压力2 000 kPa和6 700 kPa条件下,含有甲烷、乙烷、丙烷和异丁烷等典型组成的天然气其水合物的生成焓.实验所用水合物是在微分扫描量热仪里直接生成,且在指定的压力下进行恒压温度扫描,同时测定水合物中的水气比和生成焓.其误差小于1.5%.实验结果表明,在不同的实验压力条件下,水合物的生成焓与水气比变化较小.%This paper reports the measurement of the molar enthalpies of natural gas hydrates for typical natural gas mixtures containing methane, ethane, propane and iso-butaneat pressures in the vicinity of 2 000 kPa and 6 700 kPa, in a multicell differential scanningcalorimeter using modified high pressure cells. The natural gas hydrate was formed by cycling the solution in the vicinity of the ice point. The mass of hydrate formed was calculatedfrom the measurement of the enthalpy of fusion of water after the hydrate was formed andafter the hydrate was dissociated. The enthalpy of fusion of water and the enthalpy of gashydrate dissociation were determined from the calorimeter response during a slow temperature scan at a constant pressure. The amount of gas released from the dissociation of the by-drate was determined from the volume change of the high pressure pump required to maintainthe constant pressure, and the amount of the hydrate formed was determined from the mea-surement of the enthalpies of fusion of water before and after the dissociation of the hydrate.The occupation number (the ratio of the water to gas) and the enthalpy of the hydrate formation have an uncertainty of 1.5 %. The results show that the enthalpies of the hydrateformation and the occupation number are essentially independent of pressure.

  15. A PC- Based Transient Method for Thermal Conductivity Measurement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Singh

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an indigenously developed thermal probe has been interfaced with a PC for automated measurement of thermal conductivity (K . The developed system has been calibrated and standardised by measuring K of glycerol. The maximum percentage error, for repeated sets of observations, was within 7.29 per cent of standard value reported for glycerol. This methodology has been successfully employed for measuring K of propellant oxidisers, additives, binders, etc.

  16. Tetrahydrofuran hydrate decomposition characteristics in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongchen; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Shenglong; Zhao, Jiafei; Yang, Mingjun

    2016-12-01

    Many tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate properties are similar to those of gas hydrates. In the present work THF hydrate dissociation in four types of porous media is studied. THF solution was cooled to 275.15 K with formation of the hydrate under ambient pressure, and then it dissociated under ambient conditions. THF hydrate dissociation experiments in each porous medium were conducted three times. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to obtain images. Decomposition time, THF hydrate saturation and MRI mean intensity (MI) were measured and analyzed. The experimental results showed that the hydrate decomposition time in BZ-4 and BZ-3 was similar and longer than that in BZ-02. In each dissociation process, the hydrate decomposition time of the second and third cycles was shorter than that of the first cycle in BZ-4, BZ-3, and BZ-02. The relationship between THF hydrate saturation and time is almost linear.

  17. Method for measuring thermal properties using a long-wavelength infrared thermal image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Charles L.; Costin, Laurence S.; Smith, Jody L.; Moya, Mary M.; Mercier, Jeffrey A.

    2007-01-30

    A method for estimating the thermal properties of surface materials using long-wavelength thermal imagery by exploiting the differential heating histories of ground points in the vicinity of shadows. The use of differential heating histories of different ground points of the same surface material allows the use of a single image acquisition step to provide the necessary variation in measured parameters for calculation of the thermal properties of surface materials.

  18. Crystal structure, optical and thermal studies of a new organic nonlinear optical material: L-Histidinium maleate 1.5-hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsago, C. Alosious [Department of Physics, A. J. College of Engineering, Chennai 603103 (India); Albert, Helen Merina [Department of Physics, Sathyabama University, Chennai 600119 (India); Karthikeyan, J. [Department of Chemistry, Sathyabama University, Chennai 600119 (India); Sagayaraj, P. [Department of Physics, Loyola College, Chennai 600034 (India); Pragasam, A. Joseph Arul, E-mail: drjosephsu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Sathyabama University, Chennai 600119 (India)

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: ► L-Histidinium maleate 1.5-hydrate, a new organic crystal has been grown for the first time. ► The crystal structure is reported for the first time (CCDC 845975). ► The crystal belongs to monoclinic system with space group P2{sub 1}, Z = 4, a = 11.4656(7) Å, b = 8.0530(5) Å, c = 14.9705(9) Å and β = 101.657(2)°. ► The optical absorption study substantiates the complete transparency of the crystal. ► Kurtz powder SHG test confirms the nonlinear property of the crystal. -- Abstract: A new organic nonlinear optical material L-histidinium maleate 1.5-hydrate (LHM) with the molecular formula C{sub 10}H{sub 16}N{sub 3}O{sub 7.5} has been successfully synthesized from aqueous solution by slow solvent evaporation method. The structural characterization of the grown crystal was carried out by single crystal X-ray diffraction at 293(2) K. In the crystal, molecules are linked through inter and intramolecular N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, generate edge fused ring motif. The hydrogen bonded motifs are linked to each other to form a three dimensional network. The FT-IR spectroscopy was used to identify the functional groups of the synthesized compound. The optical behavior of the grown crystal was examined by UV–visible spectral analysis, which shows that the optical absorption is almost negligible in the wavelength range 280–1300 nm. The nonlinear optical property was confirmed by the powder technique of Kurtz and Perry. The thermal behavior of the grown crystal was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis.

  19. Thermal properties and structural characterizations of new types of phase change material: Anhydrous and hydrated palmitic acid/camphene solid dispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tu, E-mail: tulee@cc.ncu.edu.tw; Chiu, Yu Hsiu; Lee, Yun; Lee, Hung Lin

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: • Solid dispersion is implemented on phase change materials. • Water is added as a tertiary component. • Specific heat of solid is increased by partially amorphous camphene. • Microstructures are characterized by LTDSC, PXRD and SAXS. • Thermal properties are linked to microstructures. - Abstract: Two new types of phase change material anhydrous and hydrated palmitic acid/camphene solid dispersions (PA1CA1) are prepared and characterized by low-temperature differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering and temperature–history method. Their microstructures contain nanometer-sized palmitic acid (PA) crystallites with lamellar periodicity dispersed in a partially amorphous plastic crystalline camphene (CA) matrix. The PA phase apparently possesses a relatively high latent heat value inherited from the pristine crystalline PA of 229.7 ± 0.1 kJ kg{sup −1}. The relatively high specific heat of solid, C{sub ps}, for anhydrous PA1CA1 of 2.17 ± 0.06 kJ kg{sup −1} K{sup −1} is originated from the presence of disordered CA matrix. Hydration of PA1CA1 can further increase the C{sub ps} to 2.61 ± 0.01 kJ kg{sup −1} K{sup −1}. The mixing of partially amorphous CA, some PA and the small amount of water may have turned the matrix into more disorder due to their different bonding natures, molecular weights, and various molecular shapes and sizes.

  20. Direct Measurement of Thermal Fluctuation of High-Q Pendulum

    CERN Document Server

    Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Ohashi, Masatake; Kawamura, Seiji; Miyoki, Shinji; Miyakawa, Osamu; Telada, Souichi; Kuroda, Kazuaki

    2009-01-01

    We achieved for the first time a direct measurement of the thermal fluctuation of a pendulum in an off-resonant region using a laser interferometric gravitational wave detector. These measurements have been well identified for over one decade by an agreement with a theoretical prediction, which was derived by a fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Thermal fluctuation is dominated by the contribution of resistances in coil-magnet actuator circuits. When we tuned these resistances, the noise spectrum also changed according to a theoretical prediction. The measured thermal noise level corresponds to a high quality factor on the order of 10^5 of the pendulum.

  1. Measuring Thermal Diffusivity Of A High-Tc Superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Charles E.; Oh, Gloria; Leidecker, Henning

    1992-01-01

    Technique for measuring thermal diffusivity of superconductor of high critical temperature based on Angstrom's temperature-wave method. Peltier junction generates temperature oscillations, which propagate with attenuation up specimen. Thermal diffusivity of specimen calculated from distance between thermocouples and amplitudes and phases of oscillatory components of thermocouple readings.

  2. Analysis on thermal measuring of green roof

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐鸣放; 蒋琳

    2009-01-01

    Comparison of thermal performance between a green roof room and a bare roof room was presented during the cooling period in Shanghai. The results show that the electricity can be saved about 0.08 kW·h/(d·m2),and the heat flux can be reduced by about 70%; the inner surface temperature variation is about 1.0 ℃ comparing with the indoor temperature when using the green roof,and the extra equivalent heat resistance is 1.0 m2·K/W.

  3. Measurement of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity using a thermoelectric module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Pitarch, Braulio; Márquez-García, Lourdes; Min, Gao; García-Cañadas, Jorge

    2017-04-01

    A proof of concept of using a thermoelectric module to measure both thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of bulk disc samples at room temperature is demonstrated. The method involves the calculation of the integral area from an impedance spectrum, which empirically correlates with the thermal properties of the sample through an exponential relationship. This relationship was obtained employing different reference materials. The impedance spectroscopy measurements are performed in a very simple setup, comprising a thermoelectric module, which is soldered at its bottom side to a Cu block (heat sink) and thermally connected with the sample at its top side employing thermal grease. Random and systematic errors of the method were calculated for the thermal conductivity (18.6% and 10.9%, respectively) and thermal diffusivity (14.2% and 14.7%, respectively) employing a BCR724 standard reference material. Although errors are somewhat high, the technique could be useful for screening purposes or high-throughput measurements at its current state. This new method establishes a new application for thermoelectric modules as thermal properties sensors. It involves the use of a very simple setup in conjunction with a frequency response analyzer, which provides a low cost alternative to most of currently available apparatus in the market. In addition, impedance analyzers are reliable and widely spread equipment, which facilities the sometimes difficult access to thermal conductivity facilities.

  4. System to Measure Thermal Conductivity and Seebeck Coefficient for Thermoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Skuza, Jonathan R.; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Choi, Sang H.; Nagavalli, Anita

    2012-01-01

    The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at elevated temperatures. This has led to the implementation of nonstandardized practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. The major objective of the procedure described is for the simultaneous measurement of the Seebeck coefficient and thermal diffusivity within a given temperature range. These thermoelectric measurements must be precise, accurate, and reproducible to ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data. The custom-built thermal characterization system described in this NASA-TM is specifically designed to measure the inplane thermal diffusivity, and the Seebeck coefficient for materials in the ranging from 73 K through 373 K.

  5. Short hot wire technique for measuring thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of various materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huaqing; Gu, Hua; Fujii, Motoo; Zhang, Xing

    2006-01-01

    A transient short hot wire technique (SHWT) is developed for simultaneous determination of the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of various materials such as liquids, gases or powders. A metal wire with (or without) insulation coating serves both as a heating unit and as an electrical resistance thermometer and the wire is calibrated using water and toluene with known thermophysical properties. This SHWT includes correlation of the experimental data with numerically simulated values based on a two-dimensional heat-conduction model. For the measurements with proportional relation between temperature rise and logarithmic heating time interval, the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity are obtained from the slope and the intercept of the measured temperature rise and those of calculated non-dimensional temperature rise by including the heat flux and the properties of the wire. For the measurements with nonlinear relation between temperature rise and logarithmic heating time interval, the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity are extracted from a curve fitting method by using the downhill simplex method to match the experimental data and the numerical values. This technique is applied here using air as a testing sample. The effect of natural convection is investigated and the accuracy of this measurement is estimated to be 2% for thermal conductivity and 7% for thermal diffusivity.

  6. Anomalous preservation of pure methane hydrate at 1 atm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    Direct measurement of decomposition rates of pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate reveals a thermal regime where methane hydrate metastably `preserves' in bulk by as much as 75 K above its nominal equilibrium temperature (193 K at 1 atm). Rapid release of the sample pore pressure at isothermal conditions between 242 and 271 K preserves up to 93% of the hydrate for at least 24 h, reflecting the greatly suppressed rates of dissociation that characterize this regime. Subsequent warming through the H2O ice point then induces rapid and complete dissociation, allowing controlled recovery of the total expected gas yield. This behavior is in marked contrast to that exhibited by methane hydrate at both colder (193-240 K) and warmer (272-290 K) test conditions, where dissociation rates increase monotonically with increasing temperature. Anomalous preservation has potential application for successful retrieval of natural gas hydrate or hydrate-bearing sediments from remote settings, as well as for temporary low-pressure transport and storage of natural gas.

  7. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    and the role it plays in the global climate and the future of fuels. Russia, Japan, Nigeria, Peru, Chile, Pakistan, Indonesia, Korea, etc are various countries who are perusing the gas hydrates studies as a future resource for fuel. Indian Initiative..., 1993, Free gas at the base of the gas hydrate zone in the vicinity of the Chile Triple junction: Geology, v. 21, pp. 905-908. Borowski, W.S., C.K. Paull, and U. William, III, 1999, Global and local variations of interstitial sulfate gradients...

  8. Measurement and model on thermal properties of sintered diamond composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussa, Tala, E-mail: Tala.moussa@univ-nantes.fr [Laboratoire de Thermocinetique UMR CNRS 6607, Polytech, Universite de nantes, BP 50609, rue Christian Pauc, 44306 Nantes (France); Garnier, Bertrand; Peerhossaini, Hassan [Laboratoire de Thermocinetique UMR CNRS 6607, Polytech, Universite de nantes, BP 50609, rue Christian Pauc, 44306 Nantes (France)

    2013-02-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal properties of sintered diamond used for grinding is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Flash method with infrared temperature measurement is used to investigate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal conductivity increases with the amount of diamond. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is very sensitive to binder conductivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results agree with models assuming imperfect contact between matrix and particles. - Abstract: A prelude to the thermal management of grinding processes is measurement of the thermal properties of working materials. Indeed, tool materials must be chosen not only for their mechanical properties (abrasion performance, lifetime Horizontal-Ellipsis ) but also for thermal concerns (thermal conductivity) for efficient cooling that avoids excessive temperatures in the tool and workpiece. Sintered diamond is currently used for grinding tools since it yields higher performances and longer lifetimes than conventional materials (mineral or silicon carbide abrasives), but its thermal properties are not yet well known. Here the thermal conductivity, heat capacity and density of sintered diamond are measured as functions of the diamond content in composites and for two types of metallic binders: hard tungsten-based and soft cobalt-based binders. The measurement technique for thermal conductivity is derived from the flash method. After pulse heating, the temperature of the rear of the sample is measured with a noncontact method (infrared camera). A parameter estimation method associated with a three-layer nonstationary thermal model is used to obtain sample thermal conductivity, heat transfer coefficient and absorbed energy. With the hard metallic binder, the thermal conductivity of sintered diamond increased by up to 64% for a diamond content increasing from 0 to 25%. The increase is much less for the soft binder: 35% for diamond volumes up to 25%. In addition, experimental data

  9. Single-beam thermal lens measurement of thermal diffusivity of engine coolants

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Nibu A.; Thomas, Nibu B.; Chacko, Kavya; T, Neethu V.; Hussain Moidu, Haroon; Piyush, K.; David, Nitheesh M.

    2015-04-01

    Automobile engine coolant liquids are commonly used for efficient heat transfer from the engine to the surroundings. In this work we have investigated the thermal diffusivity of various commonly available engine coolants in Indian automobile market. We have used single beam laser induced thermal lens technique for the measurements. Engine coolants are generally available in concentrated solution form and are recommended to use at specified dilution. We have investigated the samples in the entire recommended concentration range for the use in radiators. While some of the brands show an enhanced thermal diffusivity compared to pure water, others show slight decrease in thermal diffusivity.

  10. Thermal Conductivity Based on Modified Laser Flash Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bochuan; Ban, Heng; Li, Chao; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2005-01-01

    The laser flash method is a standard method for thermal diffusivity measurement. It employs single-pulse heating of one side of a thin specimen and measures the temperature response of the other side. The thermal diffusivity of the specimen can be obtained based on a one-dimensional transient heat transfer analysis. This paper reports the development of a theory that includes a transparent reference layer with known thermal property attached to the back of sample. With the inclusion of heat conduction from the sample to the reference layer in the theoretical analysis, the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of sample can be extracted from the temperature response data. Furthermore, a procedure is established to select two points from the data to calculate these properties. The uncertainty analysis indicates that this method can be used with acceptable levels of uncertainty.

  11. Preparation, characterization, and thermal properties of the microencapsulation of a hydrated salt as phase change energy storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jin, E-mail: huangjiner@126.com [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, 510006 Guangzhou (China); Wang, Tingyu; Zhu, Panpan; Xiao, Junbin [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, 510006 Guangzhou (China)

    2013-04-10

    Highlights: ► Phase change point and fusion heat of samples are about 51 °Cand 150 J/g respectively. ► DSC results indicated the core material is not Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}·12H{sub 2}O but Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}·7H{sub 2}O. ► Encapsulation takes a significant role in reducing subcooling degree. - Abstract: Microcapsules loaded by disodium hydrogen phosphate heptahydrate (Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}·7H{sub 2}O) were prepared by means of the suspension copolymerization-solvent volatile method, with modified polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) as coating polymer under the conditions of various organic solvents. The formation of the microencapsulated phase change materials (MEPCMs)-PMMA/Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}·7H{sub 2}O was investigated and analyzed. The morphology of the resultant materials was characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and phase contrast microscope. Its final composition was confirmed by the Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR). Thermo gravimetric analyzer (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were adopted to reveal its thermal stability and thermal properties. Results indicated that the materials owned improved subcooling degree and good thermal properties, enabling the materials to be one promising phase change materials for thermal energy storage.

  12. Handbook of gas hydrate properties and occurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuustraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.

    1983-12-01

    This handbook provides data on the resource potential of naturally occurring hydrates, the properties that are needed to evaluate their recovery, and their production potential. The first two chapters give data on the naturally occurring hydrate potential by reviewing published resource estimates and the known and inferred occurrences. The third and fourth chapters review the physical and thermodynamic properties of hydrates, respectively. The thermodynamic properties of hydrates that are discussed include dissociation energies and a simplified method to calculate them; phase diagrams for simple and multi-component gases; the thermal conductivity; and the kinetics of hydrate dissociation. The final chapter evaluates the net energy balance of recovering hydrates and shows that a substantial positive energy balance can theoretically be achieved. The Appendices of the Handbook summarize physical and thermodynamic properties of gases, liquids and solids that can be used in designing and evaluating recovery processes of hydrates. 158 references, 67 figures, 47 tables.

  13. Comparison of Thermal Properties Measured by Different Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, Jan [Geo Innova AB, Linkoeping (Sweden); Kukkonen, Ilmo [Geological Survey of Finland, Helsinki (Finland); Haelldahl, Lars [Hot Disk AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2003-04-01

    A strategy for a thermal site descriptive model of bedrock is under development at SKB. In the model different kinds of uncertainties exist. Some of these uncertainties are related to the potential errors in the methods used for determining thermal properties of rock. In two earlier investigations thermal properties of rock samples were analysed according to the TPS method (transient plane source). Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity were determined using the TPS method. For a comparison, the same samples have been measured at the Geological Survey of Finland (GSF), using different laboratory methods. In this later investigation, the thermal conductivity was determined using the divided-bar method and the specific heat capacity using a calorimetric method. The mean differences between the results of different methods are relatively low but the results of individual samples show large variations. The thermal conductivity measured by the divided bar method gives for most samples slightly higher values, in average about 3%, than the TPS method. The specific heat capacity measured by the calorimetric method gives lower values, in average about 2%, than the TPS method. Consequently, the thermal diffusivity calculated from thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity gives higher values, in average about 6%, than the TPS method. Reasons for the differences are estimated mainly to be dependent on differences between the samples, errors in the temperature dependence of specific heat and in the transformation from volumetric to specific heat. The TPS measurements are performed using two pieces (sub-samples) of rock. Only one of these two sub-samples was measured using the divided bar method and the calorimetric method. Further, sample preparation involved changes in the size of some of the samples. The mean differences between the results of different methods are within the margins of error reported by the measuring laboratories. However, systematic errors in

  14. Measurement of temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity of alumina and titania thermal oil nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cieśliński Janusz T.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study the results of simultaneous measurements of dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and pH of two nanofluids, i.e., thermal oil/Al2O3 and thermal oil/TiO2 are presented. Thermal oil is selected as a base liquid because of possible application in ORC systems as an intermediate heating agent. Nanoparticles were tested at the concentration of 0.1%, 1%, and 5% by weight within temperature range from 20 °C to 60 °C. Measurement devices were carefully calibrated by comparison obtained results for pure base liquid (thermal oil with manufacturer’s data. The results obtained for tested nanofluids were compared with predictions made by use of existing models for liquid/solid particles mixtures.

  15. Measurement of temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity of alumina and titania thermal oil nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieśliński, Janusz T.; Ronewicz, Katarzyna; Smoleń, Sławomir

    2015-12-01

    In this study the results of simultaneous measurements of dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and pH of two nanofluids, i.e., thermal oil/Al2O3 and thermal oil/TiO2 are presented. Thermal oil is selected as a base liquid because of possible application in ORC systems as an intermediate heating agent. Nanoparticles were tested at the concentration of 0.1%, 1%, and 5% by weight within temperature range from 20 °C to 60 °C. Measurement devices were carefully calibrated by comparison obtained results for pure base liquid (thermal oil) with manufacturer's data. The results obtained for tested nanofluids were compared with predictions made by use of existing models for liquid/solid particles mixtures.

  16. A transient divided-bar method for simultaneous measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bording, Thue S.; Nielsen, Søren B.; Balling, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Accurate information on thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of materials is of central importance in relation to geoscience and engineering problems involving the transfer of heat. Within the geosciences, this applies to all aspects regarding the determination of terrestrial heat flow and subsurface temperature modelling. Several methods, including the classical divided-bar technique, are available for laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity, and much fewer for thermal diffusivity. We have generalized the divided-bar technique to the transient case, in which thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity, and thereby also thermal diffusivity, are measured simultaneously. As the density of samples is easily determined independently, specific heat capacity may also be determined. Finite element formulation provides a flexible forward solution for heat transfer across the bar and thermal properties are estimated by inverse Monte Carlo modelling. This methodology enables a proper quantification of experimental uncertainties on measured thermal properties. The developed methodology was applied to laboratory measurements of various materials, including a standard ceramic material and different rock samples, and measuring results were compared with results applying traditional steady-state divided-bar and an independent line-source method. All measurements show highly consistent results and with excellent reproducibility and high accuracy. For conductivity, uncertainty is typically 1-3 %, and for diffusivity uncertainty may be reduced to about 3-5 %. The main uncertainty originates from the presence of thermal contact resistance associated with the internal interfaces of the bar. They are not resolved during inversion, and it is highly important that they are minimized by careful sample preparation.

  17. Ultrasonic measurement of viscoelastic shear modulus development in hydrating cement paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojun; Subramaniam, Kolluru V; Lin, Fengbao

    2010-06-01

    A test procedure for measuring changes in amplitude and phase of SH ultrasonic waves from the interface between fused-quartz and cement paste samples is presented. The phase change is determined from the temporal shift in the reflected signal relative to the incident signal. The sensitivity of the measured parameters to changes in acoustic impedance of the materials in contact with fused-quartz is evaluated for different angles of incidence. It is shown that a reflection measurement at normal incidence at nano-second temporal resolution does not provide sufficient sensitivity to measure the viscous component of shear modulus of low viscosity fluids and cannot be applied to cement paste while it is in a fluid state. Monitoring the measured amplitude and phase at oblique angle of incidence allows for measuring fluids with acoustic impedance comparable to cement paste. The reflection measurements are used to determine the evolution of elastic and viscous components of shear modulus cement paste with time. Influence of sampling rate and temperature effects on the phase measurements are evaluated and shown to be significant. It is shown that the initial loss of workability of cement paste through setting process is associated with a larger relative increase in the viscous component of shear modulus. Following the initial rapid rise of the viscous component of shear modulus, there is a larger relative increase in the elastic component, which can be related to the emergence of a solid structure capable of retaining an imprint.

  18. Cryogenic Thermal Conductivity Measurements on Candidate Materials for Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, JIm; Canavan, Ed; Jahromi, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Spacecraft and instruments on space missions are built using a wide variety of carefully-chosen materials. In addition to having mechanical properties appropriate for surviving the launch environment, these materials generally must have thermal conductivity values which meet specific requirements in their operating temperature ranges. Space missions commonly propose to include materials for which the thermal conductivity is not well known at cryogenic temperatures. We developed a test facility in 2004 at NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center to measure material thermal conductivity at temperatures between 4 and 300 Kelvin, and we have characterized many candidate materials since then. The measurement technique is not extremely complex, but proper care to details of the setup, data acquisition and data reduction is necessary for high precision and accuracy. We describe the thermal conductivity measurement process and present results for several materials.

  19. Thermal conductivity measurements at cryogenic temperatures at LASA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broggi, F.; Pedrini, D.; Rossi, L. [INFN, Milan (Italy)]|[Laboratorio LASA, Segrate, Milan (Italy)

    1995-08-01

    Here the improvement realised to have better control of the reference junction temperature and measurements carried out on Nb{sub 3}Sn cut out from 2 different coils (named LASA3 and LASA5), showing the difference between the longitudinal and the transverse thermal conductivity, is described. Two different methods of data analysis are presented, the DAM (derivative approximated method) and the TCI (thermal conductivity integral). The data analysis for the tungsten and the LASA5 coil has been done according to the two methods showing that the TCI method with polynomial functions is not adequate to describe the thermal conductivity. Only a polynomial fit based on the TCI method but limited at a lower order than the nominal, when the data are well distributed along the range of measurements, can describe reasonably the thermal conductivity dependence with the temperature. Finally the measurements on a rod of BSCCO 2212 high T{sub c} superconductor are presented.

  20. The effect of hydrate saturation on water retention curves in hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabadi, Nariman; Zheng, Xianglei; Jang, Jaewon

    2016-05-01

    The experimental measurement of water retention curve in hydrate-bearing sediments is critically important to understand the behavior of hydrate dissociation and gas production. In this study, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is selected as hydrate former. The pore habit of THF hydrates is investigated by visual observation in a transparent micromodel. It is confirmed that THF hydrates are not wetting phase on the quartz surface of the micromodel and occupy either an entire pore or part of pore space resulting in change in pore size distribution. And the measurement of water retention curves in THF hydrate-bearing sediments with hydrate saturation ranging from Sh = 0 to Sh = 0.7 is conducted for excess water condition. The experimental results show that the gas entry pressure and the capillary pressure increase with increasing hydrate saturation. Based on the experimental results, fitting parameters for van Genuchten equation are suggested for different hydrate saturation conditions.

  1. In-Pile Thermal Conductivity Measurement Method for Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joy L. Rempe; Brandon Fox; Heng Ban; Joshua E. Daw; Darrell L. Knudson; Keith G. Condie

    2009-08-01

    Thermophysical properties of advanced nuclear fuels and materials during irradiation must be known prior to their use in existing, advanced, or next generation reactors. Thermal conductivity is one of the most important properties for predicting fuel and material performance. A joint Utah State University (USU) / Idaho National Laboratory (INL) project, which is being conducted with assistance from the Institute for Energy Technology at the Norway Halden Reactor Project, is investigating in-pile fuel thermal conductivity measurement methods. This paper focuses on one of these methods – a multiple thermocouple method. This two-thermocouple method uses a surrogate fuel rod with Joule heating to simulate volumetric heat generation to gain insights about in-pile detection of thermal conductivity. Preliminary results indicated that this method can measure thermal conductivity over a specific temperature range. This paper reports the thermal conductivity values obtained by this technique and compares these values with thermal property data obtained from standard thermal property measurement techniques available at INL’s High Test Temperature Laboratory. Experimental results and material properties data are also compared to finite element analysis results.

  2. Thermal Measurements of Resonant Ultrasonic Surgical Horn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manandhar, Prakash; Gupta, Saurav V.; Kosenko, Igor V.; Cotter, Daniel J.

    Temperatures at the distal end of the tip in ultrasonic surgical instruments are of interest because this is the applied part to a patient. It is difficult to directly measure these temperatures using contacting temperature sensors due to high vibration levels. Non-contact infrared (IR) thermography could be an important tool to experimentally determine the tip temperature. However, the low emissivity and polished cylindrical geometry of the tips complicate accurate IR thermography. In this study, we use Cr2O3 high emissivity paint to coat the tip for increased accuracy in IR measurements. Temperature measurements are consistent with heat generation models based on mechanical quality factor of about 5000 for the titanium tip material. It was found that no heat is generated at the tip distal end where strain is low. Air cooling by aspiration is effective at keeping tip distal end temperatures at near ambient levels even with heat transfer by conduction from warmer parts of the tip.

  3. Analytical estimation of skeleton thermal conductivity of a geopolymer foam from thermal conductivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henon, J.; Alzina, A.; Absi, J.; Smith, D. S.; Rossignol, S.

    2015-07-01

    The geopolymers are alumino-silicate binders. The addition of a high pores volume fraction, gives them a thermal insulation character desired in the building industry. In this work, potassium geopolymer foams were prepared at room temperature (< 70 ∘C) by a process of in situ gas release. The porosity distribution shows a multiscale character. However, the thermal conductivity measurements gave values from 0.35 to 0.12 Wm-1.K-1 for a pore volume fraction values between 65 and 85%. In the aim to predict the thermal properties of these foams and focus on the relationship "thermal-conductivity/microstructure", knowledge of the thermal conductivity of their solid skeleton (λ s ) is paramount. However, there is rare work on the determination of this value depending on the initial composition. By the formulation used, the foaming agent contributes to the final network, and it is not possible to obtain a dense material designate to make a direct measurement of λ s . The objective of this work is to use inverse analytical methods to identify the value of λ s . Measurements of thermal conductivity by the fluxmetre technique were performed. The obtained value of the solid skeleton thermal conductivity by the inverse numerical technique is situated in a framework between 0.95 and 1.35 Wm-1.K-1 and is in agreement with one issue from the literature.

  4. Temperature-Dependent Electrical Conductivity Measurements on Hydrated and Alkali-metal Intercalated Zeolite LTA and FAU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumoto, Kenji; Suzuki, Yoshinori; Wada, Noboru

    2007-03-01

    Zeolite LTA and FAU films were made from zeolite powders using a hydrothermal method. Electrical conductivity measurement were performed on the zeolite films in temperature range between 180 K and 430 K, using an LCR meter with the sweeping frequency varied from 20 to 1 MHz and drawing the Cole-Cole plots. The resistivities of both hydrated LTA and FAU zeolites increased with increasing the sample temperature from RT to 430 K, which might be caused by loss of water molecules from the pores of zeolite crystals. Also, the resistivities increased with decreasing the sample temperature from RT to 180 K, probably caused by freezing of water molecules in the zeolite. When the dehydrated zeolite samples were intercalated with alkali metals (Rb and K), the resistivities of the samples did not vary much at RT. However, the resistivities of the intercalated zeolite films decreased drastically by four orders of magnitude when the sample temperature was varied from RT to 180 K. We speculate that the dynamics of alkali atoms in the zeolite pores (electron-phonon scattering) may be responsible for the drastic change in the electrical conductivity.

  5. Dynamic Measurements of the Thermal Conductivity of Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezjak, Mladen; Zvizdić, Davor

    2011-08-01

    Measurements of the thermal conductivity of insulators that are commonly used in civil engineering are as a rule performed using Pönsgen's guarded hot-plate method under steady-state conditions. Achieving these steady-state conditions is a time consuming and relatively expensive procedure. Therefore, the application of a method that is less time consuming and less costly to common building insulating materials is of interest. The method should also have the accuracy and repeatability comparable to that of presently used methods. One such method is the transient hot-wire method (predominantly used for liquids, non-Newtonian fluids, plastics, semi-plastics, and similar materials), a dynamic method that uses a very thin pure platinum wire that functions as a thermal source in combination with a temperature sensor that detects temperature transients. This article describes the application of the transient hot-wire method to most commonly used building thermal insulating materials. The transient hot-wire measurements of the thermal conductivity were performed on many building material samples. For the sake of comparison, the thermal conductivity of samples made from the same materials was also tested using the stationary Pönsgen's guarded hot-plate method. This article describes the comparison and evaluation of the measurement results obtained from both methods as well as the estimation of pertinent measurement uncertainties. The results are presented in graphical and numerical form in tables and diagrams for each type of thermal insulator.

  6. Physical property changes in hydrate-bearingsediment due to depressurization and subsequent repressurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, Timothy; Waite, W.F.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2008-06-01

    Physical property measurements of sediment cores containing natural gas hydrate are typically performed on material exposed at least briefly to non-in situ conditions during recovery. To examine effects of a brief excursion from the gas-hydrate stability field, as can occur when pressure cores are transferred to pressurized storage vessels, we measured physical properties on laboratory-formed sand packs containing methane hydrate and methane pore gas. After depressurizing samples to atmospheric pressure, we repressurized them into the methane-hydrate stability field and remeasured their physical properties. Thermal conductivity, shear strength, acoustic compressional and shear wave amplitudes and speeds are compared between the original and depressurized/repressurized samples. X-ray computed tomography (CT) images track how the gas-hydrate distribution changes in the hydrate-cemented sands due to the depressurization/repressurization process. Because depressurization-induced property changes can be substantial and are not easily predicted, particularly in water-saturated, hydrate-bearing sediment, maintaining pressure and temperature conditions throughout the core recovery and measurement process is critical for using laboratory measurements to estimate in situ properties.

  7. Physical property changes in hydrate-bearing sediment due to depressurization and subsequent repressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    Physical property measurements of sediment cores containing natural gas hydrate are typically performed on material exposed, at least briefly, to non-in situ conditions during recovery. To examine the effects of a brief excursion from the gas-hydrate stability field, as can occur when pressure cores are transferred to pressurized storage vessels, we measured physical properties on laboratory-formed sand packs containing methane hydrate and methane pore gas. After depressurizing samples to atmospheric pressure, we repressurized them into the methane-hydrate stability field and remeasured their physical properties. Thermal conductivity, shear strength, acoustic compressional and shear wave amplitudes, and speeds of the original and depressurized/repressurized samples are compared. X-ray computed tomography images track how the gas-hydrate distribution changes in the hydrate-cemented sands owing to the depressurizaton/repressurization process. Because depressurization-induced property changes can be substantial and are not easily predicted, particularly in water-saturated, hydrate-bearing sediment, maintaining pressure and temperature conditions throughout the core recovery and measurement process is critical for using laboratory measurements to estimate in situ properties.

  8. A new measuring technique of soil thermal inertia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Thermal inertia is the function of substance density,heat capacity and heat diffusivity,and is an important parameter for researching the process of surface heat balance using remote sensing technique.In this paper,using soil heat plates,infrared thermometer,data logger and other instruments,by man-controlled changing the solar radiation status on the soil samples,the authors gave a new method to measure soil thermal inertia.Using the continuously surveying data of soil heat flux and infrared radiation temperature,thermal inertia can be calculated easily.Based on the thermal inertia calculation of three soil samples with different water content,good results were abtained by the authors,so this method is feasible.Meanwhile,this measuring technique is also a new attempt.

  9. A new measuring technique of soil thermal inertia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓敏; 朱治林; 唐新斋; 苏红波; 张仁华

    2000-01-01

    Thermal inertia is the function of substance density, heat capacity and heat diffusivity, and is an important parameter for researching the process of surface heat balance using remote sensing technique. In this paper, using soil heat plates, infrared thermometer, data logger and other instruments, by man-controlled changing the solar radiation status on the soil samples, the authors gave a new method to measure soil thermal inertia. Using the continuously surveying data of soil heat flux and infrared radiation temperature, thermal inertia can be calculated easily. Based on the thermal inertia calculation of three soil samples with different water content, good results were abtained by the authors, so this method is feasible. Meanwhile, this measuring technique is also a new attempt.

  10. Thermal-lensing measurement of particle thermophoresis in aqueous dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Isa, Lucio; Piazza, Roberto

    2004-03-01

    We show that thermophoresis (particle drift driven by thermal gradients) in aqueous solutions can be measured by using an all-optical thermal-lensing setup, where a temperature gradient is set by a near-infrared laser beam with no need of light-absorbing dyes. After discussing the principles of the method, we study by numerical simulation the nature and extent of parasitic thermal-convection effects, and we describe an optical setup designed to limit them. We finally present preliminary results on thermophoresis in micellar solutions and colloidal dispersions.

  11. Improvement of Mechanical, Thermal and Optical Properties of Barium Mixed Cobalt Tartrate Hydrate Crystals Grown by Gel Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vanaja

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this present work, CTH and BCTH crystals have been prepared by gel technique by using single diffusion method at room temperature. The as grown crystals were characterized by using XRD, FT-IR, UV, TG / DTA and Micro hardness studies. X-ray powder diffraction results analyzed by using suitable software suggest that a CTH and BCTH crystals belong to cubic crystal system. The unit cell volume is observed to increase with increase in the concentration of barium in cobalt tartrate due to the lattice distortion. The band gap and optical properties have analyzed by UV-Visible spectrum. The functional groups and compound formation of the crystals have been studied by FT-IR spectrum. The mechanical properties of the grown crystals were tested by using Vicker’s microhardness studies. The work hardening coefficient (n was determined to be 3.7 for CTH, 5.3 for BCTH (1 : 1 and 6.4 for BCTH (2 : 1 and the stiffness constants for different loads were calculated and reported. Thermal analysis suggests that pure cobalt tartrate starts decomposing at 73.2 °C whereas the barium mixed cobalt tartrate brings about better thermal stability which increases with an increase in barium concentration.

  12. Estimation of membrane hydration status for standby proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems by impedance measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bidoggia, Benoit; Rugholt, Mark; Nielsen, Morten Busk

    2014-01-01

    Fuel cells are getting growing interest in both backup systems and electric vehicles. Although these systems are characterized by long periods of inactivity, they must be able to start at any instant in the shortest time. However, the membrane of which PEMFCs are made tends to dry out when...... not in use. This increases the time required to start the system and could lead to the destruction of the fuel cell. In this article an impedance measurement circuit is presented, which is part of a humidity status estimator for monitoring the humidity status of a fuel cell stack during standby....... The impedance measurement circuit has been connected to a fuel cell stack and the operation of estimating the relative humidity has been demonstrated....

  13. Sonographic inferior vena cava measurements to assess hydration status in college football players during preseason camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterbrook, Anna L; Shah, Amish; Jannicky, Elisabeth; Stolz, Uwe; Cohen, Randy P; Gross, Austin; Adhikari, Srikar

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether sonographic measurement of the inferior vena cava (IVC) in college football players during preseason camp is a reliable way to detect and monitor dehydration. Our primary hypothesis was that IVC diameter measurements, the postpractice caval index, and expiratory diameter were significantly related to percent weight loss after a preseason football practice. A prospective cohort sample of Division I intercollegiate football players in preseason training camp was recruited before practice. All football players on the active roster who were at least 18 years of age were eligible to participate in the study. Sonographic IVC measurements were obtained in the long axis using either the subcostal or subxiphoid approach during inspiration and expiration both before and after an approximately 3-hour practice with moderate to high levels of exertion at high ambient temperatures. Player weights were recorded in the locker room before and after practice. A total of 27 prepractice and postpractice sonographic measurements were obtained. The postpractice expiratory IVC diameter was significantly related to percent weight loss after practice (R(2) = 0.153; P = .042), with the IVC diameter being significantly inversely correlated with percent weight loss; the regression coefficient was -1.07 (95% confidence interval, -2.09 to -0.04). There was no statistically significant relationship between percent weight loss and the postpractice caval index; the regression coefficient was 0.245 (95% confidence interval, -0.10 to 0.59; R(2) = 0.078; P = .16). The postpractice expiratory IVC diameter was significantly related to percent weight loss after practice, whereas the caval index was not found to correlate with weight loss. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  14. Thermal emittance measurements of a cesium potassium antimonide photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazarov, Ivan; Cultrera, Luca; Bartnik, Adam; Dunham, Bruce; Karkare, Siddharth; Li, Yulin; Liu, Xianghong; Maxson, Jared; Roussel, William

    2011-05-01

    Thermal emittance measurements of a CsK2Sb photocathode at several laser wavelengths are presented. The emittance is obtained with a solenoid scan technique using a high voltage dc photoemission gun. The thermal emittance is 0.56±0.03 mm mrad/mm(rms) at 532 nm wavelength. The results are compared with a simple photoemission model and found to be in a good agreement.

  15. Thermal emittance measurements of a cesium potassium antimonide photocathode

    CERN Document Server

    Bazarov, Ivan; Bartnik, Adam; Dunham, Bruce; Karkare, Siddharth; Li, Yulin; Liu, Xianghong; Maxson, Jared; Roussel, William

    2011-01-01

    Thermal emittance measurements of a CsK2Sb photocathode at several laser wavelengths are presented. The emittance is obtained with a solenoid scan technique using a high voltage dc photoemission gun. The thermal emittance is 0.56+/-0.03 mm-mrad/mm(rms) at 532 nm wavelength. The results are compared with a simple photoemission model and found to be in a good agreement.

  16. Single nanowire thermal conductivity measurements by Raman thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerk, Gregory S; Carraro, Carlo; Maboudian, Roya

    2010-08-24

    A facile, rapid, and nondestructive technique for determining the thermal conductivity of individual nanowires based on Raman temperature mapping has been demonstrated. Using calculated absorption efficiencies, the thermal conductivities of single cantilevered Si nanowires grown by the vapor-liquid-solid method are measured and the results agree well with values predicted by diffuse phonon boundary scattering. As a measurement performed on the wire, thermal contact effects are avoided and ambient air convection is found to be negligible for the range of diameters measured. The method's versatility is further exemplified in the reverse measurement of a single nanowire absorption efficiency assuming diffuse phonon boundary scattering. The results presented here outline the broad utility that Raman thermography may have for future thermoelectric and photovoltaic characterization of nanostructures.

  17. Ground-based measurement of surface temperature and thermal emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owe, M.; Van De Griend, A. A.

    1994-01-01

    Motorized cable systems for transporting infrared thermometers have been used successfully during several international field campaigns. Systems may be configured with as many as four thermal sensors up to 9 m above the surface, and traverse a 30 m transect. Ground and canopy temperatures are important for solving the surface energy balance. The spatial variability of surface temperature is often great, so that averaged point measurements result in highly inaccurate areal estimates. The cable systems are ideal for quantifying both temporal and spatial variabilities. Thermal emissivity is also necessary for deriving the absolute physical temperature, and measurements may be made with a portable measuring box.

  18. Synchrotron X-ray measurement techniques for thermal barrier coated cylindrical samples under thermal gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, Sanna F.; Knipe, Kevin; Manero, Albert; Raghavan, Seetha [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Bartsch, Marion [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Materials Research, 51147 Cologne (Germany); Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan [X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Karlsson, Anette M. [Cleveland State University, 2121 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Measurement techniques to obtain accurate in situ synchrotron strain measurements of thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) applied to hollow cylindrical specimens are presented in this work. The Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition coated specimens with internal cooling were designed to achieve realistic temperature gradients over the TBC coated material such as that occurring in the turbine blades of aeroengines. Effects of the circular cross section on the x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements in the various layers, including the thermally grown oxide, are investigated using high-energy synchrotron x-rays. Multiple approaches for beam penetration including collection, tangential, and normal to the layers, along with variations in collection parameters are compared for their ability to attain high-resolution XRD data from the internal layers. This study displays the ability to monitor in situ, the response of the internal layers within the TBC, while implementing a thermal gradient across the thickness of the coated sample. The thermal setup maintained coating surface temperatures in the range of operating conditions, while monitoring the substrate cooling, for a controlled thermal gradient. Through variation in measurement location and beam parameters, sufficient intensities are obtained from the internal layers which can be used for depth resolved strain measurements. Results are used to establish the various techniques for obtaining XRD measurements through multi-layered coating systems and their outcomes will pave the way towards goals in achieving realistic in situ testing of these coatings.

  19. Synchrotron X-ray measurement techniques for thermal barrier coated cylindrical samples under thermal gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Sanna F; Knipe, Kevin; Manero, Albert; Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan; Karlsson, Anette M; Bartsch, Marion; Raghavan, Seetha

    2013-08-01

    Measurement techniques to obtain accurate in situ synchrotron strain measurements of thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) applied to hollow cylindrical specimens are presented in this work. The Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition coated specimens with internal cooling were designed to achieve realistic temperature gradients over the TBC coated material such as that occurring in the turbine blades of aeroengines. Effects of the circular cross section on the x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements in the various layers, including the thermally grown oxide, are investigated using high-energy synchrotron x-rays. Multiple approaches for beam penetration including collection, tangential, and normal to the layers, along with variations in collection parameters are compared for their ability to attain high-resolution XRD data from the internal layers. This study displays the ability to monitor in situ, the response of the internal layers within the TBC, while implementing a thermal gradient across the thickness of the coated sample. The thermal setup maintained coating surface temperatures in the range of operating conditions, while monitoring the substrate cooling, for a controlled thermal gradient. Through variation in measurement location and beam parameters, sufficient intensities are obtained from the internal layers which can be used for depth resolved strain measurements. Results are used to establish the various techniques for obtaining XRD measurements through multi-layered coating systems and their outcomes will pave the way towards goals in achieving realistic in situ testing of these coatings.

  20. Techniques for Reducing Thermal Contact Resistance in Steady-State Thermal Conductivity Measurements on Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, C.; Simpkin, A. J.; Jarrett, R. N.

    2016-11-01

    The National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has developed a new variation on the established guarded hot plate technique for steady-state measurements of thermal conductivity. This new guarded hot plate has been specifically designed for making measurements on specimens with a thickness that is practical for advanced industrial composite materials and applications. During the development of this new guarded hot plate, NPL carried out an experimental investigation into methods for minimising the thermal contact resistance between the test specimen and the plates of the apparatus. This experimental investigation included tests on different thermal interface materials for use in another NPL facility based on a commercial guarded heat flow meter apparatus conforming to standard ASTM E1530-11. The results show the effect of applying different quantities of the type of heat transfer compound suggested in ASTM E1530-11 (clause 10.7.3) and also the effect on thermal resistance of alternative types of thermal interface products. The optimum quantities of two silicone greases were determined, and a silicone grease filled with copper was found to offer the best combination of repeatability, small hysteresis effect and a low thermal contact resistance. However, two products based on a textured indium foil and pyrolytic graphite sheet were found to offer similar or better reductions in thermal contact resistance, but with quicker, easier application and the advantages of protecting the apparatus plates from damage and being useable with specimen materials that would otherwise absorb silicone grease.

  1. Thermographic measurement of thermal bridges in buildings under dynamic behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrarini, G.; Bison, P.; Bortolin, A.; Cadelano, G.; De Carli, M.

    2016-05-01

    The accurate knowledge of the thermal performance could reduce significantly the impact of buildings on global energy consumption. Infrared thermography is widely recognized as one of the key technologies for building surveys, thanks to its ability to acquire at a glance thermal images of the building envelope. However, a spot measurement could be misleading when the building is under dynamic thermal conditions. In this case data should be acquired for hours or days, depending on the thermal properties of the walls. Long term thermographic monitoring are possible but imply strong challenges from a practical standpoint. This work investigates the possibilities and limitations of spot thermographic surveys coupled with contact probes, that are able to acquire continuously the thermal signal for days, to investigate the thermal bridges of a building. The goal is the estimation of the reliability and accuracy of the measurement under realistic environmental conditions. Firstly, numerical simulations are performed to determine the reference value of an experimental case. Then a long term thermographic survey is performed and integrated with the contact probe measurement, assessing the feasibility of the method.

  2. Measurement of Personal Exposure Using a Breathing Thermal Manikin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik

    In this paper personal exposure measurements are performed by means of the Breathing Thermal Manikin. Contaminant concentration is measured in a number of locations in the breathing zone and in the inhaled air. Two cases are investigated: exposure to different contaminant sources in a displacement...

  3. Non-Fickian Diffusion Affects the Relation between the Salinity and Hydrate Capacity Profiles in Marine Sediments

    CERN Document Server

    Goldobin, Denis S

    2012-01-01

    On-site measurements of water salinity (which can be directly evaluated from the electrical conductivity) in deep-sea sediments is technically the primary source of indirect information on the capacity of the marine deposits of methane hydrates. We show the relation between the salinity (chlorinity) profile and the hydrate volume in pores to be significantly affected by non-Fickian contributions to the diffusion flux---the thermal diffusion and the gravitational segregation---which have been previously ignored in the literature on the subject and the analysis of surveys data. We provide amended relations and utilize them for an analysis of field measurements for a real hydrate deposit.

  4. Welding pool measurement using thermal array sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chia-Hung; Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Chen, Hsin-Yi

    2015-08-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing (AM) technology that uses a high-power laser beam to melt metal powder in chamber of inert gas. The process starts by slicing the 3D CAD data as a digital information source into layers to create a 2D image of each layer. Melting pool was formed by using laser irradiation on metal powders which then solidified to consolidated structure. In a selective laser melting process, the variation of melt pool affects the yield of a printed three-dimensional product. For three dimensional parts, the border conditions of the conductive heat transport have a very large influence on the melt pool dimensions. Therefore, melting pool is an important behavior that affects the final quality of the 3D object. To meet the temperature and geometry of the melting pool for monitoring in additive manufacturing technology. In this paper, we proposed the temperature sensing system which is composed of infrared photodiode, high speed camera, band-pass filter, dichroic beam splitter and focus lens. Since the infrared photodiode and high speed camera look at the process through the 2D galvanometer scanner and f-theta lens, the temperature sensing system can be used to observe the melting pool at any time, regardless of the movement of the laser spot. In order to obtain a wide temperature detecting range, 500 °C to 2500 °C, the radiation from the melting pool to be measured is filtered into a plurality of radiation portions, and since the intensity ratio distribution of the radiation portions is calculated by using black-body radiation. The experimental result shows that the system is suitable for melting pool to measure temperature.

  5. Thermal Conductivity Measurement and Analysis of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H. G.; Kim, D. J.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, W. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S. J. [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    FCM nuclear fuel is composed of tristructural isotropic(TRISO) fuel particle and SiC ceramic matrix. SiC ceramic matrix play an essential part in protecting fission product. In the FCM fuel concept, fission product is doubly protected by TRISO coating layer and SiC ceramic matrix in comparison with the current commercial UO2 fuel system of LWR. In addition to a safety enhancement of FCM fuel, thermal conductivity of SiC ceramic matrix is better than that of UO2 fuel. Because the centerline temperature of FCM fuel is lower than that of the current UO2 fuel due to the difference of thermal conductivity of fuel, an operational release of fission products from the fuel can be reduced. SiC ceramic has attracted for nuclear fuel application due to its high thermal conductivity properties with good radiation tolerant properties, a low neutron absorption cross-section and a high corrosion resistance. Thermal conductivity of ceramic matrix composite depends on the thermal conductivity of each component and the morphology of reinforcement materials such as fibers and particles. There are many results about thermal conductivity of fiber-reinforced composite like as SiCf/SiC composite. Thermal conductivity of SiC ceramics and FCM pellets with the volume fraction of TRISO particles were measured and analyzed by analytical models. Polycrystalline SiC ceramics and FCM pellets with TRISO particles were fabricated by hot press sintering with sintering additives. Thermal conductivity of the FCM pellets with TRISO particles of 0 vol.%, 10 vol.%, 20 vol.%, 30 vol.% and 40 vol.% show 68.4, 52.3, 46.8, 43.0 and 34.5 W/mK, respectively. As the volume fraction of TRISO particles increased, the measured thermal conductivity values closely followed the prediction of Maxwell's equation.

  6. Thermal conductivity measurements of particulate materials under Martian conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, M. A.; Christensen, P. R.

    1993-01-01

    The mean particle diameter of surficial units on Mars has been approximated by applying thermal inertia determinations from the Mariner 9 Infrared Radiometer and the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper data together with thermal conductivity measurement. Several studies have used this approximation to characterize surficial units and infer their nature and possible origin. Such interpretations are possible because previous measurements of the thermal conductivity of particulate materials have shown that particle size significantly affects thermal conductivity under martian atmospheric pressures. The transfer of thermal energy due to collisions of gas molecules is the predominant mechanism of thermal conductivity in porous systems for gas pressures above about 0.01 torr. At martian atmospheric pressures the mean free path of the gas molecules becomes greater than the effective distance over which conduction takes place between the particles. Gas particles are then more likely to collide with the solid particles than they are with each other. The average heat transfer distance between particles, which is related to particle size, shape and packing, thus determines how fast heat will flow through a particulate material.The derived one-to-one correspondence of thermal inertia to mean particle diameter implies a certain homogeneity in the materials analyzed. Yet the samples used were often characterized by fairly wide ranges of particle sizes with little information about the possible distribution of sizes within those ranges. Interpretation of thermal inertia data is further limited by the lack of data on other effects on the interparticle spacing relative to particle size, such as particle shape, bimodal or polymodal mixtures of grain sizes and formation of salt cements between grains. To address these limitations and to provide a more comprehensive set of thermal conductivities vs. particle size a linear heat source apparatus, similar to that of Cremers, was assembled to

  7. Effects of rooibos tea, bottled water, and a carbohydrate beverage on blood and urinary measures of hydration after acute dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utter, Alan C; Quindry, John C; Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Valiente, J Scott

    2010-04-01

    Rooibos tea contains polyphenol antioxidants, including flavonoids and phenolic acids that are potent free radical scavengers and has purported benefits for accelerated rehydration. The objective was to evaluate the effects of three different drinks (rooibos tea, bottled water, and a carbohydrate beverage) on blood and urinary markers of hydration after acute dehydration in collegiate wrestlers. Twenty-three athletes were recruited and followed a randomized, cross-over design with three different study arms comparing the effectiveness of rooibos tea, carbohydrate beverage (6% or 60 grams l(-1)), or bottled water (placebo) in promoting rehydration after a 3% reduction in body mass. Urine specific gravity (U(sg)) urine (U(osm)) and plasma osmolarity (P(osm)), and plasma volume were measured pre- and post dehydration and at 1-h after rehydration. Statistical analyses utilized a 3 (conditions) x 3 (times) repeated measures analysis of variance to test main effects. Significant interaction effects were found for P(osm) and U(osm), both of which remained below basleline after 1-h rehydration in the rooibos tea and water trials. No significant interaction effects were found for either urine U(sg) or plasma volume shift. The findings of this study demonstrate that rooibos tea was no more effective in promoting rehydration than plain water, with significant changes being found for P(osm) and U(osm) in the carbohydrate/electrolyte solution, in collegiate wrestlers after a 3% reduction in body mass and a rehydration period of 1-h when consuming 100% of their body weight loss.

  8. Room temperature screening of thermal conductivity by means of thermal transient measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cañadas, Jorge; Cheng, Shudan; Márquez-García, Lourdes; Prest, Martin J.; Akbari-Rahimabadi, Ahmad; Min, Gao

    2016-10-01

    A proof of concept of the possibility to estimate thermal conductivity of bulk disc samples at room temperature by means of thermal decays is demonstrated. An experimental set-up was designed and fabricated, which is able to perform thermal transient measurements by using a specially designed multifunctional probe that has the ability to measure temperature at its tip. Initially, the probe is heated by a heater coil located in its interior until the tip temperature reaches a steady state. Then, the probe is contacted with a disc sample which produces a temperature decay until a new state is reached. The difference between the initial and final states temperatures shows a correlation with the thermal conductivity of the sample. Employing a calibration equation, obtained using reference materials, the thermal conductivity can be calculated. Reasonably good random and systematic errors (<13% and ~9% respectively) are obtained. Theoretical simulations performed using COMSOL show a good qualitative agreement with experimental results. This new method involves an inexpensive and simple set-up which can be especially useful for thermal conductivity screening and high-throughput measurements.

  9. High sensitivity measurements of thermal properties of textile fabrics

    CERN Document Server

    Romeli, D; Esposito, S; Rosace, G; Salesi, G

    2013-01-01

    A new testing apparatus is proposed to measure the thermal properties of fabrics made from polymeric materials. The calibration of the apparatus and the data acquisition procedure are considered in detail in order to measure thermal conductivity, resistance, absorption and diffusivity constants of the tested fabric samples. Differences between dry and wet fabrics have been carefully detected and analyzed. We have developed a new measurement protocol, the "ThermoTex" protocol, which agrees with the UNI EN 31092 standard and entails an accurate quantification of the experimental errors according to a standard statistical analysis, thus allowing a rigorous investigation of the physical behavior of the phenomena involved. As a consequence, our machinery exhibits great potentialities for optimizing the thermal comfort of fabrics, according to the market demand, thanks to the possible development of a predictive phenomenological theory of the effects involved.

  10. Evaluation of thermal gradients in longitudinal spin Seebeck effect measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, A.; Kuepferling, M.; Basso, V.; Pasquale, M.; Kikkawa, T.; Uchida, K.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-05-01

    In the framework of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), we developed an experimental setup for the characterization of LSSE devices. This class of device consists in a layered structure formed by a substrate, a ferrimagnetic insulator (YIG) where the spin current is thermally generated, and a paramagnetic metal (Pt) for the detection of the spin current via the inverse spin-Hall effect. In this kind of experiments, the evaluation of a thermal gradient through the thin YIG layer is a crucial point. In this work, we perform an indirect determination of the thermal gradient through the measurement of the heat flux. We developed an experimental setup using Peltier cells that allow us to measure the heat flux through a given sample. In order to test the technique, a standard LSSE device produced at Tohoku University was measured. We find a spin Seebeck SSSE coefficient of 2.8 × 10 - 7 V K-1.

  11. Thermal conductivity measurement of thin films by a dc method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junyou; Zhang, Jiansheng; Zhang, Hui; Zhu, Yunfeng

    2010-11-01

    A dc method, which needs no complex numerical calculation and expensive hardware configuration, was developed to measure the cross-plane thermal conductivity of thin films in this paper. Two parallel metallic heaters, which were deposited on different parts of the sample, serve simultaneously as the heaters and temperature sensors during the measurement. A direct current was flowed through the same two metallic strips to heat the thin-film sample. The heating power and the heater's temperature were obtained by a data acquisition device, and the thermal conductivity of thin film was calculated. To verify the validity of the dc method, several SiO(2) films with different thicknesses were deposited on Si wafers, respectively, and their thermal conductivities were measured by both the dc method and 3ω method. The results of two methods are in good agreement within an acceptable error, and they are also inconsistent with some of previously published data.

  12. Algorithm to optimize transient hot-wire thermal property measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bran-Anleu, Gabriela; Lavine, Adrienne S; Wirz, Richard E; Kavehpour, H Pirouz

    2014-04-01

    The transient hot-wire method has been widely used to measure the thermal conductivity of fluids. The ideal working equation is based on the solution of the transient heat conduction equation for an infinite linear heat source assuming no natural convection or thermal end effects. In practice, the assumptions inherent in the model are only valid for a portion of the measurement time. In this study, an algorithm was developed to automatically select the proper data range from a transient hot-wire experiment. Numerical simulations of the experiment were used in order to validate the algorithm. The experimental results show that the developed algorithm can be used to improve the accuracy of thermal conductivity measurements.

  13. Algorithm to optimize transient hot-wire thermal property measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bran-Anleu, Gabriela; Lavine, Adrienne S.; Wirz, Richard E.; Kavehpour, H. Pirouz

    2014-04-01

    The transient hot-wire method has been widely used to measure the thermal conductivity of fluids. The ideal working equation is based on the solution of the transient heat conduction equation for an infinite linear heat source assuming no natural convection or thermal end effects. In practice, the assumptions inherent in the model are only valid for a portion of the measurement time. In this study, an algorithm was developed to automatically select the proper data range from a transient hot-wire experiment. Numerical simulations of the experiment were used in order to validate the algorithm. The experimental results show that the developed algorithm can be used to improve the accuracy of thermal conductivity measurements.

  14. Experimental measurements of thermal properties of high-temperature refractory materials used for thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Leathy, Abdelrahman; Jeter, Sheldon; Al-Ansary, Hany; Abdel-Khalik, Said; Golob, Matthew; Danish, Syed Noman; Saeed, Rageh; Djajadiwinata, Eldwin; Al-Suhaibani, Zeyad

    2016-05-01

    This paper builds on studies conducted on thermal energy storage (TES) systems that were built as a part of the work performed for a DOE-funded SunShot project titled "High Temperature Falling Particle Receiver". In previous studies, two small-scale TES systems were constructed for measuring heat loss at high temperatures that are compatible with the falling particle receiver concept, both of which had shown very limited heat loss. Through the course of those studies, it became evident that there was a lack of information about the thermal performance of some of the insulating refractory materials used in the experiments at high temperatures, especially insulating firebrick and perlite concrete. This work focuses on determining the thermal conductivities of those materials at high temperatures. The apparatus consists of a prototype cylindrical TES bin built with the same wall construction used in previous studies. An electric heater is placed along the centerline of the bin, and thermocouples are used to measure temperature at the interfaces between all layers. Heat loss is measured across one of the layers whose thermal conductivity had already been well established using laboratory experiments. This value is used to deduce the thermal conductivity of other layers. Three interior temperature levels were considered; namely, 300°C, 500°C, and 700°C. Results show that the thermal conductivity of insulating firebrick remains low (approximately 0.22 W/m.K) at an average layer temperature as high as 640°C, but it was evident that the addition of mortar had an impact on its effective thermal conductivity. Results also show that the thermal conductivity of perlite concrete is very low, approximately 0.15 W/m.K at an average layer temperature of 360°C. This is evident by the large temperature drop that occurs across the perlite concrete layer. These results should be useful for future studies, especially those that focus on numerical modeling of TES bins.

  15. Thermal Measurements on Polymeric Epoxy-Expandable Graphite Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Asante

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion measurements, such as heat release rate, critical flux, time-to-ignition, ignition temperature, thermal inertia, and kinematics—activation energy as well as preexponential factor—on epoxy polymer (Prime™ 20LV with expandable graphite (EG inorganic filler of different weight percentage composites, are conducted using the Dual Cone Calorimeter, the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and Linseis (Germany THB100 Transient Hot Bridge thermal conductivity analyser. The results indicate that increasing the amount of EG in polymer composite leads to reduction in the critical flux, the time-to-ignition, the ignition temperature, the thermal inertia, the average thermal conductivity, and the activation energy (from 159.1 ± 2.3 to 145.9 ± 3.1 kJ/mol for neat epoxy to 3 wt.% EG-epoxy of the composite samples. There is, however, an increase in the heat of gasification with increasing EG content.

  16. Measurement of in-plane thermal conductivity in polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingshuo; Uehara, Chinatsu; Mukaida, Masakazu; Kirihara, Kazuhiro; Ishida, Takao

    2016-04-01

    Measuring the in-plane thermal conductivity of organic thermoelectric materials is challenging but is critically important. Here, a method to study the in-plane thermal conductivity of free-standing films (via the use of commercial equipment) based on temperature wave analysis is explored in depth. This subject method required a free-standing thin film with a thickness larger than 10 μm and an area larger than 1 cm2, which are not difficult to obtain for most solution-processable organic thermoelectric materials. We evaluated thermal conductivities and anisotropic ratios for various types of samples including insulating polymers, undoped semiconducting polymers, doped conducting polymers, and one-dimensional carbon fiber bulky papers. This approach facilitated a rapid screening of in-plane thermal conductivities for various organic thermoelectric materials.

  17. Measurement of in-plane thermal conductivity in polymer films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingshuo Wei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the in-plane thermal conductivity of organic thermoelectric materials is challenging but is critically important. Here, a method to study the in-plane thermal conductivity of free-standing films (via the use of commercial equipment based on temperature wave analysis is explored in depth. This subject method required a free-standing thin film with a thickness larger than 10 μm and an area larger than 1 cm2, which are not difficult to obtain for most solution-processable organic thermoelectric materials. We evaluated thermal conductivities and anisotropic ratios for various types of samples including insulating polymers, undoped semiconducting polymers, doped conducting polymers, and one-dimensional carbon fiber bulky papers. This approach facilitated a rapid screening of in-plane thermal conductivities for various organic thermoelectric materials.

  18. Thermal conductivity of a film of single walled carbon nanotubes measured with infrared thermal imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ya; Inoue, Taiki; Xiang, Rong; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    Heat dissipation has restricted the modern miniaturization trend with the development of electronic devices. Theoretically proven to be with high axial thermal conductivity, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) have long been expected to cool down the nanoscale world. Even though the tube-tube contact resistance limits the capability of heat transfer of the bulk film, the high intrinsic thermal conductivity of SWNT still glorify the application of films of SWNT network as a thermal interface material. In this work, we proposed a new method to straightly measure the thermal conductivity of SWNT film. We bridged two cantilevered Si thin plate with SWNT film, and kept a steady state heat flow in between. With the infrared camera to record the temperature distribution, the Si plates with known thermal conductivity can work as a reference to calculate the heat flux going through the SWNT film. Further, the thermal conductivity of the SWNT film can be obtained through Fourier's law after deducting the effect of thermal radiation. The sizes of the structure, the heating temperature, the vacuum degree and other crucial impact factors are carefully considered and analyzed. The author Y. F. was supported through the Advanced Integration Science Innovation Education and Research Consortium Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology.

  19. Direct measurement of thermal expansion in unsaturated soils

    OpenAIRE

    Pintado Llurba, Xavier; Lloret Morancho, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    A method designed to measure the thermal dilatation coefficient of unsaturated soils is presented. It is based on the ASTM 4535-85 standard with some important considerations taken into account. A number of tests following this methodology were performed on unsaturated swelling clay. Thermal dilatation coefficients were measured over a temperature range from 25 to 65°C for material dry densities and saturation degrees varying between 16–17 kN/m3 and 60–95%, respectively. The results are so...

  20. Measurements of thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity and thermal conductivity with LFA 447 apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zajas, Jan Jakub; Heiselberg, Per

    The LFA 447 can be successfully used for measurements of thermal diffusivity, specific heat and thermal conductivity of various samples. It is especially useful when determining the properties of materials on a very small scale. The matrix measurement mode allows for determining the local...... properties with a fine resolution, down to 1 millimeter. Special attention needs to be taken when determining the specific heat capacity in the comparative method. First of all, the test and reference sample should be of nearly identical thickness. Secondly, their heat diffusion time should be comparable, so...... that the heat losses from both samples during the measurement are similar. Finally, the leveling of the samples is very important. Very small discrepancies can cause a massive error in the derivation of specific heat capacity and, as a result, thermal conductivity....

  1. In situ measurements of thermal diffusivity in sediments of the methane-rich zone of Cascadia Margin, NE Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira Homola

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thermal diffusivity (TD is a measure of the temperature response of a material to external thermal forcing. In this study, TD values for marine sediments were determined in situ at two locations on the Cascadia Margin using an instrumented sediment probe deployed by a remotely operated vehicle. TD measurements in this area of the NE Pacific Ocean are important for characterizing the upslope edge of the methane hydrate stability zone, which is the climate-sensitive boundary of a global-scale carbon reservoir. The probe was deployed on the Cascadia Margin at water depths of 552 and 1049 m for a total of 6 days at each site. The instrumented probe consisted of four thermistors aligned vertically, one sensor exposed to the bottom water and one each at 5, 10, and 15 cm within the sediment. Results from each deployment were analyzed using a thermal conduction model applying a range of TD values to obtain the best fit with the experimental data. TD values corresponding to the lowest standard deviations from the numerical model runs were selected as the best approximations. Overall TDs of Cascadia Margin sediments of 4.33 and 1.15 × 10–7 m2 s–1 were calculated for the two deployments. These values, the first of their kind to be determined from in situ measurements on a methane hydrate-rich continental margin, are expected to be useful in the development of models of bottom-water temperature increases and their implications on a global scale.

  2. Combining gravimetric and vibrational spectroscopy measurements to quantify first- and second-shell hydration layers in polyimides with different molecular architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musto, Pellegrino; Mensitieri, Giuseppe; Lavorgna, Marino; Scarinzi, Gennaro; Scherillo, Giuseppe

    2012-02-02

    In-situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements have been carried out at different relative pressures of water vapor to study the H(2)O diffusion in three polyimides differing in their molecular structure and fluorine substitution. Spectral data have been analyzed by difference spectroscopy, least-squares curve fitting, and two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy, which provided molecular level information on the diffusion mechanism. In particular, two distinct water species were identified corresponding, respectively, to the first and second-shell hydration layers. The spectroscopic analysis demonstrated that the relative population of these species is a function of the total water content in the system. A method has been devised to quantify the water concentration in the two hydration layers, based on a combination of spectroscopic and gravimetric data. The results have been compared with those from an earlier spectroscopic approach reported in the literature and based on the analysis of the carbonyl region.

  3. [Hydration in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maristany, Cleofé Pérez-Portabella; Segurola Gurruchaga, Hegoi

    2011-01-01

    Water is an essential foundation for life, having both a regulatory and structural function. The former results from active and passive participation in all metabolic reactions, and its role in conserving and maintaining body temperature. Structurally speaking it is the major contributer to tissue mass, accounting for 60% of the basis of blood plasma, intracellular and intersticial fluid. Water is also part of the primary structures of life such as genetic material or proteins. Therefore, it is necessary that the nurse makes an early assessment of patients water needs to detect if there are signs of electrolyte imbalance. Dehydration can be a very serious problem, especially in children and the elderly. Dehydrations treatment with oral rehydration solution decreases the risk of developing hydration disorders, but even so, it is recommended to follow preventive measures to reduce the incidence and severity of dehydration. The key to having a proper hydration is prevention. Artificial nutrition encompasses the need for precise calculation of water needs in enteral nutrition as parenteral, so the nurse should be part of this process and use the tools for calculating the patient's requirements. All this helps to ensure an optimal nutritional status in patients at risk. Ethical dilemmas are becoming increasingly common in clinical practice. On the subject of artificial nutrition and hydration, there isn't yet any unanimous agreement regarding hydration as a basic care. It is necessary to take decisions in consensus with the health team, always thinking of the best interests of the patient.

  4. Waters of Hydration of Cupric Hydrates: A Comparison between Heating and Absorbance Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2011-01-01

    The empirical formulas of four cupric hydrates are determined by measuring the absorbance in aqueous solution. The Beer-Lambert Law is verified by constructing a calibration curve of absorbance versus known Cu[superscript 2+](aq) concentration. A solution of the unknown hydrate is prepared by using 0.2-0.3 g of hydrate, and water is added such…

  5. Research on Hydration Properties of Blended Cement based on Thermal Activated Coal Gangue%热活化煤矸石——水泥复合体系水化性能分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何燕

    2012-01-01

    By specific strength concept, the pozzolanic effect of activated coal gangue could be investigated. Through the content of Ca (OH)2 surplus and the amount of chemically combined water, the hydration degree of activated coal gangue-cement system could be investigated. By means of X-ray diffraction and Differential Thermal Analysis etc, the hydration process of the cement system with activated coal gangue could be analyzed. The results shows that, coal gangue, calcined under the temperature of 750℃ and held for 4 hours, makes a good contribution to the pozzolanic effect of the hardened cement pastes and the activated coal gangue-cement system shows high hydration degree, with fewer Ca(OH)2 surplus and more chemically combined water. The main hydration products are C-S-H gel, Ca(OH)2 and sulfoaluminate hydrate ettringite.%采用比强度法对活化煤矸石的火山灰效应进行评定,通过Ca(OH)2剩余量和化学结合水量的测定,分析活化煤矸石-水泥体系的水化程度,并采用X射线衍射分析,差热分析对其水化过程进行研究.结果表明:煅烧温度为750℃,保温时间为4h的热活化煤矸石对水泥体系的火山灰贡献率较高;该体系Ca(OH)2剩余量较少,化学结合水量较多,其水化产物主要以C-S-H凝胶,Ca(OH)2和钙矾石为主.

  6. Laboratory technique for quantitative thermal emissivity measurements of geological samples

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    George Mathew; Archana Nair; T K Gundu Rao; Kanchan Pande

    2009-08-01

    Thermal infrared spectroscopy is a powerful technique for the compositional analysis of geological materials. The spectral feature in the mid-IR region is diagnostic of the mineralogy and spectral signatures of mixtures of minerals that add linearly, and therefore, can be used as an important tool to determine the mineralogy of rocks in the laboratory and remotely for planetary exploration. The greatest challenge in the emission measurement lies in the measurement of the weak thermal photons emitted from geological materials in a laboratory setup, and accurately records the temperature of the rock sample. The present work pertains to the details of a new Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) laboratory that has been developed under the ISRO Planetary Science and Exploration (PLANEX) programme, for emission related mineralogical investigations of planetary surfaces. The focus of the paper is on the acquisition and calibration technique for obtaining emissivity, and the deconvolution procedure to obtain the modal abundances of the thermal emission spectra in the range of 6–25 m using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The basic technique is adopted from the work of Ruff et al (1997). This laboratory at the Department of Earth Sciences, IIT-Bombay is currently developing pure end mineral library of mineral particulates (> 65 m), and adding new end members to the existing ASU spectral library. The paper argues the need for considering Lunar Orbiter Thermal Emission Spectrometer (LOTES) for future Indian Moon mission programme (Chandrayan-II) to determine evidences of varied lithologies on the lunar surface.

  7. Measurement of thermal expansion coefficient of nonuniform temperature specimen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingmin Dai; Chunsuo Kin; Xiaowa He

    2008-01-01

    A new technique is developed to measure the longitudinal thermal expansion coefficient of C/C composite material at high temperature. The measuring principle and components of the apparatus are described in detail. The calculation method is derived from the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient. The apparatus mainly consists of a high temperature environmental chamber, a power circuit of heating, two high-speed pyrometers, and a laser scanning system. A long solid specimen is resistively heated to a steady high-temperature state by a steady electrical current. The temperature profile of the specimen surface is not uniform because of the thermal conduction and radiation. The temperature profile and the total expansion are measured with a high-speed scanning pyrometer and a laser slit scanning measuring system, respectively. The thermal expansion coefficient in a wide temperature range (1000 - 3800 K) of the specimen can therefore be obtained. The perfect consistency between the present and previous results justifies the validity of this technique.

  8. Fabrication of setup for high temperature thermal conductivity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashutosh; Pandey, Sudhir K.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we report the fabrication of an experimental setup for high temperature thermal conductivity (κ) measurement. It can characterize samples with various dimensions and shapes. Steady state based axial heat flow technique is used for κ measurement. Heat loss is measured using parallel thermal conductance technique. Simple design, lightweight, and small size sample holder is developed by using a thin heater and limited components. Low heat loss value is achieved by using very low thermal conductive insulator block with small cross-sectional area. Power delivered to the heater is measured accurately by using 4-wire technique and for this, the heater is developed with 4 wires. This setup is validated by using Bi0.36Sb1.45Te3, polycrystalline bismuth, gadolinium, and alumina samples. The data obtained for these samples are found to be in good agreement with the reported data. The maximum deviation of 6% in the value κ is observed. This maximum deviation is observed with the gadolinium sample. We also report the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline tellurium from 320 K to 550 K and the nonmonotonous behavior of κ with temperature is observed.

  9. Thermal lensing measurement from the coefficient of defocus aberration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bell, Teboho

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We measured the thermally induced lens from the coefficient of defocus aberration using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS). As a calibration technique, we infer the focal length of standard lenses probed by a collimated Gaussian beam...

  10. Comparison of coconut water and a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink on measures of hydration and physical performance in exercise-trained men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalman Douglas S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sport drinks are ubiquitous within the recreational and competitive fitness and sporting world. Most are manufactured and artificially flavored carbohydrate-electrolyte beverages. Recently, attention has been given to coconut water, a natural alternative to manufactured sport drinks, with initial evidence indicating efficacy with regard to maintaining hydration. We compared coconut water and a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink on measures of hydration and physical performance in exercise-trained men. Methods Following a 60-minute bout of dehydrating treadmill exercise, 12 exercise-trained men (26.6 ± 5.7 yrs received bottled water (BW, pure coconut water (VitaCoco®: CW, coconut water from concentrate (CWC, or a carbohydrate-electrolyte sport drink (SD [a fluid amount based on body mass loss during the dehydrating exercise] on four occasions (separated by at least 5 days in a random order, single blind (subject and not investigators, cross-over design. Hydration status (body mass, fluid retention, plasma osmolality, urine specific gravity and performance (treadmill time to exhaustion; assessed after rehydration were determined during the recovery period. Subjective measures of thirst, bloatedness, refreshed, stomach upset, and tiredness were also determined using a 5-point visual analog scale. Results Subjects lost approximately 1.7 kg (~2% of body mass during the dehydrating exercise and regained this amount in a relatively similar manner following consumption of all conditions. No differences were noted between coconut water (CW or CWC and SD for any measures of fluid retention (p > 0.05. Regarding exercise performance, no significant difference (p > 0.05 was noted between BW (11.9 ± 5.9 min, CW (12.3 ± 5.8 min, CWC (11.9 ± 6.0 min, and SD (12.8 ± 4.9 min. In general, subjects reported feeling more bloated and experienced greater stomach upset with the CW and CWC conditions. Conclusion All tested beverages are

  11. Measurement of boron isotopes by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The isobaric interference for boron isotopic measurement by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry (NTIMS) has been studied. The result shows that the CNO- is not only from the organic material, but also from nitrate in loading reagent in NTIMS. Monitoring the mass 43 ion intensity and 43/42 ratio of blank are also necessary for the boron isotopic measurement by NTIMS, other than is only boron content.

  12. Electrostatic analyzer measurements of ionospheric thermal ion populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, P. A.; Lynch, K. A.

    2016-07-01

    We define the observational parameter regime necessary for observing low-altitude ionospheric origins of high-latitude ion upflow/outflow. We present measurement challenges and identify a new analysis technique which mitigates these impediments. To probe the initiation of auroral ion upflow, it is necessary to examine the thermal ion population at 200-350 km, where typical thermal energies are tenths of eV. Interpretation of the thermal ion distribution function measurement requires removal of payload sheath and ram effects. We use a 3-D Maxwellian model to quantify how observed ionospheric parameters such as density, temperature, and flows affect in situ measurements of the thermal ion distribution function. We define the viable acceptance window of a typical top hat electrostatic analyzer in this regime and show that the instrument's energy resolution prohibits it from directly observing the shape of the particle spectra. To extract detailed information about measured particle population, we define two intermediate parameters from the measured distribution function, then use a Maxwellian model to replicate possible measured parameters for comparison to the data. Liouville's theorem and the thin-sheath approximation allow us to couple the measured and modeled intermediate parameters such that measurements inside the sheath provide information about plasma outside the sheath. We apply this technique to sounding rocket data to show that careful windowing of the data and Maxwellian models allows for extraction of the best choice of geophysical parameters. More widespread use of this analysis technique will help our community expand its observational database of the seed regions of ionospheric outflows.

  13. Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 1. Measurement technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

    2000-04-01

    This paper describes a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. Since ash deposit thermal conductivity is thought to be strongly dependent on deposit microstructure, the technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. Traditional techniques for measuring deposit thermal conductivity generally do not preserve the sample microstructure. Experiments are described that demonstrate the technique, quantify experimental uncertainty, and determine the thermal conductivity of highly porous, unsintered deposits. The average measured conductivity of loose, unsintered deposits is 0.14 {+-} 0.03 W/(m K), approximately midway between rational theoretical limits for deposit thermal conductivity.

  14. Determination of thermal/dynamic characteristics of lava flow from surface thermal measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Melnik, Oleg; Korotkii, Alexander; Tsepelev, Igor; Kovtunov, Dmitry

    2016-04-01

    Rapid development of ground based thermal cameras, drones and satellite data allows getting repeated thermal images of the surface of the lava flow. Available instrumentation allows getting a large amount of data during a single lava flow eruption. These data require development of appropriate quantitative techniques to link subsurface dynamics with observations. We present a new approach to assimilation of thermal measurements at lava's surface to the bottom of the lava flow to determine lava's thermal and dynamic characteristics. Mathematically this problem is reduced to solving an inverse boundary problem. Namely, using known conditions at one part of the model boundary we determine the missing condition at the remaining part of the boundary. Using an adjoint method we develop a numerical approach to the mathematical problem based on the determination of the missing boundary condition and lava flow characteristics. Numerical results show that in the case of smooth input data lava temperature and velocity can be determined with a high accuracy. A noise imposed on the smooth input data results in a less accurate solution, but still acceptable below some noise level. The proposed approach to assimilate measured data brings an opportunity to estimate thermal budget of the lava flow.

  15. Method for Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Small Samples Having Very Low Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria a.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a hot plate method capable of using air as a standard reference material for the steady-state measurement of the thermal conductivity of very small test samples having thermal conductivity on the order of air. As with other approaches, care is taken to ensure that the heat flow through the test sample is essentially one-dimensional. However, unlike other approaches, no attempt is made to use heated guards to block the flow of heat from the hot plate to the surroundings. It is argued that since large correction factors must be applied to account for guard imperfections when sample dimensions are small, it may be preferable to simply measure and correct for the heat that flows from the heater disc to directions other than into the sample. Experimental measurements taken in a prototype apparatus, combined with extensive computational modeling of the heat transfer in the apparatus, show that sufficiently accurate measurements can be obtained to allow determination of the thermal conductivity of low thermal conductivity materials. Suggestions are made for further improvements in the method based on results from regression analyses of the generated data.

  16. Measuring thermal conductivity of powders with differential scanning calorimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Pujula, Miquel; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Daniel; López-Olmedo, Joan Pere; Farjas Silva, Jordi; Roura Grabulosa, Pere

    2016-01-01

    This paper simplifies a recently proposed method for measuring the thermal conductivity of powders using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) (Sa´nchez-Rodríguez et al. in J Therm Anal Calorim 121:469-473, 2015). With this method, a crucible is filled with powder and a spherical metal reference is partially sunk into it. The thermal resistance between the metal and the crucible wall at the metal melting point is obtained from the DSC melting peak slope. In the simplified method outlined in...

  17. Measurement of in-plane thermal conductivity in polymer films

    OpenAIRE

    Qingshuo Wei; Chinatsu Uehara; Masakazu Mukaida; Kazuhiro Kirihara; Takao Ishida

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the in-plane thermal conductivity of organic thermoelectric materials is challenging but is critically important. Here, a method to study the in-plane thermal conductivity of free-standing films (via the use of commercial equipment) based on temperature wave analysis is explored in depth. This subject method required a free-standing thin film with a thickness larger than 10 μm and an area larger than 1 cm2, which are not difficult to obtain for most solution-processable organic ther...

  18. Experimental Investigation of Effect on Hydrate Formation in Spray Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of reaction condition on hydrate formation were conducted in spray reactor. The temperature, pressure, and gas volume of reaction on hydrate formation were measured in pure water and SDS solutions at different temperature and pressure with a high-pressure experimental rig for hydrate formation. The experimental data and result reveal that additives could improve the hydrate formation rate and gas storage capacity. Temperature and pressure can restrict the hydrate formation. Lower temperature and higher pressure can promote hydrate formation, but they can increase production cost. So these factors should be considered synthetically. The investigation will promote the advance of gas storage technology in hydrates.

  19. Measurement of the intrinsic thermal conductivity of a multiwalled carbon nanotube and its contact thermal resistance with the substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juekuan; Yang, Yang; Waltermire, Scott W; Gutu, Timothy; Zinn, Alfred A; Xu, Terry T; Chen, Yunfei; Li, Deyu

    2011-08-22

    The intrinsic thermal conductivity of an individual carbon nanotube and its contact thermal resistance with the heat source/sink can be extracted simultaneously through multiple measurements with different lengths of the tube between the heat source and the heat sink. Experimental results on a 66-nm-diameter multiwalled carbon nanotube show that above 100 K, contact thermal resistance can contribute up to 50% of the total measured thermal resistance; therefore, the intrinsic thermal conductivity of the nanotube can be significantly higher than the effective thermal conductivity derived from a single measurement without eliminating the contact thermal resistance. At 300 K, the contact thermal resistance between the tube and the substrate for a unit area is 2.2 × 10(-8) m(2) K W(-1) , which is on the lower end among several published data. Results also indicate that for nanotubes of relatively high thermal conductance, electron-beam-induced gold deposition at the tube-substrate contacts may not reduce the contact thermal resistance to a negligible level. These results provide insights into the long-lasting issue of the contact thermal resistance in nanotube/nanowire thermal conductity measurements and have important implications for further understanding thermal transport through carbon nanotubes and using carbon nanotube arrays as thermal interface materials. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Using thermalizers in measuring 'Ukryttia' object's FCM neutron fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnyanskaya, O G; Odinokin, G I; Pavlovich, V N

    2003-01-01

    The results of research of a thermalizer (heater) width influence on neutron thermalization efficiency during FCM neutron flux measuring in the 'Ukryttia' are described. The calculations of neutron flux densities were performed by the Monte-Carlo method with the help of computer code MCNP-4C for FCM different models.Three possible installations of detectors were considered: on FCM surface,inside the FCM, and inside the concrete under the FCM layer. It was shown,that in order to increase the sensitivity of neutron detectors in intermediate and fast neutrons field,and consequently, to decrease the dependence of the readings of spectral distribution of neutron flux,it is necessary to position the detector inside the so-called thermalizer or heater. The most reasonable application of thick 'heaters' is the situation, when the detector is placed on FCM surface.

  1. Measurement of interfacial thermal conductance in Lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitonde, Aalok; Nimmagadda, Amulya; Marconnet, Amy

    2017-03-01

    Increasing usage and recent accidents due to Lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries exploding or catching on fire has inspired research on the thermal management of these batteries. In cylindrical 18650 cells, heat generated during the charge/discharge cycle must dissipate to the surrounding through its metallic case due to the poor thermal conductivity of the jelly roll, which is spirally wound with many interfaces between electrodes and the polymeric separator. This work develops a technique to measure the thermal resistance across the case-separator interface, which ultimately limits heat transfer out of the jelly roll. Commercial 18650 batteries are discharged and opened using a battery disassembly tool, and the 25 μm thick separator and the 200 μm thick metallic case are harvested to make samples. A miniaturized version of the conventional reference bar method

  2. Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Measurements of CDA 510 Phosphor Bronze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, James E.; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Many cryogenic systems use electrical cables containing phosphor bronze wire. While phosphor bronze's electrical and thermal conductivity values have been published, there is significant variation among different phosphor bronze formulations. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will use several phosphor bronze wire harnesses containing a specific formulation (CDA 510, annealed temper). The heat conducted into the JWST instrument stage is dominated by these harnesses, and approximately half of the harness conductance is due to the phosphor bronze wires. Since the JWST radiators are expected to just keep the instruments at their operating temperature with limited cooling margin, it is important to know the thermal conductivity of the actual alloy being used. We describe an experiment which measured the electrical and thermal conductivity of this material between 4 and 295 Kelvin.

  3. Dissociation and specific heats of gas hydrates under submarine and sublacustrine environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, R.; Hachikubo, A.; Shoji, H. [Kitami Inst. of Technology, Kitami (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Studies have shown that natural gas hydrates located near a mud volcano in Lake Baikal contain high concentrations of ethane. Gas hydrates absorb and release large amounts of latent heat during their formation and dissociation processes. In this study, the specific heat of synthetic methane and ethane hydrates were measured under high pressure using a heat-flow calorimeter. The aim of the study was to develop an improved understanding of the thermal environment of gas hydrate-bearing sediments in submarine and sublacustrine environments. Ice was placed in 2 sampling cells and pressurized with methane and ethane at 5 MPa and 2 MPa. After the gas hydrates formed, the samples were then heated from 263 K to 288 K. An analysis of data obtained from the experiment showed that large negative heat flow peaks corresponding with methane gas hydrate dissociation occurred in temperature ranges of 279 to 282 K at a pressure of 5 MPa, and at temperatures of 283-286 K at 2 MPa for the ethane gas hydrate. Future experiments with the calorimeter will be conducted at higher pressure ranges. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Device for measurement of thermal emissivity at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Kralik, Tomas; Musilova, Vera; Srnka, Ales

    2016-01-01

    In the described device, the thermal emissivity or absorptivity of the sample is measured by substitution of the radiative heat flow between two parallel surfaces by thermal output of a heater. Fast measurements of the mutual emissivity for the range of the temperature of the radiating surface 25 K-150 K are possible. The absorbing surface has a temperature between 5 K and 10 K when LHe is used as cryoliquid. The desired measurement sensitivity is 1 mK for temperature and 0.1 {\\mu}W for heat power, respectively. The diameter of the whole device is 50 mm and so it is possible to use a commercial dewar can for the cooling. The form of the sample is a round plate 40 mm in diameter and 1 mm in thickness with one tested side. The emissivity and its temperature dependency for various surface treatments can be checked immediately before application in a cryogenic system.

  5. Electropyroelectric technique for measurement of the thermal effusivity of liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, R; Moreno, I; Araujo, C [Facultad de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Calz. Solidaridad Esquina Paseo de la Bufa s/n, C. P. 98060, Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Marin, E, E-mail: emarin63@yahoo.e, E-mail: emarinm@ipn.m [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y TecnologIa Avanzada, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, LegarIa 694, Colonia Irrigacion, C. P. 11500, Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-06-09

    The photopyroelectric method has been recognized as a reliable and useful tool for the measurement of the thermal properties of condensed matter samples. Usually the photothermal signal is generated using intensity modulated light beams, whose amplitudes are difficult to maintain stable. In this paper we describe a variant of this technique that uses amplitude modulated electrical current as excitation source, via Joule heating of the metal contact on one side of the pyroelectric sensor. The possibilities of this method, called by us the electropyroelectric technique, for thermal effusivity measurements of liquid samples are shown using test samples of distilled water, ethanol and glycerine. The results obtained for this parameter agree well with the values reported in the literature. Our measurement uncertainties are about 3%, a fact that opens several possible applications.

  6. Water cooling thermal power measurement in a vacuum diffusion pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Henrique Cardozo Amorin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion vacuum pumps are used both in industry and in laboratory science for high vacuum production. For its operation they must be refrigerated, and it is done by circulating water in open circuit. Considering that, vacuum systems stays operating by hours, the water consumption may be avoided if the diffusion vacuum pumps refrigeration were done in closed circuit. However, it is necessary to know the diffusion vacuum pump thermal power (the heat transferred to circulate water by time units to implement one of these and get in the refrigeration system dimension. In this paper the diffusion vacuum pump thermal power was obtained by measuring water flow and temperature variation and was calculated through the heat quantity variation equation time function. The thermal power value was 935,6 W, that is 397 W smaller and 35 W bigger than, respectively, the maximum and minimum diffusion pump thermal power suggested by its operation manual. This procedure have been shown useful to precisely determine the diffusion pump thermal power or of any other system that needs to be refrigerated in water closed circuit.

  7. The Measurement of Thermal Conductivities of Silica and Carbon Black Powders at Different pressures by Thermal COnductivity Probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.G.Liang; X.S.Ge; 等

    1992-01-01

    This investigation was done to study the gas filled powder insulation and thermal conductivity probe for the measurent of thermal conductivity of powders.The mathematical analysis showed that the heat capacity of the probe itself and the thermal rsistance between the probe and powder must be considered .The authors developed a slender probe and measured the effective thermal conductivity of sillca and carbon black powders under a variety of conditions.

  8. Impact of measurable physical phenomena on contact thermal comfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fojtlín Miloš

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cabin HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air-conditioning systems have become an essential part of personal vehicles as demands for comfortable transport are still rising. In fact, 85 % of the car trips in Europe are shorter than 18 km and last only up to 30 minutes. Under such conditions, the HVAC unit cannot often ensure desired cabin environment and passengers are prone to experience thermal stress. For this reason, additional comfort systems, such as heated or ventilated seats, are available on the market. However, there is no straightforward method to evaluate thermal comfort at the contact surfaces nowadays. The aim of this work is to summarise information about heated and ventilated seats. These technologies use electrical heating and fan driven air to contact area in order to achieve enhanced comfort. It is also expected, that such measures may contribute to lower energy consumption. Yet, in real conditions it is almost impossible to measure the airflow through the ventilated seat directly. Therefore, there is a need for an approach that would correlate measurable physical phenomena with thermal comfort. For this reason, a method that exploits a measurement of temperatures and humidity at the contact area is proposed. Preliminary results that correlate comfort with measurable physical phenomena are demonstrated.

  9. A physical model for measuring thermally-induced block displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakun-Mazor, Dagan; Feldhiem, Aviran; Keissar, Yuval; Hatzor, Yossef H.

    2016-04-01

    A new model for thermally-induced block displacement in discontinuous rock slopes has been recently suggested. The model consists of a discrete block that is separated from the rock mass by a tension crack and rests on an inclined plane. The tension crack is filled with a wedge block or rock fragments. Irreversible block sliding is assumed to develop in response to climatic thermal fluctuations and consequent contraction and expansion of the sliding block material. While a tentative analytical solution for this model is already available, we are exploring here the possibility of obtaining such a permanent, thermally-induced, rock block displacement, under fully controlled conditions at the laboratory, and the sensitivity of the mechanism to geometry, mechanical properties, and temperature fluctuations. A large scale concrete physical model (50x150x60 cm^3) is being examined in a Climate-Controlled Room (CCR). The CCR permits accurate control of ambient temperature from 5 to 45 Celsius degrees. The permanent plastic displacement is being measured using four displacement transducers and a high resolution (29M pixel) visual range camera. A series of thermocouples measure the heating front inside the sliding block, hence thermal diffusivity is evaluated from the measured thermal gradient and heat flow. In order to select the appropriate concrete mixture, the mechanical and thermo-physical properties of concrete samples are determined in the lab. Friction angle and shear stiffness of the sliding interface are determined utilizing a hydraulic, servo-controlled direct shear apparatus. Uniaxial compression tests are performed to determine the uniaxial compressive strength, Young's modulus and Poison's ratio of the intact block material using a stiff triaxial load frame. Thermal conductivity and linear thermal expansion coefficient are determined experimentally using a self-constructed measuring system. Due to the fact that this experiment is still in progress, preliminary

  10. Experimental measurements of thermal properties for Mexican building materials to simulate thermal behavior to save energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez-Galan, Jesus; Almanza, Rafael; Rodriguez, Neftali [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico). Inst. de Ingenieria

    2008-07-01

    One of the main factors that determine the reliability of building's thermal design is the values of thermal and heat transfer properties used during this process. In order to optimizing such thermal design process, there is little information available of the most utilized building materials in Mexico; hence, some measurements were carried out. We present thermal conductivity experimental results for: red brick, tepetate, adobe and concrete. Furthermore, experimental data of convective heat transfer coefficients are reported on: red brick, tepetate, adobe and concrete walls. Kondratyev methodology was used for thermal conductivity estimations. Kondratyev methodology is based on the cooling off of bodies in regular state analysis. Thermal conductivity values were: red brick k{sub L} = 0.906 W/mC, tepetate k{sub T} = 0.648 W/mC, adobe k{sub A} = 0.570 W/mC, and concrete k{sub C} = 1.918 W/mC. Red brick, tepetate, adobe and concrete test walls of 0.46 x 0.56 and 0.06 m thick, were manufactured, as well as a prototype of testing for mounting the walls, in order to evaluate their convective heat transfer coefficients. Measurements were carried out at the Institute of Engineering-UNAM Wind-Tunnel, for an air velocities interval of 2-10 m/s. Reported values for convective coefficients fluctuate on 16-134 W/m{sup 2}2 C, depending on material and position wall, as well as air velocity. (orig.)

  11. Critical Review of Industrial Techniques for Thermal-Conductivity Measurements of Thermal Insulation Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschmidt, Ulf; Hameury, Jacques; Strnad, Radek; Turzó-Andras, Emese; Wu, Jiyu

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a critical review of current industrial techniques and instruments to measure the thermal conductivity of thermal insulation materials, especially those insulations that can operate at temperatures above and up to . These materials generally are of a porous nature. The measuring instruments dealt with here are selected based on their maximum working temperature that should be higher than at least . These instruments are special types of the guarded hot-plate apparatus, the guarded heat-flow meter, the transient hot-wire and hot-plane instruments as well as the laser/xenon flash devices. All technical characteristics listed are quoted from the generally accessible information of the relevant manufacturers. The paper includes rankings of the instruments according to their standard retail price, the maximum sample size, and maximum working temperature, as well as the minimum in their measurement range.

  12. Thermal separation of soil particles from thermal conductivity measurement under various air pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sen; Ren, Tusheng; Lu, Yili; Meng, Ping; Zhang, Jinsong

    2017-01-05

    The thermal conductivity of dry soils is related closely to air pressure and the contact areas between solid particles. In this study, the thermal conductivity of two-phase soil systems was determined under reduced and increased air pressures. The thermal separation of soil particles, i.e., the characteristic dimension of the pore space (d), was then estimated based on the relationship between soil thermal conductivity and air pressure. Results showed that under both reduced and increased air pressures, d estimations were significantly larger than the geometrical mean separation of solid particles (D), which suggested that conductive heat transfer through solid particles dominated heat transfer in dry soils. The increased air pressure approach gave d values lower than that of the reduced air pressure method. With increasing air pressure, more collisions between gas molecules and solid surface occurred in micro-pores and intra-aggregate pores due to the reduction of mean free path of air molecules. Compared to the reduced air pressure approach, the increased air pressure approach expressed more micro-pore structure attributes in heat transfer. We concluded that measuring thermal conductivity under increased air pressure procedures gave better-quality d values, and improved soil micro-pore structure estimation.

  13. Thermal separation of soil particles from thermal conductivity measurement under various air pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sen; Ren, Tusheng; Lu, Yili; Meng, Ping; Zhang, Jinsong

    2017-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of dry soils is related closely to air pressure and the contact areas between solid particles. In this study, the thermal conductivity of two-phase soil systems was determined under reduced and increased air pressures. The thermal separation of soil particles, i.e., the characteristic dimension of the pore space (d), was then estimated based on the relationship between soil thermal conductivity and air pressure. Results showed that under both reduced and increased air pressures, d estimations were significantly larger than the geometrical mean separation of solid particles (D), which suggested that conductive heat transfer through solid particles dominated heat transfer in dry soils. The increased air pressure approach gave d values lower than that of the reduced air pressure method. With increasing air pressure, more collisions between gas molecules and solid surface occurred in micro-pores and intra-aggregate pores due to the reduction of mean free path of air molecules. Compared to the reduced air pressure approach, the increased air pressure approach expressed more micro-pore structure attributes in heat transfer. We concluded that measuring thermal conductivity under increased air pressure procedures gave better-quality d values, and improved soil micro-pore structure estimation.

  14. Cross-spectrum Measurement of Thermal-noise Limited Oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Hati, Archita; Howe, David A

    2015-01-01

    Cross-spectrum analysis is a commonly-used technique for the detection of phase and amplitude noise of a signal in the presence of interfering noise. It extracts the desired correlated noise from two time series in the presence of uncorrelated interfering noise. Recently, we demonstrated that the phase-inversion (anti-correlation) effect due to AM noise leakage can cause complete or partial collapse of the cross-spectral function. In this paper, we discuss the newly discovered effect of anti-correlated thermal noise that originates from the common-mode power divider (splitter), an essential component in a cross-spectrum noise measurement system. We studied this effect for different power splitters and discuss its influence on the measurement of thermal-noise limited oscillators. An oscillator whose thermal noise is primarily set by the 50 ohm source resistance is referred to as a thermally-limited oscillator. We provide theory, simulation and experimental results. In addition, we expand this study to reveal h...

  15. Thermal property measurement of thin fibers by complementary methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Troy Robert

    To improve measurement reliability and repeatability and resolve the orders of magnitude discrepancy between the two different measurements (via reduced model transient electrothermal and lock-in IR thermography), this dissertation details the development of three complementary methods to accurately measure the thermal properties of the natural and synthetic Nephila (N.) clavipes spider dragline fibers. The thermal conductivity and diffusivity of the dragline silk of the (N.) clavipes spider has been characterized by one research group to be 151-416 W m-1 K-1 and 6.4-12.3 x 10-5 m2 s -1, respectively, for samples with low to high strains (zero to 19.7%). Thermal diffusivity of the dragline silk of a different spider species, Araneus diadematus, has been determined by another research group as 2 x 10-7 m2 s-1 for un-stretched silk. This dissertation seeks to resolve this discrepancy by three complementary methods. The methods detailed are the transient electrothermal technique (in both reduced and full model versions), the 3o method (for both current and voltage sources), and the non-contact, photothermal, quantum-dot spectral shape-based fluorescence thermometry method. These methods were also validated with electrically conductive and non-conductive fibers. The resulting thermal conductivity of the dragline silk is 1.2 W m-1 K-1, the thermal diffusivity is 6 x 10-7 m2 s -1 and the volumetric heat capacity is 2000 kJ m-3 K-1, with an uncertainty of about 12% for each property.

  16. Material loss angles from direct measurements of broadband thermal noise

    CERN Document Server

    Principe, Maria; Pierro, Vincenzo; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Taurasi, Ilaria; Villar, Akira E; Black, Eric D; Libbrecht, Kenneth G; Michel, Christophe; Morgado, Nazario; Pinard, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the loss angles of the materials currently used in the highly reflective test-mass coatings of interferometric detectors of gravitational waves, namely Silica, Tantala, and Ti-dop ed Tantala, from direct measurement of coating thermal noise in an optical interferometer testbench, the Caltech TNI. We also present a simple predictive theory for the material properties of amorphous glassy oxide mixtures, which gives results in good agreement with our measurements on Ti-doped Tantala. Alternative measure ment methods and results are reviewed, and some critical issues are discussed.

  17. Measurement of Thermal Conductivity of Liquids at High Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, V.; Remy, B.; Degiovanni, A.; Demeurie, F.; Meulemans, J.; Lombard, P.

    2012-11-01

    The goal purchased in this paper is to implement a pulse method to measure the thermal conductivity of liquid silica glass above 1200°C until 1600°C. A heat flux stimulation controlled in energy and in time is generated on the front face of an experimental cell. The temperature rise is measured on the rear face of this cell face by using a fast cooled infrared camera. The choice of the measurement cell geometry is fundamental to be able to estimate at the same time the thermal diffusivity and the specific heat of the liquid by an inverse technique. The parameters estimation problem takes into account the optimization of the cell wall thickness. The theoretical model used for the inversion takes into account the coupled heat transfer modes (conduction, convection and radiation) that can occur during the experiment, particularly the thermal conductive short-cut through metallic lateral walls of the cell and radiative transfer within the semi-transparent and participating medium. First measurements are performed on a cell filled with water at ambient temperature in order to validate the parameters estimation procedure.

  18. Obsidian Hydration: A New Paleothermometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Riciputi, Lee R [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Fayek, Mostafa [ORNL; Elam, J. Michael [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2006-01-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  19. Obsidian hydration: A new paleothermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Riciputi, Lee R.; Cole, David R.; Fayek, Mostafa; Elam, J. Michael

    2006-07-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  20. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  1. Well log characterization of natural gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2011-01-01

    In the last 25 years we have seen significant advancements in the use of downhole well logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrate in nature: From an early start of using wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gas hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments to today where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. The most established and well known use of downhole log data in gas hydrate research is the use of electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data (both compressional- and shear-wave data) to make estimates of gas hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. New downhole logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation resistivity log measurements have provided the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly inter-bedded and fracture dominated gas hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing have also allowed for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids (i.e., free-water along with clay and capillary bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms controlling the formation and occurrence of gas hydrate in nature along with data on gas hydrate reservoir properties (i.e., permeabilities) needed to accurately predict gas production rates for various gas hydrate

  2. Measurement of Thermal Expansion Coefficients with Holographic Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhifengZhang

    1995-01-01

    A simplified mathematical model was created for measurement of thermal expansion coefficients of thin sheet materials with holographic technique.Experimental set-ups corresponding to the mathematical model were designed and built for both tests above room temperature and at low temperatures.A fringe control technique was introduced for low temperature measurements to compensate rigid body movement,THin sheet specimens of silicon and aluminum alloy(7075) were tested with the developed technique.The tested results are in good agreement with reported data and thus verify the validity of the developed technique.The Thermal expansion coefficients of the tested materials ranged from 2.5×10-60C-1 to 23.6×10-6oC-1.

  3. High Resolution Viscosity Measurement by Thermal Noise Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Aguilar Sandoval

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An interferometric method is implemented in order to accurately assess the thermal fluctuations of a micro-cantilever sensor in liquid environments. The power spectrum density (PSD of thermal fluctuations together with Sader’s model of the cantilever allow for the indirect measurement of the liquid viscosity with good accuracy. The good quality of the deflection signal and the characteristic low noise of the instrument allow for the detection and corrections of drawbacks due to both the cantilever shape irregularities and the uncertainties on the position of the laser spot at the fluctuating end of the cantilever. Variation of viscosity below 0.03 mPa·s was detected with the alternative to achieve measurements with a volume as low as 50 µL.

  4. Parameters measurement for the thermal neutron beam in the thermal column hole of Xi’an pulse reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The distribution of the neutron spectra in the thermal column hole of Xi’an pulse reactor was measured with the time-of-flight method.Compared with the thermal Maxwellian theory neutron spectra,the thermal neutron spectra measured is a little softer,and the average neutron energy of the experimental spectra is about 0.042±0.01 eV.The thermal neutron fluence rate at the front end of thermal column hole,measured with gold foil activation techniques,is about 1.18×105 cm-2 s-1.The standard uncertainty of the measured thermal neutron fluence is about 3%.The spectra-averaged cross section of 197Au(n,γ) determined by the experimental thermal neutron spectra is(92.8±0.93) ×10-24 cm2.

  5. Thermal Bridges in Building Construction - Measurements and Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen

    in building envelope constructions is given. After this a validation of both programs and guidelines is presented. The validation is performed by comparing calculated U-values with Guarded Hot Box measurements. The last part of the thesis discusses the possibilities of utilising the results of detailed...... calculations in more operational and applicable projecting tools, e.g. thermal bridge catalogues or U-value tables....

  6. Invasion of drilling mud into gas-hydrate-bearing sediments. Part I: effect of drilling mud properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Fulong; Zhang, Keni; Wu, Nengyou; Zhang, Ling; Li, Gang; Jiang, Guosheng; Yu, Yibing; Liu, Li; Qin, Yinghong

    2013-06-01

    To our knowledge, this study is the first to perform a numerical simulation and analysis of the dynamic behaviour of drilling mud invasion into oceanic gas-hydrate-bearing sediment (GHBS) and to consider the effects of such an invasion on borehole stability and the reliability of well logging. As a case study, the simulation background sets up the conditions of mud temperature over hydrate equilibrium temperature and overbalanced drilling, considering the first Chinese expedition to drill gas hydrate (GMGS-1). The results show that dissociating gas may form secondary hydrates in the sediment around borehole by the combined effects of increased pore pressure (caused by mud invasion and flow resistance), endothermic cooling that accompanies hydrate dissociation compounded by the Joule-Thompson effect and the lagged effect of heat transfer in sediments. The secondary hydrate ring around the borehole may be more highly saturated than the in situ sediment. Mud invasion in GHBS is a dynamic process of thermal, fluid (mud invasion), chemical (hydrate dissociation and reformation) and mechanical couplings. All of these factors interact and influence the pore pressure, flow ability, saturation of fluid and hydrates, mechanical parameters and electrical properties of sediments around the borehole, thereby having a strong effect on borehole stability and the results of well logging. The effect is particularly clear in the borehole SH7 of GMGS-1 project. The borehole collapse and resistivity distortion were observed during practical drilling and wireline logging operations in borehole SH7 of the GMGS-1.mud density (i.e. the corresponding borehole pressure), temperature and salinity have a marked influence on the dynamics of mud invasion and on hydrate stability. Therefore, perhaps well-logging distortion caused by mud invasion, hydrate dissociation and reformation should be considered for identifying and evaluating gas hydrate reservoirs. And some suitable drilling

  7. Clathrate hydrates in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Keith C; Brewer, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    Scientific knowledge of natural clathrate hydrates has grown enormously over the past decade, with spectacular new findings of large exposures of complex hydrates on the sea floor, the development of new tools for examining the solid phase in situ, significant progress in modeling natural hydrate systems, and the discovery of exotic hydrates associated with sea floor venting of liquid CO2. Major unresolved questions remain about the role of hydrates in response to climate change today, and correlations between the hydrate reservoir of Earth and the stable isotopic evidence of massive hydrate dissociation in the geologic past. The examination of hydrates as a possible energy resource is proceeding apace for the subpermafrost accumulations in the Arctic, but serious questions remain about the viability of marine hydrates as an economic resource. New and energetic explorations by nations such as India and China are quickly uncovering large hydrate findings on their continental shelves.

  8. Evaluation of thermal gradients in longitudinal spin Seebeck effect measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sola, A., E-mail: a.sola@inrim.it; Kuepferling, M.; Basso, V.; Pasquale, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Turin (Italy); Kikkawa, T. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Uchida, K. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Saitoh, E. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai 319-1195 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    In the framework of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), we developed an experimental setup for the characterization of LSSE devices. This class of device consists in a layered structure formed by a substrate, a ferrimagnetic insulator (YIG) where the spin current is thermally generated, and a paramagnetic metal (Pt) for the detection of the spin current via the inverse spin-Hall effect. In this kind of experiments, the evaluation of a thermal gradient through the thin YIG layer is a crucial point. In this work, we perform an indirect determination of the thermal gradient through the measurement of the heat flux. We developed an experimental setup using Peltier cells that allow us to measure the heat flux through a given sample. In order to test the technique, a standard LSSE device produced at Tohoku University was measured. We find a spin Seebeck S{sub SSE} coefficient of 2.8×10{sup −7} V K{sup −1}.

  9. A thermal stack structure for measurement of fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hao; Mitchell, S. J. N.; Campbell, D. H.; Gamble, Harold S.

    2003-03-01

    A stacked thermal structure for fluid flow sensing has been designed, fabricated, and tested. A double-layer polysilicon process was employed in the fabrication. Flow measurement is based on the transfer of heat from a temperature sensor element to the moving fluid. The undoped or lightly doped polysilicon temperature sensor is located on top of a heavily doped polysilicon heater element. A dielectric layer between the heater and the sensor elements provides both thermal coupling and electrical isolation. In comparison to a hot-wire flow sensor, the heating and sensing functions are separated, allowing the electrical characteristics of each to be optimized. Undoped polysilicon has a large temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) up to 7 %/K and is thus a preferred material for the sensor. However, heavily doped polysilicon is preferred for the heater due to its lower resistance. The stacked flow sensor structure offers a high thermal sensitivity making it especially suitable for medical applications where the working temperatures are restricted. Flow rates of various fluids can be measured over a wide range. The fabricated flow sensors were used to measure the flow rate of water in the range μl - ml/min and gas (Helium) in the range 10 - 100ml/min.

  10. Estimation of Membrane Hydration Status for Standby Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems by Impedance Measurement: First Results on Stack Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bidoggia, Benoit; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    Fuel cells have started replacing traditional lead-acid battery banks in backup systems. Although these systems are characterized by long periods of standby, they must be able to start at any instant in the shortest time. In the case of low temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems...... was applied, and the relationship between module of impedance and relative humidity was found. The results showed that measuring the impedance of a fuel cell during standby can be a viable way for estimating the hydration status of its membrane....

  11. Simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity and thermal contact resistance of individual carbon fibers using Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinhui; Wang, Haidong; Ma, Weigang; Zhang, Xing; Song, Yan

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, a new method employing Raman spectroscopy to determine thermal conductivity (TC) and thermal contact resistance (TCR) of an individual fiber was developed. Laser absorption is accounted for, but there is no need to be determined in this method. The local temperatures along the fiber longitudinal direction were determined by Raman shift. Two independent equations related to TC and TCR were established through measuring the temperature variation induced by changing electrical heating power at the center of the sample and the local temperature rise induced by a focused laser heating from Raman spectroscopy at two different positions on the sample, respectively. By solving the two equations, TC and TCR can then be obtained. This method has been validated by measuring two suspended carbon fibers.

  12. Thermal tests for laser Doppler perfusion measurements in Raynaud's syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacprzak, Michal; Skora, A.; Obidzinska, J.; Zbiec, A.; Maniewski, Roman; Staszkiewicz, W.

    2004-07-01

    The laser Doppler method offers a non-invasive, real time technique for monitoring of blood perfusion in microcirculation. In practical measurements the perfusion index is given only in relative values. Thus, accurate and reproducible results can be only obtained when using a well controlled stimulation test. The aim of this study was evaluation of the thermal stimulation test, which is frequently used to investigate microcirculation in patients with Raynaud's syndrome. Three types of thermal tests, in which air or water with temperature in range 5°C - 40°C were used. Ten normal volunteers and fifteen patients with clinical symptoms of the primary Raynaud's syndrome were enrolled in this study. To estimate skin microcirculation changes during the thermal test, the multichannel laser Doppler system and laser Doppler scanner were used. The obtained results were analyzed from the point of view of the efficiency of these methods and the thermal provocative tests in differentiation of normal subjects and patient with Raynaud's syndrome.

  13. Investigation into the Formation and Adhesion of Cyclopentane Hydrates on Mechanically Robust Vapor-Deposited Polymeric Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojoudi, Hossein; Walsh, Matthew R; Gleason, Karen K; McKinley, Gareth H

    2015-06-09

    Blockage of pipelines by formation and accumulation of clathrate hydrates of natural gases (also called gas hydrates) can compromise project safety and economics in oil and gas operations, particularly at high pressures and low temperatures such as those found in subsea or arctic environments. Cyclopentane (CyC5) hydrate has attracted interest as a model system for studying natural gas hydrates, because CyC5, like typical natural gas hydrate formers, is almost fully immiscible in water; and thus CyC5 hydrate formation is governed not only by thermodynamic phase considerations but also kinetic factors such as the hydrocarbon/water interfacial area, as well as mass and heat transfer constraints, as for natural gas hydrates. We present a macroscale investigation of the formation and adhesion strength of CyC5 hydrate deposits on bilayer polymer coatings with a range of wettabilities. The polymeric bilayer coatings are developed using initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) of a mechanically robust and densely cross-linked polymeric base layer (polydivinylbenzene or pDVB) that is capped with a covalently attached thin hydrate-phobic fluorine-rich top layer (poly(perfluorodecyl acrylate) or pPFDA). The CyC5 hydrates are formed from CyC5-in-water emulsions, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is used to confirm the thermal dissociation properties of the solid hydrate deposits. We also investigate the adhesion of the CyC5 hydrate deposits on bare and bilayer polymer-coated silicon and steel substrates. Goniometric measurements with drops of CyC5-in-water emulsions on the coated steel substrates exhibit advancing contact angles of 148.3 ± 4.5° and receding contact angles of 142.5 ± 9.8°, indicating the strongly emulsion-repelling nature of the iCVD coatings. The adhesion strength of the CyC5 hydrate deposits is reduced from 220 ± 45 kPa on rough steel substrates to 20 ± 17 kPa on the polymer-coated steel substrates. The measured strength of CyC5 hydrate

  14. High Accuracy Thermal Expansion Measurement at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Jim; Despit, Gregory; Stallcup, Michael; Presson, Joan; Nein, Max

    2003-01-01

    A new, interferometer-based system for measuring thermal expansion to an absolute accuracy of 20 ppb or better at cryogenic temperatures has been developed. Data from NIST Copper SRM 736 measured from room temperature to 15 K will be presented along with data from many other materials including beryllium, ULE, Zerodur, and composite materials. Particular attention will be given to a study by the Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center (SOMTC) investigating the variability of ULE and beryllium materials used in the AMSD program Approximately 20 samples of each material, tested from room temperature to below 30 K are compared as a function of billet location.

  15. Microfabricated thermal conductivity sensor: a high resolution tool for quantitative thermal property measurement of biomaterials and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xin M; Ding, Weiping; Chen, Hsiu-hung; Shu, Zhiquan; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Hai-feng; Gao, Dayong

    2011-10-01

    Obtaining accurate thermal properties of biomaterials plays an important role in the field of cryobiology. Currently, thermal needle, which is constructed by enclosing a manually winded thin metal wire with an insulation coating in a metallic sheath, is the only available device that is capable of measuring thermal conductivity of biomaterials. Major drawbacks, such as macroscale sensor size, lack of versatile format to accommodate samples with various shapes and sizes, neglected effects of heat transfer inside the probe and thermal contact resistance between the sensing element and the probe body, difficult to mass produce, poor data repeatability and reliability and labor-intense sensor calibration, have significantly reduced their potential to be an essential measurement tool to provide key thermal property information of biological specimens. In this study, we describe the development of an approach to measure thermal conductivity of liquids and soft bio-tissues using a proof-of-concept MEMS based thermal probe. By employing a microfabricated closely-packed gold wire to function as the heater and the thermistor, the presented thermal sensor can be used to measure thermal conductivities of fluids and natural soft biomaterials (particularly, the sensor may be directly inserted into soft tissues in living animal/plant bodies or into tissues isolated from the animal/plant bodies), where other more standard approaches cannot be used. Thermal standard materials have been used to calibrate two randomly selected thermal probes at room temperature. Variation between the obtained system calibration constants is less than 10%. By incorporating the previously obtained system calibration constant, three randomly selected thermal probes have been successfully utilized to measure the thermal conductivities of various solutions and tissue samples under different temperatures. Overall, the measurements are in agreement with the recommended values (percentage error less than 5

  16. Experimental investigation of smectite hydration from the simulation of 001 X-ray diffraction lines. Implications for the characterization of mineralogical modifications of the 'argilite' from the Meuse - Haute Marne site as a result of a thermal perturbation; Etude experimentale de l'hydratation des smectites par simulation des raies OOl de diffraction des rayons X. Implications pour l'etude d'une perturbation thermique sur la mineralogie de l'argilite du site Meuse-Haute Marne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrage, E

    2004-10-15

    The structural modifications affecting the reactive mineral constituents of the clay barriers (smectite) and possibly resulting from the thermal pulse related to nuclear waste storage are essentially limited to the amount and location of the layer charge deficit. These modifications likely impact the hydration properties of these minerals, and a specific methodology has thus been developed to describe, using simulation of X-ray diffraction profiles (001 reflections), these hydration properties and specifically the heterogeneity resulting from the inter-stratification of different layer types, each exhibiting a specific hydration state. The detailed study of the hydration properties of a low-charge montmorillonite (octahedral charge) has shown that the affinity of the interlayer cation for water rules the hydration state and the thickness of hydrated smectite layers. If the layer charge is increased, the transition between the different hydration states is shifted, following a water desorption isotherm, towards lower relative humidities. In addition, the hydration of studied beidellites (tetrahedral charge) was shown to be more heterogeneous than that of montmorillonites. The developed methodology also allowed describing the structural modifications resulting from a chemical perturbation (chlorinated anionic background, pH). Finally, the link between the thickness of elementary layers and the amount of interlayer water molecules has been evidenced. A new structure model has also been determined for these interlayer species allowing an improved description of their positional distribution in bi-hydrated interlayers. (author)

  17. Measurement and Simulation of Thermal Conductivity of Hafnium-Aluminum Thermal Neutron Absorber Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillen, Donna Post; Harris, William H.

    2016-09-01

    A metal matrix composite (MMC) material composed of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) intermetallic particles in an aluminum matrix has been identified as a promising material for fast flux irradiation testing applications. This material can filter thermal neutrons while simultaneously providing high rates of conductive cooling for experiment capsules. The purpose of this work is to investigate effects of Hf-Al material composition and neutron irradiation on thermophysical properties, which were measured before and after irradiation. When performing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) on the irradiated specimens, a large exotherm corresponding to material annealment was observed. Therefore, a test procedure was developed to perform DSC and laser flash analysis (LFA) to obtain the specific heat and thermal diffusivity of pre- and post-annealment specimens. This paper presents the thermal properties for three states of the MMC material: (1) unirradiated, (2) as-irradiated, and (3) irradiated and annealed. Microstructure-property relationships were obtained for the thermal conductivity. These relationships are useful for designing components from this material to operate in irradiation environments. The ability of this material to effectively conduct heat as a function of temperature, volume fraction Al3Hf, radiation damage, and annealing is assessed using the MOOSE suite of computational tools.

  18. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  19. Crystallite size distributions of marine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klapp, S.A.; Bohrmann, G.; Abegg, F. [Bremen Univ., Bremen (Germany). Research Center of Ocean Margins; Hemes, S.; Klein, H.; Kuhs, W.F. [Gottingen Univ., Gottingen (Germany). Dept. of Crystallography

    2008-07-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to determine the crystallite size distributions of natural gas hydrate samples retrieved from the Gulf of Mexico, the Black Sea, and a hydrate ridge located near offshore Oregon. Synchrotron radiation technology was used to provide the high photon fluxes and high penetration depths needed to accurately analyze the bulk sediment samples. A new beam collimation diffraction technique was used to measure gas hydrate crystallite sizes. The analyses showed that gas hydrate crystals were globular in shape. Mean crystallite sizes ranged from 200 to 400 {mu}m for hydrate samples taken from the sea floor. Larger grain sizes in the hydrate ridge samples suggested differences in hydrate formation ages or processes. A comparison with laboratory-produced methane hydrate samples showed half a lognormal curve with a mean value of 40{mu}m. Results of the study showed that a cautious approach must be adopted when transposing crystallite-size sensitive physical data from laboratory-made gas hydrates to natural settings. It was concluded that crystallite size information may also be used to resolve the formation ages of gas hydrates when formation processes and conditions are constrained. 48 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  20. Thermal conductivity measurements of proton-heated warm dense matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, A.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Hua, R.; Kim, J.; King, J.; Sio, H.; McGuffey, C.; Kemp, G. E.; Freeman, R. R.; Beg, F. N.; Shepherd, R.; Ping, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Accurate knowledge of conductivity characteristics in the strongly coupled plasma regime is extremely important for ICF processes such as the onset of hydrodynamic instabilities, thermonuclear burn propagation waves, shell mixing, and efficient x-ray conversion of indirect drive schemes. Recently, an experiment was performed on the Titan laser platform at the Jupiter Laser Facility to measure the thermal conductivity of proton-heated warm dense matter. In the experiment, proton beams generated via target normal sheath acceleration were used to heat bi-layer targets with high-Z front layers and lower-Z back layers. The stopping power of a material is approximately proportional to Z2 so a sharp temperature gradient is established between the two materials. The subsequent thermal conduction from the higher-Z material to the lower-Z was measured with time resolved streaked optical pyrometry (SOP) and Fourier domain interferometry (FDI) of the rear surface. Results will be used to compare predictions from the thermal conduction equation and the Wiedemann-Franz Law in the warm dense matter regime. Data from the time resolved diagnostics for Au/Al and Au/C Targets of 20-200 nm thickness will be presented.

  1. The strength and rheology of methane clathrate hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.; Zhang, W.

    2003-01-01

    Methane clathrate hydrate (structure I) is found to be very strong, based on laboratory triaxial deformation experiments we have carried out on samples of synthetic, high-purity, polycrystalline material. Samples were deformed in compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress, ??), at conditions of confining pressure P = 50 and 100 MPa, strain rate 4.5 ?? 10-8 ??? ?? ??? 4.3 ?? 10-4 s-1, temperature 260 ??? T ??? 287 K, and internal methane pressure 10 ??? PCH4 ??? 15 MPa. At steady state, typically reached in a few percent strain, methane hydrate exhibited strength that was far higher than expected on the basis of published work. In terms of the standard high-temperature creep law, ?? = A??ne-(E*+PV*)/RT the rheology is described by the constants A = 108.55 MPa-n s-1, n = 2.2, E* = 90,000 J mol-1, and V* = 19 cm3 mol-1. For comparison at temperatures just below the ice point, methane hydrate at a given strain rate is over 20 times stronger than ice, and the contrast increases at lower temperatures. The possible occurrence of syntectonic dissociation of methane hydrate to methane plus free water in these experiments suggests that the high strength measured here may be only a lower bound. On Earth, high strength in hydrate-bearing formations implies higher energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure. In the outer solar system, if Titan has a 100-km-thick near-surface layer of high-strength, low-thermal conductivity methane hydrate as has been suggested, its interior is likely to be considerably warmer than previously expected.

  2. Low temperature thermal expansion measurements on optical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browder, J S; Ballard, S S

    1969-04-01

    A three-terminal capacitance type dilatometer has been developed for investigating the thermal expansion of optical materials at low temperatures. The method is applicable when only small sample lengths (13 mm or less) are available. The thermal expansion coefficients of six polycrystalline materials (the Irtrans) and of one nonoxide glass have been determined in the range from room temperature down to about 60 K. Minute changes of the length of a sample produce a change of the spacing of a parallel plate capacitor with guard ring; the resulting change of capacitance is measured on a highly sensitive bridge. The expansion coefficients are then determined by relating the change of capacitance to the change of dimensions of the sample.

  3. 3D shape measurement with thermal pattern projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahm, Anika; Reetz, Edgar; Schindwolf, Simon; Correns, Martin; Kühmstedt, Peter; Notni, Gunther

    2016-12-01

    Structured light projection techniques are well-established optical methods for contactless and nondestructive three-dimensional (3D) measurements. Most systems operate in the visible wavelength range (VIS) due to commercially available projection and detection technology. For example, the 3D reconstruction can be done with a stereo-vision setup by finding corresponding pixels in both cameras followed by triangulation. Problems occur, if the properties of object materials disturb the measurements, which are based on the measurement of diffuse light reflections. For example, there are existing materials in the VIS range that are too transparent, translucent, high absorbent, or reflective and cannot be recorded properly. To overcome these challenges, we present an alternative thermal approach that operates in the infrared (IR) region of the electromagnetic spectrum. For this purpose, we used two cooled mid-wave (MWIR) cameras (3-5 μm) to detect emitted heat patterns, which were introduced by a CO2 laser. We present a thermal 3D system based on a GOBO (GOes Before Optics) wheel projection unit and first 3D analyses for different system parameters and samples. We also show a second alternative approach based on an incoherent (heat) source, to overcome typical disadvantages of high-power laser-based systems, such as industrial health and safety considerations, as well as high investment costs. Thus, materials like glass or fiber-reinforced composites can be measured contactless and without the need of additional paintings.

  4. Characterisation of advanced windows. Determination of thermal properties by measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duer, K.

    2001-04-01

    This report describes work carried out with the aim of facilitating a full energy performance characterisation of advanced windows and glazings by means of measurements. The energy performance of windows and glazings are characterised by two parameters: The thermal transmittance (U-value) and the total solar energy transmittance (g-value) and methods to determine these two parameters by measurements have been investigated. This process has included the improvement of existing equipment and existing measuring methods as well as the development of new measuring equipment and new methods of measuring and data treatment. Measurements of the thermal transmittance of windows and glazings in a guarded hot box have been investigated. The calibration and measuring procedures for determining the U-values of facade windows were analysed and a suggestion for a new calibration and measuring procedure for determining the U-values of roof windows in a guarded hot box was elaborated. The accuracy of the guarded hot box measurements was examined by comparisons to measurements in a hot-plate device and excellent agreement between the results was obtained. Analysis showed that the expected uncertainty in the U-value measurement is about 5% for a specimen with a U-value of 1.75 W/m{sup 2}K. The U-values of three different windows were measured in two separate round robin tests applying two different calibration procedures. The windows U-values where ranging from 1.1 to 2.5 W/m{sup 2}K and all measured results were within the expected uncertainties of the measurements. On the basis of the investigations on hot box measurements a high degree of confidence in the measurement accuracy and the measuring procedure of the guarded hot box at the Department of Buildings and Energy has been obtained. Indoor g-value measurements in a calorimetric test facility (the METSET) mounted in a solar simulator have been investigated and a number of problems regarding these measurements have been

  5. Measuring the thermal conductivity of liquids using photo-thermal radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusiak, A.; Pradere, Ch; Battaglia, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    A method for the estimation of thermal conductivity of liquids is proposed. The measurement is based on the front face-modulated photothermal radiometry usually used for studies of solid deposit (thin film) on substrate systems. The system considered here is in the three-layer form, the intermediate layer being the investigated liquid. An experimental setup has been developed in order to avoid the drawbacks of the classical methods such as flash or hot wire measurement. The measurement is carried out with low-temperature oscillations, and the studied liquid is confined in a specific (low thickness) container. This configuration leads to very low Rayleigh number and permits us to eliminate the convection phenomenon during the experiment and to characterize a very small (~1 µl) volume of liquid. This is an important feature for metrology of expensive or hazardous samples. According to the knowledge of the thermophysical properties of two solid layers external to a liquid, the phase lag between the thermal perturbation and the response of the sample is used as the experimental data. The measurement was validated using two well-known liquids: water and sunflower oil.

  6. Synthesis of hydrated lutetium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Liu [South China Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Guangdong (China); Rong-jun Ma [Changsha Research Institute of Minig and Metallurgy, Hunan (China)

    1997-09-01

    Crystalline lutetium carbonate was synthesized for the corresponding chloride using ammonium bicarbonate as precipitant. The chemical analyses suggest that the synthesized lutetium carbonate is a hydrated basic carbonate or oxycarbonate. The X-ray powder diffraction data are presented. The IR data for the compound show the presence of two different carbonate groups. There is no stable intermediate carbonate in the process of thermal decomposition of the lutetium carbonate. (au) 15 refs.

  7. Opto-thermal radiometry for in-vivo nail measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, P; Ciortea, L I; Berg, E P [Biox Systems Ltd, 103 Borough Road, London SE1 0AA (United Kingdom); Singh, H [Faculty of ESBE, London South Bank University, 103 Borough Road, London SE1 0AA (United Kingdom); Imhof, R E, E-mail: xiaop@lsbu.ac.u

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a new method for in-vivo human nail characterization by using opto-thermal transient emission radiometry (OTTER) and condenser-chamber TEWL (trans-dermal water loss) method - AquaFlux. With OTTER, we can measure nail water content, nail water concentration depth profiles, as well as topically applied solvent penetration through nail. With AquaFlux, we can measure nail transonychial water loss (TOWL). Combining the water content results with TOWL results, we can get the water diffusion coefficient of nail. Measuring the water diffusion coefficients of nail at different nail water concentration levels can also yield information on how nail diffusion coefficients change with water content. We will present the theoretical background, and experimental results on water concentration depth profile in nail, as well as topically applied solvent penetration through nail.

  8. Simultaneous temperature and velocity Lagrangian measurements in turbulent thermal convection

    CERN Document Server

    Liot, O; Zonta, F; Chibbaro, S; Coudarchet, T; Gasteuil, Y; Pinton, J -F; Salort, J; Chillà, F

    2015-01-01

    We report joint Lagrangian velocity and temperature measurements in turbulent thermal convection. Measurements are performed using an improved version (extended autonomy) of the neutrally-buoyant instrumented particle that was used by to performed experiments in a parallelepipedic Rayleigh-Benard cell. The temperature signal is obtained from a RFtransmitter. Simultaneously, we determine particle's position and velocity with one camera, which grants access to the Lagrangian heat flux. Due to the extended autonomy of the present particle, we obtain well converged temperature and velocity statistics, as well as pseudo-eulerian maps of velocity and heat flux. Present experimental results have also been compared with the results obtained by a corresponding campaign of Direct Numerical Simulations and Lagrangian Tracking of massless tracers. The comparison between experimental and numerical results show the accuracy and reliability of our experimental measurements. Finally, the analysis of lagrangian velocity and t...

  9. Measurement on Hydrate Products Crystallinity Degrees of Autoclaved Silicate Products%蒸压硅酸盐制品水化产物的结晶度分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯昌君; 王淑英; 王浩; 袁兵

    2012-01-01

    利用烧失量和酸溶法测定不同固体废物蒸压样品的结合水量和溶出差,研究固体废物蒸压样品中水化产物量、结晶度与其强度的关系.结果表明,粉煤灰、废玻璃、废混凝土蒸压样品的结晶度较低,钢渣蒸压样品的结晶度较高.蒸压样品的溶出差、结合水量和结晶度与水化产物种类有关.蒸压样品的结晶度可间接表达结晶良好的水化产物占总水化产物量的多少,并可用来确定不同蒸压制品的合理养护制度,指导蒸压制品的工艺优化.蒸压样品的结晶度存在合理范围.%The relationships of solid waste autoclaved samples compressive strength and their crystal-Unity degrees, hydrate amounts were studied with dissolved amount difference and bound water a-mount measured with loss on ignition and acid digestion method. The results showed that the crystal-linity degrees of autoclaved samples, such as fly ash, waste glass and waste concrete are in a low level except that the crystallinity degree of autoclaved steel slag sample is higher. The dissolved amount difference, bound water amount and crystallinity degree of the autoclaved samples were related to their hydrate types. The crystallinity degrees of autoclaved samples could be indirectly represented as the ratios of well-crystallized hydrate amounts to total hydrate amounts in the autoclaved samples, and used to determine the autoclaved schedule and guide the technology optimization for autoclaved products. There is a reasonable crystallinity degree range for the compressive strength of autoclaved samples.

  10. Measurement of directional thermal infrared emissivity of vegetation and soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, J.M. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Soil Science; Balick, L.K. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1995-10-01

    A new method has been developed for measuring directional thermal emissivity as a function of view angle for plant canopies and soils using two infrared thermometers each sensitive to a different wavelength band. By calibrating the two infrared thermometers to 0.1C consistency, canopy directional emissivity can be estimated with typical errors less than 0.005 in the 8--14 um wavelength band, depending on clarity of the sky and corrections for CO{sub 2} absorption by the atmosphere. A theoretical justification for the method is developed along with an error analysis. Laboratory measurements were used to develop corrections for CO{sub 2}, absorption and a field calibration method is used to obtain the necessary 0.1C consistency for relatively low cost infrared thermometers. The emissivity of alfalfa (LAI=2.5) and corn (LAI=3.2) was near 0.995 and independent of view angle. Individual corn leaves had an emissivity of 0.97. A wheat (LAI=3.0) canopy had an emissivity of 0.985 at nadir and 0.975 at 75 degree view angle. The canopy emissivity values tend to be higher than values in the literature, and are useful for converting infrared thermometer measurements to kinetic temperature and interpreting satellite thermal observations.

  11. Advanced structural analysis of nanoporous materials by thermal response measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oschatz, Martin; Leistner, Matthias; Nickel, Winfried; Kaskel, Stefan

    2015-04-07

    Thermal response measurements based on optical adsorption calorimetry are presented as a versatile tool for the time-saving and profound characterization of the pore structure of porous carbon-based materials. This technique measures the time-resolved temperature change of an adsorbent during adsorption of a test gas. Six carbide and carbon materials with well-defined nanopore architecture including micro- and/or mesopores are characterized by thermal response measurements based on n-butane and carbon dioxide as the test gases. With this tool, the pore systems of the model materials can be clearly distinguished and accurately analyzed. The obtained calorimetric data are correlated with the adsorption/desorption isotherms of the materials. The pore structures can be estimated from a single experiment due to different adsorption enthalpies/temperature increases in micro- and mesopores. Adsorption/desorption cycling of n-butane at 298 K/1 bar with increasing desorption time allows to determine the pore structure of the materials in more detail due to different equilibration times. Adsorption of the organic test gas at selected relative pressures reveals specific contributions of particular pore systems to the increase of the temperature of the samples and different adsorption mechanisms. The use of carbon dioxide as the test gas at 298 K/1 bar provides detailed insights into the ultramicropore structure of the materials because under these conditions the adsorption of this test gas is very sensitive to the presence of pores smaller than 0.7 nm.

  12. Reexamination of basal plane thermal conductivity of suspended graphene samples measured by electro-thermal micro-bridge methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insun Jo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Thermal transport in suspended graphene samples has been measured in prior works and this work with the use of a suspended electro-thermal micro-bridge method. These measurement results are analyzed here to evaluate and eliminate the errors caused by the extrinsic thermal contact resistance. It is noted that the room-temperature thermal resistance measured in a recent work increases linearly with the suspended length of the single-layer graphene samples synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD, and that such a feature does not reveal the failure of Fourier’s law despite the increase in the reported apparent thermal conductivity with length. The re-analyzed apparent thermal conductivity of a single-layer CVD graphene sample reaches about 1680 ± 180 W m−1 K−1 at room temperature, which is close to the highest value reported for highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In comparison, the apparent thermal conductivity values measured for two suspended exfoliated bi-layer graphene samples are about 880 ± 60 and 730 ± 60 Wm−1K−1 at room temperature, and approach that of the natural graphite source above room temperature. However, the low-temperature thermal conductivities of these suspended graphene samples are still considerably lower than the graphite values, with the peak thermal conductivities shifted to much higher temperatures. Analysis of the thermal conductivity data reveals that the low temperature behavior is dominated by phonon scattering by polymer residue instead of by the lateral boundary.

  13. Parametric studies of human thermal mechanisms and measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, S B; Nair, S S

    2000-04-01

    A systematic methodology is proposed for mathematically quantifying the effects of measurement inaccuracies due to instrument uncertainty in a human calorimetry project. Human thermal mechanisms are poorly understood at the systems level and this study investigates the importance of these mechanisms quantitatively. The proposed methodology uses sensitivity derivatives combined with sensor accuracies to quantify the effect of each heat transfer mechanism contributing to the errors in the system equations. The method is applicable to any differentiable model to be validated by experimentation. To illustrate the methodology, two example cases, a reclining nude resting subject and a reclining clothed working subject, are analyzed. The calculated expected errors clearly suggest specific modifications.

  14. Measuring thermal budgets of active volcanoes by satellite remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, L.; Francis, P. W.; Rothery, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Thematic Mapper measurements of the total radiant energy flux Q at Lascar volcano in north Chile for December 1984 are reported. The results are consistent with the earlier suggestion that a lava lake is the source of a reported thermal budget anomaly, and with values for 1985-1986 that are much lower, suggesting that fumarolic activity was then a more likely heat source. The results show that satellite remote sensing may be used to monitor the activity of a volcano quantitatively, in a way not possible by conventional ground studies, and may provide a method for predicting eruptions.

  15. Measurement of Thermal Dependencies of PBG Fiber Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laouar, Rachik

    2011-07-06

    Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) represent a class of optical fibers which have a wide spectrum of applications in the telecom and sensing industries. Currently, the Advanced Accelerator Research Department at SLAC is developing photonic bandgap particle accelerators, which are photonic crystal structures with a central defect used to accelerate electrons and achieve high longitudinal electric fields. Extremely compact and less costly than the traditional accelerators, these structures can support higher accelerating gradients and will open a new era in high energy physics as well as other fields of science. Based on direct laser acceleration in dielectric materials, the so called photonic band gap accelerators will benefit from mature laser and semiconductor industries. One of the key elements to direct laser acceleration in hollow core PCFs, is maintaining thermal and structural stability. Previous simulations demonstrate that accelerating modes are sensitive to the geometry of the defect region and the variations in the effective index. Unlike the telecom modes (for which over 95% of the energy propagates in the hollow core) most of the power of these modes is located in the glass at the periphery of the central hole which has a higher thermal constant than air ({gamma}{sub SiO{sub 2}} = 1.19 x 10{sup -6} 1/K, {gamma}{sub air} = -9 x 10{sup -7} 1/K with {gamma} = dn/dT). To fully control laser driven acceleration, we need to evaluate the thermal and structural consequences of such modes on the PCFs. We are conducting series of interferometric tests to quantify the dependencies of the HC-633-02 (NKT Photonics) propagation constant (k{sub z}) on temperature, vibration amplitude, stress and electric field strength. In this paper we will present the theoretical principles characterizing the thermal behavior of a PCF, the measurements realized for the fundamental telecom mode (TE{sub 00}), and the experimental demonstration of TM-like mode propagation in the HC-633

  16. Simultaneous measurements of anisotropic thermal diffusivity and thermal effusivity of liquid crystals using temperature wave analysis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Meguya; Morikawa, Junko

    2016-11-01

    Simultaneous measurements of anisotropic thermal diffusivity and thermal effusivity in the phase transition of the liquid crystal 4‧-(pentyloxy)-4-biphenyl carbonitrile (5OCB), Cry-53-N-68-Iso, are demonstrated using the temperature wave analysis method. A detailed calibration procedure for determining thermal diffusivity (α), thermal effusivity (e), thermal conductivity (λ), and heat capacity per unit volume (Cp ρ) is proposed utilizing hexaethylene glycol monododecyl ether (C12E6) as a calibration material, the heat capacity of which is precisely determined using a calorimetric method.

  17. Solid state interconversion between anhydrous norfloxacin and its hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongcharoen, Wanchai; Byrn, Stephen R; Sutanthavibul, Narueporn

    2008-01-01

    This work is focused on characterizing and evaluating the solid state interconversion of norfloxacin (NF) hydrates. Four stoichiometric NF hydrates, dihydrate, hemipentahydrate, trihydrate, pentahydrate and a disordered NF state, were generated by various methods and characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD), thermal analysis and Karl Fisher titrimetry. XRPD patterns of all NF hydrates exhibited crystalline structures. NF hydrate conversion was studied with respect to mild elevated temperature and various degrees of moisture levels. NF hydrates transformed to anhydrous NF Form A after gentle heating at 60 degrees C for 48 h except dihydrate and trihydrate where mixture in XRPD patterns between anhydrous NF Form A and former structures existed. Desiccation of NF hydrates at 0% RH for 7 days resulted in only partial removal of water molecules from the hydrated structures. The hydrated transitional phase and the disordered NF state were obtained from the incomplete dehydration of NF hydrates after thermal treatment and pentahydrate NF after desiccation, respectively. Anhydrous NF Form A and NF hydrates transformed to pentahydrate NF when exposed to high moisture environment except dihydrate. In conclusion, surrounding moisture levels, temperatures and the duration of exposure strongly influenced the interconversion pathways and stoichiometry of anhydrous NF and its hydrates. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Using magnetic resonance imaging to monitor CH4 hydrate formation and spontaneous conversion of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Bernard A; Stevens, Jim; Howard, James J; Graue, Arne; Kvamme, Bjorn; Aspenes, Erick; Ersland, Geir; Husebø, Jarle; Zornes, David R

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was used to monitor and quantify methane hydrate formation and exchange in porous media. Conversion of methane hydrate to carbon dioxide hydrate, when exposed to liquid carbon dioxide at 8.27 MPa and approximately 4 degrees C, was experimentally demonstrated with MRI data and verified by mass balance calculations of consumed volumes of gases and liquids. No detectable dissociation of the hydrate was measured during the exchange process.

  19. Experimental Determination of Refractive Index of Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bylov, Martin; Rasmussen, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The refractive indexes of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate have been experimentally determined. The refractive indexes were determined in an indirect manner making use of the fact that two non-absorbing materials will have the same refractive index if they cannot be distinguished visually....... For methane hydrate (structure I) the refractive index was found to be 1.346 and for natural gas hydrate (structure II) it was found to be 1.350. The measurements further suggest that the gas hydrate growth rate increases if the water has formed hydrates before. The induction time, on the other hand, seems...

  20. Measurement of thermal contact resistance at Cu-Cu interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Su; Choi, Yeon Suk [Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon,(Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    The thermal contact resistance (TCR) is one of the important components in the cryogenic systems. Especially, cryogenic measurement devices using a cryocooler can be affected by TCR because the systems have to consist of several metal components in contact with each other for heat transferring to the specimen without cryogen. Therefore, accurate measurement and understanding of TCR is necessary for the design of cryogenic measurement device using a cryocooler. The TCR occurs at the interface between metals and it can be affected by variable factors, such as roughness of metal surface, contact area and contact pressure. In this study, we designed TCR measurement system at various temperatures using a cryocooler as a heat sink and used steady state method to measure the TCR between metals. The copper is selected as a specimen in the experiment because it is widely used as a heat transfer medium in the cryogenic measurement devices. The TCR between Cu and Cu is measured for various temperatures and contact pressures. The effect of the interfacial materials on the TCR is also investigated.

  1. High accuracy thermal conductivity measurement of aqueous cryoprotective agents and semi-rigid biological tissues using a microfabricated thermal sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xin M; Sekar, Praveen K; Zhao, Gang; Zhou, Xiaoming; Shu, Zhiquan; Huang, Zhongping; Ding, Weiping; Zhang, Qingchuan; Gao, Dayong

    2015-05-20

    An improved thermal-needle approach for accurate and fast measurement of thermal conductivity of aqueous and soft biomaterials was developed using microfabricated thermal conductivity sensors. This microscopic measuring device was comprehensively characterized at temperatures from 0 °C to 40 °C. Despite the previous belief, system calibration constant was observed to be highly temperature-dependent. Dynamic thermal conductivity response during cooling (40 °C to -40 °C) was observed using the miniaturized single tip sensor for various concentrations of CPAs, i.e., glycerol, ethylene glycol and dimethyl sulfoxide. Chicken breast, chicken skin, porcine limb, and bovine liver were assayed to investigate the effect of anatomical heterogeneity on thermal conductivity using the arrayed multi-tip sensor at 20 °C. Experimental results revealed distinctive differences in localized thermal conductivity, which suggests the use of approximated or constant property values is expected to bring about results with largely inflated uncertainties when investigating bio-heat transfer mechanisms and/or performing sophisticated thermal modeling with complex biological tissues. Overall, the presented micro thermal sensor with automated data analysis algorithm is a promising approach for direct thermal conductivity measurement of aqueous solutions and soft biomaterials and is of great value to cryopreservation of tissues, hyperthermia or cryogenic, and other thermal-based clinical diagnostics and treatments.

  2. Breaking Quantum and Thermal Limits on Precision Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James K.

    2016-05-01

    I will give an overview of our efforts to use correlations and entanglement between many atoms to overcome quantum and thermal limits on precision measurements. In the first portion of my talk, I will present a path toward a 10000 times reduced sensitivity to the thermal mirror motion that limits the linewidth of today's best lasers. By utilizing narrow atomic transitions, the laser's phase information is primarily stored in the atomic gain medium rather than in the vibration-sensitive cavity field. To this end, I will present the first observation of lasing based on the mHz linewidth optical-clock transition in a laser-cooled ensemble of strontium atoms. In the second portion of my talk, I will describe how we use collective measurements to surpass the standard quantum limit on phase estimation 1 /√{ N} for N unentangled atoms. We achieve a directly observed reduction in phase variance relative to the standard quantum limit of as much as 17.7(6) dB. Supported by DARPA QuASAR, NIST, ARO, and NSF PFC. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1125844 Physics Frontier Center.

  3. Device and method for measuring thermal conductivity of thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Tahani R. (Inventor); Subramanian, Chelakara (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Alderfer, David W. (Inventor); Sealey, Bradley S. (Inventor); Burkett, Jr., Cecil G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A device and method are provided for measuring the thermal conductivity of rigid or flexible, homogeneous or heterogeneous, thin films between 50 .mu.m and 150 .mu.m thick with relative standard deviations of less than five percent. The specimen is sandwiched between like material, highly conductive upper and lower slabs. Each slab is instrumented with six thermocouples embedded within the slab and flush with their corresponding surfaces. A heat source heats the lower slab and a heat sink cools the upper slab. The heat sink also provides sufficient contact pressure onto the specimen. Testing is performed within a vacuum environment (bell-jar) between 10.sup.-3 to 10.sup.-6 Torr. An anti-radiant shield on the interior surface of the bell-jar is used to avoid radiation heat losses. Insulation is placed adjacent to the heat source and adjacent to the heat sink to prevent conduction losses. A temperature controlled water circulator circulates water from a constant temperature bath through the heat sink. Fourier's one-dimensional law of heat conduction is the governing equation. Data, including temperatures, are measured with a multi-channel data acquisition system. On-line computer processing is used for thermal conductivity calculations.

  4. Dynamics of a photoexcited hydrated electron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pshenichnikov, M.S.; Baltuška, A.; Wiersma, D.A.; Kärtner, F.X.

    2004-01-01

    Combining photon-echo and frequency-resolved pump-probe techniques with extremely short laser pulses that consist of only few optical cycles, we investigate the dynamics of the equilibrated hydrated electron. The pure dephasing time of the hydrated electron deduced from the photon-echo measurements

  5. Development of an in situ thermal conductivity measurement system for exploration of the shallow subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirila, Marian Andrei; Christoph, Benjamin; Vienken, Thomas; Dietrich, Peter; Bumberger, Jan

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we attempted to develop an in situ thermal conductivity measurement system that can be used for subsurface thermal exploration. A new thermal probe was developed for mapping both the spatial and temporal variability of thermal conductivity, via direct push methods in the unconsolidated shallow subsurface. A robust, hollow cylindrical probe was constructed and its performance was tested by carrying out thermal conductivity measurements on materials with known properties. The thermal conductivity of the investigated materials can be worked out by measuring the active power consumption (in alternating current system) and temperature of the probe over fixed time intervals. A calibration method was used to eliminate any undesired thermal effects regarding the size of the probe, based on mobile thermal analyzer thermal conductivity values. Using the hollow cylindrical probe, the thermal conductivity results obtained had an error of less than 2.5% for solid samples (such as Teflon, Agar Jelly and Nylatron).

  6. Intermolecular hydrogen transfer between guest species in small and large cages of methane + propane mixed gas hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugahara, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Tani, Atsushi; Inoue, Tatsuya; Ohgaki, Kazunari

    2012-03-15

    To investigate the molecular interaction between guest species inside of the small and large cages of methane + propane mixed gas hydrates, thermal stabilities of the methyl radical (possibly induced in small cages) and the normal propyl and isopropyl radicals (induced in large cages) were investigated by means of electron spin resonance measurements. The increase of the total amount of the normal propyl and isopropyl radicals reveals that the methyl radical in the small cage withdraws one hydrogen atom from the propane molecule enclathrated in the adjacent large cage of the structure-II hydrate. A guest species in a hydrate cage has the ability to interact closely with the other one in the adjacent cages. The clathrate hydrate may be utilized as a possible nanoscale reaction field.

  7. Temperature, pressure, and compositional effects on anomalous or "self" preservation of gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2003-01-01

    We previously reported on a thermal regime where pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate is preserved metastably in bulk at up to 75 K above its nominal temperature stability limit of 193 K at 0.1 MPa, following rapid release of the sample pore pressure. Large fractions (>50 vol.%) of methane hydrate can be preserved for 2-3 weeks by this method, reflecting the greatly suppressed rates of dissociation that characterize this "anomalous preservation" regime. This behavior contrasts that exhibited by methane hydrate at both colder (193-240 K) and warmer (272-290 K) isothermal test conditions, where dissociation rates increase monotonically with increasing temperature. Here, we report on recent experiments that further investigate the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition on anomalous preservation behavior. All tests conducted on sI methane hydrate yielded self-consistent results that confirm the highly temperature-sensitive but reproducible nature of anomalous preservation behavior. Temperature-stepping experiments conducted between 250 and 268 K corroborate the relative rates measured previously in isothermal preservation tests, and elevated pore-pressure tests showed that, as expected, dissociation rates are further reduced with increasing pressure. Surprisingly, sII methane-ethane hydrate was found to exhibit no comparable preservation effect when rapidly depressurized at 268 K, even though it is thermodynamically stable at higher temperatures and lower pressures than sI methane hydrate. These results, coupled with SEM imaging of quenched sample material from a variety of dissociation tests, strongly support our earlier arguments that ice-"shielding" effects provided by partial dissociation along hydrate grain surfaces do not serve as the primary mechanism for anomalous preservation. The underlying physical-chemistry mechanism(s) of anomalous preservation remains elusive, but appears to be based more on textural or morphological changes within the hydrate

  8. Radon measurements in the Catalagzi Thermal Power Plant, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytekin, H; Bayata, S; Baldik, R; Celebi, N

    2008-01-01

    The Catalağzi Thermal Power Plant (CTPP) (41(0)30'48.4('')N and 0.31(0)53'41.5('')E) is located at nearly 13 km North-east of Zonguldak city, which is located at the West Black Sea coast in Turkey. The middling products with high ash content of bituminous coals are used in this plant. Seasonal radon concentration measurements have been carried out by using CR-39 plastic track detectors in and around the CTPP. The annual average radon concentration has been found to vary from a minimum of 39.8 +/- 28.9 Bq m(-3) in the ash area to a maximum of approximately 75.0 +/- 15.7 Bq m(-3) in the service building of the power plant. The annual average radon concentration in the dwellings of the thermal power plant colony of the plant is 71.0 +/- 33.4 Bq m(-3). The effective dose has been found to vary from 0.38 to 0.71 mSv y(-1) with a mean value of 0.56 mSv y(-1), which is lower than the effective dose values 3-10 mSv given as the range of action levels recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection: Protection against radon-222 at home and at work, ICRP Publication 65 (1993).

  9. Radon measurements in the Catalagzi Thermal Power Plant, Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aytekin, H.; Bayata, S.; Baldik, R.; Celebi, N. [Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Zonguldak (Turkey). Dept. of Physics

    2008-01-15

    The Catalagzi Thermal Power Plant (CTPP) is located at nearly 13 km North-east of Zonguldak city, which is located at the West Black Sea coast in Turkey. The middling products with high ash content of bituminous coals are used in this plant. Seasonal radon concentration measurements have been carried out by using CR-39 plastic track detectors in and around the CTPP. The annual average radon concentration has been found to vary from a minimum of 39.8 {+-} 28.9 Bq m{sup -3}) in the ash area to a maximum of about to 75.0 {+-} 15.7 Bq m{sup -3} in the service building of the power plant. The annual average radon concentration in the dwellings of the thermal power plant colony of the plant is 71.0 {+-} 33.4 Bq m{sup -3}. The effective dose has been found to vary from 0.38 to 0.71 mSv y{sup -1} with a mean value of 0.56 mSv y{sup -1}, which is lower than the effective dose values 3-10 mSv given as the range of action levels recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection: Protection against radon-222 at home and at work, ICRP Publication 65 (1993).

  10. Cassini CAPS Measurements of Thermal Ion Properties: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R. J.; Bagenal, F.; Delamere, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    Since the Wilson et al. [2008] paper on thermal ion properties in Saturn's inner equatorial magnetosphere there have been several advances in forward model techniques and instrument knowledge. These include: a) Improved CAPS (SNG) calibration values since 2008. While the previous fits to data are still valid, this efficiency adjustment has the effect of reducing the density values calculated from that fit. Compared to the previous calibration values, nOH+ and nH+ are ≈30% and ≈9% lower respectively. b) Robust error analysis on the forward model process to produce standard deviations for the fitted parameters. This also shows the expected dependences between various fitted parameters, such as Vφ and OH+ T⊥, inherent in the model. c) Utilization of real magnetic field data to forward model T⊥ and T\\par. Previously assumed magnetic field was in the -z direction. In addition, these improvements allow us to remove the constraint that Vz = 0, and the use of real magnetic field data allows us to analyze data farther from the equator. References Wilson, R. J., R. L. Tokar, M. G. Henderson, T. W. Hill, M. F. Thomsen, and D. H. Pontius (2008), Cassini plasma spectrometer thermal ion measurements in Saturn's inner magnetosphere,

  11. Assessment of the Impact of the Measurement Precision of Thermal Properties of Materials on the Prediction of Their Thermal Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatun, Ayesha

    The thermal properties of the sidewall lining materials are capturing attention since the last two decades. Good prediction of the dynamic thermal behaviour of Hall Heroult cells, including precise estimation of energy losses and location of the side ledge formed by the solidification of electrolytic bath, is made possible when the sidelining materials are well characterized in function of temperature. The present work aim at measuring the thermal diffusivity, heat capacity and thermal conductivity of silicon carbide (SiC), graphitic and graphitized carbon materials and cryolite (Na3AlF 6) based on transient characterization techniques. The thermal diffusivity and the heat capacity are measured by using state-of-the-art transient laser flash analyzer and differential scanning calorimeter respectively. The thermal conductivity is calculated by assuming a constant density. The range of precision error for each thermal property is also calculated for a finite number of data sets. Empirical correlation has been drawn for each of the properties to describe the relation with temperature in mathematical terms. Thermal characterization of the latent heat evolved during the melting of ledge is also carried out. Finally, based on the calculations conducted with a 2-D numerical model, the effect of the precision errors of temperature varying thermal properties of the sidewall materials and ledge on the dynamic behaviour of a laboratory scale phase change reactor is also presented. The results, so obtained, encourage further studies on the thermal properties of materials used in the aluminium reduction cell to find out the thermal environment inside the cell, heat loss estimation and effect of the additives on the location of ledge. Key words: Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, heat capacity, temperature varying properties, precision error, phase change profile, latent heat.

  12. Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2009-12-09

    Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

  13. Quantitative measurement of productivity loss due to thermal discomfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lan, Li; Wargocki, Pawel; Lian, Zhiwei

    2011-01-01

    The effects on human performance of elevated temperature causing thermal discomfort were investigated. Recruited subjects performed neurobehavioural tests examining different component skills, and addition and typing tasks that were used to replicate office work. The results show that thermal dis...

  14. Formation rate of natural gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, Marit

    2002-07-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 deg C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted to hydrate. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by gas injection rate and pressure. The effect of stirring rate is less significant and subcooling has no observable effect on the formation rate. Hydrate crystal concentration and gas composition do not influence the hydrate formation rate. Observations of produced hydrate crystals indicate that the crystals are elongated, about 5 micron in diameter and 10 micron long. Analysis of the results shows that the rate of hydrate formation is dominated by gas-liquid mass transfer. A mass transfer model, the bubble-to-crystal model, was developed for the hydrate formation rate in a continuous stirred tank reactor, given in terms of concentration driving force and an overall mass transfer coefficient. The driving force is the difference between the gas concentration at the gas-liquid interface and at the hydrate crystal surface. These concentrations correspond to the solubility of gas in water at experimental temperature and pressure and the solubility of gas at hydrate equilibrium temperature and experimental pressure, respectively. The overall mass transfer coefficient is expressed in terms of superficial gas velocity and impeller power consumption, parameters commonly used in study of stirred tank reactors. Experiments and modeling show that the stirred tank reactor has a considerable potential for increased production capacity. However, at higher hydrate production rates the

  15. Thermal measurement. Nanoscale temperature mapping in operating microelectronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecklenburg, Matthew; Hubbard, William A; White, E R; Dhall, Rohan; Cronin, Stephen B; Aloni, Shaul; Regan, B C

    2015-02-06

    Modern microelectronic devices have nanoscale features that dissipate power nonuniformly, but fundamental physical limits frustrate efforts to detect the resulting temperature gradients. Contact thermometers disturb the temperature of a small system, while radiation thermometers struggle to beat the diffraction limit. Exploiting the same physics as Fahrenheit's glass-bulb thermometer, we mapped the thermal expansion of Joule-heated, 80-nanometer-thick aluminum wires by precisely measuring changes in density. With a scanning transmission electron microscope and electron energy loss spectroscopy, we quantified the local density via the energy of aluminum's bulk plasmon. Rescaling density to temperature yields maps with a statistical precision of 3 kelvin/hertz(-1/2), an accuracy of 10%, and nanometer-scale resolution. Many common metals and semiconductors have sufficiently sharp plasmon resonances to serve as their own thermometers. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Quantitative reconstruction of thermal and dynamic characteristics of lava flow from surface thermal measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkii, Alexander; Kovtunov, Dmitry; Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Tsepelev, Igor; Melnik, Oleg

    2016-06-01

    We study a model of lava flow to determine its thermal and dynamic characteristics from thermal measurements of the lava at its surface. Mathematically this problem is reduced to solving an inverse boundary problem. Namely, using known conditions at one part of the model boundary we determine the missing condition at the remaining part of the boundary. We develop a numerical approach to the mathematical problem in the case of steady-state flow. Assuming that the temperature and the heat flow are prescribed at the upper surface of the model domain, we determine the flow characteristics in the entire model domain using a variational (adjoint) method. We have performed computations of model examples and showed that in the case of smooth input data the lava temperature and the flow velocity can be reconstructed with a high accuracy. As expected, a noise imposed on the smooth input data results in a less accurate solution, but still acceptable below some noise level. Also we analyse the influence of optimization methods on the solution convergence rate. The proposed method for reconstruction of physical parameters of lava flows can also be applied to other problems in geophysical fluid flows.

  17. Gas hydrate inhibition of drilling fluid additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaolan, L.; Baojiang, S.; Shaoran, R. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Dongying (China). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates that form during offshore well drilling can have adverse impacts on well operational safety. The hydrates typically form in the risers and the annulus between the casing and the drillstring, and can stop the circulation of drilling fluids. In this study, experiments were conducted to measure the effect of drilling fluid additives on hydrate inhibition. Polyalcohols, well-stability control agents, lubricating agents, and polymeric materials were investigated in a stirred tank reactor at temperatures ranging from -10 degree C to 60 degrees C. Pressure, temperature, and torque were used to detect onset points of hydrate formation and dissociation. The inhibitive effect of the additives on hydrate formation was quantified. Phase boundary shifts were measured in terms of temperature difference or sub-cooling gained when chemicals were added to pure water. Results showed that the multiple hydroxyl groups in polyalcohol chemicals significantly inhibited hydrate formation. Polymeric and polyacrylamide materials had only a small impact on hydrate formation, while sulfonated methyl tannins were found to increase hydrate formation. 6 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  18. Local thermal conductivity of polycrystalline AlN ceramics measured by scanning thermal microscopy and complementary scanning electron microscopy techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yue-Fei; Wang Li; R. Heiderhoff; A. K. Geinzer; Wei Bin; Ji Yuan; Han Xiao-Dong; L. J. Balk; Zhang Ze

    2012-01-01

    The local thermal conductivity of polycrystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) ceramics is measured and imaged by using a scanning thermal microscope (SThM) and complementary scanning electron microscope (SEM) based techniques at room temperature.The quantitative thermal conductivity for the AlN sample is gained by using a SThM with a spatial resolution of sub-micrometer scale through using the 3w method.A thermal conductivity of 308 W/m·K withingrains corresponding to that of high-purity single crystal AlN is obtained.The slight differences in thermal conduction between the adjacent grains are found to result from crystallographic misorientations,as demonstrated in the electron backscattered diffraction.A much lower thermal conductivity at the grain boundary is due to impurities and defects enriched in these sites,as indicated by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  19. Thermal separation of soil particles from thermal conductivity measurement under various air pressures

    OpenAIRE

    Sen Lu; Tusheng Ren; Yili Lu; Ping Meng; Jinsong Zhang

    2017-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of dry soils is related closely to air pressure and the contact areas between solid particles. In this study, the thermal conductivity of two-phase soil systems was determined under reduced and increased air pressures. The thermal separation of soil particles, i.e., the characteristic dimension of the pore space (d), was then estimated based on the relationship between soil thermal conductivity and air pressure. Results showed that under both reduced and increased air...

  20. In-situ measurements of material thermal parameters for accurate LED lamp thermal modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellvehi, M.; Perpina, X.; Jorda, X.; Werkhoven, R.J.; Kunen, J.M.G.; Jakovenko, J.; Bancken, P.; Bolt, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the extraction of key thermal parameters for accurate thermal modelling of LED lamps: air exchange coefficient around the lamp, emissivity and thermal conductivity of all lamp parts. As a case study, an 8W retrofit lamp is presented. To assess simulation results, temperature is

  1. In-situ measurements of material thermal parameters for accurate LED lamp thermal modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellvehi, M.; Perpina, X.; Jorda, X.; Werkhoven, R.J.; Kunen, J.M.G.; Jakovenko, J.; Bancken, P.; Bolt, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the extraction of key thermal parameters for accurate thermal modelling of LED lamps: air exchange coefficient around the lamp, emissivity and thermal conductivity of all lamp parts. As a case study, an 8W retrofit lamp is presented. To assess simulation results, temperature is

  2. Innovative methodologies and technologies for thermal energy release measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Enrica; Peluso, Rosario; Avino, Rosario; Belviso, Pasquale; Caliro, Stefano; Carandente, Antonio; Chiodini, Giovanni; Mangiacapra, Annarita; Petrillo, Zaccaria; Sansivero, Fabio; Vilardo, Giuseppe; Marfe, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Volcanoes exchange heat, gases and other fluids between the interrior of the Earth and its atmosphere influencing processes both at the surface and above it. This work is devoted to improve the knowledge on the parameters that control the anomalies in heat flux and chemical species emissions associated with the diffuse degassing processes of volcanic and hydrothermal zones. We are studying and developing innovative medium range remote sensing technologies to measure the variations through time of heat flux and chemical emissions in order to boost the definition of the activity state of a volcano and allowing a better assessment of the related hazard and risk mitigation. The current methodologies used to measure heat flux (i.e. CO2 flux or temperature gradient) are either poorly efficient or effective, and are unable to detect short to medium time (days to months) variation trends in the heat flux. Remote sensing of these parameters will allow for measurements faster than already accredited methods therefore it will be both more effective and efficient in case of emergency and it will be used to make quick routine monitoring. We are currently developing a method based on drone-born IR cameras to measure the ground surface temperature that, in a purely conductive regime, is directly correlated to the shallow temperature gradient. The use of flying drones will allow to quickly obtain a mapping of areas with thermal anomalies and a measure of their temperature at distance in the order of hundreds of meters. Further development of remote sensing will be done through the use, on flying drones, of multispectral and/or iperspectral sensors, UV scanners in order to be able to detect the amount of chemical species released in the athmosphere.

  3. Density dependence of the yield of hydrated electrons in the low-LET radiolysis of supercritical water at 400 °C: influence of the geminate recombination of subexcitation-energy electrons prior to thermalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesungnoen, Jintana; Sanguanmith, Sunuchakan; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2013-10-21

    Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the yield of hydrated electrons (eaq(-)) in the low-linear energy transfer radiolysis of supercritical water at 400 °C as a function of water density over the range of ~0.15 to 0.6 g cm(-3). Very good agreement was found between our calculations and picosecond pulse radiolysis experimental data at ~60 ps and 1 ns at high density (>0.35 g cm(-3)). At densities lower than ~0.35 g cm(-3), our eaq(-) yields were lower than the experimental data, especially at ~60 ps. However, if we incorporated into the simulations a prompt geminate electron-cation (H2O˙(+)) recombination (prior thermalization of the electron) that decreased as the density decreased, our computed eaq(-) yields at ~60 ps and 1 ns compared fairly well with the experimental data for the entire density range studied.

  4. Measurements of the Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Diffusivity of Polymer Melts with the Short-Hot-Wire Method

    OpenAIRE

    Wicaksono, Hendro; Zhang, Xing; Fujii, Motoo

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of four kinds of polymer melts were measured by using the transient short-hot-wire method. This method was developed from the hot-wire technique and is based on two-dimensional numerical solutions of unsteady heat conduction from a wire with the same length-to-diameter ratio and boundary conditions as those in the actual experiments. The present method is particularly suitable for measurements of molten polymers where natural con...

  5. Measured Two-Dimensional Ice-Wedge Polygon Thermal Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Busey, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Ice-wedge polygons are perhaps the most dominant permafrost related features in the arctic landscape. The microtopography of these features, that includes rims, troughs, and high and low polygon centers, alters the local hydrology, as water tends to collect in the low areas. During winter, wind redistribution of snow leads to an increased snowpack depth in the low areas, while the slightly higher areas often have very thin snow cover, leading to differences across the landscape in vegetation communities and soil moisture between higher and lower areas. These differences in local surface conditions lead to spatial variability of the ground thermal regime in the different microtopographic areas and between different types of ice-wedge polygons. To study these features in depth, we established temperature transects across four different types of ice-wedge polygons near Barrow, Alaska. The transects were composed of five vertical array thermistor probes (VATP) beginning in the center of each polygon and extending through the trough to the rim of the adjacent polygon. Each VATP had 16 thermistors from the surface to a depth of 1.5 m. In addition to these 80 subsurface temperature measurement points per polygon, soil moisture, thermal conductivity, heat flux, and snow depth were all measured in multiple locations for each polygon. Above ground, a full suite of micrometeorological instrumentation was present at each polygon. Data from these sites has been collected continuously for the last three years. We found snow cover, timing and depth, and active layer soil moisture to be major controlling factors in the observed thermal regimes. In troughs and in the centers of low-center polygons, the combined effect of typically saturated soils and increased snow accumulation resulted in the highest mean annual ground temperatures (MAGT). Additionally, these areas were the last part of the polygon to refreeze during the winter. However, increased active layer thickness was not

  6. Measurement of thermal conductivity and diffusivity in situ: Literature survey and theoretical modelling of measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukkonen, I.; Suppala, I. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-01-01

    In situ measurements of thermal conductivity and diffusivity of bedrock were investigated with the aid of a literature survey and theoretical simulations of a measurement system. According to the surveyed literature, in situ methods can be divided into `active` drill hole methods, and `passive` indirect methods utilizing other drill hole measurements together with cutting samples and petrophysical relationships. The most common active drill hole method is a cylindrical heat producing probe whose temperature is registered as a function of time. The temperature response can be calculated and interpreted with the aid of analytical solutions of the cylindrical heat conduction equation, particularly the solution for an infinite perfectly conducting cylindrical probe in a homogeneous medium, and the solution for a line source of heat in a medium. Using both forward and inverse modellings, a theoretical measurement system was analysed with an aim at finding the basic parameters for construction of a practical measurement system. The results indicate that thermal conductivity can be relatively well estimated with borehole measurements, whereas thermal diffusivity is much more sensitive to various disturbing factors, such as thermal contact resistance and variations in probe parameters. In addition, the three-dimensional conduction effects were investigated to find out the magnitude of axial `leak` of heat in long-duration experiments. The radius of influence of a drill hole measurement is mainly dependent on the duration of the experiment. Assuming typical conductivity and diffusivity values of crystalline rocks, the measurement yields information within less than a metre from the drill hole, when the experiment lasts about 24 hours. We propose the following factors to be taken as basic parameters in the construction of a practical measurement system: the probe length 1.5-2 m, heating power 5-20 Wm{sup -1}, temperature recording with 5-7 sensors placed along the probe, and

  7. Thermal conductivity measurements of warm dense iron at the LCLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, A.; Jiang, S.; Collins, G.; Shepherd, R.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Hill, M. P.; Brown, C. R. D.; Floyd, E.; Fyrth, J. D.; Skidmore, J. W.; Hua, R.; Beg, F. N.; Kim, M.; Cho, B.; Lee, J.; King, J.; Freeman, R. R.; Lee, H. J.; Galtier, E.; Audebert, P.; Levy, A.; Ping, Y.

    2016-10-01

    Accurate knowledge of conductivity characteristics in the strongly coupled plasma regime is extremely important for ICF processes such as the onset of hydrodynamic instabilities, thermonuclear burn propagation waves, shell mixing, and efficient x-ray conversion of indirect drive schemes. Recently, an experiment was performed at the LCLS at SLAC to measure the thermal conductivity of warm dense iron. The experiment used 6.8 keV x-rays to differentially heat thin bi-layer Au/Fe targets and establish a prompt temperature gradient at the layer interface. We used a SOP and a FDI to measure the rear layer's time-resolved temperature, expansion velocity, and reflectivity. Data from the time-resolved diagnostics for 100 nm Au and 50 to 100 nm Fe targets will be presented along with analysis and comparison with various models in the strongly coupled plasma regime. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Kinetics of hydrate formation and decomposition of methane in silica sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, S.C. [Korea Inst. of Energy Reserch, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Energy Conversion Research; Linga, P.; Haligva, C.; Englezos, P. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Ripmeester, J.A. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Steacie Inst. for Molecular Sciences

    2008-07-01

    The kinetics of hydrate formation and the decomposition behaviour of methane hydrates formed in a bed of silica sand particles were investigated. An experimental apparatus was used to study hydrate formation at temperatures of 7.0, 4.0, and 1.0 degrees C. Thermocouples were used to obtain temperature profiles during the experiments. Data obtained from the experiments were then used to determine formation gas uptake measurement curves and gas release decomposition measurement curves. Results of the study showed that the percentage of water converted to hydrates was higher when the temperature was 1.0 degrees C. Multiple nucleation points occurred during formation experiments conducted at 4.0 and 1.0 degrees C. A thermal stimulation approach was used to recover methane from the hydrates. The study showed that methane recovery occurred during 2 stages of the decomposition process. It was concluded that methane recovery rates of between 95 and 98 per cent were achieved using the method. 35 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Salinity-buffered methane hydrate formation and dissociation in gas-rich systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Kehua; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Flemings, Peter B.; Polito, Peter; Bryant, Steven L.

    2015-02-01

    Methane hydrate formation and dissociation are buffered by salinity in a closed system. During hydrate formation, salt excluded from hydrate increases salinity, drives the system to three-phase (gas, water, and hydrate phases) equilibrium, and limits further hydrate formation and dissociation. We developed a zero-dimensional local thermodynamic equilibrium-based model to explain this concept. We demonstrated this concept by forming and melting methane hydrate from a partially brine-saturated sand sample in a controlled laboratory experiment by holding pressure constant (6.94 MPa) and changing temperature stepwise. The modeled methane gas consumptions and hydrate saturations agreed well with the experimental measurements after hydrate nucleation. Hydrate dissociation occurred synchronously with temperature increase. The exception to this behavior is that substantial subcooling (6.4°C in this study) was observed for hydrate nucleation. X-ray computed tomography scanning images showed that core-scale hydrate distribution was heterogeneous. This implied core-scale water and salt transport induced by hydrate formation. Bulk resistivity increased sharply with initial hydrate formation and then decreased as the hydrate ripened. This study reproduced the salinity-buffered hydrate behavior interpreted for natural gas-rich hydrate systems by allowing methane gas to freely enter/leave the sample in response to volume changes associated with hydrate formation and dissociation. It provides insights into observations made at the core scale and log scale of salinity elevation to three-phase equilibrium in natural hydrate systems.

  10. Sulfate Hydration States in Interpretation of Martian Mineral Assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Bish, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    Remote spectral data and surface-measured chemical associations with S indicate widespread distribution of Mg-, Ca-, and Fe-sulfate salts on Mars. These salts are identified at least in part as hydrates, but spectral data and the low temperatures and low pH2O of Mars suggest that hydration states vary with origin, latitude, and exposure history. An understanding of stability limits and dehydration/rehydration rates is vital to understanding occurrences that may be interpreted variously as lacustrine, alteration via groundwater or discharge with evaporation, surface weathering, thermal brine systems, eolian recycling, or others. Different sulfates on Mars have varied susceptibility to desiccation at relatively warm, low-RH conditions or to hydration at cold, high-RH conditions. This variability provides a potent tool for interpreting exposure history. Among Ca-sulfates, gypsum and insoluble anhydrite should be stable and remain, respectively, fully hydrated or water-free at most latitudes and through diurnal and seasonal cycles, but bassanite is more sensitive to transient hydration. Mg-sulfates may have various values of n in the formula MgSO4.nH2O, and rehydration of desiccated forms often produces metastable phases. At low pH2O, unlike Ca- sulfates, amorphous forms appear with low values of n dependent, in part, on temperature. Kieserite resists dehydration but may hydrate in conditions where ice is stable at the surface. Fe-sulfates have more complex dehydration and rehydration properties. Jarosite is very resilient because of the lack of H2O molecules and presence of OH. Other Fe-sulfates are not so durable, e.g., coquimbite (Fe2 (SO4)3.9H2O) has independent H2O and dehydration on heating to 30 °C produces an amorphous product that does not rehydrate. Copiapite is similarly susceptible to dehydration. Modest heating of many H2O-bearing ferric sulfates can be destructive, and degradation can produce both cemented solids and viscous liquids. Sulfate salt

  11. Thermal conductivity measurements on ferrofluids with special reference to measuring arrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krichler, M., E-mail: Martin.Krichler@tu-dresden.de [Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Odenbach, S. [Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Material properties like viscosity and sound propagation in colloidal suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles, so-called ferrofluids, are known to depend on external magnetic fields due to structure formation of the magnetic particles. In this experimental study we investigate the effect of magnetically driven structure formation on heat flux in ferrofluids on the basis of thermal conductivity measurements in variation of an external magnetic field. Therefore an improved measuring device based on the plane heat source instead of the standard hot wire method is used to enable both parallel and perpendicular orientation of magnetic field and heat flux. Thermal conductivity measurements are carried out in variation of strength and direction of an external magnetic field relative to heat flux. Unlike former experimental investigations for the first time the results show qualitative consistency with theoretical predictions for both orientations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the effect of a magnetic field on thermal conductivity in ferrofluids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To investigate potential anisotropy, a plane heat source is mandatory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For the first time experimental results fit qualitatively with theoretical predictions.

  12. Measuring thermal expansion using X-band persistent scatterer interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosetto, Michele; Monserrat, Oriol; Cuevas-González, María; Devanthéry, Núria; Luzi, Guido; Crippa, Bruno

    2015-02-01

    This paper is focused on the estimation of the thermal expansion of buildings and infrastructures using X-band Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) observations. For this purpose an extended PSI model is used, which allows separating the thermal expansion from the total observed deformation thus generating a new PSI product: the map of the thermal expansion parameter, named thermal map. The core of the paper is devoted to the exploitation of the information contained in the thermal maps: three examples are discussed in detail, which concern a viaduct, a set of industrial buildings and two skyscrapers. The thermal maps can be used to derive the thermal expansion coefficient of the observed objects and information on their static structure. In addition, the paper illustrates the distortions in the PSI deformation products that occur if the thermal expansion is not explicitly modelled. Finally, an inter-comparison exercise is described, where the thermal expansion coefficients estimated by PSI are compared with those derived by a Ku-band ground-based SAR campaign.

  13. Measurement of in-plane thermal conductivity in polymer films

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wei, Qingshuo; Uehara, Chinatsu; Mukaida, Masakazu; Kirihara, Kazuhiro; Ishida, Takao

    2016-01-01

    .... We evaluated thermal conductivities and anisotropic ratios for various types of samples including insulating polymers, undoped semiconducting polymers, doped conducting polymers, and one-dimensional...

  14. Terahertz sensing of corneal hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul S; Tewari, Priyamvada; Bourges, Jean Louis; Hubschman, Jean Pierre; Bennett, David B; Taylor, Zachary D; Lee, H; Brown, Elliott R; Grundfest, Warren S; Culjat, Martin O

    2010-01-01

    An indicator of ocular health is the hydrodyanmics of the cornea. Many corneal disorders deteriorate sight as they upset the normal hydrodynamics of the cornea. The mechanisms include the loss of endothelial pump function of corneal dystophies, swelling and immune response of corneal graft rejection, and inflammation and edema, which accompany trauma, burn, and irritation events. Due to high sensitivity to changes of water content in materials, a reflective terahertz (300 GHz and 3 THz) imaging system could be an ideal tool to measure the hydration level of the cornea. This paper presents the application of THz technology to visualize the hydration content across ex vivo porcine corneas. The corneas, with a thickness variation from 470 - 940 µm, were successfully imaged using a reflective pulsed THz imaging system, with a maximum SNR of 50 dB. To our knowledge, no prior studies have reported on the use of THz in measuring hydration in corneal tissues or other ocular tissues. These preliminary findings indicate that THz can be used to accurately sense hydration levels in the cornea using a pulsed, reflective THz imaging system.

  15. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-14

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  16. XFEM for Thermal Crack of Massive Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowei Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal cracking of massive concrete structures occurs as a result of stresses caused by hydration in real environment conditions. The extended finite element method that combines thermal fields and creep is used in this study to analyze the thermal cracking of massive concrete structures. The temperature field is accurately simulated through an equivalent equation of heat conduction that considers the effect of a cooling pipe system. The time-dependent creep behavior of massive concrete is determined by the viscoelastic constitutive model with Prony series. Based on the degree of hydration, we consider the main properties related to cracking evolving with time. Numerical simulations of a real massive concrete structure are conducted. Results show that the developed method is efficient for numerical calculations of thermal cracks on massive concrete. Further analyses indicate that a cooling system and appropriate heat preservation measures can efficiently prevent the occurrence of thermal cracks.

  17. Accurate photopyroelectric measurements of thermal diffusivity of (semi)liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dadarlat, D.; Neamtu, C.; Surducan, E.; Sahraoui, A.H.; Longuemart, S.; Bicanic, D.

    2002-01-01

    The back photopyroelectric (PPE) configuration, with opaque sample and thermally thick sample and sensor, was applied in order to obtain room temperature values of the thermal diffusivity of some (semi)liquid materials. The methodology is based on a sample's thickness scan, and not on a frequency sc

  18. Thermal Properties of Some Organic Liquids Using Ultrasonic Velocity Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ramadoss

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Debye temperature and thermal relaxation time has been calculated in normal and boiling temperature. Using thermal relaxation time, the heat of fusion has been calculated for nineteen organic liquids and the results throw light on the method of calculating heat of fusion.

  19. Solar Thermal Propulsion Optical Figure Measuring and Rocket Engine Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonometti, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    Solar thermal propulsion has been an important area of study for four years at the Propulsion Research Center. Significant resources have been devoted to the development of the UAH Solar Thermal Laboratory that provides unique, high temperature, test capabilities. The facility is fully operational and has successfully conducted a series of solar thruster shell experiments. Although presently dedicated to solar thermal propulsion, the facility has application to a variety of material processing, power generation, environmental clean-up, and other fundamental research studies. Additionally, the UAH Physics Department has joined the Center in support of an in-depth experimental investigation on Solar Thermal Upper Stage (STUS) concentrators. Laboratory space has been dedicated to the concentrator evaluation in the UAH Optics Building which includes a vertical light tunnel. Two, on-going, research efforts are being sponsored through NASA MSFC (Shooting Star Flight Experiment) and the McDonnell Douglas Corporation (Solar Thermal Upper Stage Technology Ground Demonstrator).

  20. Evaluation of different measurements for effective thermal conductivity of fibrous materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Ming-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective thermal conductivity is generally recognized as the intrinsic factor to reveal the thermal responses of fibrous materials. Here, two typical measurements, the step-wise transient method and the guarded hot plate method, were utilized to identify their feasibility for the effective thermal conductivity of fibrous materials (non-woven fabric and twill fabric with different stacking layers.

  1. Simultaneous Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity and Thermal Conductivity by Means of Inverse Solution for One-Dimensional Heat Conduction (Anisotropic Thermal Properties of CFRP for FCEV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Masataka; Monde, Masanori

    2015-11-01

    For safe and fast fueling of hydrogen in a fuel cell electric vehicle at hydrogen fueling stations, an understanding of the heat transferred from the gas into the tank wall (carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) material) during hydrogen fueling is necessary. Its thermal properties are needed in estimating heat loss accurately during hydrogen fueling. The CFRP has anisotropic thermal properties, because it consists of an adhesive agent and layers of the CFRP which is wound with a carbon fiber. In this paper, the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of the tank wall material were measured by an inverse solution for one-dimensional unsteady heat conduction. As a result, the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity were 2.09 × 10^{-6}{ m}2{\\cdot }{s}^{-1} and 3.06{ W}{\\cdot }{m}{\\cdot }^{-1}{K}^{-1} for the axial direction, while they were 6.03 × 10^{-7} {m}2{\\cdot }{s}^{-1} and 0.93 {W}{\\cdot }{m}^{-1}{\\cdot }{K}^{-1} for the radial direction. The thermal conductivity for the axial direction was about three times higher than that for the radial direction. The thermal diffusivity shows the same trend in both directions because the thermal capacity, ρ c, is independent of direction, where ρ is the density and c is the heat capacity.

  2. Optimization of experimental conditions of hot wire method in thermal conductivity measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Luyao

    2012-01-01

    This work studied the hot wire method in measuring thermal conductivity at room temperature. The purpose is to find the optimized experimental conditions to minimize natural convection in liquid for this method, which will be taken as reference for high temperature thermal conductivity measurement of slag. Combining room temperature experiments and simulation with COMSOL Multiphysics 4.2a, the study on different experimental parameters which may influence the accuracy of the measured thermal ...

  3. How to measure thermal effects of personal cooling systems : Human, thermal manikin and human simulator study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogerd, N.; Psikuta, A.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Rossi, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal effects, such as cooling power and thermophysiological responses initiated upon application of a personal cooling system, can be assessed with (i) humans, (ii) a thermal manikin and (iii) a thermophysiological human simulator. In order to compare these methods, a cooling shirt (mild cooling)

  4. Measurement of Thermal Noise in Multilayer Coatings with Optimized Layer Thickness

    CERN Document Server

    Villar, Akira E; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Libbrecht, Kenneth G; Michel, Christophe; Morgado, Nazario; Pinard, Laurent; Pinto, Innocenzo M; Pierro, Vincenzo; Galdi, Vincenzo; Principe, Maria; Taurasi, Ilaria

    2010-01-01

    A standard quarter-wavelength multilayer optical coating will produce the highest reflectivity for a given number of coating layers, but in general it will not yield the lowest thermal noise for a prescribed reflectivity. Coatings with the layer thicknesses optimized to minimize thermal noise could be useful in future generation interferometric gravitational wave detectors where coating thermal noise is expected to limit the sensitivity of the instrument. We present the results of direct measurements of the thermal noise of a standard quarter-wavelength coating and a low noise optimized coating. The measurements indicate a reduction in thermal noise in line with modeling predictions.

  5. First Results of Scanning Thermal Diffusivity Microscope (STDM) Measurements on Irradiated Monolithic and Dispersion Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. K. Huber; M. K. Figg; J. R. Kennedy; A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs

    2012-07-01

    The thermal conductivity of the fuel material in a reactor before and during irradiation is a sensitive and fundamental parameter for thermal hydraulic calculations that are useds to correctly determine fuel heat fluxes and meat temperatures and to simulate performance of the fuel elements during operation. Several techniques have been developed to measure the thermal properties of fresh fuel to support these calculations, but it is crucial to also investigate the change of thermal properties during irradiation.

  6. Correlation between subjective assessments of local thermal discomfort and thermal manikin measurements in a simulated aircraft cabin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukowska, Daria; Strøm-Tejsen, Peter; Jama, Agnieszka

    2005-01-01

    The thermal environment in a 21-seat simulated section of an aircraft cabin installed in a climate chamber was investigated. Using two thermal manikins and fourteen heated cylin-ders to represent passengers, measurements were carried out at cabin temperatures of 20.6°C, 23.3°C and 26.1°C (69°F, 74...

  7. Thermal Diffusivity and Conductivity Measurements in Diamond Anvil Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonangeli, D; Farber, D L

    2007-02-22

    We have undertaken a study of the feasibility of an innovative method for the determination of thermal properties of materials at extreme conditions. Our approach is essentiality an extension of the flash method to the geometry of the diamond-anvil cell and our ultimate goal is to greatly enlarge the pressure and temperature range over which thermal properties can be investigated. More specifically, we have performed test experiments to establish a technique for probing thermal diffusivity on samples of dimensions compatible with the physical constraints of the diamond anvil cell.

  8. Thermal diffusivity measurement by lock-in photothermal shadowgraph method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cifuentes, A. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Ciudad de México 11500 (Mexico); Departamento de Física Aplicada I, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería, Universidad del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Alvarado, S. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Ciudad de México 11500 (Mexico); Laboratory for Soft Matter and Biophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, Heverlee B-3001 (Belgium); Cabrera, H. [Centro Multidisciplinario de Ciencias, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, IVIC, Mérida 5101, Venezuela and SPIE-ICTP Anchor Research in Optics Program Lab, International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Strada Costiera 11, Trieste (Italy); Calderón, A.; Marín, E., E-mail: emarinm@ipn.mx [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Ciudad de México 11500 (Mexico)

    2016-04-28

    Here, we present a novel application of the shadowgraph technique for obtaining the thermal diffusivity of an opaque solid sample, inspired by the orthogonal skimming photothermal beam deflection technique. This new variant utilizes the shadow projected by the sample when put against a collimated light source. The sample is then heated periodically by another light beam, giving rise to thermal waves, which propagate across it and through its surroundings. Changes in the refractive index of the surrounding media due to the heating distort the shadow. This phenomenon is recorded and lock-in amplified in order to determine the sample's thermal diffusivity.

  9. Exploitation of subsea gas hydrate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas hydrates are considered to be a potential energy resource in the future. They occur in permafrost areas as well as in subsea sediments and are stable at high pressure and low temperature conditions. According to estimations the amount of carbon bonded in natural gas hydrates worldwide is two times larger than in all known conventional fossil fuels. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e.g. depressurization and/or injection of carbon dioxide) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR«. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into a numerical model. The physics of the process leads to strong non-linear couplings between hydraulic fluid flow, hydrate dissociation and formation, hydraulic properties of the sediment, partial pressures and seawater solution of components and the thermal budget of the system described by the heat equation. This paper is intended to provide an overview of the recent development regarding the production of natural gas from subsea gas hydrate reservoirs. It aims at giving a broad insight into natural gas hydrates and covering relevant aspects of the exploitation process. It is focused on the thermodynamic principles and technological approaches for the exploitation. The effects occurring during natural gas production within hydrate filled sediment layers are identified and discussed by means of numerical simulation results. The behaviour of relevant process parameters such as pressure, temperature and phase saturations is described and compared for different strategies. The simulations are complemented by calculations for different safety relevant problems.

  10. Proton percolation on hydrated lysozyme powders

    OpenAIRE

    Careri, G; Giansanti, A; Rupley, John A.

    1986-01-01

    The framework of percolation theory is used to analyze the hydration dependence of the capacitance measured for protein samples of pH 3-10, at frequencies from 10 kHz to 4 MHz. For all samples there is a critical value of the hydration at which the capacitance sharply increases with increase in hydration level. The threshold hc = 0.15 g of water per g of protein is independent of pH below pH 9 and shows no solvent deuterium isotope effect. The fractional coverage of the surface at hc is in cl...

  11. Concrete Hydration Heat Analysis for RCB Basemat Considering Solar Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong-Cheol; Son, Yong-Ki [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong-Cheol [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The NPP especially puts an emphasis on concrete durability for structural integrity. It has led to higher cementitious material contents, lower water-cementitious-material ratios, and deeper cover depth over reinforcing steel. These requirements have resulted in more concrete placements that are subject to high internal temperatures. The problem with high internal temperatures is the increase in the potential for thermal cracking that can decrease concrete's long-term durability and ultimate strength. Thermal cracking negates the benefits of less permeable concrete and deeper cover by providing a direct path for corrosion-causing agents to reach the reinforcing steel. The purpose of this study is to develop how to analyze and estimate accurately concrete hydration heat of the real-scale massive concrete with wide large plane. An analysis method considering concrete placement sequence was studied and solar radiation effects on the real-scale massive concrete with wide large plane were reviewed through the analytical method. In this study, the measured temperatures at the real scale structure and the analysis results of concrete hydration heat were compared. And thermal stress analysis was conducted. Through the analysis, it was found that concrete placement duration, sequence and solar radiation effects should be considered to get the accurate concrete peak temperature, maximum temperature differences and crack index.

  12. Development of Light Powered Sensor Networks for Thermal Comfort Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasheng Lee

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent technological advances in wireless communications have enabled easy installation of sensor networks with air conditioning equipment control applications. However, the sensor node power supply, through either power lines or battery power, still presents obstacles to the distribution of the sensing systems. In this study, a novel sensor network, powered by the artificial light, was constructed to achieve wireless power transfer and wireless data communications for thermal comfort measurements. The sensing node integrates an IC-based temperature sensor, a radiation thermometer, a relative humidity sensor, a micro machined flow sensor and a microprocessor for predicting mean vote (PMV calculation. The 935 MHz band RF module was employed for the wireless data communication with a specific protocol based on a special energy beacon enabled mode capable of achieving zero power consumption during the inactive periods of the nodes. A 5W spotlight, with a dual axis tilt platform, can power the distributed nodes over a distance of up to 5 meters. A special algorithm, the maximum entropy method, was developed to estimate the sensing quantity of climate parameters if the communication module did not receive any response from the distributed nodes within a certain time limit. The light-powered sensor networks were able to gather indoor comfort-sensing index levels in good agreement with the comfort-sensing vote (CSV preferred by a human being and the experimental results within the environment suggested that the sensing system could be used in air conditioning systems to implement a comfort-optimal control strategy.

  13. Measurements of the interfacial fracture energy of thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, L.L.; Barber, B; Jordan, E.H.; Gell, M.

    1998-10-13

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been extensively used in aircraft engines for improved durability and performance for more than 15 years. In this study, chevron-notched sandwich specimens proposed recently by Shaw are chosen for the study of the interfacial fracture energy of TBCs. The specimen of this kind has been successfully used to quantify the fracture energy of TBCs. The specimen of this kind has been successfully used to quantify the fracture energy of several metal/oxide and metal/silicide interfaces. The main advantages of this test specimen are: (1) it provides a rigorous fracture mechanics quantification for the bimaterial interface; (2) the fracture energy obtained arises mainly from the chemical bonding at the interface; (3) the test specimen is easy to fabricate (either diffusion or adhesive bonding), and the test is easy to implement (e.g., neither fatigue precracking nor crack length monitoring is needed); (4) no special compliance calibration of specimens is necessary because previously developed compliance calibrations for homogeneous materials can be utilized directly; (5) the test specimen is suitable for the fracture energy measurement of a single interface as well as for interfacial regions composed of several discrete interfaces, which is often the case for TBCs; and (6) the test method allows the interfacial fracture energy of TBCs to be found independent of the poorly characterized TBCs' elastic modulus as to which there is great uncertainty (e.g., the modulus in tension may be different then in compression). As will be shown in this study, all the aforementioned advantages are maintained for TBCs. Furthermore, the failure location using the chevron notched sandwich specimen duplicates the service failure mode. Thus, the data obtained can be utilized directly for lifetime prediction modeling.

  14. Thermally induced filter bias in TEOM mass measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, S.J.; Tuchman, D.P.; Vinson, R.P. [NIOSH, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). US Dept. of Health

    2007-07-01

    Researchers at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) have long used stationary tapered element oscillating microbalances (TEOMs) in laboratory settings. Current NIOSH research is focused on adapting TEOM technology as a wearable personal dust monitor (PDM) for coal mining occupations. The present research investigated bias caused by thermal effects on filter assemblies. New filters used in the PDM for 8 It tests show an average positive bias of 25.5 {mu}g., while similar tests of equivalent filters used in two 1400A model TEOMs show an average positive bias of 34.3 {mu}g. The derived bias values allow correction of previously collected biased data. Also, pre-heating the filters for 24 h at 46 degrees C shows significant bias reduction, with PDM pre-heated filters subsequently averaging -3.3 {mu}g and 1400A TEOM filters averaging 5.9 {mu}g. On a single-point comparison to gravimetric sampling, a 25.5 {mu}g bias is only significant at low mass loadings. At 2.5 mg, this bias represents a negligible 1% of the mass measurement. If ordinary linear regression is used, the bias is still insignificant. However, if the more valid weighted linear regression is used, it gives more weight to the smaller dependent variable values, which are more impacted by the bias. Consequently, what is 1% bias on a single high-mass value can translate into a larger bias percentage at high-mass values when performing a weighted regression on data that include a large number of low-mass values.

  15. Investigation of the crystalline structure of ettringite with in situ measurement of its evolution during formation and thermal decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Michael R.

    2005-07-01

    The crystalline structure of ettringite, Ca6[Al(OH)6 ]2(SO4)3·26H2O, an important hydration product in the chemistry of Portland cement, was investigated using time-of-flight neutron diffraction combined with Rietveld crystal structure refinement. In addition, the changes in crystalline structure during the formation and thermal decomposition of ettringite were followed in situ, using specialized experimental assemblies. The diffusive motions of crystalline water within the ettringite structure were studied using incoherent quasi-elastic neutron scattering techniques. The results of this investigation led to an improved model for the crystalline structure of ettringite, including a detailed understanding of the three-dimensional hydrogen bond network that extends throughout the structure. Structural changes were observed for ettringite specimens with thermal decomposition up to 30 wt. %. These studies showed that previous models of the dehydration process, based upon indirect experimental evidence, were incorrect. The formation of ettringite during the hydration of tricalcium aluminate (Ca3Al 2O6) in the presence of gypsum (CaSO4·2H 2O), for temperatures ranging from 25°C to 80°C, demonstrated that ettringite was the only crystalline hydration product, in contrast to a prior study which reported the presence of a precursor phase in the reaction pathway. An analysis of the kinetics of the hydration reaction showed that the rate law of the reaction changed markedly over the temperature range investigated. Approximately 12% of the hydrogen atoms present in a fully hydrated ettringite specimen were observed to perform a localized diffusive motion for temperatures between 200 K and 320 K, while an ettringite specimen dehydrated to a weight loss of 20 wt. % showed indications of translational diffusion for approximately 9% of the remaining hydrogen atoms.

  16. a Methodology for Thermal Characterization of Cementitious Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousan, Akram Abdel-Majeed

    This study was an attempt to develop and utilize a method to measure thermal conductivity of cementitious materials without affecting the state of equilibrium of the sample. The thermal comparator method employed and developed here was proved to be suitable for this kind of material. The method was used to measure thermal conductivity of neat cement and cement plus additives. An attempt was also made to study other thermal properties of cementitious materials, such as thermal expansion and early heat of hydration. Class C portland cement was used in this study, mixed with different water to cement ratios and with additives and admixtures (fine quartz, fly ash, and quartz and basalt sands); and the thermal properties were measured at curing times up to three months. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion were found to be dependent upon curing times, moisture contents, and concentrations and types of admixed phases. Mathematical relations of thermal conductivity as a function of additive contents were obtained at different curing times for the additives used in this study. Both thermal conductivity and thermal expansion were found to reach constant values when cementitious materials approach maturity. It was shown that thermal conductivity of mature hydrated additives can be estimated using the experimental results from measurements on composites. The hydration rate was also studied and the effect of additives as accelerators or retarders was explored using the rate of heat evolution curves. Results indicate that inert additives like quartz have no significant effect on the hydration rate, and reactive additives like fly ash tend, in general, to accelerate the reaction. Applications of the methods to the determination of properties of seal materials for geologic repositories for nuclear waste are discussed.

  17. Extraction of thermal parameters of microbolometer infrared detectors using electrical measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunasiri, R. P. G.; Xu, Gu; Chen, G. X.; Sridhar, U.

    1998-10-01

    The performance of microbolometer infrared sensors is typically characterized by its thermal time constant, heat capacitance, and thermal conductance. Therefore, the determination of these parameters accurately and efficiently is of considerable interest for the design and operation of microbolometer infrared sensors. Usually, the thermal time constant is obtained by measuring the frequency response of microbolometers under infrared excitation and the thermal conductance and capacity are extracted using electrical measurement. In this paper, a technique is described to extract all three parameters using a single electrical measurement. In the measurement, we have employed a Wheatstone Bridge consisting of a bolometer and three reference resistors. The resistance of the bolometer changes as a result of self-heating under an external bias which in turn generates an output voltage across the Bridge. The time dependence of the output voltage was used to extract thermal parameters of the bolometer. We believe this technique is useful in determining the thermal parameters of microbolometer based sensors.

  18. ADR salt pill design and crystal growth process for hydrated magnetic salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor); DiPirro, Michael J. (Inventor); Canavan, Edgar R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A process is provided for producing a salt pill for use in very low temperature adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADRs). The method can include providing a thermal bus in a housing. The thermal bus can include an array of thermally conductive metal conductors. A hydrated salt can be grown on the array of thermally conductive metal conductors. Thermal conductance can be provided to the hydrated salt.

  19. Application of Hot-wire Method for Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Fine Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangxi WANG

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic substrate is preferred in high density packaging due to its high electrical resistivity and moderate expansion coefficient. The thermal conductivity is a key parameter for packaging substrates. There are two common methods to measure the thermal conductivity, which are the hot-wire method and the laser-flash method. Usually, the thermal conductivities of porcelain is low and meet the measurement range of hot-wire method, and the measured value by hot-wire method has little difference with that by laser-flash method. In recent years, with the requirement of high-powered LED lighting, some kinds of ceramic substrates with good thermal conductivity have been developed and their thermal conductivity always measured by the means of laser flash method, which needs expensive instrument. In this paper, in order to detect the thermal conductivity of fine ceramic with convenience and low cost, the feasibility of replacing the laser flash method with hot wire method to measure thermal conductivity of ceramic composites was studied. The experiment results showed that the thermal conductivity value of fine ceramics measured by the hot-wire method is severely lower than that by the laser-flash method. However, there is a positive relationship between them. It is possible to measure the thermal conductivity of fine ceramic workpiece instantly by hot-wire method via a correction formula.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.12543

  20. A travelling photothermal technique employing pyroelectric detection to measure thermal diffusivity of films and coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, J.; Manjusha, M. V.; Soumya, H.

    2011-10-01

    A travelling thermal wave technique employing optical excitation and pyroelectric detection of thermal waves propagating along a material film/coating on a substrate is described. The method enables direct measurement of thermal diffusivity. The technique involves measurement of the phase lag undergone by an optically excited thermal wave as it propagates along the coating. The set up has been automated for convenient and fast data acquisition and analysis. The technique has been adapted to measurement of thermal diffusivity of a commercial paint sample coated on glass and copper substrates. It is found that thermal diffusivity of the coating is independent of the thermal conductivity of the substrate. Dependence of thermal diffusivity on coating thickness shows exponential increase, with value reaching a constant at a characteristic high thickness. Measurements have been carried out on a few other samples with wide variations in thermal diffusivity, and the results compared with available reports or results obtained following other techniques. Analyses of the results show that the technique allows measurement of thermal diffusivity of coatings and films with uncertainties better than ±2.5%.

  1. Physical activity, hydration and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascensión Marcos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of mankind, man has sought ways to promote and preserve health as well as to prevent disease. Hydration, physical activity and exercise are key factors for enhancing human health. However, either a little dose of them or an excess can be harmful for health maintenance at any age. Water is an essential nutrient for human body and a major key to survival has been to prevent dehydration. However, there is still a general controversy regarding the necessary amount to drink water or other beverages to properly get an adequate level of hydration. In addition, up to now the tools used to measure hydration are controversial. To this end, there are several important groups of variables to take into account such as water balance, hydration biomarkers and total body water. A combination of methods will be the most preferred tool to find out any risk or situation of dehydration at any age range. On the other hand, physical activity and exercise are being demonstrated to promote health, avoiding or reducing health problems, vascular and inflammatory diseases and helping weight management. Therefore, physical activity is also being used as a pill within a therapy to promote health and reduce risk diseases, but as in the case of drugs, dose, intensity, frequency, duration and precautions have to be evaluated and taken into account in order to get the maximum effectiveness and success of a treatment. On the other hand, sedentariness is the opposite concept to physical activity that has been recently recognized as an important factor of lifestyle involved in the obesogenic environment and consequently in the risk of the non-communicable diseases. In view of the literature consulted and taking into account the expertise of the authors, in this review a Decalogue of global recommendations is included to achieve an adequate hydration and physical activity status to avoid overweight/obesity consequences.

  2. Synthesis, Crystal Structure, Vibrational Spectroscopy and Thermal Behavior of the First Alkali Metal Hydrated Hexaborate: K2[B6O9(OH)2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI,Hong-Juan; LIU,Zhi-Hong; SUN,Li-Mei

    2007-01-01

    New hydrated potassium hexaborate K2[B6O9(OH)2] has been synthesized under mild solvothermal conditions.The structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and further characterized by FT-IR, Raman spectra and DTA-TG. It crystallizes in the monoclinic system with space group P21/n, a=0.9036(2) nm, b=0.66052(18)nm, c= 1.5997(4) nm, β=91.862(4)°, V=0.9543(4) nm3 and Z=4. Its crystal structure consists of K-O polyhedra and 1-D stepped polyborate chains constructed by new [B6O9(OH)2]2- fundamental building blocks. 1-D polyborate chains contain 3,8-membered boron rings. Adjacent chains are further linked via H-bonding interactions into 2-D layers. The K+ cations reside not only between the layers but also in the 8-membered boron rings of the chains,compensating the negative charges of the borate chains and holding the layers together into the 3-D structure through bonding with oxygen atoms of the chains.

  3. Quantifying hydrate formation and kinetic inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloan, E.D.; Subramanian, S.; Matthews, P.N.; Lederhos, J.P.; Khokhar, A.A. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Hydrate Research

    1998-08-01

    In the Prausnitz tradition, molecular and macroscopic evidence of hydrate formation and kinetic inhibition is presented. On the microscopic level, the first Raman spectra are presented for the formation of both uninhibited and inhibited methane hydrates with time. This method has the potential to provide a microscopic-based kinetics model. Three macroscopic aspects of natural gas hydrate kinetic inhibition are also reported: (1) The effect of hydrate dissociation residual structures was measured, which has application in decreasing the time required for subsequent formation. (2) The performance of a kinetic inhibitor (poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) or PVCap) was measured and correlated as a function of PVCap molecular weight and concentrations of PVCap, methanol, and salt in the aqueous phase. (3) Long-duration test results indicated that the use of PVCap can prevent pipeline blockage for a time exceeding the aqueous phase residence time in some gas pipelines.

  4. Production behaviour of gas hydrate under hot sea water injection : laboratory case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nengkoda, A. [Schlumberger, Calgary, AB (Canada); Budhijanto, B.; Supranto, S.; Prasetyo, I.; Purwono, S.; Sutijan, S. [Gadjah Mada Univ., Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2010-07-01

    The gas hydrate potential in Indonesia was discussed, with particular reference to offshore production of gas from deep-water gas-hydrates by injection of hot seawater. In 2004, the Indonesian National Agency for Assessment and Application Technology estimated the gas hydrate resource potential to be 850 trillion cubic feet (tcf). To date, the 3 most reliable scenarios for gas hydrate production are thermal stimulation which involves increasing the temperature until the hydrates break into water and gas; depressurization which involves lowering the pressure by pumping out gas at the base of the hydrate to cause dissociation of hydrates into gas; and injection of a chemical inhibitor such as methanol into the hydrated sediments to cause destabilization, thus releasing gas from hydrates. This study investigated the effect of hot seawater injection on the gas hydrate production under laboratory conditions. The temperature profile distribution was examined along with operational parameters and flow characteristics of the dissociated gas and water from hydrates in porous systems under a synthetic hydrate setup. The study showed that gas production increases with time until a maximum is reached, at which time it begins to decrease. The energy ratio of thermal stimulation production was found to be influenced by the injection water temperature and rate as well as the hydrate content in the synthetic sediment. Scale problems were found to be associated with high temperature seawater injection. 8 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs.

  5. A Wearable Hydration Sensor with Conformal Nanowire Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shanshan; Myers, Amanda; Malhotra, Abhishek; Lin, Feiyan; Bozkurt, Alper; Muth, John F; Zhu, Yong

    2017-01-27

    A wearable skin hydration sensor in the form of a capacitor is demonstrated based on skin impedance measurement. The capacitor consists of two interdigitated or parallel electrodes that are made of silver nanowires (AgNWs) in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. The flexible and stretchable nature of the AgNW/PDMS electrode allows conformal contact to the skin. The hydration sensor is insensitive to the external humidity change and is calibrated against a commercial skin hydration system on an artificial skin over a wide hydration range. The hydration sensor is packaged into a flexible wristband, together with a network analyzer chip, a button cell battery, and an ultralow power microprocessor with Bluetooth. In addition, a chest patch consisting of a strain sensor, three electrocardiography electrodes, and a skin hydration sensor is developed for multimodal sensing. The wearable wristband and chest patch may be used for low-cost, wireless, and continuous monitoring of skin hydration and other health parameters.

  6. Thermal Conductivity Measurement Setup for Low Temperature Characterization of Laser Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    temperature for typical dielectrics Temperature is not the only factor that can influence thermal conductivity; the purity of the dielectric solid also plays...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We have developed a setup for accurately measuring the thermal conductivity κ of solid dielectric samples in the...and low thermal losses across the sample. Initial benchmark κ measurements of an undoped single-crystal yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) sample show

  7. Thermal conductivity measurements of laser crystals by infrared thermography. Application to Nd:doped crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Didierjean, Julien; Hérault, Emilie; Balembois, François; Georges, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    International audience; We present a thermal conductivity measurement method for laser crystals based on thermal mapping of the crystal face by an infrared camera. Those measurements are performed under end-pumping of the laser crystal and during laser operation. The calculation of the fraction of pump power converted into heat is therefore simplified, and it is possible to link easily the temperature in the crystal to the thermal conductivity. We demonstrate the efficiency of this measuremen...

  8. Relation between relative permeability and hydrate saturation in Shenhu area, South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Chuan-Hui; Zhao Qian; Xu Hong-Jun; Feng Kai; Liu Xue-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in hydrate-bearing sandstone samples from the Shenhu area, South China Sea were used to study the effect of gas hydrates on the sandstone permeability. The hydrate-bearing samples contain pore-fi lling hydrates. The data show that the pore-fi lling hydrates greatly affect the formation permeability while depending on many factors that also bear on permeability; furthermore, with increasing hydrate saturation, the formation permeability decreases. We used the Masuda model and an exponent N = 7.9718 to formulate the empirical equation that describes the relation between relative permeability and hydrate saturation for the Shenhu area samples.

  9. Dehydration-Induced Optical Effects (0.20 - 2.50 µm ) of Hydrated Salts: Laboratory Spectral Measurements with Application to Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Caixia; Rodriguez lopez, Gerard; Dukes, Catherine; McFadden, Lucy Ann; Li, Jian-Yang; Ruesch, Ottaviano

    2016-10-01

    Introduction: Photometric measurements by the Dawn spacecraft find bright regions amidst the globally, low albedo (0.11) surface of Ceres, and possible constituents include Fe-poor clay minerals and salts, as suggested by the UV-Vis spectral shape at 0.4-1.0µm [1-2]. The albedo darkens with distance from the brightest spot at the center of Occator crater. Nathues et al [1] hypothesize that the darkening may result from the dehydration of MgSO4 hexahydrate. We perform laboratory experiments with hydrated salts to determine the optical effects of dehydration [1-4].Experiment: MgSO4.nH2O (n=0, 1, 6, 7), Na2SO4.10H2O and Na2CO3.10H2O powders with composition confirmed by XRD were prepared in three grain size fractions (Astronomy programs.References: [1]A. Nathues et al (2015) Nature 528, 237-239 [2]M.C. DeSanctis et al (2015) Nature 528, 241-244 [3]O. Saint-Pé, et al (1993) Icarus 105(2), 271-281 [4]J.-Y. Li et al (2016) ApJL 817:L22

  10. A direct differential method for measuring thermal conductivity of thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yuqiang; Marconnet, Amy

    2017-04-01

    Over the past two decades, significant progress in the thermal metrology for thin films and wires has enabled new understanding of the thermal conductivity of nanostructures. However, a large variation in the measured thermal conductivity of similar nanostructured samples has been observed. In addition to potential differences from sample-to-sample, measurement uncertainty contributes to the observed variation in measured properties. Many now standard micro/nanoscale thermal measurement techniques require extensive calibration of the properties of the substrate and support structures and this calibration contributes to uncertainty. Within this work, we develop a simple, direct differential electrothermal measurement of thermal conductivity of micro/nanoscale sample films by extending conventional steady state electrothermal approaches. Specifically, we leverage a cross-beam measurement structure consisting of a suspended, composite heater beam (metal on silicon) with the sample structure (silicon) extending at a right angle from the center of the heater beam, in a configuration similar to the T-type measurements used for fibers and nanotubes. To accurately resolve the thermal conductivity of the sample, the steady-state Joule heating response of the cross-beam structure is measured. Then, the sample is detached from the heater beam with a Focused Ion Beam (FIB) tool enabling direct characterization of the composite heater beam thermal properties. The differential measurement of the structure before and after FIB cut enables direct extraction of the sample thermal conductivity. The effectiveness of this differential measurement technique is demonstrated by measuring thermal conductivity of a 200 nm silicon layer. Additionally, this new method enables investigation of the accuracy of conventional approaches for extracting sample thermal conductivity with the composite beam structure and conventional comparative approaches. The results highlight the benefits of the

  11. A non-destructive method to measure the thermal properties of frozen soils during phase transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Zhang; Chanjuan Han; Xiong Bill Yu

    2015-01-01

    Frozen soils cover about 40%of the land surface on the earth and are responsible for the global energy balances affecting the climate. Measurement of the thermal properties of frozen soils during phase transition is important for analyzing the thermal transport process. Due to the involvement of phase transition, the thermal properties of frozen soils are rather complex. This paper introduces the uses of a multifunctional instrument that integrates time domain reflectometry (TDR) sensor and thermal pulse technology (TPT) to measure the thermal properties of soil during phase transition. With this method, the extent of phase transition (freezing/thawing) was measured with the TDR module; and the corre-sponding thermal properties were measured with the TPT module. Therefore, the variation of thermal properties with the extent of freezing/thawing can be obtained. Wet soils were used to demonstrate the performance of this measurement method. The performance of individual modules was first validated with designed experiments. The new sensor was then used to monitor the properties of soils during freezingethawing process, from which the freezing/thawing degree and thermal properties were simultaneously measured. The results are consistent with documented trends of thermal properties variations.

  12. A non-destructive method to measure the thermal properties of frozen soils during phase transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Frozen soils cover about 40% of the land surface on the earth and are responsible for the global energy balances affecting the climate. Measurement of the thermal properties of frozen soils during phase transition is important for analyzing the thermal transport process. Due to the involvement of phase transition, the thermal properties of frozen soils are rather complex. This paper introduces the uses of a multifunctional instrument that integrates time domain reflectometry (TDR sensor and thermal pulse technology (TPT to measure the thermal properties of soil during phase transition. With this method, the extent of phase transition (freezing/thawing was measured with the TDR module; and the corresponding thermal properties were measured with the TPT module. Therefore, the variation of thermal properties with the extent of freezing/thawing can be obtained. Wet soils were used to demonstrate the performance of this measurement method. The performance of individual modules was first validated with designed experiments. The new sensor was then used to monitor the properties of soils during freezing–thawing process, from which the freezing/thawing degree and thermal properties were simultaneously measured. The results are consistent with documented trends of thermal properties variations.

  13. Hydration of polyethylene glycol-grafted liposomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Tirosh, O; Barenholz, Y.; Katzhendler, J; Priev, A

    1998-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the effect of polyethylene glycol of 2000 molecular weight (PEG2000) attached to a dialkylphosphatidic acid (dihexadecylphosphatidyl (DHP)-PEG2000) on the hydration and thermodynamic stability of lipid assemblies. Differential scanning calorimetry, densitometry, and ultrasound velocity and absorption measurements were used for thermodynamic and hydrational characterization. Using a differential scanning calorimetry technique we showed that each molecule of PEG...

  14. Gas Hydrates as a CH4 Source and a CO2 Sink: New Approaches Based on Fundamental Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicks, J. M.; Spangenberg, E.; Erzinger, J.

    2007-12-01

    The huge amount of methane, stored in the gas hydrate reservoirs of the world suggests that natural gas hydrates may be used in the future as a source of energy. A first production test was performed during the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program, showing that the thermal stimulation of natural gas hydrates successfully results in methane production (Dallimore et al. 2005). However, regarding the energy balance, the most efficient method for methane production from hydrates still needs to be developed. From another point of view, the sequestration of CO2 in form of gas hydrates in (marine) sediments is an interesting idea. A combination of methane production from natural gas hydrates on the one hand and CO2 - sequestration on the other hand seems to be an obvious and ideal solution. Different studies on possible methods - e.g. the exchange of CH4 with CO2 in gas hydrates (Lee et al, 2003, Graue and Kvamme, 2006) - have been published recently and demonstrated that this could be a possible way, in principle. Our own investigations on the exchange of CH4 with gaseous CO2 showed that this reaction is much too slow and inefficient to be a reasonable approach. The exchange of only 20 percent CH4 with CO2 could be detected in stable structure I hydrate crystals after 120 hours. In addition, multicomponent hydrates containing higher hydrocarbons beside methane tend to be more stable than pure methane hydrates (Schicks et al, 2006). Therefore, the application of an additional and controlled method for CH4 -hydrate destabilization seems to be necessary and might lead to an efficient release of CH4 from and CO2 inclusion into hydrates. In any case, the question of process optimization still remains. In this contribution the chances and challenges of a combination of these two processes based on experimental data will be examined. Different kinds of experiments have been performed on natural marine and permafrost gas hydrates and synthesized clathrate

  15. An apparatus to measure the thermal conductivity of insulation panels at sub-ambient temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanapalli, Srinivas; Klünder, T.; Hegeman, I.; Tolboom, A.H.; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.

    2017-01-01

    A single-sided guarded-plate apparatus has been developed to measure the thermal conductivity of insulation panels of sub-meter size at sub-ambient temperatures ranging from 250 to 300 K. This apparatus allows thermal conductivity measurements to be performed at large temperature differences

  16. Improvement on Thermal Conductivity Measurement Involved in ISO 8894—2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGYajing; ZHENGXianghua; 等

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of thermal conductivity of some materials have been conducted using parallel hot wire method desribed in ISO8894-2,With improved techniques,the measuring range has been extended ,It is suggested that this method be used to determine thermal conductivity of various refractories more widely.

  17. Thermal transport characteristics of human skin measured in vivo using ultrathin conformal arrays of thermal sensors and actuators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Chad Webb

    Full Text Available Measurements of the thermal transport properties of the skin can reveal changes in physical and chemical states of relevance to dermatological health, skin structure and activity, thermoregulation and other aspects of human physiology. Existing methods for in vivo evaluations demand complex systems for laser heating and infrared thermography, or they require rigid, invasive probes; neither can apply to arbitrary regions of the body, offers modes for rapid spatial mapping, or enables continuous monitoring outside of laboratory settings. Here we describe human clinical studies using mechanically soft arrays of thermal actuators and sensors that laminate onto the skin to provide rapid, quantitative in vivo determination of both the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity, in a completely non-invasive manner. Comprehensive analysis of measurements on six different body locations of each of twenty-five human subjects reveal systematic variations and directional anisotropies in the characteristics, with correlations to the thicknesses of the epidermis (EP and stratum corneum (SC determined by optical coherence tomography, and to the water content assessed by electrical impedance based measurements. Multivariate statistical analysis establishes four distinct locations across the body that exhibit different physical properties: heel, cheek, palm, and wrist/volar forearm/dorsal forearm. The data also demonstrate that thermal transport correlates negatively with SC and EP thickness and positively with water content, with a strength of correlation that varies from region to region, e.g., stronger in the palmar than in the follicular regions.

  18. Influence of the sample mounting on thermal conductance measurements using PPMS TTO option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebek, J.; Santava, E.

    2009-02-01

    We discuss the performance of the automated heat conductivity measurement system manufactured by the Quantum Design, Inc. The Thermal Transport Option implemented into the Physical Properties Measurement System (PPMS) measures the thermal transport properties of materials (thermal conductivity, Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity simultaneously) in the temperature range 1.8 - 395 K and in magnetic fields generated by the installed superconducting solenoid. Recently, discrepancies up to 30% in measured quantities at 390 K have been reported. We critically analyze the experimental method used to measure the above mentioned quantities and show possible sources of problems.

  19. Instrument for Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Materials at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James; Sass, Jared; Johnson, Wesley

    2010-01-01

    With the advance of polymer and other non-metallic material sciences, whole new series of polymeric materials and composites are being created. These materials are being optimized for many different applications including cryogenic and low-temperature industrial processes. Engineers need these data to perform detailed system designs and enable new design possibilities for improved control, reliability, and efficiency in specific applications. One main area of interest is cryogenic structural elements and fluid handling components and other parts, films, and coatings for low-temperature application. An important thermal property of these new materials is the apparent thermal conductivity (k-value).

  20. Systems and methods for thermal imaging technique for measuring mixing of fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booten, Charles; Tomerlin, Jeff; Winkler, Jon

    2016-06-14

    Systems and methods for thermal imaging for measuring mixing of fluids are provided. In one embodiment, a method for measuring mixing of gaseous fluids using thermal imaging comprises: positioning a thermal test medium parallel to a direction gaseous fluid flow from an outlet vent of a momentum source, wherein when the source is operating, the fluid flows across a surface of the medium; obtaining an ambient temperature value from a baseline thermal image of the surface; obtaining at least one operational thermal image of the surface when the fluid is flowing from the outlet vent across the surface, wherein the fluid has a temperature different than the ambient temperature; and calculating at least one temperature-difference fraction associated with at least a first position on the surface based on a difference between temperature measurements obtained from the at least one operational thermal image and the ambient temperature value.

  1. Measurement of Linear Coefficient of Thermal Expansion and Temperature-Dependent Refractive Index Using Interferometric System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsetti, James A.; Green, William E.; Ellis, Jonathan D.; Schmidt, Greg R.; Moore, Duncan T.

    2017-01-01

    A system combining an interferometer with an environmental chamber for measuring both coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and temperature-dependent refractive index (dn/dT) simultaneously is presented. The operation and measurement results of this instrument are discussed.

  2. Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

    2011-12-31

    processes that control production potential of hydrates in marine settings, Mallik was included because of the extensive data collected in a producible hydrate accumulation. To date, such a location had not been studied in the oceanic environment. The project worked closely with ongoing projects (e.g. GOM JIP and offshore India) that are actively investigating potentially economic hydrate accumulations in marine settings. The overall approach was fivefold: (1) collect key data concerning hydrocarbon fluxes which is currently missing at all locations to be included in the study, (2) use this and existing data to build numerical models that can explain gas hydrate variance at all four locations, (3) simulate how natural gas could be produced from each location with different production strategies, (4) collect new sediment property data at these locations that are required for constraining fluxes, production simulations and assessing sediment stability, and (5) develop a method for remotely quantifying heterogeneities in gas hydrate and free gas distributions. While we generally restricted our efforts to the locations where key parameters can be measured or constrained, our ultimate aim was to make our efforts universally applicable to any hydrate accumulation.

  3. Estimating thermal diffusivity and specific heat from needle probe thermal conductivity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; Gilbert, L.Y.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity and specific heat can be estimated from thermal conductivity measurements made using a standard needle probe and a suitably high data acquisition rate. Thermal properties are calculated from the measured temperature change in a sample subjected to heating by a needle probe. Accurate thermal conductivity measurements are obtained from a linear fit to many tens or hundreds of temperature change data points. In contrast, thermal diffusivity calculations require a nonlinear fit to the measured temperature change occurring in the first few tenths of a second of the measurement, resulting in a lower accuracy than that obtained for thermal conductivity. Specific heat is calculated from the ratio of thermal conductivity to diffusivity, and thus can have an uncertainty no better than that of the diffusivity estimate. Our thermal conductivity measurements of ice Ih and of tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate, made using a 1.6 mm outer diameter needle probe and a data acquisition rate of 18.2 pointss, agree with published results. Our thermal diffusivity and specific heat results reproduce published results within 25% for ice Ih and 3% for THF hydrate. ?? 2006 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Thermal conductivity measurement by the 3omega method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bourlon, A.B.; Van der Tempel, L.

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The power of LEDs increases exponentially over the years,while the mean time to failure (MTTF) should remain >100000 hours. The reliability requirement limits the junction temperature and the thermo elastic stresses, which are roughly inversely proportional tothe thermal conductivity of th

  5. Thermal diffusivity measurements on porous carbon fiber reinforced polymer tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Jürgen; Gresslehner, Karl Heinz; Mayr, Günther; Hendorfer, Günther

    2017-02-01

    This work presents the application of methods for the determination of the thermal diffusivity well suited for flat bodies adapted to cylindrical bodies. Green's functions were used to get the temperature time history for small and large times, for the approach of intersecting these two straight lines. To verify the theoretical considerations noise free data are generated by finite element simulations. Furthermore effects of inhomogeneous excitation and the anisotropic heat conduction of carbon fiber reinforced polymers were taken into account in these numerical simulations. It could be shown that the intersection of the two straight lines is suitable for the determination of the thermal diffusivity, although the results have to be corrected depending on the ratio of the cylinders inner and outer radii. Inhomogeneous excitation affects the results of this approach as it lead to multidimensional heat flux. However, based on the numerical simulations a range of the azimuthal angle exists, where the thermal diffusivity is nearly independent of the angle. The method to determine the thermal diffusivity for curved geometries by the well suited Thermographic Signal Reconstruction method and taking into account deviations from the slab by a single correction factor has great advantages from an industrial point of view, just like an easy implementation into evaluation software and the Thermographic Signal Reconstruction methods rather short processing time.

  6. A method of measuring the thermal conductivity of liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Held, E.F.M. van der; Drunen, F.G. van

    1949-01-01

    We described the development of an apparatus for the determination of the thermal conductivity of liquids. The apparatus is suitable for all kinds of liquids, including the strongest acids. From a given time we pass an electric current through a thin straight wire, placed in a homogeneous material o

  7. Measuring energy expenditure in sports by thermal video analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Rikke; Larsen, Ryan Godsk; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2017-01-01

    Estimation of human energy expenditure in sports and exercise contributes to performance analyses and tracking of physical activity levels. The focus of this work is to develop a video-based method for estimation of energy expenditure in athletes. We propose a method using thermal video analysis...

  8. Thermal conductivity measurement by the 3omega method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bourlon, A.B.; Van der Tempel, L.

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The power of LEDs increases exponentially over the years,while the mean time to failure (MTTF) should remain >100000 hours. The reliability requirement limits the junction temperature and the thermo elastic stresses, which are roughly inversely proportional tothe thermal conductivity of

  9. Vibrational dynamics of hydration water in amylose

    CERN Document Server

    Cavatorta, F; Albanese, G; Angelini, N

    2002-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamical properties of hydration water associated with amylose helices, based on low-temperature vibrational spectra collected using the TOSCA inelastic spectrometer at ISIS. The structural constraints of the polysaccharidic chains favour the formation of a high-density structure for water, which has been suggested by Imberty and Perez on the basis of conformational analysis. According to this model, hydration water can only enter the pores formed by six adjacent helices and completely fills the pores at a hydration level of about 0.27-g water/g dry amylose. Our measurements show that the dynamical behaviour of hydration water is similar to that observed in high-density amorphous ice. (orig.)

  10. Measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of hen egg-white lysozyme crystals using a short hot wire method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Seiji; Maki, Syou; Tanaka, Seiichi; Maekawa, Ryunosuke; Masuda, Tomoki; Hagiwara, Masayuki

    2017-07-01

    Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) crystals were examined by using the transient short hot wire method. This method is based on the conventional hot wire method, but improved by using a wire that is much shorter than conventional ones. The magneto-Archimedes levitation technique was utilized to attach the HEWL crystals onto the wire. Owing to the upward magnetic force, the HEWL crystals were deposited at the air-liquid interface of the protein buffer solution where the short hot wire was preliminarily fixed. In situ observation clarified that the wire was completely buried into the HEWL crystals. By means of these techniques, the measurement of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of HEWL crystals was realized for the first time. Gadolinium chloride (a paramagnetic subject) was used as a precipitant agent of crystallization. Crystal growth was carried out over 20 h at 17.2 °C. The applied magnetic field was 4 T. Measurements were conducted during the crystal growth at two different times. The thermal conductivity and diffusivity of the HEWL crystals were determined to be 0.410 W/(m.K) and 3.77×10-8 m2/s at 14 h after, and 0.438 W/(m.K) and 5.18×10-8 m2/s at 20 h after, respectively. We emphasize that this method is versatile and applicable for other protein crystals.

  11. Gas hydrate as a proxy for contemporary climate change and shallow heat flow on the US east coast and north slope of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phrampus, Benjamin J.

    conductive regime of continental slopes. Due to their strict and well understood thermodynamic stability regime, I can determine background conductive heat flows from the distribution of hydrate and methane gas. This technique greatly extends our current heat flow measurements, and allows us to identify zones of fluid flow with high accuracy. The extended heat flow dataset combined with observations of sedimentation, porosity, compaction, and basal heat flow evolution results in a basin thermal model over the life of the Atlantic continental margin (˜200 Ma) and reveals zones of significant hydrate potential along the Carolina Trough, a region of upcoming hydrocarbon exploration. Taken together, these studies reveal the utility of gas hydrate as a geologic tool to understand conductive heat flow and identify regions of fluid flow via seismic reflections. Additionally, studying methane hydrate reservoirs to gain a better understanding of how they evolve in response to climate forcing allows us to better judge their contribution to the global methane budget. Methane hydrates may be the largest reservoir of fossil fuels on Earth, yet it is the dynamics and unique thermodynamic properties that make these deposits so important to study, and why we must continue to pursue hydrate related problems. This study is pursuant to those ends.

  12. Assessment of construction workers’ hydration status using urine specific gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saideh Montazer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study objective was to assess hydration status by measuring USG among construction workers in Iran. Materials and Methods: The study design was comparative and experimental. Sixty participants were randomly selected from the construction workers from a construction campus with a similar type of work, climate and diet and formed 2 groups (individuals exposed to the sun and non-exposed individuals. TWL and USG were measured in both groups on 2 consequent days, at the beginning, mid and end of the work shift. Results: USG test showed that mean USG was 1.0213±0.0054 in the control group and in the exposed group, where it was significantly higher, it amounted to 1.026±0.005. In the exposed group, 38% of workers had a USG level between 1.026-1.030, representing a higher risk of heat illness and impaired performance and 12.72% had a USG level above 1.030 representing a clinically dehydrated status, while this proportion in the control group was 15.2% and 0.58%, respectively. The mean TWL index measure was 215.8±5.2 W/m2 for the control group and 144±9.8 W/m2 for the exposed group, where, again, it was significantly higher. The Pearson correlation measure showed a significant correlation between USG and TWL. Conclusions: Strong correlation between TWL, as an indicator of thermal stress and USG shows that USG can be considered as a predictor of thermal stress. The difference between USG among the exposed and non-exposed workers and the increase in USG during midday work show the sensitivity of this measure in different thermal and climatic conditions, whereas, the high level of dehydration among workers despite acceptable TWL level, shows that heat stress management without considering the real hydration status of workers, is insufficient.

  13. A new solution of measuring thermal response of prestressed concrete bridge girders for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Pengcheng; Borchani, Wassim; Hasni, Hassene; Lajnef, Nizar

    2017-08-01

    This study develops a novel buckling-based mechanism to measure the thermal response of prestressed concrete bridge girders under continuous temperature changes for structural health monitoring. The measuring device consists of a bilaterally constrained beam and a piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride transducer that is attached to the beam. Under thermally induced displacement, the slender beam is buckled. The post-buckling events are deployed to convert the low-rate and low-frequency excitations into localized high-rate motions and, therefore, the attached piezoelectric transducer is triggered to generate electrical signals. Attaching the measuring device to concrete bridge girders, the electrical signals are used to detect the thermal response of concrete bridges. Finite element simulations are conducted to obtain the displacement of prestressed concrete girders under thermal loads. Using the thermal-induced displacement as input, experiments are carried out on a 3D printed measuring device to investigate the buckling response and corresponding electrical signals. A theoretical model is developed based on the nonlinear Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and large deformation assumptions to predict the buckling mode transitions of the beam. Based on the presented theoretical model, the geometry properties of the measuring device can be designed such that its buckling response is effectively controlled. Consequently, the thermally induced displacement can be designed as limit states to detect excessive thermal loads on concrete bridge girders. The proposed solution sufficiently measures the thermal response of concrete bridges.

  14. Evaluation of Perfusion and Thermal Parameters of Skin Tissue Using Cold Provocation and Thermographic Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strąkowska Maria

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of the perfusion coefficient and thermal parameters of skin tissue using dynamic thermography is presented in this paper. A novel approach based on cold provocation and thermal modelling of skin tissue is presented. The measurement was performed on a person’s forearm using a special cooling device equipped with the Peltier module. The proposed method first cools the skin, and then measures the changes of its temperature matching the measurement results with a heat transfer model to estimate the skin perfusion and other thermal parameters. In order to assess correctness of the proposed approach, the uncertainty analysis was performed.

  15. The Study of Thermal Diffusivity Measurement of Composite Materials by Unsteady Probe Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Yukihiro; Yamada, Etsuro; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    The object of this study is to research the possibility of in-line measurement of the thermal diffusivity on composite materials, such as suspension and emulsion, by previously developed apparatus for the dynamic viscosity. The calibration curve between the thermal diffusivity and any physical quantity that can be measured by this apparatus is proposed by the numerical analysis. The experimental results were obtained by using the dispersed materials composed agargel cooking oil (as matrix) and Ti02 particle. Nondimensional effective thermal diffusivity that is the ratio of the effective thermal diffusivity of dispersed materials to the one of the matrix are compared with previous results obtained by periodic heating method. These data of nondimensional values show good agreement with each other. From these results, this measurement apparatus may be applicable for the thermal diffusivity measurement of dispersed materals.

  16. On the van der Pauw's method applied to the measurement of low thermal conductivity materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, C; Flores, E; Bodega, J; Leardini, F; Ferrer, I J; Ares, J R; Sánchez, C

    2016-08-01

    The electrical van der Pauw's method has recently been extended to measure the thermal conductivity of different elements and compounds. This technique provides an easy way to determine the sample in-plane thermal conductivity by avoiding the influence of the thermal contact resistances. However, the reported calculated error values appear to be underestimated when dealing with the materials with low thermal conductivity (conduction heat losses through the thermo-resistance wires as well as the resulting modification of the sample temperature map. Both phenomena lead to experimental values of the sample thermal conductivity, which are systematically higher than the tabulated ones. The magnitude of this systematic error is ∼100% dealing with the samples of macroscopic dimensions, and low thermal conductivity indicated that the obtained accurate measurements can be quite challenging.

  17. On the van der Pauw's method applied to the measurement of low thermal conductivity materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, C.; Flores, E.; Bodega, J.; Leardini, F.; Ferrer, I. J.; Ares, J. R.; Sánchez, C.

    2016-08-01

    The electrical van der Pauw's method has recently been extended to measure the thermal conductivity of different elements and compounds. This technique provides an easy way to determine the sample in-plane thermal conductivity by avoiding the influence of the thermal contact resistances. However, the reported calculated error values appear to be underestimated when dealing with the materials with low thermal conductivity (temperature. The causes of this underestimation are investigated in this communication and it has been found that they are due to the drastic influence of conduction heat losses through the thermo-resistance wires as well as the resulting modification of the sample temperature map. Both phenomena lead to experimental values of the sample thermal conductivity, which are systematically higher than the tabulated ones. The magnitude of this systematic error is ˜100% dealing with the samples of macroscopic dimensions, and low thermal conductivity indicated that the obtained accurate measurements can be quite challenging.

  18. Estimation of gas hydrate saturation with temperature calculated from hydrate threshold at C0002 during IODP NanTroSEIZE Stage 1 expeditions in the Nankai Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, A.; Yamada, Y.; Saito, S.; Bourlange, S.; Chang, C.; Conin, M.; Tomaru, H.; Kinoshita, M.; Tobin, H.; 314/315/316Scientists, E.

    2008-12-01

    During the IODP Expedition 314, conducted at Nankai trough accretionary prism, gas hydrate was observed at Site C0002. Gas hydrate beneath seafloor is promising energy source and potentially hazardous material during drilling. The precise estimation of gas hydrate saturation is important, but previous works have not considered the effect" of the in-situ temperature. In this study, we propose an estimation method of gas hydrate saturation with temperature calculated from threshold of gas hydrate. Gas hydrate saturation was determined based on the Logging While Drilling (LWD) Expedition 314 data. The gas hydrate bearing zone was located between 218.1 to 400.4 m below seafloor. Archie's relation was used to estimate gas hydrate saturation. This relation requires the porosity, the sea water resistivity and formation resistivity. We determined porosity to be between ~70 to ~30% based on density log. Since the resistivity of sea water is temperature dependent, temperature profile (calculated temperature model) was determined from the thermal conductivity and the temperature at the base of the gas hydrate. In our calculated temperature model, the saturation increases from ~10% at ~220m to ~30% at 400 m below sea floor. Spikes that have a maximum value at 80% at sand layers were observed. We also estimated the gas hydrate saturation from the constant temperature profile in 12°C (temperature constant model). This resulted in almost constant saturation (~15%) with the high saturation spikes. We compared these saturations with the hydrate occupation ratio within sand layers derived from RAB image. The hydrate occupation ratio shows increasing trend with increasing depth, and this trend is similar to the gas hydrate saturation with the calculated temperature model. This result suggests that the temperature profile should be considered to obtain precise gas hydrate saturation. Since the high sedimentation rate can affect thermal condition, we are planning to estimate the

  19. Development of a direct push based in-situ thermal conductivity measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirla, Marian Andrei; Vienken, Thomas; Dietrich, Peter; Bumberger, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Heat pump systems are commonly utilized in Europe, for the exploitation of the shallow geothermal potential. To guarantee a sustainable use of the geothermal heat pump systems by saving resources and minimizing potential negative impacts induced by temperature changes within soil and groundwater, new geothermal exploration methods and tools are required. The knowledge of the underground thermal properties is a necessity for a correct and optimum design of borehole heat exchangers. The most important parameter that indicates the performance of the systems is thermal conductivity of the ground. Mapping the spatial variability of thermal conductivity, with high resolution in the shallow subsurface for geothermal purposes, requires a high degree of technical effort to procure adequate samples for thermal analysis. A collection of such samples from the soil can disturb sample structure, so great care must be taken during collection to avoid this. Factors such as transportation and sample storage can also influence measurement results. The use of technologies like Thermal Response Test (TRT) require complex mechanical and electrical systems for convective heat transport in the subsurface and longer monitoring times, often three days. Finally, by using thermal response tests, often only one integral value is obtained for the entire coupled subsurface with the borehole heat exchanger. The common thermal conductivity measurement systems (thermal analyzers) can perform vertical thermal conductivity logs only with the aid of sample procurement, or by integration into a drilling system. However, thermal conductivity measurements using direct push with this type of probes are not possible, due to physical and mechanical limitations. Applying vertical forces using direct push technology, in order to penetrate the shallow subsurface, can damage the probe and the sensors systems. The aim of this study is to develop a new, robust thermal conductivity measurement probe, for direct

  20. CO2 Sorption to Subsingle Hydration Layer Montmorillonite Clay Studied by Excess Sorption and Neutron Diffraction Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rother, Gernot; Ilton, Eugene S.; Wallacher, Dirk; Hauβ, Thomas; Schaef, Herbert T.; Qafoku, Odeta; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Krukowski, Elizabeth G.; Stack, Andrew G.; Grimm, Nico; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2013-01-02

    Geologic storage of CO2 requires that the caprock sealing the storage rock is highly impermeable to CO2. Swelling clays, which are important components of caprocks, may interact with CO2 leading to volume change and potentially impacting the seal quality. The interactions of supercritical (sc) CO2 with Na saturated montmorillonite clay containing a subsingle layer of water in the interlayer region have been studied by sorption and neutron diffraction techniques. The excess sorption isotherms show maxima at bulk CO2 densities of ≈0.15 g/cm3, followed by an approximately linear decrease of excess sorption to zero and negative values with increasing CO2 bulk density. Neutron diffraction experiments on the same clay sample measured interlayer spacing and composition. The results show that limited amounts of CO2 are sorbed into the interlayer region, leading to depression of the interlayer peak intensity and an increase of the d(001) spacing by ca. 0.5 Å. The density of CO2 in the clay pores is relatively stable over a wide range of CO2 pressures at a given temperature, indicating the formation of a clay-CO2 phase. Finally, at the excess sorption maximum, increasing CO2 sorption with decreasing temperature is observed while the high-pressure sorption properties exhibit weak temperature dependence.

  1. Thermal conductivity of silica nanoparticle powder: Measurement and theoretical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Congliang; Lin, Zizhen; Feng, Yanhui; Zhang, Xinxin; Wang, Ge

    2015-12-01

    The hot-wire method was applied to experimentally determine the thermal conductivity (TC) of a silica nanoparticle powder. A fitting model was further employed to analyze the experimental results and to predict the TC over a wider porosity scale. Results show that the effective TC of the silica-nanoparticle powder can be less than that of free air because of the low TC of both the silica nanoparticles and the air confined in the pore spaces; the relative contribution of the nanoparticle TC, the confined air TC, and the radiation heat transfer coefficient to the effective TC will significantly affect at which porosity the extreme value of the effective TC occurs; the porosity obtained when the contribution to the effective TC of the confined air equals that of the nanoparticles is the most favorable for constructing thermal insulation materials.

  2. Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M.; Jordan, E.

    1995-12-31

    Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. This program evaluates the bond strength of yttria stabilized zirconia coatings with MCrAlY and Pt-Al bond coats utilizing diffraction and fluorescence methods.

  3. Measurement Uncertainty Budget of the PMV Thermal Comfort Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekici, Can

    2016-05-01

    Fanger's predicted mean vote (PMV) equation is the result of the combined quantitative effects of the air temperature, mean radiant temperature, air velocity, humidity activity level and clothing thermal resistance. PMV is a mathematical model of thermal comfort which was developed by Fanger. The uncertainty budget of the PMV equation was developed according to GUM in this study. An example is given for the uncertainty model of PMV in the exemplification section of the study. Sensitivity coefficients were derived from the PMV equation. Uncertainty budgets can be seen in the tables. A mathematical model of the sensitivity coefficients of Ta, hc, T_{mrt}, T_{cl}, and Pa is given in this study. And the uncertainty budgets for hc, T_{cl}, and Pa are given in this study.

  4. Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M.; Jordan, E. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. To meet the aggressive Advanced Turbine Systems goals for efficiency, durability and the environment, it will be necessary to employ thermal barrier coatings on turbine airfoils and other hot section components. For The successful application of TBCs to ATS engines with 2600{degrees}F turbine inlet temperatures and required component lives 10 times greater than those for aircraft gas turbine engines, it is necessary to develop quantitative assessment techniques for TBC coating integrity with time and cycles in ATS engines. Thermal barrier coatings in production today consist of a metallic bond coat, such as an MCrAlY overlay coating or a platinum aluminide (Pt-Al) diffusion coating. During heat treatment, both these coatings form a thin, tightly adherent alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) film. Failure of TBC coatings in engine service occurs by spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the bond coat to alumina or the alumina to zirconia bonds. Thus, it is the initial strength of these bonds and the stresses at the bond plane, and their changes with engine exposure, that determines coating durability. The purpose of this program is to provide, for the first time, a quantitative assessment of TBC bond strength and bond plane stresses as a function of engine time and cycles.

  5. Nanoscale Electromechanics To Measure Thermal Conductivity, Expansion, and Interfacial Losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, John P; Patel, Raj; Borah, Abhinandan; Maliakkal, Carina B; Abhilash, T S; Deshmukh, Mandar M

    2015-11-11

    We study the effect of localized Joule heating on the mechanical properties of doubly clamped nanowires under tensile stress. Local heating results in systematic variation of the resonant frequency; these frequency changes result from thermal stresses that depend on temperature dependent thermal conductivity and expansion coefficient. The change in sign of the linear expansion coefficient of InAs is reflected in the resonant response of the system near a bath temperature of 20 K. Using finite element simulations to model the experimentally observed frequency shifts, we show that the thermal conductivity of a nanowire can be approximated in the 10-60 K temperature range by the empirical form κ = bT W/mK, where the value of b for a nanowire was found to be b = 0.035 W/mK(2), significantly lower than bulk values. Also, local heating allows us to independently vary the temperature of the nanowire relative to the clamping points pinned to the bath temperature. We suggest a loss mechanism (dissipation ~10(-4)-10(-5)) originating from the interfacial clamping losses between the metal and the semiconductor nanostructure.

  6. Thermal Diffusivity of Sweet Potato Flour Measured Using Dickerson Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.K. Tastra

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Sweet potato (Ipmoea batatas I. is one the carbohydrate sources in indonesia that can be used both for food and industry purposes. To support the utilization of sweet potato as flour, it is imperative to develop a drying system that can improve its quality. A preliminary study using an improved variety, namely Sari, was conducted to determine its floure thermal diffusivity ( , an imprortant parameter in developing drying process. The experiment was run according to Dickerson method using sweet potato flour at different levels of moisture content (5.05-5.97% wet basis and temperatures (23.7 -40.9 oC this method used an apparatus based on transient heat transfer condition requiring only a time- temperature data. At the levels of moisture and temperature studied, the thermal diffusivity of sweet potato flour could be expressed using a linear regression model, = 10-9 M.T + 9X 10-9( R2=0.9779. the average value of the thermal diffusivity sweet potato flour was 1.72 x 10-7 m2/s at a moisture level of 5.51 % wet basis and temperature of 29.58 oC. Similar studies are needed for different varieties or cultivars of sweet potato as well at a wide range of moisture content and temperature content and temperature levels.

  7. Calculating and measuring thermal neutrons exiting from neutron diffractometers collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Tafazolee, K

    2000-01-01

    process, effectiveness of them are studied for the enhancement of the available system. Final conclusion from the simulation process, indicates that the heavy water with the thickness of 50 to 60 cm. is the best moderator for gaining the better thermal neutrons flux for enhancement of P.N.D. in the T.R.R. Powder Neutron Diffractometer y (P.N.D.) is relatively good and practical way for identification of the 3 dimensional construction of materials. In order to exploit the capabilities of this method, in one of the neutron beam of the Tehran Research Reactor (T.R.R.), a collimator embedded inside the concrete wall, direct the neutrons produced in the core reactor towards a monochromator e. Neutrons having been monochromated by 2 nd collimator are then directed towards the sample. Then the pattern of diffracted neutrons from the sample are studied. In order to make the best out of it, neutrons coming to sit on the sample must be of the thermal type. That means the number/amount of thermal neutrons flux in compar...

  8. Comparison of temperature measurement methods for evaluation of the thermal environment in vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, J..; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2006-01-01

    A new standard, ISO/DIS 14505 is under preparation, dealing with the assessment of the thermal environment in vehicles, based on the equivalent temperature. The scope of this paper is to demonstrate the different results obtained when evaluating the thermal environment inside a vehicle, using the...... during each test. Based on the measurement results, the time used to reach the level of thermal comfort is evaluated and compared....

  9. Distribution of gas hydrate inhibitor monoethylene glycol in condensate and water systems: Experimental measurement and thermodynamic modeling using the cubic-plus-association equation of state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Yussuf, Mustafe A.; Frost, Michael

    2014-01-01

    hydrate formation in subsea pipelines, monoethylene glycol (MEG) and methanol are injected in large amounts. It is important to know the distribution of these chemicals in oil and water systems for economical operation of a production facility and environmental perspective. In this work, we present new......The deepwater energy sector represents one of the major growth areas of the oil and gas industry today. To meet the challenges of hydrate formation, corrosion, scaling, and foaming, the oil and gas industry uses many chemicals and their use has increased significantly over the years. To inhibit gas...

  10. Wet hydrate dissolution plant

    OpenAIRE

    Stanković Mirjana S.; Kovačević Branimir T.; Pezo Lato L.

    2003-01-01

    The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant with capacity of 50,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE), Italy, in 1997, for increasing detergent zeolite production from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate ...

  11. Thermal insulation and clothing area factors of typical Arabian Gulf clothing ensembles for males and females: measurements using thermal manikins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-ajmi, F F; Loveday, D L; Bedwell, K H; Havenith, G

    2008-05-01

    The thermal insulation of clothing is one of the most important parameters used in the thermal comfort model adopted by the International Standards Organisation (ISO) [BS EN ISO 7730, 2005. Ergonomics of the thermal environment. Analytical determination and interpretation of thermal comfort using calculation of the PMV and PPD indices and local thermal comfort criteria. International Standardisation Organisation, Geneva.] and by ASHRAE [ASHRAE Handbook, 2005. Fundamentals. Chapter 8. American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air-conditioning Engineers, Inc., 1791 Tullie Circle N.E., Atlanta, GA.]. To date, thermal insulation values of mainly Western clothing have been published with only minimal data being available for non-Western clothing. Thus, the objective of the present study is to measure and present the thermal insulation (clo) values of a number of Arabian Gulf garments as worn by males and females. The clothing ensembles and garments of Arabian Gulf males and females presented in this study are representative of those typically worn in the region during both summer and winter seasons. Measurements of total thermal insulation values (clo) were obtained using a male and a female shape thermal manikin in accordance with the definition of insulation as given in ISO 9920. In addition, the clothing area factors (f cl) determined in two different ways were compared. The first method used a photographic technique and the second a regression equation as proposed in ISO 9920, based on the insulation values of Arabian Gulf male and female garments and ensembles as they were determined in this study. In addition, fibre content, descriptions and weights of Arabian Gulf clothing have been recorded and tabulated in this study. The findings of this study are presented as additions to the existing knowledge base of clothing insulation, and provide for the first time data for Arabian Gulf clothing. The analysis showed that for these non-Western clothing designs, the

  12. Thermal Properties Capability Development Workshop Summary to Support the Implementation Plan for PIE Thermal Conductivity Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braase, Lori [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Papesch, Cynthia [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hurley, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE)-Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and associated nuclear fuels programs have invested heavily over the years in infrastructure and capability development. With the current domestic and international need to develop Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF), increasing importance is being placed on understanding fuel performance in irradiated conditions and on the need to model and validate that performance to reduce uncertainty and licensing timeframes. INL’s Thermal Properties Capability Development Workshop was organized to identify the capability needed by the various nuclear programs and list the opportunities to meet those needs. In addition, by the end of fiscal year 2015, the decision will be made on the initial thermal properties instruments to populate the shielded cell in the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL).

  13. Monitoring and analysis of thermal deformation waves with a high-speed phase measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lucas; Talghader, Joseph

    2015-10-20

    Thermal effects in optical substrates are vitally important in determining laser damage resistance in long-pulse and continuous-wave laser systems. Thermal deformation waves in a soda-lime-silica glass substrate have been measured using high-speed interferometry during a series of laser pulses incident on the surface. Two-dimensional images of the thermal waves were captured at a rate of up to six frames per thermal event using a quantitative phase measurement method. The system comprised a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, along with a high-speed camera capable of up to 20,000 frames-per-second. The sample was placed in the interferometer and irradiated with 100 ns, 2 kHz Q-switched pulses from a high-power Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm. Phase measurements were converted to temperature using known values of thermal expansion and temperature-dependent refractive index for glass. The thermal decay at the center of the thermal wave was fit to a function derived from first principles with excellent agreement. Additionally, the spread of the thermal distribution over time was fit to the same function. Both the temporal decay fit and the spatial fit produced a thermal diffusivity of 5×10-7  m2/s.

  14. Pulsed-laser Pumped Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy for Liquid Thermal Diffusivity Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Liantuan; LI Changyong; ZHANG Linjie; ZHAO Yanting; JIA Suotang; ZHOU Guosheng

    2000-01-01

    The pulsed-laser pumped photothermal deflection spectroscopy (PPDS) is applied to measure liquid thermal diffusivity in a modified collinear configuration. Here the pulsed beam is regarded as in the form of a Dirac delta function. The experiment setup used is described. Measurement result for the thermal diffusivity of a liquid sample(magnta/ethanol saturated solution) is reported. The measurement error is less than 3%.

  15. Fundamental challenges to methane recovery from gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servio, P.; Eaton, M.W.; Mahajan, D.; Winters, W.J.

    2005-01-01

    The fundamental challenges, the location, magnitude, and feasibility of recovery, which must be addressed to recover methane from dispersed hydrate sources, are presented. To induce dissociation of gas hydrate prior to methane recovery, two potential methods are typically considered. Because thermal stimulation requires a large energy input, it is less economically feasible than depressurization. The new data will allow the study of the effect of pressure, temperature, diffusion, porosity, tortuosity, composition of gas and water, and porous media on gas-hydrate production. These data also will allow one to improve existing models related to the stability and dissociation of sea floor hydrates. The reproducible kinetic data from the planned runs together with sediment properties will aid in developing a process to economically recover methane from a potential untapped hydrate source. The availability of plentiful methane will allow economical and large-scale production of methane-derived clean fuels to help avert future energy crises.

  16. Hydration of Portland cement with additions of calcium sulfoaluminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Saout, Gwenn, E-mail: gwenn.le-saout@mines-ales.fr [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Lothenbach, Barbara [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Hori, Akihiro [DENKA Chemicals GmbH, Wehrhahn-Center, Cantadorstr. 3, D-40211 Duesseldorf (Germany); Higuchi, Takayuki [Denki Kagaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha (DENKA), Omi, Itoigawa, Niigata, 949-0393 (Japan); Winnefeld, Frank [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    The effect of mineral additions based on calcium aluminates on the hydration mechanism of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated using isothermal calorimetry, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and pore solution analysis. Results show that the addition of a calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA) to the OPC does not affect the hydration mechanism of alite but controls the aluminate dissolution. In the second blend investigated, a rapid setting cement, the amorphous calcium aluminate reacts very fast to ettringite. The release of aluminum ions strongly retards the hydration of alite but the C-S-H has a similar composition as in OPC with no additional Al to Si substitution. As in CSA-OPC, the aluminate hydration is controlled by the availability of sulfates. The coupling of thermodynamic modeling with the kinetic equations predicts the amount of hydrates and pore solution compositions as a function of time and validates the model in these systems.

  17. Thermal expansivities of peptides, polypeptides and proteins as measured by pressure perturbation calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandharipande, Pranav P; Makhatadze, George I

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of this work was to provide direct experimental evidence that the expansivity of peptides, polypeptides and proteins as measured by pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC), can serve as a proxy to characterize relative compactness of proteins, especially the denatured state ensemble. This is very important as currently only small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), intrinsic viscosity and, to a lesser degree, fluorescence resonance transfer (FRET) experiments are capable of reporting on the compactness of denatured state ensembles. We combined the expansivity measurements with other biophysical methods (far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and small angle X-ray scattering). Three case studies of the effects of conformational changes on the expansivity of polypeptides in solution are presented. We have shown that expansivity appears to be insensitive to the helix-coil transition, and appears to reflect the changes in hydration of the side-chains. We also observed that the expansivity is sensitive to the global conformation of the polypeptide chain and thus can be potentially used to probe hydration of different collapsed states of denatured or even intrinsically disordered proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clathrate Hydrates of Isopentane + Carbon Dioxide and Isopentane + Methane: Experimental Measurements of Dissociation Conditions Hydrates (clathrates d’isopentane + dioxyde de carbone et d’isopentane + méthane : Déterminations expérimentales des conditions de dissociation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi A.H.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, experimental dissociation data for clathrate hydrates of isopentane + carbon dioxide and isopentane + methane are reported in the temperature ranges of (273.5-282.4 and (275.5-285.7 K, respectively. The experimental data were generated using an isochoric pressure-search method. The reliability of this method is examined by generating new dissociation data for clathrate hydrates of isopentane + methane and comparing them with the experimental data reported in the literature. The acceptable agreement demonstrates the reliability of the experimental method used in this work. The experimental data for all measured systems are finally compared with the corresponding experimental data in the absence of isopentane reported in the literature to identify its promotion effects. Des données expérimentales de dissociation d’hydrates d’isopentane + dioxyde de carbone et d’isopentane + méthane sont respectivement présentées ici dans les gammes de température (273.5-282.4 et (275.5-285.7 K. Ces valeurs expérimentales ont été générées en utilisant une méthode isochore de recherche d’une discontinuité de pression. La fiabilité de cette méthode est examinée grâce à la production de données nouvelles pour la dissociation des hydrates de méthane + isopentane et à leur comparaison à des données expérimentales disponibles dans la littérature. L’accord tout à fait acceptable permet de garantir la fiabilité de la méthode expérimentale utilisée. Les valeurs expérimentales de tous les systèmes mesurés sont finalement comparées aux données expérimentales correspondantes de la littérature, obtenues toutefois en l’absence d’isopentane, et ce afin de quantifier ses effets promoteurs de formation d’hydrates.

  19. Impact of Thermal Mass Oriented Measures Over CO2 Emissions Of a Thermally Insulated Lowrise Apartment Building in Izmir, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mümine Gerçek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Climate change has drawn the attention of many researchers and practitioners to focus on the methods to address the challenges in achieving low-carbon buildings and cities and in future developments. Nevertheless, few studies have explored the impacts of thermal mass applications for the lowest carbon emissions of building operational energy consumption. A comparative study of CO2 emissions due to different wall and floor compositions is presented in accordance with their lifespans for a hot-humid climate site. Aim of this study is to examine the relation between the energy oriented operations and carbon emissions of the building. Firstly, an existing low-rise building in İzmir is selected, then modelled in the dynamic simulation model software DesignBuilder v4 by synchronizing drawings with basic operational principles of the program. Furthermore, various influence factors of building envelope thermal characteristics are selected as follows: type, location, thickness and thermal specifications of materials used by keeping thermal conductivity value constant. At the end, the research presents remarkable influence of thermal mass oriented measures on reducing energy demands and carbon footprints.

  20. Thermal conductivity measurements of laser crystals by infrared thermography. Application to Nd:doped crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didierjean, Julien; Herault, Emilie; Balembois, François; Georges, Patrick

    2008-06-09

    We present a thermal conductivity measurement method for laser crystals based on thermal mapping of the crystal face by an infrared camera. Those measurements are performed under end-pumping of the laser crystal and during laser operation. The calculation of the fraction of pump power converted into heat is therefore simplified, and it is possible to link easily the temperature in the crystal to the thermal conductivity. We demonstrate the efficiency of this measurement method with a Nd:YAG crystal, before using it to compare Nd:YVO(4) and Nd:GdVO(4) crystals.

  1. Pulse-power integrated-decay technique for the measurement of thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharalkar, Nachiket M.; Hayes, Linda J.; Valvano, Jonathan W.

    2008-07-01

    A pulse-power integrated-decay technique for the measurement of thermal conductivity of biological tissues is presented. A self-heated thermistor probe is used to deliver heat and also to measure the temperature response. Three-dimensional finite element analyses are used in this paper to design and optimize the technique. The thermal conductivity measurements from the computer simulations were in close accordance with the experimental data. An empirical calibration process, performed in glycerol and agar-gelled water, provides accurate thermal conductivity measurements. An accuracy analysis evaluated multiple experimental protocols using three solutions of known thermal properties. The results indicate that the thermal decay technique protocol had better accuracy than the constant temperature heating techniques. In vitro measurements demonstrate the variability of tissue thermal conductivity, and the need to perform direct measurements for tissues of interest. The factors that may introduce error in the experimental data are (i) poor thermal/physical contact between the thermistor probe and tissue sample, (ii) water loss from tissue during the course of experimentation and (iii) temperature stability.

  2. Simulating the gas hydrate production test at Mallik using the pilot scale pressure reservoir LARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeschen, Katja; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Priegnitz, Mike; Giese, Ronny; Luzi-Helbing, Manja

    2014-05-01

    LARS, the LArge Reservoir Simulator, allows for one of the few pilot scale simulations of gas hydrate formation and dissociation under controlled conditions with a high resolution sensor network to enable the detection of spatial variations. It was designed and built within the German project SUGAR (submarine gas hydrate reservoirs) for sediment samples with a diameter of 0.45 m and a length of 1.3 m. During the project, LARS already served for a number of experiments simulating the production of gas from hydrate-bearing sediments using thermal stimulation and/or depressurization. The latest test simulated the methane production test from gas hydrate-bearing sediments at the Mallik test site, Canada, in 2008 (Uddin et al., 2011). Thus, the starting conditions of 11.5 MPa and 11°C and environmental parameters were set to fit the Mallik test site. The experimental gas hydrate saturation of 90% of the total pore volume (70 l) was slightly higher than volumes found in gas hydrate-bearing formations in the field (70 - 80%). However, the resulting permeability of a few millidarcy was comparable. The depressurization driven gas production at Mallik was conducted in three steps at 7.0 MPa - 5.0 MPa - 4.2 MPa all of which were used in the laboratory experiments. In the lab the pressure was controlled using a back pressure regulator while the confining pressure was stable. All but one of the 12 temperature sensors showed a rapid decrease in temperature throughout the sediment sample, which accompanied the pressure changes as a result of gas hydrate dissociation. During step 1 and 2 they continued up to the point where gas hydrate stability was regained. The pressure decreases and gas hydrate dissociation led to highly variable two phase fluid flow throughout the duration of the simulated production test. The flow rates were measured continuously (gas) and discontinuously (liquid), respectively. Next to being discussed here, both rates were used to verify a model of gas

  3. 电阻率法测定硅酸盐水泥水化活化能%Activation Energy of Portland Cement Hydration by Electrical Resistivity Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏小胜; 肖莲珍

    2011-01-01

    研究了温度对水泥水化时电阻率的影响情况,建立了用于估算电阻率极大值的双曲线方程,提出根据不同温度时的电阻率可以计算孔隙液相活化能(Eas)和水化反应的活化能(Ear).试验所用水泥浆体试样的水灰比分别为0.30、0.35、0.40、0.45和0.55,养护温度分别为15、20℃和30℃,测试时间均为72h.为消除温度对孔隙液相离子迁移的影响,在15℃和30℃测得的电阻率值分别以20℃为基准进行了校正,分析了温度对水泥水化产物形成的影响.研究表明:当水灰比从0.55减小到0.30时.Eas从16.5kJ/mol增大到25.7kJ/mol,这是因为低水灰比水泥浆体的液相离子浓度较大.计算表明:硅酸盐水泥水化反应的活化能Ear为37.2 kJ/mol,这与ASTM C1074的推荐值(40 kJ/mol)比较接近.在不同养护温度下得到的电阻率双曲线方程表明:在所测试的温度范围内,温度越低,电阻率的极大值越大.%Temperature effect on the electrical resistivity of Portland cement pastes during first 72 h was investigated. The experiments were conducted on the cement pastes with various water cement ratios of 0.30, 0.35, 0.40, 0.45, 0.55 at different curing temperatures of 15, 20 and 30 ℃. The hyperbolic equation for each sample was established to estimate the ultimate resistivity. The electrical resistivity at various temperatures can determinate the activation energy for the liquid solution in pores (Eas) and the activation energy for hydration reaction (Ear). The electrical resistivities at 15 and 30 ℃ are obtained based on the value at 20 ℃ to eliminate the effect of temperature on the ionic mobility in the liquid solutions. The Eas increased with the decrease of water cement ratio due to a higher ion concentration in a lower water cement ratio paste solution, and the Eas ranged from 16.5 to 25.7 kJ/mol. The activation energy of cement hydration determined was 37.2 k J/mol, which was similar to the value recommended by the

  4. Electrical properties of methane hydrate + sediment mixtures: The σ of CH4 Hydrate + Sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Frane, Wyatt L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stern, Laura A. [U. S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Constable, Steven [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); Weitemeyer, Karen A. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); National Oceanography Centre Southampton (United Kingdom), Univ. of Southampton Waterfront Campus, Southampton (United Kingdom); Smith, Megan M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Roberts, Jeffery J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-30

    Knowledge of the electrical properties of multicomponent systems with gas hydrate, sediments, and pore water is needed to help relate electromagnetic (EM) measurements to specific gas hydrate concentration and distribution patterns in nature. We built a pressure cell capable of measuring in situ electrical properties of multicomponent systems such that the effects of individual components and mixing relations can be assessed. We first established the temperature-dependent electrical conductivity (σ) of pure, single-phase methane hydrate to be ~5 orders of magnitude lower than seawater, a substantial contrast that can help differentiate hydrate deposits from significantly more conductive water-saturated sediments in EM field surveys. We report σ measurements of two-component systems in which methane hydrate is mixed with variable amounts of quartz sand or glass beads. Sand by itself has low σ but is found to increase the overall σ of mixtures with well-connected methane hydrate. Alternatively, the overall σ decreases when sand concentrations are high enough to cause gas hydrate to be poorly connected, indicating that hydrate grains provide the primary conduction path. Our measurements suggest that impurities from sand induce chemical interactions and/or doping effects that result in higher electrical conductivity with lower temperature dependence. Finally, these results can be used in the modeling of massive or two-phase gas-hydrate-bearing systems devoid of conductive pore water. Further experiments that include a free water phase are the necessary next steps toward developing complex models relevant to most natural systems.

  5. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Thomas Williams; Bjorn Paulsson; Alexander Goertz

    2005-02-01

    generated of these seismic data with cores, logging, and other well data. Unfortunately, the Hot Ice No. 1 well did not encounter hydrates in the reservoir sands, although brine-saturated sands containing minor amounts of methane were encountered within the hydrate stability zone (HSZ). Synthetic seismograms created from well log data were in agreement with reflectivity data measured by the 3D VSP survey. Modeled synthetic seismograms indicated a detectable seismic response would be expected in the presence of hydrate-bearing sands. Such a response was detected in the 3D VSP data at locations up-dip to the west of the Hot Ice No. 1 wellbore. Results of this project suggest that the presence of hydrate-bearing strata may not be related as simply to HSZ thickness as previously thought. Geological complications of reservoir facies distribution within fluvial-deltaic environments will require sophisticated detection technologies to assess the locations of recoverable volumes of methane contained in hydrates. High-resolution surface seismic data and more rigorous well log data analysis offer the best near-term potential. The hydrate resource potential is huge, but better tools are needed to accurately assess their location, distribution and economic recoverability.

  6. The Measurement and Uncertainty Analysis of Thermal Resistance in Cryogenic Temperature Sensor Installation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K. R.; Zhou, G.; Dong, B.; Liu, L. Q.; Xiong, L. Y.; Meng, R.; Li, Q.

    2017-02-01

    The choice of the appropriate installation method plays an important role for accurate temperature measurement. In the cryogenic and high vacuum environment, due to poor contact between the cryogenic temperature sensor and the surroundings that the sensor is installed and intended to measure, the self-heating from sensor measuring current brings about temperature difference and creates a potential temperature measurement error. The self-heating temperature difference is directly proportional to the thermal resistance for a mounted sensor, which means that lower installation thermal resistance of sensors is advantageous to obtain better measurement results. In this paper, a measurement model for the installation thermal resistance of sensor is built in terms of two currents method which is always used to measure self-heating effect. A cryostat that can provide variable temperature in the accurate temperature measurement and control experiments is designed and manufactured. This cryostat can reach 3K in a few hours and the sample temperature can reach as high as 20 K. Based on the experimental results, the measurement uncertainty of the thermal resistance are also analyzed and calculated. To obtain the best measurement results in our cryostat, the thermal resistances of sensors with two installation methods are measured and compared.

  7. Directly measuring of thermal pulse transfer in one-dimensional highly aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2013-01-01

    Using a simple and precise instrument system, we directly measured the thermo-physical properties of one-dimensional highly aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A kind of CNT-based macroscopic materials named super aligned carbon nanotube (SACNT) buckypapers was measured in our experiment. We defined a new one-dimensional parameter, the "thermal transfer speed" to characterize the thermal damping mechanisms in the SACNT buckypapers. Our results indicated that the SACNT buckypapers with different densities have obviously different thermal transfer speeds. Furthermore, we found that the thermal transfer speed of high-density SACNT buckypapers may have an obvious damping factor along the CNTs aligned direction. The anisotropic thermal diffusivities of SACNT buckypapers could be calculated by the thermal transfer speeds. The thermal diffusivities obviously increase as the buckypaper-density increases. For parallel SACNT buckypapers, the thermal diffusivity could be as high as 562.2 ± 55.4 mm(2)/s. The thermal conductivities of these SACNT buckypapers were also calculated by the equation k = Cpαρ.

  8. Thermal diffusivity measurement for p-Si and Ag/p-Si by photoacoustic technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, Mohammed Jabbar; Yunus, W. Mahmood Mat; Kamari, Halimah Mohamed; Zakaria, Azmi, E-mail: mohammed55865@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti PutraMalaysia (UPM), Serdang (Malaysia)

    2015-10-15

    Thermal diffusivity (TD) of p-Si and Ag/p-Si samples were measured by photoacoustic technique using open photoacoustic cell (OPC). The samples were annealed by heating them at 960, 1050, 1200, and 1300 °C for 3 h in air. The thermal diffusivity of Ag-coated samples was obtained by fitting the photoacoustic experimental data to the thermally thick equation for Rosencwaig and Gersho (RG) theory. For the single layer samples, the thermal diffusivity can be obtained by fitting as well as by obtaining the critical frequency f{sub c.} In this study, the thermal diffusivity of the p-Si samples increased with increasing the annealing temperature. The thermal diffusivity of the Ag/p-Si samples, after reaching the maximum value of about 2.73 cm{sup 2}/s at a temperature of 1200 °C, decreased due to the silver complete melt in the surface of the silicon. (author)

  9. Measurement of thermal properties of magnetic nanoparticles using infrared thermal microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jae Young; Chang, Ki Soo; Kook, Myung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are considered promising for biomedical applications such as hyperthermia treatment and disease diagnosis owing to their distinctive thermal properties. For these applications, it is essential to screen the temperature distribution in the targeted disease site. This ...... temperature was observed using lock-in thermography for a small amount of MNPs distributed around the lesion. This suggests that the proposed microthermography technique can be used for diagnosis and screening in the early stage of a disease. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  10. The transient divided bar method for laboratory measurements of thermal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bording, Thue S.; Nielsen, Søren B.; Balling, Niels

    2016-12-01

    Accurate information on thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of materials is of central importance in relation to geoscience and engineering problems involving the transfer of heat. Several methods, including the classical divided bar technique, are available for laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity, but much fewer for thermal diffusivity. We have generalized the divided bar technique to the transient case in which thermal conductivity, volumetric heat capacity and thereby also thermal diffusivity are measured simultaneously. As the density of samples is easily determined independently, specific heat capacity can also be determined. The finite element formulation provides a flexible forward solution for heat transfer across the bar, and thermal properties are estimated by inverse Monte Carlo modelling. This methodology enables a proper quantification of experimental uncertainties on measured thermal properties and information on their origin. The developed methodology was applied to various materials, including a standard ceramic material and different rock samples, and measuring results were compared with results applying traditional steady-state divided bar and an independent line-source method. All measurements show highly consistent results and with excellent reproducibility and high accuracy. For conductivity the obtained uncertainty is typically 1-3 per cent, and for diffusivity uncertainty may be reduced to about 3-5 per cent. The main uncertainty originates from the presence of thermal contact resistance associated with the internal interfaces in the bar. These are not resolved during inversion and it is imperative that they are minimized. The proposed procedure is simple and may quite easily be implemented to the many steady-state divided bar systems in operation. A thermally controlled bath, as applied here, may not be needed. Simpler systems, such as applying temperature-controlled water directly from a tap, may also be applied.

  11. Soil thermal resistivity and thermal stability measuring instrument. Volume 2: Manual for operation and use of the thermal property analyzer and statistical weather analysis program to determine thermal design parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, S. A.; Radhakrishna, H. S.; Chu, F. Y.; Ford, G. L.; Griffin, J. D. A.; Steinmanis, J.

    1981-11-01

    Numerous considerations influence the thermal design of an underground power cable, including the soil thermal resistivity, thermal diffusivity and thermal stability. Each of these properties is a function of soil moisture which is in turn a function of past weather, soil composition, and biological burden. The Neher-McGrath formalism has been widely used for thermal cable design. However, this formalism assumes knowledge of soil thermal properties (resistivity and diffusivity). For design purposes, these parameters should be treated statistically, since weather varies greatly from year to year. As well, soil thermal property surveys are normally required along the route to assess the thermal quality of the native soil. This project is intended to fill the gap between the need to carry out thermal design and the use of the Neher-McGrath formalism which is normally employed. This goal has been addressed through: development of instrumentation and methods of measuring soil thermal properties in situ and in the laboratory; recommendation of methods for conducting soil surveys along a proposed cable route and of assessing the thermal quality of soils; and development of a computerized method to treat soil thermal design parameters on a statistical basis using computerized weather records as supplied by the US Environmental Data Service. The use of the methods and instrumentation developed as a result of this contract should permit less conservative thermal design thereby improving the economics of underground transmission. As well, these techniques and instrumentation facilitate weather-dependent prediction of cable ampacity for installed cables, monitoring of backfill thermal stability, and many other new practices.

  12. Thermal property measurement of insulating material used in HTS power device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yeon Suk; Kim, Dong Lak

    2012-10-01

    An experiment to measure the thermal property of insulating material at cryogenic temperature has been performed. The main objective of this study is to develop a precise instrument for measuring the thermal property of insulating materials over a temperature range of 30 K to approximately room temperature by utilizing a cryocooler. In a vacuum chamber, the cold head of the cryocooler is thermally anchored to the copper link and used to bring the apparatus to a desired temperature. An electric heater is placed in the middle of test sample for generating uniform heat flux. The entire apparatus is covered by thermal shields and wrapped in multi-layer insulation to minimize thermal radiation in a vacuum chamber. For a supplied heat flux the temperature distribution in test sample, polypropylene laminated paper (PPLP), is measured in steady state, from which the effective thermal conductivity is calculated and presented with respect to the mean temperature. The correlation near liquid nitrogen temperature is derived from measured data. Moreover, using the measured thermal conductivity, we obtain the specific heat of PPLP by solving one-dimensional heat diffusion equation.

  13. Thermal conductivity measurement in clay dominant consolidated material by Transient Hot-Wire method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, J. P.; Gallier, J.; Mercx, B.; Dudoignon, P.; Milcent, D.

    2010-06-01

    The transient hot-wire (THW) technique is widely used for measurements of the thermal-conductivity of most fluids and some attempts have also been carried out for simultaneous measurements of the thermal-diffusivity with the same hot wire. This technique was also tried to determine thermal properties of soils by the mean of probes which can be considered as wire with some assumptions. The purpose of this paper is to validate the thermal conductivity measurement by the THW technique in geomaterials, composed of compacted sand + clay mineral that can be used for earth construction (Compacted Earth Brick). The thermal transfer behaviors are mainly governed by the texture and moisture of the geomaterials. Thus the investigations were performed (1) in media made of glass beads of different diameters in dry and saturated state in order to observe the role of grain sizes and saturation state on the wire temperature (Δt) measurements and (2) in the compacted clay-geomaterial at different moisture states. The Δt / ln(t) diagrams allow the calculation of two thermal conductivities. The first one, measured in the short time acquisition (thermal conductivity of the material.

  14. New Methods for Gas Hydrate Energy and Climate Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, C. D.; Pohlman, J.; Waite, W. F.; Hunt, A. G.; Stern, L. A.; Casso, M.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few years, the USGS Gas Hydrates Project has focused on advancements designed to enhance both energy resource and climate-hydrate interaction studies. On the energy side, the USGS now manages the Pressure Core Characterization Tools (PCCTs), which includes the Instrumented Pressure Testing Chamber (IPTC) that we have long maintained. These tools, originally built at Georgia Tech, are being used to analyze hydrate-bearing sediments recovered in pressure cores during gas hydrate drilling programs (e.g., Nankai 2012; India 2015). The USGS is now modifying the PCCTs for use on high-hydrate-saturation and sand-rich sediments and hopes to catalyze third-party tool development (e.g., visualization). The IPTC is also being used for experiments on sediments hosting synthetic methane hydrate, and our scanning electron microscope has recently been enhanced with a new cryo-stage for imaging hydrates. To support climate-hydrate interaction studies, the USGS has been re-assessing the amount of methane hydrate in permafrost-associated settings at high northern latitudes and examined the links between methane carbon emissions and gas hydrate dissociation. One approach relies on the noble gas signature of methane emissions. Hydrate dissociation uniquely releases noble gases partitioned by molecular weight, providing a potential fingerprint for hydrate-sourced methane emissions. In addition, we have linked a DOC analyzer with an IRMS at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, allowing rapid and precise measurement of DOC and DIC concentrations and carbon isotopic signatures. The USGS has also refined methods to measure real-time sea-air flux of methane and CO2 using cavity ring-down spectroscopy measurements coupled with other data. Acquiring ~8000 km of data on the Western Arctic, US Atlantic, and Svalbard margins, we have tested the Arctic methane catastrophe hypothesis and the link between seafloor methane emissions and sea-air methane flux.

  15. Simulation of gas hydrate dissociation caused by repeated tectonic uplift events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Shusaku; Matsubayashi, Osamu; Nagakubo, Sadao

    2016-05-01

    Gas hydrate dissociation by tectonic uplift is often used to explain geologic and geophysical phenomena, such as hydrate accumulation probably caused by hydrate recycling and the occurrence of double bottom-simulating reflectors in tectonically active areas. However, little is known of gas hydrate dissociation resulting from tectonic uplift. This study investigates gas hydrate dissociation in marine sediments caused by repeated tectonic uplift events using a numerical model incorporating the latent heat of gas hydrate dissociation. The simulations showed that tectonic uplift causes upward movement of some depth interval of hydrate-bearing sediment immediately above the base of gas hydrate stability (BGHS) to the gas hydrate instability zone because the sediment initially maintains its temperature: in that interval, gas hydrate dissociates while absorbing heat; consequently, the temperature of the interval decreases to that of the hydrate stability boundary at that depth. Until the next uplift event, endothermic gas hydrate dissociation proceeds at the BGHS using heat mainly supplied from the sediment around the BGHS, lowering the temperature of that sediment. The cumulative effects of these two endothermic gas hydrate dissociations caused by repeated uplift events lower the sediment temperature around the BGHS, suggesting that in a marine area in which sediment with a highly concentrated hydrate-bearing layer just above the BGHS has been frequently uplifted, the endothermic gas hydrate dissociation produces a gradual decrease in thermal gradient from the seafloor to the BGHS. Sensitivity analysis for model parameters showed that water depth, amount of uplift, gas hydrate saturation, and basal heat flow strongly influence the gas hydrate dissociation rate and sediment temperature around the BGHS.

  16. Audio-band coating thermal noise measurement for Advanced LIGO with a multimode optical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, S.; Yu, H.; Yam, W.; Martynov, D.; Evans, M.

    2017-01-01

    In modern high precision optical instruments, such as in gravitational wave detectors or frequency references, thermally induced fluctuations in the reflective coatings can be a limiting noise source. This noise, known as coating thermal noise, can be reduced by choosing materials with low mechanical loss. Examination of new materials becomes a necessity in order to further minimize the coating thermal noise and thus improve sensitivity of next generation instruments. We present a novel approach to directly measure coating thermal noise using a high finesse folded cavity in which multiple Hermite-Gaussian modes coresonate. This method is used to probe surface fluctuations on the order 10-17 m /√{Hz } in the frequency range 30-400 Hz. We applied this technique to measure thermal noise and loss angle of the coating used in Advanced LIGO.

  17. Static and dynamic thermal infrared signatures measured during the FESTER experiment: first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, W. H.; February, F.; Seiffer, D. P.; Eisele, C.

    2016-10-01

    The First European South African Experiment (FESTER) was conducted over about a 10 month period at the Institute of Maritime Technology (IMT) in False Bay, South Africa. One of the principal goals was recording of static and dynamic thermal infrared signatures under different environmental conditions for both validations of existing thermal equilibrium signature prediction codes, but also to aid development of dynamic thermal signature models. A small scientific work boat (called Sea Lab) was used as the principal target and sensor platform. Painted metal plates of different thicknesses were also used as infrared targets on-board Sea Lab to study static/dynamic thermal signatures and were also fitted with pyrgeometers, pyrometers and iButton temperature sensors/loggers. First results focused on the variable of thermal signatures as function of environmental conditions and the accuracy of calculated source temperatures (from measured radiometric temperatures) compared to the physical temperature measurements of the plates.

  18. Measurement of depth-resolved thermal deformation distribution using phase-contrast spectral optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Dong, Bo; Bai, Yulei; Ye, Shuangli; Lei, Zhenkun; Zhou, Yanzhou

    2015-10-19

    An updated B-scan method is proposed for measuring the evolution of thermal deformation fields in polymers. In order to measure the distributions of out-of-plane deformation and normal strain field, phase-contrast spectral optical coherence tomography (PC-SOCT) was performed with the depth range and resolution of 4.3 mm and 10.7 μm, respectively, as thermal loads were applied to three different multilayer samples. The relation between temperature and material refractive index was predetermined before the measurement. After accounting for the refractive index, the thermal deformation fields in the polymer were obtained. The measured thermal expansion coefficient of silicone sealant was approximately equal to its reference value. This method allows correctly assessing the mechanical properties in semitransparent polymers.

  19. Measurement of Thermal Resistance of Heat-resistant Fabrics with a Guarded-hot-box

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Fang-long; ZHANG Wei-yuan

    2006-01-01

    A novel analytical method with the guarded-hot-box (GHB) in investigating the thermal resistance of heat-resistant fabrics is described and the analytical method is also presented in this paper. The new apparatus is capable of measure thermal resistance of the fabrics in high temperature up to an average applied temperature of 250℃.The maximum measurement error of the apparatus is 6.5%and relative error is less than 2.8% between the introduced method and standard given value. In the GHB method, air layer thickness is the most important factor that influences measurement value of thermal resistance of heat-resistant fabrics. Results show that the method is more accurate and efficient than GB11048-89 one in measuring thermal resistance of heat-resistant fabrics.

  20. The Thermal Conductivity Measurements of Solid Samples by Heat Flux Differantial Scanning Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kök, M.; Aydoǧdu, Y.

    2007-04-01

    The thermal conductivity of polyvinylchloride (PVC), polysytrene (PS) and polypropylene (PP) were measured by heat flux DSC. Our results are in good agreement with the results observed by different methods.

  1. Self-consistent photothermal techniques: Application for measuring thermal diffusivity in vegetable oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderas-López, J. A.; Mandelis, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    The thermal wave resonator cavity (TWRC) was used to measure the thermal properties of vegetable oils. The thermal diffusivity of six commercial vegetable oils (olive, corn, soybean, canola, peanut, and sunflower) was measured by means of this device. A linear relation between both the amplitude and phase as functions of the cavity length for the TWRC was observed and used for the measurements. Three significant figure precisions were obtained. A clear distinction between extra virgin olive oil and other oils in terms of thermal diffusivity was shown. The high measurement precision of the TWRC highlights the potential of this relatively new technique for assessing the quality of this kind of fluids in terms of their thermophysical properties.

  2. Measuring the thermal conductivity of individual carbon nanotubes by the Raman shift method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Qingwei; Liu Changhong; Wang Xueshen; Fan Shoushan [Tsinghua-Foxconn Nanotechnology Research Center and Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: chliu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2009-04-08

    The thermal contact resistance is a difficult problem that has puzzled many researchers in measuring the intrinsic thermal conductivity of an individual carbon nanotube (CNT). To avoid this problem, a non-contact Raman spectra shift method is introduced, by which we have successfully measured the thermal conductivity ({kappa}) of an individual single-walled carbon nanotube and a multi-walled carbon nanotube. The measured {kappa} values are 2400 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1} and 1400 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}, respectively. The CNT was suspended over a trench and heated by electricity. The temperature difference between the middle and the two ends of the CNT indicated its intrinsic heat transfer capability. The temperature difference was determined by the temperature-induced shifts of its G band Raman spectra. This new method can eliminate the impact of the thermal contact resistance which was a Gordian knot in many previous measurements.

  3. Dielectric dispersion and protonic conduction in hydrated purple membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, I; Váró, G

    1988-01-01

    Dielectric dispersion effects were studied in purple membranes of different hydration levels. The capacitance and conductivity were measured over the frequency range of 10(2) Hz to 10(5) Hz. With increase in the hydration level, the conductivity increases sharply above the critical hydration of hc = 0.06 g H2O/g protein. This critical hydration is close to the extent of the first continuous strongly bound water layer and is interpreted as the threshold for percolative proton transfer. The capacitance increases continuously with increasing hydration and a larger increase above the water content of 0.1 g H2O/g protein can be seen only at low frequencies. Maxwell-Wagner relaxation also appears above this hydration, showing the presence of a bulk water phase.

  4. Pore capillary pressure and saturation of methane hydrate bearing sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Shicai; LIU Changling; YE Yuguang; LIU Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the relationship between the pore capillary pressure and hydrate saturation in sedi-ments, a new method was proposed. First, the phase equilibria of methane hydrate in fine-grained silica sands were measured. As to the equilibrium data, the pore capillary pressure and saturation of methane hydrate were calculated. The results showed that the phase equilibria of methane hydrates in fine-grained silica sands changed due to the depressed activity of pore water caused by the surface group and negatively charged characteristic of silica particles as well as the capillary pressure in small pores together. The capil-lary pressure increased with the increase of methane hydrate saturation due to the decrease of the available pore space. However, the capillary-saturation relationship could not yet be described quantitatively because of the stochastic habit of hydrate growth.

  5. Transient thermal analysis as measurement method for IC package structural integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanß, Alexander; Schmid, Maximilian; Liu, E.; Elger, Gordon

    2015-06-01

    Practices of IC package reliability testing are reviewed briefly, and the application of transient thermal analysis is examined in great depth. For the design of light sources based on light emitting diode (LED) efficient and accurate reliability testing is required to realize the potential lifetimes of 105 h. Transient thermal analysis is a standard method to determine the transient thermal impedance of semiconductor devices, e.g. power electronics and LEDs. The temperature of the semiconductor junctions is assessed by time-resolved measurement of their forward voltage (Vf). The thermal path in the IC package is resolved by the transient technique in the time domain. This enables analyzing the structural integrity of the semiconductor package. However, to evaluate thermal resistance, one must also measure the dissipated energy of the device (i.e., the thermal load) and the k-factor. This is time consuming, and measurement errors reduce the accuracy. To overcome these limitations, an innovative approach, the relative thermal resistance method, was developed to reduce the measurement effort, increase accuracy and enable automatic data evaluation. This new way of evaluating data simplifies the thermal transient analysis by eliminating measurement of the k-factor and thermal load, i.e. measurement of the lumen flux for LEDs, by normalizing the transient Vf data. This is especially advantageous for reliability testing where changes in the thermal path, like cracks and delaminations, can be determined without measuring the k-factor and thermal load. Different failure modes can be separated in the time domain. The sensitivity of the method is demonstrated by its application to high-power white InGaN LEDs. For detailed analysis and identification of the failure mode of the LED packages, the transient signals are simulated by time-resolved finite element (FE) simulations. Using the new approach, the transient thermal analysis is enhanced to a powerful tool for reliability

  6. A coupled THMC model of a heating and hydration laboratory experiment in unsaturated compacted FEBEX bentonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liange; Samper, Javier; Montenegro, Luis; Fernández, Ana María

    2010-05-01

    SummaryUnsaturated compacted bentonite is foreseen by several countries as a backfill and sealing material in high-level radioactive waste repositories. The strong interplays between thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes during the hydration stage of a repository call for fully coupled THMC models. Validation of such THMC models is prevented by the lack of comprehensive THMC experiments and the difficulties of experimental methods to measure accurately the chemical composition of bentonite porewater. We present here a non-isothermal multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive solute transport model for a deformable medium of a heating and hydration experiment performed on a sample of compacted FEBEX bentonite. Besides standard solute transport and geochemical processes, the model accounts for solute cross diffusion and thermal and chemical osmosis. Bentonite swelling is solved with a state-surface approach. The THM model is calibrated with transient temperature, water content and porosity data measured at the end of the experiment. The reactive transport model is calibrated with porewater chemical data derived from aqueous extract data. Model results confirm that thermal osmosis is relevant for the hydration of FEBEX bentonite while chemical osmosis can be safely neglected. Dilution and evaporation are the main processes controlling the concentration of conservative species. Dissolved cations are mostly affected by calcite dissolution-precipitation and cation exchange reactions. Dissolved sulphate is controlled by gypsum/anhydrite dissolution-precipitation. pH is mostly buffered by protonation/deprotonation via surface complexation. Computed concentrations agree well with inferred aqueous extract data at all sections except near the hydration boundary where cation data are affected by a sampling artifact. The fit of Cl - data is excellent except for the data near the heater. The largest deviations of the model from inferred

  7. A coupled THMC model of a heating and hydration laboratory experiment in unsaturated compacted FEBEX bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.; Fernandez, A.M.

    2010-05-01

    Unsaturated compacted bentonite is foreseen by several countries as a backfill and sealing material in high-level radioactive waste repositories. The strong interplays between thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes during the hydration stage of a repository call for fully coupled THMC models. Validation of such THMC models is prevented by the lack of comprehensive THMC experiments and the difficulties of experimental methods to measure accurately the chemical composition of bentonite porewater. We present here a non-isothermal multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive solute transport model for a deformable medium of a heating and hydration experiment performed on a sample of compacted FEBEX bentonite. Besides standard solute transport and geochemical processes, the model accounts for solute cross diffusion and thermal and chemical osmosis. Bentonite swelling is solved with a state-surface approach. The THM model is calibrated with transient temperature, water content and porosity data measured at the end of the experiment. The reactive transport model is calibrated with porewater chemical data derived from aqueous extract data. Model results confirm that thermal osmosis is relevant for the hydration of FEBEX bentonite while chemical osmosis can be safely neglected. Dilution and evaporation are the main processes controlling the concentration of conservative species. Dissolved cations are mostly affected by calcite dissolution-precipitation and cation exchange reactions. Dissolved sulphate is controlled by gypsum/anhydrite dissolution-precipitation. pH is mostly buffered by protonation/deprotonation via surface complexation. Computed concentrations agree well with inferred aqueous extract data at all sections except near the hydration boundary where cation data are affected by a sampling artifact. The fit of Cl{sup -} data is excellent except for the data near the heater. The largest deviations of the model from inferred aqueous

  8. A coupled THMC model of a heating and hydration laboratory experiment in unsaturated compacted FEBEX bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.; Fernandez, A.M.

    2010-05-01

    Unsaturated compacted bentonite is foreseen by several countries as a backfill and sealing material in high-level radioactive waste repositories. The strong interplays between thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes during the hydration stage of a repository call for fully coupled THMC models. Validation of such THMC models is prevented by the lack of comprehensive THMC experiments and the difficulties of experimental methods to measure accurately the chemical composition of bentonite porewater. We present here a non-isothermal multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive solute transport model for a deformable medium of a heating and hydration experiment performed on a sample of compacted FEBEX bentonite. Besides standard solute transport and geochemical processes, the model accounts for solute cross diffusion and thermal and chemical osmosis. Bentonite swelling is solved with a state-surface approach. The THM model is calibrated with transient temperature, water content and porosity data measured at the end of the experiment. The reactive transport model is calibrated with porewater chemical data derived from aqueous extract data. Model results confirm that thermal osmosis is relevant for the hydration of FEBEX bentonite while chemical osmosis can be safely neglected. Dilution and evaporation are the main processes controlling the concentration of conservative species. Dissolved cations are mostly affected by calcite dissolution-precipitation and cation exchange reactions. Dissolved sulphate is controlled by gypsum/anhydrite dissolution-precipitation. pH is mostly buffered by protonation/deprotonation via surface complexation. Computed concentrations agree well with inferred aqueous extract data at all sections except near the hydration boundary where cation data are affected by a sampling artifact. The fit of Cl{sup -} data is excellent except for the data near the heater. The largest deviations of the model from inferred aqueous

  9. Measuring in situ dissolved methane concentrations in gas hydrate-rich systems, Part 1: Investigating the correlation between tectonics and methane release from sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, L.; Wilson, R. M.; Paull, C. K.; Chanton, J.; Riedel, M.

    2010-12-01

    In 2009, an area of extended methane venting at 1200 meters water depth was found with high resolution AUV bathymetry scans on the Northern Cascadia Margin that was previously unknown. When visited by ROV, we found seafloor cracks with active bubble streams and thin bacterial mats suggesting shallow gas and possible pore-fluid saturation. Upon coring into the cracks, a hard-substrate (carbonate or gas hydrate) was punctured and gas flows began. With these observations, we asked the question “is this shallow gas released from the seafloor from regional tectonic activity, and, if so, what is the temporal variability of such release events?” To answer this, we deployed a long term pore-water collection device at one of these gas crack sites, informally named “bubbly gulch”, for 9 months. The device is made up of 4 OsmoSamplers that were each plumbed to a port along a 1-meter probe tip using small diameter tubing. By osmosis, the samplers collected water samples slowly through the ports and maintained them within a 300 meter-long copper tubing coil. Because of the high methane concentrations anticipated, in situ pressures were maintained within the coil by the addition of a high pressure valve. Water samples were collected from the overlying water, at the sediment-water interface, and 6 and 10 cm into the sediments. Bottom water temperatures were also measured over the time series to determine pumping rates of the samplers but also to look for any temporal variability. In May 2010, the samplers were retrieved by ROV during efforts to install seafloor instruments for Neptune Canada. In a land-based lab, the coils were sub-sampled by cutting every 4 meters of tubing. With a pumping rate of 0.5 mL/day, this allowed a temporal resolution of 6 days. To date, one sampler coil has been sub-sampled and measured for methane concentrations and stable carbon isotopes. Preliminary results from this coil show pore-fluids nearly saturated with respect to methane, ~45 m

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF AN IN-PILE TECHNIQUE FOR THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandon Fox; Heng Ban; Joy L. Rempe; Joshua E. Daw; Keith G. Condie; Darrell L. Knudson

    2009-04-01

    Thermophysical properties of advanced fuels and materials during irradiation must be known prior to their use in existing, advanced, or next generation reactors. Fuel thermal conductivity is one of the most important properties for predicting fuel performance and reactor safety. This paper discusses a joint Utah State University (USU)/Idaho National Laboratory (INL) project to investigate an in-pile fuel thermal conductivity measurement technique using a surrogate fuel rod. The method used a surrogate fuel rod with Joule heating to simulate volumetric heat generation as a proof-of-concept test in-pile application. Carbon structural foam, CFOAM®, a product of Touchtone Research Laboratory was chosen as the surrogate material because of the variable electrical and thermal properties upon fabrication. To stay within the surrogate fuel rod requirements, electrical and thermal properties were tailored by Touchtone Research Laboratory to match required values. This paper describes are the techniques used for quantifying thermal conductivity. A description of the test setup and preliminary results are presented. Two thermocouples are inserted into a 1-inch diameter, 6-inch long rod of CFOAM® at known locations. Knowing the applied volumetric heat to the rod by electrical resistance heating, the thermal conductivity can be calculated. Sensitivities of this measurement can also found by analysis and testing of different configurations of the sample setup. Verification of thermal conductivity is found by measuring the thermal properties of the CFOAM® using different methods. Thermal properties including thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity, and expansion coefficient of two types of CFOAM®, CFOAM20 and CFOAM25, were characterized using standard measurement techniques, such as laser flash, differential scanning calorimetry, and pushrod dilatometry.

  11. Approach of the measurement of thermal diffusivity of mural paintings by front face photothermal radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candoré, Jean Charles; Bodnar, J. L.; Detalle, Vincent; Remy, B.; Grossel, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    In this paper we present, in an experimental way, the possibilities of front face photothermal radiometry to measure, in situ, the longitudinal thermal diffusivity of mural paintings. First, we present the principle of the method of measurement. Then, we present the experimental device implemented for the study. Finally, we show, using the experimental study of a plaster sample, the photothermal method allows in a particular case, a good approximation of the parameter longitudinal thermal diffusivity.

  12. Hydrocarbon Fuel Thermal Performance Modeling based on Systematic Measurement and Comprehensive Chromatographic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-31

    distribution unlimited Hydrocarbon Fuel Thermal Performance Modeling based on Systematic Measurement and Comprehensive Chromatographic Analysis Matthew...Technical Note 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 04 January 2016 - 31 July 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hydrocarbon Fuel Thermal Performance Modeling based on...Systematic Measurement and Comprehensive Chromatographic Analysis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  13. Kinetics of hydrate formation using gas bubble suspended in water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马昌峰; 陈光进; 郭天民

    2002-01-01

    An innovative experimental technique, which was devised to study the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate of hydrate formation at the surface of a gas bubble suspended in a stagnant water phase, was adapted in this work. Under such conditions, the hydrate-growth process is free from dynamic mass transfer factors. The rate of hydrate formation of methane and carbon dioxide has been systematically studied. The measured hydrate-growth data were correlated by using the molar Gibbs free energy as driving force. In the course of the experiments, some interesting surface phenomena were observed.

  14. Thermal measurements and sensors. Recent developments; Mesures et capteurs thermiques. Developpements recents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This conference day was organized by the `thermo-kinetics` section of the French association of thermal engineers. This book of proceedings contains 6 papers entitled: `non-intrusive temperature control using microwave radiometry`; `bicolor pyro-reflectometer and optical fiber directional reflectometer applied to the in-situ thermophysical diagnosis of surfaces`; `non-cooled IR detectors. State-of-the-art and and development at the LETI/LIR`; `laser probes for temperature and surface deformation measurements at the micron scale. Application to the study of the thermal behaviour of integrated circuits`; `parietal flux micro-sensors. Sensitivity study and improvement`; `thermal measurements and sensors. Recent developments`. (J.S.)

  15. Simultaneous measurements of the torsional oscillator anomaly and thermal conductivity in solid 4He.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmeev, D E; Golov, A I

    2011-08-01

    In these torsional oscillator experiments, the samples of solid (4)He were characterized by measuring their thermal conductivity. Polycrystalline samples of helium of either high isotopic purity or natural concentration of (3)He were grown in an annular container by the blocked-capillary method and investigated before and after annealing. No correlation has been found between the magnitude of the low-temperature shift of the torsional oscillator frequency and the amount of crystalline defects as measured by the thermal conductivity. In samples with the natural (3)He concentration, a substantial excess thermal conductivity over the usual T(3) dependence was observed below 120 mK.

  16. The specific surface area of methane hydrate formed in different conditions and manners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The specific surface area of methane hydrates, formed both in the presence and absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and processed in different manners (stirring, compacting, holding the hydrates at the formation conditions for different periods of time, cooling the hydrates for different periods of time before depressurizing them), was measured under atmospheric pressure and temperatures below ice point. It was found that the specific surface area of hydrate increased with the decreasing temperature. The methane hydrate in the presence of SDS was shown to be of bigger specific surface areas than pure methane hydrates. The experimental results further demonstrated that the manners of forming and processing hydrates affected the specific surface area of hydrate samples. Stirring or compacting made the hydrate become finer and led to a bigger specific surface area.

  17. Thermal transport in suspended silicon membranes measured by laser-induced transient gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vega-Flick

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Studying thermal transport at the nanoscale poses formidable experimental challenges due both to the physics of the measurement process and to the issues of accuracy and reproducibility. The laser-induced transient thermal grating (TTG technique permits non-contact measurements on nanostructured samples without a need for metal heaters or any other extraneous structures, offering the advantage of inherently high absolute accuracy. We present a review of recent studies of thermal transport in nanoscale silicon membranes using the TTG technique. An overview of the methodology, including an analysis of measurements errors, is followed by a discussion of new findings obtained from measurements on both “solid” and nanopatterned membranes. The most important results have been a direct observation of non-diffusive phonon-mediated transport at room temperature and measurements of thickness-dependent thermal conductivity of suspended membranes across a wide thickness range, showing good agreement with first-principles-based theory assuming diffuse scattering at the boundaries. Measurements on a membrane with a periodic pattern of nanosized holes (135nm indicated fully diffusive transport and yielded thermal diffusivity values in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Based on the results obtained to-date, we conclude that room-temperature thermal transport in membrane-based silicon nanostructures is now reasonably well understood.

  18. Further elucidation of nanofluid thermal conductivity measurement using a transient hot-wire method apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Donghoon; Lee, Joohyun; Lee, Byeongchan; Kwon, Suyong; Koo, Junemo

    2017-08-01

    The Transient Hot-Wire Method (THWM) was developed to measure the absolute thermal conductivity of gases, liquids, melts, and solids with low uncertainty. The majority of nanofluid researchers used THWM to measure the thermal conductivity of test fluids. Several reasons have been suggested for the discrepancies in these types of measurements, including nanofluid generation, nanofluid stability, and measurement challenges. The details of the transient hot-wire method such as the test cell size, the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) and the sampling number are further investigated to improve the accuracy and consistency of the measurements of different researchers. It was observed that smaller test apparatuses were better because they can delay the onset of natural convection. TCR values of a coated platinum wire were measured and statistically analyzed to reduce the uncertainty in thermal conductivity measurements. For validation, ethylene glycol (EG) and water thermal conductivity were measured and analyzed in the temperature range between 280 and 310 K. Furthermore, a detailed statistical analysis was conducted for such measurements, and the results confirmed the minimum number of samples required to achieve the desired resolution and precision of the measurements. It is further proposed that researchers fully report the information related to their measurements to validate the measurements and to avoid future inconsistent nanofluid data.

  19. SCHEMES OF GAS PRODUCTION FROM NATURAL GAS HYDRATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李淑霞; 陈月明; 杜庆军

    2003-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates are a kind of nonpolluting and high quality energy resources for future, the reserves of which are about twice of the carbon of the current fossil energy (petroleum, natural gas and coal) on the earth. And it will be the most important energy for the 21st century. The energy balance and numerical simulation are applied to study the schemes of the natural gas hydrates production in this paper,and it is considered that both depressurization and thermal stimulation are effective methods for exploiting natural gas hydrates, and that the gas production of the thermal stimulation is higher than that of the depressurization. But thermal stimulation is non-economic because it requires large amounts of energy.Therefore the combination of the two methods is a preferable method for the current development of the natural gas hydrates. The main factors which influence the production of natural gas hydrates are: the temperature of injected water, the injection rate, the initial saturation of the hydrates and the initial temperature of the reservoir which is the most important factor.

  20. IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank R. Rack; Tim Francis; Peter Schultheiss; Philip E. Long; Barry M. Freifeld

    2005-04-01

    oxidation and incorporation in seafloor carbonate, or expulsion to the ocean. This expedition builds on the previous Cascadia gas hydrate drilling of ODP Leg 146 and on more recent ODP Leg 204 off Oregon. Important experiments being considered for DOE/NETL funding as part of the JOI cooperative agreement include, (1) Logging-While-Drilling/Measurements-While-Drilling (LWD/MWD), (2) Pressure Core Sampling (PCS/HYACINTH) of gas hydrate, and fluid recovery under in situ conditions, (3) X-ray CT logging of whole cores under in situ conditions, and (4) Infrared thermal imaging of whole round cores to map temperature variations resulting from the presence of hydrate. Preliminary budget estimates have been made for each of these tasks and discussions are ongoing with DOE/NETL program managers to develop a final plan that can be implemented within the constraints of the available funding and logistical considerations.

  1. Dynamic measurement of coal thermal properties and elemental composition of volatile matter during coal pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Stanger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new technique that allows dynamic measurement of thermal properties, expansion and the elemental chemistry of the volatile matter being evolved as coal is pyrolysed is described. The thermal and other properties are measured dynamically as a function of temperature of the coal without the need for equilibration at temperature. In particular, the technique allows for continuous elemental characterisation of tars as they are evolved during pyrolysis and afterwards as a function of boiling point. The technique is demonstrated by measuring the properties of maceral concentrates from a coal. The variation in heats of reaction, thermal conductivity and expansion as a function of maceral composition is described. Combined with the elemental analysis, the results aid in the interpretation of the chemical processes contributing to the physical and thermal behaviour of the coal during pyrolysis. Potential applications in cokemaking studies are discussed.

  2. Measurement of the Thermal-Conductivity Coefficient of Nanofluids by the Hot-Wire Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakov, A. V.; Rudyak, V. Ya.; Guzei, D. V.; Pryazhnikov, M. I.; Lobasov, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the authors present results of adaptation and testing of the hot-wire method for determination for the thermal-conductivity coefficient of nanofluids. A mathematical model of heat transfer with allowance for free convection has been constructed to elucidate the parameters of an experimental setup and the range of its applicability. The experimental procedure has been tested on measurements of the thermal conductivities of water and ethylene glycol. The thermal-conductivity coefficient of a nanofluid has been measured at room temperature. The nanofluid under study was prepared on the basis of ethylene glycol and alumina nanoparticles. The concentrations of the nanoparticles ranged from 0.5% to 2% by volume. Good agreement has been obtained between the measured values of the thermal-conductivity coefficient and the data of other authors.

  3. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  4. Analysis of In Situ Thermal Ion Measurements from the MICA Sounding Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, P. A.; Lynch, K. A.; Zettergren, M. D.; Hampton, D. L.; Fisher, L. E.; Powell, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    The MICA sounding rocket launched on 19 Feb. 2012 into several discrete, localized arcs in the wake of a westward traveling surge. In situ and ground-based observations provide a measured response of the ionosphere to preflight and localized auroral drivers. Initial analysis of the in situ thermal ion data indicate possible measurement of an ion conic at low altitude (thermal ion population is sensitive to the presence of the instrument. The plasma is accelerated in the frame of the instrument due to flows, ram, and acceleration through the sheath which forms around the spacecraft. The energies associated with these processes are large compared to the thermal energy. Correct interpretation of thermal plasma measurements requires accounting for all of these plasma processes and the non-ideal response of the instrument in the low-energy regime. This is an experimental and modeling project which involves thorough analysis of ionospheric thermal ion data from the MICA campaign. Analysis includes modeling and measuring the instrument response in the low-energy regime as well as accounting for the complex sheath formed around the instrument. This results in a forward model in which plasma parameters of the thermal plasma are propagated through the sheath and instrument models, resulting in an output which matches the in situ